Sample records for nanotube umbilicals pnus

  1. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matsui, Hiroshi (Glen Rock, NJ); Matsunaga, Tadashi (Tokyo, JP)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  2. Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.; Wang, Zhongchun

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

  3. Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA); Wang, Zhongchun (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

  4. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Philip G

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For example, nanotube “supercapacitors” exhibit very large74). Furthermore, nanotube supercapacitors can charge and

  5. Photophysics of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samsonidze, Georgii G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reviews the recent advances made in optical studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Studying the electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanotubes, we find that carbon nanotubes less than 1 nm in ...

  6. Umbilical cord blood gas analysis at the time of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Umbilical cord blood gas analysis at the time of delivery Maureen Harris, Sarah L. Beckley, Jonathan M. Garibaldi, Robert D. E Keith and Keith R. Greene Aims: it is now recommended that cord blood. In this paper our experience of cord blood analysis is described and the literature is reviewed to: (I) provide

  7. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Haibing (Houston, TX); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, TX)

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  8. INTERACTIONS OF HUMAN UMBILICAL VEIN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS WITH TOBACCO TREATED STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    INTERACTIONS OF HUMAN UMBILICAL VEIN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS WITH TOBACCO TREATED STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS such as S. mutans treated with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) and nicotine have on human umbilical vein and supernatants will then be used to treat HUVEC cells for 72 hours before the media is collected and analyzed

  9. INTERACTIONS OF HUMAN UMBILICAL VEIN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS WITH TOBACCO TREATED STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    INTERACTIONS OF HUMAN UMBILICAL VEIN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS WITH TOBACCO TREATED STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS of S. mutans UA 159 has on binding to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) when treated to treat HUVECs for 72 hours and cytotoxicity was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays

  10. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

    2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  11. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong (El Cerrito, CA); He, Rongrui (El Cerrito, CA); Goldberger, Joshua (Berkeley, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA); Wu, Yiying (Albany, CA); Li, Deyu (Albany, CA); Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA)

    2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  12. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong (Berkeley, CA); He, Rongrui (El Cerrito, CA); Goldberger, Joshua (Berkeley, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA); Wu, Yiying (Albany, CA); Li, Deyu (Albany, CA); Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA)

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  13. Optically Functional Nanomaterials: Optothermally Responsive Composites and Carbon Nanotube Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okawa, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Carbon Nanotube Photovoltaics by David Christopher OkawaPart II: Carbon Nanotube Photovoltaics Chapter 6:Carbon Nanotube – Polymer Photovoltaics 6.1 Polymer-Nanotube

  14. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex K. (Kensington, CA); Jensen, Kenneth J. (Berkeley, CA); Girit, Caglar (Albany, CA); Mickelson, William E. (San Francisco, CA); Grossman, Jeffrey C. (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  15. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  16. Nanotube resonator devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  17. Boron nitride nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Michael W. (Newport News, VA); Jordan, Kevin (Newport News, VA); Park, Cheol (Yorktown, VA)

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  18. Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion irradiation of carbon nanotubes is a tool that can be used to achieve modification of the structure. Irradiation stability of carbon nanotubes was studied by ion and electron bombardment of the samples. Different ion ...

  19. Sensor applications of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushfeldt, Scott I

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search of published research on sensing mechanisms of carbon nanotubes was performed to identify applications in which carbon nanotubes might improve on current sensor technologies, in either offering improved performance, ...

  20. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noy, Aleksandr (Belmont, CA); Bakajin, Olgica (San Leandro, CA); Letant, Sonia (Livermore, CA); Stadermann, Michael (Dublin, CA); Artyukhin, Alexander B. (Menlo Park, CA)

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  1. The Evaluation of an Expert System for the Analysis of Umbilical Cord Blood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garibaldi, Jon

    H, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). A parameter termed base. Such assessment of the acid-base status of umbilical cord blood has recently been recommended by the British Royal the fact that the sampling took place within a research study which featured regular staff training

  2. Electrical Transport in Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Gang

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction to Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Single wallCarbon nanotubes and graphene are the most popular Carbonin the Normal Metal – Graphene – Superconductor Junctions

  3. Functionalized carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for biosensing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for biosensing applications. Functionalized carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for biosensing applications. Abstract: This review summarizes the recent...

  4. Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deck, Christian Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    around Surface-Attached Carbon Nanotubes. Ind. Eng. Chem.the flexural rigidity of carbon nanotube ensembles. AppliedNanotechnology in Carbon Materials. Acta Metallurgica, 1997.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Templated Asembly of Protein. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotube Templated Asembly of Protein. Carbon Nanotube Templated Asembly of Protein. Abstract: This paper describes a novel general strategy for fabricating protein-polyion...

  6. Accelerated dynamics simulations of nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uberuaga, B. P. (Blas Pedro); Stuart, S. J. (Steve J.); Voter, A. F.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the application of accelerated dynamics techniques to the study of carbon nanotubes. We have used the parallel replica method and temperature accelerated dynamics simulations are currently in progress. In the parallel replica study, we have stretched tubes at a rate significantly lower than that used in previous studies. In these preliminary results, we find that there are qualitative differences in the rupture of the nanotubes at different temperatures. We plan on extending this investigation to include nanotubes of various chiralities. We also plan on exploring unique geometries of nanotubes.

  7. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  8. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gennett, Thomas (Denver, CO); Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Honeoye Falls, NY); Landi, Brian J. (Rochester, NY); Heben, Michael J. (Denver, CO)

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  9. Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deck, Christian Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bonding in nanotubes also gives them high resistance to electro- migration, a current-assisted diffusion

  10. Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deck, Christian Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in carbon nanotube ceramic matrix composites. Actapolymeric, metallic, or ceramic matrix material. These fiber

  11. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  12. Modelling Heat Transfer of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xin-She

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modelling heat transfer of carbon nanotubes is important for the thermal management of nanotube-based composites and nanoelectronic device. By using a finite element method for three-dimensional anisotropic heat transfer, we have simulated the heat conduction and temperature variations of a single nanotube, a nanotube array and a part of nanotube-based composite surface with heat generation. The thermal conductivity used is obtained from the upscaled value from the molecular simulations or experiments. Simulations show that nanotube arrays have unique cooling characteristics due to its anisotropic thermal conductivity.

  13. Effect of bending buckling of carbon nanotubes on thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Effect of bending buckling of carbon nanotubes on thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube materials and lateral lattice strain states under a tensile load in as-reacted and prebent CuNb/Nb3Sn wires using;Effect of bending buckling of carbon nanotubes on thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube materials

  14. Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    were used in experiments, and several defect characterization techniques were applied to characterize the damage. Development of dimensional changes of carbon nanotubes in microscopes operated at accelerating voltages of 30 keV revealed that binding...

  15. Method for producing carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Perry, William L. (Jemez Springs, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

  16. Increasing carbon nanotube forest density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Alexander P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The outstanding mechanical, electrical, thermal, and morphological properties of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) open up exciting potential applications in a wide range of fields. One such application is replacing the ...

  17. Carbon nanotubes: synthesis and functionalization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Robert

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conditions were then used as the basis of several comparative CVD experiments showing that the quality of nanotubes and the yield of carbon depended on the availability of carbon to react. The availability could be controlled by the varying concentration...

  18. Emerging Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnorr, Jan Markus

    On the basis of their unique electrical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted great attention in recent years. A diverse array of methods has been developed to modify CNTs and to assemble them ...

  19. A carbon nanotube bearing and Stodola rotor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Eugene Hightower

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nano-scale rotor supported on a cantilevered multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) shaft (Stodola configuration) is proposed. The nanotube is also expected to function as the bearing, since individual walls of a MWNT are not ...

  20. Oligomer functionalized nanotubes and composites formed therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K; Sainsbury, Toby; Frechet, Jean M.J.

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a sequential functionalization methodology for the covalent modification of nanotubes with between one and four repeat units of a polymer. Covalent attachment of oligomer units to the surface of nanotubes results in oligomer units forming an organic sheath around the nanotubes, polymer-functionalized-nanotubes (P-NTs). P-NTs possess chemical functionality identical to that of the functionalizing polymer, and thus provide nanoscale scaffolds which may be readily dispersed within a monomer solution and participate in the polymerization reaction to form a polymer-nanotube/polymer composite. Formation of polymer in the presence of P-NTs leads to a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within the polymer matrix, in contrast to aggregated masses of nanotubes in the case of pristine-NTs. The covalent attachment of oligomeric units to the surface of nanotubes represents the formation of a functional nanoscale building block which can be readily dispersed and integrated within the polymer to form a novel composite material.

  1. Carbon Nanotubes: Bearing Stress Like Never Before

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limaye, Aditya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the mechanical properties of carbon nanotube– polymercomposites. Carbon, 44. 1624 – 1652 doi: 10.1016/j.R.H. , & Hart, A.J. (2013). Carbon Nanotubes: Present and

  2. Mechanical energy storage in carbon nanotube springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Frances Ann

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy storage in mechanical springs made of carbon nanotubes is a promising new technology. Springs made of dense, ordered arrays of carbon nanotubes have the potential to surpass both the energy density of electrochemical ...

  3. Mechanics of deformation of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Mohit, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deformation mechanics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays were studied using analytical and numerical methods. An equivalent orthotropic representation (EOR) ...

  4. Carbon Nanotubes Based Nanoelectrode Arrays: Fabrication, Evaluation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arrays: Fabrication, Evaluation and Application in Voltammetric Analysis. Carbon Nanotubes Based Nanoelectrode Arrays: Fabrication, Evaluation and Application in...

  5. Carbon nanotube composites P. J. F. Harris*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Peter J F

    Carbon nanotube composites P. J. F. Harris* Carbon nanotubes are molecular-scale tubes of graphitic carbon with outstanding properties. They are among the stiffest and strongest fibres known, with Young. There is currently great interest in exploiting these properties by incorporating carbon nanotubes into some form

  6. Electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube reinforced polyimide composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ounaies, Zoubeida

    Electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube reinforced polyimide composites Z. Ounaiesa of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) reinforced polyimide composites were investigated as a function nanotube; Composites 1. Introduction Polyimides are widely used in applications ranging from

  7. Modifying Nanotubes Chemistry and Electronics of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joselevich, Ernesto

    by electric fields, based on their different dielectric constants.[2] Recently, two groups simultaneously-wall car- bon nanotubes,[3] and have a high selec- tivity for metallic versus semiconducting carbon, based on differ- ences in physical properties, such as their dielectric response to electric fields

  8. Understanding the Nanotube Growth Mechanism: A Strategy to Control Nanotube Chirality during Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez Gualdron, Diego Armando 1983-

    2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    for the creation of novel and revolutionary electronic, medical, and energy technologies. However, a major stumbling block in the exploitation of nanotube-based technologies is the lack of control of nanotube structure (chirality) during synthesis, which...

  9. Molecular jet growth of carbon nanotubes and dense vertically aligned nanotube arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eres, Gyula (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of growing a carbon nanotube includes the step of impinging a beam of carbon-containing molecules onto a substrate to grow at least one carbon nanotube on the catalyst surface.

  10. Synthesis of supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica-wood composites. Synthesis of supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica-wood composites. Abstract: Multiwall carbon...

  11. Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with covalently-bound hexafluoroisopropanol groups. Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with...

  12. Cathodoluminescence from a device of carbon nanotube-field emission...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cathodoluminescence from a device of carbon nanotube-field emission display with ZnO nanocluster phosphor. Cathodoluminescence from a device of carbon nanotube-field emission...

  13. Band-Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes with Grain Boundaries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Band-Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes with Grain Boundaries. Band-Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes with Grain Boundaries. Abstract: Structure and electronic properties of...

  14. aligned carbon nanotube: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Transfer Printing of Aligned Carbon Nanotube Patterns and Characterization materials. For many promising nanomaterials, includ- ing carbon nanotubes (CNTs), major...

  15. aligned carbon nanotubes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Transfer Printing of Aligned Carbon Nanotube Patterns and Characterization materials. For many promising nanomaterials, includ- ing carbon nanotubes (CNTs), major...

  16. Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) for the Development of Electrochemical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CNTs) for the Development of Electrochemical Biosensors . Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) for the Development of Electrochemical Biosensors . Abstract: Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a very...

  17. Disposable Carbon Nanotube Modified Screen-Printed Biosensor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Nanotube Modified Screen-Printed Biosensor for Amperometric Detection of Organophosphorus Pesticides and Nerve Disposable Carbon Nanotube Modified Screen-Printed Biosensor...

  18. Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes in Organic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube...

  19. Supporting Information Nanofluidic Diodes based on Nanotube Heterojunctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong

    Supporting Information Nanofluidic Diodes based on Nanotube Heterojunctions Ruoxue Yan, Wenjie loaded with R6G. Nanotube diode device fabrication Nanofluidic diode devices interfaced

  20. Terahertz detection and carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, Francois

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

  1. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  2. Terahertz detection and carbon nanotubes

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Leonard, Francois

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

  3. Telescopic nanotube device for hot nanolithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popescu, Adrian; Woods, Lilia M

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for maintaining a constant tip-surface distance for producing nanolithography patterns on a surface using a telescopic nanotube for hot nanolithography. An outer nanotube is attached to an AFM cantilever opposite a support end. An inner nanotube is telescopically disposed within the outer nanotube. The tip of the inner nanotube is heated to a sufficiently high temperature and brought in the vicinity of the surface. Heat is transmitted to the surface for thermal imprinting. Because the inner tube moves telescopically along the outer nanotube axis, a tip-surface distance is maintained constant due to the vdW force interaction, which in turn eliminates the need of an active feedback loop.

  4. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  5. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  6. Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deck, Christian Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nanofibers in catalysis. Applied Catalysis A: General, 2003.the catalytic lifetime. Applied Catalysis A: General, 2001.properties have been applied to catalysis, where nanotube

  7. Hydrogen Raman shifts in carbon nanotubes from molecular dynamics simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, Donald W.

    Hydrogen Raman shifts in carbon nanotubes from molecular dynamics simulation S.J.V. Frankland *, D hydrogen in individual single-shell carbon nanotubes and nanotube ropes using a semiclassical model. The calculations predict that isolated hydrogen molecules inside of nanotubes have a Raman frequency that increases

  8. Oriented nanotube electrodes for lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Arthur J.; Zhu, Kai; Wang, Qing

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrode having an oriented array of multiple nanotubes is disclosed. Individual nanotubes have a lengthwise inner pore defined by interior tube walls which extends at least partially through the length of the nanotube. The nanotubes of the array may be oriented according to any identifiable pattern. Also disclosed is a device featuring an electrode and methods of fabrication.

  9. NASA Partners License Nanotube Technology for Commercial Use...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    prnewswire.comnews-releasesnasa-partners-license-nanotube-technology-for-commercial-use-149724205.html Submitted: Tuesday, May...

  10. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Insepov, Zeke (Darien, IL); Hassanein, Ahmed (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  11. Sacrificial template method of fabricating a nanotube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong (Berkeley, CA); He, Rongrui (Berkeley, CA); Goldberger, Joshua (Berkeley, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA); Wu, Yi-Ying (Albany, CA); Li, Deyu (Albany, CA); Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of fabricating uniform nanotubes are described in which nanotubes were synthesized as sheaths over nanowire templates, such as using a chemical vapor deposition process. For example, single-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are utilized as templates over which gallium nitride (GaN) is epitaxially grown. The ZnO templates are then removed, such as by thermal reduction and evaporation. The completed single-crystalline GaN nanotubes preferably have inner diameters ranging from 30 nm to 200 nm, and wall thicknesses between 5 and 50 nm. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that the resultant nanotubes are single-crystalline with a wurtzite structure, and are oriented along the <001> direction. The present invention exemplifies single-crystalline nanotubes of materials with a non-layered crystal structure. Similar "epitaxial-casting" approaches could be used to produce arrays and single-crystalline nanotubes of other solid materials and semiconductors. Furthermore, the fabrication of multi-sheath nanotubes are described as well as nanotubes having multiple longitudinal segments.

  12. ccsd00003923, Combination of carbon nanotubes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of composite optical limiters, in which two complementary nonlinear optical materials are mixed togetherccsd­00003923, version 1 ­ 18 Jan 2005 Combination of carbon nanotubes and two-photon absorbers-linear scattering from single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and multiphoton absorption (MPA) from organic

  13. PLANAR MEMS SUPERCAPACITOR USING CARBON NANOTUBE FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    PLANAR MEMS SUPERCAPACITOR USING CARBON NANOTUBE FORESTS Y.Q. Jiang, Q. Zhou, and L. Lin Mechanical ABSTRACT Planar micro supercapacitors utilizing vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and very robust cycling stability. As such, we believe these planar MEMS supercapacitors could

  14. Inorganic Nanotubes: A Novel Platform for Nanofluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong

    Inorganic Nanotubes: A Novel Platform for Nanofluidics JOSHUA GOLDBERGER, RONG FAN, AND PEIDONG are being developed for the synthesis of inorganic nanotubes, a novel platform for nanofluidics. Single modulation of ionic conductance. These nanofluidic devices have been further dem- onstrated to be useful

  15. CARBON NANOTUBES: PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, John, E.

    2009-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991 as a minority byproduct of fullerene synthesis. Remarkable progress has been made in the ensuing years, including the discovery of two basic types of nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall), great strides in synthesis and purification, elucidation of many fundamental physical properties, and important steps towards practical applications. Both the underlying science and technological potential of SWNT can profitably be studied at the scale of individual tubes and on macroscopic assemblies such as fibers. Experiments on single tubes directly reveal many of the predicted quantum confinement and mechanical properties. Semiconductor nanowires have many features in common with nanotubes, and many of the same fundamental and practical issues are in play – quantum confinement and its effect on properties; possible device structures and circuit architectures; thermal management; optimal synthesis, defect morphology and control, etc. In 2000 we began a small effort in this direction, conducted entirely by undergraduates with minimal consumables support from this grant. With DOE-BES approval, this grew into a project in parallel with the carbon nanotube work, in which we studied of inorganic semiconductor nanowire growth, characterization and novel strategies for electronic and electromechanical device fabrication. From the beginnings of research on carbon nanotubes, one of the major applications envisioned was hydrogen storage for fuel-cell powered cars and trucks. Subsequent theoretical models gave mixed results, the most pessimistic indicating that the fundamental H2-SWNT interaction was similar to flat graphite (physisorption) with only modest binding energies implying cryogenic operation at best. New material families with encouraging measured properties have emerged, and materials modeling has gained enormously in predictive power, sophistication, and the ability to treat a realistically representative number of atoms. One of the new materials, highly porous carbide-derived carbons (CDC), is the subject of an add-on to this grant awarded to myself and Taner Yildirim (NIST). Results from the add-on led eventually to a new 3-year award DE-FG02-08ER46522 “From Fundamental Understanding to Predicting New Nanomaterials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage”, $1000K, (05/31/2008 - 05/01/2011) with Taner Yildirim and myself as co-PI’s.

  16. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  17. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  18. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  19. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian (Newton, MA); Chen, Jinghua (Chestnut Hill, MA); Huang, Zhongping (Belmont, MA); Wang, Dezhi (Wellesley, MA)

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  20. BX CY NZ nanotubes and nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Marvin Lou (Piedmont, CA); Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides crystalline nanoscale particles and tubes made from a variety of stoichiometries of B.sub.x C.sub.y N.sub.z where x, y, and z indicate a relative amount of each element compared to the others and where no more than one of x, y, or z are zero for a single stoichiometry. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are useful as miniature electronic components, such as wires, coils, schotky barriers, diodes, etc. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are also useful as coating that will protect an item from detection by electromagnetic monitoring techniques like radar. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are additionally useful for their mechanical properties, being comparable in strength and stiffness to the best graphite fibers or carbon nanotubes. The inventive nanoparticles are useful in lubricants and composites.

  1. Stimuli-responsive polymer nanotube arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chia, Khek-Khiang

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanotube arrays, composed of materials such as carbon, titania, and zinc oxide, have shown potential as conductors, energy conversion devices, actuators, and adhesives. Such nanoscale constructs are particularly novel for ...

  2. Nanolithographic control of carbon nanotube synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huitink, David Ryan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method offering precise control over the synthesis conditions to obtain carbon nanotube (CNT) samples of a single chirality (metallic or semi-conducting) is presented. Using this nanolithographic method of catalyst deposition, the location of CNT...

  3. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Gao (Oakland, CA); Johnson, Stephen (Richmond, CA); Kerr, John B. (Oakland, CA); Minor, Andrew M. (El Cerrito, CA); Mao, Samuel S. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  4. Carbon nanotube-based field ionization vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Daniel, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the development of a novel micropump architecture that uses arrays of isolated vertical carbon nanotubes (CNT) to field ionize gas particles. The ionized gas molecules are accelerated to and implanted into a ...

  5. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph (Arvada, CO); Heben, Michael J. (Denver, CO)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  6. Carbon nanotube interconnects for IC chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anwar Ali, Hashina Parveen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been investigated as candidate materials to replace or augment the existing copper-based technologies as interconnects for Integrated Circuit (IC) chips. Being ballistic conductors, CNTs are ...

  7. Carbon nanotube bearings in theory and practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Eugene Hightower

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are attractive elements for bearings in Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), because their structure comprises nested shells with no bonding and sub-nanometer spacing between them, enabling ...

  8. Towards a carbon nanotube antibody sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojö, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/polymer-protein A complexes for optically reporting antibody concentration via a change in near infrared fluorescent emission after antibody binding. SWNT have ...

  9. Carbon nanotube synthesis for integrated circuit interconnects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nessim, Gilbert Daniel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on their properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been identified as ideal replacements for copper interconnects in integrated circuits given their higher current density, inertness, and higher resistance to ...

