National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for naph tha boiling

  1. Validation Data Plan Implementation: Subcooled Flow Boiling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Validation Data Plan," Idaho National Laboratory, Tech. rep. ... in nuclear reactor safety," in NURETH-15, 2013; Also, ... and V.K. Dhir, Eds., Handbook of phase change - Boiling ...

  2. CHIMNEY FOR BOILING WATER REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petrick, M.

    1961-08-01

    A boiling-water reactor is described which has vertical fuel-containing channels for forming steam from water. Risers above the channels increase the head of water radially outward, whereby water is moved upward through the channels with greater force. The risers are concentric and the radial width of the space between them is somewhat small. There is a relatively low rate of flow of water up through the radially outer fuel-containing channels, with which the space between the risers is in communication. (AE C)

  3. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of boiling heat transfer: The boiling curve and the effects of wettability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Q.; Kang, Q. J.; Francois, M. M.; He, Y. L.; Luo, K. H.

    2015-03-03

    A hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is presented to simulate thermal multiphase flows with phase change based on an improved pseudopotential LB approach (Li et al., 2013). The present model does not suffer from the spurious term caused by the forcing-term effect, which was encountered in some previous thermal LB models for liquid–vapor phase change. Using the model, the liquid–vapor boiling process is simulated. The boiling curve together with the three boiling stages (nucleate boiling, transition boiling, and film boiling) is numerically reproduced in the LB community for the first time. The numerical results show that the basic featuresmore » and the fundamental characteristics of boiling heat transfer are well captured, such as the severe fluctuation of transient heat flux in the transition boiling and the feature that the maximum heat transfer coefficient lies at a lower wall superheat than that of the maximum heat flux. Moreover, the effects of the heating surface wettability on boiling heat transfer are investigated. It is found that an increase in contact angle promotes the onset of boiling but reduces the critical heat flux, and makes the boiling process enter into the film boiling regime at a lower wall superheat, which is consistent with the findings from experimental studies.« less

  4. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of boiling heat transfer: The boiling curve and the effects of wettability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Q.; Kang, Q. J.; Francois, M. M.; He, Y. L.; Luo, K. H.

    2015-03-03

    A hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is presented to simulate thermal multiphase flows with phase change based on an improved pseudopotential LB approach (Li et al., 2013). The present model does not suffer from the spurious term caused by the forcing-term effect, which was encountered in some previous thermal LB models for liquid–vapor phase change. Using the model, the liquid–vapor boiling process is simulated. The boiling curve together with the three boiling stages (nucleate boiling, transition boiling, and film boiling) is numerically reproduced in the LB community for the first time. The numerical results show that the basic features and the fundamental characteristics of boiling heat transfer are well captured, such as the severe fluctuation of transient heat flux in the transition boiling and the feature that the maximum heat transfer coefficient lies at a lower wall superheat than that of the maximum heat flux. Moreover, the effects of the heating surface wettability on boiling heat transfer are investigated. It is found that an increase in contact angle promotes the onset of boiling but reduces the critical heat flux, and makes the boiling process enter into the film boiling regime at a lower wall superheat, which is consistent with the findings from experimental studies.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Subcooled Flow Boiling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Experimental Investigation of Subcooled Flow Boiling Yassin A. Hassan TAMU September 30, 2013 CASL-8-2013-0214-000 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Experimental Investigation of Subcooled Flow Boiling Milestone Report PI: Yassin A. Hassan 9/30/2013 CASL-U-2013-0214-000 Contents Introduction ....................................................................................................................................................... 5 Experimental Setup

  6. Self-Sustaining Thorium Boiling Water Reactors (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Self-Sustaining Thorium Boiling Water Reactors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Self-Sustaining Thorium Boiling Water Reactors The primary objectives of this project are ...

  7. 2010 Inspection and Status Report for the Boiling Nuclear Superheater...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Annual Inspection - Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Site, Rincn, Puerto Rico October 2013 Page 1 2013 Inspection and Status Report for the Former Boiling Nuclear Superheater...

  8. PACCAR CRADA: Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Power Electronics of Electric Vehicles with Small Channel Coolant Boiling Cooling Boiling in Head Region - PACCAR Integrated Underhood Thermal and External Aerodynamics- Cummins

  9. CRADA with PACCAR Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Circular Tube Efficient Cooling in Engines with Nucleated Boiling Cooling Boiling in Head Region - PACCAR Integrated Underhood Thermal and External Aerodynamics- Cummins

  10. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines You are accessing ...

  11. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines This study ...

  12. Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and...

  13. Preliminary design study of small long life boiling water reactor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    boiling water reactor (BWR) with tight lattice thorium nitride fuel Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Preliminary design study of small long life boiling water reactor ...

  14. Numerical Simulations of Boiling Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumanchi, S.; Troshko, A.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2006-12-01

    This paper explores turbulent boiling jet impingement for cooling power electronic components in hybrid electric vehicles.

  15. SUPERHEATING IN A BOILING WATER REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Treshow, M.

    1960-05-31

    A boiling-water reactor is described in which the steam developed in the reactor is superheated in the reactor. This is accomplished by providing means for separating the steam from the water and passing the steam over a surface of the fissionable material which is not in contact with the water. Specifically water is boiled on the outside of tubular fuel elements and the steam is superheated on the inside of the fuel elements.

  16. Subcooled Flow Boiling Heat Transfer to Water and Ethylene Glycol...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subcooled Flow Boiling Heat Transfer to Water and Ethylene GlycolWater Mixtures in a Bottom-Heated Tube Title Subcooled Flow Boiling Heat Transfer to Water and Ethylene Glycol...

  17. PNNL Enhanced Pool-Boiling Heat Transfer Using Nanostructured Surfaces

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-31

    Close-up video of boiling taking place on a nanostructured surface in a controlled laboratory experiment.

  18. CRADA with PACCAR Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in a

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Half-Heated Circular Tube | Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon vss057_yu_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications PACCAR CRADA: Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube Efficient Cooling in Engines with Nucleated Boiling Cooling Boiling in Head Region - PACCAR Integrated Underhood Thermal and External Aerodynamics- Cummins

  19. Enhanced Pool-Boiling Heat Transfer Using Nanostructured Surfaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    creates optimal surface wettability characteristics that allow better capillary flow of water on the liquid boiling surfaces often used to cool electronics. the dense...

  20. Geothermal Technology Breakthrough in Alaska: Harvesting Heat below Boiling Temperatures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department is supporting geothermal exploration at lower temperatures, thanks to a technology breakthrough that allows geothermal energy to be produced at temperatures below the boiling...

  1. Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brinson, Jonathan Ashley (Vale of Glamorgan, GB); Crum, Bruce Robert (Madison, IN); Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank (Midland, MI)

    2000-01-01

    A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

  2. AECU-4439 PHYSICS AND MATHEMATICS HYDRODYNAMIC ASPECTS OF BOILING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The change from one regime t o another is accompanied by narked changes i n the ... CHAPTER I A RWIEW OF NUCLIUTE BOILING The first systematic investigation of nucleate ...

  3. Correlations estimate volume distilled using gravity, boiling point

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, A.; Consuelo Perez de Alba, M. del; Manriquez, L.; Guardia Mendoz, P. de la

    1995-10-23

    Mathematical nd graphic correlations have been developed for estimating cumulative volume distilled as a function of crude API gravity and true boiling point (TBP). The correlations can be used for crudes with gravities of 21--34{degree} API and boiling points of 150--540 C. In distillation predictions for several mexican and Iraqi crude oils, the correlations have exhibited accuracy comparable to that of laboratory measurements. The paper discusses the need for such a correlation and the testing of the correlation.

  4. Efficient Cooling in Engines with Nucleated Boiling | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon vssp_14_yu.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Thermal Control of Power Electronics of Electric Vehicles with Small Channel Coolant Boiling CRADA with PACCAR Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Thermal Control of

  5. CASL-U-2015-0040-000 Initial Boiling Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    40-000 Initial Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Input Specifications Scott Palmtag Core Physics February 28, 2015 Initial Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Input Specification Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs ii CASL-U-2015-0040-000 REVISION LOG Revision Date Affected Pages Revision Description 0 02/28/2015 All Original Report for L3:PHI.VCS.P10.02 Document pages that are: Export Controlled NO IP/Proprietary/NDA Controlled NO Sensitive Controlled NO Requested Distribution: To: Copy: Initial

  6. Critical heat flux for free convection boiling in thin rectangular channels

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Critical heat flux for free convection boiling in thin rectangular channels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Critical heat flux for free convection boiling in thin rectangular channels A review of the experimental data on free convection boiling critical heat flux (CHF) in vertical rectangular channels reveals three mechanisms of burnout. They are the pool boiling limit, the circulation limit, and the flooding limit associated with a transition in

  7. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuoulsly vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  8. COMPOSITION OF VAPORS FROM BOILING NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS B A

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    COMPOSITION OF VAPORS FROM BOILING NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS B A T T E L L E M E M O R I A L I N S T I T U T E DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an ...

  9. Efficiency of a solar collector with internal boiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeper, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The behavior of a solar collector with a boiling fluid is analyzed to provide a simple algebraic model for future systems simulations, and to provide guidance for testing. The efficiency equation is developed in a form linear in the difference between inlet and saturation (boiling) temperatures, whereas the expression upon which ASHRAE Standard 109P is based utilizes the difference between inlet and ambient temperatures. The coefficient of the revised linear term is a weak function of collector parameters, weather, and subcooling of the working fluid. For a glazed flat-plate collector with metal absorber, the coefficient is effectively constant. Therefore, testing at multiple values of insolation and subcooling, as specified by ASHRAE 109P, should not be necessary for most collectors. The influences of collector properties and operating conditions on efficiency are examined.

  10. COMPOSITION OF VAPORS FROM BOILING NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS B A

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    COMPOSITION OF VAPORS FROM BOILING NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS B A T T E L L E M E M O R I A L I N S T I T U T E DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

  11. DIRECT-CYCLE, BOILING-WATER NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrer, J.M.; Fromm, L.W. Jr.; Kolba, V.M.

    1962-08-14

    A direct-cycle boiling-water nuclear reactor is described that employs a closed vessel and a plurality of fuel assemblies, each comprising an outer tube closed at its lower end, an inner tube, fuel rods in the space between the tubes and within the inner tube. A body of water lying within the pressure vessel and outside the fuel assemblies is converted to saturated steam, which enters each fuel assembly at the top and is converted to superheated steam in the fuel assembly while it is passing therethrough first downward through the space between the inner and outer tubes of the fuel assembly and then upward through the inner tube. (AEC)

  12. Union job fight boiling at DOE cleanup sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setzer, S.W.

    1993-11-15

    The US DOE is facing a growing jurisdictional dispute over which unions will perform the majority of clean-up work at its facilities. Unions affiliated with the AFL-CIO Metal Trades Council representing operations employees at the sites believe they have a fundamental right to work. Unions in the AFL-CIO's Building and Construction Trades Dept. insist that they have a clear mandate under federal labor law and the Davis-Bacon Act. The issue has heated up in recent weeks at the policy level and is boiling in a contentious dispute at DOE's Fernald site in Ohio.

  13. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1987-01-01

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (non-borated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  14. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1985-02-19

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (nonborated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two water volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  15. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-03-12

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  16. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  17. BOILING WATER REACTOR WITH FEED WATER INJECTION NOZZLES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Treshow, M.

    1963-04-30

    This patent covers the use of injection nozzles for pumping water into the lower ends of reactor fuel tubes in which water is converted directly to steam. Pumping water through fuel tubes of this type of boiling water reactor increases its power. The injection nozzles decrease the size of pump needed, because the pump handles only the water going through the nozzles, additional water being sucked into the tubes by the nozzles independently of the pump from the exterior body of water in which the fuel tubes are immersed. The resulting movement of exterior water along the tubes holds down steam formation, and thus maintains the moderator effectiveness, of the exterior body of water. (AEC)

  18. Feasibility study on the thorium fueled boiling water breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PetrusTakaki, N.

    2012-07-01

    The feasibility of (Th,U)O 2 fueled, boiling water breeder reactor based on conventional BWR technology has been studied. In order to determine the potential use of water cooled thorium reactor as a competitive breeder, this study evaluated criticality, breeding and void reactivity coefficient in response to changes made in MFR and fissile enrichments. The result of the study shows that while using light water as moderator, low moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR=0.5), it was possible to breed fissile fuel in negative void reactivity condition. However the burnup value was lower than the value of the current LWR. On the other hand, heavy water cooled reactor shows relatively wider feasible breeding region, which lead into possibility of designing a core having better neutronic and economic performance than light water with negative void reactivity coefficient. (authors)

  19. Analysis of scrams and forced outages at boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earle, R. T.; Sullivan, W. P.; Miller, K. R.; Schwegman, W. J.

    1980-07-01

    This report documents the results of a study of scrams and forced outages at General Electric Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) operating in the United States. This study was conducted for Sandia Laboratories under a Light Water Reactor Safety Program which it manages for the United States Department of Energy. Operating plant data were used to identify the causes of scrams and forced outages. Causes of scrams and forced outages have been summarized as a function of operating plant and plant age and also ranked according to the number of events per year, outage time per year, and outage time per event. From this ranking, identified potential improvement opportunities were evaluated to determine the associated benefits and impact on plant availability.

  20. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists solely of tables of temperature measurements; minima, maxima, averages and standard deviations being measured.

  1. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of a summary of temperature measurements to include recorded minima, maxima, averages and standard deviations.

  2. New flow boiling heat transfer model for hydrocarbons evaporating inside horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G. F.; Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Zou, X.; Wang, S.

    2014-01-29

    Hydrocarbons have high thermodynamic performances, belong to the group of natural refrigerants, and they are the main components in mixture Joule-Thomson low temperature refrigerators (MJTR). New evaluations of nucleate boiling contribution and nucleate boiling suppression factor in flow boiling heat transfer have been proposed for hydrocarbons. A forced convection heat transfer enhancement factor correlation incorporating liquid velocity has also been proposed. In addition, the comparisons of the new model and other classic models were made to evaluate its accuracy in heat transfer prediction.

  3. Effect of surface roughness and polymeric additive on nucleate pool boiling at subatmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, P.K.; Verma, R.K.; Ramani, M.P.S.; Mahajan, S.P.

    1986-09-01

    This investigation pertains to boiling heat transfer from a submerged flat surface at subatmospheric and atmospheric pressures in the presence of hydroxy ethyl cellulose (HEC) as a polymeric additive in small doses. Boiling was carried out in presence of the additive on smooth and rough aluminium surfaces having effective cavity size within the range as predicted by Hsu model and the pressure was kept in the range of 8 - 100 KN/sq.m (abs). Effects of surface roughness, saturation pressure and polymer concentration on boiling heat transfer were studied and the results were compared with Rohsenow's correlation.

  4. An experimental study of pool boiling heat transfer in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shatto, D.P.; Renzi, K.I.; Peterson, G.P.; Morris, T.K.; Aaron, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    Experiments were performed in which pool boiling of pure water at reduced pressures was observed for behavior of the critical heatflux (CHF) and nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficients in a reduced gravitational environment. The experiments took place while alternating between microgravity and g/g{sub o} = 1.8 during parabolic flights aboard the NASA 930 (KC-135A). Heat transfer data were also obtained at Martian gravity levels (g/g{sub o} = 1/3). Parts of the test chamber were constructed of transparent materials to allow viewing and recording of the various boiling regimes encountered during the experiments. Results indicate that the onset of nucleate boiling occurred at lower heat fluxes in reduced gravity, resulting in higher two-phase heat transfer coefficients for g/g{sub o} < 1 than for g/g{sub o} = 1.8. In addition, the results indicate a significant reduction in the critical heat flux under reduced gravity conditions.

  5. Camera Inspection Arm for Boiling Water Reactors - 13330

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Scott; Rood, Marc

    2013-07-01

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) outage maintenance tasks can be time-consuming and hazardous. Reactor facilities are continuously looking for quicker, safer, and more effective methods of performing routine inspection during these outages. In 2011, S.A. Technology (SAT) was approached by Energy Northwest to provide a remote system capable of increasing efficiencies related to Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) internal inspection activities. The specific intent of the system discussed was to inspect recirculation jet pumps in a manner that did not require manual tooling, and could be performed independently of other ongoing inspection activities. In 2012, SAT developed a compact, remote, camera inspection arm to create a safer, more efficient outage environment. This arm incorporates a compact and lightweight design along with the innovative use of bi-stable composite tubes to provide a six-degree of freedom inspection tool capable of reducing dose uptake, reducing crew size, and reducing the overall critical path for jet pump inspections. The prototype camera inspection arm unit is scheduled for final testing in early 2013 in preparation for the Columbia Generating Station refueling outage in the spring of 2013. (authors)

  6. Multi-cycle boiling water reactor fuel cycle optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ottinger, K.; Maldonado, G.I.

    2013-07-01

    In this work a new computer code, BWROPT (Boiling Water Reactor Optimization), is presented. BWROPT uses the Parallel Simulated Annealing (PSA) algorithm to solve the out-of-core optimization problem coupled with an in-core optimization that determines the optimum fuel loading pattern. However it uses a Haling power profile for the depletion instead of optimizing the operating strategy. The result of this optimization is the optimum new fuel inventory and the core loading pattern for the first cycle considered in the optimization. Several changes were made to the optimization algorithm with respect to other nuclear fuel cycle optimization codes that use PSA. Instead of using constant sampling probabilities for the solution perturbation types throughout the optimization as is usually done in PSA optimizations the sampling probabilities are varied to get a better solution and/or decrease runtime. The new fuel types available for use can be sorted into an array based on any number of parameters so that each parameter can be incremented or decremented, which allows for more precise fuel type selection compared to random sampling. Also, the results are sorted by the new fuel inventory of the first cycle for ease of comparing alternative solutions. (authors)

  7. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200{degrees}C (2,200{degrees}F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed.

  8. Pebble Bed Boiling Water Reactor Concept With Superheated Steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsiklauri, G.; Newman, D.; Meriwether, G.; Korolev, V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2002-07-01

    An Advanced Nuclear Reactor concept is presented which extends Boiling Water Reactor technology with micro-fuel elements (MFE) and produces superheated steam. A nuclear plant with MFE is highly efficient and safe, due to ceramic-clad nuclear fuel. Water is used as both moderator and coolant. The fuel consists of spheres of about 1.5 mm diameter of UO{sub 2} with several external coatings of different carbonaceous materials. The outer coating of the particles is SiC, manufactured with chemical vapor disposition (CVD) technology. Endurance of the integrity of the SiC coating in water, air and steam has been demonstrated experimentally in Germany, Russia and Japan. This paper describes a result of a preliminary design and analysis of 3750 MWt (1500 MWe) plant with standard pressure of 16 MPa, which is widely achieved in the vessel of pressurized-water type reactors. The superheated steam outlet temperature of 550 deg. C elevates the steam cycle to high thermal efficiency of 42%. (authors)

  9. Boiling-Water Reactor internals aging degradation study. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luk, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of an aging assessment study for boiling water reactor (BWR) internals. Major stressors for BWR internals are related to unsteady hydrodynamic forces generated by the primary coolant flow in the reactor vessel. Welding and cold-working, dissolved oxygen and impurities in the coolant, applied loads and exposures to fast neutron fluxes are other important stressors. Based on results of a component failure information survey, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fatigue are identified as the two major aging-related degradation mechanisms for BWR internals. Significant reported failures include SCC in jet-pump holddown beams, in-core neutron flux monitor dry tubes and core spray spargers. Fatigue failures were detected in feedwater spargers. The implementation of a plant Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) program is considered as a promising method for controlling SCC problems in BWR. More operating data are needed to evaluate its effectiveness for internal components. Long-term fast neutron irradiation effects and high-cycle fatigue in a corrosive environment are uncertainty factors in the aging assessment process. BWR internals are examined by visual inspections and the method is access limited. The presence of a large water gap and an absence of ex-core neutron flux monitors may handicap the use of advanced inspection methods, such as neutron noise vibration measurements, for BWR.

  10. Development of 1000 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazuo Hisajima; Ken Uchida; Keiji Matsumoto; Koichi Kondo; Shigeki Yokoyama; Takuya Miyagawa [Toshiba Corporation (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    1000 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor has only two main steam lines and six reactor internal pumps, whereas 1350 MWe ABWR has four main steam lines and ten reactor internal pumps. In order to confirm how the differences affect hydrodynamic conditions in the dome and lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel, fluid analyses have been performed. The results indicate that there is not substantial difference between 1000 MWe ABWR and 1350 MWe ABWR. The primary containment vessel of the ABWR consists of the drywell and suppression chamber. The suppression chamber stores water to suppress pressure increase in the primary containment vessel and to be used as the source of water for the emergency core cooling system following a loss-of-coolant accident. Because the reactor pressure vessel of 1000 MWe ABWR is smaller than that of 1350 MWe ABWR, there is room to reduce the size of the primary containment vessel. It has been confirmed feasible to reduce inner diameter of the primary containment vessel from 29 m of 1350 MWe ABWR to 26.5 m. From an economic viewpoint, a shorter outage that results in higher availability of the plant is preferable. In order to achieve 20-day outage that results in 97% of availability, improvement of the systems for removal of decay heat is introduced that enables to stop all the safety-related decay heat removal systems except at the beginning of an outage. (authors)

  11. Subcooled Boiling Heat Transfer for Cooling of Power Electronics in Hybrid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SubcontractingGuidelines.doc&#0; SubcontractingGuidelines.doc&#0; PDF icon SubcontractingGuidelines.doc&#0; More Documents & Publications Guidance of the Department of Energy Subcontracting Program Acquisition Guide Chapter 19 Update Chapter 19 - Small Business Programs Electric Vehicles | Argonne National Laboratory

    Subcooled Boiling Heat Transfer for Cooling of Power Electronics in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Title Subcooled Boiling Heat Transfer for Cooling of Power

  12. Enhanced convective and film boiling heat transfer by surface gas injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R.; Greene, G.A. ); Irvine, T.F., Jr. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-04-01

    Heat transfer measurements were made for stable film boiling of water over a horizontal, flat stainless steel plate from the minimum film boiling point temperature, T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}500K, to T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}950K. The pressure at the plate was approximately 1 atmosphere and the temperature of the water pool was maintained at saturation. The data were compared to the Berenson film-boiling model, which was developed for minimum film-boiling-point conditions. The model accurately represented the data near the minimum film-boiling point and at the highest temperatures measured, as long it was corrected for the heat transferred by radiation. On the average, the experimental data lay within {plus minus}7% of the model. Measurements of heat transfer were made without film boiling for nitrogen jetting into an overlying pool of water from nine 1-mm- diameter holes, drilled in the heat transfer plate. The heat flux was maintained constant at approximately 26.4 kW/m{sup 2}. For water-pool heights of less than 6cm the heat transfer coefficient deceased linearly with a decrease in heights. Above 6cm the heat transfer coefficient was unaffected. For the entire range of gas velocities measured (0 to 8.5 cm/s), the magnitude of the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient only changed by approximately 20%. The heat transfer data bound the Konsetov model for turbulent pool heat transfer which was developed for vertical heat transfer surfaces. This agreement suggests that surface orientation may not be important when the gas jets do not locally affect the surface heat transfer. Finally, a database was developed for heat transfer from the plate with both film boiling and gas jetting occurring simultaneously, in a pool of water maintained at its saturation temperature. The effect of passing nitrogen through established film boiling is to increase the heat transfer from that surface. 60 refs.

  13. Enhanced convective and film boiling heat transfer by surface gas injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R.; Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F., Jr.

    1992-04-01

    Heat transfer measurements were made for stable film boiling of water over a horizontal, flat stainless steel plate from the minimum film boiling point temperature, T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}500K, to T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}950K. The pressure at the plate was approximately 1 atmosphere and the temperature of the water pool was maintained at saturation. The data were compared to the Berenson film-boiling model, which was developed for minimum film-boiling-point conditions. The model accurately represented the data near the minimum film-boiling point and at the highest temperatures measured, as long it was corrected for the heat transferred by radiation. On the average, the experimental data lay within {plus_minus}7% of the model. Measurements of heat transfer were made without film boiling for nitrogen jetting into an overlying pool of water from nine 1-mm- diameter holes, drilled in the heat transfer plate. The heat flux was maintained constant at approximately 26.4 kW/m{sup 2}. For water-pool heights of less than 6cm the heat transfer coefficient deceased linearly with a decrease in heights. Above 6cm the heat transfer coefficient was unaffected. For the entire range of gas velocities measured [0 to 8.5 cm/s], the magnitude of the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient only changed by approximately 20%. The heat transfer data bound the Konsetov model for turbulent pool heat transfer which was developed for vertical heat transfer surfaces. This agreement suggests that surface orientation may not be important when the gas jets do not locally affect the surface heat transfer. Finally, a database was developed for heat transfer from the plate with both film boiling and gas jetting occurring simultaneously, in a pool of water maintained at its saturation temperature. The effect of passing nitrogen through established film boiling is to increase the heat transfer from that surface. 60 refs.

  14. Design and Testing of Vacuum Breaker Check Valve for Simplified Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishii, M.; Xu, Y.; Revankar, S.T.

    2002-07-01

    A new design of the vacuum breaker check valve was developed to replace the mechanical valve in a simplified boiling water reactor. Scaling and design calculations were performed to obtain the geometry of new passive hydraulic vacuum breaker check valve. In order to check the valve performance, a RELAP5 model of the simplified boiling water reactor system with the new valve was developed. The valve was implemented in an integral facility, PUMA and was tested for large break loss of coolant accident. (authors)

  15. Simultaneous boiling and spreading of liquefied petroleum gas on water. Final report, December 12, 1978-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, H.R.; Reid, R.C.

    1981-04-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation was carried out to study the boiling and spreading of liquid nitrogen, liquid methane and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water in a one-dimensional configuration. Primary emphasis was placed on the LPG studies. Experimental work involved the design and construction of a spill/spread/boil apparatus which permitted the measurement of spreading and local boil-off rates. With the equations of continuity and momentum transfer, a mathematical model was developed to describe the boiling-spreading phenomena of cryogens spilled on water. The model accounted for a decrease in the density of the cryogenic liquid due to bubble formation. The boiling and spreading rates of LPG were found to be the same as those of pure propane. An LPG spill was characterized by the very rapid and violent boiling initially and highly irregular ice formation on the water surface. The measured local boil-off rates of LPG agreed reasonably well with theoretical predictions from a moving boundary heat transfer model. The spreading velocity of an LPG spill was found to be constant and determined by the size of the distributor opening. The maximum spreading distance was found to be unaffected by the spilling rate. These observations can be explained by assuming that the ice formation on the water surface controls the spreading of LPG spills. While the mathematical model did not predict the spreading front adequately, it predicted the maximum spreading distance reasonably well.

  16. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  17. Multi-scale Control and Enhancement of Reactor Boiling Heat Flux by Reagents and Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manglik, R M; Athavale, A; Kalaikadal, D S; Deodhar, A; Verma, U

    2011-09-02

    The phenomenological characterization of the use of non-invasive and passive techniques to enhance the boiling heat transfer in water has been carried out in this extended study. It provides fundamental enhanced heat transfer data for nucleate boiling and discusses the associated physics with the aim of addressing future and next-generation reactor thermal-hydraulic management. It essentially addresses the hypothesis that in phase-change processes during boiling, the primary mechanisms can be related to the liquid-vapor interfacial tension and surface wetting at the solidliquid interface. These interfacial characteristics can be significantly altered and decoupled by introducing small quantities of additives in water, such as surface-active polymers, surfactants, and nanoparticles. The changes are fundamentally caused at a molecular-scale by the relative bulk molecular dynamics and adsorption-desorption of the additive at the liquid-vapor interface, and its physisorption and electrokinetics at the liquid-solid interface. At the micro-scale, the transient transport mechanisms at the solid-liquid-vapor interface during nucleation and bubblegrowth can be attributed to thin-film spreading, surface-micro-cavity activation, and micro-layer evaporation. Furthermore at the macro-scale, the heat transport is in turn governed by the bubble growth and distribution, macro-layer heat transfer, bubble dynamics (bubble coalescence, collapse, break-up, and translation), and liquid rheology. Some of these behaviors and processes are measured and characterized in this study, the outcomes of which advance the concomitant fundamental physics, as well as provide insights for developing control strategies for the molecular-scale manipulation of interfacial tension and surface wetting in boiling by means of polymeric reagents, surfactants, and other soluble surface-active additives.

  18. Analysis of the magnetic corrosion product deposits on a boiling water reactor cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlov, Andrey; Degueldre, Claude; Kaufmann, Wilfried

    2013-01-15

    The buildup of corrosion product deposits (CRUD) on the fuel cladding of the boiling water reactor (BWR) before and after zinc injection has been investigated by applying local experimental analytical techniques. Under the BWR water chemistry conditions, Zn addition together with the presence of Ni and Mn induce the formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}] spinel solid solutions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion ratios of cation distribution in spinels deposited from the solid solution. Based on this information, a two-site ferrite spinel solid solution model is proposed. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) findings suggest the zinc-rich ferrite spinels formation on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin. - Graphical Abstract: Analysis of spinels in corrosion product deposits on boiling water reactor fuel rod. Combining EPMA and XAFS results: schematic representation of the ferrite spinels in terms of the end members and their extent of inversion. Note that the ferrites are represented as a surface between the normal (upper plane, M[Fe{sub 2}]O{sub 4}) and the inverse (lower plane, Fe[MFe]O{sub 4}). Actual compositions red Black-Small-Square for the specimen at low elevation (810 mm), blue Black-Small-Square for the specimen at mid elevation (1800 mm). The results have an impact on the properties of the CRUD material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Buildup of corrosion product deposits on fuel claddings of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under BWR water conditions, Zn addition with Ni and Mn induced formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}]. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-Ray Adsorption Spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion of cations in spinel solid solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc-rich ferrite spinels are formed on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin elevations.

  19. CASL-U-2015-0248-000 Modeling Boiling Water Reactor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8-000 Modeling Boiling Water Reactor Designs using MPACT Andrew P. Fitzgerald Brendan Kochunas Daniel Jabaay Thomas Downar University of Michigan July 7, 2015 CASL-U-2015-0248-000 ATRIUM TM 10: K-inf vs burn-up for the ATRIUM TM 10 lattice from various transport codes. MPACT is shown to have the ability to model some BWR features such as (square) channel boxes, water rods, and water channels with reasonable accuracy. The ATRIUM TM 10 comparison has shown MPACT can predict k-inf with similar

  20. Modeling Single-Phase and Boiling Liquid Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumanchi, S. V. J.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Jet impingement has been an attractive cooling option in a number of industries over the past few decades. Over the past 15 years, jet impingement has been explored as a cooling option in microelectronics. Recently, interest has been expressed by the automotive industry in exploring jet impingement for cooling power electronics components. This technical report explores, from a modeling perspective, both single-phase and boiling jet impingement cooling in power electronics, primarily from a heat transfer viewpoint. The discussion is from the viewpoint of the cooling of IGBTs (insulated-gate bipolar transistors), which are found in hybrid automobile inverters.

  1. A study of out-of-phase power instabilities in boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, J.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1988-06-20

    This paper presents a study of the stability of subcritical neutronic modes in boiling water reactors that can result in out-of-phase power oscillations. A mechanism has been identified for this type of oscillation, and LAPUR code has been modified to account for it. Numerical results show that there is a region in the power-flow operating map where an out-or-phase stability mode is likely even if the core-wide mode is stable. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Resistivity During Boiling in the SB-15-D Core from the Geysers Geothermal Field: The Effects of Capillarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J.; Duba, A.; Bonner, B.; Kasameyer, P.

    1997-01-01

    In a laboratory study of cores from borehole SB-15-D in The Geysers geothermal area, we measured the electrical resistivity of metashale with and without pore-pressure control, with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures between 20 and 150 C, to determine how the pore-size distribution and capillarity affected boiling. We observed a gradual increase in resistivity when the downstream pore pressure or confining pressure decreased below the phase boundary of free water. For the conditions of this experiment, boiling, as indicated by an increase in resistivity, is initiated at pore pressures of approximately 0.5 to 1 bar (0.05 to 0.1 MPa) below the free-water boiling curve, and it continues to increase gradually as pressure is lowered to atmospheric. A simple model of the effects of capillarity suggests that at 145 C, less than 15% of the pore water can boil in these rocks. If subsequent experiments bear out these preliminary observations, then boiling within a geothermal reservoir is controlled not just by pressure and temperature but also by pore-size distribution. Thus, it may be possible to determine reservoir characteristics by monitoring changes in electrical resistivity as reservoir conditions change.

  3. Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti Part 1: Results from the Water Boiling Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, Kayje; Han, Tae Won; Granderson, Jessica; Jones, Jennifer; Lsk, Kathleen; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

    2011-06-01

    In April 2010, a team of scientists and engineers from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) and UC Berkeley, with support from the Darfur Stoves Project (DSP), undertook a fact-finding mission to Haiti in order to assess needs and opportunities for cookstove intervention. Based on data collected from informal interviews with Haitians and NGOs, the team, Scott Sadlon, Robert Cheng, and Kayje Booker, identified and recommended stove testing and comparison as a high priority need that could be filled by LBNL. In response to that recommendation, five charcoal stoves were tested at the LBNL stove testing facility using a modified form of version 3 of the Shell Foundation Household Energy Project Water Boiling Test (WBT). The original protocol is available online. Stoves were tested for time to boil, thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of CO, CO{sub 2}, and the ratio of CO/CO{sub 2}. In addition, Haitian user feedback and field observations over a subset of the stoves were combined with the experiences of the laboratory testing technicians to evaluate the usability of the stoves and their appropriateness for Haitian cooking. The laboratory results from emissions and efficiency testing and conclusions regarding usability of the stoves are presented in this report.