  10. Functionalization and applications of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnorr, Jan M. (Jan Markus)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess a unique set of electrical and mechanical properties and have been used in a variety of applications. In this thesis, we explore strategies to functionalize CNTs as well as applications which ...

  11. Transplanting assembly of individual carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Soohyung

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Handling and assembling individual nanostructures to bigger scale systems such as MEMS have been the biggest challenge. A deterministic assembly of individual carbon nanotubes by transplanting them to MEMS structures is ...

  12. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  13. Nanotube Formation: Researchers Learn To Control The Dimensions Of Metal Oxide Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    made from metal oxides -- work that could lead to a technique for precisely conNanotube Formation: Researchers Learn To Control The Dimensions Of Metal Oxide Nanotubes Science their diameter and length. Based on metal oxides in combination with silicon and germanium, such single

  14. Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composites While there are limitless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Julie P.

    Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composites Figure1 Figure2 While there are limitless applications industry. Initially, we focused on optically transparent single wall nanotoube (SWNT) polymer composites (2 to produce poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanotube composites. When these composites are dissolved

  15. A Continuum Model for Carbon Nanotube-Infused Polyimides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Continuum Model for Carbon Nanotube-Infused Polyimides Heather Wilson1 , Sumanth Banda2 , Ralph C, the materials need to withstand this process. The nanotube-infused polyimides are flexible enough to withstand

  16. Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel 1985-

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in various fields demands a thorough investigation of their stability under irradiation. Open structure, ability to reorganize and heal defects, and large surface-to-volume ratio of carbon nanotubes affect...

  17. Energy Carrier Transport In Surface-Modified Carbon Nanotubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Yeontack

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    on carbon nanotubes was employed to enhance their electrical conductivity, to improve thermoelectric power factor by modulating their electrical conductance and thermopower, or to obtain n-type converted carbon nanotube. The electrical conductivity of double...

  18. Testing and characterization of carbon nanotubes as strain sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Juan D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of using carbon nanotube coated flexible cloth as strain gauges was studied. Samples were prepared by sonicating strips of cloth inside a 1mg/ml carbon nanotube in propylene carbonate solution. A dynamic ...

  19. ambipolar nanotube field: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in All-Carbon-Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors by Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Coating Materials Science Websites Summary: Ambipolar Behavior in All-Carbon-Nanotube Field-Effect...

  20. First Principles Prediction of Nitrogen-doped Carbon Nanotubes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Principles Prediction of Nitrogen-doped Carbon Nanotubes as a High-Performance Cathode for Li-S Batteries. First Principles Prediction of Nitrogen-doped Carbon Nanotubes as a...

  1. Analyzing manufacturing methods of carbon nanotubes for commercialization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dee, H. Devin (Herbert Devin)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research explores the history and structure of carbon nanotubes and the current technologies and methods available for synthesizing, purifying, and assembling carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, the current state of ...

  2. Flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes and metallic nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Height, Murray John, 1975-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes are a remarkable material with many appealing properties. Despite the appeal of this material, there are few synthesis techniques capable of producing nanotubes in large quantities at low-cost. The broad ...

  3. Nanoelectro-mechanical systems based on carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    are long thin tubes made from rolled up single sheets of graphene. Nanotube resonators have already reached", in preparation. #12;

  4. Method for synthesis of titanium dioxide nanotubes using ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for producing titanium dioxide nanotubes, the method comprising anodizing titanium metal in contact with an electrolytic medium containing an ionic liquid. The invention is also directed to the resulting titanium dioxide nanotubes, as well as devices incorporating the nanotubes, such as photovoltaic devices, hydrogen generation devices, and hydrogen detection devices.

  5. Carbon nanotubes used to form fast, flexible circuitry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Carbon nanotubes used to form fast, flexible circuitry By Yun Xie | Published: July 23, 2008 - 12 the semiconductor portion of these flexible integrated circuits. Related Stories Carbon nanotubes as molecular scales Carbon nanotubes send electrons for a spin These conventional materials are serviceable

  6. Inorganic nanotubes and electro-fluidic devices fabricated therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong (Kensington, CA); Majumdar, Arunava (Orinda, CA); Fan, Rong (Pasadena, CA); Karnik, Rohit (Cambridge, MA)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofluidic devices incorporating inorganic nanotubes fluidly coupled to channels or nanopores for supplying a fluid containing chemical or bio-chemical species are described. In one aspect, two channels are fluidly interconnected with a nanotube. Electrodes on opposing sides of the nanotube establish electrical contact with the fluid therein. A bias current is passed between the electrodes through the fluid, and current changes are detected to ascertain the passage of select molecules, such as DNA, through the nanotube. In another aspect, a gate electrode is located proximal the nanotube between the two electrodes thus forming a nanofluidic transistor. The voltage applied to the gate controls the passage of ionic species through the nanotube selected as either or both ionic polarities. In either of these aspects the nanotube can be modified, or functionalized, to control the selectivity of detection or passage.

  7. Carbon Nanotubes: Measuring Dispersion and Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Bauer, Barry J.; Hobbie, Erik K.; Becker, Matthew L.; Hight-Walker, Angela; Simpson, Jeffrey R.; Chun, Jaehun; Obrzut, Jan; Bajpai, Vardhan; Phelan, Fred R.; Simien, Daneesh; Yeon Huh, Ji; Migler, Kalman B.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced technological uses of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) rely on the production of single length and chirality populations that are currently only available through liquid phase post processing. The foundation of all of these processing steps is the attainment of individualized nanotube dispersion in solution; an understanding of the collodial properties of the dispersed SWCNTs can then be used to designed appropriate conditions for separations. In many instances nanotube size, particularly length, is especially active in determining the achievable properties from a given population, and thus there is a critical need for measurement technologies for both length distribution and effective separation techniques. In this Progress Report, we document the current state of the art for measuring dispersion and length populations, including separations, and use examples to demonstrate the desirability of addressing these parameters.

  8. Extended Platinum Nanotubes as Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alia, S.; Pivovar, B. S.; Yan, Y.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy consumption has relied principally on fossil fuels as an energy source; fuel cells, however, can provide a clean and sustainable alternative, an answer to the depletion and climate change concerns of fossil fuels. Within proton exchange membrane fuel cells, high catalyst cost and poor durability limit the commercial viability of the device. Recently, platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) were studied as durable, active catalysts, providing a platform to meet US Department of Energy vehicular activity targets.[1] Porous PtNTs were developed to increase nanotube surface area, improving mass activity for oxygen reduction without sacrificing durability.[2] Subsurface platinum was then replaced with palladium, forming platinum-coated palladium nanotubes.[3] By forming a core shell structure, platinum utilization was increased, reducing catalyst cost. Alternative substrates have also been examined, modifying platinum surface facets and increasing oxygen reduction specific activity. Through modification of the PtNT platform, catalyst limitations can be reduced, ensuring a commercially viable device.

  9. First principles study of structure and lithium storage in inorganic nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tibbetts, Kevin (Kevin Joseph)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The exact structure of layered inorganic nanotubes is difficult to determine, but this information is vital to using atomistic calculations to predict nanotube properties. A multi-walled nanotube with a circular cross ...

  10. Engineering carbon nanostructures : development of novel aerogel-nanotube composites and optimization techniques for nanotube growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Stephen Alan, III

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels offer several unique advantages which make them ideal for evaluating a metal's ability to catalyze nanotube growth, including in situ carbothermic reduction of oxidized nanoparticles to their catalytic ...

  11. Understanding the Nanotube Growth Mechanism: A Strategy to Control Nanotube Chirality during Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez Gualdron, Diego Armando 1983-

    2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    For two decades, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have captured the attention of the research community, and become one of the flagships of nanotechnology. Due to their remarkable electronic and optical properties, SWCNTs are prime candidates...

  12. Impact of carbon nanotube length on electron transport in aligned carbon nanotube networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jeonyoon

    Here, we quantify the electron transport properties of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) networks as a function of the CNT length, where the electrical conductivities may be tuned by up to 10× with anisotropies exceeding 40%. ...

  13. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Michael W. (Newport News, VA); Jordan, Kevin (Newport News, VA); Park, Cheol (Yorktown, VA)

    2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  14. Does water dope carbon nanotubes?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Robert A.; Payne, Michael C. [Theory of Condensed Matter Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Mostofi, Arash A. [Department of Materials and Department of Physics, and the Thomas Young Centre for Theory and Simulation of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the long-range perturbation to the electronic charge density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a result of the physisorption of a water molecule. We find that the dominant effect is a charge redistribution in the CNT due to polarisation caused by the dipole moment of the water molecule. The charge redistribution is found to occur over a length-scale greater than 30 Å, highlighting the need for large-scale simulations. By comparing our fully first-principles calculations to ones in which the perturbation due to a water molecule is treated using a classical electrostatic model, we estimate that the charge transfer between CNT and water is negligible (no more than 10{sup ?4}?e per water molecule). We therefore conclude that water does not significantly dope CNTs, a conclusion that is consistent with the poor alignment of the relevant energy levels of the water molecule and CNT. Previous calculations that suggest water n-dopes CNTs are likely due to the misinterpretation of Mulliken charge partitioning in small supercells.

  15. Fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Geohegan, David B. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilya N. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Puretzky, Alexander A [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites. A composition includes a vertically aligned nanotube array including a plurality of nanotubes characterized by a property across substantially all of the vertically aligned nanotube array. A method includes depositing a vertically aligned nanotube array that includes a plurality of nanotubes; and controlling a deposition rate of the vertically aligned nanotubes array as a function of an in situ monitored property of the plurality of nanotubes.

  16. Doped Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) measurements yielded an average nitrogen content of ~5 that result in a high yield of material possessing favorable characteristics · Utilize theoretical modeling or nitrogen largely due to the possibility of fabricating nanotube materials with tailored electrical

  17. Nanotube/Nanowire Based ORR Catalyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation about nanotube or nanowire-based oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts, presented by Yushan Yan, University of Delaware, at the kick-off meeting of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program's Catalysis Working Group, held May 14, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia.

  18. Nanotubes, Nanowires and Nano-electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    composites have applications in integrated circuits, photonics, solar cells, and displays. ECE professor promising light sensitivity, and which could be used for developing future solar cells. Advances in Nano industrial uses. One potential application for single-walled nanotubes is electron emitters for flat-panel

  19. Nanofluidic Diodes Based on Nanotube Heterojunctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong

    Nanofluidic Diodes Based on Nanotube Heterojunctions Ruoxue Yan, Wenjie Liang, Rong Fan devices has recently been implemented into the nanofluidic field for the active control of ion transport, a signature of ionic diode behavior. Such nanofluidic diodes could find applications in ion separation

  20. Deformable Transparent All-Carbon-Nanotube Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    and organic materials16,17 are candidates for next-generation flexible and transparent electronic devices-carbon-nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT- FETs), making use of the flexible yet robust nature of single than those used in other flexible CNT-FETs allowed our devices to be highly deformable without

  1. Diffusion through Carbon Nanotube Semipermeable membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakajin, O

    2006-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to measure transport through CNTs and study effects of confinement at molecular scale. This work is motivated by several simulation papers in high profile journals that predict significantly higher transport rates of gases and liquids through carbon nanotubes as compared with similarly-sized nanomaterials (e.g. zeolites). The predictions are based on the effects of confinement, atomically smooth pore walls and high pore density. Our work will provide the first measurements that would compare to and hopefully validate the simulations. Gas flux is predicted to be >1000X greater for SWNTs versus zeolitesi. A high flux of 6-30 H2O/NT/ns {approx} 8-40 L/min for a 1cm{sup 2} membrane is also predicted. Neutron diffraction measurements indicate existence of a 1D water chain within a cylindrical ice sheet inside carbon nanotubes, which is consistent with the predictions of the simulation. The enabling experimental platform that we are developing is a semipermeable membrane made out of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with gaps between nanotubes filled so that the transport occurs through the nanotubes. The major challenges of this project included: (1) Growth of CNTs in the suitable vertically aligned configuration, especially the single wall carbon nanotubes; (2) Development of a process for void-free filling gaps between CNTs; and (3) Design of the experiments that will probe the small amounts of analyte that go through. Knowledge of the behavior of water upon nanometer-scale confinement is key to understanding many biological processes. For example, the protein folding process is believed to involve water confined in a hydrophobic environment. In transmembrane proteins such as aquaporins, water transport occurs under similar conditions. And in fields as far removed as oil recovery and catalysis, an understanding of the nanoscale molecular transport occurring within the nanomaterials used (e.g. zeolites) is the key to process optimization. Furthermore, advancement of many emerging nanotechnologies in chemistry and biology will undoubtedly be aided by an understanding confined water transport, particularly the details of hydrogen bonding and solvation that become crucial on this length scale. We can envision several practical applications for our devices, including desalination, gas separations, dialysis, and semipermeable fabrics for protection against CW agents etc. The single wall carbon nanotube membranes will be the key platform for applications because they will allow high transport rates of small molecules such as water and eliminate solvated ions or CW agents.

  2. Water-splitting using photocatalytic porphyrin-nanotube composite devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Miller, James E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wang, Zhongchun (Albuquerque, NM); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for generating hydrogen by photocatalytic decomposition of water using porphyrin nanotube composites. In some embodiments, both hydrogen and oxygen are generated by photocatalytic decomposition of water.

  3. PtRu/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Synthesized in Supercritical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid: A Novel Electrocatalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell. PtRuCarbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid: A Novel...

  4. Continuous Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzman de Villoria, Roberto

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes are one of the most promising materials due their numerous applications in flexible electronic devices, biosensors and multifunctional aircraft materials, among others. However, the ...

  5. Platinum/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Synthesized in Supercritical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanocomposite Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid as Electrocatalysts for Low-Temperature Fuel Cells. PlatinumCarbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid as...

  6. Carbon nanotube oscillator surface profiling device and method of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popescu, Adrian (Tampa, FL); Woods, Lilia M. (Tampa, FL); Bondarev, Igor V. (Fuquay Varina, NC)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed device is based on a carbon nanotube oscillator consisting of a finite length outer stationary nanotube and a finite length inner oscillating nanotube. Its main function is to measure changes in the characteristics of the motion of the carbon nanotube oscillating near a sample surface, and profile the roughness of this surface. The device operates in a non-contact mode, thus it can be virtually non-wear and non-fatigued system. It is an alternative to the existing atomic force microscope (AFM) tips used to scan surfaces to determine their roughness.

  7. Carbon nanotube applications for CMOS back-end processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Tan Mau, 1979-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes are a recently discovered material with excellent mechanical, thermal, and electronic properties. In particular, they are potential ballistic transporters and are theorized to have thermal conductivities ...

  8. Electrochemical Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Titania Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Que Anh

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    titanium, oxygen, and fluoride in heat- treated nanotube samples. corresponding to energy-energy values are cap- tured. In this analysis, the chemical elements of interest are titanium,

  9. Carbon nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic self-assembly: a highly active oxygen reduction Carbon nanotubes decorated with Pt nanoparticles via electrostatic self-assembly: a highly...

  10. Carbon Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensor for Assay of Salivary...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensor for Assay of Salivary Cholinesterase Enzyme Activity: An Exposure Biomarker of Carbon Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensor for Assay of Salivary Cholinesterase Enzyme...

  11. Towards structural health monitoring in carbon nanotube reinforced composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wennie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation was conducted to understand the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) capabilities of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of several network architectures towards structural health monitoring (SHM). As ...

  12. Characterization of composites with aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Enrique J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes' (CNTs) superlative combination of electrical, thermal, and especially mechanical properties make them ideal candidates for composite reinforcement. Nanocomposites and hybrid composite architectures employing ...

  13. Scanning electron microscopy study of carbon nanotubes heated at high temperatures in air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . INTRODUCTION Because of their remarkable physical and electronic properties, carbon nanotubes are promising nanotubes in air,3,4 in an oxygen stream,5 or under a flow of carbon dioxide gas.6 Thinning of nanotubesScanning electron microscopy study of carbon nanotubes heated at high temperatures in air Xuekun Lu

  14. Rheology, Morphology and Temperature Dependency of Nanotube Networks in Polycarbonate/Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, Samaneh; Carreau, Pierre J. [CREPEC, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique, P.O. Box 6079, Station Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC, H3C 3A7 (Canada); Derdouri, Abdessalem [CREPEC, Industrial Materials Institute, National Research Council Canada, 75, de Mortagne, Boucherville, QC, JB4 6Y4 (Canada)

    2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present several issues related to the state of dispersion and rheological behavior of polycarbonate/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composites. The composites were prepared by diluting a commercial masterbatch containing 15 wt% nanotubes using optimized melt-mixing conditions. The state of dispersion was then analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM). Rheological characterization was also used to assess the final morphology. Further, it was found that the rheological percolation threshold decreased significantly with increasing temperature and finally reached a constant value. This is described in terms of the Brownian motion, which increases with temperature. However, by increasing the nanotube content, the temperature effects on the complex viscosity at low frequency decreased significantly. Finally, the percolation thresholds were found to be approximately equal to 0.3 and 2 wt% for rheological and electrical conductivity measurements, respectively.

  15. Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng F. (Newton, MA); Tu, Yi (Belmont, MA)

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

  16. An ultrafast carbon nanotube terahertz polarisation modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Docherty, Callum J.; Stranks, Samuel D.; Habisreutinger, Severin N.; Joyce, Hannah J.; Herz, Laura M.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Johnston, Michael B., E-mail: m.johnston@physics.ox.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate ultrafast modulation of terahertz radiation by unaligned optically pumped single-walled carbon nanotubes. Photoexcitation by an ultrafast optical pump pulse induces transient terahertz absorption in nanowires aligned parallel to the optical pump. By controlling the polarisation of the optical pump, we show that terahertz polarisation and modulation can be tuned, allowing sub-picosecond modulation of terahertz radiation. Such speeds suggest potential for semiconductor nanowire devices in terahertz communication technologies.

  17. Carbon Nanotube DNA Sensor and Sensing Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    nanotube (SWNT) DNA sensors and the sensing mechanism. The simple and generic protocol for label for direct label-free detection of DNA hybridization in a biocompatible buffer solution. We also carried out is a field effect device, which has a typical on-current of 3-6 µA at 10 mV source- drain bias and an on-off

  18. Carbon Nanotubes for Thermoacoustic Contrast Enhancement Preliminary Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patch, Sarah

    ) and SWNTs4,5 for near-infrared illumination. It has been reported that SWNTs can enhance heating these measurements on nanotubes. 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Review of experimental CNT heating enhancement results nanotubes into solutions and tissues can cause an increase in the materials' heating upon EM illumination

  19. A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles for Potential Energy Applications coated with nanoparticles of multiple materials to realize the multicomponent coating. High resolution.1115/1.2787026 Keywords: carbon nanotubes, nanoparticles, electrostatic force directed assembly, coating, size selection

  20. Percolation in Transparent and Conducting Carbon Nanotube Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, George

    and chemical sensors9 , field emission devices10,11 , and transparent conductive coatings7 . We12 , and another. Transmission measurements also indicate the usefulness of nanotube network films as a transparent, conductive coating. Avenues for improvement of the network transparency are discussed. KEYWORDS Nanotubes, Networks

  1. Doped Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Storage Ragaiy Zidan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hydrogen storage system is expected to be simple to engineer and tremendously safer. Carbon nanotubesDoped Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Storage Ragaiy Zidan Savannah River Technology Center Savannah-capacity hydrogen storage material. The final product should have favorable thermodynamics and kinetics

  2. CARBON NANOTUBE POLYMER NANOCOMPOSITES FOR ELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEM APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Arnab

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ....................................................................... 43 2.4.4 Elastic Modulus of Multi-wall Nanotubes ...................................................... 45 2.4.5 Twist/Torsion Modulus of Carbon Nanotubes ................................................ 49 2.4.6 Twist Modulus of Single... Torsion ............................................................................................................ 9? Figure 6 An Uncompahgre Ute Buffalo rawhide ceremonial rattle filled with quartz crystals 18...

  3. Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors Coskun Kocabas*, Hoon properties of individ- ual tubes. We have implemented solutions to some of these challenges to yield radio band with power gains as high as 14 dB. As a demon- stration, we fabricated nanotube transistor radios

  4. Functionalized Few-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Mechanical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jie

    Functionalized Few-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Mechanical Reinforcement of Polymeric Composites Ye the application of such materials as reinforcing fillers in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)- based composites. The results-polymer composites has remained elusive. In this study, free-standing carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/polymer composite films

  5. Water transport through functionalized nanotubes with tunable hydrophobicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskowitz, Ian; Snyder, Mark A.; Mittal, Jeetain, E-mail: jeetain@lehigh.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States)

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the occupancy and flow of water through nanotubes comprised of hydrophobic and hydrophilic atoms, which are arranged on a honeycomb lattice to mimic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We consider single-file motion of TIP3P water through narrow channels of (6,6) CNTs with varying fractions (f) of hydrophilic atoms. Various arrangements of hydrophilic atoms are used to create heterogeneous nanotubes with separate hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains along the tube as well as random mixtures of the two types of atoms. The water occupancy inside the nanotube channel is found to vary nonlinearly as a function of f, and a small fraction of hydrophilic atoms (f ? 0.4) are sufficient to induce spontaneous and continuous filling of the nanotube. Interestingly, the average number of water molecules inside the channel and water flux through the nanotube are less sensitive to the specific arrangement of hydrophilic atoms than to the fraction, f. Two different regimes are observed for the water flux dependence on f – an approximately linear increase in flux as a function of f for f < 0.4, and almost no change in flux for higher f values, similar to the change in water occupancy. We are able to define an effective interaction strength between nanotube atoms and water's oxygen, based on a linear combination of interaction strengths between hydrophobic and hydrophilic nanotube atoms and water, that can quantitatively capture the observed behavior.