  4. Magnetic thaw-down and boil-off due to magneto acceptors in 2DEG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaubet, C.; Raymond, A.; Bisotto, I.; Harmand, J. C.; Kubisa, M.; Zawadzki, W.

    2013-12-04

    The Quantum Hall Effect (QHE) and Shubnikov-de Haas effect are investigated experimentally using n type modulation-doped GaAs/GaAlAs quantum wells (QWs) additionally doped in the well with beryllium acceptor atoms. It is presently shown that the localized magneto-acceptor (MA) states which possess discrete energies above the corresponding Landau levels (LLs) lead to two observable effects in magneto-transport: magnetic thaw-down and magnetic boil-off of 2D electrons. Both effects are related to the fact that electrons occupying the localized MA states cannot conduct. Thus in the thaw-down effect the electrons fall down from the MA states to the free Landau states. This leads to a shift of the Hall plateau towards higher magnetic fields as a consequence of an increase of the 2D electron density N{sub S}. In the boil-off effect the electrons are pushed from the free Landau states to the empty MA states under high enough Hall electric field. This process has an avalanche character leading to a dramatic increase of magneto-resistance, consequence of a decrease of N{sub S}.

  5. Modeling the Thermal Mechanical Behavior of a 300 K Vacuum Vesselthat is Cooled by Liquid Hydrogen in Film Boiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, S.Q.; Green, M.A.; Lau, W.

    2004-05-07

    This report discusses the results from the rupture of a thin window that is part of a 20-liter liquid hydrogen vessel. This rupture will spill liquid hydrogen onto the walls and bottom of a 300 K cylindrical vacuum vessel. The spilled hydrogen goes into film boiling, which removes the thermal energy from the vacuum vessel wall. This report analyzes the transient heat transfer in the vessel and calculates the thermal deflection and stress that will result from the boiling liquid in contact with the vessel walls. This analysis was applied to aluminum and stainless steel vessels.

  6. A Study of the Role of Adjoint-Equipped CFD in VUQ Analysis of Channel Boiling Simulations -Slides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study of the Role of Adjoint- Equipped CFD in VUQ Analysis of Channel Boiling Simulations Krzysztof Fidkowski University of Michigan Milestone L3:THM.CFD.P7.08 November 21, 2013 CASL-U-2013-0192-000-b L3-THM-CFD-P7-08 A Study of the Role of Adjoint-Equipped CFD in VUQ Analysis of Channel Boiling Simulations Milestone owner: Krzysztof Fidkowski, U. Michigan Additional personnel: Isaac Asher, U. Michigan 2 CASL-U-2013-0192-000-b Milestone Execution Responsibility & Personnel * Contact:

  7. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, P.R.

    1994-12-27

    A boiling water reactor is described having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit. 4 figures.

  8. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    A boiling water reactor having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit.

  9. Effect of nonuniformity of subcooled boiling flow on the onset of thermoacoustic vibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerliga, V.A.; Skalozubov, V.I.; Lesin, V.Y. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper develops the hypothesis that the factor responsible for the onset of thermoacoustic vibrations in two-phase bubble flow is positive work by bubbles condensing in the flow core. It is shown that the predicted threshold of generation of these vibrations depends strongly on the accuracy of description of the steady-state distribution of parameters of bubbles and the liquid. The results predicted on the basis of a two-zone nonequilibrium polydisperse model are compared with those given by the uniform-flow model and an equation representing the condition of applicability of one-dimensional models for predicting the steady-state parameters of nonequilibrium boiling flows is derived.

  10. LIQUID PROPANE GAS (LPG) STORAGE AREA BOILING LIQUID EXPANDING VAPOR EXPLOSION (BLEVE) ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACE, M.E.

    2004-01-13

    The PHA and the FHAs for the SWOC MDSA (HNF-14741) identified multiple accident scenarios in which vehicles powered by flammable gases (e.g., propane), or combustible or flammable liquids (e.g., gasoline, LPG) are involved in accidents that result in an unconfined vapor cloud explosion (UVCE) or in a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE), respectively. These accident scenarios are binned in the Bridge document as FIR-9 scenarios. They are postulated to occur in any of the MDSA facilities. The LPG storage area will be in the southeast corner of CWC that is relatively remote from store distaged MAR. The location is approximately 30 feet south of MO-289 and 250 feet east of 2401-W by CWC Gate 10 in a large staging area for unused pallets and equipment.

  11. Statistical modeling support for calibration of a multiphysics model of subcooled boiling flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bui, A. V.; Dinh, N. T.; Nourgaliev, R. R.; Williams, B. J.

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear reactor system analyses rely on multiple complex models which describe the physics of reactor neutronics, thermal hydraulics, structural mechanics, coolant physico-chemistry, etc. Such coupled multiphysics models require extensive calibration and validation before they can be used in practical system safety study and/or design/technology optimization. This paper presents an application of statistical modeling and Bayesian inference in calibrating an example multiphysics model of subcooled boiling flows which is widely used in reactor thermal hydraulic analysis. The presence of complex coupling of physics in such a model together with the large number of model inputs, parameters and multidimensional outputs poses significant challenge to the model calibration method. However, the method proposed in this work is shown to be able to overcome these difficulties while allowing data (observation) uncertainty and model inadequacy to be taken into consideration. (authors)

  12. Lattice Boltzmann Methods to Address Fundamental Boiling and Two-Phase Problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uddin, Rizwan

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the progress made during the fourth (no cost extension) year of this three-year grant aimed at the development of a consistent Lattice Boltzmann formulation for boiling and two-phase flows. During the first year, a consistent LBM formulation for the simulation of a two-phase water-steam system was developed. Results of initial model validation in a range of thermo-dynamic conditions typical for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) were shown. Progress was made on several fronts during the second year. Most important of these included the simulation of the coalescence of two bubbles including the surface tension effects. Work during the third year focused on the development of a new lattice Boltzmann model, called the artificial interface lattice Boltzmann model (AILB model) for the 3 simulation of two-phase dynamics. The model is based on the principle of free energy minimization and invokes the Gibbs-Duhem equation in the formulation of non-ideal forcing function. This was reported in detail in the last progress report. Part of the efforts during the last (no-cost extension) year were focused on developing a parallel capability for the 2D as well as for the 3D codes developed in this project. This will be reported in the final report. Here we report the work carried out on testing the AILB model for conditions including the thermal effects. A simplified thermal LB model, based on the thermal energy distribution approach, was developed. The simplifications are made after neglecting the viscous heat dissipation and the work done by pressure in the original thermal energy distribution model. Details of the model are presented here, followed by a discussion of the boundary conditions, and then results for some two-phase thermal problems.

  13. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWR) (NUREG-1123) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog and Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations (NUREG-1121) will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55. The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at boiling water reactors. Each K/A statement has been rated for its importance to the safe operation of the plant in a manner ensuring personnel and public health and safety. The BWR K/A Catalog is organized into five major sections: Plant-wide Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Function, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. The BWR Catalog represents a modification of the form and content of the K/A Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Pressurized Water Reactors (NUREG-1122). First, categories of knowledge and ability statements have been redefined. Second, the scope of the definition of emergency and abnormal plant evolutions has been revised in line with a symptom-based approach. Third, K/As related to the operational applications of theory have been incorporated into the delineations for both plant systems and emergency and abnormal plant evolutions, while K/As pertaining to theory fundamental to plant operation have been delineated in a separate theory section. Finally, the components section has been revised.

  14. Design of a boiling water reactor equilibrium core using thorium-uranium fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francois, J-L.; Nunez-Carrera, A.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

    2004-10-06

    In this paper the design of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium is presented; a heterogeneous blanket-seed core arrangement concept was adopted. The design was developed in three steps: in the first step two different assemblies were designed based on the integrated blanket-seed concept, they are the blanket-dummy assembly and the blanket-seed assembly. The integrated blanketseed concept comes from the fact that the blanket and the seed rods are located in the same assembly, and are burned-out in a once-through cycle. In the second step, a core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of 365 effective full power days in a standard BWR with a reload of 104 fuel assemblies designed with an average 235U enrichment of 7.5 w/o in the seed sub-lattice. The main operating parameters, like power, linear heat generation rate and void distributions were obtained as well as the shutdown margin. It was observed that the analyzed parameters behave like those obtained in a standard BWR. The shutdown margin design criterion was fulfilled by addition of a burnable poison region in the assembly. In the third step an in-house code was developed to evaluate the thorium equilibrium core under transient conditions. A stability analysis was also performed. Regarding the stability analysis, five operational states were analyzed; four of them define the traditional instability region corner of the power-flow map and the fifth one is the operational state for the full power condition. The frequency and the boiling length were calculated for each operational state. The frequency of the analyzed operational states was similar to that reported for BWRs; these are close to the unstable region that occurs due to the density wave oscillation phenomena in some nuclear power plants. Four transient analyses were also performed: manual SCRAM, recirculation pumps trip, main steam isolation valves closure and loss of feed water. The results of these transients are similar to those obtained with the traditional UO2 nuclear fuel.

  15. Experimental investigation on the flow instability behavior of a multi-channel boiling natural circulation loop at low-pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Vikas; Nayak, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2010-09-15

    Natural circulation as a mode of heat removal is being considered as a prominent passive feature in the innovative nuclear reactor designs, particularly in boiling-water-reactors, due to its simplicity and economy. However, boiling natural circulation system poses many challenges to designer due to occurrence of various kinds of instabilities such as excursive instability, density wave oscillations, flow pattern transition instability, geysering and metastable states in parallel channels. This problem assumes greater significance particularly at low-pressures i.e. during startup, where there is great difference in the properties of two phases. In light of this, a parallel channel loop has been designed and installed that has a geometrical resemblance to the pressure-tube-type boiling-water-reactor, to investigate into the behavior of boiling natural circulation. The loop comprises of four identical parallel channels connected between two common plenums i.e. steam drum and header. The recirculation path is provided by a single downcomer connected between steam drum and header. Experiments have been conducted over a wide range of power and pressures (1-10 bar). Two distinct unstable zones are observed with respect to power i.e. corresponding to low power (Type-I) and high power (Type-II) with a stable zone at intermediate powers. The nature of oscillations in terms of their amplitude and frequency and their evolution for Type-I and Type-II instabilities are studied with respect to the effect of heater power and pressure. This paper discusses the evolution of unstable and stable behavior along with the nature of flow oscillation in the channels and the effect of pressure on it. (author)

  16. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

  17. Many-Group Cross-Section Adjustment Techniques for Boiling Water Reactor Adaptive Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessee, Matthew Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Computational capability has been developed to adjust multigroup neutron cross sections, including self-shielding correction factors, to improve the fidelity of boiling water reactor (BWR) core modeling and simulation. The method involves propagating multigroup neutron cross-section uncertainties through various BWR computational models to evaluate uncertainties in key core attributes such as core k{sub eff}, nodal power distributions, thermal margins, and in-core detector readings. Uncertainty-based inverse theory methods are then employed to adjust multigroup cross sections to minimize the disagreement between BWR core modeling predictions and observed (i.e., measured) plant data. For this paper, observed plant data are virtually simulated in the form of perturbed three-dimensional nodal power distributions with the perturbations sized to represent actual discrepancies between predictions and real plant data. The major focus of this work is to efficiently propagate multigroup neutron cross-section uncertainty through BWR lattice physics and core simulator calculations. The data adjustment equations are developed using a subspace approach that exploits the ill-conditioning of the multigroup cross-section covariance matrix to minimize computation and storage burden. Tikhonov regularization is also employed to improve the conditioning of the data adjustment equations. Expressions are also provided for posterior covariance matrices of both the multigroup cross-section and core attributes uncertainties.

  18. Improvements of fuel failure detection in boiling water reactors using helium measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsson, I.; Sihver, L.; Grundin, A.; Helmersson, J. O.

    2012-07-01

    To certify a continuous and safe operation of a boiling water reactor, careful surveillance of fuel integrity is of high importance. The detection of fuel failures can be performed by off-line gamma spectroscopy of off-gas samples and/or by on-line nuclide specific monitoring of gamma emitting noble gases. To establish the location of a leaking fuel rod, power suppression testing can be used. The accuracy of power suppression testing is dependent on the information of the delay time and the spreading of the released fission gases through the systems before reaching the sampling point. This paper presents a method to improve the accuracy of power suppression testing by determining the delay time and gas spreading profile. To estimate the delay time and examine the spreading of the gas in case of a fuel failure, helium was injected in the feed water system at Forsmark 3 nuclear power plant. The measurements were performed by using a helium detector system based on a mass spectrometer installed in the off-gas system. The helium detection system and the results of the experiment are presented in this paper. (authors)

  19. Advanced fuel assembly characterization capabilities based on gamma tomography at the Halden boiling water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcombe, S.; Eitrheim, K.; Svaerd, S. J.; Hallstadius, L.; Willman, C.

    2012-07-01

    Characterization of individual fuel rods using gamma spectroscopy is a standard part of the Post Irradiation Examinations performed on experimental fuel at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor. However, due to handling and radiological safety concerns, these measurements are presently carried out only at the end of life of the fuel, and not earlier than several days or weeks after its removal from the reactor core. In order to enhance the fuel characterization capabilities at the Halden facilities, a gamma tomography measurement system is now being constructed, capable of characterizing fuel assemblies on a rod-by-rod basis in a more timely and efficient manner. Gamma tomography for measuring nuclear fuel is based on gamma spectroscopy measurements and tomographic reconstruction techniques. The technique, previously demonstrated on irradiated commercial fuel assemblies, is capable of determining rod-by-rod information without the need to dismantle the fuel. The new gamma tomography system will be stationed close to the Halden reactor in order to limit the need for fuel transport, and it will significantly reduce the time required to perform fuel characterization measurements. Furthermore, it will allow rod-by-rod fuel characterization to occur between irradiation cycles, thus allowing for measurement of experimental fuel repeatedly during its irradiation lifetime. The development of the gamma tomography measurement system is a joint project between the Inst. for Energy Technology - OECD Halden Reactor Project, Westinghouse (Sweden), and Uppsala Univ.. (authors)

  20. Enhancement of Heat Transfer with Pool and Spray Impingement Boiling on Microporous and Nanowire Surface Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiagarajan, S. J.; Wang, W.; Yang, R.; Narumanchi, S.; King, C.

    2010-09-01

    The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is leading a national effort to develop next-generation cooling technologies for hybrid vehicle electronics. The goal is to reduce the size, weight, and cost of power electronic modules that convert direct current from batteries to alternating current for the motor, and vice versa. Aggressive thermal management techniques help to increase power density and reduce weight and volume, while keeping chip temperatures within acceptable limits. The viability of aggressive cooling schemes such as spray and jet impingement in conjunction with enhanced surfaces is being explored. Here, we present results from a series of experiments with pool and spray boiling on enhanced surfaces, such as a microporous layer of copper and copper nanowires, using HFE-7100 as the working fluid. Spray impingement on the microporous coated surface showed an enhancement of 100%-300% in the heat transfer coefficient at a given wall superheat with respect to spray impingement on a plain surface under similar operating conditions. Critical heat flux also increased by 7%-20%, depending on flow rates.

  1. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner`s Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section.

  2. Metallurgical failure analysis of a propane tank boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, Alice C.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth Hall; Susan, Donald Francis

    2005-01-01

    A severe fire and explosion occurred at a propane storage yard in Truth or Consequences, N.M., when a truck ran into the pumping and plumbing system beneath a large propane tank. The storage tank emptied when the liquid-phase excess flow valve tore out of the tank. The ensuing fire engulfed several propane delivery trucks, causing one of them to explode. A series of elevated-temperature stress-rupture tears developed along the top of a 9800 L (2600 gal) truck-mounted tank as it was heated by the fire. Unstable fracture then occurred suddenly along the length of the tank and around both end caps, along the girth welds connecting the end caps to the center portion of the tank. The remaining contents of the tank were suddenly released, aerosolized, and combusted, creating a powerful boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE). Based on metallography of the tank pieces, the approximate tank temperature at the onset of the BLEVE was determined. Metallurgical analysis of the ruptured tank also permitted several hypotheses regarding BLEVE mechanisms to be evaluated. Suggestions are made for additional work that could provide improved predictive capabilities regarding BLEVEs and for methods to decrease the susceptibility of propane tanks to BLEVEs.

  3. Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs.

  4. Stress and Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Boiling Water Reactor and Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Shengjun; Bass, Bennett Richard; Stevens, Gary; Kirk, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes stress analysis and fracture mechanics work performed to assess boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) nozzles located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Various RPV nozzle geometries were investigated: 1. BWR recirculation outlet nozzle; 2. BWR core spray nozzle3 3. PWR inlet nozzle; ; 4. PWR outlet nozzle; and 5. BWR partial penetration instrument nozzle. The above nozzle designs were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-license (EOL) to require evaluation as part of establishing the allowed limits on heatup, cooldown, and hydrotest (leak test) conditions. These nozzles analyzed represent one each of the nozzle types potentially requiring evaluation. The purpose of the analyses performed on these nozzle designs was as follows: To model and understand differences in pressure and thermal stress results using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) versus a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for all nozzle types. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated; To verify the accuracy of a selected linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solution for stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for both thermal and pressure loading for all nozzle types; To assess the significance of attached piping loads on the stresses in the nozzle corner region; and To assess the significance of applying pressure on the crack face with respect to the stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack.

  5. Effect of rolling motion on critical heat flux for subcooled flow boiling in vertical tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J. S.; Park, I. U.; Park, M. Y.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents defining characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF) for the boiling of R-134a in vertical tube operation under rolling motion in marine reactor. It is important to predict CHF of marine reactor having the rolling motion in order to increase the safety of the reactor. Marine Reactor Moving Simulator (MARMS) tests are conducted to measure the critical heat flux using R-134a flowing upward in a uniformly heated vertical tube under rolling motion. MARMS was rotated by motor and mechanical power transmission gear. The CHF tests were performed in a 9.5 mm I.D. test section with heated length of 1 m. Mass fluxes range from 285 to 1300 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1}, inlet subcooling from 3 to 38 deg. C and outlet pressures from 13 to 24 bar. Amplitudes of rolling range from 15 to 40 degrees and periods from 6 to 12 sec. To convert the test conditions of CHF test using R-134a in water, Katto's fluid-to-fluid modeling was used in present investigation. A CHF correlation is presented which accounts for the effects of pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling and rolling angle over all conditions tested. Unlike existing transient CHF experiments, CHF ratio of certain mass flux and pressure are different in rolling motion. For the mass fluxes below 500 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 13, 16 (region of relative low mass flux), CHF ratio was decreased but was increased above that mass flux (region of relative high mass flux). Moreover, CHF tend to enhance in entire mass flux at 24 bar. (authors)

  6. Study of plutonium disposition using the GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-04-30

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the U.S. to disposition 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in parallel with a similar program in Russia. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} identified light water reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a U.S. disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a 1350 MWe GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. The ABWR represents the integration of over 30 years of experience gained worldwide in the design, construction and operation of BWRs. It incorporates advanced features to enhance reliability and safety, minimize waste and reduce worker exposure. For example, the core is never uncovered nor is any operator action required for 72 hours after any design basis accident. Phase 1 of this study was documented in a GE report dated May 13, 1993. DOE`s Phase 1 evaluations cited the ABWR as a proven technical approach for the disposition of plutonium. This Phase 2 study addresses specific areas which the DOE authorized as appropriate for more in-depth evaluations. A separate report addresses the findings relative to the use of existing BWRs to achieve the same goal.

  7. MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

    2003-06-16

    OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral system scaling analysis, design parameters were obtained and designs of the compact modular 200 MWe SBWR and the full size 1200 MWe SBWR were developed. These reactors are provided with passive safety systems. A new passive vacuum breaker check valve was designed to replace the mechanical vacuum beaker check valve. The new vacuum breaker check valve was based on a hydrostatic head, and was fail safe. The performance of this new valve was evaluated both by the thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5 and by the experiments in a scaled SBWR facility, PUMA. In the core neutronic design a core depletion model was implemented to PARCS code. A lattice design for the SBWR fuel assemblies was performed. Design improvements were made to the neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models of SBWR-200 and SBWR-1200, and design analyses of these reactors were performed. The design base accident analysis and evaluation of all the passive safety systems were completed as scheduled in tasks 4 and 5. Initial conditions for the small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and large break LOCA using REALP5 code were obtained. Small and large break LOCA tests were performed and the data was analyzed. An anticipated transient with scram was simulated using the RELAP5 code for SBWR-200. The transient considered was an accidental closure of the main steam isolation valve (MSIV), which was considered to be the most significant transient. The evaluation of the RELAP5 code against experimental data for SBWR-1200 was completed. In task 6, the instability analysis for the three SBWR designs (SBWR-1200, SBWR-600 and SBWR-200) were simulated for start-up transients and the results were similar. Neither the geysering instability, nor the loop type instability was predicted by RAMONA-4B in the startup simulation following the recommended procedure by GE. The density wave oscillation was not observed at all because the power level used in the simulation was not high enough. A study was made of the potential instabilities by imposing an unrealistically high power ramp in a short time period, as suggested by GE. RAMON

  8. Experimental Investigation on the Effects of Coolant Concentration on Sub-Cooled Boiling and Crud Deposition on Reactor Cladding at Prototypical PWR Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultis, J., Kenneth; Fenton, Donald, L.

    2006-10-20

    Increasing demand for energy necessitates nuclear power units to increase power limits. This implies significant changes in the design of the core of the nuclear power units, therefore providing better performance and safety in operations. A major hindrance to the increase of nuclear reactor performance especially in Pressurized Deionized water Reactors (PWR) is Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA)--the unexpected change in the core axial power distribution during operation from the predicted distribution. This problem is thought to be occur because of precipitation and deposition of lithiated compounds like boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) and lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) on the fuel rod cladding. Deposited boron absorbs neutrons thereby affecting the total power distribution inside the reactor. AOA is thought to occur when there is sufficient build-up of crud deposits on the cladding during subcooled nucleate boiling. Predicting AOA is difficult as there is very little information regarding the heat and mass transfer during subcooled nucleate boiling. An experimental investigation was conducted to study the heat transfer characteristics during subcooled nucleate boiling at prototypical PWR conditions. Pool boiling tests were conducted with varying concentrations of lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) and boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) solutions in deionized water. The experimental data collected includes the effect of coolant concentration, subcooling, system pressure and heat flux on pool the boiling heat transfer coefficient. The analysis of particulate deposits formed on the fuel cladding surface during subcooled nucleate boiling was also performed. The results indicate that the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient degrades in the presence of boric acid and lithium metaborate compared to pure deionized water due to lesser nucleation. The pool boiling heat transfer coefficients decreased by about 24% for 5000 ppm concentrated boric acid solution and by 27% for 5000 ppm lithium metaborate solution respectively at the saturation temperature for 1000 psi (68.9 bar) coolant pressure. Boiling tests also revealed the formation of fine deposits of boron and lithium on the cladding surface which degraded the heat transfer rates. The boron and lithium metaborate precipitates after a 5 day test at 5000 ppm concentration and 1000 psi (68.9 bar) operating pressure reduced the heat transfer rate 21% and 30%, respectively for the two solutions.

  9. Application of the Isotope Ratio Method to a Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, Douglas P.; Gerlach, David C.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.; Meriwether, George H.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.

    2010-08-11

    The isotope ratio method is a technique for estimating the energy or plutonium production in a fission reactor by measuring isotope ratios in non-fuel reactor components. The isotope ratios in these components can then be directly related to the cumulative energy production with standard reactor modeling methods. All reactor materials contain trace elemental impurities at parts per million levels, and the isotopes of these elements are transmuted by neutron irradiation in a predictable manner. While measuring the change in a particular isotopes concentration is possible, it is difficult to correlate to energy production because the initial concentration of that element may not be accurately known. However, if the ratio of two isotopes of the same element can be measured, the energy production can then be determined without knowing the absolute concentration of that impurity since the initial natural ratio is known. This is the fundamental principle underlying the isotope ratio method. Extremely sensitive mass-spectrometric methods are currently available that allow accurate measurements of the impurity isotope ratios in samples. Additionally, indicator elements with stable activation products have been identified so that their post-irradiation isotope ratios remain constant. This method has been successfully demonstrated on graphite-moderated reactors. Graphite reactors are particularly well-suited to such analyses since the graphite moderator is resident in the fueled region of the core for the entire period of operation. Applying this method to other reactor types is more difficult since the resident portions of the reactor available for sampling are either outside the fueled region of the core or structural components of individual fuel assemblies. The goal of this research is to show that the isotope ratio method can produce meaningful results for light water-moderated power reactors. In this work, we use the isotope ratio method to estimate the energy production in a boiling water reactor fuel bundle based on measurements taken from the corresponding fuel assembly channel. Our preliminary results are in good agreement with the actual operating history of the reactor during the cycle that the fuel bundle was resident in the core.

  10. Comparing Simulation Results with Traditional PRA Model on a Boiling Water Reactor Station Blackout Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhegang Ma; Diego Mandelli; Curtis Smith

    2011-07-01

    A previous study used RELAP and RAVEN to conduct a boiling water reactor station black-out (SBO) case study in a simulation based environment to show the capabilities of the risk-informed safety margin characterization methodology. This report compares the RELAP/RAVEN simulation results with traditional PRA model results. The RELAP/RAVEN simulation run results were reviewed for their input parameters and output results. The input parameters for each simulation run include various timing information such as diesel generator or offsite power recovery time, Safety Relief Valve stuck open time, High Pressure Core Injection or Reactor Core Isolation Cooling fail to run time, extended core cooling operation time, depressurization delay time, and firewater injection time. The output results include the maximum fuel clad temperature, the outcome, and the simulation end time. A traditional SBO PRA model in this report contains four event trees that are linked together with the transferring feature in SAPHIRE software. Unlike the usual Level 1 PRA quantification process in which only core damage sequences are quantified, this report quantifies all SBO sequences, whether they are core damage sequences or success (i.e., non core damage) sequences, in order to provide a full comparison with the simulation results. Three different approaches were used to solve event tree top events and quantify the SBO sequences: W process flag, default process flag without proper adjustment, and default process flag with adjustment to account for the success branch probabilities. Without post-processing, the first two approaches yield incorrect results with a total conditional probability greater than 1.0. The last approach accounts for the success branch probabilities and provides correct conditional sequence probabilities that are to be used for comparison. To better compare the results from the PRA model and the simulation runs, a simplified SBO event tree was developed with only four top events and eighteen SBO sequences (versus fifty-four SBO sequences in the original SBO model). The estimated SBO sequence conditional probabilities from the original SBO model were integrated to the corresponding sequences in the simplified SBO event tree. These results were then compared with the simulation run results.

  11. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this works calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the CIPS Validation Data Plan at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable quantitative assessment of the CASL modeling of Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) phenomenon, in particular, and the CASL advanced predictive capabilities, in general. This report is prepared for the Department of Energys Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs programs VUQ Focus Area.

  12. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 1: Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  13. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  14. Dispersed-flow film boiling in rod-bundle geometry: steady-state heat-transfer data and correlation comparisons. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder, G. L.; Morris, D. G.; Mullins, C. B.; Ott, L. J.; Reed, D. A.

    1982-03-01

    Assessment of six film boiling correlations and one single-phase vapor correlation has been made using data from 22 steady state upflow rod bundle tests (series 3.07.9). Bundle fluid conditions were calculated using energy and mass conservation considerations. Results of the steady state film boiling tests support the conclusions reached in the analysis of prior transient tests 3.03.6AR, 3.06.6B, and 3.08.6C. Comparisons between experimentally determined and correlation-predicted heat transfer coefficients, are presented.

  15. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-09-15

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval.

  16. Summary and bibliography of safety-related events at boiling-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormack, K.E.; Gallaher, R.B.

    1982-03-01

    This document presents a bibliography that contains 100-word abstracts of event reports submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning operational events that occurred at boiling-water-reactor nuclear power plants in 1980. The 1547 abstracts included on microfiche in this bibliography describe incidents, failures, and design or construction deficiencies that were experienced at the facilities. These abstracts are arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor. Full-size keyword and permuted-title indexes to facilitate location of individual abstracts are provided following the text. Tables that summarize the information contained in the bibliography are also provided. The information in the tables includes a listing of the equipment items involved in the reported events and the associated number of reports for each item. Similar information is given for the various kinds of instrumentation and systems, causes of failures, deficiencies noted, and the time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction).

  17. Experimental and Thermalhydraulic Code Assessment of the Transient Behavior of the Passive Condenser System in an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.T. Revankar; W. Zhou; Gavin Henderson

    2008-07-08

    The main goal of the project was to study analytically and experimentally the condensation heat transfer for the passive condenser system such as GE Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The effect of noncondensable gas in condenser tube and the reduction of secondary pool water level to the condensation heat transfer coefficient was the main focus in this research. The objectives of this research were to : 1) obtain experimental data on the local and tube averaged condensation heat transfer rates for the PCCS with non-condensable and with change in the secondary pool water, 2) assess the RELAP5 and TRACE computer code against the experimental data, and 3) develop mathematical model and ehat transfer correlation for the condensation phenomena for system code application. The project involves experimentation, theoretical model development and verification, and thermal- hydraulic codes assessment.

  18. Influence of lubricant oil on heat transfer performance of refrigerant flow boiling inside small diameter tubes. Part II: Correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Wenjian; Ding, Guoliang; Hu, Haitao; Wang, Kaijian

    2007-10-15

    The predictive ability of the available state-of-the-art heat transfer correlations of refrigerant-oil mixture is evaluated with the present experiment data of small tubes with inside diameter of 6.34 mm and 2.50 mm. Most of these correlations can be used to predict the heat transfer coefficient of 6.34 mm tube, but none of them can predict heat transfer coefficient of 2.50 mm tube satisfactorily. A new correlation of two-phase heat transfer multiplier with local properties of refrigerant-oil mixture is developed. This correlation approaches the actual physical mechanism of flow boiling heat transfer of refrigerant-oil mixture and can reflect the actual co-existing conditions of refrigerant and lubricant oil. More than 90% of the experiment data of both test tubes have less than {+-}20% deviation from the prediction values of the new correlations. (author)

  19. Steam Line Break and Station Blackout Transients for Proliferation-Resistant Hexagonal Tight Lattice Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, Upendra S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Jo, Jae H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Chung, Bub Dong [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Takahashi, Hiroshi [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Downar, Thomas J. [Purdue University (United States)

    2004-01-15

    Safety analyses of a proliferation-resistant, economically competitive, high-conversion boiling water reactor (HCBWR) fueled with fissile plutonium and fertile thorium oxide fuel elements, and with passive safety systems, are presented here. The HCBWR developed here is characterized by a very tight lattice with a relatively small water volume fraction in the core that therefore operates with a fast reactor neutron spectrum and a considerably improved neutron economy compared to the current generation of light water reactors. The tight lattice core has a very narrow flow channel with a hydraulic diameter less than half of the regular boiling water reactor (BWR) core and, thus, presents a special challenge to core cooling because of reduced water inventory and high friction in the core. The primary safety concern when reducing the moderator-to-fuel ratio and when using a tightly packed lattice arrangement is to maintain adequate cooling of the core during both normal operation and accident scenarios.In the preliminary HCBWR design, the core is placed in a vessel with a large chimney section, and the vessel is connected to the isolation condenser system (ICS). The vessel is placed in containment with the gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) and passive containment cooling system (PCCS) in a configuration similar to General Electric's simplified BWR (SBWR). The safety systems are similar to those of the SBWR; the ICS and PCCS are scaled with power. An internal recirculation pump is placed in the downcomer to augment the buoyancy head provided by the chimney since the buoyancy provided by the chimney alone could not generate sufficient recirculation in the vessel as the tight lattice configuration results in much larger friction in the core than with the SBWR.The constitutive relationships for RELAP5 are assessed for narrow channels, and as a result the heat transfer package is modified. The modified RELAP5 is used to simulate and analyze two of the most limiting events for a tight pitch lattice core: the station blackout and the main-steam-line-break events. The results of the analyses indicate that the HCBWR system will be safely brought to the shutdown condition for these transients.

  20. Explosive boiling of Ge{sub 35}Sb{sub 10}S{sub 55} glass induced by a CW laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knotek, P.; Tichy, L.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Interaction of the CW 785 nm laser with chalcogenide GeSbS glass. First demonstration of the explosive boiling induced by CW laser in glass. Different processes as photo-induced oxidation, expansion, and viscosity-flow observed. Applied diagnostics SEM, DHM, AFM, force spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Damage threshold determined at 1.2 10{sup 24}s{sup ?1} cm{sup ?3} of absorbed photons. - Abstract: The response of bulk Ge{sub 35}Sb{sub 10}S{sub 55} glass to illumination by a continuous wave (CW) laser, sub-band-gap photons, was studied specifically with an atomic force microscopy including a force spectroscopy, with a digital holographic microscopy and with a scanning electron microscopy. Depending on the number of photons absorbed, photo-expansion, photo-oxidation and explosive boiling were observed.

  1. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

  2. Simulation of in-core neutron noise measurements for axial void profile reconstruction in boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykin, V.; Pazsit, I.

    2012-07-01

    A possibility to reconstruct the axial void profile from the simulated in-core neutron noise which is caused by density fluctuations in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) heated channel is considered. For this purpose, a self-contained model of the two-phase flow regime is constructed which has quantitatively and qualitatively similar properties to those observed in real BWRs. The model is subsequently used to simulate the signals of neutron detectors induced by the corresponding perturbations in the flow density. The bubbles are generated randomly in both space and time using Monte-Carlo techniques. The axial distribution of the bubble production is chosen such that the mean axial void fraction and void velocity follow the actual values of BWRs. The induced neutron noise signals are calculated and then processed by the standard signal analysis methods such as Auto-Power Spectral Density (APSD) and Cross-Power Spectral Density (CPSD). Two methods for axial void and velocity profiles reconstruction are discussed: the first one is based on the change of the break frequency of the neutron auto-power spectrum with axial core elevation, while the second refers to the estimation of transit times of propagating steam fluctuations between different axial detector positions. This paper summarizes the principles of the model and presents a numerical testing of the qualitative applicability to estimate the required parameters for the reconstruction of the void fraction profile from the neutron noise measurements. (authors)

  3. Preliminary design study of small long life boiling water reactor (BWR) with tight lattice thorium nitride fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trianti, Nuri E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Su'ud, Zaki E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Arif, Idam E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Riyana, EkaSapta

    2014-09-30

    Neutronic performance of small long-life boiling water reactors (BWR) with thorium nitride based fuel has been performed. A recent study conducted on BWR in tight lattice environments (with a lower moderator percentage) produces small power reactor which has some specifications, i.e. 10 years operation time, power density of 19.1 watt/cc and maximum excess reactivity of about 4%. This excess reactivity value is smaller than standard reactivity of conventional BWR. The use of hexagonal geometry on the fuel cell of BWR provides a substantial effect on the criticality of the reactor to obtain a longer operating time. Supported by a tight concept lattice where the volume fraction of the fuel is greater than the moderator and fuel, Thorium Nitride give good results for fuel cell design on small long life BWR. The excess reactivity of the reactor can be reduced with the addition of gadolinium as burnable poisons. Therefore the hexagonal tight lattice fuel cell design of small long life BWR that has a criticality more than 20 years of operating time has been obtained.

  4. Influence of lubricant oil on heat transfer performance of refrigerant flow boiling inside small diameter tubes. Part I: Experimental study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Wenjian; Ding, Guoliang; Hu, Haitao; Wang, Kaijian

    2007-10-15

    Two-phase flow pattern and heat transfer characteristics of refrigerant-oil mixture flow boiling inside small tubes with inside diameters of 6.34 mm and 2.50 mm are investigated experimentally. The test condition of nominal oil concentration is from 0% to 5%, mass flux from 200 to 400 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, heat flux from 3.2 to 14 kW m{sup -2}, evaporation temperature of 5 C, inlet quality from 0.1 to 0.8, and quality change from 0.1 to 0.2. Wavy, wavy-annular, annular and mist-annular flow pattern in 6.34 mm tube are observed, while only slug-annular and annular flow pattern are observed in 2.50 mm tube. Oil presence can make annular flow to form early and to retard to diminish in quality direction at nominal oil concentration {>=}3%. Augmentation effect of oil on heat transfer coefficient becomes weakened or even diminishes for small diameter tube while detrimental effect of oil on small tube performance becomes more significant than large tube. For both test tubes, variation of heat transfer coefficient and enhanced factor with oil concentration is irregular. Two-phase heat transfer multiplier with refrigerant-oil mixture properties increases consistently and monotonically with local oil concentration at different vapor quality. (author)

  5. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-13

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

  6. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor design. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    This report supplements the final safety evaluation report (FSER) for the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design. The FSER was issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff as NUREG-1503 in July 1994 to document the NRC staff`s review of the US ABWR design. The US ABWR design was submitted by GE Nuclear Energy (GE) in accordance with the procedures of Subpart B to Part 52 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This supplement documents the NRC staff`s review of the changes to the US ABWR design documentation since the issuance of the FSER. GE made these changes primarily as a result of first-of-a-kind-engineering (FOAKE) and as a result of the design certification rulemaking for the ABWR design. On the basis of its evaluations, the NRC staff concludes that the confirmatory issues in NUREG-1503 are resolved, that the changes to the ABWR design documentation are acceptable, and that GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B to 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR design.

  7. Boiling water reactor fuel behavior at burnup of 26 GWd/tonne U under reactivity-initiated accident conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Yoshinaga, Makio . Dept. of Reactor Safety Research); Sobajima, Makoto ); Ishijima, Kiyomi; Fujishiro, Toshio . Dept. of Reactor Safety Research)

    1994-10-01

    Irradiated boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel behavior under reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions was investigated in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Short test fuel rods, refabricated from a commercial 7 x 7 type BWR fuel rod at a burnup of 26 GWd/ tonne U, were pulse irradiated in the NSRR under simulated cooled startup RIA conditions of the BWRs. Thermal energy from 230 J/g fuel (55 cal/g fuel) to 410 J/g fuel (98 cal/g fuel) was promptly subjected to the test fuel rods by pulse irradiation within [approximately] 10 ms. The peak fuel enthalpies are believed to be the same as the prompt energy depositions. The test fuel rods demonstrated characteristic behavior of the irradiated fuel rods under the accident conditions, such as enhanced pellet cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) and fission gas release. However, all the fuel rods survived the accident conditions with considerable margins. Simulations by the FRAP-T6 code and fresh fuel rod tests under the same RIA conditions highlighted the burnup effects on the accident fuel performance. The tests and the simulation suggested that the BWR fuel would possibly fail by a cladding burst due to fission gas release during the cladding temperature escalation rather than the PCMI under the cold startup RIA conditions of a severe power burst.

  8. Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas M. Gerstner

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 “flux traps” (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loop’s temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation.

  9. Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Behavior Under Reactivity-Initiated-Accident Conditions at Burnup of 41 to 45 GWd/tonne U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Yoshinaga, Makio; Takahashi, Masato; Okonogi, Kazunari; Ishijima, Kiyomi

    2000-02-15

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel at burnup of 41 to 45 GWd/tonne U was pulse irradiated in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to investigate fuel behavior under cold startup reactivity-initiated-accident conditions. Current Japanese BWR fuel, 8 x 8BJ type (Step I), from Fukushima-Daiichi Unit 3 was refabricated into short segments, and the test rods were promptly subjected to thermal energy from 293 to 607 J/g (70 to 145 cal/g) within {approx}20 ms. The fuel cladding was ductile enough to survive the prompt deformation due to pellet cladding mechanical interaction, while the plastic hoop strain reached 1.5% at the peak location. Transient fission gas release by the pulse irradiation varied from 3.1 to 8.2%, depending on the peak fuel enthalpy and the steady-state operation conditions.

  10. Neutronic evaluation of a non-fertile fuel for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium in a boiling water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterbentz, J.W.

    1994-10-01

    A new non-fertile, weapons-grade plutonium oxide fuel concept is developed and evaluated for deep burn applications in a boiling water reactor environment using the General Electric 8x8 Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) fuel assembly dimensions and pitch. Detailed infinite lattice fuel burnup results and neutronic performance characteristics are given and although preliminary in nature, clearly demonstrate the fuel`s potential as an effective means to expedite the disposition of plutonium in existing light water reactors. The new non-fertile fuel concept is an all oxide composition containing plutonia, zirconia, calcia, and erbia having the following design weight percentages: 8.3; 80.4; 9.7; and 1.6. This fuel composition in an infinite fuel lattice operating at linear heat generation rates of 6.0 or 12.0 kW/ft per rod can remain critical for up to 1,200 and 600 Effective Full Power Days (EFPD), respectively, and achieve a burnup of 7.45 {times} 10{sup 20} f/cc. These burnups correspond to a 71--73% total plutonium isotope destruction and a 91--94% destruction of the {sup 239}Pu isotope for the 0--40% moderator steam void condition. Total plutonium destruction greater than 73% is possible with a fuel management scheme that allows subcritical fuel assemblies to be driven by adjacent high reactivity assemblies. The fuel exhibits very favorable neutron characteristics from beginning-of-life (BOL) to end-of-life (EOL). Prompt fuel Doppler coefficient of reactivity are negative, with values ranging between {minus}0.4 to {minus}2.0 pcm/K over the temperature range of 900 to 2,200 K. The ABWR fuel lattice remains in an undermoderated condition for both hot operational and cold startup conditions over the entire fuel burnup lifetime.

  11. An experimental study on sub-cooled flow boiling CHF of R134a at low pressure condition with atmospheric pressure (AP) plasma assisted surface modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Seung Jun; Zou, Ling; Jones, Barclay G.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, sub-cooled flow boiling critical heat flux tests at low pressure were conducted in a rectangular flow channel with one uniformly heated surface, using simulant fluid R-134a as coolant. The experiments were conducted under the following conditions: (1) inlet pressure (P) of 400-800 kPa, (2) mass flux (G) of 124-248 kg/m2s, (3) inlet sub-cooling enthalpy (ΔHi) of 12~ 26 kJ/kg. Parametric trends of macroscopic system parameters (G, P, Hi) were examined by changing inlet conditions. Those trends were found to be generally consistent with previous understandings of CHF behavior at low pressure condition (i.e. reduced pressure less than 0.2). A fluid-to-fluid scaling model was utilized to convert the test data obtained with the simulant fluid (R-134a) into the prototypical fluid (water). The comparison between the converted CHF of equivalent water and CHF look-up table with same operation conditions were conducted, which showed good agreement. Furthermore, the effect of surface wettability on CHF was also investigated by applying atmospheric pressure plasma (AP-Plasma) treatment to modify the surface characteristic. With AP-Plasma treatment, the change of microscopic surface characteristic was measured in terms of static contact angle. The static contact angle was reduced from 80° on original non-treated surface to 15° on treated surface. An enhancement of 18% on CHF values under flow boiling conditions were observed on AP-Plasma treated surfaces compared to those on non-treated heating surfaces.

  12. Two-dimensional DORT discrete ordinates X-Y geometry neutron flux calculations for the Halden Heavy Boiling Water Reactor core configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, C.O.

    1990-07-01

    Results are reported for two-dimensional discrete ordinates, X-Y geometry calculations performed for seven Halden Heavy Boiling Water Reactor core configurations. The calculations were performed in support of an effort to reassess the neutron fluence received by the reactor vessel. Nickel foil measurement data indicated considerable underprediction of fluences by the previously used multigroup removal- diffusion method. Therefore, calculations by a more accurate method were deemed appropriate. For each core configuration, data are presented for (1) integral fluxes in the core and near the vessel wall, (2) neutron spectra at selected locations, (3) isoflux contours superimposed on the geometry models, (4) plots of the geometry models, and (5) input for the calculations. The initial calculations were performed with several mesh sizes. Comparisons of the results from these calculations indicated that the uncertainty in the calculated fluxes should be less than 10%. However, three-dimensional effects (such as axial asymmetry in the fuel loading) could contribute to much greater uncertainty in the calculated neutron fluxes. 7 refs., 22 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Support and Modeling for the Boiling Water Reactor Station Black Out Case Study Using RELAP and RAVEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diego Mandelli; Curtis Smith; Thomas Riley; John Schroeder; Cristian Rabiti; Aldrea Alfonsi; Joe Nielsen; Dan Maljovec; Bie Wang; Valerio Pascucci

    2013-09-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated. In order to evaluate the impact of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insight to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This report focuses, in particular, on the impact of power uprate on the safety of a boiled water reactor system. The case study considered is a loss of off-site power followed by the loss of diesel generators, i.e., a station black out (SBO) event. Analysis is performed by using a thermo-hydraulic code, i.e. RELAP-5, and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at INL, i.e. RAVEN. Starting from the event tree models contained in SAPHIRE, we built the input file for RELAP-5 that models in great detail system dynamics under SBO conditions. We also interfaced RAVEN with RELAP-5 so that it would be possible to run multiple RELAP-5 simulation runs by changing specific keywords of the input file. We both employed classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. We also employed advanced data analysis and visualization tools that helped us to correlate simulation outcome such as maximum core temperature with a set of input uncertain parameters. Results obtained gave a detailed overview of the issues associated to power uprate for a SBO accident scenario. We were able to quantify how timing of safety related events were impacted by a higher reactor core power. Such insights can provide useful material to the decision makers to perform risk-infomed safety margins management.

  14. TH-A-9A-04: Incorporating Liver Functionality in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, V; Epelman, M; Feng, M; Cao, Y; Wang, H; Romeijn, E; Matuszak, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Liver SBRT patients have both variable pretreatment liver function (e.g., due to degree of cirrhosis and/or prior treatments) and sensitivity to radiation, leading to high variability in potential liver toxicity with similar doses. This work aims to explicitly incorporate liver perfusion into treatment planning to redistribute dose to preserve well-functioning areas without compromising target coverage. Methods: Voxel-based liver perfusion, a measure of functionality, was computed from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Two optimization models with different cost functions subject to the same dose constraints (e.g., minimum target EUD and maximum critical structure EUDs) were compared. The cost functions minimized were EUD (standard model) and functionality-weighted EUD (functional model) to the liver. The resulting treatment plans delivering the same target EUD were compared with respect to their DVHs, their dose wash difference, the average dose delivered to voxels of a particular perfusion level, and change in number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving a particular dose. Two-dimensional synthetic and three-dimensional clinical examples were studied. Results: The DVHs of all structures of plans from each model were comparable. In contrast, in plans obtained with the functional model, the average dose delivered to high-/low-functioning voxels was lower/higher than in plans obtained with its standard counterpart. The number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving high/low dose was lower in the plans that considered perfusion in the cost function than in the plans that did not. Redistribution of dose can be observed in the dose wash differences. Conclusion: Liver perfusion can be used during treatment planning potentially to minimize the risk of toxicity during liver SBRT, resulting in better global liver function. The functional model redistributes dose in the standard model from higher to lower functioning voxels, while achieving the same target EUD and satisfying dose limits to critical structures. This project is funded by MCubed and grant R01-CA132834.

  15. TH-A-9A-06: Inverse Planning of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    obtained by solving a constrained integer-linear problem. (4) The shots are placed into ... Subject: 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALGORITHMS; GEOMETRY; KERNELS; NEOPLASMS; OPTIMIZATION; ...

  16. TH-A-17A-01: Innovation in PET Instrumentation and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, M; Miyaoka, R; Shao, Y

    2014-06-15

    Innovation in PET instrumentation has led to the new millennium revolutionary imaging applications for diagnosis, therapeutic guidance, and development of new molecular imaging probes, etc. However, after several decades innovations, will the advances of PET technology and applications continue with the same trend and pace? What will be the next big thing beyond the PET/CT, PET/MRI, and Time-of-flight PET? How will the PET instrumentation and imaging performance be further improved by novel detector research and advanced imaging system development? Or will the development of new algorithms and methodologies extend the limit of current instrumentation and leapfrog the imaging quality and quantification for practical applications? The objective of this session is to present an overview of current status and advances in the PET instrumentation and applications with speakers from leading academic institutes and a major medical imaging company. Presenting with both academic research projects and commercial technology developments, this session will provide a glimpse of some latest advances and challenges in the field, such as using semiconductor photon-sensor based PET detectors to improve performance and enable new applications, as well as the technology trend that may lead to the next breakthrough in PET imaging for clinical and preclinical applications. Both imaging and image-guided therapy subjects will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Describe the latest innovations in PET instrumentation and applications Understand the driven force behind the PET instrumentation innovation and development Learn the trend of PET technology development for applications.

  17. TH-A-18C-04: Ultrafast Cone-Beam CT Scatter Correction with GPU-Based Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Y; Bai, T; Yan, H; Ouyang, L; Wang, J; Pompos, A; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Zhou, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Scatter artifacts severely degrade image quality of cone-beam CT (CBCT). We present an ultrafast scatter correction framework by using GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and prior patient CT image, aiming at automatically finish the whole process including both scatter correction and reconstructions within 30 seconds. Methods: The method consists of six steps: 1) FDK reconstruction using raw projection data; 2) Rigid Registration of planning CT to the FDK results; 3) MC scatter calculation at sparse view angles using the planning CT; 4) Interpolation of the calculated scatter signals to other angles; 5) Removal of scatter from the raw projections; 6) FDK reconstruction using the scatter-corrected projections. In addition to using GPU to accelerate MC photon simulations, we also use a small number of photons and a down-sampled CT image in simulation to further reduce computation time. A novel denoising algorithm is used to eliminate MC scatter noise caused by low photon numbers. The method is validated on head-and-neck cases with simulated and clinical data. Results: We have studied impacts of photo histories, volume down sampling factors on the accuracy of scatter estimation. The Fourier analysis was conducted to show that scatter images calculated at 31 angles are sufficient to restore those at all angles with <0.1% error. For the simulated case with a resolution of 512×512×100, we simulated 10M photons per angle. The total computation time is 23.77 seconds on a Nvidia GTX Titan GPU. The scatter-induced shading/cupping artifacts are substantially reduced, and the average HU error of a region-of-interest is reduced from 75.9 to 19.0 HU. Similar results were found for a real patient case. Conclusion: A practical ultrafast MC-based CBCT scatter correction scheme is developed. The whole process of scatter correction and reconstruction is accomplished within 30 seconds. This study is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01), The Core Technology Research in Strategic Emerging Industry, Guangdong, China (2011A081402003)

  18. TH-A-18C-06: A Scatter Elimination Scheme for Cone Beam CT Using An Oscillating Narrow Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, H; Folkerts, M; Jia, X; Jiang, S; Xu, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: While cone beam CT (CBCT) has been widely used in image guided radiation therapy, its low image quality, primarily caused by scattered x-rays, hinders advanced clinical applications, e.g., CBCT based on-line adaptive re-planning. We propose in this abstract a new scheme called oscillating narrow beam CBCT (ONB-CBCT) to eliminate scatter signals. Methods: ONB-CBCT consists of two major components. 1) Oscillating narrow beam (ONB) scan and 2) partitioned flat panel containing multiple individual detector strips and their own readouts. Both the beam oscillation and detector partition are along the superior-inferior (SI) direction. During data acquisition, at a given projection, the narrow beam sweep through the detector region, and different portions of the detector acquires projection data in synchrony with the narrow beam. ONB can be generated by a rotating slit collimator design with conventional tube with single focal spot, or by directly using a new source with multiple focal spots. A proof-of-principle study via Monte Carlo simulation is conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of ONB-CBCT. Results: As the beam becomes narrower, more and more scatter signals are eliminated. For the case with a bowtie filter and using 15 ONBs, the maximum and the average intensity error due to scatter are below 20 and 10 HU, respectively. Conclusion: ONB yields a narrowed exposure field at each snapshot and hence an inherently negligible scatter effect. Meanwhile, the individualized detector units guarantee high frame rate detection and hence a same large volume coverage as that in conventional CBCT. In summary, ONB-CBCT is a promising design to achieve high-quality CBCT imaging. This study is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01)

  19. TH-A-18C-09: Ultra-Fast Monte Carlo Simulation for Cone Beam CT Imaging of Brain Trauma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Stayman, J; Yorkston, J; Aygun, N; Koliatsos, V; Siewerdsen, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Application of cone-beam CT (CBCT) to low-contrast soft tissue imaging, such as in detection of traumatic brain injury, is challenged by high levels of scatter. A fast, accurate scatter correction method based on Monte Carlo (MC) estimation is developed for application in high-quality CBCT imaging of acute brain injury. Methods: The correction involves MC scatter estimation executed on an NVIDIA GTX 780 GPU (MC-GPU), with baseline simulation speed of ~1e7 photons/sec. MC-GPU is accelerated by a novel, GPU-optimized implementation of variance reduction (VR) techniques (forced detection and photon splitting). The number of simulated tracks and projections is reduced for additional speed-up. Residual noise is removed and the missing scatter projections are estimated via kernel smoothing (KS) in projection plane and across gantry angles. The method is assessed using CBCT images of a head phantom presenting a realistic simulation of fresh intracranial hemorrhage (100 kVp, 180 mAs, 720 projections, source-detector distance 700 mm, source-axis distance 480 mm). Results: For a fixed run-time of ~1 sec/projection, GPU-optimized VR reduces the noise in MC-GPU scatter estimates by a factor of 4. For scatter correction, MC-GPU with VR is executed with 4-fold angular downsampling and 1e5 photons/projection, yielding 3.5 minute run-time per scan, and de-noised with optimized KS. Corrected CBCT images demonstrate uniformity improvement of 18 HU and contrast improvement of 26 HU compared to no correction, and a 52% increase in contrast-tonoise ratio in simulated hemorrhage compared to “oracle” constant fraction correction. Conclusion: Acceleration of MC-GPU achieved through GPU-optimized variance reduction and kernel smoothing yields an efficient (<5 min/scan) and accurate scatter correction that does not rely on additional hardware or simplifying assumptions about the scatter distribution. The method is undergoing implementation in a novel CBCT dedicated to brain trauma imaging at the point of care in sports and military applications. Research grant from Carestream Health. JY is an employee of Carestream Health.

  20. TH-A-16A-01: Image Quality for the Radiation Oncology Physicist: Review of the Fundamentals and Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seibert, J; Imbergamo, P

    2014-06-15

    The expansion and integration of diagnostic imaging technologies such as On Board Imaging (OBI) and Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) into radiation oncology has required radiation oncology physicists to be responsible for and become familiar with assessing image quality. Unfortunately many radiation oncology physicists have had little or no training or experience in measuring and assessing image quality. Many physicists have turned to automated QA analysis software without having a fundamental understanding of image quality measures. This session will review the basic image quality measures of imaging technologies used in the radiation oncology clinic, such as low contrast resolution, high contrast resolution, uniformity, noise, and contrast scale, and how to measure and assess them in a meaningful way. Additionally a discussion of the implementation of an image quality assurance program in compliance with Task Group recommendations will be presented along with the advantages and disadvantages of automated analysis methods. Learning Objectives: Review and understanding of the fundamentals of image quality. Review and understanding of the basic image quality measures of imaging modalities used in the radiation oncology clinic. Understand how to implement an image quality assurance program and to assess basic image quality measures in a meaningful way.

  1. Self-Sustaining Thorium Boiling Water...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... RBWR Th uru much simp ur: the tie must nnt melt, the plenum pressure m.ust remain belnxv ... Ci-oenoveld-Stev:arc model.' h ika(>, the quench temperature i> assumed lo be 725 K. Thu ...

  2. Boiling Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 6 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  3. TH-A-18C-03: Noise Correlation in CBCT Projection Data and Its Application for Noise Reduction in Low-Dose CBCT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHANG, H; Huang, J; Ma, J; Chen, W; Ouyang, L; Wang, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the noise correlation properties of cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection data and to incorporate the noise correlation information to a statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT. Methods: In this study, we systematically investigated the noise correlation properties among detector bins of CBCT projection data by analyzing repeated projection measurements. The measurements were performed on a TrueBeam on-board CBCT imaging system with a 4030CB flat panel detector. An anthropomorphic male pelvis phantom was used to acquire 500 repeated projection data at six different dose levels from 0.1 mAs to 1.6 mAs per projection at three fixed angles. To minimize the influence of the lag effect, lag correction was performed on the consecutively acquired projection data. The noise correlation coefficient between detector bin pairs was calculated from the corrected projection data. The noise correlation among CBCT projection data was then incorporated into the covariance matrix of the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion for noise reduction of low-dose CBCT. Results: The analyses of the repeated measurements show that noise correlation coefficients are non-zero between the nearest neighboring bins of CBCT projection data. The average noise correlation coefficients for the first- and second- order neighbors are about 0.20 and 0.06, respectively. The noise correlation coefficients are independent of the dose level. Reconstruction of the pelvis phantom shows that the PWLS criterion with consideration of noise correlation (PWLS-Cor) results in a lower noise level as compared to the PWLS criterion without considering the noise correlation (PWLS-Dia) at the matched resolution. Conclusion: Noise is correlated among nearest neighboring detector bins of CBCT projection data. An accurate noise model of CBCT projection data can improve the performance of the statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for low-dose CBCT.

  4. TH-A-19A-08: Intel Xeon Phi Implementation of a Fast Multi-Purpose Monte Carlo Simulation for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souris, K; Lee, J; Sterpin, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recent studies have demonstrated the capability of graphics processing units (GPUs) to compute dose distributions using Monte Carlo (MC) methods within clinical time constraints. However, GPUs have a rigid vectorial architecture that favors the implementation of simplified particle transport algorithms, adapted to specific tasks. Our new, fast, and multipurpose MC code, named MCsquare, runs on Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. This technology offers 60 independent cores, and therefore more flexibility to implement fast and yet generic MC functionalities, such as prompt gamma simulations. Methods: MCsquare implements several models and hence allows users to make their own tradeoff between speed and accuracy. A 200 MeV proton beam is simulated in a heterogeneous phantom using Geant4 and two configurations of MCsquare. The first one is the most conservative and accurate. The method of fictitious interactions handles the interfaces and secondary charged particles emitted in nuclear interactions are fully simulated. The second, faster configuration simplifies interface crossings and simulates only secondary protons after nuclear interaction events. Integral depth-dose and transversal profiles are compared to those of Geant4. Moreover, the production profile of prompt gammas is compared to PENH results. Results: Integral depth dose and transversal profiles computed by MCsquare and Geant4 are within 3%. The production of secondaries from nuclear interactions is slightly inaccurate at interfaces for the fastest configuration of MCsquare but this is unlikely to have any clinical impact. The computation time varies between 90 seconds for the most conservative settings to merely 59 seconds in the fastest configuration. Finally prompt gamma profiles are also in very good agreement with PENH results. Conclusion: Our new, fast, and multi-purpose Monte Carlo code simulates prompt gammas and calculates dose distributions in less than a minute, which complies with clinical time constraints. It has been successfully validated with Geant4. This work has been financialy supported by InVivoIGT, a public/private partnership between UCL and IBA.

  5. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Nesbitt, Loyd B.

    1997-01-01

    A system for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs.

  6. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Nesbitt, L.B.

    1997-01-21

    A system is disclosed for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs. 3 figs.

  7. Nucleate Boiling Model Liping C, Y. Sung, and V. Kucukboyaci

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Its major applications as designed originally were nuclear power plant loss of coolant accident and other anticipated operational transients. * In its current form, it solves the ...

  8. Metallurgical failure analysis of a propane tank boiling liquid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The storage tank emptied when the liquid-phase excess flow valve tore out of the tank. The ensuing fire engulfed several propane delivery trucks, causing one of them to explode. A ...

  9. Subcooled Boiling Heat Transfer for Cooling of Power Electronics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiator and associated pumping system are still required in HEVs. This additional cooling system adds weight and cost while decreasing the efficiency of HEVs. With the...

  10. Test Plan for the Boiling Water Reactor Dry Cask Simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, Samuel; Lindgren, Eric R.

    2015-11-01

    The thermal performance of commercial nuclear spent fuel dry storage casks are evaluated through detailed numerical analysis . These modeling efforts are completed by the vendor to demonstrate performance and regulatory compliance. The calculations are then independently verified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Carefully measured data sets generated from testing of full sized casks or smaller cask analogs are widely recognized as vital for validating these models. Recent advances in dry storage cask designs have significantly increased the maximum thermal load allowed in a cask in part by increasing the efficiency of internal conduction pathways and by increasing the internal convection through greater canister helium pressure. These same vertical, canistered cask systems rely on ventilation between the canister and the overpack to convect heat away from the canister to the environment for both above and below-ground configurations. While several testing programs have been previously conducted, these earlier validation attempts did not capture the effects of elevated helium pressures or accurately portray the external convection of above-ground and below-ground canistered dry cask systems. The purpose of the investigation described in this report is to produce a data set that can be used to test the validity of the assumptions associated with the calculations presently used to determine steady-state cladding temperatures in modern vertical, canistered dry cask systems. The BWR cask simulator (BCS) has been designed in detail for both the above-ground and below-ground venting configurations. The pressure vessel representing the canister has been designed, fabricated, and pressure tested for a maximum allowable pressure (MAWP) rating of 24 bar at 400 deg C. An existing electrically heated but otherwise prototypic BWR Incoloy-clad test assembly is being deployed inside of a representative storage basket and cylindrical pressure vessel that represents the canister. The symmetric single assembly geometry with well-controlled boundary conditions simplifies interpretation of results. Various configurations of outer concentric ducting will be used to mimic conditions for above and below-ground storage configurations of vertical, dry cask systems with canisters. Radial and axial temperature profiles will be measured for a wide range of decay power and helium cask pressures. Of particular interest is the evaluation of the effect of increased helium pressure on allowable heat load and the effect of simulated wind on a simplified below ground vent configuration. While incorporating the best available information, this test plan is subject to changes due to improved understanding from modeling or from as-built deviations to designs. As-built conditions and actual procedures will be documented in the final test report.

  11. Cooling Boiling in Head Region - PACCAR Integrated Underhood...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Integrated External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis for Heavy Vehicles CRADA with PACCAR Experimental Investigation in...

  12. Visual observation of boiling in high power liquid target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeples, J. L.; Stokely, M. H.; Poorman, M. C.; Magerl, M.; Wieland, B. W.

    2012-12-19

    A top pressurized, batch style, 3.15 mL total volume (2.5 mL fill volume) water target with transparent viewing windows was operated on an IBA 18/9 cyclotron at 18 MeV proton energy and beam power up to 1.1 kW. Video recordings documented bubble formation and transport, and blue light from de-excitation of water molecules produced images of proton beam stopping geometry including location of the Bragg peak.

  13. Critical heat flux for free convection boiling in thin rectangular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    heat flux (CHF) in vertical rectangular channels reveals three mechanisms of burnout. ... from the CHFs calculated according to the three mechanisms of burnout. 17 refs., 7 figs. ...

  14. Apparatus for pumping liquids at or below the boiling point

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N.

    2002-01-01

    A pump comprises a housing having an inlet and an outlet. An impeller assembly mounted for rotation within the housing includes a first impeller piece having a first mating surface thereon and a second impeller piece having a second mating surface therein. The second mating surface of the second impeller piece includes at least one groove therein so that at least one flow channel is defined between the groove and the first mating surface of the first impeller piece. A drive system operatively associated with the impeller assembly rotates the impeller assembly within the housing.

  15. Flow Boiling Carolyn Coyle, Jacopo Buongiorno, Thomas McKrell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... in MIT's Reactor Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory. ... and CRUD Actually Improve Safety Margins in LWRs?" ... CASL-U-2015-0068-000 23. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and ...

  16. Cooling Boiling in Head Region- PACCAR Integrated Underhood Thermal and External Aerodynamics- Cummins

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  17. Apparatus for draining lower drywell pool water into suppresion pool in boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus which mitigates temperature stratification in the suppression pool water caused by hot water drained into the suppression pool from the lower drywell pool. The outlet of a spillover hole formed in the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool is connected to and in flow communication with one end of piping. The inlet end of the piping is above the water level in the suppression pool. The piping is routed down the vertical downcomer duct and through a hole formed in the thin wall separating the downcomer duct from the suppression pool water. The piping discharge end preferably has an elevation at or near the bottom of the suppression pool and has a location in the horizontal plane which is removed from the point where the piping first emerges on the suppression pool side of the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool. This enables water at the surface of the lower drywell pool to flow into and be discharged at the bottom of the suppression pool.

  18. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, A.B.; Ballas, G.J.

    1998-02-24

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. 5 figs.

  19. Chimney for enhancing flow of coolant water in natural circulation boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oosterkamp, Willem Jan; Marquino, Wayne

    1999-01-05

    A chimney which can be reconfigured or removed during refueling to allow vertical removal of the fuel assemblies. The chimney is designed to be collapsed or dismantled. Collapse or dismantlement of the chimney reduces the volume required for chimney storage during the refueling operation. Alternatively, the chimney has movable parts which allow reconfiguration of its structure. In a first configuration suitable for normal reactor operation, the chimney is radially constricted such that the chimney obstructs vertical removal of the fuel assemblies. In a second configuration suitable for refueling or maintenance of the fuel core, the parts of the chimney which obstruct access to the fuel assemblies are moved radially outward to positions whereat access to the fuel assemblies is not obstructed.

  20. Chimney for enhancing flow of coolant water in natural circulation boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oosterkamp, W.J.; Marquino, W.

    1999-01-05

    A chimney which can be reconfigured or removed during refueling to allow vertical removal of the fuel assemblies is disclosed. The chimney is designed to be collapsed or dismantled. Collapse or dismantlement of the chimney reduces the volume required for chimney storage during the refueling operation. Alternatively, the chimney has movable parts which allow reconfiguration of its structure. In a first configuration suitable for normal reactor operation, the chimney is radially constricted such that the chimney obstructs vertical removal of the fuel assemblies. In a second configuration suitable for refueling or maintenance of the fuel core, the parts of the chimney which obstruct access to the fuel assemblies are moved radially outward to positions whereas access to the fuel assemblies is not obstructed. 11 figs.

  1. Accident source terms for boiling water reactors with high burnup cores.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

    2007-11-01

    The primary objective of this report is to provide the technical basis for development of recommendations for updates to the NUREG-1465 Source Term for BWRs that will extend its applicability to accidents involving high burnup (HBU) cores. However, a secondary objective is to re-examine the fundamental characteristics of the prescription for fission product release to containment described by NUREG-1465. This secondary objective is motivated by an interest to understand the extent to which research into the release and behaviors of radionuclides under accident conditions has altered best-estimate calculations of the integral response of BWRs to severe core damage sequences and the resulting radiological source terms to containment. This report, therefore, documents specific results of fission product source term analyses that will form the basis for the HBU supplement to NUREG-1465. However, commentary is also provided on observed differences between the composite results of the source term calculations performed here and those reflected NUREG-1465 itself.

  2. Pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of boiling water in sub-hundred micron channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhide, R.R.; Singh, S.G.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Duttagupta, S.P.; Agrawal, Amit [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2009-09-15

    The current work focuses on the pressure drop, heat transfer and stability in two phase flow in microchannels with hydraulic diameter of less than one hundred microns. Experiments were conducted in smooth microchannels of hydraulic diameter of 45, 65 {mu}m, and a rough microchannel of hydraulic diameter of 70 {mu}m, with deionised water as the working fluid. The local saturation pressure and temperature vary substantially over the length of the channel. In order to correctly predict the local saturation temperature and subsequently the heat transfer characteristics, numerical techniques have been used in conjunction with the conventional two phase pressure drop models. The Lockhart-Martinelli (liquid-laminar, vapour-laminar) model is found to predict the two phase pressure drop data within 20%. The instability in two phase flow is quantified; it is found that microchannels of smaller hydraulic diameter have lesser instabilities as compared to their larger counterparts. The experiments also suggest that surface characteristics strongly affect flow stability in the two phase flow regime. The effect of hydraulic diameter and surface characteristics on the flow characteristics and stability in two phase flow is seldom reported, and is of considerable practical relevance. (author)

  3. Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

    1982-12-21

    The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships. 3 figs.