  6. Water transport through functionalized nanotubes with tunable hydrophobicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian Moskowitz; Mark A. Snyder; Jeetain Mittal

    2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the occupancy and flow of water through nanotubes comprised of hydrophobic and hydrophilic atoms, which are arranged on a honeycomb lattice to mimic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We consider single-file motion of TIP3P water through narrow channels of (6,6) CNTs with varying fractions (f) of hydrophilic atoms. Various arrangements of hydrophilic atoms are used to create heterogeneous nanotubes with separate hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains along the tube as well as random mixtures of the two types of atoms. The water occupancy inside the nanotube channel is found to vary nonlinearly as a function of f, and a small fraction of hydrophilic atoms (f ~ 0.4) are sufficient to induce spontaneous and continuous filling of the nanotube. Interestingly, the average number of water molecules inside the channel and water flux through the nanotube are less sensitive to the specific arrangement of hydrophilic atoms than to the fraction, f. Two different regimes are observed for the water flux dependence on f - an approximately linear increase in flux as a function of f for f water occupancy. We are able to define an effective interaction strength between nanotube atoms and water's oxygen, based on a linear combination of interaction strengths between hydrophobic and hydrophilic nanotube atoms and water, that can quantitatively capture the observed behavior.

  7. Carbon nanotubes as photoacoustic molecular imaging agents in living mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

    Carbon nanotubes as photoacoustic molecular imaging agents in living mice ADAM DE LA ZERDA1 not shown to target a diseased site in living subjects. Here we show that single-walled carbon nanotubes were verified ex vivo using Raman microscopy. Photoacoustic imaging of targeted single-walled carbon

  8. adding carbon nanotubes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adding carbon nanotubes First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Carbon Nanotubes. Open Access...

  9. asbestos carbon nanotubes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    asbestos carbon nanotubes First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Carbon Nanotubes. Open Access...

  10. Apparatus for the laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Michael W. (Newport News, VA); Jordan, Kevin (Newport News, VA)

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of carbon nanotubes. Such an apparatus, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently provides a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization.

  11. Bouncing Water Droplet on a Superhydrophobic Carbon Nanotube Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aria, Adrianus I

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past few decades, superhydrophobic materials have attaracted a lot of interests, due to their numerous practical applications. Among various superhydrophobic materials, carbon nanotube arrays have gained enormous attentions simply because of their outstanding properties. The impact dynamic of water droplet on a superhydrophobic carbon nanotube array is shown in this fluid dynamics video.

  12. Superhydrophobic Carbon Nanotube Forests Kenneth K. S. Lau*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superhydrophobic Carbon Nanotube Forests Kenneth K. S. Lau*1 , José Bico2 , Kenneth B. K. Teo3 demonstrates the creation of a stable, superhydrophobic surface using the nano-scale roughness inherent (PTFE) coating on the surface of the nanotubes. Superhydrophobicity is achieved down to the microscopic

  13. Structure of Carbon Nanotubes as a Product of Processing Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    a step back and attempt to understand how processing of a carbon nanotube correlates to its structure installed a 1" diameter spiral substrate heater upon which samples can be set. The chamber is also connected go through a number of prepping steps. Currently the carbon nanotubes that we have obtained have been

  14. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Bhardwaj, Sunil [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Sincrotone Trieste S.C.p.A., s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Cepek, Cinzia [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  15. Rotational actuator of motor based on carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA); Fennimore, Adam M. (Berkeley, CA); Yuzvinsky, Thomas D. (Berkeley, CA)

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotational actuator/motor based on rotation of a carbon nanotube is disclosed. The carbon nanotube is provided with a rotor plate attached to an outer wall, which moves relative to an inner wall of the nanotube. After deposit of a nanotube on a silicon chip substrate, the entire structure may be fabricated by lithography using selected techniques adapted from silicon manufacturing technology. The structures to be fabricated may comprise a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT), two in plane stators S1, S2 and a gate stator S3 buried beneath the substrate surface. The MWNT is suspended between two anchor pads and comprises a rotator attached to an outer wall and arranged to move in response to electromagnetic inputs. The substrate is etched away to allow the rotor to freely rotate. Rotation may be either in a reciprocal or fully rotatable manner.

  16. Mesoporous organosilica nanotubes containing a chelating ligand in their walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiao; Goto, Yasutomo; Maegawa, Yoshifumi; Inagaki, Shinji, E-mail: inagaki@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp [Toyota Central R and D Laboratories, Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST)/ACT-C, Nagakute, Aichi, 480-1192 (Japan); Ohsuna, Tetsu [Toyota Central R and D Laboratories, Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the synthesis of organosilica nanotubes containing 2,2?-bipyridine chelating ligands within their walls, employing a single-micelle-templating method. These nanotubes have an average pore diameter of 7.8 nm and lengths of several hundred nanometers. UV-vis absorption spectra and scanning transmission electron microscopy observations of immobilized nanotubes with an iridium complex on the bipyridine ligands showed that the 2,2?-bipyridine groups were homogeneously distributed in the benzene-silica walls. The iridium complex, thus, immobilized on the nanotubes exhibited efficient catalytic activity for water oxidation using Ce{sup 4+}, due to the ready access of reactants to the active sites in the nanotubes.

  17. Individual Single-Walled Nanotubes and Hydrogels Made by Oxidative Exfoliation of Carbon Nanotube Ropes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is attributed to the formation of a hydrogen-bonded nanotube network. The oxidized tubes bind readily to amine been demonstrated. They have been successfully used in nanoelectronic2 and photovoltaic3 devices and as scanning probe tips,9 chemical10a and flow10b sensors, hydrogen-storage reservoirs,11 nanocomposite

  18. Nanotube Fabrication byNanotube Fabrication by Anodic Aluminum Oxide,Anodic Aluminum Oxide,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    High density devices for energy capture, storage, displays, ... #12;Nanofabrication by Self-aligned processes to form nanostructures Self-limiting chemical synthesis by HfO2 nanotubes Self-limiting chemical approaches to control materials, devices, and products at the nanoscale Natural phenomena (self

  19. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    López-Oyama, A. B.; Silva-Molina, R. A.; Ruíz-García, J.; Guirado-López, R. A., E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Física “Manuel Sandoval Vallarta,” Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Álvaro Obregón 64, 78000 San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Gámez-Corrales, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, 83190, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH–MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ?2 nm, lengths of approximately 100–300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage ??0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH–MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO–LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube ? OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH–MWCNTs might have promising applications.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Assemblies for Transparent Conducting Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, Matthew P [ORNL] [ORNL; Gerhardt, Rosario [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this chapter is to introduce readers to the fundamental and practical aspects of nanotube assemblies made into transparent conducting networks and discuss some practical aspects of their characterization. Transparent conducting coatings (TCC) are an essential part of electro-optical devices, from photovoltaics and light emitting devices to electromagnetic shielding and electrochromic widows. The market for organic materials (including nanomaterials and polymers) based TCCs is expected to show a growth rate of 56.9% to reach nearly 20.3billionin2015,whilethemarketfortraditionalinorganictransparentelectronicswillexperiencegrowthwithratesof6.7103 billion in 2015. Emerging flexible electronic applications have brought additional requirements of flexibility and low cost for TCC. However, the price of indium (the major component in indium tin oxide TCC) continues to increase. On the other hand, the price of nanomaterials has continued to decrease due to development of high volume, quality production processes. Additional benefits come from the low cost, nonvacuum deposition of nanomaterials based TCC, compared to traditional coatings requiring energy intensive vacuum deposition. Among the materials actively researched as alternative TCC are nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanotubes with high aspect ratio as well as their composites. The figure of merit (FOM) can be used to compare TCCs made from dissimilar materials and with different transmittance and conductivity values. In the first part of this manuscript, we will discuss the seven FOM parameters that have been proposed, including one specifically intended for flexible applications. The approach for how to measure TCE electrical properties, including frequency dependence, will also be discussed. We will relate the macroscale electrical characteristics of TCCs to the nanoscale parameters of conducting networks. The fundamental aspects of nanomaterial assemblies in conducting networks will also be addressed. We will review recent literature on TCCs composed of carbon nanotubes of different types in terms of the FOM.

  1. Theoretical Modeling of Mechanical-Electrical Coupling of Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jun-Qiang [ORNL; Jiang, Hanqiang [Arizona State University

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes have been studied extensively due to their unique properties, ranging from electrical, mechanical, optical, to thermal properties. The coupling between the electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes has emerged as a new field, which raises both interesting fundamental problems and huge application potentials. In this article, we will review our recently work on the theoretical modeling on mechanical-electrical coupling of carbon nanotubes subject to various loading conditions, including tension/compression, torsion, and squashing. Some related work by other groups will be also mentioned.

  2. Carbon Nanotubes Potentialities in Directional Dark Matter Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. M. Capparelli; G. Cavoto; D. Mazzilli; A. D. Polosa

    2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new solution to the problem of dark matter directional detection based on large parallel arrays of carbon nanotubes. The phenomenon of ion channeling in single wall nanotubes is simulated to calculate the expected number of recoiling carbon ions, due to the hypothetical scattering with dark matter particles, subsequently being driven along their longitudinal extension. As shown by explicit calculation, the relative orientation of the carbon nanotube array with respect to the direction of motion of the Sun has an appreciable effect on the channeling probability of the struck ion and this provides the required detector anisotropic response.

  3. Fibrous composites comprising carbon nanotubes and silica

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Huisheng (Shanghai, CN); Zhu, Yuntian Theodore (Cary, NC); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Fibrous composite comprising a plurality of carbon nanotubes; and a silica-containing moiety having one of the structures: (SiO).sub.3Si--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--NR.sub.1R.sub.2) or (SiO).sub.3Si--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--NCO; where n is from 1 to 6, and R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each independently H, CH.sub.3, or C.sub.2H.sub.5.

  4. Metallic Carbon Nanotubes and Ag Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brus, Louis E

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this DOE solar energy research was to understand how visible light interacts with matter, and how to make electric excitations evolve into separated electrons and holes in photovoltaic cells, especially in nanoparticles and nanowires. Our specific experiments focused on A) understanding plasmon enhanced spectroscopy and charge-transfer (metal-to-molecule) photochemistry on the surface of metallic particles and B) the spectroscopy and photochemistry of carbon nanotubes and graphene. I also worked closely with R. Friesner on theoretical studies of photo-excited electrons near surfaces of titanium dioxide nanoparticles; this process is relevant to the Gratzel photovoltaic cell.

  5. Electron transport through single carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenkel, Thomas; Chai, G.; Heinrich, H.; Chow, L.; Schenkel, T.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the transport of energetic electrons through single, well aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT). Embedding of CNTs in a protective carbon fiber coating enables the application of focused ion beam based sample preparation techniques for the non-destructive isolation and alignment of individual tubes. Aligned tubes with lengths of 0.7 to 3 mu m allow transport of 300 keV electrons in a transmission electron microscope through their hollow cores at zero degree incident angles and for a misalignment of up to 1 degree.

  6. Thermal expansion of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline silver matrix composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Manjula, E-mail: manjula.physics@gmail.com; Sharma, Vimal [Department of Physics, NIT Hamirpur - 177005, HP (India); Pal, Hemant [Department of Physics, NIT Hamirpur - 177005, HP, India and Department of Physics, Govt. College Chamba - 176310, HP (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced silver matrix composite was fabricated by novel molecular level mixing method, which involves nucleation of Ag ions inside carbon nanotube dispersion at the molecular level. As a result the carbon nanotubes get embedded within the powder rather than on the surfaces. Micro structural characterization by X- ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy reveals that the nanotubes are homogeneously dispersed and anchored within the matrix. The thermal expansion of the composite with the multiwall nanotube content (0, 1.5 vol%) were investigated and it is found that coefficient of thermal expansion decreases with the addition of multiwall nanotube content and reduce to about 63% to that of pure Ag.

  7. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    So, Hye-Mi [Department of Nano Mechanics, Nanomechanical Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Sim, Jin Woo [Advanced Nano Technology Ltd., Seoul 132-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jinhyeong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Department of Energy Science and School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Won Seok, E-mail: paul@kimm.re.kr [Department of Nano Mechanics, Nanomechanical Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate.

  8. Low-dimensional carbon nanotube and graphene devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scard, Philip

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    -jet printing of nanotubes directly onto GaAs. Although only one atom thick, graphene is macroscopic in area and must be patterned to confine conduction; room temperature transistor behaviour requires graphene ribbons only a few nanometres wide. This work...

  9. Thermoelectric Behavior of Flexible Organic Nanocomposites with Carbon Nanotubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Kyung Who

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been significant researches about thermoelectric behaviors by applying carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer nanocomposites. Due to its thermally disconnected but electrically connected junctions between CNTs, the thermoelectric properties were...

  10. Nematic elastomers with aligned carbon nanotubes: new electromechanical actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Courty; J. Mine; A. R. Tajbakhsh; E. M. Terentjev

    2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the large electromechanical response in nematic liquid crystalline elastomers filled with a very low (~0.01%) concentration of carbon nanotubes, aligned along the nematic director at preparation. The nanotubes create a very large effective dielectric anisotropy of the composite. Their local field-induced torque is transmitted to the rubber-elastic network and is registered as the exerted uniaxial stress of order ~1kPa in response to a constant field of order ~1MV/m. We investigate the dependence of the effect on field strength, nanotube concentration and reproducibility under multiple field-on and -off cycles. The results indicate the potential of the nanotube-nematic elastomer composites as electrically driven actuators.

  11. Raman Scattering in Carbon Nanotubes Christian Thomsen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    , which make them a model system for one-dimensional physics, their relative ease of preparation of graphene ­ are relatively well understood. Still, nanotube research has given new impetus to the study

  12. Computational Study of Catalyzed Growth of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Jin

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis process called CoMoCAT yields single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)s of controlled diameter and chirality, making them extremely attractive for technological ...

  13. Characterization of double walled carbon nanotubes-polyvinylidene fluoride nanocomposites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almasri, Atheer Mohammad

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main objectives of this thesis is to disperse double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNT) in a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) matrix, and to characterize the resulting composite using electrical, thermal, and mechanical ...

  14. Characterization of surfactant dispersed single wall nanotube - polystyrene matrix nanocomposite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayewah, Daniel Osagie, Oyinkuro

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are a new form of carbon with exceptional electrical and mechanical properties. This makes them attractive as inclusions in nanocomposite materials with the potential to provide improvements in electrical and mechanical...

  15. Characterization of surfactant dispersed single wall nanotube - polystyrene matrix nanocomposite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayewah, Daniel Osagie, Oyinkuro

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are a new form of carbon with exceptional electrical and mechanical properties. This makes them attractive as inclusions in nanocomposite materials with the potential to provide improvements in electrical and mechanical...

  16. Computational Study of Catalyzed Growth of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Jin

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis process called CoMoCAT yields single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)s of controlled diameter and chirality, making them extremely attractive for technological applications...

  17. Segregated Network Polymer-Carbon Nanotubes Composites For Thermoelectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dasaroyong

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    nanocomposites were measured for carbon nanotubes and the thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, was calculated at room temperature. The influence on thermoelectric properties from filler concentration, stabilizer materials and drying condition are also discussed....

  18. Carbide-derived carbons - From porous networks to nanotubes and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Carbide-derived carbons - From porous networks to nanotubes and graphene Re-direct Destination: Carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) are a large family of carbon materials derived from...

  19. Design and modeling of carbon nanotube-based compliant mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DiBiasio, Christopher M. (Christopher Michael)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to generate the knowledge required to adapt macro- and microscale compliant mechanism theory to design carbon nanotube-based nano-scale compliant mechanisms. Molecular simulations of a ...

  20. Carbon Nanotubes and Nano-Structure Manufacturing at TJNAF |...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    use tens of watts to make nanotubes at around 200 milligrams per hour. Michael W. Smith, a staff scientist at NASA Langley Research Center, and his colleagues designed a new...

  1. Thermal properties of nanowires and nanotubes : modeling and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dames, Christopher Eric

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanowires and nanotubes have drawn a great deal of recent attention for such potential applications as lasers, transistors, biosensors, and thermoelectric energy converters. Although the thermal properties of nanowires can ...

  2. Chemically driven carbon-nanotube-guided thermopower waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Wonjoon

    Theoretical calculations predict that by coupling an exothermic chemical reaction with a nanotube or nanowire possessing a high axial thermal conductivity, a self-propagating reactive wave can be driven along its length. ...

  3. Uniform Diffusion of Acetonitrile inside Carbon Nanotubes Favors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materials. Nanoporous carbon exhibits excellent charge-discharge properties and a stable cyclic life. Moreover, activated composite carbon films generate high specific capacitance, laying the foundationUniform Diffusion of Acetonitrile inside Carbon Nanotubes Favors Supercapacitor Performance Oleg N

  4. Alignment and characterization of carbon nanotubes of photolithographically patterned electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, HyungBin, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work is to make an (n,m) assignment for individual suspended single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based on the measurements of their Raman Radial Breathing Modes and electron transition energies E[sub]ii ...

  5. Mechanics of deformation of carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akiskalos, Theodoros, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal is to develop finite element techniques to evaluate the mechanical behavior of carbon nanotube enabled composites and gain a thorough understanding of the parameters that affect the properties of the composite, ...

  6. Energy storage in carbon nanotube super-springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Frances Ann

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new technology is proposed for lightweight, high density energy storage. The objective of this thesis is to study the potential of storing energy in the elastic deformation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Prior experimental ...

  7. Carbon Nanotube Growth Using Ni Catalyst in Different Layouts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, H. Q.

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes have been grown using Ni as catalyst by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system (PECVD) in various pre-patterned substrates. Ni was thermally evaporated on silicon substrates ...

  8. Nanodeposition and plasmonically enhanced Raman spectroscopy on individual carbon nanotubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strain, Kirsten Margaret

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) exhibit extraordinary properties: mechanical, thermal, optical and, possibly the most interesting, electrical. These all-carbon cylindrical structures can be metallic or semi-conducting ...

  9. Carbon nanotubes: in situ studies of growth and electromechanical properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weis, Johan Ek

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes have been found to have extraordinary properties, such as ballistic electrical conductivity, extremely high thermal conductivity and they can be metallic or semiconducting with a wide range of band ...

  10. Carbon nanotube field effect transistors for power application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Tao, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are nanometer-diameter cylinders formed from rolled-up graphene sheets which have found widespread interests due to their many excellent electrical properties. In particular, most of them are direct ...

  11. Process variables controlling consistency of carbon nanotube forest growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Hanna Megumi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aligned arrays of carbon nanotubes (A-CNTs), called CNT forests, are the precursor for controlled-morphology macroscopic nanocomposites and nanoengineered composites due to theirscale-dependent, tunable physicall properties. ...

  12. Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Thermotropic Liquid Crystal Polymer Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jun Young

    This paper focuses on the fabrication via simple melt blending of thermotropic liquid crystal polyester (TLCP) nanocomposites reinforced with a very small quantity of modified carbon nanotube (CNT) and the unique effects ...

  13. New concepts in energy and mass transport within carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Wonjoon, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unique structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) contributes to their distinguished properties, making them useful in nanotechnology. CNTs have been explored for energy transport in next-generation, such as light-emitting ...

  14. Mechanical response of carbon nanotubes turfs under lateral strains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Mechanical response of carbon nanotubes turfs under lateral strains Melinda C. Lopez, David F. Bahr in a furnace 150° C under a stress equal to that of the buckling stress of the CNT. Figure 2. An illustration

  15. Carbon nanotube processing and chemistry for electronic interconnect applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Tan Mau, 1979-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes possess many properties that are ideally suited for electronic applications, such as metallic/semiconducting behavior and ballistic transport. Specifically, in light of mounting concerns over the increasing ...

  16. Growth and deterministic assembly of single stranded carbon nanotube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doddabasanagouda, Sunil

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to control the shape, position, alignment, length and assembly of carbon nanotubes over large areas has become an essential but very difficult goal in the field of nanotechnology. Current assembly efforts for ...

  17. Carbon Nanotube Membranes: Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Energy-Efficient Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Porifera is developing carbon nanotube membranes that allow more efficient removal of CO2 from coal plant exhaust. Most of today’s carbon capture methods use chemical solvents, but capture methods that use membranes to draw CO2 out of exhaust gas are potentially more efficient and cost effective. Traditionally, membranes are limited by the rate at which they allow gas to flow through them and the amount of CO2 they can attract from the gas. Smooth support pores and the unique structure of Porifera’s carbon nanotube membranes allows them to be more permeable than other polymeric membranes, yet still selective enough for CO2 removal. This approach could overcome the barriers facing membrane-based approaches for capturing CO2 from coal plant exhausts.

  18. Structure, Properties and Treatments of Carbon Nanotube Fibres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilatela García, Juan José

    2009-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 4.3 Secondary Parameters Affecting Drawing of the CNT Aerogel . . 34 4.3.1 Gas Flow Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 4.3.2 Precursors Feed Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 4.4 Summary... and their composites are discussed in Chapter 3. The nanotubes are synthesised by a floating catalyst chemical vapour depo- sition route such that nanotubes grow up to millimetres in seconds and form an aerogel of entangled tubes and bundles that can be drawn from...

  19. Apparatus for the production of boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for the large scale production of boron nitride nanotubes comprising; a pressure chamber containing; a continuously fed boron containing target; a source of thermal energy preferably a focused laser beam; a cooled condenser; a source of pressurized nitrogen gas; and a mechanism for extracting boron nitride nanotubes that are condensed on or in the area of the cooled condenser from the pressure chamber.