  4. Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-12-21

    The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships.

  5. PACCAR CRADA: Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  6. L3:THM.CLS.P7.09 Advancements on Wall Boiling Modeling in CFD...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... angle dependency, the active nucleation site density models have difficulty capturing the number of active nucleation sites seen experimentally. To remove this dependency on ...

  7. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Appendices. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Appendices are presented concerning the evaluations of decommissioning financing alternatives; reference site description; reference BWR facility description; radiation dose rate and concrete surface contamination data; radionuclide inventories; public radiation dose models and calculated maximum annual doses; decommissioning methods; generic decommissioning information; immediate dismantlement details; passive safe storage, continuing care, and deferred dismantlement details; entombment details; demolition and site restoration details; cost estimating bases; public radiological safety assessment details; and details of alternate study bases.

  8. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, Alex Blair (San Jose, CA); Ballas, Gary J. (San Jose, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening.

  9. Analysis of high pressure boil-off situation during MSIV closure ATWS in a typical BWR/4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymotin, L.Y.; Slovik, G.C.; Saha, P.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a best-estimate analysis of the MSIV Closure ATWS in the Browns Ferry Unit 1 BWR with Mark 1 containment. The calculations have been performed using the RAMONA-3B code which has a three-dimensional neutron kinetics model coupled with one-dimensional (multi-channel core representation), four-equation, nonhomogeneous, nonequilibrium thermal hydraulics. The code also allows for one-dimensional neutronic core representation. The 1-D capability of the code has been employed in this calculation since a thorough sensitivity study showed that for a full ATWS, a one-dimensional (axial) neutron kinetics adequately describes the core behavior. (Note that the core steady-state symmetry in this case was preserved throughout the transient so that radial effects could be neglected.) The calculation described in the paper was started from a steady-state fuel condition corresponding to the end of Cycle 5 of the Browns Ferry reactor.

  10. Blanket Module Boil-Off Times during a Loss-of-Coolant Accident - Case 0: with Beam Shutdown only

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report is one of a series of reports that document LBLOCA analyses for the Accelerator Production of Tritium primary blanket Heat Removal system. This report documents the analysis results of a LBLOCA where the accelerator beam is shut off without primary pump trips and neither the RHR nor the cavity flood systems operation.

  11. An assessment of BWR (boiling water reactor) Mark-II containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, R.J. ); Wagner, K.C. )

    1990-07-01

    This report assesses challenges to BWR Mark II containment integrity that could potentially arise from severe accidents. Also assessed are some potential improvements that could prevent core damage or containment failure, or could mitigate the consequences of such failure by reducing the release of fission products to the environment. These challenges and improvements are analyzed via a limited quantitative risk/benefit analysis of a generic BWR/4 reactor with Mark II containment. Point estimate frequencies of the dominant core damage sequences are obtained and simple containment event trees are constructed to evaluate the response of the containment to these severe accident sequences. The resulting containment release modes are then binned into source term release categories, which provide inputs to the consequence analysis. The output of the consequences analysis is used to construct an overall base case risk profile. Potential improvements and sensitivities are evaluated by modifying the event tree spilt fractions, thus generating a revised risk profile. Several important sensitivity cases are examined to evaluate the impact of phenomenological uncertainties on the final results. 75 refs., 25 figs., 65 tabs.

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Thermal Control of Power Electronics of Electric Vehicles with Small Channel Coolant Boiling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about thermal control...

  13. On the Modeling of Local Neutronically-Coupled Flow-Induced Oscillations in Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aniel-Buchheit, Sylvie; Podowski, Michael Z.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development in progress of a complete space- and time-dependent model of the coupled neutron kinetic and reactor thermal-hydraulics. The neutron kinetics model is based on two-group diffusion equations with Doppler and void reactivity feedback effects. This model is coupled with the model of two-phase flow and heat transfer in parallel coolant channels. The modeling concepts considered for this purpose include one-dimensional drift flux and two-fluid models, as well a CFD model implemented in the NPHASE advanced computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) computer code. Two methods of solution for the overall model are proposed. One is based on direct numerical integration of the spatially-discretized governing equations. The other approach is based on a quasi-analytical modal approach to the neutronics model, in which a complete set of eigenvectors is found for step-wise temporal changes of the cross-sections of core materials (fuel and coolant/moderator). The issues investigated in the paper include details of model formulation, as well as the results of calculations for neutronically-coupled density-wave oscillations. (authors)

  14. Characterization of thermal-hydraulic and ignition phenomena in prototypic, full-length boiling water reactor spent fuel pool assemblies after a complete loss-of-coolant accident.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindgren, Eric Richard; Durbin, Samuel G

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this project was to provide basic thermal-hydraulic data associated with a SFP complete loss-of-coolant accident. The accident conditions of interest for the SFP were simulated in a full-scale prototypic fashion (electrically-heated, prototypic assemblies in a prototypic SFP rack) so that the experimental results closely represent actual fuel assembly responses. A major impetus for this work was to facilitate code validation (primarily MELCOR) and reduce questions associated with interpretation of the experimental results. It was necessary to simulate a cluster of assemblies to represent a higher decay (younger) assembly surrounded by older, lower power assemblies. Specifically, this program provided data and analysis confirming: (1) MELCOR modeling of inter-assembly radiant heat transfer, (2) flow resistance modeling and the natural convective flow induced in a fuel assembly as it heats up in air, (3) the potential for and nature of thermal transient (i.e., Zircaloy fire) propagation, and (4) mitigation strategies concerning fuel assembly management.

  15. Study of Pu consumption in light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants, compilation of Phase 1C task reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-15

    This report summarizes the evaluations conducted during Phase 1C of the Pu Disposition Study have provided further results which reinforce the conclusions reached during Phase 1A & 1B: These conclusions clearly establish the benefits of the fission option and the use of the ABWR as a reliable, proven, well-defined and cost-effective means available to disposition the weapons Pu. This project could be implemented in the near-term at a cost and on a schedule being validated by reactor plants currently under construction in Japan and by cost and schedule history and validated plans for MOX plants in Europe. Evaluations conducted during this phase have established that (1) the MOX fuel is licensable based on existing criteria for new fuel with limited lead fuel rod testing, (2) that the applicable requirements for transport, handling and repository storage can be met, and (3) that all the applicable safeguards criteria can be met.

  16. California Institute of Technology Caltech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of higher learning tha investigates the most challenging, fundamental problems in science and technology. Coordinates: 29.690847, -95.196308 Show Map Loading map......

  17. Thailand: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Thailand Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TH 3-letter ISO code THA Numeric ISO code...

  18. Introduction to computed microtomography and applications in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Related Information: CMS Workshop Lectures, Advanced Applications of Synchrotron Radiation in Clay Science Publisher: 2014; Tha Clay Minerals Society ;Urbana, IL ...

  19. Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    After boiling and then combustion, a fluorescent red pigment is formed. Image: University ... After boiling and then combustion, a fluorescent red pigment is formed. Image: University ...

  20. Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    After boiling and then combustion, a fluorescent red pigment is formed. Image: University ... After boiling and then combustion, a fluorescent red pigment is formed. Image: University ...

  1. Microsoft Word - TR07-27.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS), Site, Rincn, Puerto Rico July 2010 Page 1 2010 Inspection and Status Report for the Former Boiling Nuclear Superheater (BONUS) Reactor...

  2. L3:THM.CLS.P9.06

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Micro-hydrodynamics in High Heat Flux Boiling and Burnout: Experimental Data and Model ... proposes a framework that describes phenomena of high heat flux subcooled flow boiling. ...

  3. Microsoft Word - NURETH-15_Full paper#586_Final

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Analysis of Interfacial Heat transfer Phenomena in Subcooled Boiling Along PWR Coolant ... 1 MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF INTERFACIAL HEAT TRANSFER PHENOMENA IN SUBCOOLED BOILING ...

  4. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1996-07-01

    The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

  5. In-vessel Retention Strategy for High Power Reactors - K-INERI Final Report (includes SBLB Test Results for Task 3 on External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) Boiling Data and CHF Enhancement Correlations)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. B. Cheung; J. Yang; M. B. Dizon; J. Rempe

    2005-01-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe PWR (AP600), which relied upon External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) for IVR, resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing LWRs. However, it is not clear that currently proposed external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) without additional enhancements could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). Hence, a collaborative, three-year, U.S. - Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project was completed in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) investigated the performance of ERVC and an in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) to determine if IVR is feasible for reactors up to 1500 MWe.

  6. SSRL Accelerator Phycics Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at.gif (15297 bytes) BeamOptics.gif (29047 bytes) ICFA2000t.gif (31362 bytes) Home Page LCLS Accelerator Physics at SSRL The field tha t can be covered by the Accelerator Physics...

  7. Cosan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subsidiary of Cosan Limited. Tha company is one of the largest ethanol producers in the world. References: Cosan1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it....

  8. To1 Col. A. 8. Pry., Jr. Prom L. c. Furney

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    HoeeNer, thue Ub no.reoorda in our Special Ueteriale Department 8upprting ruoh l tmnefer. This material may hare been ubipped through tha Property 8eOtion of the :L: Contractor...

  9. Building America Puts Residential Research Results To Work; Building America Research That Works (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Residential buildings use more than 20% of the energy consumed annually in the United States. To help reduce that energy use, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its Building America partners conduct research to develop advanced building energy systems tha

  10. Fun With The Sun - Teacher's Activity Guide for Elementary Grades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... A leaf moving in the wind, a pot of boiling water, and a school bus traveling to school ... A leaf moving in the wind, a pot of boiling water, and a school bus traveling to school ...

  11. Minimizing corrosion in coal liquid distillation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumert, Kenneth L.; Sagues, Alberto A.; Davis, Burtron H.

    1985-01-01

    In an atmospheric distillation tower of a coal liquefaction process, tower materials corrosion is reduced or eliminated by introduction of boiling point differentiated streams to boiling point differentiated tower regions.

  12. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    84.9 BWR 7281975 10172034 855 6,361 84.9 Data for 2010 BWR Boiling Water Reactor. ... The 900-acre site is also the location of two other General Electric boiling water ...

  13. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    85.5 BWR 1211969 492029 615 4,601 85.5 Data for 2010 BWR Boiling Water Reactor. ... The nuclear generating unit is a General Electric Type 2 boiling water reactor. ...

  14. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    99.3 BWR 1131975 12272034 1,858 14,808 91.0 Data for 2010 BWR Boiling Water Reactor. ... Reactor Descriptions: Both units are General Electric Type 4 boiling water reactors. ...

  15. Concentrating solar power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the southwestern United States and other sunbelts worldwide. Many power plants today use fossil fuels as a heat source to boil water. The steam from the boiling water spins a...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - 03072012 ModSim_Industry_Montgomery.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Valley Authority Fossil Plants Combustion Turbines ... 155 distributors Hydroelectric Dams Pumped- Storage ... Boiling Water Reactors g - Small Modular Reactors - Advanced ...

  17. TOUGHREACT Testing in High Ionic Strength Brine Sandstone Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    United States Language: English Subject: 54; 58; AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS; BOILING; BRINES; EVAPORATION; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; REACTION KINETICS; SANDSTONES; SIMULATION; SIMULATORS; TESTING...

  18. CASL - Lift Forces in Bubbly Flows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lift Forces in Bubbly Flows The dynamics of two-phase (gas/liquid) bubbly flows are complex: bubbles deform and disperse; large latent heats and heat capacity differentials influence local boiling; and relatively small changes in heated surface temperatures yield order of magnitude changes in boiling complexity. Because the local void volume has a direct feedback effect on reactor neutron flux and fuel rod power production, prediction of local boiling rates and bulk boiling effects in nuclear

  19. Direct production of fractionated and upgraded hydrocarbon fuels from biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felix, Larry G.; Linck, Martin B.; Marker, Terry L.; Roberts, Michael J.

    2014-08-26

    Multistage processing of biomass to produce at least two separate fungible fuel streams, one dominated by gasoline boiling-point range liquids and the other by diesel boiling-point range liquids. The processing involves hydrotreating the biomass to produce a hydrotreatment product including a deoxygenated hydrocarbon product of gasoline and diesel boiling materials, followed by separating each of the gasoline and diesel boiling materials from the hydrotreatment product and each other.

  20. SolarReserve Is Testing Prototype Heliostats at NSTTF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory Cylindrical Boiling Facility Distributed Energy Technology Lab Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications National Solar Thermal Test ...

  1. Pratt Whitney Rocketdyne Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory Cylindrical Boiling Facility Distributed Energy Technology Lab Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications National Solar Thermal Test ...

  2. Sandia's Continuously Recirculating Falling-Particle Receiver...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory Cylindrical Boiling Facility Distributed Energy Technology Lab Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications National Solar Thermal Test ...

  3. Solar Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory Cylindrical Boiling Facility Distributed Energy Technology Lab Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications National Solar ...

  4. Sandia Researcher Recognized at SunSpec Alliance Annual Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory Cylindrical Boiling Facility Distributed Energy Technology Lab Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications National Solar ...

  5. Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory (PSEL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory Cylindrical Boiling Facility Distributed Energy Technology Lab Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications National Solar ...

  6. Sandia's Supercritical Carbon-Dioxide/Brayton-Cycle Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory Cylindrical Boiling Facility Distributed Energy Technology Lab Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications National Solar ...

  7. MELCOR Model of the Spent Fuel Pool of Fukushima Dai-ichi Unit...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ALUMINIUM; BOILING; DIMENSIONS; EARTHQUAKES; EXPLOSIONS; FUEL ASSEMBLIES; FUEL RACKS; HYDROGEN; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; OXIDATION; OXYGEN; RADIOISOTOPES; REACTOR ACCIDENTS;...

  8. The dynamics of two-phase (gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dynamics of two-phase (gas/ liquid) bubbly flows are complex: bubbles deform and disperse; large latent heats and heat capacity differ- entials influence local boiling; and relatively small changes in heated surface temperatures yield order of magnitude changes in boiling com- plexity. Because the local void vol- ume has a direct feedback effect on reactor neutron flux and fuel rod power production, prediction of local boiling rates and bulk boiling effects in nuclear reactors is key in achiev-

  9. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An essential part of developing a closed form set of equations (closures) for prediction of two-phase flow with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is understanding how the bubbles generat- ed by boiling interact. An accurate prediction of moderator and fuel performance once boiling has begun is needed to simulate CASL Challenge Problems related to boiling water reactors (BWRs), departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) behavior in pressurized water reactors (PWRs), loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs),

  10. Sandia Energy - Advanced Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory Cylindrical Boiling Facility Distributed Energy Technology Lab Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications National...

  11. Coal liquefaction process with increased naphtha yields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Daniel F.

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein the solid carbonaceous material is slurried with a suitable solvent and then subjected to liquefaction at elevated temperature and pressure to produce a normally gaseous product, a normally liquid product and a normally solid product. The normally liquid product is further separated into a naphtha boiling range product, a solvent boiling range product and a vacuum gas-oil boiling range product. At least a portion of the solvent boiling-range product and the vacuum gas-oil boiling range product are then combined and passed to a hydrotreater where the mixture is hydrotreated at relatively severe hydrotreating conditions and the liquid product from the hydrotreater then passed to a catalytic cracker. In the catalytic cracker, the hydrotreater effluent is converted partially to a naphtha boiling range product and to a solvent boiling range product. The naphtha boiling range product is added to the naphtha boiling range product from coal liquefaction to thereby significantly increase the production of naphtha boiling range materials. At least a portion of the solvent boiling range product, on the other hand, is separately hydrogenated and used as solvent for the liquefaction. Use of this material as at least a portion of the solvent significantly reduces the amount of saturated materials in said solvent.

  12. I:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    076181 .-. -. ,- _- ,^, - THIS AGmmmiT, entered into this & day of MCUV I: 1991, effective as of the - day of , 1991 betvse; TIE UNITED STATES OF ANERICA, (hereinafter called tha %ovarnmanta) , acting through tha DEPARTKENT OP RNRRC!( (harsinaftsr called VOEn), and LCR-PSW PARTtmEm P (hereinafter callsd the "Licenser") uho is the fee owner of the parcel of land (hereinafter called the Premises) vhich is described in the deed title no. 43% R-01817 filed in the New York County Clerks

  13. Progress in the Development of Compressible, Multiphase Flow Modeling Capability for Nuclear Reactor Flow Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Berry; R. Saurel; F. Petitpas; E. Daniel; O. Le Metayer; S. Gavrilyuk; N. Dovetta

    2008-10-01

    In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. Within the context of multiphase flows, two bubble-dynamic phenomena boiling (heterogeneous) and flashing or cavitation (homogeneous boiling), with bubble collapse, are technologically very important to nuclear reactor systems. The main difference between boiling and flashing is that bubble growth (and collapse) in boiling is inhibited by limitations on the heat transfer at the interface, whereas bubble growth (and collapse) in flashing is limited primarily by inertial effects in the surrounding liquid. The flashing process tends to be far more explosive (and implosive), and is more violent and damaging (at least in the near term) than the bubble dynamics of boiling. However, other problematic phenomena, such as crud deposition, appear to be intimately connecting with the boiling process. In reality, these two processes share many details.

  14. EERE Success Story-Geothermal Technology Breakthrough in Alaska:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Harvesting Heat below Boiling Temperatures | Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Breakthrough in Alaska: Harvesting Heat below Boiling Temperatures EERE Success Story-Geothermal Technology Breakthrough in Alaska: Harvesting Heat below Boiling Temperatures March 19, 2015 - 11:49am Addthis Sunrise at Pilgrim Hot Springs outside of Nome, Alaska. | Photo courtesy of CPike, Alaska Center for Energy and Power (ACEP). Sunrise at Pilgrim Hot Springs outside of Nome, Alaska. | Photo courtesy

  15. CASL-U-2015-0113-000 RPI Milestone:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13-000 RPI Milestone: Development of a Mechanistic Subcooled Boiling Model for PWR Assemblies M.Z. Podowski Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) August 31, 2014 CASL-U-2015-0113-000 August 31, 2014 RPI Milestone: Development of a mechanistic subcooled boiling model for PWR assemblies 1 TOP FOCUS AREA ACHIEVEMENTS * Top achievement 1 - The formulation of a mechanistic multidimensional model of vapor condensation in subcooled boiling. The new model allows to separately capture each: the

  16. Microsoft Word - ANFM_Methodology_rev4.docx

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    material was evaluated for modern 10 x 10 boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel bundles. ... fuel, a method based on 2D lattice physics was established to estimate excess ...

  17. Microsoft Word - ANFM_Demonstration.docx

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fuel (ATF) cladding material was evaluated for modern 10 x 10 boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel bundles. Lattice physics calculations were completed with the 2D deterministic ...

  18. DOE Solicits Feedback on Subsurface Characterization to Commercialize...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Administration of the Wave Energy Converter Prize Geothermal energy below the boiling point is now being harnessed to generate electricity and a host of applications....

  19. U.S. Spent Nuclear Fuel Data as of December 31,2002 Table 3

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    permanently discharged in previous years, the historical totals change. BWR Boiling-water reactor; PWR Pressurized-water reactor; HTGR High-temperature gas cooled reactor....

  20. Investigations of Dual-Purpose Canister Direct Disposal Feasibility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... activities include validation of criticality modeling tools (e.g., boiling water reactor fuel burnup analysis), and DPC basket corrosion modeling and testing (stainless steel). ...

  1. CONSORTIUM FOR ADVANCED SIMULATION OF LIGHT WATER REACTORS (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) Cladding integrity during loss of coolant accidents ... (PWR BWR) - Behavior during severe accident conditions - Issues related to spent ...

  2. Office of Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Sludge...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... In a similar situation several decades ago, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission discovered that a design basis maximum loss-of-coolant-accident in boiling-water-reactor commercial ...

  3. CNS 2008 Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    boiling transients, loss of coolant accident, reactivity insertion accident, advanced fuel material implementation and the extension of reactor vessel and internals lifetime. ...

  4. Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the inclusion fluids range from dilute meteoric water to highly modified sea water concentrated by boiling. Comparison of measured drill-hole temperatures with...

  5. Brunswick County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Island, North Carolina Belville, North Carolina Boiling Spring Lakes, North Carolina Bolivia, North Carolina Calabash, North Carolina Carolina Shores, North Carolina Caswell...

  6. Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Efficiency can be limited by mechanical, chemical, or other physical parameters, or by the ... Heating of water, petroleum crude, chemical feedstocks, and other liquids Boiling or ...

  7. Los Alamos boosts light-water reactor research with advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    boiling can result in undesirable local hotspots and the accumulation of excess corrosion and contaminants. A simulation demonstrates the volume fraction of a bubble phase in...

  8. Sambar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ingredients (this section does not need to be done here) Ingredient Alternative Bengal Gram water sambar Powder Turmeric Powder Any Dal alternative Instructions Boil Bengal...

  9. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    temperature response during subcooled flow boiling in a rectangular flow channel Yabuki, Tomohide ; Samaroo, Randy ; Nakabeppu, Osamu ; Kawaji, Masahiro October 2015 , Elsevier

  10. Presentation Title

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    o Heavy metal and sodium fast reactor safety - Gen IV research Reactor Technology - "keeping boiling under control" o Thermal hydraulics of Light Water Reactors o 2-phase flow, ...

  11. Nureth-15 paper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advancements on Wall Boiling Modeling in CFD: Leveraging New Understanding from MIT Flow Boiling Facility Massachusetts Institute of Technology L Gilman and E. Baglietto May 12-17, 2013: CASL-U-2013-0099-000 The 15 th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics, NURETH-15 NURETH15-633 Pisa, Italy, May 12-17, 2013 ADVANCEMENTS ON WALL BOILING MODELING IN CFD: LEVERAGING NEW UNDERSTANDING FROM MIT FLOW BOILING FACILITY L. Gilman 1 and E. Baglietto 1 1 Massachusetts

  12. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    groups conduct an investigation into the similarities and differences between solar tea and tea brewed by boiling water. Students will compare their two samples on four...

  13. Sandia Energy - First-Ever Asian MELCOR User Group Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear power plants. Sandia developed MELCOR for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-to treat a broad spectrum of phenomena in both boiling and pressurized water reactors...

  14. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 02 PETROLEUM; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; API GRAVITY; BOILING POINTS; MOLECULAR WEIGHT; OIL SANDS; PETROLEUM; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; STEAM; TESTING; ...

  15. Fluid Inclusion Evidence for Rapid Formation of the Vapor-Dominated...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geohydrology and not just from simple boiling. Authors Masakatsu Sasada and Fraser E. Goff Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 1995 DOI Not Provided...

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bonus

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Puerto Rico Boiling Nuclear Superheater (BONUS), Puerto Rico, Decommissioned Reactor Site Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdficon Key Documents Fact...

  17. BONUS, Puerto Rico, Decommissioned Reactor Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    information about the Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Boiling Nuclear Superheater (BONUS) reactor located northwest of Rincn, Puerto Rico. The site is...

  18. Integrated External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Cooling Boiling in Head Region - PACCAR Integrated Underhood Thermal and External Aerodynamics- Cummins Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology and ...

  19. EERE Success Story-Geothermal Technology Breakthrough in Alaska...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Technology Breakthrough in Alaska: Harvesting Heat below Boiling Temperatures EERE Success Story-Geothermal Technology Breakthrough in Alaska: Harvesting Heat below ...

  20. Microsoft Word - NURETH-14_Paper_397_rev June 15- no review track...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NUCLEATE POOL BOILING X. Duan, J. Buongiorno and T. McKrell Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA Abstract High-resolution data of nucleate pool...

  1. Mutton Rogan Josh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    boil mutton Ingredients (this section does not need to be done here) Ingredient Alternative Mutton Haldi Ginger Garlic Paste Chicken none Ginger Garlic grinded Instructions...

  2. Modeling of coupled heat transfer and reactive transport processesin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    heating and boiling, and through local convection. In cooler regions, the vapor condenses on fracture walls, where it drains through the fracture network. Slow imbibition of water ...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), Canoga ... systems (6) tuff (6) water (6) boiling (5) chemical ... and (2) CO2 disposal in a deep saline aquifer. less Full ...

  4. Sticky foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Peter B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1980-01-01

    Access to a space is impeded by the generation of a sticky foam from a tacky polymeric resin and a low boiling solvent.

  5. CASL Industry Council Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shift (CIPS), Crud Induced Localized Corrosion (CILC), Grid to Rod Fretting (GTRF), Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI), Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB), Clad Integrity 2 of...

  6. EA-1394: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Ricon, Puerto Rico

  7. Macon County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Macon County, Tennessee Lafayette, Tennessee Red Boiling Springs, Tennessee Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMacon...

  8. MEMO TO:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    21 September 2011 To: Madeline Ramos, Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) Copy: Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) File and Gunseli Shareef, URS (Program Manager) From:...

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bonus

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of the DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program, the Office of Legacy Management manages the Boiling Nuclear Superheater (BONUS) Decommissioned Reactor Site...

  10. Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measure the thermophysical properties of heat transfer fluids and storage materials to ... measure the melting point, boiling point, heat capacity, density, viscosity, and phase- ...

  11. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Download What's Cooking Students in small groups conduct an investigation into the similarities and differences between solar tea and tea brewed by boiling water. Students will...

  12. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CASL's Latest Research CIPS Simulation Capability Implemented in VERA Posted on October 28, 2015 Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) Multi-Physics Approach & Applications using...

  13. Water injection as a means for reducing non-condensible andcorrosive...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Two effects have beenrecognized and discussed in the literature as contributing to ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 54; ADSORPTION; BOILING; ...

  14. Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Differences since 1982 in fluid chemistry of springs has been minor except at Casa Diablo, where rapid fluctuations in chemistry result from near surface boiling and...

  15. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, draft report for comment. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.

    1994-09-01

    On June 27, 1988, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published in the Federal Register (53 FR 24018) the final rule for the General Requirements for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities. With the issuance of the final rule, owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the NRC for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s WNP-2, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives, which now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste. Costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities are given in 1993 dollars. Sensitivities of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances are also examined.

  16. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    by uo&utboFlwd putqlm. ). The &&a, ' 8m ;altielJ 79 p-rmlt arrgora ted and ttw tap t.ha aikalini, . L pokotlal brlf)r, bU88M 8-i .ii.i co sat8 awtaet wltb the mBtmtl8a. aada...

  17. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    the fir+ hamrd dmn d-l- with BCZ' C. mot 4-0 b. krpti io Rind* l;.r, Fienhar,thQ plant nana@, told ua thut tha kao WOr@ taW6mWt e&W+ xmt;i P6 sot thi: pwiblo tblle rffeatar of...

  18. Imision, Sohmso~ operatlonr Offloe

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3ayslde, Long fElti, 8. Y. Sylvaaia'o prooorr for pa-oduofng unmiunr pwdor by rtoaimtloa ir rtU1 .kr tha amly mpertal rtqpr and ot thllr tlma it la nof poirible to supply pou with...

  19. Effect of Narrow Cut Oil Shale Distillates on HCCI Engine Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, Scott J; Bunting, Bruce G; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Fairbridge, Craig

    2009-01-01

    In this investigation, oil shale crude obtained from the Green River Formation in Colorado using Paraho Direct retorting was mildly hydrotreated and distilled to produce 7 narrow boiling point fuels of equal volumes. The resulting derived cetane numbers ranged between 38.3 and 43.9. Fuel chemistry and bulk properties strongly correlated with boiling point.

  20. Fast estimation of reboiler reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durand, A.A.; Bonilla, M.A.O.

    1995-08-01

    The problems one faces in evaluating the reliability of a reboiler design, or in judging the effect of modifications of process conditions on reboiler operation can be complex. To carry out such evaluations, it is necessary for engineers to perform some calculations to determine: heat transfer coefficients in convection boiling; temperature difference, for the onset of nucleate boiling; heat transfer coefficients in the nucleate boiling region; critical heat flux or critical temperature difference; minimum {Delta}T for film boiling; and heat transfer coefficients for the film boiling region. There are a number of correlations, graphs, and computer programs that can be used to make these calculations. However, besides being laborious, it is still difficult to get a suitable picture of the overall problem from just this data. To simplify the process, and to have a better understanding of the problem, a map of the different boiling regions and their boundaries is presented here. With this map it is possible to locate the design or operating point of a specific kettle reboiler among all the boiling regions, enabling one to make a clearer analysis of its behavior. The parameters used to develop this map are described.

  1. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, C.H.

    1986-02-11

    A process is described for the liquefaction of coal wherein raw feed coal is dissolved in recycle solvent with a slurry containing recycle coal minerals in the presence of added hydrogen at elevated temperature and pressure. The highest boiling distillable dissolved liquid fraction is obtained from a vacuum distillation zone and is entirely recycled to extinction. Lower boiling distillable dissolved liquid is removed in vapor phase from the dissolver zone and passed without purification and essentially without reduction in pressure to a catalytic hydrogenation zone where it is converted to an essentially colorless liquid product boiling in the transportation fuel range. 1 fig.

  2. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Charles H.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of coal wherein raw feed coal is dissolved in recycle solvent with a slurry containing recycle coal minerals in the presence of added hydrogen at elevated temperature and pressure. The highest boiling distillable dissolved liquid fraction is obtained from a vacuum distillation zone and is entirely recycled to extinction. Lower boiling distillable dissolved liquid is removed in vapor phase from the dissolver zone and passed without purification and essentially without reduction in pressure to a catalytic hydrogenation zone where it is converted to an essentially colorless liquid product boiling in the transportation fuel range.

  3. Visit us at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting, Booth#1211 |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dec 14-18th> us at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting, Booth#1211 | Dec 14-18th - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization

  4. X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (Book) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy Authors: Newville, M. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (UC) Publication Date: 2014-12-22 OSTI Identifier: 1168410 Resource Type: Book Resource Relation: Related Information: CMS Workshop Lectures, Advanced Applications of Synchrotron Radiation in Clay Science Publisher: 2014; Tha Clay Minerals Society ;Urbana, IL ;Joseph W. Stucki and Glenn Waychunas, eds.;167-

  5. Interim Safety Basis for Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2000-09-07

    This ISB, in conjunction with the IOSR, provides the required basis for interim operation or restrictions on interim operations and administrative controls for the facility until a SAR is prepared in accordance with the new requirements or the facility is shut down. It is concluded that the risks associated with tha current and anticipated mode of the facility, uranium disposition, clean up, and transition activities required for permanent closure, are within risk guidelines.

  6. Introduction to computed microtomography and applications in Earth science

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Book) | SciTech Connect Introduction to computed microtomography and applications in Earth science Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Introduction to computed microtomography and applications in Earth science Authors: Rivers, M. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (UC) Publication Date: 2014-12-22 OSTI Identifier: 1168409 Resource Type: Book Resource Relation: Related Information: CMS Workshop Lectures, Advanced Applications of Synchrotron Radiation in Clay Science Publisher: 2014; Tha

  7. Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials (Book)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials Authors: Lanzirotti, A. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (UC) Publication Date: 2014-12-22 OSTI Identifier: 1168411 Resource Type: Book Resource Relation: Related Information: CMS Workshop Lectures, Advanced Applications of Synchrotron Radiation in Clay Science Publisher: 2014; Tha Clay Minerals

  8. Software Based DIAS and FACET Training Guide

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-01

    The Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) is an ANL- developed framework fo developing multidisciplinary simulation systems. It is copyrighted (ANL-SF-96-130 and ANL-SF-98-127) and licensed software and the invention is patented (ANL-IN-95-146). This Developer's Guide and accompanying Farm Tax tutorial provides software based system and documentation tha supports the DIAS licenses.

  9. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrOil-FiredBoiler ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rmlYrMwhYrOil-FiredBoiler Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Oil-fired boiler Pages using the property "BuildingSPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrOil-FiredBoil...

  10. L3:VUQ.SAUQ.P2-2.01 Brian Williams LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    distributions for DBCoeff based on two calibrations to crud index from F71 and F22 (green) and F71, F22, and F88 (blue). Figure 4 . Calibrated V IPRE---W boiling index...

  11. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  12. CX-004148: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Online Monitoring Implementation in Boiling Water ReactorsCX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1Date: 09/17/2010Location(s): Knoxville, TennesseeOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  13. CASL-U-2015-0054-000 COBRA-TF Subchannel Thermal-Hydraulics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coolant-Boiling in Rod Arrays-Two Fluids (COBRA-TF) is a Thermal Hydraulic (TH) ... sponsorship of the NRC 68, began as a TH rod-bundle analysis code, but has been ...

  14. L3:PHI.VCS.P9.02 CTF Validation Robert K. Salko Oak Ridge National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coolant-Boiling in Rod Arrays- Two Fluids (COBRA-TF) is a ... Water Reactor (BWR)s in both normal and accident conditions. ... channels in BFBT cases with loss coefficient for each ...

  15. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    tea brewed by boiling water. Students will compare their two samples on four criteria-color, clarity, smell and taste-rate which they prefer, and graph the results of the...

  16. LA-23336-MS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Hours to Severe Corrosion Temperature Range ("C) boiling point of water are known as fusible alloys. These are ...

  17. CASL-U-2015-0278-000 CASL Program Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78-000 CASL Program Highlights July 2015 Jess Gehin Oak Ridge National Laboratory July 31, 2015 CASL-U-2015-0278-000 1 Demonstrate on new VERA Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) ...