  20. Production of single-walled carbon nanotube grids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a nanotube grid includes placing a plurality of catalyst nanoparticles on a grid framework, contacting the catalyst nanoparticles with a gas mixture that includes hydrogen and a carbon source in a reaction chamber, forming an activated gas from the gas mixture, heating the grid framework and activated gas, and controlling a growth time to generate a single-wall carbon nanotube array radially about the grid framework. A filter membrane may be produced by this method.

  1. Gas sorption properties of zwitterion-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surapathi, Anil; Chen, Hang-yan; Marand, Eva; Johnson, J Karl, Zdenka Sedlakova

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have functionalized carbon nanotubes with carboxylic acid and zwitterion groups. We have evaluated the effect of functionalization by measuring the sorption of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} at 35? for pressures up to 10 bar. Zwitterion functionalized nanotubes were found to be highly hygroscopic. Thermal gravimetric analysis indicates that water can be desorbed at about 200°C. The adsorption of gases in zwitterion functionalized nanotubes is dramatically reduced compared with nanotubes functionalized with carboxylic acid groups. The presence of water on the zwitterion functionalized nanotube reduces the sorption even further. Molecular simulations show that three or more zwitterion groups per tube entrance are required to significantly reduce the flux of CO{sub 2} into the tubes. Simulations also show that gas phase water is rapidly sorbed into the zwitterion functionalized nanotubes, both increasing the free energy barrier to CO{sub 2} entering the tube and also lowering the equilibrium adsorption through competitive adsorption.

  2. Catalyst-free carbon nanotubes from coal-based material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, R.B.; Lal, C.; Sharma, D.K. [Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (India)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DC-Arc Discharge technique has been used to synthesize carbon nanotubes from super clean coal samples instead of graphite electrodes filled with metal catalysts. The adverse effect of the mineral matter present in coal may be, thus, avoided. The cathode deposits showed the presence of single walled carbon nanotubes as well, which are generally known to be formed only in presence of transition metal catalysts and lanthanides. The process also avoids the tedious purification treatments of carbon nanotubes by strong acids to get rid of metal catalysts produced as impurities along with nanotubes. Thus, coal may be refined and demineralized by an organorefining technique to obtain super clean coal, an ultra low ash coal which may be used for the production of carbon nanotubes. The residual coal obtained after the organorefining may be used as an energy source for raising steam for power generation. Thus, coal may afford its use as an inexpensive feedstock for the production of carbon nanotubes besides its conventional role as a fuel for power generation.

  3. Adsorption characteristics of alkanes onto carbon nanotube bundles: Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Adsorption characteristics of alkanes onto carbon nanotube bundles: Grand Canonical Monte Carlo alkane adsorption and separation. Rather than remaining isolated however, nanotubes tend to bundle together, and the adsorption properties of such bundles and subsequent potential for practical alkane

  4. Chemical Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes For Li ion Batteries: A XANES Study. Chemical Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes For Li ion...

  5. Theoretical and simulation tools for electron transfer and chain reactions in single walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Nitish

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are cylindrical sheets of graphene whose electronic structures and diameters are determined by their chiralities. Current synthetic methods produce batches of nanotubes containing a ...

  6. Fully Integrated Graphene and Carbon Nanotube Interconnects for Gigahertz High-Speed Cmos Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xiangyu

    Carbon-based nanomaterials such as metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and graphene have been considered as some of the most promising candidates for future interconnect technology ...

  7. Effects of doping single and double walled carbon nanotubes with nitrogen and boron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villalpando Paéz, Federico

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlling the diameter and chirality of carbon nanotubes to fine tune their electronic band gap will no longer be enough to satisfy the growing list of characteristics that future carbon nanotube applications are starting ...

  8. Patternable transparent carbon nanotube films for electrochromic devices Liangbing Hu and George Grunera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, George

    Patternable transparent carbon nanotube films for electrochromic devices Liangbing Hu and George nanotube films on polyethylene terephthalate as flexible electrodes in electrochromic devices using. Electrochromic devices attract much interest due to their potential use in applications such as smart windows

  9. Structure-Property Relationships in Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Systems: Influence of Noncovalent Stabilization Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Lei

    2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of experiments were carried out to study the dispersion and microstructure of carbon nanotubes in aqueous suspensions and polymer composites with the goal to improve the electrical conductivity of the composites containing nanotubes. Epoxy...

  10. ambipolar-transporting coaxial nanotubes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (more) Fredriksson, Tore 2014-01-01 11 Research Progress of Organic polymer Composite Materials Modified by Carbon Nanotube CiteSeer Summary: ABSTRACT: Carbon nanotube is a kind of...

  11. Photochemical Transformation of Carboxylated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes: Role of Reactive Oxygen Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    in consumer and industrial products (e.g., electronics, composite materials, and sporting equipment) mayPhotochemical Transformation of Carboxylated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes: Role of Reactive Oxygen investigated the photochemical transformation of carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (COOH

  12. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes and composites Deepak Srivastava and Chenyu Wei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Deepak

    Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes and composites Deepak Srivastava and Chenyu Wei Computational-polyethylene composite materials are described and compared with experi- mental observations. Young's modulus nanotube composite materials with sensing and actuating ca- pacity. To realize the proposed devices

  13. Highly dispersed carbon nanotubes in organic media for polymer:fullerene photovoltaic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    Highly dispersed carbon nanotubes in organic media for polymer:fullerene photovoltaic devices Gwang photovoltaic device are fabricated using homogeneously dispersed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a polymer. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Organic photovoltaic (OPV) materials promise the production

  14. Single walled carbon nanotubes functionally adsorbed to biopolymers for use as chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jr., Alan T. (Philadelphia, PA); Gelperin, Alan (Princeton, NJ); Staii, Cristian (Madison, WI)

    2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

  15. Structure-Property Relationships in Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Systems: Influence of Noncovalent Stabilization Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Lei

    2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    composites containing covalently and noncovalently functionalized nanotubes were compared in terms of electrical and mechanical behavior. Covalent functionalization of nanotubes is based on chemical attachments of polyethylenimine (PEI) whereas noncovalent...

  16. Monolithic three-dimensional electrochemical energy storage system on aerogel or nanotube scaffold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C; Stadermann, Michael

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic three-dimensional electrochemical energy storage system is provided on an aerogel or nanotube scaffold. An anode, separator, cathode, and cathodic current collector are deposited on the aerogel or nanotube scaffold.

  17. Monolithic three-dimensional electrochemical energy storage system on aerogel or nanotube scaffold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph Collin; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic three-dimensional electrochemical energy storage system is provided on an aerogel or nanotube scaffold. An anode, separator, cathode, and cathodic current collector are deposited on the aerogel or nanotube scaffold.

  18. Hydrogen Sensing and Sensitivity of Palladium-Decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Philip G

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pubs.acs.org/NanoLett Hydrogen Sensing and Sensitivity ofsite. KEYWORDS Carbon nanotube, hydrogen sensor, defect S

  19. Nanotubes, nanorods and nanowires having piezoelectric and/or pyroelectric properties and devices manufactured therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Russell, Thomas P. (Amherst, MA); Lutkenhaus, Jodie (Wethersfield, CT)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a device comprising a pair of electrodes; and a nanotube, a nanorod and/or a nanowire; the nanotube, nanorod and/or nanowire comprising a piezoelectric and/or pyroelectric polymeric composition; the pair of electrodes being in electrical communication with opposing surfaces of the nanotube, nanorod and/or a nanowire; the pair of electrodes being perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the nanotube, nanorod and/or a nanowire.

  20. Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dillon, Anne C.; Heben, Michael J.; Gennett, Thomas; Parilla, Philip A.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof. The metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes may be produced according to one embodiment of the invention by combining single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material and metal in a solution, and mixing the solution to incorporate at least a portion of the metal with the single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material. Other embodiments may comprise sputter deposition, evaporation, and other mixing techniques.

  1. Irradiation effects in carbon nanotubes A.V. Krasheninnikov *, K. Nordlund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

    successfully be used for nano-engineering, e.g. for creating molecular junctions between the nanotubes, making and further outline the most promising ways of using beams of energetic particles for nanotube-related nano nanotubes (CNTs) [1] are hollow cylindrical molecules consisting of single or many sheets of graphite

  2. Carbon nanotube-containing structures, methods of making, and processes using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Yong (Richland, WA); Chin, Ya-Huei (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Blue Bell, PA); Aardahl, Christopher L. (Richland, WA); Stewart, Terri L. (Richland, WA)

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotube structures are disclosed in which nanotubes are disposed over a porous support such as a foam, felt, mesh, or membrane. Techniques of making these structures are also disclosed. In some of these techniques, a support is pretreated with a templated surfactant composition to assist with the formation of a nanotube layer.

  3. Carbon Nanotube-Containing Structures, Methods Of Making, And Processes Using Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Yong (Richland, WA); Chin, Ya-Huei (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Blue Bell, PA); Aardahl, Christopher L. (Richland, WA); Stewart, Terri L. (Richland, WA)

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotube structures are disclosed in which nanotubes are disposed over a porous support such as a foam, felt, mesh, or membrane. Techniques of making these structures are also disclosed. In some of these techniques, a support is pretreated with a templated surfactant composition to assist with the formation of a nanotube layer.

  4. Integration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on to CMOS Circuitry with Parylene-C Encapsulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokmeci, Mehmet

    Integration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on to CMOS Circuitry with Parylene-C Encapsulation heterogeneous integration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) with CMOS integrated circuits using die the successful integration of carbon nanotubes with the CMOS circuitry. This paper lays the foundation

  5. Coaxial Si/anodic titanium oxide/Si nanotube arrays for lithium-ion battery anode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Nano Res 1 Coaxial Si/anodic titanium oxide/Si nanotube arrays for lithium-ion battery anode Titanium Oxide / Si Nanotube Arrays for Lithium-ion Battery Anode JiepengRong,,§Xin Fang Oxide / Si Nanotube Arrays for Lithium-ion Battery Anode Jiepeng Rong,1,§ Xin Fang,1,§ Mingyuan Ge,1

  6. An atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Growth of carbon nanotubes during transition-metal particles catalytically-assisted thermal decomposition of the transition-metal particles and onto the surface of carbon nanotubes, carbon atom attachment to the growing. Carbon nanotubes are generally processed by laser ablation of carbon rods e.g. [7], a direct current arc

  7. Mechanical and electrical evaluation of parylene-C encapsulated carbon nanotube networks on a flexible substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokmeci, Mehmet

    Mechanical and electrical evaluation of parylene-C encapsulated carbon nanotube networks, interconnects, and sensors. In this letter, we demonstrate the fabrication of single-walled carbon nanotube SWNT.1063/1.2976633 Carbon nanotube CNT networks are excellent candi- dates for flexible electronic devices and sensors due

  8. Enhancement of thermal and electrical properties of carbon nanotube polymer composites by magnetic field processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    of thermal conductance in a composite material assuming a linear law of mixing, and nanotube­polymerEnhancement of thermal and electrical properties of carbon nanotube polymer composites by magnetic and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube CNT -polymer composites are significantly enhanced

  9. Uniform Directional Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Viscous Polymer Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    of the carbon nanotubes on their ability to enhance the mechanical properties of the composites that they form of carbon nanotube dispersion on composite properties, their degree of alignment in the respective matrixUniform Directional Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Viscous Polymer Flow Erin

  10. Field emission and current-voltage properties of boron nitride nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Field emission and current-voltage properties of boron nitride nanotubes John Cumings*, A. Zettl microscope. Stable currents were measured in a field emission geometry, but in contact the nanotubes Published by Elsevier Ltd. PACS: 79.70. þ q Keywords: A. Boron nitride; B. Nanotubes; C. Field emission

  11. NANOTECHNOLOGY LAW & BUSINESS MARCH 2007 569 Carbon Nanotube-Based Supercapacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ning

    NANOTECHNOLOGY LAW & BUSINESS · MARCH 2007 569 Carbon Nanotube-Based Supercapacitors CHUNSHENG DU and NING PAN ABSTRACT Due to the need for increased power performance, supercapacitors are emerging nanotubes are a promising material for next generation supercapacitors. Specifically, the use of nanotubes

  12. Tuning Chirality of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Selective Etching with Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bongsoo

    Tuning Chirality of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Selective Etching with Carbon Dioxide Kwanyong properties that are determined by the chirality1 and diameter of carbon nanotubes. One way to overcome@skku.ac.kr Application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to various electronic devices such as field emission displays, gas

  13. Atomic Layer Deposition on Suspended Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) on single-walled carbon nanotubesAtomic Layer Deposition on Suspended Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes via Gas-Phase Noncovalent, 2005; Revised Manuscript Received February 6, 2006 ABSTRACT Alternating exposures of nitrogen dioxide

  14. Carbon nanotubes grow in combustion flames Issued on March 31, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Ryo

    Carbon nanotubes grow in combustion flames Issued on March 31, 2014 Quantum chemical simulations reveal an unprecedented relationship between the mechanism of carbon nanotube growth and hydrocarbon of carbon nanotube (CNT) growth and hydrocarbon combustion actually share many similarities. In studies

  15. Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon Accepted 14 January 2010 Available online 20 January 2010 A B S T R A C T Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes (buckypaper) and carbon nanofiber (CNF) paper

  16. Superhydrophobic Carbon Nanotube Kenneth K. S. Lau,*, Jose Bico, Kenneth B. K. Teo, Manish Chhowalla,|

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bico,José

    Superhydrophobic Carbon Nanotube Forests Kenneth K. S. Lau,*, Jose´ Bico, Kenneth B. K. Teo, superhydrophobic surface using the nanoscale roughness inherent in a vertically aligned carbon nanotube forest of the nanotubes. Superhydrophobicity is achieved down to the microscopic level where essentially spherical

  17. Method for making nanotubes and nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Piedmont, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for producing nano-scale tubes and particles. The apparatus comprises novel electrodes for use in arc discharge techniques. The electrodes have interior conduits for delivery and withdrawal of material from the arc region where product is formed. In one embodiment, the anode is optionally made from more than one material and is termed a compound anode. The materials used in the compound anode assist in the reaction that forms product in the arc region of the apparatus. The materials assist either by providing reaction ingredients, catalyst, or affecting the reaction kinetics. Among other uses, the inventive apparatus is used to produce nanotubes and nanoparticles having a variety of electrical and mechanical properties.

  18. A boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loh, G. C., E-mail: jgloh@mtu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Baillargeat, D. [CNRS-International-NTU-Thales Research Alliance (CINTRA), 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The precise guidance of heat from one specific location to another is paramount in many industrial and commercial applications, including thermal management and thermoelectric generation. One of the cardinal requirements is a preferential conduction of thermal energy, also known as thermal rectification, in the materials. This study introduces a novel nanomaterial for rectifying heat—the boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier. Classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed on this nanomaterial, and interestingly, the strength of the rectification phenomenon is dissimilar at different operating temperatures. This is due to the contingence of the thermal flux on the conductance at the localized region around the scatterer, which varies with temperature. The rectification performance of the peapod rectifier is inherently dependent on its asymmetry. Last but not least, the favourable rectifying direction in the nanomaterial is established.

  19. Waveguide-integrated electroluminescent carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Flavel, Benjamin S; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Krupke, Ralph

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon based optoelectronic devices promise to revolutionize modern integrated circuits by combining outstanding electrical and optical properties into a unified technology. By coupling nanoelectronic devices to nanophotonic structures functional components such as nanoscale light emitting diodes, narrow-band thermal emitters, cavity controlled detectors and wideband electro optic modulators can be realized for chipscale information processing. These devices not only allow the light-matter interaction of low-dimensional systems to be studied, but also provide fundamental building blocks for high bandwidth on-chip communication. Here we demonstrate how light from an electrically-driven carbon-nanotube can be coupled directly into a photonic waveguide architecture. We realize wafer scale, broadband sources integrated with nanophotonic circuits allowing for propagation of light over centimeter distances. Moreover, we show that the spectral properties of the emitter can be controlled directly on chip with passive...

  20. Microfluidic sieve using intertwined, free-standing carbon nanotube mesh as active medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bakajin, Olgica (San Leandro, CA); Noy, Aleksandr (Belmont, CA)

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfluidic sieve having a substrate with a microfluidic channel, and a carbon nanotube mesh. The carbon nanotube mesh is formed from a plurality of intertwined free-standing carbon nanotubes which are fixedly attached within the channel for separating, concentrating, and/or filtering molecules flowed through the channel. In one embodiment, the microfluidic sieve is fabricated by providing a substrate having a microfluidic channel, and growing the intertwined free-standing carbon nanotubes from within the channel to produce the carbon nanotube mesh attached within the channel.

  1. Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lassila, David H. (Aptos, CA); Bonner, Brian P. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

  2. Carbon nanotubes grown on bulk materials and methods for fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menchhofer, Paul A. (Clinton, TN); Montgomery, Frederick C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Baker, Frederick S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are structures formed as bulk support media having carbon nanotubes formed therewith. The bulk support media may comprise fibers or particles and the fibers or particles may be formed from such materials as quartz, carbon, or activated carbon. Metal catalyst species are formed adjacent the surfaces of the bulk support material, and carbon nanotubes are grown adjacent the surfaces of the metal catalyst species. Methods employ metal salt solutions that may comprise iron salts such as iron chloride, aluminum salts such as aluminum chloride, or nickel salts such as nickel chloride. Carbon nanotubes may be separated from the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species by using concentrated acids to oxidize the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species.

  3. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Gupta, Gautam; Duque, Juan G.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; DeFriend Obrey, Kimberly A.

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity was observed when the suspension of DOC-wrapped SWNTs were exposed to the TMOS vapors, but about a 50% decrease in the emission signal was observed from the SDS-wrapped SWNTs nanotubes. The decrease in emission was minimal by buffering the SDS/SWNT suspension prior to forming the composite. Fluorescent xerogels were prepared by adding glycerol to the SWNT suspensions prior to TMOS vapor exposure, followed by drying the gels. Fluorescent aerogels were prepared by replacing water in the gels with methanol and then exposing them to supercritical fluid drying conditions. The aerogels can be used for gas sensing.

  4. Center for Applications of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resasco, Daniel E

    2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities conducted under a Congressional Direction project whose goal was to develop applications for Single-walled carbon nanotubes, under the Carbon Nanotube Technology Center (CANTEC), a multi-investigator program that capitalizes on OU’s advantageous position of having available high quality carbon nanotubes. During the first phase of CANTEC, 11 faculty members and their students from the College of Engineering developed applications for carbon nanotubes by applying their expertise in a number of areas: Catalysis, Reaction Engineering, Nanotube synthesis, Surfactants, Colloid Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Tissue Engineering, Biosensors, Biochemical Engineering, Cell Biology, Thermal Transport, Composite Materials, Protein synthesis and purification, Molecular Modeling, Computational Simulations. In particular, during this phase, the different research groups involved in CANTEC made advances in the tailoring of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) of controlled diameter and chirality by Modifying Reaction Conditions and the Nature of the catalyst; developed kinetic models that quantitatively describe the SWNT growth, created vertically oriented forests of SWNT by varying the density of metal nanoparticles catalyst particles, and developed novel nanostructured SWNT towers that exhibit superhydrophobic behavior. They also developed molecular simulations of the growth of Metal Nanoparticles on the surface of SWNT, which may have applications in the field of fuell cells. In the area of biomedical applications, CANTEC researchers fabricated SWNT Biosensors by a novel electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition method, which may have an impact in the control of diabetes. They also functionalized SWNT with proteins that retained the protein’s biological activity and also retained the near-infrared light absorbance, which finds applications in the treatment of cancer.

  5. Polymer Nanofibers and Nanotubes: Charge Transport and Device Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey N. Aleshin

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical analysis of recent advances in synthesis and electrical characterization of nanofibers and nanotubes made of different conjugated polymers is presented. The applicability of various theoretical models is considered in order to explain results on transport in conducting polymer nanofibers and nanotubes. The relationship between these results and the one-dimensional (1D) nature of the conjugated polymers is discussed in light of theories for tunneling in 1D conductors (e.g. Luttinger liquid, Wigner crystal). The prospects for nanoelectronic applications of polymer fibers and tubes as wires, nanoscale field-effect transistors (nanoFETs), and in other applications are analyzed.