  18. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    boiling water. Students will compare their two samples on four criteria-color, clarity, smell and taste-rate which they prefer, and graph the results of the experiment as a class....

  19. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    boiling water. Students will compare their two samples on four criteria-color, clarity, smell and taste-rate which they prefer, and graph the results of the experiment as a...

  20. Mamba_ptacFeb2014.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cladding surface z (cm) 100.0 r (microns) 50.0 Coolant flow Thermodynamics and chemical kinetics computed at each node and time step MAMBA example grid: Heat flux Boiling...

  1. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    It is a colorless liquid that boils at a temperature of 156.2 degrees Fahrenheit. Isooctane Isooctane (C8H18). A saturated branch-chain hydrocarbon with chemical name 2,2,4 ...

  2. Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1950) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Crank wells, encountered boiling water. References Diek, A.; White, L.; Roegiers, J.-C.; Moore, J.; McLennan, J. D. (1 January 2012) BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL...

  3. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    are used in on-highway diesel engines, such as those in ... It is a colorless paraffinic gas that boils at a temperature ... aviation fuels and meets engine requirements at high ...

  4. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. ...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. ...

  6. Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a high boiling point. Viscosity and thermal capacity determine the amount of pumping energy required. A fluid with low viscosity and high specific heat is easier to pump, because...

  7. Volatilization of iodine from nitric acid using peroxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cathers, G.I.; Shipman, C.J.

    1975-10-21

    A method for removing radioactive iodine from nitric acid solution by adding hydrogen peroxide to the solution while concurrently holding the solution at the boiling point and distilling hydrogen iodide from the solution is reported.

  8. Aluto-Langano Geothermal Field, Ethiopian Rift Valley- Physical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    region of the Ethiopian Rift Valley. The upflow zone for the system lies along a deep, young NNE trending fault and is characterized by boiling. As a result, the deep upflow zone...

  9. 02-10ER85986 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of oil from water-wet Osorb. The project team demonstrated that other low boiling gases (LPG liquefied petroleum gas and refrigerant R134a) are suitable for use in the...

  10. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    At present, Boiling Springs is the only known intact, old-growth community that exists on the SRS. Ironically, this remnant stand is both the oldest plant community recorded for ...

  11. Modeling Cladding-Coolant Heat Transfer of High-Burnup Fuel During...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the fuel performance code FRAPTRAN 1.2. The minimum stable film boiling temperature, affected by the subcooling and the clad oxidation, is modeled by a modified Henry correlation. ...

  12. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Petroleum Coke A residue high in carbon content and low in ... It is a colorless paraffinic gas that boils at a temperature ... dust pallative and surface treatment on roads and highways. ...

  13. Top 6 Things You Didn't Know About Solar Energy | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The hot fluid then is used to boil water in a conventional steam-turbine generator to produce electricity. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Former Digital ...

  14. Geothermal Energy (5 Activities) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rock to water? How does energy transferred between fluids in a binary geothermal power plant work? How does salinity affect the boiling point of water? How do the emissions...

  15. Use of once-through treat gas to remove the heat of reaction in solvent hydrogenation processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nizamoff, Alan J.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process wherein feed coal is contacted with molecular hydrogen and a hydrogen-donor solvent in a liquefaction zone to form coal liquids and vapors and coal liquids in the solvent boiling range are thereafter hydrogenated to produce recycle solvent and liquid products, the improvement which comprises separating the effluent from the liquefaction zone into a hot vapor stream and a liquid stream; cooling the entire hot vapor stream sufficiently to condense vaporized liquid hydrocarbons; separating condensed liquid hydrocarbons from the cooled vapor; fractionating the liquid stream to produce coal liquids in the solvent boiling range; dividing the cooled vapor into at least two streams; passing the cooling vapors from one of the streams, the coal liquids in the solvent boiling range, and makeup hydrogen to a solvent hydrogenation zone, catalytically hydrogenating the coal liquids in the solvent boiling range and quenching the hydrogenation zone with cooled vapors from the other cooled vapor stream.

  16. Coal Liquefaction desulfurization process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

    1983-01-01

    In a solvent refined coal liquefaction process, more effective desulfurization of the high boiling point components is effected by first stripping the solvent-coal reacted slurry of lower boiling point components, particularly including hydrogen sulfide and low molecular weight sulfur compounds, and then reacting the slurry with a solid sulfur getter material, such as iron. The sulfur getter compound, with reacted sulfur included, is then removed with other solids in the slurry.

  17. Highly Selective Membranes For The Separation Of Organic Vapors Using Super-Glassy Polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinnau, Ingo; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid; Nguyen, Phuong; Segelke, Scott

    1997-11-18

    A process for separating hydrocarbon gases of low boiling point, particularly methane, ethane and ethylene, from nitrogen. The process is performed using a membrane made from a super-glassy material. The gases to be separated are mixed with a condensable gas, such as a C.sub.3+ hydrocarbon. In the presence of the condensable gas, improved selectivity for the low-boiling-point hydrocarbon gas over nitrogen is achieved.

  18. Request for Proposals for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Request for Information explores mineral recovery from geothermal fluids Request for Information explores mineral recovery from geothermal fluids May 12, 2015 - 11:01am Addthis Geothermal energy below the boiling point is now being harnessed to generate electricity and a host of applications. Source: NREL/Ted Clutter Geothermal energy below the boiling point is now being harnessed to generate electricity and a host of applications. Source: NREL/Ted Clutter The DOE

  19. Process for the conversion of alcohols and oxygenates to hydrocarbons in a turbulent fluid bed reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avidan, A. A.; Kam, A. Y.

    1985-04-23

    Improvements in converting C/sub 1/-C/sub 3/ monohydric alcohols, particularly methanol, related oxygenates of said alcohols and/or oxygenates produced by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis to light olefins, gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons and/or distillate boiling range hydrocarbons are obtained in a fluidized bed of ZSM-5 type zeolite catalyst operating under conditions effective to provide fluidization in the turbulent regime.

  20. Lesson 6 - Atoms to Electricity | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 - Atoms to Electricity Lesson 6 - Atoms to Electricity Most power plants make electricity by boiling water to make steam that turns a turbine. A nuclear power plant works this way, too. At a nuclear power plant, splitting atoms produce the heat to boil the water. This lesson covers Inside the Reactor Heat Pressure Water Fission Control Fuel assemblies Control rods Coolant Pressure vessel Electricity Generation Generator Condenser Cooling tower File Lesson 6 - Atoms to Electricity.pptx More

  1. Request for Information explores mineral recovery from geothermal fluids |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Request for Information explores mineral recovery from geothermal fluids Request for Information explores mineral recovery from geothermal fluids May 12, 2015 - 11:01am Addthis Geothermal energy below the boiling point is now being harnessed to generate electricity and a host of applications. Source: NREL/Ted Clutter Geothermal energy below the boiling point is now being harnessed to generate electricity and a host of applications. Source: NREL/Ted Clutter The DOE

  2. Self-consistent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1-3023 Self-Sustaining Thorium Boiling Water Reactors Reactor Concepts Dr. Ehud Greenspan University of California-Berkeley In collaboration with: Massachusetts Institute of Technology University of Michigan Brookhaven National Laboratory Brian Robinson, Federal POC Temitope Taiwo, Technical POC NEUP Project # 11-3023 September 2011 to December 2014 Self-sustaining thorium boiling water reactors Summary Report Ehud Greenspan, Phillip M. Gorman, Sandra Bogetic, Jeffrey E. Seifried, Guanheng

  3. L3:THM.P9.08

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Development of a General Purpose Subgrid Wall Boiling Model from Improved Physical Understanding for Use in Computational Fluid Dynamics Emilio Baglietto Massachusetts Institute of Technology September 30, 2014 CASL-8-2014-0205-000 CASL-U-2014-0205-000 Development of a General Purpose Subgrid Wall Boiling Model from Improved Physical Understanding for Use in Computational Fluid Dynamics by Lindsey Anne Gilman B.S. Chemistry, Valparaiso University, 2010 S.M. Nuclear Science and Engineering,

  4. Vegetation N A County

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N A County road 39 Community D Bottomland Hardwood _ Mixed Swamp Forest _ Bottomland Hardwood/Pine .** TES Plants (1) ~ Site Boundary ~ Roads m. Streams N County Line em Hydric Soils 410 o 410 820 Meters Soils Soil Series _ Pk D VeD Figure 18-2. Plant communities and soils of the Boiling Springs Natural Area. 18-7 Set-Aside 18: Boiling Springs Natural Area

  5. Research Call Issued for Design Support Tool for Remote Microgrids |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Request for Information explores mineral recovery from geothermal fluids Request for Information explores mineral recovery from geothermal fluids May 12, 2015 - 11:01am Addthis Geothermal energy below the boiling point is now being harnessed to generate electricity and a host of applications. Source: NREL/Ted Clutter Geothermal energy below the boiling point is now being harnessed to generate electricity and a host of applications. Source: NREL/Ted Clutter The DOE

  6. Collecting and Characterizing Validation Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterizing Validation Data to Support Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor Hydraulics Nam Dinh North Carolina State University Anh Bui Idaho National Laboratory Hyung Lee Bettis Laboratory ASME 2013 Verification and Validation Symposium Las Vegas, NV, May 22-24, 2013 Multi-Physics, Multi-Scale Problem Validation Hierarchy (Validation Pyramid) of Subcooled Boiling Flow Model Bayesian Framework for Data Integration Nuclear System Analysis - Subcooled Boiling Flow Example * Underlying physics

  7. SUBCOOLING DETECTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCann, J.A.

    1963-12-17

    A system for detecting and measuring directly the subcooling margin in a liquid bulk coolant is described. A thermocouple sensor is electrically heated, and a small amount of nearly stagnant bulk coolant is heated to the boiling point by this heated thermocouple. The sequential measurement of the original ambient temperature, zeroing out this ambient temperature, and then measuring the boiling temperature of the coolant permits direct determination of the subcooling margin of the ambient liquid. (AEC)

  8. Prediction of critical heat flux in water-cooled plasma facing components using computational fluid dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullock, James H.; Youchison, Dennis Lee; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Several commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes now have the capability to analyze Eulerian two-phase flow using the Rohsenow nucleate boiling model. Analysis of boiling due to one-sided heating in plasma facing components (pfcs) is now receiving attention during the design of water-cooled first wall panels for ITER that may encounter heat fluxes as high as 5 MW/m2. Empirical thermalhydraulic design correlations developed for long fission reactor channels are not reliable when applied to pfcs because fully developed flow conditions seldom exist. Star-CCM+ is one of the commercial CFD codes that can model two-phase flows. Like others, it implements the RPI model for nucleate boiling, but it also seamlessly transitions to a volume-of-fluid model for film boiling. By benchmarking the results of our 3d models against recent experiments on critical heat flux for both smooth rectangular channels and hypervapotrons, we determined the six unique input parameters that accurately characterize the boiling physics for ITER flow conditions under a wide range of absorbed heat flux. We can now exploit this capability to predict the onset of critical heat flux in these components. In addition, the results clearly illustrate the production and transport of vapor and its effect on heat transfer in pfcs from nucleate boiling through transition to film boiling. This article describes the boiling physics implemented in CCM+ and compares the computational results to the benchmark experiments carried out independently in the United States and Russia. Temperature distributions agreed to within 10 C for a wide range of heat fluxes from 3 MW/m2 to 10 MW/m2 and flow velocities from 1 m/s to 10 m/s in these devices. Although the analysis is incapable of capturing the stochastic nature of critical heat flux (i.e., time and location may depend on a local materials defect or turbulence phenomenon), it is highly reliable in determining the heat flux where boiling instabilities begin to dominate. Beyond this threshold, higher heat fluxes lead to the boiling crisis and eventual burnout. This predictive capability is essential in determining the critical heat flux margin for the design of complex 3d components.

  9. Method and apparatus for processing a test sample to concentrate an analyte in the sample from a solvent in the sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, T.D.; Beller, L.S.; Clark, M.L.; Klingler, K.M.

    1997-10-14

    A method of processing a test sample to concentrate an analyte in the sample from a solvent in the sample includes: (a) boiling the test sample containing the analyte and solvent in a boiling chamber to a temperature greater than or equal to the solvent boiling temperature and less than the analyte boiling temperature to form a rising sample vapor mixture; (b) passing the sample vapor mixture from the boiling chamber to an elongated primary separation tube, the separation tube having internal sidewalls and a longitudinal axis, the longitudinal axis being angled between vertical and horizontal and thus having an upper region and a lower region; (c) collecting the physically transported liquid analyte on the internal sidewalls of the separation tube; and (d) flowing the collected analyte along the angled internal sidewalls of the separation tube to and pass the separation tube lower region. The invention also includes passing a turbulence inducing wave through a vapor mixture to separate physically transported liquid second material from vaporized first material. Apparatus is also disclosed for effecting separations. Further disclosed is a fluidically powered liquid test sample withdrawal apparatus for withdrawing a liquid test sample from a test sample container and for cleaning the test sample container. 8 figs.

  10. Method and apparatus for processing a test sample to concentrate an analyte in the sample from a solvent in the sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D.; Beller, Laurence S.; Clark, Michael L.; Klingler, Kerry M.

    1997-01-01

    A method of processing a test sample to concentrate an analyte in the sample from a solvent in the sample includes: a) boiling the test sample containing the analyte and solvent in a boiling chamber to a temperature greater than or equal to the solvent boiling temperature and less than the analyte boiling temperature to form a rising sample vapor mixture; b) passing the sample vapor mixture from the boiling chamber to an elongated primary separation tube, the separation tube having internal sidewalls and a longitudinal axis, the longitudinal axis being angled between vertical and horizontal and thus having an upper region and a lower region; c) collecting the physically transported liquid analyte on the internal sidewalls of the separation tube; and d) flowing the collected analyte along the angled internal sidewalls of the separation tube to and pass the separation tube lower region. The invention also includes passing a turbulence inducing wave through a vapor mixture to separate physically transported liquid second material from vaporized first material. Apparatus are also disclosed for effecting separations. Further disclosed is a fluidically powered liquid test sample withdrawal apparatus for withdrawing a liquid test sample from a test sample container and for cleaning the test sample container.

  11. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, J.B.; Comolli, A.G.; McLean, J.B.

    1989-10-17

    A process is described for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600--750 F to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650 F and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710--800 F temperature, 1,000--4,000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft[sup 3] catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760--860 F temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600--750 F[sup +] fraction containing 0--20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials. 2 figs.

  12. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, James B.; Comolli, Alfred G.; McLean, Joseph B.

    1989-01-01

    A process for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600.degree.-750.degree. F. to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650.degree. F. and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft.sup.3 catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760.degree.-860.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600.degree.-750.degree. F..sup.+ fraction containing 0-20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials.

  13. OFFICE,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OFFICE, . . . . . ..-..__. _ --.-.__.. .-..I............ !..-... bUmME. wArl&l ' rrsldu*. in the dw6lopmQt pmgrwh : Be ostiamts Uuat not man lf+ .b%'o,Q~~~ds. cik'e%ah of the eevenl reel&~ will be require& In : 'ri~ofthehereiabefor6notedeopreodo~ of puriata~tio.aadap :, Iv ve unbntend you vi11 not obj.& to:tha aoe " ai spoh +ant+lea of the mirloua real&es ,, ', ',"" ': ., .,.. i. : /~. ,".. .I,: /, . . ' .* ,; ., ,' ,:.' . .-;. ,-Y .b4 P-0 : ,.

  14. WASH-

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    rcc.p,anc. 01 thts arf~cle. tha yubl~rhe, "r ~u~~iunl riknouu~adqnS the U.S. C;ov.rnmmnf' s rayhr (0 retam l nOn*aClulive.roy~ltV (r-0 ltconso In ma IO Dny Copvrlqhl WASH- covrrm~ the wtvdo. ISADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE SEAWAY INDUSTRIAL PARK W . D. Cottrell, R. W . Leggett and H. W . Dickson Health Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 December 1976 CONTENTS l&t of Tab1 es - . . . List of Illustrations . . Abstract . . . . . . Introduction . . . .

  15. Summary - Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX)Technology at the SRS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ETR R Un Baseline The Sm being The SC operat which Sr, and waste critical the SC deploy Specif exchan [CST]) CST, a (mono and so (RMF) maturi readin design moving The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S E Report Date: F ited States Sma Why DOE e SCIX System Pr mall Column Io developed at S CIX system is tions (ion excha function to rem d actinides) fro and prepare th l technology ele CIX system tha yment and thes fically the critica nge on a selec ) housed in an actinide and Sr osodium titanat

  16. ORNL/RASA-85/

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    e?Ll ( U o't /u/ / ORNL/RASA-85/ 4I 4 RESULTS 0FRADI0L0GICALMEASUREMENTSTMENNEA OF BUFFALO AVENUE A'ID HYffi PARK BLVD. IN NIAGARA FALLS' NET{ YORK Access to the inlormation in thit rtport ir limitcd to tho!' ino-icateo on tha distribution list and to oepartmsnt of Encrgy tnd Oepartment ol Enoqy Contracton F This report was prepared as an accountof work sponsored by an agency of the UnitedstatesGovernment.NeithertheUnitedstatesGovernmentnoranyagency thereo|, nor any o| the.r employees, makes any

  17. Oligomerization process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1991-03-26

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled. 2 figures.

  18. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-01-05

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  19. Etherification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1990-08-21

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled. 2 figs.

  20. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  1. Methods of cracking a crude product to produce additional crude products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mo, Weijian; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay

    2009-09-08

    A method for producing a crude product is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce one or more crude products. At least one of the crude products has a boiling range distribution from 38.degree. C. and 343.degree. C. as determined by ASTM Method D5307. The crude product having the boiling range distribution from 38.degree. C. and 343.degree. C. is catalytically cracked to produce one or more additional crude products. At least one of the additional crude products is a second gas stream. The second gas stream has a boiling point of at most 38.degree. C. at 0.101 MPa.

  2. Generic Issue 87: Flexible wedge gate valve test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, R. Jr.; DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C. )

    1991-01-01

    Qualification and flow isolation tests were conducted to analyze the ability of selected boiling water reactor process valves to perform their containment isolation functions at high energy pipe break conditions and other more normal flow conditions. Numerous parameters were measured to assess valve and motor-operator performance at various valve loadings and to assess industry practices for predicting valve and motor operator requirements. The valves tested were representative of those used in reactor water cleanup systems in boiling water reactors and those used in boiling water reactor high-pressure coolant injection (HPCI) steam lines. These tests will provide further information for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Generic Issue-87, Failure of the HPCI Steam Line Without Isolation,'' and Generic Letter 89--10, Safety-related Motor Operated Valve Testing and Surveillance.'' 6 refs., 54 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence (Bellaire, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  4. Oligomerization process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

    1991-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  5. Etherification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  6. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  7. Transetherification method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hearn, D.

    1985-04-09

    Transetherification is carried out in a catalytic distillation reactor, wherein the catalytic structure also serves as a distillation structure, by feeding a first ether to the catalyst bed to at least partially dissociate it into a first olefin and a first alcohol while concurrently therewith feeding either a second olefin (preferably a tertiary olefin) having a higher boiling point than said first olefin or a second alcohol having a higher boiling point than said first alcohol to the catalyst whereby either the second olefin and the first alcohol or the first olefin and the second alcohol react to form a second ether which has a higher boiling point than the first ether, which second ether is concurrently removed as a bottoms in the concurrent reaction-distillation to force that reaction to completion, while the unreacted first olefin or first alcohol is removed in the overhead. 1 fig.

  8. Transetherification method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hearn, Dennis

    1985-01-01

    Transetherification is carried out in a catalytic distillation reactor, wherein the catalytic structure also serves as a distillation structure, by feeding a first ether to the catalyst bed to at least partially dissociate it into a first olefin and a first alcohol while concurrently therewith feeding either a second olefin (preferably a tertiary olefin) having a higher boiling point than said first olefin or a second alcohol having a higher boiling point than said first alcohol to the catalyst whereby either the second olefin and the first alcohol or the first olefin and the second alcohol react to form a second ether which has a higher boiling point than the first ether, which second ether is concurrently removed as a bottoms in the concurrent reaction-distillation to force that reaction to completion, while the unreacted first olefin or first alcohol is removed in the overhead.

  9. Characteristic evaluation of cooling technique using liquid nitrogen and metal porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanno, Yusuke; Ito, Satoshi; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-29

    A remountable high-temperature superconducting magnet, whose segments can be mounted and demounted repeatedly, has been proposed for construction and maintenance of superconducting magnet and inner reactor components of a fusion reactor. One of the issues in this design is that the performance of the magnet deteriorates by a local temperature rise due to Joule heating in jointing regions. In order to prevent local temperature rise, a cooling system using a cryogenic coolant and metal porous media was proposed and experimental studies have been carried out using liquid nitrogen. In this study, flow and heat transfer characteristics of cooling system using subcooled liquid nitrogen and bronze particle sintered porous media are evaluated through experiments in which the inlet degree of subcooling and flow rate of the liquid nitrogen. The flow characteristics without heat input were coincided with Erguns equation expressing single-phase flow in porous materials. The obtained boiling curve was categorized into three conditions; convection region, nucleate boiling region and mixed region with nucleate and film boiling. Wall superheat did not increase drastically with porous media after departure from nucleate boiling point, which is different from a situation of usual boiling curve in a smooth tube. The fact is important characteristic to cooling superconducting magnet to avoid its quench. Heat transfer coefficient with bronze particle sintered porous media was at least twice larger than that without the porous media. It was also indicated qualitatively that departure from nucleate boiling point and heat transfer coefficient depends on degree of subcooling and mass flow rate. The quantitative evaluation of them and further discussion for the cooling system will be performed as future tasks.

  10. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Vehicle Fuel? (Fact Sheet), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Performance of SVO Research has shown that there are sev- eral technical barriers to widespread use of SVO as a vehicle fuel. The published engineering literature strongly indicates that the use of SVO leads to reduced engine life, 1 caused by the buildup of carbon deposits inside the engine and the buildup of SVO in the engine lubricant. These issues are attributable to SVO's high viscosity and high boiling point relative to the required boiling range for diesel fuel. The carbon buildup doesn't

  11. 8. Innovative Technologies: Two-Phase Heat Transfer in Water-Based Nanofluids for Nuclear Applications Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hu, Lin-wen

    2009-07-31

    Abstract Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in water. Many studies have reported very significant enhancement (up to 200%) of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) in pool boiling of nanofluids (You et al. 2003, Vassallo et al. 2004, Bang and Chang 2005, Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2007). These observations have generated considerable interest in nanofluids as potential coolants for more compact and efficient thermal management systems. Potential Light Water Reactor applications include the primary coolant, safety systems and severe accident management strategies, as reported in other papers (Buongiorno et al. 2008 and 2009). However, the situation of interest in reactor applications is often flow boiling, for which no nanofluid data have been reported so far. In this project we investigated the potential of nanofluids to enhance CHF in flow boiling. Subcooled flow boiling heat transfer and CHF experiments were performed with low concentrations of alumina, zinc oxide, and diamond nanoparticles in water (? 0.1 % by volume) at atmospheric pressure. It was found that for comparable test conditions the values of the nanofluid and water heat transfer coefficient (HTC) are similar (within ?20%). The HTC increased with mass flux and heat flux for water and nanofluids alike, as expected in flow boiling. The CHF tests were conducted at 0.1 MPa and at three different mass fluxes (1500, 2000, 2500 kg/m2s) under subcooled conditions. The maximum CHF enhancement was 53%, 53% and 38% for alumina, zinc oxide and diamond, respectively, always obtained at the highest mass flux. A post-mortem analysis of the boiling surface reveals that its morphology is altered by deposition of the particles during nanofluids boiling. A confocal-microscopy-based examination of the test section revealed that nanoparticles deposition not only changes the number of micro-cavities on the surface, but also the surface wettability. A simple model was used to estimate the ensuing nucleation site density changes, but no definitive correlation between the nucleation site density and the heat transfer coefficient data could be found. Wettability of the surface was substantially increased for heater coupons boiled in alumina and zinc oxide nanofluids, and such wettability increase seems to correlate reasonably well with the observed marked CHF enhancement for the respective nanofluids. Interpretation of the experimental data was conducted in light of the governing surface parameters (surface area, contact angle, roughness, thermal conductivity) and existing models. It was found that no single parameter could explain the observed HTC or CHF phenomena.

  12. In-pile post-DNB behavior of a nine-rod PWR-type fuel bundle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunnerson, F.S.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an in-pile power-cooling-mismatch (PCM) test designed to investigate the behavior of a nine-rod, PWR-type fuel bundle under intermittent and sustained periods of high temperature film boiling operation are presented. Primary emphasis is placed on the DNB and post-DNB events including rod-to-rod interactions, return to nucleate boiling (RNB), and fuel rod failure. A comparison of the DNB behavior of the individual bundle rods with single-rod data obtained from previous PCM tests is also made.

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Thompson, Jeffrey" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything5 Electronic Full Text4 Citations1 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject absorption (1) assemblies (1) assembly (1) boiling (1) boiling water (1) breaker (1) breaker valve (1) chamber (1)

  14. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  15. CASL-U-2015-0016-000

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6-000 Advanced Calibration and Validation of a Mechanistic Model of Subcooled Boiling Two-Phase Flow Anh Bui, Idaho National Laboratory Brian Williams, Los Alamos National Laboratory Nam Dinh, North Carolina State University April 6, 2014 CASL-U-2015-0016-000 Proceedings of ICAPP 2014 Charlotte, USA, April 6-9, 2014 Paper 14257 Advanced Calibration and Validation of a Mechanistic Model of Subcooled Boiling Two-Phase Flow Anh Bui 1 , Brian Williams 2 , Nam Dinh 3,* 1 Idaho National Laboratory

  16. CNS 2008 Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensitivity Study Of Eulerian Multiphase Boiling Models: NPHASE-CMFD University of Michigan I. Asher, K. Fidkowski, T. Drzewiecki, T. Grunloh, V. Petrov, A. Manera, T Downar May 12-17, 2013: CASL-U-2013-0095-000 The 15 th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal - Hydraulics, NURETH-15 NURETH15-215 Pisa, Italy, May 12-17, 2013 SENSITIVITY STUDY OF EULERIAN MULTIPHASE BOILING MODELS: NPHASE-CMFD I. Asher 1 , K. Fidkowski 1 , T. Drzewiecki 2 , T. Grunloh 2 , V. Petrov 2 , A. Manera

  17. Upgrading heavy oils by non-catalytic treatment with hydrogen and hydrogen transfer solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbyshire, F.J.; Mitchell, T.O.; Whitehurst, D.D.

    1981-09-29

    Heavy liquid hydrocarbon oil, such as petroleum derived tars, predominantly boiling over 425/sup 0/C, are upgraded to products boiling below 425/sup 0/C, without substantial formation of insoluble char, by heating the heavy oil with hydrogen and a hydrogen transfer solvent in the absence of hydrogenation catalyst at temperatures of about 320/sup 0/C to 500/sup 0/C, and a pressure of 20 to 180 bar for 3 to 30 minutes. The hydrogen transfer solvents polycyclic compounds free of carbonyl groups, e.g., pyrene, and have a polarographic reduction potential which is less negative than phenanthrene and equal to or more negative than azapyrene.

  18. Process for upgrading heavy hydrocarbonaceous oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, I.P.; Souhrada, F.; Woods, H.J.

    1981-10-13

    An integrated upgrading process is disclosed which can be used to lower the specific gravity, viscosity and boiling range of heavy, viscous hydrocarbonaceous oil . The process consists of fractionally distilling the oil, treating its residuum with a hydrogen donor material under hydrocracking conditions, fractionally distilling the effluent from the hydrocracking zone and rehydrogenating that portion boiling from about 180/sup 0/ C to 350/sup 0/ C for recycling to the hydrocracking zone. The liquid portion of the oil not recycled can be recombined into a reconstituted crude suitable for transporting by normal crude pipelines.

  19. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural Gas Plant Net Stocks Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Butylene (C4H8) An olefinic hydrocarbon recovered from refinery processes. Ethane (C2H6) A normally gaseous straight-chain hydrocarbon. It is a colorless paraffinic gas that boils at a temperature of -127.48º F. It is extracted from natural gas and refinery gas streams. Isobutane (C4H10) A normally gaseous branch-chain hydrocarbon. It is a colorless paraffinic gas that boils at a

  20. Process and catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid hydrocarbon mixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rao, V. Udaya S.; Gormley, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Synthesis gas containing CO and H.sub.2 is converted to a high-octane hydrocarbon liquid in the gasoline boiling point range by bringing the gas into contact with a heterogeneous catalyst including, in physical mixture, a zeolite molecular sieve, cobalt at 6-20% by weight, and thoria at 0.5-3.9% by weight. The contacting occurs at a temperature of 250.degree.-300.degree. C., and a pressure of 10-30 atmospheres. The conditions can be selected to form a major portion of the hydrocarbon product in the gasoline boiling range with a research octane of more than 80 and less than 10% by weight aromatics.

  1. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Sulfide Nanoparticles Prepared in Dimethylsulfoxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yuebin; Ma, Lun; Zhang, Xing; Joly, Alan G.; Liu, Zuli; Chen, Wei

    2008-11-01

    Many methods have been reported for the formation of sulfide nanoparticles by the reaction of metallic salts with sulfide chemical sources in aqueous solutions or organic solvents. Here, we report the formation of sulfide nanoparticles in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) by boiling metallic salts without sulfide sources. The sulfide sources are generated from the boiling of DMSO and react with metallic salts to form sulfide nanoparticles. In this method DMSO functions as a solvent and a sulfide source as well as a stabilizer for the formation of the nanoparticles. The recipe is simple and economical making sulfide nanoparticles formed in this way readily available for many potential applications.

  2. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nibur, Kevin A.

    2010-11-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  3. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros; Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A.

    2010-07-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  4. What's Cooking

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students in small groups conduct an investigation into the similarities and differences between solar tea and tea brewed by boiling water. Students will compare their two samples on four criteria—color, clarity, smell and taste—rate which they prefer, and graph the results of the experiment as a class.

  5. BWR containment failure analysis during degraded-core accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, D.D.

    1982-06-06

    This paper presents a containment failure mode analysis during a spectrum of postulated degraded core accident sequences in a typical 1000-MW(e) boiling water reactor (BWR) with a Mark-I wetwell containment. Overtemperature failure of containment electric penetration assemblies (CEPAs) has been found to be the major failure mode during such accidents.

  6. Method for hydrocracking a heavy polynuclear hydrocarbonaceous feedstock in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorin, Everett (San Rafael, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A method for hydrocracking a heavy polynuclear hydrocarbonaceous feedstock to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the feedstock with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, the method comprising: mixing the feedstock with a heavy naphtha fraction which has an initial boiling point from about 100.degree. to about 160.degree. C. with a boiling point difference between the initial boiling point and the final boiling point of no more than about 50.degree. C. to produce a mixture; thereafter contacting the mixture with partially spent molten metal halide and hydrogen under temperature and pressure conditions so that the temperature is near the critical temperature of the heavy naphtha fraction; separating at least a portion of the heavy naphtha fraction and lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the partially spent molten metal halide, unreacted feedstock and reaction products; thereafter contacting the partially spent molten metal halide, unreacted feedstock and reaction products with hydrogen and fresh molten metal halide in a hydrocracking zone to produce additional lighter hydrocarbon fuels and separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide.

  7. Liquid level, void fraction, and superheated steam sensor for nuclear-reactor cores. [PWR; BWR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1981-10-27

    This disclosure relates to an apparatus for monitoring the presence of coolant in liquid or mixed liquid and vapor, and superheated gaseous phases at one or more locations within an operating nuclear reactor core, such as pressurized water reactor or a boiling water reactor.

  8. United States Department of Energy`s reactor core protection evaluation methodology for fires at RBMK and VVER nuclear power plants. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    This document provides operators of Soviet-designed RBMK (graphite moderated light water boiling water reactor) and VVER (pressurized light water reactor) nuclear power plants with a systematic Methodology to qualitatively evaluate plant response to fires and to identify remedies to protect the reactor core from fire-initiated damage.

  9. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bamberger, C.E.

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  10. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1980-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  11. Conditioning of BWR Control - Elements Using the New MOSAIK 80T/SWR-SE Cask - Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldiges, O.; Blenski, H.-J.; Engelage, H.; Behrens, W.; Majunke, J.; Schwarz, W.; Hallfarth, Dr.

    2002-02-27

    During the operation of Boiling Water Reactors, Control - Elements are used to control the neutron flux inside the reactor vessel. After the end of the lifetime, the Control - Elements are usually stored in the fuel - elements - pool of the reactor. Up to now, in Germany no conditioning of Control - Elements has been done in a BWR under operation.

  12. NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

    1963-05-14

    A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

  13. Loss of spent fuel pool cooling PRA: Model and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siu, N.; Khericha, S.; Conroy, S.; Beck, S.; Blackman, H.

    1996-09-01

    This letter report documents models for quantifying the likelihood of loss of spent fuel pool cooling; models for identifying post-boiling scenarios that lead to core damage; qualitative and quantitative results generated for a selected plant that account for plant design and operational practices; a comparison of these results and those generated from earlier studies; and a review of available data on spent fuel pool accidents. The results of this study show that for a representative two-unit boiling water reactor, the annual probability of spent fuel pool boiling is 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and the annual probability of flooding associated with loss of spent fuel pool cooling scenarios is 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}. Qualitative arguments are provided to show that the likelihood of core damage due to spent fuel pool boiling accidents is low for most US commercial nuclear power plants. It is also shown that, depending on the design characteristics of a given plant, the likelihood of either: (a) core damage due to spent fuel pool-associated flooding, or (b) spent fuel damage due to pool dryout, may not be negligible.

  14. Enhanced shell-and-tube heat eschangers for the power and process industries. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergles, A.E.; Jensen, M.K.; Somerscales, E.F.; Curcio, L.A. Jr.; Trewin, R.R.

    1994-08-01

    Single-tube pool boiling tests were performed with saturated pure refrigerants and binary mixtures of refrigerants. Generally, with pure refrigerants, the High Flux surface performed better at the higher heat fluxes compared to the Turbo-B tube, and both enhanced surfaces performed significantly better than smooth surface. In tests of R-11/R-113 mixtures, the enhanced surfaces had much less degradation in heat transfer coefficient due to mixture effects compared to smooth tubes; the largest degradation occurred at a mixture of 25% R-11/75% R-113. Under boiling in saturated aqueous solution of calcium sulfate, with a single tube, effects of fouling were more pronounced at the higher heat fluxes for all surfaces. Two staggered tube bundles were tested with tube pitch-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.50. For the pure refrigerant, tests on the smooth-tube bundle indicated that the effects on the heat transfer coefficient of varying mass flux, quality, and tube-bundle geometry were small, except at low heat fluxes. Neither enhanced surface showed any effect with changing mass flux or quality. The binary mixture bundle-boiling tests had results that were very similar to those obtained with the pure refrigerants. When boiling a refrigerant-oil mixture, all three surfaces (smooth, High Flux, and Turbo-B) experienced a degradation in its heat transfer coefficient; no surface studied was found to be immune or vulnerable to the presence of oil than another surface.

  15. Heat reclaiming method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jardine, Douglas M. (Colorado Springs, CO)

    1984-01-01

    Method and apparatus to extract heat by transferring heat from hot compressed refrigerant to a coolant, such as water, without exceeding preselected temperatures in the coolant and avoiding boiling in a water system by removing the coolant from direct or indirect contact with the hot refrigerant.

  16. RECOVERY OF ACTINIDES FROM AQUEOUS NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ader, M.

    1963-11-19

    A process of recovering actinides is presented. Tetravalent actinides are extracted from rare earths in an aqueous nitric acid solution with a ketone and back-extracted from the ketone into an aqueous medium. The aqueous actinide solution thus obtained, prior to concentration by boiling, is sparged with steam to reduce its ketone to a maximum content of 3 grams per liter. (AEC)

  17. Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1968 through 2002 1968 through June 30, 2013 Increase Boiling-water reactor 89,843 136,821 46,978 Pressurized-water reactor 69,352 104,647 35,295 Total 159,195 241,468 82,273 ...

  18. Method of controlling crystallite size in nuclear-reactor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lloyd, Milton H.; Collins, Jack L.; Shell, Sam E.

    1985-01-01

    Improved spherules for making enhanced forms of nuclear-reactor fuels are prepared by internal gelation procedures within a sol-gel operation and are accomplished by first boiling the concentrated HMTA-urea feed solution before engaging in the spherule-forming operation thereby effectively controlling crystallite size in the product spherules.

  19. Method of controlling crystallite size in nuclear-reactor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lloyd, M.H.; Collins, J.L.; Shell, S.E.

    Improved spherules for making enhanced forms of nuclear-reactor fuels are prepared by internal gelation procedures within a sol-gel operation and are accomplished by first boiling the concentrated HMTA-urea feed solution before engaging in the spherule-forming operation thereby effectively controlling crystallite size in the product spherules.

  20. Apparatus for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons employing a diluent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calderon, J. L.; Layrisse, I.

    1985-06-04

    Apparatus for upgrading heavy hydrocarbonaceous materials for making coke suitable for metallurgical purposes comprises mixing the heavy hydrocarbonaceous materials with a diluent having a closely controlled boiling range so as to facilitate transport, dehydration and desalting of the crude oil. In addition, the diluent aids in controlling temperature and residence time of the crude thereby avoiding premature decomposition.

  1. Combined process for heavy oil, upgrading and synthetic fuel production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polomski, R.E.

    1984-06-05

    A process for upgrading heavy oil to fuel products comprises deasphalting the heavy oil with an oxygenated solvent and simultaneously converting the oxygenated solvent and deasphalted oil over a ZSM-5 type catalyst to produce gasoline and distillate boiling range hydrocarbons.

  2. Process for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons employing a diluent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calderon, J.L.; Layrisse, I.

    1984-06-19

    A process for upgrading heavy hydrocarbonaceous materials for making coke suitable for metallurgical purposes comprises mixing the heavy hydrocarbonaceous materials with a diluent having a closely controlled boiling range so as to facilitate transport, dehydration and desalting of the crude oil. In addition, the diluent aids in controlling temperature and residence time of the crude thereby avoiding premature decomposition.

  3. Fuel and fuel blending components from biomass derived pyrolysis oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCall, Michael J.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2012-12-11

    A process for the conversion of biomass derived pyrolysis oil to liquid fuel components is presented. The process includes the production of diesel, aviation, and naphtha boiling point range fuels or fuel blending components by two-stage deoxygenation of the pyrolysis oil and separation of the products.

  4. Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte battery. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1972-06-26

    It is an object of the invention to provide a primary cell or battery using ammonium fluoride--anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte having improved current and power production capabilities at low temperatures. It is operable at temperatures substantially above the boiling point of hydrogen fluoride. (GRA)

  5. Superconducting cable cooling system by helium gas and a mixture of gas and liquid helium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dean, John W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermally contacting, oppositely streaming cryogenic fluid streams in the same enclosure in a closed cycle that changes from a cool high pressure helium gas to a cooler reduced pressure helium fluid comprised of a mixture of gas and boiling liquid so as to be near the same temperature but at different pressures respectively in go and return legs that are in thermal contact with each other and in thermal contact with a longitudinally extending superconducting transmission line enclosed in the same cable enclosure that insulates the line from the ambient at a temperature T.sub.1. By first circulating the fluid in a go leg from a refrigerator at one end of the line as a high pressure helium gas near the normal boiling temperature of helium; then circulating the gas through an expander at the other end of the line where the gas becomes a mixture of reduced pressure gas and boiling liquid at its boiling temperature; then by circulating the mixture in a return leg that is separated from but in thermal contact with the gas in the go leg and in the same enclosure therewith; and finally returning the resulting low pressure gas to the refrigerator for compression into a high pressure gas at T.sub.2 is a closed cycle, where T.sub.1 >T.sub.2, the temperature distribution is such that the line temperature is nearly constant along its length from the refrigerator to the expander due to the boiling of the liquid in the mixture. A heat exchanger between the go and return lines removes the gas from the liquid in the return leg while cooling the go leg.

  6. Carbon-13 variations in fluids from the Cerro Prieto geothermal system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janik, C.J.; Nehring, N.L.; Huebner, M.A.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1982-08-10

    The carbon isotope compositions of CO/sub 2/ in steam from Cerro Prieto production well have been measured for 1977, 1979, and 1982. Variations in the delta/sup 13/C values are caused by production-related changes in the chemical and physical parameters of the geothermal system. In 1977, most CO/sub 2/ in the reservoir was isotopically light (delta/sup 13/C = -6.4 +/- 0.4). Heavier CO/sub 2/ was produced from wells in the center of the field (M5,M26,M27) due to deposition of isotopically light calcite caused by near-well boiling. In 1979 nearly all well showed relatively heavy CO/sub 2/, probably due to expansion of aquifer boiling and calcite precipitation. In 1982, many wells in the central part of the field were shut in. The amount of drawndown decreased and as temperatures and pressures near the wells increased, the boiling zones collapsed. The CO/sub 2/ in the fluid then exchanged with the precipitated calcite and became isotopically lighter. The sensitivity of carbon isotopes to calcite precipitations caused by aquifer boiling and to reequilibration with this deposited calcite upon decrease of boiling suggests use as an indicator of these aquifer processes. Surficial CO/sub 2/ of thermal origin was collected in 1981. Generally, the carbon-13 contents were close to CO/sub 2/ from production wells except for high-temperature mud pots and fumaroles containing isotopically light CO/sub 2/ derived from near surface alteration of organic matter.

  7. Sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver on-sun test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andraka, C E; Moreno, J B; Diver, R B; Moss, T A

    1992-06-01

    The efficient operation of a Stirling engine requires the application of a high heat flux to the relatively small area occupied by the heater head tubes. Previous attempts to couple solar energy to Stirling engines generally involved directly illuminating the heater head tubes with concentrated sunlight. In this study, operation of a 75-kW{sub t} sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver has been demonstrated and its performance characterized on Sandia's nominal 75-kW{sub t} parabolic-dish concentrator, using a cold-water gas-gap calorimeter to simulate Stirling engine operation. The pool boiler (and more generally liquid-metal reflux receivers) supplies heat to the engine in the form of latent heat released from condensation of the metal vapor on the heater head tubes. The advantages of the pool boiler include uniform tube temperature, leading to longer life and higher temperature available to the engine, and decoupling of the design of the solar absorber from the engine heater head. The two-phase system allows high input thermal flux, reducing the receiver size and losses, therefore improving system efficiency. The receiver thermal efficiency was about 90% when operated at full power and 800{degree}C. Stable sodium boiling was promoted by the addition of 35 equally spaced artificial cavities in the wetted absorber surface. High incipient boiling superheats following cloud transients were suppressed passively by the addition of small amounts of xenon gas to the receiver volume. Stable boiling without excessive incipient boiling superheats was observed under all operating conditions. The receiver developed a leak during performance evaluation, terminating the testing after accumulating about 50 hours on sun. The receiver design is reported here along with test results including transient operations, steady-state performance evaluation, operation at various temperatures, infrared thermography, x-ray studies of the boiling behavior, and a postmortem analysis.

  8. Method of detecting genetic deletions identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2013-11-26

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acids probes are typically of a complexity greater tha 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particlularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar ut genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  9. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The body of this report provides summaries of the aims, scope and progress of the research by groups of investigators in the Division during the period of October 1, 1984, through September 30, 1985. At the end of each summary is a list of publications covering the same period. For convenience, the summaries are assembled under Sections in accordance with the current organizational structure of the Biology Division; each Section begins with an overview. It will be apparent, however, tha crosscurrents run throughout the Division and that the various programs support and interact with each other. In addition, this report includes information on the Division's educational activities, Advisory Committee, seminar program, and international interactions, as well as extramural activities of staff members, abstracts for technical meetings, and funding and personnel levels.

  10. Cryogenic Current Lead Analysis Model Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-01-01

    CCLAMP was developed to provide a tool for tha analysis of superconducting or normal current leads used to supply electricity from a warm interface (usually room temperature) to a device at cryogenic temperatures. It determines the heat leak to the cryogenic connection and the mass flow of the cryogen (typically helium) for the lead and installation modelled. It may be used to thermally optimize a lead design for a particular application. The user provides relevantmore » geometry details to model the electrical (length, diameter, superconducting length) and heat exchanger design of the lead (heat transfer coefficient, heat transfer area). It has a transient analysis capability so that lead transients such as cool down, current ramping, flow disruptions, and control simulations can be performed.« less

  11. To study of different level of nitrogen manure and density on yield and yield component of variety of K.S.C 704 in dry region of sistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahmardeh, M.; Forghani, F.; Khammari, E.

    2008-01-30

    Out of three grain of the world, Corn is one of the best, About 7 to 10 thousand years ago in south of Mexico corn become domesticated. In the year 1995 culfivation of corn in the world was 130 mil/ha, and to Total production of the world of corn is 507 M/Tons. Average yield of corn in the year 1995 Among Producer countries was 7.78 To 7.60 t/ha in fance and united state was state was 2.36 To 2.20 t/ha, but in Brazil and Mexico Production of corn was different. With this regards, special manner has been arranged for the suitable cultivation or suitable density plants in one heactar on cultivation variety of K.S.C 704 corn. Also suitable level of Nitrogen manure, this Protect in climatic condition of Sistan region done, sith complete block design with 3 replication. Experiment has been selected as split plot, the main plot with 4 different concentration level such as (200-250-3500 and 350 Kg/ha) and sub plot density with 3 different level such as 111000,83000 and 66000 plan/ha respectively. From stage growth up to harvesting of corn in this reache having Data for each treat. ment, After harvesting Analysis of variance and companion of Average of each treatment has been done by DunKan method. Results has been shown, Measurment of characteristics (yield component) seed yield effected different density level of manure, with increasing of manure weight of one thousand seed yield and also in high density showed high significant differente amoung each other. These are with suitable climatic condition of sistan region if enough water will be available ed using Amount of 350 ks/ha Nitrogen manure and with density 111000 plants/ha we can product suitable seed yield Biological yield.

  12. The effect of fuel thermal conductivity on the behavior of LWR cores during loss-of-coolant accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Wang, Dean; Ott, Larry J.; Montgomery, Robert O.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of variation in thermal conductivity of light water reactor fuel elements on core response during loss-of-coolant accident scenarios is examined. Initially, a simplified numerical analysis is utilized to determine the time scales associated with dissipation of stored energy from the fuel into the coolant once the fission reaction is stopped. The analysis is then followed by full reactor system thermal-hydraulics analysis of a typical boiling and pressurized water reactor subjected to a large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario using the TRACE code. Accordingly, sensitivity analyses to examine the effect of an increase in fuel thermal conductivity, up to 500%, on fuel temperature evolution during these transients are performed. Given the major differences in thermal-hydraulics design aspects of boiling and pressurized water reactors, different fuel and temperature responses during the simulated loss-of-coolant transients are observed.

  13. Methods of producing transportation fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nair, Vijay; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Cherrillo, Ralph Anthony; Bauldreay, Joanna M.

    2011-12-27

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing transportation fuel is described herein. The method for producing transportation fuel may include providing formation fluid having a boiling range distribution between -5.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process to a subsurface treatment facility. A liquid stream may be separated from the formation fluid. The separated liquid stream may be hydrotreated and then distilled to produce a distilled stream having a boiling range distribution between 150.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. The distilled liquid stream may be combined with one or more additives to produce transportation fuel.

  14. RAMONA-3B calculations for Browns Ferry ATWS (Anticipated Transient Without Scram) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, P; Slovik, G C; Neymotin, L Y

    1987-02-01

    Several aspects of the Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) initiated by an inadvertent closure of all Main Steam Isolation Valves (MSIV) in a typical BWR/4 are analyzed in the report. The analysis is performed using the Brookhaven National Laboratory code, RAMONA-3B, which employs a three-dimensional neutron kinetics model coupled with a parallel-channel thermal hydraulics in representing a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Core. Four different transient scenarios have been investigated: (a) downcomer water level and reactor pressure control, (b) manual control rod insertion transient, (c) high pressure boil-off, and (d) recirculation pump trip failure. Results of these calculations should provide better understanding of mitigative effects of operator actions during ATWS, thus helping in the development of adequate Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPG) required for the BWR plant safety. A few unresolved questions subject to future investigations are also discussed.

  15. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the BORAX-V facility turbine building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arave, A.E.; Rodman, G.R.

    1992-12-01

    The Boiling Water Reactor Experiment (BORAX)-V Facility Turbine Building Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project is described in this report. The BORAX series of five National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS) reactors pioneered intensive work on boiling water reactor (BWR) experiments conducted between 1953 and 1964. Facility characterization, decision analyses, and D&D plans for the turbine building were prepared from 1979 through 1990. D&D activities of the turbine building systems were initiated in November of 1988 and completed with the demolition and backfill of the concrete foundation in March 1992. Due to the low levels of radioactivity and the absence of loose contamination, the D&D activities were completed with no radiation exposure to the workers. The D&D activities were performed in a manner that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) remain.

  16. Synthetic crude oils carcinogenicity screening tests. Progress report, September 15, 1979-March 15, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calkins, W.H.; Deye, J.F.; King, C.F.; Hartgrove, R.W.; Krahn, D.F.

    1980-01-01

    Four crude oils (H Coal-Fuel Oil Mode, Occidental in situ Shale Oil, Exxon Donor Solvent Liquid, and SRC II) which were distilled into four fractions (naphtha, mid-distillate, gas oil and residue) for analysis and biological screening testing during the last report period were tested for mutagenicity by the Ames test and for tumor initiating activity by an initiation/promotion (skin painting) test. Substantial agreement exists between Ames and skin painting results. Low boiling naphtha fractions of the 4 crude oils showed little or no mutagenicity or tumor initiating activity by the two tests used. The higher boiling fractions (gas oils and residues) and the crude oils themselves were mutagenic and exhibited tumor initiation activity. The coal derived fractions were more active by both tests than the shale oil fractions.

  17. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the BORAX-V facility turbine building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arave, A.E.; Rodman, G.R.

    1992-12-01

    The Boiling Water Reactor Experiment (BORAX)-V Facility Turbine Building Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Project is described in this report. The BORAX series of five National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS) reactors pioneered intensive work on boiling water reactor (BWR) experiments conducted between 1953 and 1964. Facility characterization, decision analyses, and D D plans for the turbine building were prepared from 1979 through 1990. D D activities of the turbine building systems were initiated in November of 1988 and completed with the demolition and backfill of the concrete foundation in March 1992. Due to the low levels of radioactivity and the absence of loose contamination, the D D activities were completed with no radiation exposure to the workers. The D D activities were performed in a manner that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) remain.

  18. Study on release and transport of aerial radioactive materials in reprocessing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amano, Y.; Tashiro, S.; Uchiyama, G.; Abe, H.; Yamane, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Kodama, T.

    2013-07-01

    The release and transport characteristics of radioactive materials at a boiling accident of the high active liquid waste (HALW) in a reprocessing plant have been studied for improving experimental data of source terms of the boiling accident. In the study, a heating test and a thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) test were conducted. In the heating test using a simulated HALW, it was found that ruthenium was mainly released into the air in the form of gas and that non-volatile elements were released into the air in the form of mist. In the TG-DTA test, the rate constants and reaction heat of thermal decomposition of ruthenium nitrosyl nitrate were obtained from TG and DTA curves. (authors)

  19. ATOMIC POWER PLANT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniels, F.

    1957-11-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactor power plants and discloses a design of a reactor utilizing a mixture of discrete units of a fissionable material, such as uranium carbide, a neutron moderator material, such as graphite, to carry out the chain reaction. A liquid metal, such as bismuth, is used as the coolant and is placed in the reactor chamber with the fissionable and moderator material so that it is boiled by the heat of the reaction, the boiling liquid and vapors passing up through the interstices between the discrete units. The vapor and flue gases coming off the top of the chamber are passed through heat exchangers, to produce steam, for example, and thence through condensers, the condensed coolant being returned to the chamber by gravity and the non- condensible gases being carried off through a stack at the top of the structure.

  20. Viscosity stabilization of SRC residual oil. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, K.C.

    1984-05-01

    The use of SRC residual oils for No. 6 Fuel Oil substitutes has been proposed. The oils exhibit viscosity characteristics at elevated temperatures that allow this substitution with only minor modifications to the existing fuel oil infrastructure. However, loss of low-boiling materials causes an increase in the viscosity of the residual oils that is greater than expected from concentration changes. A process has been developed that minimizes the loss of volatiles and thus maintains the viscosity of these materials. The use of an additive (water, phenol, or an SRC light oil cut rich in low-boiling phenols in amounts up to 2.0 wt %) accomplishes this and hence stabilizes the pumping and atomizing characteristics for an extended period. During the course of the work, the components of the volatiles lost were identified and the viscosity change due to this loss was quantified. 3 references, 6 figures, 9 tables.

  1. Fission gas induced fuel swelling in low and medium burnup fuel during high temperature transients. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of light water reactor fuel elements under postulated accident conditions is being studied by the EG and G Idaho, Inc., Thermal Fuels Behavior Program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. As a part of this program, unirradiated and previously irradiated, pressurized-water-reactor type fuel rods were tested under power-cooling-mismatch (PCM) conditions in the Power Burst Facility (PBF). During these integral in-reactor experiments, film boiling was produced on the fuel rods which created high fuel and cladding temperatures. Fuel rod diameters increased in the film boiling region to a greater extent for irradiated rods than for unirradiated rods. The purpose of the study was to investigate and assess the fuel swelling which caused the fuel rod diameter increases and to evaluate the ability of an analytical code, the Gas Release and Swelling Subroutine - Steady-State and Transient (GRASS-SST), to predict the results.

  2. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Dali; Devlin, David; Barbero, Robert S.; Carrera, Martin E.; Colling, Craig W.

    2011-11-29

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  3. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang; Dali; Devlin, David; Barbero, Robert S.; Carrera, Martin E.; Colling, Craig W.

    2010-08-10

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  4. Upgrading of heavy hydrocarbonaceous feeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, A.K.; Storm, D.A.; DeRosa, T.F.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is based on our work in the area of upgrading of heavy hydrocarbonaceous feedstocks. The work involves the development of a method of catalytically hydroconverting a hydrocarbon feed stream containing a substantial quantity of components boiling above about 538{degrees}C to a substantial portion thereof to components boiling below 538{degrees}C. More particularly, an oil-miscible or oil-soluble poly(ether)diol or a derivative thereof and an aromatic additive oil, such as Heavy Cycle Gas oil, are added to a heavy hydrocarbon feed and the mixed stream is contacted at elevated temperatures with a solid catalyst such as a sulfided nickel molybdenum oxide on alumina in the presence of hydrogen under pressure. This method advantageously affords higher conversion to more valuable liquid products containing lower amounts of heteroatoms such as sulfur, substantially eliminates plugging of the hydroconversion reactor, and reduces the amount of insolubles in the total liquid product.

  5. Process for catalytic cracking of heavy hydrocarbon feed to lighter products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbst, J.A.; Owen, H.; Schipper, P.H.

    1990-05-29

    This patent describes a process for catalytic cracking of a feed of hydrocarbons boiling in the gas oil and heavier boiling range to lighter products by contacting the feed at catalytic cracking conditions and catalytically cracking the feed to lighter products with a cracking catalyst. It comprises: a mixture of separate particles of: a bulk conversion cracking catalyst containing at least one component with an equivalent pore size of at least about 7 angstroms in a matrix, the bulk conversion cracking catalyst having fluidization properties which permit use in a fluidized or moving bed catalytic cracking reactor; a light paraffin upgrading catalyst comprising at least one zeolite having a constraint index of 1--12 and paraffin cracking/isomerization activity; and, a light paraffin upgrading catalyst comprising at least one zeolite having a constraint index of 1--12 and paraffin aromatization activity; and wherein the upgrading catalysts have substantially the same fluidization properties as the bulk conversion cracking catalyst.

  6. Generation of energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalina, Alexander I.

    1984-01-01

    A method of generating energy which comprises utilizing relatively lower temperature available heat to effect partial distillation of at least portion of a multicomponent working fluid stream at an intermediate pressure to generate working fluid fractions of differing compositions. The fractions are used to produce at least one main rich solution which is relatively enriched with respect to the lower boiling component, and to produce at least one lean solution which is relatively improverished with respect to the lower boiling component. The pressure of the main rich solution is increased whereafter it is evaporated to produce a charged gaseous main working fluid. The main working fluid is expanded to a low pressure level to release energy. The spent low pressure level working fluid is condensed in a main absorption stage by dissolving with cooling in the lean solution to regenerate an initial working fluid for reuse.

  7. Catalytic two-stage coal liquefaction process having improved nitrogen removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comolli, Alfred G.

    1991-01-01

    A process for catalytic multi-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal to produce high yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquids containing low concentrations of nitogen compounds. First stage catalytic reaction conditions are 700.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1500-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure, with the space velocity maintained in a critical range of 10-40 lb coal/hr ft.sup.3 catalyst settled volume. The first stage catalyst has 0.3-1.2 cc/gm total pore volume with at least 25% of the pore volume in pores having diameters of 200-2000 Angstroms. Second stage reaction conditions are 760.degree.-870.degree. F. temperature with space velocity exceeding that in the first stage reactor, so as to achieve increased hydrogenation yield of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products having at least 75% removal of nitrogen compounds from the coal-derived liquid products.

  8. BWR ATWS simulations for Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallman, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Under auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, simulations of anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) in a boiling water reactor are being performed. A methodology has been developed to study the ATWS, and deterministic analyses have been conducted. Results are presented for one of the most probable (albeit hypothetical) sequences leading to core and containment damage. Areas presenting calculational uncertainties are identified, and requirements for their resolution are proposed.

  9. Improved LWR Cladding Performance by EPD Surface Modification Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2012-11-26

    This project will utilize the electro-phoretic deposition technique (EPD) in conjunction with nanofluids to deposit oxide coatings on prototypic zirconium alloy cladding surfaces. After demonstrating that this surface modification is reproducible and robust, the team will subject the modified surface to boiling and corrosion tests to characterize the improved nucleate boiling behavior and superior corrosion performance. The scope of work consists of the following three tasks: The first task will employ the EPD surface modification technique to coat the surface of a prototypic set of zirconium alloy cladding tube materials (e.g. Zircaloy and advanced alloys such as M5) with a micron-thick layer of zirconium oxide nanoparticles. The team will characterize the modified surface for uniformity using optical microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy, and for robustness using standard hardness measurements. After zirconium alloy cladding samples have been prepared and characterized using the EPD technique, the team will begin a set of boiling experiments to measure the heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF) limit for each prepared sample and its control sample. This work will provide a relative comparison of the heat transfer performance for each alloy and the surface modification technique employed. As the boiling heat transfer experiments begin, the team will also begin corrosion tests for these zirconium alloy samples using a water corrosion test loop that can mimic light water reactor (LWR) operational environments. They will perform extended corrosion tests on the surface-modified zirconium alloy samples and control samples to examine the robustness of the modified surface, as well as the effect on surface oxidation

  10. Heavy oil catalytic cracking apparatus (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Heavy oil catalytic cracking apparatus Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Heavy oil catalytic cracking apparatus This patent describes an apparatus for the fluidized catalytic cracking of a heavy hydrocarbon feed comprising hydrocarbons having a boiling point above about 650{degrees} F to lighter products by contact the feed with catalytic cracking catalyst. It comprises a catalytic cracking reactor means; a separation means connective with the reactor outlet; a primary stripping means

  11. Heavy oil catalytic cracking process and apparatus (Patent) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Heavy oil catalytic cracking process and apparatus Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Heavy oil catalytic cracking process and apparatus This paper describes a fluidized catalytic cracking process for catalytic cracking of a feed comprising hydrocarbons having a boiling point about 750 F. It comprises: a catalytically cracking the feed in a catalytic cracking zone riser reactor having a height in excess of 30 meters at catalytic cracking conditions by contacting the feed with

  12. Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page 1 .........CIPS Simulation Capability Implemented in VERA 1 .........Watts Bar Operating Cycles Simulated to Present 1 .........VERA Training Workshop Held 2 .........Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) Multi-Physics Approach & Applications using VERA 5 .........ITM/DNS Simulations for Closure Development 7 .........EPRI Test Stand Concluded 8 .........Verification and Validation Supporting VERA 12 .........Illustration of VERA Capability to Model a Typical SMR 14 .........VERA

  13. Integrated coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Effron, Edward

    1978-01-01

    In a process for the liquefaction of coal in which coal liquids containing phenols and other oxygenated compounds are produced during the liquefaction step and later hydrogenated, oxygenated compounds are removed from at least part of the coal liquids in the naphtha and gas oil boiling range prior to the hydrogenation step and employed as a feed stream for the manufacture of a synthesis gas or for other purposes.

  14. Inverted fractionation apparatus and use in a heavy oil catalytic cracking

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    process (Patent) | SciTech Connect Inverted fractionation apparatus and use in a heavy oil catalytic cracking process Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Inverted fractionation apparatus and use in a heavy oil catalytic cracking process This patent describes a process for fractionating a superheated, cracked vapor stream having a temperature above about 750{degrees} F. and comprising a full boiling range cracked product stream including normally gaseous hydrocarbons, at least normally

  15. Investigation and Optimization of Biodiesel Chemistry for HCCI Combustion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Investigation and Optimization of Biodiesel Chemistry for HCCI Combustion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Investigation and Optimization of Biodiesel Chemistry for HCCI Combustion Over the past 5 years, ORNL has run 95 diesel range fuels in homogene-ous charge compression ignition (HCCI), including 40 bio-diesels and associated diesel fuels in their blending. The bio-diesel blends varied in oxygen content, iodine number, cetane, boiling

  16. Investigation and Optimization of Biodiesel Chemistry for HCCI Combustion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Investigation and Optimization of Biodiesel Chemistry for HCCI Combustion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Investigation and Optimization of Biodiesel Chemistry for HCCI Combustion Over the past 5 years, ORNL has run 95 diesel range fuels in homogene-ous charge compression ignition (HCCI), including 40 bio-diesels and associated diesel fuels in their blending. The bio-diesel blends varied in oxygen content, iodine number, cetane, boiling

  17. Rare earth element content of thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-09-23

    Rare earth element measurements for thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California. Samples were collected in acid washed HDPE bottles and acidified with concentrated trace element clean (Fisher Scientific) nitric acid. Samples were pre-concentratated by a factor of approximately 10 using chelating resin with and IDA functional group and measured on magnetic sector ICP-MS. Samples include Seyferth Hot Springs, Surprise Valley Resort Mineral Well, Leonard's Hot Spring, and Lake City Mud Volcano Boiling Spring.

  18. Hydrocarbonaceous material processing methods and apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brecher, Lee E.

    2011-07-12

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for possibly producing pipeline-ready heavy oil from substantially non-pumpable oil feeds. The methods and apparatus may be designed to produce such pipeline-ready heavy oils in the production field. Such methods and apparatus may involve thermal soaking of liquid hydrocarbonaceous inputs in thermal environments (2) to generate, though chemical reaction, an increased distillate amount as compared with conventional boiling technologies.

  19. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CONTROLLING DIRECT-CYCLE NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, G.A.

    1961-01-10

    A control arrangement is offered for a boiling-water reactor. Boric acid is maintained in the water in the reactor and the amount in the reactor is controlled by continuously removing a portion of the water from the reactor, concentrating the boric acid by evaporating the water therefrom, returning a controlled amount of the acid to the reactor, and simultaneously controlling the water level by varying the rate of spent steam return to the reactor.

  20. A Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light Water

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reactor Cooling System Components | Department of Energy Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light Water Reactor Cooling System Components A Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light Water Reactor Cooling System Components In the United States currently there are approximately 104 operating light water reactors. Of these, 69 are pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and 35 are boiling water reactors (BWRs). In 2007, the 104 light-water reactors (LWRs) in the

  1. NREL: Transportation Research - Power Electronics Thermal Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Electronics Thermal Management A photo of water boiling in liquid cooling lab equipment. Power electronics thermal management research aims to help lower the cost and improve the performance of electric-drive vehicles. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL NREL investigates and develops thermal management strategies for power electronics systems that use wide-bandgap technology, which enables the development of devices that are smaller than those based on other materials, demonstrating

  2. Process and apparatus for preheating heavy feed to a catalytic cracking

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    unit (Patent) | SciTech Connect Process and apparatus for preheating heavy feed to a catalytic cracking unit Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Process and apparatus for preheating heavy feed to a catalytic cracking unit This patent describes an improvement in a catalytic cracking process wherein a heavy hydrocarbon feed comprising hydrocarbons having a boiling point above about 650{degrees}F is catalytically cracked to cracked products. It comprises preheating at least a portion of

  3. Process and apparatus for split feed of spent catalyst to high efficiency

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    catalyst regenerator (Patent) | SciTech Connect Process and apparatus for split feed of spent catalyst to high efficiency catalyst regenerator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Process and apparatus for split feed of spent catalyst to high efficiency catalyst regenerator This patent describes a fluidized catalytic cracking process for catalytic cracking of a heavy hydrocarbon feed. It comprises hydrocarbons having a boiling point above about 650{degrees} F to lighter products by

  4. FIRST Center Research Perspective_Mamontov_QENS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gradual development of the separate localized relaxation in liquids on cooling down makes one- component QENS data fitting inadequate, as manifested by the difference plot (data minus fit) deviation from zero level. Measurements performed at the neutron backscattering spectrometer BASIS of the Spallation Neutron Source, ORNL, suggest that the extent of the separation between the main and secondary relaxations scales with temperature as (T b /T), where T b is boiling temperature. FIRST Center

  5. Report on Reactor Physics Assessment of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials in LWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, Jeffrey J.; George, Nathan; Maldonado, G. Ivan; Worrall, Andrew

    2015-08-28

    This work focuses on ATF concepts being researched at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), expanding on previous studies of using alternate cladding materials in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The neutronic performance of two leading alternate cladding materials were assessed in boiling water reactors (BWRs): iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) cladding, and silicon carbide (SiC)-based composite cladding. This report fulfills ORNL Milestone M3FT-15OR0202332 within the fiscal year 2015 (FY15)

  6. Membrane permeation process for dehydration of organic liquid mixtures using sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cabasso, Israel; Korngold, Emmanuel

    1988-01-01

    A membrane permeation process for dehydrating a mixture of organic liquids, such as alcohols or close boiling, heat sensitive mixtures. The process comprises causing a component of the mixture to selectively sorb into one side of sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene (e.g., polyethylene) membranes and selectively diffuse or flow therethrough, and then desorbing the component into a gas or liquid phase on the other side of the membranes.

  7. MEMS sensor measurement of surface temperature response during subcooled

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    flow boiling in a rectangular flow channel (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Kokorian, Jaap" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Accepted Manuscript Published Article Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org: Sponsoring Org: Publication Date: to Update Date: to Sort: Relevance (highest to lowest) Publication Date (newest first) Publication Date (oldest first) Close Clear All Find DOE PAGES Search Results Publisher's Accepted Manuscript:

  8. FRAP-T5 predictions during reactor shutdown events. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, G.B.; Laats, E.T.