  6. Nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotubes with enhanced photocatalytic activity synthesized by a facile wet chemistry method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng Jiaqing; Yang Dong; Zhu Juhong; Chen Daimei [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Jiang Zhongyi [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)], E-mail: zhyjiang@tju.edu.cn

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotubes with enhanced photocatalytic activity were synthesized using titanate nanotubes as raw material by a facile wet chemistry method. The resulting nanotubes were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, etc. The photocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotubes was evaluated by the decomposition of methylene blue under artificial solar light. And it was found that nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotubes exhibited much higher photocatalytic activity than undoped titanate nanotubes.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors with Integrated Ohmic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javey, Ali

    segments of the tube are electrostatically "doped" by a back gate and act effectively as source and drain as gate insulators, and electrostatically doped nanotube segments as source/drain electrodes for low OFF currents and suppressed ambipolar conduction. The doped source and drain approach resembles

  8. Elastic modulus of viral nanotubes Zhibin Ge,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    TMV nano- tubes. The initial elastic response of TMV nanotubes can be described by finite. INTRODUCTION Tobacco mosaic virus TMV is a hollow tubular structure formed by the self-assembly of 2130 nano- particles because it combines high sensitivity in applying and measuring forces and high

  9. INVITED REVIEW Self-organized nanotube materials and their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    toward the multiscale self-assembly of materials from the molecular or nano- structure level upwards with this trend, research on supramolecular nanotube architectures2­8 with a well-defined hollow cylindrical to the function of these hollow cylinders themselves, such as their encapsulation ability.8,27 On the other hand

  10. Simulations of nanosensors based on single walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    ] and biosensors [9, 10, 11] and include ultrasensitive nano-bio sensors [3], electroanalytical nanotube devices [4] and electromechanical actuators for artificial muscles [12]. The development of nano-bio sensors [13] and nanoscale such as proteins, enzymes, bacteria can be immobilized either in the hollow cavity or on the surface of carbon

  11. Superconducting Nanowires Fabricated Using DNA and Nanotubes as Molecular Templates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldbart, Paul M.

    functions of DNA have been demonstrated in recent experiments in which a linear arrangement of nanoparticles acid molecules or suspended single-wall carbon nanotubes as templates for making superconducting Introduction Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contains genetic instructions used in the develop- ment

  12. Previous Article: Carbon Nanotubes Coated in Bee Venom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    Previous Article: Carbon Nanotubes Coated in Bee Venom Can Detect Even a Single Molecule-so-blazing 1.3 miles per hour for 397.75 laps around a running track, but managed to make the whole trek using permission is prohibited. 05/12/11 at 10:32 am Utterly useless, except for use on dry lake beds, and paved

  13. Characterization of Solution-Processed Double-Walled Carbon Nanotube/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ounaies, Zoubeida

    ductility was retained.[4] Po¨tschke et al. reported a significant increase in the conductivity and the dielectric constant of a polycarbonate composite by adding multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs).[5 it is conductive, was calculated to be 1.0 wt.-% for the MWNTs. Ounaies Full Paper Dispersion of CNTs in polymers

  14. Nuclear Magnetism and Electronic Order in 13 C Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braunecker, Bernd

    Nuclear Magnetism and Electronic Order in 13 C Nanotubes Bernd Braunecker,1 Pascal Simon,1 on nuclear magnetism in one dimension. If the electrons are in the metallic, Luttinger liquid regime, we show that even a very weak hyperfine coupling to the 13C nuclear spins has a striking effect: The system

  15. Nonlinear Optical Imaging of Individual Carbon Nanotubes with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potma, Eric Olaf

    Nonlinear Optical Imaging of Individual Carbon Nanotubes with Four-Wave-Mixing Microscopy Hyunmin ABSTRACT Dual color four-wave-mixing (FWM) microscopy is used to spatially resolve the third-order optical and experiment rather challenging. Optical exami- nation of individual SWNTs avoids the heterogeneity of ensemble

  16. Characterization of Nanoporous Metal-Carbon Nanotube Composite Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    has been conducted on carbon fibers at X'ian University of Technology in China. This method consistsCharacterization of Nanoporous Metal-Carbon Nanotube Composite Arrays Chloe Heinen, Dr. David Bahr, Hang Zhou, and Chunlan Ren. "Research on Surface Metallization of Carbon Fiber Based on Electroless

  17. Experimental study of exiton binding energy in semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8565, Japan 3 Global Edge Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan 4 Departement of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan (Dated: July 21 dimensional nanotube leads to strong electron-hole localiza- tion, with binding energy as high as 0.5 e

  18. Nanotube dichroism DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800439

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    to their exceptional proper- ties CNTs are candidates for many engineering applications, such as electronic devices to be able to monitor their electronic and mechanical character. The electronic, chemical, and mechanical challenges for advancing CNT-based nanotechnologies.[4] Electronic applications require nanotubes without

  19. Scrolled Sheet Precursor Route to Niobium and Tantalum Oxide Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4Nb6O17,4.4H2O scrolls, prepared by exfoliation of K4Nb6O17. Thermal dehydration of the scrolls strain to drive scrolling of the unilamellar colloidal sheets. Layered materials that can be exfoliatedO2 nanotubes.19 Despite this, there exist many other layered oxides that readily exfoliate

  20. ZnO Nanotube Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ZnO Nanotube Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Alex B. F. Martinson,, Jeffrey W. Elam, Joseph T templated by anodic aluminum oxide for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Atomic layer deposition of the best dye- sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is the product of a dye with moderate extinction

  1. Quantum rotation of hydrogen in single-wall carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildirim, Taner

    be widely used as an energy carrier. Current hydrogen storage technologies, in partic- ular, are inadequate Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction It is desirable to develop hydrogen-based energyQuantum rotation of hydrogen in single-wall carbon nanotubes C.M. Brown a,b , T. Yildirim b , D

  2. armchair carbon nanotubes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    armchair carbon nanotubes First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Enrichment of Armchair Carbon...

  3. DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601748 Carbon Nanotube Aerogels**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601748 Carbon Nanotube Aerogels** By Mateusz B. Bryning, Daniel E. Milkie, Mohammad F. Islam, Lawrence A. Hough, James M. Kikkawa, and Arjun G. Yodh* Aerogels are ultralight, highly. Microscopically, aerogels are composed of tenuous networks of clustered nanoparticles, and the materials often

  4. The one-dimensional Wigner crystal in carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    gas without significant disorder. Individual-nanotube transport experiments have demonstrated Coulomb, using low-temperature single-electron transport spectroscopy, we show that the hole gas in low density, aB = ¯h2 /me2 is the Bohr radius, is the dielectric constant, e is the electric charge, ¯h

  5. Integration of Carbon Nanotubes with Semiconductor Technology; Fabrication of Hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nygård, Jesper

    and electrical contacts to the nanotubes are obtained by GaMnAs grown at 250C. The resulting devices can exhibit: Semicond. Sci. Technol. Present address: COM·DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby performance of specific components9 . Such integration is presently unfeasible due to a number of unsolved

  6. Ion Exclusion by Sub 2-nm Carbon Nanotube Pores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes offer an outstanding platform for studying molecular transport at nanoscale, and have become promising materials for nanofluidics and membrane technology due to their unique combination of physical, chemical, mechanical, and electronic properties. In particular, both simulations and experiments have proved that fluid flow through carbon nanotubes of nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast compared to what continuum hydrodynamic theories would predict when applied on this length scale, and also, compared to conventional membranes with pores of similar size, such as zeolites. For a variety of applications such as separation technology, molecular sensing, drug delivery, and biomimetics, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In particular, for water desalination, coupling the enhancement of the water flux with selective ion transport could drastically reduce the cost of brackish and seawater desalting. In this work, we study the ion selectivity of membranes made of aligned double-walled carbon nanotubes with sub-2 nm diameter. Negatively charged groups are introduced at the opening of the carbon nanotubes by oxygen plasma treatment. Reverse osmosis experiments coupled with capillary electrophoresis analysis of permeate and feed show significant anion and cation rejection. Ion exclusion declines by increasing ionic strength (concentration) of the feed and by lowering solution pH; also, the highest rejection is observed for the A{sub m}{sup Z{sub A}} C{sub n}{sup Z{sub C}} salts (A=anion, C=cation, z= valence) with the greatest Z{sub A}/Z{sub C} ratio. Our results strongly support a Donnan-type rejection mechanism, dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion rejection capabilities.

  7. Plasmon enhanced Raman scattering effect for an atom near a carbon nanotube

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bondarev, I. V.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum electrodynamics theory of the resonance Raman scattering is developed for an atom in a close proximity to a carbon nanotube. The theory predicts a dramatic enhancement of the Raman intensity in the strong atomic coupling regime to nanotube plasmon near-fields. This resonance scattering is a manifestation of the general electromagnetic surface enhanced Raman scattering effect, and can be used in designing efficient nanotube based optical sensing substrates for single atom detection, precision spontaneous emission control, and manipulation.

  8. Characterizing the global dispersion of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koszor, Orsolya; Tapaszto, Levente; Balazsi, Csaba [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Marko, Marton [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in silicon nitride ceramic matrices has been investigated by small angle neutron scattering experiments. In contrast to electron microscopy investigations of fracture surfaces, neutron scattering measurements provide information on the bulk dispersion of nanotubes within the matrix. The scattering intensities reveal a decay exponent characteristic to surface fractals, which indicates that the predominant part of nanotubes can be found in loose networks surrounding the grains of the polycrystalline matrix.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of next-generation multifunctional material architectures : aligned carbon nanotube carbon matrix nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Itai Y

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials comprising carbon nanotube (CNT) aligned nanowire (NW) polymer nanocomposites (A-PNCs) have emerged as promising architectures for next-generation multifunctional applications. Enhanced operating regimes, such ...

  10. Go No-Go Decision: Pure, Undoped, Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This document provides information about the go/no-go decision on pure, undoped single walled carbon nanotubes for vehicular hydrogen storage.

  11. Hierarchical carbon fiber composites with radially aligned carbon nanotubes : preservation of in-plane tensile properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Richard, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hierarchical carbon-nanotube (CNT)-based composites have significant potential to expand the performance and functionality of aerospace composite structures. Notably, circumferentially aligned CNT arrays have previously ...

  12. Radiofrequency field absorption by carbon nanotubes embedded in a conductive host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, George

    Radiofrequency field absorption by carbon nanotubes embedded in a conductive host Mikhail V. Shuba centimeters depth penetration of visible and infrared radiation in tissue. Thermoacoustic imaging refers

  13. Carbon nanotubes and graphene in aqueous surfactant solutions : molecular simulations and theoretical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Shangchao

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes combined molecular simulations and theoretical modeling studies, supported by experimental observations, on properties and applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene sheets dispersed in ...

  14. Desktop systems for manufacturing carbon nanotube films by chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhn, David S. (David Scott)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit exceptional electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties that could potentially transform such diverse fields as composites, electronics, cooling, energy storage, and biological sensing. ...

  15. Donor doping of single-walled carbon nanotubes by filling of channels with silver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharlamova, M. V., E-mail: mv.kharlamova@gmail.com [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Niu, J. J. [Drexel University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The channels of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are filled with metallic silver. The synthesized nanocomposites are studied by Raman spectroscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy, and these data indicate a substantial modification of the electronic structure of the nanotubes upon their filling. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the incorporation of the metal leads to a change in the work function of SWNTs due to the Fermi level upshift and to the transfer of an electron density from inserted nanoparticles to the nanotube walls. Thus, the filling of the channels with silver results in donor doping of the nanotubes.

  16. Efficient boron nitride nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitney, R. Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

  17. Temperature effects on the electronic conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascaro, Mark Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The room-temperature electronic conductivity and temperature dependence of conductivity were measured for samples of carbon nanotubes of three types: pristine; functionalized with a nitrobenzene covalent functionalization, ...

  18. Multiple NaNbO3/Nb2O5 Heterostructure Nanotubes: A New Class of Ferroelectric/Semiconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are created inside hollow Nb2O5 nanotubes, forming a novel class of multiple ferroelectric (NaNbO3 multifunctional ferroelectric/semiconductor devices. The scientific and technological interest in tubular nano within the nanotube's hollow. Herein, we employed a nanotube-confined growth strategy for the one

  19. Effects of hydrogen adsorption on single-wall carbon nanotubes: Metallic hydrogen decoration O. Gulseren,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildirim, Taner

    Effects of hydrogen adsorption on single-wall carbon nanotubes: Metallic hydrogen decoration O. Gu of carbon nanotubes undergo dramatic changes with hydrogen chemisorption from first principle calculations other isomers can be insulating. For both zigzag and armchair nanotubes, hydrogenation of each carbon

  20. Electrical impedance tomography of carbon nanotube composite Tsung-Chin Hou, Kenneth J. Loh, Jerome P. Lynch1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    Electrical impedance tomography of carbon nanotube composite materials Tsung-Chin Hou, Kenneth J composites with the carbon nanotube significantly contributing to bulk material properties. One approach. Carbon nanotubes are included in the composite material by dispersing them in the polyanionic solution

  1. Purification of boron nitride nanotubes via polymer wrapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jin-Hyuk [Department of Nano Science and Technology, Sejong University, 98 Gunja, Gwangjin, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jaewoo [Nuclear Materials Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedukdaero, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); WCI Quantum Beam based Radiation Research Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedukdaero, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Duckbong [Nuclear Materials Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedukdaero, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Young-Soo, E-mail: ysseo@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Nano Science and Technology, Sejong University, 98 Gunja, Gwangjin, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Surface modification of boron nitride nanotubes using polymeric materials. ? Surface-modified BNNT was purified with a simple dilution-centrifugation step. ? Surface-modified BNNT can be directly used for polymer composite fabrication ? Degree of purification was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. - Abstract: Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) synthesized by a ball milling-annealing were surface-modified using three different types of polymeric materials. Those materials were chosen depending on future applications especially in polymer nanocomposite fabrications. We found that the surface-modified BNNT can be purified with a simple dilution-centrifugation step, which would be suitable for large-scale purification. Degree of purification was monitored by means of the center peak position and FWHM of E{sub 2g} mode of BNNT in Raman spectra. As the purification of BNNT develops, the peak position was up-shifted while FWHM of the peak was narrowed.

  2. Broadband laser polarization control with aligned carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, He; Lia, Diao; Chen, Ya; Mattila, Marco; Tian, Ying; Yong, Zhenzhong; Yang, Changxi; Tittonen, Ilkka; Ren, Zhaoyu; Bai, Jingtao; Li, Qingwen; Kauppinen, Esko I; Lipsanen, Harri; Sun, Zhipei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a simple approach to fabricate aligned carbon nanotube (ACNT) device for broadband polarization control in fiber laser systems. The ACNT device was fabricated by pulling from as-fabricated vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays. Their anisotropic property is confirmed with optical and scanning electron microscopy, and with polarized Raman and absorption spectroscopy. The device was then integrated into fiber laser systems (at two technologically important wavelengths of 1 and 1.5 um) for polarization control. We obtained a linearly-polarized light output with the maximum extinction ratio of ~12 dB. The output polarization direction could be fully controlled by the ACNT alignment direction in both lasers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that ACNT device is applied to polarization control in laser systems. Our results exhibit that the ACNT device is a simple, low-cost, and broadband polarizer to control laser polarization dynamics, for various photonic applications (such as ...

  3. Compositions and methods for cancer treatment using targeted carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrison, Jr., Roger G; Resasco, Daniel E; Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method for detecting and destroying cancer tumors. The method is based on the concept of associating a linking protein or linking peptide such as, but not limited to, annexin V or other annexins to carbon nanotubes such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to form a protein-CNT complex. Said linking protein or peptide can selectively bind to cancerous cells, especially tumor vasculature endothelial cells, rather than to healthy ones by binding to cancer-specific external receptors such as anionic phospholipids including phosphatidylserine expressed on the outer surfaces of cancer cells only. Irradiation of bound CNTs with one or more specific electromagnetic wavelengths is then used to detect and destroy those cells to which the CNTs are bound via the linking protein or peptide thereby destroying the tumor or cancer cells and preferably an immunostimulant is provided to the patient to enhance the immune response against antigens released from the tumor or cancer cells.

  4. Slippage of water past superhydrophobic carbon nanotube forests in microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Joseph; C. Cottin-Bizonne; J. -M. Benoit; C. Ybert; C. Journet; P. Tabeling; L. Bocquet

    2006-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present in this letter an experimental characterization of liquid flow slippage over superhydrophobic surfaces made of carbon nanotube forests, incorporated in microchannels. We make use of a micro-PIV (Particule Image Velocimetry) technique to achieve the submicrometric resolution on the flow profile necessary for accurate measurement of the surface hydrodynamic properties. We demonstrate boundary slippage on the Cassie superhydrophobic state, associated with slip lengths of a few microns, while a vanishing slip length is found in the Wenzel state, when the liquid impregnates the surface. Varying the lateral roughness scale L of our carbon nanotube forest-based superhydrophobic surfaces, we demonstrate that the slip length varies linearly with L in line with theoretical predictions for slippage on patterned surfaces.

  5. Non-equilibrium singlettriplet Kondo effect in carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    ­2 ­1 0 1 2 Si gate SiO2 Source Drain Nanotube a c b Figure 1 Experimental setup and shell/Au source and drain electrodes, spaced 250nm apart. Highly doped silicon below the SiO2 cap layer acted as a back-gate electrode. Room-temperature measurements of conductance as a function of back-gate voltage

  6. Characterization of double walled carbon nanotubes-polyvinylidene fluoride nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almasri, Atheer Mohammad

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARACTERIZATION OF DOUBLE WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES- POLYVINYLIDENE FLUORIDE NANOCOMPOSITES A Thesis by ATHEER MOHAMMAD ALMASRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... MOHAMMAD ALMASRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Zoubeida Ounaies...

  7. Preparation of supported electrocatalyst comprising multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Gang; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing a durable non-precious metal oxygen reduction electrocatalyst involves heat treatment of a ball-milled mixture of polyaniline and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the presence of a Fe species. The catalyst is more durable than catalysts that use carbon black supports. Performance degradation was minimal or absent after 500 hours of operation at constant cell voltage of 0.40 V.

  8. Dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube composites to shock wave loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube composites to shock wave loading B of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube CNT composites to shock wave compression. For phenolic resin, our strain hardening. Shock loading of the CNT-resin composites is applied parallel or perpendicular

  9. Synthesis of condensed phases containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons fullerenes and nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to methods for producing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes, and nanotubes, comprising: a. heating at least one carbon-containing material to form a condensed phase comprising at least one polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon; b. collecting at least some of the condensed phase; c. reacting the condensed phase to form fullerenes and/or nanotubes.

  10. Supplementary Information for Field Ionization of Cold Atoms Near the Wall of a Single Carbon Nanotube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hau, Lene Vestergaard

    1 Supplementary Information for Field Ionization of Cold Atoms Near the Wall of a Single Carbon with suspended nanotubes. Single-walled carbon nanotubes, suspended across 10-m gaps, are grown on silicon chips is applied with clip connections to the pads. The electrode design was optimized with numerical modelling

  11. Graphene coating makes carbon nanotube aerogels superelastic and resistant to fatigue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Graphene coating makes carbon nanotube aerogels superelastic and resistant to fatigue Kyu Hun Kim one and five layers of graphene nanoplates. The graphene-coated aerogel exhibits no change , but collapse under stress15 . We fabricated graphene-coated single-walled carbon nanotube aerogels by coating

  12. Gas Sensing Mechanism of Gold Nanoparticles Decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gas Sensing Mechanism of Gold Nanoparticles Decorated Single- Walled Carbon Nanotubes Syed Mubeen towards different gas analytes, however the sensing mechanism was not clearly elucidated. The detailed demonstration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as highly sensitive gas sensors [1], there have been

  13. Isotope Effect on the Thermal Conductivity of Boron Nitride Nanotubes C. W. Chang,1,5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex

    been achieved in Si and Ge via isotopic enrichment [7,8], with enriched carbon (diamond) showing that an enhancement of due to isotope enrichment could be large in boron nitride nanotubes [20]. Although previousIsotope Effect on the Thermal Conductivity of Boron Nitride Nanotubes C. W. Chang,1,5 A. M

  14. Highly Stable Hysteresis-Free Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors by Fluorocarbon Polymer Encapsulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javey, Ali

    Highly Stable Hysteresis-Free Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors by Fluorocarbon Polymer report hysteresis-free carbon nanotube thin-film transistors (CNT-TFTs) employing a fluorocarbon polymer (Teflon-AF) as an encapsulation layer. Such fluorocarbon encapsulation improves device uniformity

  15. Short communication TiO2 nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanotubes for significantly improved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short communication TiO2 nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanotubes for significantly improved-Remediation and Pollution Control, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063, China h i g h l i g h t s g r a p h i c Carbon nanotube Microbial fuel cell a b s t r a c t A facile and reliable method has been developed

  16. Resonant transmission through finite-sized carbon nanotubes Daniel Orlikowski,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resonant transmission through finite-sized carbon nanotubes Daniel Orlikowski,1 Hatem Mehrez,2 of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, China Received 26 October 2000; published 28 March 2001 We have investigated theoretically the conductance through finite-sized carbon nanotubes coupled to fea- tureless leads

  17. Curved carbon nanotubes: From unique geometries to novel properties and peculiar applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Curved carbon nanotubes: From unique geometries to novel properties and peculiar applications and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024, China 2 Department Incorporating pentagons and heptagons into the hexagonal networks of pristine carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can form

  18. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Modified Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (start 9/15/01)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Modified Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (start 9/15/01) Channing Ahn, PI physisorption for reversible solid-state material storage systems. · Investigate effect of potassium (alkal-metal;Project timeline Only commercial vendor of laser-oven material is Carbolex -sells as-prepared nanotubes

  19. Influence of Electrolyte Composition on Liquid-Gated Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekker, Cees

    Influence of Electrolyte Composition on Liquid-Gated Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Transistors Iddo-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphene can function as highly sensitive nanoscale (bio)sensors in solution. Here, we compare experimentally how SWNT and graphene transistors respond to changes in the composition

  20. Production of vertical arrays of small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A hot filament chemical vapor deposition method has been developed to grow at least one vertical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). In general, various embodiments of the present invention disclose novel processes for growing and/or producing enhanced nanotube carpets with decreased diameters as compared to the prior art.

  1. Environmental effect on the exciton transition energy of single wall carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Environmental effect on the exciton transition energy of single wall carbon nanotubes Riichiro The optical transition energy of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are frequently used for assigning (n and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Depending on the surrounding materials of SWNTs, the transition energy is shifted up

  2. Chirality Distribution and Transition Energies of Carbon Nanotubes J. Maultzsch,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Chirality Distribution and Transition Energies of Carbon Nanotubes H. Telg,1 J. Maultzsch,1 S Raman scattering on isolated nanotubes we obtained the optical transition energies, the radial breathing and the optical transition energies vary strongly with their chiral index n1; n2 [5]. Because the synthesis

  3. Water transport inside a single-walled carbon nanotube driven by temperature gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Water transport inside a single-walled carbon nanotube driven by temperature gradient J. Shiomi mass transport of a water cluster inside a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) with the diameter of about 1.4 nm. The influence of the non-equilibrium thermal environment on the confined water cluster has

  4. DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800135 Directed Self-Assembly of Gradient Concentric Carbon Nanotube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800135 Directed Self-Assembly of Gradient Concentric Carbon Nanotube Rings the need for lithography or an external field over large surface areas using a facile routine. Carbon stripes of iron catalyst,[31] and blown bubble film process[32] to fabricate nanotube-based devices, e

  5. Macro-scale Bubbles for Aligning Carbon Nanotubes Jordan Hoyt,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UG-18 Macro-scale Bubbles for Aligning Carbon Nanotubes Jordan Hoyt,1 Shota Ushiba,2-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit high aspect ratios that can lead to extreme anisotropic mechanical-scale bubble structures to align SWCNTs in larger quantities and in less time compared to pre-existing methods

  6. Entropy and the driving force for the filling of carbon nanotubes with water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Entropy and the driving force for the filling of carbon nanotubes with water Tod A. Pascala,b , William A. Goddarda,b,1 , and Yousung Junga,1 a Graduate School of Energy, Environment, Water nanotubes (CNTs) by water observed both experimentally and from simulations is counterintuitive because

  7. Thermal conductance of the junction between single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    conductances of the carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions that would be found in a CNT aerogel are predicted using of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (e.g., aligned films, mats, and aerogels) are candidates for use in electronic issue in all of these applications. Our focus here is related to single-walled CNT aerogels, which

  8. Complementary Detection of Prostate-Specific Antigen Using In2O3 Nanowires and Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    as successful sensors for a number of biological analytes;1,2 however, combining these two nanomaterials may for the presence of prostate cancer, which is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among men in the U.S.4 Despite/nanotube sensors is schemati- cally shown in Figure 1a, where an active channel made up of nanowires or nanotubes

  9. Computational modeling of thermal conductivity of single walled carbon nanotube polymer composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    was developed to study the thermal conductivity of single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composites1 Computational modeling of thermal conductivity of single walled carbon nanotube polymer resistance on effective conductivity of composites were quantified. The present model is a useful tool

  10. Microstructure and thermal stability of copper -carbon nanotube composites consolidated by High Pressure Torsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    Microstructure and thermal stability of copper - carbon nanotube composites consolidated by High as the hardness of the pure and composite materials were determined. Due to the pinning effect of CNTs­matrix nanocomposites [3,4]. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising disperse phase in these composites because their high

  11. CHAPTER 5: CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE WORK Theoretical predictions of the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    of multifunctional composite materials with controllable electrical and thermal properties, in addition to order to these material systems within the last few years. Initial experimental work on carbon nanotube properties of carbon nanotubes, and in particular their predicted high strengths (on the order of 60 GPa

  12. Few Graphene layer/Carbon-Nanotube composite Grown at CMOS-compatible Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the growth of the recently demonstrated composite material composed of vertically aligned carbon nanotubesFew Graphene layer/Carbon-Nanotube composite Grown at CMOS-compatible Temperature V. Jousseaume1 materials and technologies for the next-generation of Integrated Circuits (ICs). Carbon nanomaterials

  13. Continuum Models of Carbon Nanotube-Based Composites Using the Boundary Element Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yijun

    Continuum Models of Carbon Nanotube-Based Composites Using the Boundary Element Method Y.J. Liu)-based composites. Carbon nanotubes, formed conceptually by rolling thin graphite sheets, have been found to be extremely stiff, strong and resilient, and therefore may be ideal for reinforcing composite materials

  14. INVESTIGATION OF ELECTRIC CONDITIONS IN THE VICINITY OF CARBON NANOTUBES GROWN IN A DC PLASMA SHEATH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    nanotubes (CNTs ­ long tubular carbon nanostructures) belong to the best electron field emitting materials, such as nanoelectronics devices or mechanical reinforcement in composite materials [2,3]. The field emission propertiesINVESTIGATION OF ELECTRIC CONDITIONS IN THE VICINITY OF CARBON NANOTUBES GROWN IN A DC PLASMA

  15. Elastic properties of carbon nanotubes under hydrostatic pressure S. Reich and C. Thomsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    .g., in composite nanotube materials, and to gain a better understanding of this one-dimensional carbon basedElastic properties of carbon nanotubes under hydrostatic pressure S. Reich and C. Thomsen Institut. Ordejo´n Institut de Cie`ncia de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), Campus de la U.A.B. E-08193 Bellaterra

  16. Structure in Nascent Carbon Nanotubes Revealed by Spatially Resolved Raman Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or filtration [1], supercapacitors [2], composite materials [3,4]. They are mainly prepared by CVD (Chemical1 Structure in Nascent Carbon Nanotubes Revealed by Spatially Resolved Raman Spectroscopy Périne: The understanding of carbon nanotubes (CNT) growth is crucial for the control of their production. In particular

  17. Theme issue: inorganic nanotubes and DOI: 10.1039/b900135m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    . This themed issue on inorganic 1D nano- materials gathers papers about the synthesis, characterization Jin Fan et al. gave a review on the synthesis of 1D nano- materials of spinel structured materialsTheme issue: inorganic nanotubes and nanowires DOI: 10.1039/b900135m Nanotubes, nanowires

  18. Field emission from strained carbon nanotubes on cathode substrate D. Roy Mahapatra a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    Field emission from strained carbon nanotubes on cathode substrate D. Roy Mahapatra a, *, N. Sinha, Waterloo, Ont. N2L3C5, Canada 1. Introduction Field emission from carbon nanotube (CNT) was first reported, the use of CNTs in the field emission devices (e.g., field emission displays, X-ray tube sources, electron

  19. Field Emission Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with a Variety of Emitter-Morphologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 Field Emission Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with a Variety of Emitter@chemsys.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp Field emission properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which have been prepared through. Protrusive bundles at the top surface of samples act selectively as emission sites. The number of emission

  20. Random Networks and Aligned Arrays of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Electronic Device Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Random Networks and Aligned Arrays of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Electronic Device that could find utility in areas such as flexible electronics, RF analog devices and others that might complement the capabilities of established systems. KEYWORDS Carbon nanotubes, electronic devices, thin

  1. Carbon nanotube parametric electron pump: A molecular device Yadong Wei,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon nanotube parametric electron pump: A molecular device Yadong Wei,1 Jian Wang,1 Hong Guo,2 explored, including single-electron transistor,1 tunneling-magnetoresistance device,2 electromechanical the properties of a nanotube- based parametric electron pump, a molecular device by which a dc electric current

  2. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as a multimodal-thermoacoustic and photoacoustic-contrast agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes as a multimodal- thermoacoustic and photoacoustic-contrast agent thermoacoustic and photoacoustic tomography. In comparison to deionized water, single-walled carbon nanotubes ex- hibited more than twofold signal enhancement for thermoacoustic to- mography at 3 GHz. In comparison

  3. Water-soluble carbon nanotube compositions for drug delivery and medicinal applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tour, James M.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine; Hudson, Jared L.; Conyers, Jr., Jodie L.; Moore, Valerie C.; Casscells, S. Ward; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Mason, Kathy A.; Milas, Luka

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions comprising a plurality of functionalized carbon nanotubes and at least one type of payload molecule are provided herein. The compositions are soluble in water and PBS in some embodiments. In certain embodiments, the payload molecules are insoluble in water. Methods are described for making the compositions and administering the compositions. An extended release formulation for paclitaxel utilizing functionalized carbon nanotubes is also described.

  4. Arrays of Sealed Silicon Nanotubes As Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Arrays of Sealed Silicon Nanotubes As Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries Taeseup Song, Jianliang Xia ABSTRACT Silicon is a promising candidate for electrodes in lithium ion batteries due to its large reversible capacity and long-term cycle stability. KEYWORDS Lithium ion battery, silicon, nanotubes

  5. Conducting Polymer Nanotubes toward Supercapacitor Ran Liu and Sang Bok Lee*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Conducting Polymer Nanotubes toward Supercapacitor Ran Liu and Sang Bok Lee* Capacitive properties density, power density values of the supercapacitors. Under the same charge- discharge current densities (5mA/cm2) and equal scan rate of cyclic voltammogram (CV, 100mV/s), nanotube supercapacitors

  6. Single walled carbon nanotubes with functionally adsorbed biopolymers for use as chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jr., Alan T

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA or RNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

  7. GHZ ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON SILICON DIOXIDE MICRO BRIDGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, William C

    1 GHZ ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON SILICON DIOXIDE MICRO BRIDGES SHENG F. YEN1 of an approach to reduce the high-frequency capacitive feedthrough and dielectric leakages of carbon nanotubes grown on silicon dioxide micro bridges suspended over silicon substrates. The microwave reflection

  8. Photovoltaic device using single wall carbon nanotubes and method of fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Li, Zhongrui

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic device and methods for forming the same. In one embodiment, the photovoltaic device has a silicon substrate, and a film comprising a plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes disposed on the silicon substrate, wherein the plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes forms a plurality of heterojunctions with the silicon in the substrate.

  9. SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Alexandre

    of the Electrochemical Society - Cold Cathodes II) We present three-dimensional simulations of transport and fieldSIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES Alexandre- emission properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. The structure considered for the transport properties

  10. Carbon nanotube-induced macroscopic helical twist in an achiral nematic liquid crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblatt, Charles

    macroscopic dimensions. The nanotube-induced chiral pitch length P was determined as a function of average concentration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be organized in a nematic medium over macroscopic dimensions [1 ,2 both domains are equally likely, the disclination lines that run between the cell's spacer particles

  11. Viscosity of carbon nanotubes water based nanofluids: Influence of1 concentration and temperature2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Viscosity of carbon nanotubes water based nanofluids: Influence of1 concentration and temperature of carbon nanotubes water-based nanofluids24 are presented considering the influence of particle volume nanofluids behave as shear-thinning materials for high particle content. For lower particle29 content

  12. Shear history effect on the viscosity of carbon nanotubes water-based nanofluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Shear history effect on the viscosity of carbon nanotubes water-based nanofluid Patrice Estellé results on the steady state rheological behaviour of carbon nanotube (CNT) water-based nanofluid-based nanofluid. Two types of preshear history effect are studied: the influence of stress rate during preshear

  13. Template synthesis and luminescence properties of TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Huan; Zheng, Keyan; Sheng, Ye; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hongguang; Qi, Xiaofei [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Shi, Zhan [State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zou, Haifeng, E-mail: zouhf@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanotubes have been successfully synthesized through a simple solvothermal process with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as templates, free of any surfactant or catalyst. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results demonstrate that the product is a pure anatase phase of TiO{sub 2}. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicate that the as-obtained TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanotubes are uniform in size and distribution, and the thickness of the wall is about 8 nm. The possible formation mechanism has also been proposed. The luminescent spectrum shows that TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanotubes exhibit a red emission at 612 nm due to the {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition. Furthermore, this synthetic route is promising for the preparation of other one-dimensional inorganic nanomaterials because of its simplicity and the low cost of the starting reagents. - Graphical abstract: This picture is the illustration for the formation process of TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanotubes. Display Omitted - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanotubes have been prepared through a simple solvothermal process. • The TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanotubes are uniform in size and distribution. • Under UV light excitation, the TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} nanotubes show strong red emission.

  14. Facile Synthesis of Highly Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes from Polymer Precursors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Catherine Y.; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Wang, H. Hau; Lin, Xiao-Min; Trasobares, Susana; Cook, Russell E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a facile one-step approach which involves no flammable gas, no catalyst, and no in situ polymerization for the preparation of well-aligned carbon nanotube array. A polymer precursor is placed on top of an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane containing regular nanopore arrays, and slow heating under Ar flow allows the molten polymer to wet the template through adhesive force. The polymer spread into the nanopores of the template to form polymer nanotubes. Upon carbonization the resulting multi-walled carbon nanotubes duplicate the nanopores morphology precisely. The process is demonstrated for 230, 50, and 20?nm pore membranes. The synthesized carbonmore »nanotubes are characterized with scanning/transmission electron microscopies, Raman spectroscopy, and resistive measurements. Convenient functionalization of the nanotubes with this method is demonstrated through premixing CoPt nanoparticles in the polymer precursors.« less

  15. Catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes on tips of cantilevers and nanowires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Eres, Gyula; Wei, Yayi; Greenbaum, Elias; Lee, Ida

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructures on the tips of nanowires, cantilevers, conductive micro/nanometer structures, wafers and the like. The method can be used for production of carbon nanotube-anchored cantilevers that can significantly improve the performance of scaning probe microscopy (AFM, EFM etc). The invention can also be used in many other processes of micro and/or nanofabrication with carbon nanotubes/fibers. Key elements of this invention include: (1) Proper selection of a metal catalyst and programmable pulsed electrolytic deposition of the desired specific catalyst precisely at the tip of a substrate, (2) Catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes/fibers at the catalyst-deposited tips, (3) Control of carbon nanotube/fiber growth pattern by manipulation of tip shape and growth conditions, and (4) Automation for mass production.

  16. Laser irradiation of carbon nanotube films: Effects and heat dissipation probed by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mialichi, J. R.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Iikawa, F. [Instituto de Fisica 'Gleb Wataghin,' Unicamp, Campinas, 13083-859 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Verissimo, C.; Moshkalev, S. A. [Centro de Componentes Semicondutores, Unicamp, Campinas, 13083-870 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermal properties of thin films formed by single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes submitted to laser irradiation using Raman scattering as a probe of both the tube morphology and the local temperature. The nanotubes were submitted to heating/cooling cycles attaining high laser intensities ({approx}1.4 MW/cm{sup 2}) under vacuum and in the presence of an atmosphere, with and without oxygen. We investigate the heat diffusion of the irradiated nanotubes to their surroundings and the effect of laser annealing on their properties. The presence of oxygen during laser irradiation gives rise to an irreversible increase of the Raman efficiency of the carbon nanotubes and to a remarkable increase of the thermal conductivity of multi-walled films. The second effect can be applied to design thermal conductive channels in devices based on carbon nanotube films using laser beams.

  17. Design of highly ordered Ag-SrTiO{sub 3} nanotube arrays for photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Yue [Key Laboratory of Design and Synthesis of Functional Materials and Green Catalysis, Colleges of Heilongjiang Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Normal University, Harbin 150025 (China); Liu Jiawen, E-mail: jiawenliu@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Design and Synthesis of Functional Materials and Green Catalysis, Colleges of Heilongjiang Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Normal University, Harbin 150025 (China); Li Zhonghua, E-mail: lizh@hit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Microsystems and Microstructures Manufacturing, Ministry of Education, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ag-SrTiO{sub 3} nanotube arrays were successfully prepared for the degradation of methyl orange (MO) under ultraviolet irradiation. In order to form highly ordered SrTiO{sub 3} nanotube arrays, the preparation of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays by anodic oxidation of titanium foil in different electrolytes was investigated. The selected organic solvents in electrolytes include glycerol, dimethyl sulfoxide and glycol. The results indicate that the morphology of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays prepared in glycol containing ammonium fluoride electrolyte is more regular. Then SrTiO{sub 3} nanotube arrays were synthesized by a hydrothermal method using TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays as the precursor. In order to further improve the photocatalytic activity of SrTiO{sub 3} nanotube arrays, Ag nanoparticles were loaded on SrTiO{sub 3} nanotube arrays by two sets of experiments. The loaded Ag results in an enhancement of photocatalytic activity of SrTiO{sub 3} nanotube arrays. Moreover, the effect of pH on the photocatalytic degradation of MO was also studied. - Graphical abstract: Ag-SrTiO{sub 3} nanotube arrays were successfully prepared. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by degradation of methyl orange under ultraviolet irradiation. Highlights: > TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays prepared in glycol+NH{sub 4}F electrolyte are more regular. > Highly ordered Ag-SrTiO{sub 3} nanotube arrays were successfully synthesized. > Ag loading could enhance the photocatalytic activity of SrTiO{sub 3} nanotube arrays. > Ag-SrTiO{sub 3} nanotube arrays show excellent catalytic activity at a low pH value.

  18. A High-Flux, Flexible Membrane with Parylene-encapsulated Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, H G; In, J; Kim, S; Fornasiero, F; Holt, J K; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present fabrication and characterization of a membrane based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and parylene. Carbon nanotubes have shown orders of magnitude enhancement in gas and water permeability compared to estimates generated by conventional theories [1, 2]. Large area membranes that exhibit flux enhancement characteristics of carbon nanotubes may provide an economical solution to a variety of technologies including water desalination [3] and gas sequestration [4]. We report a novel method of making carbon nanotube-based, robust membranes with large areas. A vertically aligned dense carbon nanotube array is infiltrated with parylene. Parylene polymer creates a pinhole free transparent film by exhibiting high surface conformity and excellent crevice penetration. Using this moisture-, chemical- and solvent-resistant polymer creates carbon nanotube membranes that promise to exhibit high stability and biocompatibility. CNT membranes are formed by releasing a free-standing film that consists of parylene-infiltrated CNTs, followed by CNT uncapping on both sides of the composite material. Thus fabricated membranes show flexibility and ductility due to the parylene matrix material, as well as high permeability attributed to embedded carbon nanotubes. These membranes have a potential for applications that may require high flux, flexibility and durability.

  19. High power laser coupling to carbon nano-tubes and ion Coulomb explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K, Magesh Kumar K; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear and non linear interaction of laser with an array of carbon nanotubes is investigated. The ac conductivity of nanotubes, due to uneven response of free electrons in them to axial and transverse fields, is a tensor. The propagation constant for p-polarization shows resonance at a specific frequency that varies with the direction of laser propagation. It also shows surface plasmon resonance at ?=?{sub p}/?(2), where ?{sub p} is the plasma frequency of free electrons inside a nanotube, assumed to be uniform plasma cylinder. The attenuation constant is also resonantly enhanced around these frequencies. At large laser amplitude, the nanotubes behave as thin plasma rods. As the electrons get heated, the nanotubes undergo hydrodynamic expansion. At an instant when plasma frequency reaches ?{sub p}=?(2)?, the electron temperature rises rapidly and then saturates. For a Gaussian laser beam, the heating rate is maximum on the laser axis and falls off with the distance r from the axis. When the excursion of the electrons ? is comparable or larger than the radius of the nanotube r{sub c}, the nanotubes undergo ion Coulomb explosion. The distribution function of ions turns out to be a monotonically decreasing function of energy.

  20. OSU-A9 inhibits angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells via disrupting Akt–NF-?B and MAPK signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar, Hany A. [Division of Medicinal Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Arafa, El-Shaimaa A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Salama, Samir A. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11511 (Egypt); Arab, Hany H. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo 11562 (Egypt); Wu, Chieh-Hsi, E-mail: chhswu@mail.cmu.edu.tw [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Weng, Jing-Ru, E-mail: columnster@gmail.com [Department of Biological Science and Technology, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the introduction of angiogenesis as a useful target for cancer therapy, few agents have been approved for clinical use due to the rapid development of resistance. This problem can be minimized by simultaneous targeting of multiple angiogenesis signaling pathways, a potential strategy in cancer management known as polypharmacology. The current study aimed at exploring the anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, an indole-3-carbinol-derived pleotropic agent that targets mainly Akt–nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) signaling which regulates many key players of angiogenesis such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to study the in vitro anti-angiogenic effect of OSU-A9 on several key steps of angiogenesis. Results showed that OSU-A9 effectively inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HUVECs. Besides, OSU-A9 inhibited angiogenesis as evidenced by abrogation of migration/invasion and Matrigel tube formation in HUVECs and attenuation of the in vivo neovascularization in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay. Mechanistically, Western blot, RT-PCR and ELISA analyses showed the ability of OSU-A9 to inhibit MMP-2 production and VEGF expression induced by hypoxia or phorbol-12-myristyl-13-acetate. Furthermore, dual inhibition of Akt–NF-?B and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, the key regulators of angiogenesis, was observed. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, at least in part through the inhibition of Akt–NF-?B and MAPK signaling and their consequent inhibition of VEGF and MMP-2. These findings support OSU-A9's clinical promise as a component of anticancer therapy. - Highlights: • The antiangiogenic activity of OSU-A9 in HUVECs was explored. • OSU-A9 inhibited HUVECs proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation. • OSU-A9 targeted signaling pathways mediated by Akt-NF-kB, VEGF, and MMP-2. • The anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9 supports its clinical promise.

  1. Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dillon, Anne C. (Boulder, CO); Mahan, Archie H. (Golden, CO); Alleman, Jeffrey L. (Lakewood, CO)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

  2. Assessing cytotoxicity of boron nitride nanotubes: Interference with the MTT assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciofani, Gianni, E-mail: g.ciofani@sssup.it [Italian Institute of Technology, Smart Materials Lab, Center of MicroBioRobotics at Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio, 34, 56025 Pontedera (Pisa) (Italy)] [Italian Institute of Technology, Smart Materials Lab, Center of MicroBioRobotics at Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio, 34, 56025 Pontedera (Pisa) (Italy); Danti, Serena; D'Alessandro, Delfo [Otology-Cochlear Implants, Cisanello Hospital, Via Paradisa 2, 56124 Pisa (Italy)] [Otology-Cochlear Implants, Cisanello Hospital, Via Paradisa 2, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Moscato, Stefania [Department of Human Morphology and Applied Biology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 55, 56126 Pisa (Italy)] [Department of Human Morphology and Applied Biology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 55, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Menciassi, Arianna [Italian Institute of Technology, Smart Materials Lab, Center of MicroBioRobotics at Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio, 34, 56025 Pontedera (Pisa) (Italy) [Italian Institute of Technology, Smart Materials Lab, Center of MicroBioRobotics at Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio, 34, 56025 Pontedera (Pisa) (Italy); CRIM Lab, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio, 34, 56025 Pontedera (Pisa) (Italy)

    2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Thanks to a non-covalent wrapping with glycol-chitosan, highly biocompatible and highly concentrated dispersions of boron nitride nanotubes were obtained and tested on human neuroblastoma cells. A systematic investigation of the cytotoxicity of these nanovectors with several complementary qualitative and quantitative assays allowed a strong interference with the MTT metabolic assay to be highlighted, similar to a phenomenon already observed for carbon nanotubes, that would wrongly suggest toxicity of boron nitride nanotubes. These results confirm the high complexity of these new nanomaterials, and the needing of extensive investigations on their exciting potential applications in the biomedical field.