    1980-01-01

    The Transient Fuel Rod Analysis Program, FRAP-T5, was recently assessed by EG and G Idaho, Inc. As part of this assessment, the measured and FRAP-T5 predicted fuel centerline temperature response during reactor shutdown events were compared. For these events either forced convection or nucleate boiling boundary conditions existed, resulting in a negligible effect on fuel behavior from cladding temperature and deformation uncertainties. This allowed the assessment of internal heat transfer to be emphasized.

  9. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald P.

    1985-01-01

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  10. Development and Testing of CTF to Support Modeling of BWR Operating

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conditions (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Development and Testing of CTF to Support Modeling of BWR Operating Conditions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development and Testing of CTF to Support Modeling of BWR Operating Conditions This milestone supports developing and assessing COBRA-TF (CTF) for the modeling of boiling water reactors (BWRs). This is achieved in three stages. First, a new preprocessor utility that is capable of handling BWR-specic design

  11. Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2015 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 5 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2015 News Updates  The NRC has scheduled a public Commissioner's hearing for February 4 on DTE Electric's application for a combined license to build and operate a General Electric Hitachi Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) at the Enrico Fermi Generating Station near Newport, Michigan. This is the third time an applicant has reached the "final step" in the part 52 reactor licensing process.  The Vermont

  12. ARM - Temperature Converter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CalculatorsTemperature Converter Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Temperature Converter The Fahrenheit scale, invented by German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686-1736), is based on 32 °F for the freezing point of water and 212 °F for the boiling point of water. The

  13. Process for demetallizing and desulfurizing heavy crude oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, R.E.; Hogan, R.J.; Combs, D.M.; Kukes, S.G.

    1989-12-05

    This patent describes a process for producing a synthetic crude oil of improved properties by desulfurizing, denitrogenating and demetallizing a heavy crude oil feed stock. The feed stock being a crude oil having an average boiling point at least as high as 500{degrees} F., an API gravity at 60{degrees} F. of less than 20, and containing at least about 1 weight percent sulfur.

  14. Method of preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Yu-Min; Wang, Jih-Wen; Liue, Chun-Ying; Yeh, Shinn-Horng

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals includes the steps of washing the silicon carbide particles with an organic solvent; washing the silicon carbide particles with an inorganic acid; grinding the silicon carbide particles; and heating the silicon carbide particles in a nickel-containing solution at a boiling temperature for a predetermined period of time.

  15. Fabrication of heterojunction solar cells by improved tin oxide deposition on insulating layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

    1980-01-01

    Highly efficient tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells are prepared by heating a silicon substrate, having an insulating layer thereon, to provide a substrate temperature in the range of about 300.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C. and thereafter spraying the so-heated substrate with a solution of tin tetrachloride in a organic ester boiling below about 250.degree. C. Preferably the insulating layer is naturally grown silicon oxide layer.

  16. Cooling and solidification of heavy hydrocarbon liquid streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Antieri, Salvatore J. (Trenton, NJ); Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA)

    1983-01-01

    A process and apparatus for cooling and solidifying a stream of heavy hydrocarbon material normally boiling above about 850.degree. F., such as vacuum bottoms material from a coal liquefaction process. The hydrocarbon stream is dropped into a liquid bath, preferably water, which contains a screw conveyor device and the stream is rapidly cooled, solidified and broken therein to form discrete elongated particles. The solid extrudates or prills are then dried separately to remove substantially all surface moisture, and passed to further usage.

  17. Polymer-electrolyte membrane, electrochemical fuel cell, and related method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Lakshmi; Yeager, Gary William; Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-12-09

    A polymer-electrolyte membrane is presented. The polymer-electrolyte membrane comprises an acid-functional polymer, and an additive incorporated in at least a portion of the membrane. The additive comprises a fluorinated cycloaliphatic additive, a hydrophobic cycloaliphatic additive, or combinations thereof, wherein the additive has a boiling point greater than about 120.degree. C. An electrochemical fuel cell including the polymer-electrolyte membrane, and a related method, are also presented.

  18. CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shannon, R.H.; Williamson, H.E.

    1962-10-30

    A boiling water type nuclear reactor power system having improved means of control is described. These means include provisions for either heating the coolant-moderator prior to entry into the reactor or shunting the coolantmoderator around the heating means in response to the demand from the heat engine. These provisions are in addition to means for withdrawing the control rods from the reactor. (AEC)

  19. Liquid metal heat exchanger for efficient heating of soils and geologic formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVault, Robert C. [Knoxville, TN; Wesolowski, David J. [Kingston, TN

    2010-02-23

    Apparatus for efficient heating of subterranean earth includes a well-casing that has an inner wall and an outer wall. A heater is disposed within the inner wall and is operable within a preselected operating temperature range. A heat transfer metal is disposed within the outer wall and without the inner wall, and is characterized by a melting point temperature lower than the preselected operating temperature range and a boiling point temperature higher than the preselected operating temperature range.

  20. Decontamination performance of selected in situ technologies for jet fuel contamination. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chesley, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    Specific study of jet fuel is warranted because of the quantitive and qualitative component differences between jet fuel and other hydrocarbon fuels. Quantitatively, jet fuel contains a larger aliphatic or saturate fraction and a smaller aromatic fraction than other fuels (i.e. heating oil and diesel oil) in the medium-boiling-point-distillate class of fuels. Since the aliphatic and aromatic fractions of fuel are not equally susceptible to biodegradation, jet fuel decontamination using biodegradation may be different from other fuels.

  1. Mixed feed evaporator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vakil, Himanshu B. (Schenectady, NY); Kosky, Philip G. (Ballston Lake, NY)

    1982-01-01

    In the preparation of the gaseous reactant feed to undergo a chemical reaction requiring the presence of steam, the efficiency of overall power utilization is improved by premixing the gaseous reactant feed with water and then heating to evaporate the water in the presence of the gaseous reactant feed, the heating fluid utilized being at a temperature below the boiling point of water at the pressure in the volume where the evaporation occurs.

  2. Italy Nuclear Security Summit: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Nuclear Security Summit: Fact Sheet March 26, 2012 Between the 1960s and mid-1980s, Italy had an ambitious nuclear power research program which included heavy water, boiling water, light water, and fast reactors. In 1979, Italy signed the NPT which reaffirmed its commitment to be nuclear weapons free. In 1987, through a referendum, Italy announced the end of its nuclear energy program, and the Società Gestione Impianti Nucleari (SOGIN) was created in 2001 to decommission and

  3. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquefying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper. 6 figs.

  4. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquifying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper.

  5. Method and apparatus for the production of cluster ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedman, Lewis; Beuhler, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the production of cluster ions, and preferably isotopic hydrogen cluster ions is disclosed. A gas, preferably comprising a carrier gas and a substrate gas, is cooled to about its boiling point and expanded through a supersonic nozzle into a region maintained at a low pressure. Means are provided for the generation of a plasma in the gas before or just as it enters the nozzle.

  6. Method and apparatus for the production of cluster ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedman, L.; Beuhler, R.J.

    A method and apparatus for the production of cluster ions, and preferably isotopic hydrogen cluster ions is disclosed. A gas, preferably comprising a carrier gas and a substrate gas, is cooled to about its boiling point and expanded through a supersonic nozzle into a region maintained at a low pressure. Means are provided for the generation of a plasma in the gas before or just as it enters the nozzle.

  7. Assessment of Nanofluids for HEV Cooling Applications | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon pm042_routbort_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Nanofluids for Cooling Power Electronics for Hybrid Electric Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Thermal Control of Power Electronics of Electric Vehicles with Small Channel Coolant Boiling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Nanofluids for

  8. Aqueous process for recovering sulfur from hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Basu, Arunabha

    2015-05-05

    A process for recovering sulfur from a hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas utilizes an aqueous reaction medium, a temperature of about 110-150.degree. C., and a high enough pressure to maintain the aqueous reaction medium in a liquid state. The process reduces material and equipment costs and addresses the environmental disadvantages associated with known processes that rely on high boiling point organic solvents.

  9. Vacuum breaker valve assembly (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Vacuum breaker valve assembly Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Vacuum breaker valve assembly Breaker valve assemblies for a simplified boiling water nuclear reactor are described. The breaker valve assembly, in one form, includes a valve body and a breaker valve. The valve body includes an interior chamber, and an inlet passage extends from the chamber and through an inlet opening to facilitate transporting particles from outside of the valve body to the interior chamber. The

  10. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boland, James F.; Koenig, John F.

    1985-01-01

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  11. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boland, J.F.; Koenig, J.F.

    1984-05-29

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  12. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.P.

    1984-06-05

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  13. Energy conversion system involving change in the density of an upwardly moving liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petrick, Michael (Jolliet, IL)

    1989-01-01

    A system for converting thermal energy into electrical energy includes a fluid reservoir, a relatively high boiling point fluid such as lead or a lead alloy within the reservoir, a downcomer defining a vertical fluid flow path communicating at its upper end with the reservoir and an upcomer defining a further vertical fluid flow path communicating at its upper end with the reservoir. A variable area nozzle of rectangular section may terminate the upper end of the upcomer and the lower end of the of the downcomer communicates with the lower end of the upcomer. A mixing chamber is located at the lower end portion of the upcomer and receives a second relatively low boiling point fluid such as air, the mixing chamber serving to introduce the low boiling point fluid into the upcomer so as to produce bubbles causing the resultant two-phase fluid to move at high velocity up the upcomer. Means are provided for introducing heat into the system preferably between the lower end of the downcomer and the lower end of the upcomer. Power generating means are associated with the one of the vertical fluid flow paths one such power generating means being a magneto hydrodynamic electrical generator.

  14. Direct molecular diffusion and micro-mixing for rapid dewatering of LiBr solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, S; Isfahani, RN; Moghaddam, S

    2014-03-01

    A slow molecular diffusion rate often limits the desorption process of an absorbate molecule from a liquid absorbent. To enhance the desorption rate, the absorbent is often boiled to increase the liquid vapor interfacial area. However, the growth of bubbles generated during the nucleate boiling process still remains mass-diffusion limited. Here, it is shown that a desorption rate higher than that of boiling can be achieved, if the vapor absorbent interface is continuously replenished with the absorbate-rich solution to limit the concentration boundary layer growth. The study is conducted in a LiBr-water-solution, in which the water molecules' diffusion rate is quite slow. The manipulation of the vapor solution interface concentration distribution is enabled by the mechanical confinement of the solution flow within microchannels, using a hydrophobic vapor-venting membrane and the implementation of microstructures on the flow channel's bottom wall. The microstructures stretch and fold the laminar streamlines within the solution film and produce vortices. The vortices continuously replace the concentrated solution at the vapor solution interface with the water-rich solution brought from the bottom and middle of the flow channel. The physics of the process is described using a combination of experimental and numerical studies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

    1991-01-01

    Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

  16. Beneficial effects of groundwater entry into liquid-dominated geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippmann, M.J. ); Truesdell, A.H. )

    1990-04-01

    In all active liquid-dominated geothermal systems there is continuous circulation of mass and transfer of heat, otherwise they would slowly cool and fade away. In the natural state these systems are in dynamic equilibrium with the surrounding colder groundwater aquifers. The ascending geothermal fluids cool conductively, boil, or mix with groundwaters, and ultimately may discharge at the surface as fumaroles or hot springs. With the start of fluid production and the lowering of reservoir pressure, the natural equilibrium is disrupted and cooler groundwater tends to enter the reservoir. Improperly constructed or damaged wells, and wells located near the margins of the geothermal system, exhibit temperature reductions (and possibly scaling from mixing of chemically distinct fluids) as the cooler-water moves into the reservoir. These negative effects, especially in peripheral wells are, however, compensated by the maintenance of reservoir pressure and a reduction in reservoir boiling that might result in mineral precipitation in the formation pores and fractures. The positive effect of cold groundwater entry on the behavior of liquid-dominated system is illustrated by using simple reservoir models. The simulation results show that even though groundwater influx into the reservoir causes cooling of fluids produced from wells located near the cold-water recharge area, it also reduces pressure drawdown and boiling in the exploited zone, and sweeps the heat stored in the reservoir rocks toward production wells, thus increasing the productive life of the wells and field. 9 refs.

  17. Determination of post-DNB and post-BT fuel design limits. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croucher, D.W.; Loyd, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Categories of light water reactor transients and the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) and boiling transition (BT) fuel design limits in light water reactors are reviewed. These fuel design limits for reactor licensing may be overly conservative because experiments have shown that fuel rods do not fail and may not experience damage as a result of momentary operation in film boiling or dryout conditions. Damage to the fuel rod is strongly dependent on the peak cladding temperature and the length of time at that temperature durng the transient. Testing of two potential licensing fuel design limits is suggested: (a) fuel rod functional capabilities are retained and fuel system dimensions remain within operational telerances; and (b) cladding deformation is permitted, but no significant oxidation is allowed. Damage mechanisms which may affect post-DNB or post-BT operation of fuel rods are permanent rod bowing and pellet-cladding interaction. The data necessary to support a fuel design limit and a means of obtaining these data are outlined.

  18. Superheated fuel injection for combustion of liquid-solid slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robben, F.A.

    1984-10-19

    A method and device are claimed for obtaining, upon injection, flash evaporation of a liquid in a slurry fuel to aid in ignition and combustion. The device is particularly beneficial for use of coal-water slurry fuels in internal combustion engines such as diesel engines and gas turbines, and in external combustion devices such as boilers and furnaces. The slurry fuel is heated under pressure to near critical temperature in an injector accumulator, where the pressure is sufficiently high to prevent boiling. After injection into a combustion chamber, the water temperature will be well above boiling point at a reduced pressure in the combustion chamber, and flash boiling will preferentially take place at solid-liquid surfaces, resulting in the shattering of water droplets and the subsequent separation of the water from coal particles. This prevents the agglomeration of the coal particles during the subsequent ignition and combustion process, and reduces the energy required to evaporate the water and to heat the coal particles to ignition temperature. The overall effect will be to accelerate the ignition and combustion rates, and to reduce the size of the ash particles formed from the coal. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Superheated fuel injection for combustion of liquid-solid slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robben, Franklin A.

    1985-01-01

    A method and device for obtaining, upon injection, flash evaporation of a liquid in a slurry fuel to aid in ignition and combustion. The device is particularly beneficial for use of coal-water slurry fuels in internal combustion engines such as diesel engines and gas turbines, and in external combustion devices such as boilers and furnaces. The slurry fuel is heated under pressure to near critical temperature in an injector accumulator, where the pressure is sufficiently high to prevent boiling. After injection into a combustion chamber, the water temperature will be well above boiling point at a reduced pressure in the combustion chamber, and flash boiling will preferentially take place at solid-liquid surfaces, resulting in the shattering of water droplets and the subsequent separation of the water from coal particles. This prevents the agglomeration of the coal particles during the subsequent ignition and combustion process, and reduces the energy required to evaporate the water and to heat the coal particles to ignition temperature. The overall effect will be to accelerate the ignition and combustion rates, and to reduce the size of the ash particles formed from the coal.

  20. Thermal performance simulation of a solar cavity receiver under windy conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.B.; Wei, J.J.; Dong, X.W.; Wang, Y.S.

    2011-01-15

    Solar cavity receiver plays a dominant role in the light-heat conversion. Its performance can directly affect the efficiency of the whole power generation system. A combined calculation method for evaluating the thermal performance of the solar cavity receiver is raised in this paper. This method couples the Monte-Carlo method, the correlations of the flow boiling heat transfer, and the calculation of air flow field. And this method can ultimately figure out the surface heat flux inside the cavity, the wall temperature of the boiling tubes, and the heat loss of the solar receiver with an iterative solution. With this method, the thermal performance of a solar cavity receiver, a saturated steam receiver, is simulated under different wind environments. The highest wall temperature of the boiling tubes is about 150 C higher than the water saturation temperature. And it appears in the upper middle parts of the absorbing panels. Changing the wind angle or velocity can obviously affect the air velocity inside the receiver. The air velocity reaches the maximum value when the wind comes from the side of the receiver (flow angle {alpha} = 90 ). The heat loss of the solar cavity receiver also reaches a maximum for the side-on wind. (author)

  1. Temperature Effects on seepage Fluid Compositions at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicolas Spycher; Eric Sonnenthal

    2001-06-01

    This project investigated the effect of two repository operating temperature modes on coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes around potential nuclear waste-emplacement tunnels (drifts) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the composition of fluids (water and gas) that could enter the drifts, because these data directly relate to the performance of waste canisters and other in-drift engineered systems over the life of the potential repository. Multicomponent reactive transport simulations were performed using TOUGHREACT, initially written by T. Xu and K. Pruess at LBNL and modified here to handle high-temperature and boiling environments. Two repository operating temperature modes were investigated: (1) a ''high-temperature'' mode, which considered a short preclosure ventilation period (50 years) and gave rise to above-boiling temperatures in rocks around the drift for hundreds of years, and (2) a ''low-temperature'' mode with a smaller heat load and longer preclosure ventilation (300 years), yielding temperatures at the surface of the waste package below 85 C (a design threshold) and thus below boiling conditions. Simulations under ambient conditions (no heat load) were also conducted to serve as a baseline for comparing results of thermal-loading simulations.

  2. Process for removing thorium and recovering vanadium from titanium chlorinator waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsen, Richard S.; Banks, John T.

    1996-01-01

    A process for removal of thorium from titanium chlorinator waste comprising: (a) leaching an anhydrous titanium chlorinator waste in water or dilute hydrochloric acid solution and filtering to separate insoluble minerals and coke fractions from soluble metal chlorides; (b) beneficiating the insoluble fractions from step (a) on shaking tables to recover recyclable or otherwise useful TiO.sub.2 minerals and coke; and (c) treating filtrate from step (a) with reagents to precipitate and remove thorium by filtration along with acid metals of Ti, Zr, Nb, and Ta by the addition of the filtrate (a), a base and a precipitant to a boiling slurry of reaction products (d); treating filtrate from step (c) with reagents to precipitate and recover an iron vanadate product by the addition of the filtrate (c), a base and an oxidizing agent to a boiling slurry of reaction products; and (e) treating filtrate from step (d) to remove any remaining cations except Na by addition of Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3 and boiling.

  3. RAMONA-4B a computer code with three-dimensional neutron kinetics for BWR and SBWR system transient - models and correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.J.; Mallen, A.N.; Neymotin, L.Y.

    1998-03-01

    This document describes the major modifications and improvements made to the modeling of the RAMONA-3B/MOD0 code since 1981, when the code description and assessment report was completed. The new version of the code is RAMONA-4B. RAMONA-4B is a systems transient code for application to different versions of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) such as the current BWR, the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR), and the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). This code uses a three-dimensional neutron kinetics model coupled with a multichannel, non-equilibrium, drift-flux, two-phase flow formulation of the thermal hydraulics of the reactor vessel. The code is designed to analyze a wide spectrum of BWR core and system transients and instability issues. Chapter 1 is an overview of the code`s capabilities and limitations; Chapter 2 discusses the neutron kinetics modeling and the implementation of reactivity edits. Chapter 3 is an overview of the heat conduction calculations. Chapter 4 presents modifications to the thermal-hydraulics model of the vessel, recirculation loop, steam separators, boron transport, and SBWR specific components. Chapter 5 describes modeling of the plant control and safety systems. Chapter 6 presents and modeling of Balance of Plant (BOP). Chapter 7 describes the mechanistic containment model in the code. The content of this report is complementary to the RAMONA-3B code description and assessment document. 53 refs., 81 figs., 13 tabs.

  4. Process for producing low-sulfur boiler fuel by hydrotreatment of solvent deashed SRC

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, George W.; Tao, John C.

    1985-01-01

    In this invention, a process is disclosed characterized by heating a slurry of coal in the presence of a process-derived recycle solvent and passing same to a dissolver zone, separating the resultant gases and liquid/solid products therefrom, vacuum distilling the liquid/solids products, separating the portions of the liquid/solids vacuum distillation effluent into a solid ash, unconverted coal particles and SRC material having a boiling point above 850.degree. F. and subjecting same to a critical solvent deashing step to provide an ash-free SRC product. The lighter liquid products from the vacuum distillation possess a boiling point below 850.degree. F. and are passed through a distillation tower, from which recycled solvent is recovered in addition to light distillate boiling below 400.degree. F. (overhead). The ash-free SRC product in accompanyment with at least a portion of the process derived solvent is passed in combination to a hydrotreating zone containing a hydrogenation catalyst and in the presence of hydrogen is hydroprocessed to produce a desulfurized and denitrogenized low-sulfur, low-ash boiler fuel and a process derived recycle solvent which is recycled to slurry the coal in the beginning of the process before heating.

  5. Boildown Study on Supernatant Liquid Retrieved from AW-106 in December 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Jason S.

    2013-06-04

    This document reports the results of a boil down study using a composite created from supernatant liquid grab samples retrieved from tank 241-AW-I06 in December of 2012. The composite was made using predetermined volumes of the grab samples which accounted for layering of the supernatant liquid in the tank. The finished composite was a clear, yellow liquid containing no visible solids at hot cell ambient temperatures (24 - 27°C). The density of the test composite was measured in the hot cell immediately before the boildown study and was 1.266 g/mL at 27.1 °C. The boiling temperature of the composite was measured at three different pressures (40, 60, and 80 Torr) throughout the volume reduction, and the results show steadily increasing boiling temperatures with increasing volume reduction and no significant discontinuities. Moderate foaming was observed at the onset of the boildown. The foaming disappeared during the first reduction step, and minimal foaming was observed throughout the rest of the study. The bulk densities at 18.0 °C (D{sub Bulk}{sup 18 °C}) and quantities of settled and centrifuged solids were measured on samples of the boildown concentrates. Estimated values of the bulk densities at the 60-Torr boiling temperatures (D{sub Bulk}{sup 60 Torr}) were also calculated. Solids were first observed at boildown temperatures when the % VWR reached 39.3%. The quantity of solids in the composite quickly increased after this initial formation; the amount of centrifuged solids increased by 22% as the %WVR increased from 39.3 to 44.1 %. A small amount of solids did appear in the samples collected prior to the initial formation during the boildown. These solids precipitated while they sat at hot cell ambient temperature and in the 18. 0 °C water bath. Analysis of boil down test samples indicated that natrophosphate (Na7{sub 3}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{centerdot} 19 H{sub 2}O) and kogarkoite (Na3FS04) accounted for a majority of the initial solids (~80% of the dissolved sulfate and phosphate precipitated from the composite by 44.1 % WVR). The large increase in solids at 44.1 % WVR was dominated by sodium nitrate and sodium carbonate.

  6. A user's guide to the PLTEMP/ANL code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalimullah, M.

    2011-07-05

    PLTEMP/ANL V4.1 is a FORTRAN program that obtains a steady-state flow and temperature solution for a nuclear reactor core, or for a single fuel assembly. It is based on an evolutionary sequence of ''PLTEMP'' codes in use at ANL for the past 20 years. Fueled and non-fueled regions are modeled. Each fuel assembly consists of one or more plates or tubes separated by coolant channels. The fuel plates may have one to five layers of different materials, each with heat generation. The width of a fuel plate may be divided into multiple longitudinal stripes, each with its own axial power shape. The temperature solution is effectively 2-dimensional. It begins with a one-dimensional solution across all coolant channels and fuel plates/tubes within a given fuel assembly, at the entrance to the assembly. The temperature solution is repeated for each axial node along the length of the fuel assembly. The geometry may be either slab or radial, corresponding to fuel assemblies made of a series of flat (or slightly curved) plates, or of nested tubes. A variety of thermal-hydraulic correlations are available with which to determine safety margins such as Onset-of-Nucleate boiling (ONB), departure from nucleate boiling (DNB), and onset of flow instability (FI). Coolant properties for either light or heavy water are obtained from FORTRAN functions rather than from tables. The code is intended for thermal-hydraulic analysis of research reactor performance in the sub-cooled boiling regime. Both turbulent and laminar flow regimes can be modeled. Options to calculate both forced flow and natural circulation are available. A general search capability is available (Appendix XII) to greatly reduce the reactor analyst's time.

  7. A User's Guide to the PLTEMP/ANL Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Arne P.; Kalimullah, M.

    2015-07-07

    PLTEMP/ANL V4.2 is a FORTRAN program that obtains a steady-state flow and temperature solution for a nuclear reactor core, or for a single fuel assembly. It is based on an evolutionary sequence of ''PLTEMP'' codes in use at ANL for the past 20 years. Fueled and non-fueled regions are modeled. Each fuel assembly consists of one or more plates or tubes separated by coolant channels. The fuel plates may have one to five layers of different materials, each with heat generation. The width of a fuel plate may be divided into multiple longitudinal stripes, each with its own axial power shape. The temperature solution is effectively 2-dimensional. It begins with a one-dimensional solution across all coolant channels and fuel plates/tubes within a given fuel assembly, at the entrance to the assembly. The temperature solution is repeated for each axial node along the length of the fuel assembly. The geometry may be either slab or radial, corresponding to fuel assemblies made of a series of flat (or slightly curved) plates, or of nested tubes. A variety of thermal-hydraulic correlations are available with which to determine safety margins such as Onset-of- Nucleate boiling (ONB), departure from nucleate boiling (DNB), and onset of flow instability (FI). Coolant properties for either light or heavy water are obtained from FORTRAN functions rather than from tables. The code is intended for thermal-hydraulic analysis of research reactor performance in the sub-cooled boiling regime. Both turbulent and laminar flow regimes can be modeled. Options to calculate both forced flow and natural circulation are available. A general search capability is available (Appendix XII) to greatly reduce the reactor analyst’s time.

  8. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone, the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1,500 psig (105 kg/cm[sup 2]), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone at a temperature in the range of between about 455 and about 500 C to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425 C to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C[sub 5]-454 C is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent. The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance. 6 figs.

  9. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -454.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent (83) and recycled as process solvent (16). The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance.

  10. Conversion of LPG hydrocarbons into distillate fuels using an integral LPG dehydrogenation-MOGD process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, H.; Zahner, J.C.

    1987-06-23

    This patent describes a process for converting lower paraffinic hydrocarbon feedstock comprising propane and/or butane into heavier hydrocarbons comprising gasoline and distillate, comprising the steps of: feeding the paraffinic feedstock to a dehydrogenation zone under conversion conditions for dehydrogenating at least a portion of the feedstock; recovering a first dehydrogenation gaseous effluent stream comprising propene and/or butene; contacting the first gaseous effluent steam with a liquid lean oil sorbent stream comprising C/sub 5//sup +/ hydrocarbons under sorption conditions to produce a C/sub 3//sup +/ rich liquid absorber stream and a light gas stream; sequentially pressurizing, heating and passing the C/sub 3//sup +/ rich liquid absorber stream to an oligomerization reactor zone at elevated temperature and pressure; contacting the C/sub 3//sup +/ rich stream with oligomerization catalyst in the oligomerization reactor zone for conversion of at least a portion of lower olefins to heavier hydrocarbons under oligomerization reaction conditions to provide a second reactor effluent stream comprising gasoline and distillate boiling range hydrocarbons; flash separating the second reactor effluent stream into a separator vapor stream comprising a major portion of the hydrocarbons which later form the lean oil stream, and a major portion of the C/sub 4//sup -/ hydrocarbons and a separator liquid stream comprising the gasoline and distillate boiling range materials produced in the oligomerization reactor zone; fractionating the separator liquid stream in a first product debutanizer tower into a first debutanizer overhead vapor stream comprising C/sub 4//sup -/ hydrocarbons and a product debutanizer liquid bottoms stream comprising C/sub 5//sup +/ gasoline and distillate boiling range hydrocarbons.

  11. Boildown Study on Supernatant Liquid Retrieved from AP-107 in May 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, W. S.; Page, J. S.

    2013-02-12

    A boildown study was completed on a composite prepared from supernatant liquid grab samples retrieved from tank 241-AP-107 in May of 2010. The composite was a clear, yellow liquid containing no visible solids at hot cell ambient temperatures (25-27 °C). The density of the test composite was 1.216 g/mL at 26.8 °C. The boiling temperature curves generated at three reduced pressures—40-, 60-, and 80 Torr—displayed steadily increasing boiling temperatures with increasing volume reduction with no significant discontinuities. Only minimal foaming was observed after the volume reduction proceeded beyond 50 %WVR (percent waste volume reduction). The bulk densities (D{sub Bulk}{sup 18 °C}) and quantities of settled and centrifuged solids present were measured on samples of the boildown concentrates that were kept at 18 °C for 7-8 days. Estimated values of the bulk densities of the concentrates at 60-Torr boiling temperatures (D{sub Bulk}{sup 60 Torr}) were also calculated. Solids were observed in all boildown concentrates at process temperatures, at hot cell ambient temperatures (25-27 °C), and at 18 °C. The quantity of solids found in the cooled concentrates increased slowly through 50.2 %WVR. The quantity of solids found in concentrates after 54.0 %WVR was noticeably greater. Beyond 54.0 %WVR, the quantity of solids found in cooled concentrates increased dramatically. Analysis of boildown test samples indicated that sodium oxalate and sodium carbonate solids form in cooled concentrates after volume reduction of 8.4 %WVR or less. The major contributors to the large increase in the quantity of solids found in concentrates after 54 %WVR were sodium nitrate and sodium carbonate.

  12. Macro-to-microchannel transition in two-phase flow: Part 1 - Two-phase flow patterns and film thickness measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, C.L.; Thome, J.R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, EPFL-STI-IGM-LTCM, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-01-15

    The classification of macroscale, mesoscale and microscale channels with respect to two-phase processes is still an open question. The main objective of this study focuses on investigating the macro-to-microscale transition during flow boiling in small scale channels of three different sizes with three different refrigerants over a range of saturation conditions to investigate the effects of channel confinement on two-phase flow patterns and liquid film stratification in a single circular horizontal channel (Part 2 covers the flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux). This paper presents the experimental two-phase flow pattern transition data together with a top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison for refrigerants R134a, R236fa and R245fa during flow boiling in small channels of 1.03, 2.20 and 3.04 mm diameter. Based on this work, an improved flow pattern map has been proposed by determining the flow patterns transitions existing under different conditions including the transition to macroscale slug/plug flow at a confinement number of Co {approx} 0.3-0.4. From the top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison results, it was observed that the gravity forces are fully suppressed and overcome by the surface tension and shear forces when the confinement number approaches 1, Co {approx} 1. Thus, as a new approximate rule, the lower threshold of macroscale flow is Co = 0.3-0.4 while the upper threshold of symmetric microscale flow is Co {approx} 1 with a transition (or mesoscale) region in-between. (author)

  13. Heat transfer and flow resistance of a shell and plate-type evaporator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uehara, H.; Stuhltraeger, E.; Miyara, A.; Murakami, H.; Miyazaki, K.

    1997-05-01

    The performance test of a shell-and-plate-type evaporator designed for OTEC plants, geothermal power plants, and heat pump systems is reported. This evaporator contains 30 plates with a unit area of 0.813 m{sup 2}, coated with aluminum powder on the working fluid side. Freon 22 is used as working fluid. Results show an overall heat transfer coefficient of about 5,000 W/(m{sup 2}K) when the heating water velocity is 1M/s. The mean boiling heat transfer coefficient is compared with a precious correlation proposed by Nakaoka and Uehara (1988). The water-side pressure loss is also reported.

  14. Application of TRAC-BD1/MOD1 to a BWR/4 feedwater control failure ATWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouhani, S.Z.; Giles, M.M.; Mohr, C.M. Jr.; Weaver, W.L. III

    1984-01-01

    This paper begins with a short description of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code for Boiling Water Reactors (TRAC-BWR), briefly mentioning some of its main features such as specific BWR models and input structure. Next, an input model of a BWR/4 is described, and, the assumptions used in performing an analysis of the loss of a feedwater controller without scram are listed. The important features of the calculated trends in flows, pressure, reactivity, and power are shown graphically and commented in the text. A comparison of some of the main predicted trends with the calculated results from a similar study by General Electric is also presented.

  15. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1989-04-25

    There is disclosed a composite immobilized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation. 3 figs.

  16. Dual-phase reactor plant with partitioned isolation condenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hui, Marvin M. (Cupertino, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear energy plant housing a boiling-water reactor utilizes an isolation condenser in which a single chamber is partitioned into a distributor plenum and a collector plenum. Steam accumulates in the distributor plenum and is conveyed to the collector plenum through an annular manifold that includes tubes extending through a condenser pool. The tubes provide for a transfer of heat from the steam, forming a condensate. The chamber has a disk-shaped base, a cylindrical sidewall, and a semispherical top. This geometry results in a compact design that exhibits significant performance and cost advantages over prior designs.

  17. Calculation of the temperature in the container unit with a modified design for the production of {sup 99}Mo at the VVR-Ts research reactor facility (IVV.10M)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazantsev, A. A.; Sergeev, V. V.; Kochnov, O. Yu.

    2015-12-15

    The temperature regime is calculated for two different designs of containers with uranium-bearing material for the upgraded VVR-Ts research reactor facility (IVV.10M). The containers are to be used in the production of {sup 99}Mo. It is demonstrated that the modification of the container design leads to a considerable temperature reduction and an increase in the near-wall boiling margin and allows one to raise the amount of material loaded into the container. The calculations were conducted using the international thermohydraulic contour code TRAC intended to analyze the technical safety of water-cooled nuclear power units.

  18. Modeling Cladding-Coolant Heat Transfer of High-Burnup Fuel During RIA

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Modeling Cladding-Coolant Heat Transfer of High-Burnup Fuel During RIA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling Cladding-Coolant Heat Transfer of High-Burnup Fuel During RIA This paper describes a model for the cladding-coolant heat transfer of high burnup fuel during a Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) which is implemented in the fuel performance code FRAPTRAN 1.2. The minimum stable film boiling temperature, affected by the subcooling and the

  19. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Marr

    2000-05-11

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation.