  3. Polymer-assisted deposition of films and preparation of carbon nanotube arrays using the films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luo, Hongmei; Li, Qingwen; Bauer, Eve; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes were prepared by coating a substrate with a coating solution including a suitable solvent, a soluble polymer, a metal precursor having a first metal selected from iron, nickel, cobalt, and molybdenum, and optionally a second metal selected from aluminum and magnesium, and also a binding agent that forms a complex with the first metal and a complex with the second metal. The coated substrate was exposed to a reducing atmosphere at elevated temperature, and then to a hydrocarbon in the reducing atmosphere. The result was decomposition of the polymer and formation of carbon nanotubes on the substrate. The carbon nanotubes were often in the form of an array on the substrate.

  4. Array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes and method of producing the array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Simpson, John T; Hendricks, Troy R

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes includes an elongate drawn body including a plurality of channels extending therethrough from a first end to a second end of the body, where the channels have a number density of at least about 100,000 channels/mm.sup.2 over a transverse cross-section of the body. A plurality of carbon nanotubes are disposed in each channel, and the carbon nanotubes are sufficiently dispersed and aligned along a length of the channels for the array to comprise an average resistivity per channel of about 9700 .OMEGA.m or less.

  5. Understanding the mechanism of nanotube synthesis for controlled production of specific (n,m) structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resasco, Daniel E.

    2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report shows the extensive research on the mechanism responsible for the formation of single walled carbon nanotubes in order to get control over their structural parameters (diameter and chirality). Catalyst formulations, pre-treatment conditions, and reaction conditions are described in detail as well as mechanisms to produce nanotubes structures of specific arrays (vertical forest, nanotube pillars). Applications of SWNT in different fields are also described in this report. In relation to this project five students have graduated (3 PhD and 2 MS) and 35 papers have been published.

  6. Strain-Engineered Manufacturing of Freeform Carbon Nanotube Microstructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Volder, M.; Park, S.; Tawfick, S.; Hart, A. J.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    4 0FS, UK 5 2 IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Heverlee, Belgium, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Katholieke 6 Universiteit Leuven, 3001 Leuven, Belgium 7 3Mechanosynthesis Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2350... 1 Strain-Engineered Manufacturing of Freeform Carbon Nanotube 1 Microstructures 2 M. De Volder1,2,*,†, S. Park3,4,*, S. Tawfick3,4,5, A.J. Hart3,4,† 3 1 Institute for Manufacturing, University of Cambridge, 17 Charles Babbage Rd, Cambridge, CB3...

  7. Alternating current response of carbon nanotubes with randomly distributed impurities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirai, Daisuke; Watanabe, Satoshi [Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Yamamoto, Takahiro [Department of Electrical Engineering and Department of Liberal Arts (Physics), Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing need for nanodevices has necessitated a better understanding of the electronic transport behavior of nanomaterials. We therefore theoretically examine the AC transport properties of metallic carbon nanotubes with randomly distributed impurities. We find that the long-range impurity scattering increases the emittance, but does not affect the DC conductance. The estimated dwell time of electrons increases with the potential amplitudes. That is, multiple scattering by the impurities increases the kinetic inductance in proportion to the dwell time, which eventually increases the emittance. We believe that our findings can contribute significantly to nanodevice development.

  8. Polymer Grafted Janus Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Priftis, Dimitrios [ORNL; Sakellariou, Georgios [ORNL; Baskaran, Durairaj [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Hadjichristidis, Nikos [University of Athens, Athens, Greece

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a novel and facile strategy to modify the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with two chemically different polymer brushes utilizing the grafting from technique. A [4 + 2] Diels Alder cycloaddition reaction was used to functionalize multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with two different precursor initiators, one for ring opening polymerization (ROP) and one for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The binary functionalized MWNTs were used for the simultaneous surface initiated polymerizations of different monomers resulting in polymer grafted MWNTs that can form Janus type structures under appropriate conditions. 1H NMR, FTIR and Raman spectra showed that the precursor initiators were successfully synthesized and covalently attached on the CNT surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that the grafted polymer content varies when different monomer ratios and polymerization times are used. The presence of an organic layer around the CNTs was observed through transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) proved that the glass transition (Tg) and melting (Tm) temperatures of the grafted polymers are affected by the presence of the CNTs, while circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated that the PLLA ahelix conformation remains intact.

  9. Thermogravimetry-Mass Spectrometry for Carbon Nanotube Detection in Complex Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plata, Desiree Louise

    In spite of the growth of the carbon nanotube (CNT) industry, there are no established analytical methods with which to detect or quantify CNTs in environmental matrices. Given that CNTs have relatively high thermal ...

  10. Effects of electron exchange-correlation potential on electrostatic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, S. A., E-mail: sakhan@ncp.edu.pk; Hassan, Sunia [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using macroscopic quantum hydrodynamic formulation, we study the dispersion properties of electrostatic electron plasma oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes. The electrons and ions are considered uniformly distributed over the cylindrical surface of a nanotube thus forming a two-component (electron-ion) quantum plasma system. Electron degeneracy via Fermi-Dirac statistics as well as electron exchange and correlation effects is taken into account. It is found that the quantum (Bohm) potential arising due to fermionic nature of electrons and exchange-correlations effects has significant impact on the wave. The frequency of wave is influenced by variation in azimuthal index and radius of the nanotube. The results are analyzed numerically for typical systems for relatively longer wavelength waves and possible consequences are discussed. The results can be important in general understanding of the role of exchange-correlation potential in quantum hydrodynamic treatment of charge-carriers in nanotubes.

  11. Preparation, Characterization, and Physical Properties of Multiwall Carbon Nanotube/Elastomer Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark, James E.

    - zation, and physical properties of nanoparticles-filled composites consisting of multiwall carbon carbonate sub- strates. These MWCNT were further treated with nitric acid to produce hydroxyl and carbonyl functional groups on the carbon nanotubes (CNT) surfaces. Of particular importance

  12. Electrical and Thermal Experimental Characterization and Modeling of Carbon Nanotube/Epoxy Composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardea, Frank

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work investigates the effect of carbon nanotube (CNT) inclusions on the electrical and thermal conductivity of a thermoset epoxy resin. The characterization of electrical and thermal conductivity of CNT/epoxy composites is presented...

  13. An Atomistic Study of the Mechanical Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanocomposite Interfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awasthi, Amnaya P.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented in this dissertation pertains to the evaluation of stiffness of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a multiscale framework and modeling of the interfacial mechanical behavior in CNT-polymer nanocomposites. The goal is to study...

  14. An extensive analysis of modified nanotube surfaces for next-generation orthopedic implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Christine Jeanette

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nanotube arrays in dye-sensitized solar cells. Nano Letters,for improved dye-sensitized solar cells. ” Journal ofJin. “Enhancement of dye sensitized solar cell efficiency by

  15. Energy Loss of the Electron System in Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Philip

    to significant Joule heating, and hence self-heating effects are important in determining the performance limits of nanotube-based devices. These self-heating effects also provide a tool for studying the nonequilibrium

  16. Design of electrode for electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices using multiwall carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seung Woo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All-multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) thin films are created by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of surface functionalized MWNTs. Negatively and positively charged MWNTs were prepared by surface functionalization, allowing the ...

  17. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil...

  18. Micromechanics modeling of the multifunctional nature of carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidel, Gary Don

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work provides a micromechanics approach based on the generalized self-consistent composite cylinders method as a non-Eshelby approach towards for assessing the impact of carbon nanotubes on the multi-functional nature of nanocom...

  19. Racemic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Circular Dichroism When Wrapped with DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    twist of the graphene lattice along the nanotube axis.1 With the exception of structures with high Information for sample preparation). Interaction between d(GT)20 and SWNTs is very robust, and excess DNA can

  20. Epoxy/Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Thin Films for Composites Reinforcement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Graham

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is mainly focused upon the preparation, processing and evaluation of mechanical and material properties of epoxy/single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) nanocomposite thin films. B-staged epoxy/SWCNT nanocomposite ...

  1. Investigation of lithium-air battery discharge product formed on carbon nanotube and nanofiber electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Robert Revell, III

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes have been actively investigated for integration in a wide variety of applications since their discovery over 20 years ago. Their myriad desirable material properties including exceptional mechanical strength, ...

  2. Carbon nanotube-based nanorelays for low-power circuit applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Courtney E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to reduce static power dissipation by developing a vertically-oriented carbon nanotube-based nanoelectromechanical switch that has no off-state leakage current. This switch, called a ...

  3. N-Type Thermoelectric Performance of Functionalized Carbon Nanotube-Filled Polymer Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Dallas

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes were dispersed and functionalized with polyethylene imine (PEI) before incorporation in a polyvinyl acetate matrix. The resulting samples exhibit air-stable N-type characteristics with electrical conductivities as great as 1600 S...

  4. Processing, Characterization and Modeling Carbon Nanotube Modified Interfaces in Hybrid Polymer Matrix Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Hieu 1990-

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Multifunctional hybrid composites are proposed as novel solutions to meet the demands in various industrial applications ranging from aerospace to biomedicine. The combination of carbon fibers and/or fabric, metal foil and carbon nanotubes...

  5. Stimuli-Tailored Dispersion State of Aqueous Carbon Nanotube Suspensions and Solid Polymer Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etika, Krishna

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    -controlled dispersion of carbon nanotubes could have a variety of applications in nanoelectronics, sensing, and drug and gene delivery systems. Furthermore, this dissertation also contains a published study focused on controlling the dispersion state of carbon black (CB...

  6. Micromechanics modeling of the multifunctional nature of carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidel, Gary Don

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work provides a micromechanics approach based on the generalized self-consistent composite cylinders method as a non-Eshelby approach towards for assessing the impact of carbon nanotubes on the multi-functional nature of nanocom...

  7. Effect of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the electromechanical properties of polyimide nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Sujay

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , toughness, and electromechanical coupling. The broad goal of this thesis was to investigate potential electromechanical behavior in single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polyimide (PI) composites. The specific objective was to measure and characterize...

  8. Epoxy/Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Thin Films for Composites Reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Graham

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is mainly focused upon the preparation, processing and evaluation of mechanical and material properties of epoxy/single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) nanocomposite thin films. B-staged epoxy/SWCNT nanocomposite thin films at 50% of cure...

  9. Three-dimensional elastic constitutive relations of aligned carbon nanotube architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handlin, Daniel

    Tailorable anisotropic intrinsic and scale-dependent properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them attractive elements in next-generation advanced materials. However, in order to model and predict the behavior of CNTs ...

  10. Manufacturing and fracture of hierarchical composite materials enhanced with aligned carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wicks, Sunny S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hierarchical advanced composite structures comprised of both nano- and micro-scale fibers are currently being studied as next-generation materials for multifunctional aerospace applications. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an ...

  11. Electron diffraction from cylindrical nanotubes Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Lu-Chang

    Electron diffraction from cylindrical nanotubes L. C. Qin Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (Received 14 January 1994; accepted 26 April 1994) Electron diffraction intensities from cylindrical objects can be conveniently

  12. Atomic-Level Study of Melting Behavior of GaN Nanotubes. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Behavior of GaN Nanotubes. Abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations with a Stillinger-Weber potential have been used to investigate the melting behavior of wurtzite-type single...

  13. Polymer and carbon nanotube materials for chemical sensors and organic electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Fei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis details the development of new materials for high-performance chemical sensing as well as organic electronic applications. In Chapter 2, we develop a chemiresistive material based on single-walled carbon nanotubes ...

  14. Use of plasma treatment to grow carbon nanotube forests on TiN substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esconjauregui, S.; Bayer, B. C.; Fouquet, M.; Wirth, C. T.; Yan, F.; Xie, R.; Hofmann, S.; Robertson, J. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Ducati, C. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Baehtz, C. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf e.V., P.O. Box 51 01 19, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Castellarin-Cudia, C. [Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Strada Statale, 14 km 163.4, I-34149, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Bhardwaj, S.; Cepek, C. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen plasma pretreatment is used to enforce the growth of vertically-aligned carbon nanotube forests on TiN substrates. The evolution of the substrate, catalyst, and nanotubes are studied by in situ and ex-situ photoemission and X-ray diffraction in order to understand the growth mechanism. We find that TiN retains its crystallographic structure and its conductivity during plasma pretreatment and nanotube growth, which is confirmed by electrical measurements. Plasma pretreatment is found to favor the growth of nanotube forests by root growth, as it binds the catalyst nanoparticles more strongly to the substrate than thermal pretreatment. We find that plasma pretreatment time should be limited, otherwise poor or no growth is found.

  15. Shape transition of unstrained flattest single-walled carbon nanotubes under pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mu, Weihua, E-mail: whmu@mit.edu, E-mail: muwh@itp.ac.cn [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2735 Beijing 100190 (China); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2735 Beijing 100190 (China); Cao, Jianshu, E-mail: jianshu@mit.edu [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), Singapore 138602 (Singapore); Ou-Yang, Zhong-can [State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2735 Beijing 100190 (China); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2735 Beijing 100190 (China); Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), Singapore 138602 (Singapore); Center for Advanced Study, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Single walled carbon nanotube's (SWCNT's) cross section can be flattened under hydrostatic pressure. One example is the cross section of a single walled carbon nanotube successively deforms from the original round shape to oval shape, then to peanut-like shape. At the transition point of reversible deformation between convex shape and concave shape, the side wall of nanotube is flattest. This flattest tube has many attractive properties. In the present work, an approximate approach is developed to determine the equilibrium shape of this unstrained flattest tube and the curvature distribution of this tube. Our results are in good agreement with recent numerical results, and can be applied to the study of pressure controlled electric properties of single walled carbon nanotubes. The present method can also be used to study other deformed inorganic and organic tube-like structures.

  16. Transparent and Conductive Carbon Nanotube Multilayer Thin Films Suitable as an Indium Tin Oxide Replacement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Yong Tae

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent electrodes made from metal oxides suffer from poor flexibility and durability. Highly transparent and electrically conductive thin films based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were assembled as a potential indium tin oxide (ITO) replacement...

  17. In situ curing of polymeric composites via resistive heaters comprised of aligned carbon nanotube networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jeonyoon

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread application of polymer matrix composites (PMCs) has encouraged the use of nanofibers, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs), to concurrently enhance the physical properties of such composites while adding ...

  18. Elucidating Nucleation and Growth Behavior of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes obtained via Catalyzed Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos Beltran, Juan Carlos

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    use of SWCNTs in electronic devices. RMD simulations demonstrate that small catalyst particles favor the growth of lengthy nanotubes over catalyst encapsulation as a result of an increase of the curvature energies of the carbon capsule. Furthermore...

  19. Characterization of Schottky barrier carbon nanotube transistors and their applications to digital circuit design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cline, Julia Van Meter, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The difficulty in shrinking silicon transistors past a certain feature size has been acknowledged for years. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offer a technology with an exciting solution to the scaling issues of transistors and ...

  20. Understanding and engineering interfacial charge transfer of carbon nanotubes and graphene for energy and sensing applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulus, Geraldine L. C. (Geraldine Laura Caroline)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene is a one-atom thick planar monolayer of sp2 -bonded carbon atoms organized in a hexagonal crystal lattice. A single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) can be thought of as a graphene sheet rolled up into a seamless ...

  1. Chemical, mechanical, and thermal control of substrate-bound carbon nanotube growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Anastasios John, 1979-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are long molecules having exceptional properties, including several times the strength of steel piano wire at one fourth the density, at least five times the thermal conductivity of pure copper, and ...

  2. Percolation in a nanotube-polymer system and its lumped-circuit modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Vaia, Richard A [ORNL; Arlen, Michael Jeffrey [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical properties of composites composed of polyurethane polymer and multi-walled nanotubes are reported. Samples with different nanotube volume fractions are prepared, and an impedance spectroscopy technique in the frequency range from 10 mHz to 10 MHz is used to characterize the properties of the samples. It is observed that the resistivity of the mixture can be varied widely, from {approx}10 M{Omega}m to {approx}1 {Omega}m, just by slightly altering the volume fraction of nanotubes. A lumped-circuit model illustrated that the micro-scale morphology between nanotube-clusters influences the resistive relaxation in the composite system. The investigations show that the presented binary mixture has a potential to be utilized in conductive electrical components (flexible electrodes), electromagnetic shielding, and electrostatic and field grading materials for electronic and high voltage insulation technologies.

  3. N-Type Thermoelectric Performance of Functionalized Carbon Nanotube-Filled Polymer Composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Dallas

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes were dispersed and functionalized with polyethylene imine (PEI) before incorporation in a polyvinyl acetate matrix. The resulting samples exhibit air-stable N-type characteristics with electrical conductivities as great as 1600 S...

  4. Thermal Conduction in Aligned Carbon Nanotube–Polymer Nanocomposites with High Packing Density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marconnet, Amy M.

    Nanostructured composites containing aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are very promising as interface materials for electronic systems and thermoelectric power generators. We report the first data for the thermal conductivity ...

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Polymer Composites Containing Aligned Conducting Polymers and Carbon Nanotubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manda, Swathi

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    with high power factor by modulating the morphology of the conducting polymer poly-(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and creating a composite with carbon nanotubes to control the mobility and hence the electrical conductivity of the thin films. Aligned...

  6. Origami-inspired nanofabrication utilizing physical and magnetic properties of in situ grown carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In, Hyun Jin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in particular the vertically-aligned variety grown through a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)-based process, are highly versatile nanostructures that can be used in a variety of ...

  7. Plasma deposition of Ultrathin polymer films on carbon nanotubes Donglu Shia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yijun

    Received 21 May 2002; accepted 18 October 2002 Ultrathin films of pyrrole were deposited on the surfaces properties.1­6 One of the important developments in nano- structures is the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

  8. Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Titanium Dioxide Nanobelts with Cell-Specific Transcriptomic Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon...

  9. Fabrication and electrical characterization of transistors made from carbon nanotubes and graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nezich, Daniel Andrew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene are low-dimensional allotropes of carbon which exhibit novel mechanical and electrical properties. The methods for producing these materials and fabricating electronic devices from them are ...

  10. NANOTECHNOLOGY LAW & BUSINESS MARCH 2007 585 Carbon Nanotube-Based Supercapacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gisele

    NANOTECHNOLOGY LAW & BUSINESS · MARCH 2007 585 Carbon Nanotube-Based Supercapacitors: Technologies-layer capacitors (also known as "supercapacitors" or "ultracapacitors") have tremendous potential as high double layer (ECDL) capacitors (also abbreviated EDLC), commonly called "supercapacitors

  11. Carbon nanotube synthesis and detection : limiting the environmental impact of novel technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plata, Desirée L

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Driven by commercial promise, the carbon nanotube (CNT) industry is growing rapidly, yet little is known about the potential environmental impacts of these novel materials. In particular, there are no methods to detect ...

  12. Radiation Detection: Resistivity Responses in Functional Poly(Olefin Sulfone)/Carbon Nanotube Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swager, Timothy Manning

    Detection of gamma rays is shown using a non-scintillating organic-based sensor composed of poly(olefin sulfone)/carbon nanotube blends. Functionalization of the polymers can be performed after polymerization to tailor ...

  13. Mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worsley, Marcus A; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel, including the steps of dispersing nanotubes in an aqueous media or other media to form a suspension, adding reactants and catalyst to the suspension to create a reaction mixture, curing the reaction mixture to form a wet gel, drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel, and pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce the mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel. The aerogel is mechanically robust, electrically conductive, and ultralow-density, and is made of a porous carbon material having 5 to 95% by weight carbon nanotubes and 5 to 95% carbon binder.

  14. Proposition de sujet de thse tude de nano/micro contact pour les nanotubes et les

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezerianos, Anastasia

    Proposition de sujet de thèse Étude de nano/micro contact pour les nanotubes et les nanocomposites) que pour des nanostructures hybrides (NTC recouverts de polypyrrole, NTC dans une matrice polymère ou

  15. Strain Determination in Electrochemically Doped Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes via Raman Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    batteries,4 and actuators.5 Doping the nanotubes is an important method to influence their electronic) at 1600 cm-1 with a displace- ment pattern derived from the E2g bond-stretching mode of graphite

  16. Multifunctional Superhydrophobic Polymer/Carbon Nanocomposites: Graphene, Carbon Nanotubes, or Carbon Black?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    Multifunctional Superhydrophobic Polymer/Carbon Nanocomposites: Graphene, Carbon Nanotubes, Switzerland *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Superhydrophobic surfaces resisting water penetration fabrication of highly electrically conductive, polymer-based superhydrophobic coatings, with impressive

  17. Synthesis of Thermal Interface Materials Made of Metal Decorated Carbon Nanotubes and Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okoth, Marion Odul

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    -Methly-2-Pyrrolidone (NMP). The metals used for this experiment were copper (Cu), tin (Sn), and nickel (Ni). The metal nanoparticles were seeded using functionalized MWCNTs as templates. Once seeded, the nanotubes and polymer composites were made...

  18. Large-scale fabrication and assembly of carbon nanotubes via nanopelleting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Aguizy, Tarek A., 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Widespread use of carbon nanotubes is predicated on the development of robust large-scale manufacturing techniques. There remain, however, few feasible methods for the large-scale handling of aligned and geometrically ...