  20. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,974,"8,363",98.0,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,974,"8,363",98.0 "Data for 2010" "BWR = Boiling

  1. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Monticello

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monticello" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,554,"4,695",96.7,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,554,"4,695",96.7 "Data for 2010" "BWR = Boiling Water Reactor."

  2. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Grand Gulf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Grand Gulf" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,251","9,643",88.0,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"1,251","9,643",88.0 "Data for 2010" "BWR = Boiling Water Reactor."

  3. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Cooper

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cooper" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,767,"6,793",101.1,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,767,"6,793",101.1 "Data for 2010" "BWR = Boiling

  4. Thermionic converter temperature controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaner, Benjamin J. (McMurray, PA); Wolf, Joseph H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Johnson, Robert G. R. (Trafford, PA)

    2001-04-24

    A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

  5. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matson, Stephen L.; Lee, Eric K. L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kelly, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    There is disclosed a composite immobulized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation.

  6. Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radcliff, Thomas D.; Biederman, Bruce P.; Brasz, Joost J.

    2011-05-17

    A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

  7. DNB CP - Steamline Break Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5-000 DNB Challenge Problem Progress - Steamline Break Analysis Industry Council Meeting April 12, 2016 2 CASL-U-2016-1085-000 Outline * DNB CP to Meet Industry's Needs * PWR Steamline Break (SLB) Analysis Overview * Ongoing FY16 Activities on SLB Analysis 3 CASL-U-2016-1085-000 Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) * DNB also referred to as Critical Heat Flux (CHF) - Local clad surface dryout causes dramatic reduction in heat transfer during transients - One of safety and regulatory acceptance

  8. High temperature adhesive silicone foam composition, foam generating system and method of generating foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mead, Judith W.; Montoya, Orelio J.; Rand, Peter B.; Willan, Vernon O.

    1984-01-01

    Access to a space is impeded by generation of a sticky foam from a silicone polymer and a low boiling solvent such as a halogenated hydrocarbon. In a preferred aspect, the formulation is polydimethylsiloxane gel mixed with F502 Freon as a solvent and blowing agent, and pressurized with CO.sub.2 in a vessel to about 250 PSI, whereby when the vessel is opened, a sticky and solvent resistant foam is deployed. The foam is deployable, over a wide range of temperatures, adhering to wet surfaces as well as dry, is stable over long periods of time and does not propagate flame or lose adhesive properties during an externally supported burn.

  9. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jody, Bassam J.; Daniels, Edward J.; Bonsignore, Patrick V.

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  10. Direct numerical simulations of fluid flow, heat transfer and phase changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juric, D.; Tryggvason, G.; Han, J.

    1997-04-01

    Direct numerical simulations of fluid flow, heat transfer, and phase changes are presented. The simulations are made possible by a recently developed finite difference/front tracking method based on the one-field formulation of the governing equations where a single set of conservation equations is written for all the phases involved. The conservation equations are solved on a fixed rectangular grid, but the phase boundaries are kept sharp by tracking them explicitly by a moving grid of lower dimension. The method is discussed and applications to boiling heat transfer and the solidification of drops colliding with a wall are shown.

  11. LCOE and LACE: Seeking Simplicity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    LCOE and LACE Seeking Simplicity Michael Leifman GE Power & Water Marketing Presented to the EIA LCOE/LACE Workshop July 25, 2013 © 2013 General Electric Company. All Rights Reserved 2 GE Power & Water July 25, 2013 A love-hate relationship * We love Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) because it is simple * Everything is boiled down to one number * Provides an easy point of comparison across technologies * Serves as a shorthand for many dimensions BUT * LCOE masks many site-specific

  12. Nuclear-Coupled Flow Instabilities and Their Effects on Dryout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ishii; X. Sunn; S. Kuran

    2004-09-27

    Nuclear-coupled flow/power oscillations in boiling water reactors (BWRs) are investigated experimentally and analytically. A detailed literature survey is performed to identify and classify instabilities in two-phase flow systems. The classification and the identification of the leading physical mechanisms of the two-phase flow instabilities are important to propose appropriate analytical models and scaling criteria for simulation. For the purpose of scaling and the analysis of the nonlinear aspects of the coupled flow/power oscillations, an extensive analytical modeling strategy is developed and used to derive both frequency and time domain analysis tools.

  13. Method of nitriding niobium to form a superconducting surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, Michael J.; Klopf, John Michael; Singaravelu, Senthilaraja

    2014-08-19

    A method of forming a delta niobium nitride .delta.-NbN layer on the surface of a niobium object including cleaning the surface of the niobium object; providing a treatment chamber; placing the niobium object in the treatment chamber; evacuating the chamber; passing pure nitrogen into the treatment chamber; focusing a laser spot on the niobium object; delivering laser fluences at the laser spot until the surface of the niobium object reaches above its boiling temperature; and rastering the laser spot over the surface of the niobium object.

  14. Supercritical Water Nuclear Steam Supply System: Innovations In Materials, Neutronics & Thermal-Hydraulics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Anderson; M.L. Corradini; K. Sridharan; P. WIlson; D. Cho; T.K. Kim; S. Lomperski

    2004-09-02

    In the 1990's supercritical light-water reactors were considered in conceptual designs. A nuclear reactor cooled by supercritical waster would have a much higher thermal efficiency with a once-through direct power cycle, and could be based on standardized water reactor components (light water or heavy water). The theoretical efficiency could be improved by more than 33% over that of other water reactors and could be simplified with higher reliability; e.g., a boiling water reactor without steam separators or dryers.

  15. FORMING PROTECTIVE FILMS ON METAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gurinsky, D.H.; Kammerer, O.F.; Sadofsky, J.; Weeks, J.R.

    1958-12-16

    Methods are described of inhibiting the corrosion of ferrous metal by contact with heavy liquid metals such as bismuth and gallium at temperatures above 500 icient laborato C generally by bringing nltrogen and either the metal zirconium, hafnium, or titanium into reactlve contact with the ferrous metal to form a thin adherent layer of the nitride of the metal and thereafter maintaining a fractional percentage of the metal absorbed in the heavy liquid metal in contact with the ferrous metal container. The general purpose for uslng such high boiling liquid metals in ferrous contalners would be as heat transfer agents in liquid-metal-fueled nuclear reactors.

  16. Hydrocracking with molten zinc chloride catalyst containing 2-12% ferrous chloride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zielke, Clyde W.; Bagshaw, Gary H.

    1981-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy aromatic polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce hydrocarbon fuels boiling below about 475.degree. C. by contacting the feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten zinc chloride catalyst and thereafter separating at least a major portion of the hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten zinc chloride catalyst, an improvement comprising: adjusting the FeCl.sub.2 content of the molten zinc chloride to from about 2 to about 12 mol percent based on the mixture of ferrous chloride and molten zinc chloride.

  17. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY JANUARY 2015

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5 Updates available at: www.energy.gov/ne NEXT UPDATE - April 2015 Page 1 News Updates  The NRC has scheduled a public Commissioner's hearing for February 4 on DTE Electric's application for a combined license to build and operate a General Electric Hitachi Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) at the Enrico Fermi Generating Station near Newport, Michigan. This is the third time an applicant has reached the "final step" in the part 52 reactor licensing process.  The

  18. Neutronics Design and Fuel Cycle Analysis of a High Conversion BWR with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pu-Th Fuel (Conference) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Conference: Neutronics Design and Fuel Cycle Analysis of a High Conversion BWR with Pu-Th Fuel Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutronics Design and Fuel Cycle Analysis of a High Conversion BWR with Pu-Th Fuel As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI), a 'Generation IV' high conversion Boiling Water Reactor design is being investigated at Purdue University and

  19. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing trend was identified in the HPCI results. Statistically significant decreasing trends were identified for RCIC start-only and 8-hour trends.

  20. Prediction of quench and rewet temperatures. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunnerson, F.S.

    1980-01-01

    Many postulated nuclear reactor accidents result in high-temperature dryout or film boiling within the nuclear core. In order to mitigate potential fuel rod damage or rod failure, safe or lower fuel rod temperatures must be reestablished by promoting coolant/cladding contact. This process is commonly referred to as quenching or rewetting, and often, these terms are not differentiated. All theoretical predictions of the cooling process by various models based on single or multidimensional analytical and numerical studies require a knowledge of either the quenching or the rewetting temperature. The purpose of this paper is to define quench and rewet temperatures and present a method whereby each may be estimated.

  1. Advanced digital PWR plant protection system based on optimal estimation theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tylee, J.L.

    1981-04-01

    An advanced plant protection system for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor plant is described and evaluated. The system, based on a Kalman filter estimator, is capable of providing on-line estimates of such critical variables as fuel and cladding temperature, departure from nucleate boiling ratio, and maximum linear heat generation rate. The Kalman filter equations are presented, as is a description of the LOFT plant dynamic model inherent in the filter. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the advanced system.

  2. Fuel Performance Improvement Program. Semiannual progress report, October 1979-March 1980. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    Progress on the Fuel Performance Improvement Program's fuel design tests and demonstration irradiations for October 1979 through March 1980 is reported. Included are the results of out-of-reactor experiments with Zircaloy cladding using a device that simulates the interaction between fuel and cladding. Also included are reports on the irradiation of the advanced LWR fuel designs in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor and in Consumers Power Company's Big Rock Point Reactor. The establishment of the technical bases and licensing requirements for the advanced fuel concepts are also described.

  3. ISOTOPIC MODEL FOR COMMERCIAL SNF BURNUP CREDIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.H. Wells

    2004-11-17

    The purpose of this report is to demonstrate a process for selecting bounding depletion parameters, show that they are conservative for pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and establish the range of burnup for which the parameters are conservative. The general range of applicability is for commercial light water reactor (LWR) SNF with initial enrichments between 2.0 and 5.0 weight percent {sup 235}U and burnups between 10 and 50 gigawatt-day per metric ton of uranium (GWd/MTU).

  4. CONCEPTUAL DIAGRAM OF ENGINEERED RUBBLE PILE AERIAL VIEW OF PROPOSED LOCATION FOR ENGINEERED RUBBLE PILE AT THE HAMMER FACILITY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COMPOSITION OF VAPORS FROM BOILING NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS B A T T E L L E M E M O R I A L I N S T I T U T E DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

  5. INL SITEWIDE INSTITUTIONAL CONTROLS, AND OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE PLAN FOR CERCLA RESPONSE ACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOLLEY, WENDELL L

    2008-02-05

    On November 9, 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality approved the 'Record of Decision Experimental Breeder Reactor-I/Boiling Water Reactor Experiment Area and Miscellaneous Sites', which required a Site-wide institutional controls plan for the then Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory). This document, first issued in June 2004, fulfilled that requirement. This revision identifies and consolidates the institutional controls and operations and maintenance requirements into a single document.

  6. Hanford Achieves a Cleanup First | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hands-On Lessons in Clean Energy Hands-On Lessons in Clean Energy December 24, 2013 - 9:40am Addthis Sixth graders compare emissions from a candle—invisible until they hold a mirror close to the flame and watch carbon blacken its surface. The same mirror grows steamy but clear when held up to the water vapor piping out of the tea kettle. Sharon Cosgrove, of the Energy Department’s Geothermal Technologies Office, talks with the students about energy options: burning hydrocarbons to boil

  7. Scattering Amplitudes, the AdS/CFT Correspondence, Minimal Surfaces, and Integrability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alday, Luis F.

    2010-01-01

    We focus on the computation of scattering amplitudes of planar maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mill in four dimensions at strong coupling by means of the AdS/CFT correspondence and explain how the problem boils down to the computation of minimal surfaces in AdS in the first part of this paper. In the second part of this review we explain how integrability allows to give a solution to the problem in terms of a set of integral equations. The intention of the review is to give a pedagogical, rather than very detailed, exposition.

  8. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-01

    This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 3 contains reports from 6 government contractors on LPG, anhydrous ammonia, and hydrogen energy systems. Report subjects include: simultaneous boiling and spreading of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water; LPG safety research; state-of-the-art of release prevention and control technology in the LPG industry; ammonia: an introductory assessment of safety and environmental control information; ammonia as a fuel, and hydrogen safety and environmental control assessment.

  9. Correlation of laboratory and field stress corrosion results in the power generation industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdowski, R.

    1999-11-01

    This paper compares stress corrosion crack growth rates measured in the laboratory with stress corrosion crack growth rates derived from field experience in three different applications of the power generating industry: Pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressure vessel head penetrations with alloy 600, boiling water reactor (BWR) and RBMK (the Russian, watercooled graphite moderated channel-type power reactor, for example Chernobyl) welded nuclear reactor coolant pipes with stabilized stainless steels, and generator rotor retaining rings made from a high strength austenitic steel. It is shown that the minimum time to failure in service can well be predicted from laboratory crack growth rate tests.

  10. Effect of cold work on the growth rates of stress corrosion cracks in structural materials of nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdowski, R.; Speidel, M.O.

    1996-10-01

    The growth rates of stress corrosion cracks in austenitic stainless steels and nickel base alloy 600 exposed to simulated boiling water reactor coolant were measured by fracture mechanics testing techniques. Cold work may increase the crack growth rates up to one hundred times. In both, the annealed condition and the cold worked condition, the stress corrosion crack growth rates are independent of stress intensity over a wide K-range and crack growth rates correlate well with yield strength and hardness. In the annealed condition the fracture path is intergranular, but higher degrees of cold work introduce higher proportions of transgranular stress corrosion cracking.

  11. Upgrading heavy gas oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, S.; Reese, D.D.

    1986-05-20

    A method is described of neutralizing the organic acidity in heavy gas oils to produce a neutralization number less than 1.0 whereby they are rendered suitable as lube oil feed stocks which consists essentially of treating the heavy gas oils with a neutralizing amount of monoethanolamine to form an amine salt with the organic acids and then heating the thus-neutralized heavy gas oil at a temperature at least about 25/sup 0/F greater than the boiling point of water and for a time sufficient to convert the amine salts to amides.

  12. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P.

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs.

  13. Surface functionalized mesoporous material and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Xiangdong [West Richland, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA; Fryxell, Glen E. [Kennewick, WA

    2001-12-04

    According to the present invention, an organized assembly of functional molecules with specific interfacial functionality (functional group(s)) is attached to available surfaces including within mesopores of a mesoporous material. The method of the present invention avoids the standard base soak that would digest the walls between the mesopores by boiling the mesoporous material in water for surface preparation then removing all but one or two layers of water molecules on the internal surface of a pore. Suitable functional molecule precursor is then applied to permeate the hydrated pores and the precursor then undergoes condensation to form the functional molecules on the interior surface(s) of the pore(s).

  14. Characterization of Cerro Negro crude. Part I. Physical and chemical separations. [Project shared by Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, US DOE, and Institute de Tecnologico del Venezolana Petroleo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grizzle, P.L.; Green, J.B.; Sanchez, V.; Murgia, E.; Lubkowitz, J.

    1981-09-01

    The scheme couples distillation and ion exchange and solid liquid chromatography in an attempt to prepare narrow-boiling, chemically unique fractions, which can be analyzed further or can supply data for process development. For evaluation of the separation approach, a Cerro Negro crude from the Venezuelan Orinoco basin has been studied in a cooperative program between the United States Department of Energy and the Institute de Tecnologico del Venezolana Petroleo. These fractions may be analyzed by ir, uv, fluorescence, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, as well as various mass spectroscopy methods. The approach appears to be promising. 5 figures, 6 tables.

  15. Influence of lithium salts on the discharge chemistry of Li-air cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veith, Gabriel M; Nanda, Jagjit; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Dudney, Nancy J

    2012-01-01

    In this work we show that the use of a high boiling point ether solvent (tetraglyme) promotes the formation of Li2O2 in a lithium-air cell. In addition, another major constituent in the discharge product of a Li-air cell contains halides, from the lithium salt, and the tetraglyme used as the solvent. This information is critical to the development of Li-air electrolytes which are stable and promote the formation of the desired Li2O2 products.

  16. L3:THM.CFD.P5.03 Mark Christon LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Mark Christon LANL Completed: 10/03/2012 CASL-U-2012-0163-000 Sensitivity, Verification, and Validation Studies of STAR-CD, STAR-CCM+, and Nphase CFD Boiling Models Isaac M. Asher ∗ , Timothy J. Drzewiecki † , Timothy P. Grunloh ‡ , Victor E. Petrov § , Krzysztof J. Fidkowski ¶ , Annalisa Manera , September 29, 2012 CASL Milestone L3-THM-CFD-P5-03 ∗ Graduate Student, Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan † Graduate Student, Department of Nuclear Engineering

  17. Method for reclaiming waste lubricating oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whisman, Marvin L.; Goetzinger, John W.; Cotton, Faye O.

    1978-01-01

    A method for purifying and reclaiming used lubricating oils containing additives such as detergents, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, extreme pressure agents and the like and other solid and liquid contaminants by preferably first vacuum distilling the used oil to remove water and low-boiling contaminants, and treating the dried oil with a solvent mixture of butanol, isopropanol and methylethyl ketone which causes the separation of a layer of sludge containing contaminants, unspent additives and oxidation products. After solvent recovery, the desludged oil is then subjected to conventional lubricating oil refining steps such as distillation followed by decolorization and deodorization.

  18. Catalysts for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabo, Jule A.; Coughlin, Peter K.

    1987-01-01

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst composition capable of ensuring the production of only relatively minor amounts of heavy products boiling beyond the diesel oil range. The catalyst composition, having desirable stability during continuous production operation, employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component. The latter component is a steam-stabilized zeolite Y catalyst of hydrophobic character, desirably in acid-extracted form.

  19. Sintering Kinetics of Inkjet Printed Conductive Silver Lines on Insulating Plastic Substrate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Wenchao; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Duty, Chad E; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2015-01-24

    This paper focuses on sintering kinetics of inkjet printed lines containing silver nanoparticles deposited on a plastic substrate. Upon heat treatment, the change of resistance in the printed lines was measured as a function of time and sintering temperatures from 150 to 200 C. A critical temperature was observed for the sintering process, beyond which there was no further reduction in resistance. Analysis shows the critical temperature correlates to the boiling point of the solvent, which is attributed to a liquid-mediated sintering mechanism. It is demonstrated that the sintering process shuts down after the solvent has completely evaporated.

  20. Development of Mechanistic Modeling Capabilities for Local Neutronically-Coupled Flow-Induced Instabilities in Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Podowski

    2009-11-30

    The major research objectives of this project included the formulation of flow and heat transfer modeling framework for the analysis of flow-induced instabilities in advanced light water nuclear reactors such as boiling water reactors. General multifield model of two-phase flow, including the necessary closure laws. Development of neurton kinetics models compatible with the proposed models of heated channel dynamics. Formulation and encoding of complete coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models for the analysis of spatially-dependent local core instabilities. Computer simulations aimed at testing and validating the new models of reactor dynamics.

  1. Flowsheets and source terms for radioactive waste projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1985-03-01

    Flowsheets and source terms used to generate radioactive waste projections in the Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program are given. Volumes of each waste type generated per unit product throughput have been determined for the following facilities: uranium mining, UF/sub 6/ conversion, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, boiling-water reactors (BWRs), pressurized-water reactors (PWRs), and fuel reprocessing. Source terms for DOE/defense wastes have been developed. Expected wastes from typical decommissioning operations for each facility type have been determined. All wastes are also characterized by isotopic composition at time of generation and by general chemical composition. 70 references, 21 figures, 53 tables.

  2. Coal liquefaction with subsequent bottoms pyrolysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walchuk, George P.

    1978-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process wherein heavy bottoms produced in a liquefaction zone are upgraded by coking or a similar pyrolysis step, pyrolysis liquids boiling in excess of about 1000.degree. F. are further reacted with molecular hydrogen in a reaction zone external of the liquefaction zone, the resulting effluent is fractionated to produce one or more distillate fractions and a bottoms fraction, a portion of this bottoms fraction is recycled to the reaction zone, and the remaining portion of the bottoms fraction is recycled to the pyrolysis step.

  3. Step-wise supercritical extraction of carbonaceous residua

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warzinski, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    A method of fractionating a mixture containing high boiling carbonaceous material and normally solid mineral matter includes processing with a plurality of different supercritical solvents. The mixture is treated with a first solvent of high critical temperature and solvent capacity to extract a large fraction as solute. The solute is released as liquid from solvent and successively treated with other supercritical solvents of different critical values to extract fractions of differing properties. Fractionation can be supplemented by solute reflux over a temperature gradient, pressure let down in steps and extractions at varying temperature and pressure values.

  4. High temperature adhesive silicone foam composition, foam generating system and method of generating foam. [For access denial

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mead, J.W.; Montoya, O.J.; Rand, P.B.; Willan, V.O.

    1983-12-21

    Access to a space is impeded by generation of a sticky foam from a silicone polymer and a low boiling solvent such as a halogenated hydrocarbon. In a preferred aspect, the formulation is polydimethylsiloxane gel mixed with F502 Freon as a solvent and blowing agent, and pressurized with CO/sub 2/ in a vessel to about 250 PSI, whereby when the vessel is opened, a sticky and solvent resistant foam is deployed. The foam is deployable, over a wide range of temperatures, adhering to wet surfaces as well as dry, is stable over long periods of time and does not propagate flame or lose adhesive properties during an externally supported burn.

  5. Severe Accident Sequence Analysis Program: Anticipated transient without scram simulations for Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallman, R J; Gottula, R C; Holcomb, E E; Jouse, W C; Wagoner, S R; Wheatley, P D

    1987-05-01

    An analysis of five anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The five detailed deterministic simulations of postulated ATWS sequences were initiated from a main steamline isolation valve (MSIV) closure. The subject of the analysis was the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1, a boiling water reactor (BWR) of the BWR/4 product line with a Mark I containment. The simulations yielded insights to the possible consequences resulting from a MSIV closure ATWS. An evaluation of the effects of plant safety systems and operator actions on accident progression and mitigation is presented.

  6. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 19982012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at 8 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  7. Hands-On Session 6: Monolayer Boron Nitride BerkeleyGW Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hands-On Lessons in Clean Energy Hands-On Lessons in Clean Energy December 24, 2013 - 9:40am Addthis Sixth graders compare emissions from a candle—invisible until they hold a mirror close to the flame and watch carbon blacken its surface. The same mirror grows steamy but clear when held up to the water vapor piping out of the tea kettle. Sharon Cosgrove, of the Energy Department’s Geothermal Technologies Office, talks with the students about energy options: burning hydrocarbons to boil

  8. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Vermont Yankee

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Yankee" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,620,"4,782",88.0,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,620,"4,782",88.0 "Data for 2010" "BWR = Boiling

  9. Two-stage coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skinner, Ronald W.; Tao, John C.; Znaimer, Samuel

    1985-01-01

    An improved SRC-I two-stage coal liquefaction process which improves the product slate is provided. Substantially all of the net yield of 650.degree.-850.degree. F. heavy distillate from the LC-Finer is combined with the SRC process solvent, substantially all of the net 400.degree.-650.degree. F. middle distillate from the SRC section is combined with the hydrocracker solvent in the LC-Finer, and the initial boiling point of the SRC process solvent is increased sufficiently high to produce a net yield of 650.degree.-850.degree. F. heavy distillate of zero for the two-stage liquefaction process.

  10. Nuclear reactor with low-level core coolant intake

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, Roy C.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    A natural-circulation boiling-water reactor has skirts extending downward from control rod guide tubes to about 10 centimeters from the reactor vessel bottom. The skirts define annular channels about control rod drive housings that extend through the reactor vessel bottom. Recirculating water is forced in through the low-level entrances to these channels, sweeping bottom water into the channels in the process. The sweeping action prevents cooler water from accumulating at the bottom. This in turn minimizes thermal shock to bottom-dwelling components as would occur when accumulated cool water is swept away and suddenly replaced by warmer water.

  11. Site Selection & Characterization Status Report for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Holbrook

    2007-09-01

    In the near future, the US Department of Energy (DOE) will need to make important decisions regarding design and construction of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). One part of making these decisions is considering the potential environmental impacts that this facility may have, if constructed here at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 provides DOE decision makers with a process to systematically consider potential environmental consequences of agency decisions. In addition, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Title VI, Subtitel C, Section 644) states that the 'Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) shall have licensing and regulatory authority for any reactor authorized under this subtitle.' This stipulates that the NRC will license the NGNP for operation. The NRC NEPA Regulations (10 CFR Part 51) require tha thte NRC prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a permit to construct a nuclear power plant. The applicant is required to submit an Environmental report (ER) to aid the NRC in complying with NEPA.

  12. Hydrogen donor solvent coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Plumlee, Karl W.

    1978-01-01

    An indigenous hydrocarbon product stream boiling within a range of from about C.sub.1 -700.degree. F., preferably C.sub.1 -400.degree. F., is treated to produce an upgraded hydrocarbon fuel component and a component which can be recycled, with a suitable donor solvent, to a coal liquefaction zone to catalyze the reaction. In accordance therewith, a liquid hydrocarbon fraction with a high end boiling point range up to about 700.degree. F., preferably up to about 400.degree. F., is separated from a coal liquefaction zone effluent, the separated fraction is contacted with an alkaline medium to provide a hydrocarbon phase and an aqueous extract phase, the aqueous phase is neutralized, and contacted with a peroxygen compound to convert indigenous components of the aqueous phase of said hydrocarbon fraction into catalytic components, such that the aqueous stream is suitable for recycle to the coal liquefaction zone. Naturally occurring phenols and alkyl substituted phenols, found in the aqueous phase, are converted, by the addition of hydroxyl constituents to phenols, to dihydroxy benzenes which, as disclosed in copending Application Ser. Nos. 686,813 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,536; 686,814 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,537; 686,827 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,051,012 and 686,828, K. W. Plumlee et al, filed May 17, 1976, are suitable hydrogen transfer catalysts.

  13. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation and hydroconversion process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, James B.; McLean, Joseph B.; Comolli, Alfred G.

    1989-01-01

    A process for two-stage catalytic hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent and fed at temperature below about 650.degree. F. into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils at conditions favoring hydrogenation reactions. The first stage reactor is maintained at 650.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-60 lb coal/hr/ft.sup.3 reactor space velocity. The partially hydrogenated material from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the close-coupled second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at a temperature at least about 25.degree. F. higher than for the first stage reactor and within a range of 750.degree.-875.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and thermal hydroconversion reactions. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, which results in significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of undesirable residuum and unconverted coal and hydrocarbon gases, with use of less energy to obtain the low molecular weight products, while catalyst life is substantially increased.

  14. Thermal properties and chemical reactivity. Quarterly report, October 1971--December 1971

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, L.C.

    1998-12-31

    A very high boiling impurity was concentrated from a sample of FEFO with a hexane wash. Additional washing of this sample has increased the concentration of this impurity. A mass spectrum was obtained but an identification has not been made. The results of the analysis of the products from the thermal decomposition of FEFO at 120, 135, 150 C are discussed. A chromatogram of FEFO heated for 22 hours at 150 C shows a definite increase in low and high boiling impurities. The evaluation of the condition of the two coupon test assemblies aged at 80 C for 21 and 27 months are discussed. Thermal analysis of the LX-09 from these two coupon tests, a PASS A mechanical test specimen and a control sample are reported. A PDP-12/30 was interfaced with a Perkin Elmer DSC-1 to measure the heat of fusion of PETN. Some of the problems associated with getting reproducible data are discussed. The heat of fusion for six lots of LX-13 grade PETN are given.

  15. Simulation of 1% hot leg SBLOCA with TRACE5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Veru, G.

    2012-07-01

    During a Small Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) transient, depressurization can be slow enough to delay the Accumulators (ACC) entry for a long time. Actuation of High Pressure Injection (HPI) system is then necessary in order to maintain the core temperature low enough to avoid core boil off, and consequently avoiding the core level to fall below fuel rods level, thus producing a temperature trip in the fuel cladding. In this frame, the OECD/NEA ROSA Project Test 1.2 (SB-HL-17 in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)) has been simulated using the thermal-hydraulic code TRACES. Test 1.2 was performed in the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) reproducing a 1% hot leg SBLOCA in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). A comparison between experimental and the main simulated variables was performed to study the effect of important parameters (liquid stratification, geometry and size) to model the break. Finally, in an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) failure scenario, loss of coolant is large enough to produce core boil-off and a Peak Cladding Temperature (PCT) excursion. With this purpose a sensitivity analysis varying the HPI mass flow rate has been performed covering the range between HPI actuation and failure. (authors)

  16. Heat up and potential failure of BWR upper internals during a severe accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    In boiling water reactors, the steam dome, steam separators, and dryers above the core are comprised of approximately 100 tons of stainless steel. During a severe accident in which the coolant boils away and exothermic oxidation of zirconium occurs, gases (steam and hydrogen) are superheated in the core region and pass through the upper internals. Historically, the upper internals have been modeled using severe accident codes with relatively simple approximations. The upper internals are typically modeled in MELCOR as two lumped volumes with simplified heat transfer characteristics, with no structural integrity considerations, and with limited ability to oxidize, melt, and relocate. The potential for and the subsequent impact of the upper internals to heat up, oxidize, fail, and relocate during a severe accident was investigated. A higher fidelity representation of the shroud dome, steam separators, and steam driers was developed in MELCOR v1.8.6 by extending the core region upwards. This modeling effort entailed adding 45 additional core cells and control volumes, 98 flow paths, and numerous control functions. The model accounts for the mechanical loading and structural integrity, oxidation, melting, flow area blockage, and relocation of the various components. The results indicate that the upper internals can reach high temperatures during a severe accident; they are predicted to reach a high enough temperature such that they lose their structural integrity and relocate. The additional 100 tons of stainless steel debris influences the subsequent in-vessel and ex-vessel accident progression.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ACTIVELY COOLED METAL FOIL THERMAL RADIATION SHIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feller, J. R.; Salerno, L. J.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.

    2010-04-09

    Zero boil-off (ZBO) or reduced boil-off (RBO) systems that involve active cooling of large cryogenic propellant tanks will most likely be required for future space exploration missions. For liquid oxygen or methane, such systems could be implemented using existing high technology readiness level (TRL) cryocoolers. However, for liquid hydrogen temperatures (approx20 K) no such coolers exist. In order to partially circumvent this technology gap, the concept of broad area cooling (BAC) has been developed, whereby a low mass thermal radiation shield could be maintained at temperatures around 100 K by steady circulation of cold pressurized gas through a network of narrow tubes. By this method it is possible to dramatically reduce the radiative heat leak to the 20 K tank. A series of experiments, designed to investigate the heat transfer capabilities of BAC systems, have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Results of the final experiment in this series, investigating heat transfer from a metal foil film to a distributed cooling line, are presented here.

  18. Measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity of multi-layer insulation between 20 K and 90 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurd, Joseph A.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-29

    NASA has the need to efficiently store cryogenic propellants in space for long periods of time. One method to improve storage efficiency is to use multi-layer insulation (MLI), a technique that minimizes the boiling rate due to radiation heat transfer. Typically, the thermal performance of MLI is determined by measuring the rate of evaporation of liquid nitrogen from a calibrated cryostat. The main limitation with this method is that testing conditions are restricted by the boiling temperature of the LN{sub 2}, which may not match the requirements of the application. The Multi-Layer Insulation Thermal Conductivity Experiment (MIKE) at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is capable of measuring the effective thermal conductivity of MLI at variable boundary temperatures. MIKE uses cryo-refrigerators to control boundary temperatures in the calorimeter and a calibrated thermal link to measure the heat load. To make the measurements requested by NASA, MIKE needed to be recalibrated for the 20 K to 90 K range. Also, due to the expectation of a lower heat transfer rate, the heat load support rod material was changed to one with a lower thermal conductivity to ensure the temperature difference seen on the cold rod could be measurable at the estimated heat load. Presented are the alterations to MIKE including calibration data and heat load measurements on new load-bearing MLI supplied by NASA.

  19. Direct Measurement and Chemical Speciation of Top Ring Zone Liquid During Engine Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Splitter, Derek A; Burrows, Barry Clay; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The present manuscript consists of proof of concept experiments involving direct measurements and detailed chemical speciation from the top ring zone of a running engine. The work uses a naturally aspirated single cylinder utility engine that has been modified to allow direct liquid sample acquisition from behind the top ring. Samples were analyzed and spectated using gas chromatographic techniques. Results show that the liquid mixture in the top ring zone is neither neat lubricant nor fuel but a combination of the two with unique chemical properties. At the tested steady state no-load operating condition, the chemical species of the top ring zone liquid were found to be highly dependent on boiling point, where both low reactivity higher boiling point fuel species and lubricant are observed to be the dominant constituents. The results show that at least for the tested condition, approximately 25% of the top ring zone is comprised of gasoline fuel like molecules, which are dominated by high octane number aromatic species, while the remainder of the liquid is comprised of lubricant like species.

  20. Solar powered circulation pump development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.L.

    1980-09-01

    An iterative design and evaluation process was undertaken to develop a prototype solar powered liquid circulation pump. The first effort was to review the state-of-the-art of liquid piston heat engines. Next a morphological analysis of the original concept was performed. An analysis of the pump performance from a theoretical basis was performed by deriving and solving the equations governing the cycle. The results are documented. An experimental evaluation of the condensing phenomena was performed. The design of the boiler was then undertaken. This effort showed a fundamental physical limitation imposed by the original geometry and the physics of water boiling. In an effort to resolve this problem, a number of alternate configurations were examined, with the result being that the boiler and heat pipe elements of the design were entirely eliminated. In their stead it was assumed that the boiling could be conducted in the solar panel. A number of solar panel designs were examined, and the most appropriate type of solar panel is described in the appendix. A 1/4th scale unit was fabricated and tested. The overall efficiency was approximately 1% at the design point, compared with a theoretical limit of 1.6% for the given operating conditions. The production costs of the full size pump were examined. Finally systems integration aspects were considered and the results presented.