  19. Acoustic energy dissipation and thermalization in carbon nanotubes: Atomistic modeling and mesoscopic description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, David A.

    The exchange of energy between low-frequency mechanical oscillations and high-frequency vibrational modes in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is a process that plays an important role in a range of dynamic phenomena involving the ...

  20. System and method for controlling hydrogen elimination during carbon nanotube synthesis from hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for producing carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition includes a catalyst support having first and second surfaces. The catalyst support is capable of hydrogen transport from the first to the second surface. A catalyst is provided on the first surface of the catalyst support. The catalyst is selected to catalyze the chemical vapor deposition formation of carbon nanotubes. A fuel source is provided for supplying fuel to the catalyst.

  1. Mechanics of C60 in Nanotubes Dong Qian, Wing Kam Liu, and Rodney S. Ruoff*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Wing Kam

    at the tube inlet; C60 then oscillates back and forth inside the (10, 10) and (9, 9) nanotubes. C60 seems of carbon with a mixed Ni/Y catalyst. In addition, Sloan et al.7 have shown that single-walled nanotubes can of graphite. The other is from Girifalco's11 modeling of the lattice energy of C60 solid. Case 3, shown

  2. Giant Zero-Bias Conductance and Multiple Andreev Reflections in Carbon Nanotubes with Superconducting Contacts.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Gleb

    walled. Metal electrodes to the nanotubes were patterned by e-beam lithography. We choose to use Pb as the electrode material for its rel- 4 5 6 7 8 9 -2 -1 0 1 2 Vsd(mV) Vgate (V) 4 5 6 7 8 9 -2 -1 0 1 2 Vsd itself was found to form low transparency contacts to the nanotubes, a 15 nm Pd/Au alloy contact layer

  3. Elucidating Nucleation and Growth Behavior of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes obtained via Catalyzed Synthesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos Beltran, Juan Carlos

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    view for the monohydrated surface. Four directions indicated by solid blue arrows. The dashed blue arrow indicates parallel positions along x: [100](2) and y: [010](1) axes. C. Top view for di-hydrated surface. D. Three finite length nanotubes...] direction. .......................................................................................................... 116 8.4 Adsorption energy per carbon atom in contact with the surface for three different nanotubes on the di-hydrated surface...

  4. Self-assembled laminated nanoribbon-directed synthesis of noble metallic nanoparticle-decorated silica nanotubes and their catalytic applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianbin

    such as silica dioxide (SiO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), carbon nanotube (CNT), graphene, microgel, and polymer.18

  5. Multi-scale electrical and thermal properties of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Namiko

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a potential new component to be incorporated into existing aerospace structural composites for multi-functional (mechanical, electrical, thermal, etc.) property enhancement and tailoring. ...

  6. Defect induced plasticity and failure mechanism of boron nitride nanotubes under tension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anoop Krishnan, N. M., E-mail: anoopnm@civil.iisc.ernet.in; Ghosh, Debraj [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of Stone-Wales (SW) and vacancy defects on the failure behavior of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) under tension are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The Tersoff-Brenner potential is used to model the atomic interaction and the temperature is maintained close to 300?K. The effect of a SW defect is studied by determining the failure strength and failure mechanism of nanotubes with different radii. In the case of a vacancy defect, the effect of an N-vacancy and a B-vacancy is studied separately. Nanotubes with different chiralities but similar diameter is considered first to evaluate the chirality dependence. The variation of failure strength with the radius is then studied by considering nanotubes of different diameters but same chirality. It is observed that the armchair BNNTs are extremely sensitive to defects, whereas the zigzag configurations are the least sensitive. In the case of pristine BNNTs, both armchair and zigzag nanotubes undergo brittle failure, whereas in the case of defective BNNTs, only the zigzag ones undergo brittle failure. An interesting defect induced plastic behavior is observed in defective armchair BNNTs. For this nanotube, the presence of a defect triggers mechanical relaxation by bond breaking along the closest zigzag helical path, with the defect as the nucleus. This mechanism results in a plastic failure.

  7. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yang, Junbing (Westmont, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Naperville, IL)

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  8. Mass production of multi-wall carbon nanotubes by metal dusting process with high yield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghorbani, H. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, A.M., E-mail: Rashidiam@ripi.ir [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastegari, S.; Mirdamadi, S. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alaei, M. [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthesis of carbon nanotubes over Fe-Ni nanoparticles supported alloy 304L. {yields} Production of carbon nanotubes with high yield (700-1000%) and low cost catalyst. {yields} Optimum growth condition is CO/H{sub 2} = 1/1, 100 cm{sup 3}/min, at 620 {sup o}C under long term repetitive thermal cycling. {yields} Possibility of the mass production by metal dusting process with low cost. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotube materials were synthesized over Fe-Ni nanoparticles generated during disintegration of the surface of alloy 304L under metal dusting environment. The metal dusting condition was simulated and optimized through exposing stainless steel samples during long term repetitive thermal cycling in CO/H{sub 2} = 1/1, total gas flow rate 100 cm{sup 3}/min, at 620 {sup o}C for 300 h. After reaction, surface morphology of the samples and also carbonaceous deposition which had grown on sample surfaces were examined by stereoscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results revealed that multi-wall carbon nanotubes could be formed over nanocatalyst generated on the alloy surface by exploiting metal dusting process. By optimization of reaction parameters the yields of carbon nanotube materials obtained were 700-1000%. Also it has been shown herein that the amount of carbon nanotube materials remarkably increases when the reaction time is extended up to 300 h, indicating a possibility of the mass production by this easy method.

  9. Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption on the transport properties of carbon and boron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Ravi

    Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular;Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption University, Houghton, Michigan 49931, USA 2 US Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research

  10. Publisher's Note: Thermally Induced Local Failures in Quasi-One-Dimensional Systems: Collapse in Carbon Nanotubes, Necking in Nanowires, and Opening of Bubbles in DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Carbon Nanotubes, Necking in Nanowires, and Opening of Bubbles in DNA [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 025503 (2010

  11. Impact of three different TiO2 morphologies on hydrogen evolution by methonal assisted water-splitting: nanoparticles, nanotubes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -splitting: nanoparticles, nanotubes and aerogels. (published in International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 36, 22 (2011, nanotubes and aerogels. These materials have shown different behaviours depending on both their composition of the samples (nanotubes or aerogels). Among all the tested samples, the TiO2 aerogel supported Pt one exhibited

  12. To cite this version : Pacchini, Sbastien and Dubuc, David and Flahaut, Emmanuel and Grenier, Katia. Double-walled carbon nanotube-based polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    the mainstream broad- band market. The use of composite materials based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) appears, Katia. Double-walled carbon nanotube-based polymer composites for electromagnetic protection. (2010-walled carbon nanotube-based polymer composites for electromagnetic protection se'bastien pacchini1,2 , david

  13. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holloway, Brian C.; Eklund, Peter C.; Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin C.; Shinn, Michelle

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces an output above about 50 watts/cm2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  14. Optimized fabrication and characterization of carbon nanotube spin valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samm, J.; Gramich, J.; Baumgartner, A., E-mail: andreas.baumgartner@unibas.ch; Weiss, M.; Schönenberger, C. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an improved fabrication scheme for carbon based nanospintronic devices and demonstrate the necessity for a careful data analysis to investigate the fundamental physical mechanisms leading to magnetoresistance. The processing with a low-density polymer and an optimised recipe allows us to improve the electrical, magnetic, and structural quality of ferromagnetic Permalloy contacts on lateral carbon nanotube (CNT) quantum dot spin valve devices, with comparable results for thermal and sputter deposition of the material. We show that spintronic nanostructures require an extended data analysis, since the magnetization can affect all characteristic parameters of the conductance features and lead to seemingly anomalous spin transport. In addition, we report measurements on CNT quantum dot spin valves that seem not to be compatible with the orthodox theories for spin transport in such structures.

  15. Generation of mirage effect by heated carbon nanotube thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tong, L. H. [Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Lim, C. W., E-mail: bccwlim@cityu.edu.hk [USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China and City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Li, Y. C. [Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Chuanzeng; Quoc Bui, Tinh [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, Paul-Bonatz-Str. 9-11, D-57076 Siegen (Germany)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Mirage effect, a common phenomenon in nature, is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which lights are bent due to the gradient variation of refraction in the temperature gradient medium. The theoretical analysis of mirage effect generated by heated carbon nanotube thin film is presented both for gas and liquid. Excellent agreement is demonstrated through comparing the theoretical prediction with published experimental results. It is concluded from the theoretical prediction and experimental observation that the mirage effect is more likely to happen in liquid. The phase of deflected optical beam is also discussed and the method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of medium is theoretically verified. Furthermore, a method for measuring the refractive index of gas by detecting optical beam deflection is also presented in this paper.

  16. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holloway, Brian C; Eklund, Peter C; Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C; Shinn, Michelle

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  17. Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotube with vacant defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Gang; Shen, Huaze; Wang, Enge; Xu, Limei, E-mail: limei.xu@pku.edu.cn [International Center for Quantum Materials and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Tangpanitanon, Jirawat [University of Cambridge, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire CB2 1TP (United Kingdom); Wen, Bo [International Center for Quantum Materials and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Heqing Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Xue, Jianming [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is important for its engineering applications and hydrogen energy storage. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we study the physisorption of molecular hydrogen on a SWCNT with a vacant defect, focusing on the effect of the vacant defect size and external parameters such as temperature and pressure. We find that hydrogen can be physisorbed inside a SWCNT through a vacant defect when the defect size is above a threshold. By controlling the size of the defects, we are able to extract hydrogen molecules from a gas mixture and store them inside the SWCNT. We also find that external parameters, such as low temperature and high pressure, enhance the physisorption of hydrogen molecules inside the SWCNT. In addition, the storage efficiency can be improved by introducing more defects, i.e., reducing the number of carbon atoms on the SWCNT.

  18. ION EXCHANGE PERFORMANCE OF TITANOSILICATES, GERMANATES AND CARBON NANOTUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alsobrook, A.; Hobbs, D.

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of testing the affinity of titanosilicates (TSP), germanium-substituted titanosilicates (Ge-TSP) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for lanthanide ions in dilute nitric acid solution. The K-TSP ion exchanger exhibited the highest affinity for lanthanides in dilute nitric acid solutions. The Ge-TSP ion exchanger shows promise as a material with high affinity, but additional tests are needed to confirm the preliminary results. The MWCNT exhibited much lower affinities than the K-TSP in dilute nitric acid solutions. However, the MWCNT are much more chemically stable to concentrated nitric acid solutions and, therefore, may candidates for ion exchange in more concentrated nitric acid solutions. This technical report serves as the deliverable documenting completion of the FY13 research milestone, M4FT-13SR0303061 – measure actinide and lanthanide distribution values in nitric acid solutions with sodium and potassium titanosilicate materials.

  19. Triplet absorption in carbon nanotubes: a TD-DFT study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei Tretiak

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We predict properties of triplet excited states in single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using a time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT). We show that the lowest triplet state energy in CNTs to be about 0.2-0.3 eV lower than the lowest singlet states. Like in $\\pi$-conjugated polymers, the lowest CNT triplets are spatially localized. These states show strong optical absorption at about 0.5-0.6 eV to the higher lying delocalized triplet states. These results demonstrate striking similarity of the electronic features between CNTs and $\\pi$-conjugated polymers and provide explicit guidelines for spectroscopic detection of CNT triplet states.

  20. Stable doping of carbon nanotubes via molecular self assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, B.; Chen, Y.; Podzorov, V., E-mail: podzorov@physics.rutgers.edu [Department of Physics and Institute for Advanced Materials and Devices for Nanotechnology, Rutgers University, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Cook, A.; Zakhidov, A. [Department of Physics and NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States)

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a novel method for stable doping of carbon nanotubes (CNT) based on methods of molecular self assembly. A conformal growth of a self-assembled monolayer of fluoroalkyl trichloro-silane (FTS) at CNT surfaces results in a strong increase of the sheet conductivity of CNT electrodes by 60–300%, depending on the CNT chirality and composition. The charge carrier mobility of undoped partially aligned CNT films was independently estimated in a field-effect transistor geometry (~100 cm²V?¹s?¹). The hole density induced by the FTS monolayer in CNT sheets is estimated to be ~1.8 ×10¹?cm?². We also show that FTS doping of CNT anodes greatly improves the performance of organic solar cells. This large and stable doping effect, easily achieved in large-area samples, makes this approach very attractive for applications of CNTs in transparent and flexible electronics.

  1. High performance transistors via aligned polyfluorene-sorted carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Gerald J.; Joo, Yongho; Singha Roy, Susmit; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S., E-mail: msarnold@wisc.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1509 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the performance of exceptionally electronic-type sorted, semiconducting, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) in field effect transistors (FETs). High on-conductance and high on/off conductance modulation are simultaneously achieved at channel lengths which are both shorter and longer than individual s-SWCNTs. The s-SWCNTs are isolated from heterogeneous mixtures using a polyfluorene-derivative as a selective agent and aligned on substrates via dose-controlled, floating evaporative self-assembly at densities of ?50 s-SWCNTs ?m{sup ?1}. At a channel length of 9??m the s-SWCNTs percolate to span the FET channel, and the on/off ratio and charge transport mobility are 2.2?×?10{sup 7} and 46?cm{sup 2}?V{sup ?1}?s{sup ?1}, respectively. At a channel length of 400?nm, a large fraction of the s-SWCNTs directly span the channel, and the on-conductance per width is 61??S??m{sup ?1} and the on/off ratio is 4?×?10{sup 5}. These results are considerably better than previous solution-processed FETs, which have suffered from poor on/off ratio due to spurious metallic nanotubes that bridge the channel. 4071 individual and small bundles of s-SWCNTs are tested in 400?nm channel length FETs, and all show semiconducting behavior, demonstrating the high fidelity of polyfluorenes as selective agents and the promise of assembling s-SWCNTs from solution to create high performance semiconductor electronic devices.

  2. Electrical Conductivity in Polymer Blends/ Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Ajit R.; Bose, Suryasarathi; Bhattacharyya, Arup R. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai-400076 (India)

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) based polymer composites have emerged as the future multifunctional materials in view of its exceptional mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. One of the major interests is to develop conductive polymer composites preferably at low concentration of CNT utilizing their high aspect ratio (L/D) for numerous applications, which include antistatic devices, capacitors and materials for EMI shielding. In this context, polymer blends have emerged as a potential candidate in lowering the percolation thresholds further by the utilization of 'double-percolation' which arises from the synergistic improvements in blend properties associated with the co-continuous morphology. Due to strong inter-tube van der Waals' forces, they often tend to aggregate and uniform dispersion remains a challenge. To overcome this challenge, we exploited sodium salt of 6-aminohexanoic acid (Na-AHA) which was able to assist in debundlling the multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) through 'cation-{pi}' interactions during melt-mixing leading to percolative 'network-like' structure of MWNT within polyamide6 (PA6) phase in co-continuous PA6/acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) blends. The composite exhibited low electrical percolation thresholds of 0.25 wt% of MWNT, the lowest reported value in this system so far. Retention of 'network-like structure' in the solid state with significant refinement was observed even at lower MWNT concentration in presence Na-AHA, which was assessed through AC electrical conductivity measurements. Reactive coupling was found to be a dominant factor besides 'cation-{pi}' interactions in achieving low electrical percolation in PA6/ABS+MWNT composites.

  3. ZnO Nanotubes Grown at Low Temperature Using Ga as Catalysts and Their Enhanced Photocatalytic Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    as substrates. Structure analysis shows that the nanotube is single crystal and has a hollow structure or nanoneedles because of their hollow internal structure, resulting in the enhancement of photocatalytic activity. Besides the application of nanotubes for photocatalysts, tubular nano- structures of various

  4. Decorating anode with bamboo-like nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes for microbial Suqin Ci a,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decorating anode with bamboo-like nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes for microbial fuel cells Suqin Ci, Nanchang 330063, PR China b Department of Mechanical, University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee, 3200 North Cramer November 2011 Available online 20 November 2011 Keywords: Carbon nanotubes Nitrogen doping Anode Microbial

  5. Frequency-and electric-field-dependent conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotube networks of varying density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, George

    Frequency- and electric-field-dependent conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotube networks October 2007; published 20 February 2008 We present measurements of the frequency- and electric-field-dependent conductivity of single-walled car- bon nanotube SWCNT networks of various densities. The ac conductivity

  6. From carbon nanobells to nickel nanotubes S. Ma, V. V. S. S. Srikanth, D. Maik, G. Y. Zhang,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guangyu

    From carbon nanobells to nickel nanotubes S. Ma, V. V. S. S. Srikanth, D. Maik, G. Y. Zhang,a T nanostructures as the initial templates. Following the strategy, nickel Ni nanotubes are prepared by using carbon deposition technique. Carbon/nickel core/shell structures are then prepared by electroplating the CNBs

  7. DOI: 10.1002/asia.201200349 Dye-Sensitized TiO2 Nanotube Solar Cells: Rational Structural and Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    DOI: 10.1002/asia.201200349 Dye-Sensitized TiO2 Nanotube Solar Cells: Rational Structural employed to substitute TiO2 nanoparticles for use in dye-sensitized solar cells. To fur- ther improve the performance of dye-sensitized TiO2 nanotube solar cells, efforts have been directed toward the optimization

  8. Synthesis of Nearly Uniform Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Identical Metal-Containing Molecular Nanoclusters as Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -known that the physical and chemical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) vary stronglySynthesis of Nearly Uniform Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Identical Metal extremely small but uniform SWNTs on silicon dioxide surfaces using the CVD method. With a standard

  9. A Novel "Green" Fully-integrated Ultrasensitive RFID-enabled Gas Sensor Utilizing Inkjet-printed Antennas and Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    -cost paper substrate. Carbon nanotube composites change their electric properties (e.g. resistance. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) composites were found to have electrical properties highly sensitive to extremely small quantities of gases, such as ammonia (NH3), carbon dioxide (C02), nitrogen

  10. Carbon Nanotubes as Binder in Electrochemical Supercapacitor Malinda Caudle, Iowa State University Georgia Tech SURF 2011 Fellow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Carbon Nanotubes as Binder in Electrochemical Supercapacitor Malinda Caudle, Iowa State University devices that are both long lasting and fast charging1 . It is possible that carbon nanotubes can act as an effective binder for an activated carbon electrode2 . The effect on the electrochemical properties by adding

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Heat Transfer Issues of Nanotubes. > Yasuhiro Igarashi, Yuki Taniguchi, Yasushi Shibuta and Shigeo Maruyama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Heat Transfer Issues of Nanotubes. ·> Yasuhiro Igarashi, Yuki 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan Heat transfer between single-walled carbon nanotubes, which was 0.105 µm. In other words, when the length of SWNT is 0.105 µm, the radial heat transfer

  12. Title: Decomposition of ethanol and dimethyl-ether during CVD synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    of ethanol and dimethyl-ether during CVD synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes Author list: Bo Hou (single-walled carbon nanotubes) was investigated. Gas-phase thermal decomposition of ethanol and DME ethanol and DME decomposition, confirming expected reaction trends and primary byproducts. Peak

  13. Influence of the dynamical image potential on the rainbows in ion channeling through short carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borka, D.; Petrovic, S.; Neskovic, N. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Mowbray, D. J.; Miskovic, Z. L. [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the influence of the dynamic polarization of the carbon valence electrons on the angular distributions of protons channeled through short (11,9) single-wall carbon nanotubes at speeds of 3 and 5 a.u. (corresponding to the proton energies of 0.223 and 0.621 MeV), with the nanotube length varied from 0.1 to 0.3 {mu}m. The dynamic image force on protons is calculated by means of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the nanotube's dielectric response, whereas the repulsive interaction with the nanotube's cylindrical wall is modeled by a continuum potential based on the Doyle-Turner interatomic potential. The angular distributions of channeled protons are generated by a computer simulation method using the numerical solution of the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane. Our analysis shows that the inclusion of the image interaction causes qualitative changes in the proton deflection function, giving rise to a number of rainbow maxima in the corresponding angular distribution. We propose that observations of those rainbow maxima could be used to deduce detailed information on the relevant interaction potentials, and consequently to probe the electron distribution inside carbon nanotubes.

  14. Improved thermoelectric power output from multilayered polyethylenimine doped carbon nanotube based organic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewitt, Corey A.; Montgomery, David S.; Barbalace, Ryan L.; Carlson, Rowland D.; Carroll, David L., E-mail: carroldl@wfu.edu [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Wake Forest University, 501 Deacon Blvd., Winston Salem, North Carolina 27105 (United States)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    By appropriately selecting the carbon nanotube type and n-type dopant for the conduction layers in a multilayered carbon nanotube composite, the total device thermoelectric power output can be increased significantly. The particular materials chosen in this study were raw single walled carbon nanotubes for the p-type layers and polyethylenimine doped single walled carbon nanotubes for the n-type layers. The combination of these two conduction layers leads to a single thermocouple Seebeck coefficient of 96 ± 4??VK{sup ?1}, which is 6.3 times higher than that previously reported. This improved Seebeck coefficient leads to a total power output of 14.7 nW per thermocouple at the maximum temperature difference of 50?K, which is 44 times the power output per thermocouple for the previously reported results. Ultimately, these thermoelectric power output improvements help to increase the potential use of these lightweight, flexible, and durable organic multilayered carbon nanotube based thermoelectric modules in low powered electronics applications, where waste heat is available.

  15. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grigorian, Leonid (Raymond, OH); Hornyak, Louis (Evergreen, CO); Dillon, Anne C (Boulder, CO); Heben, Michael J (Denver, CO)

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  16. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  17. Phonon dispersion and quantization tuning of strained carbon nanotubes for flexible electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gautreau, Pierre; Chu, Yanbiao; Basaran, Cemal [Electronic Packaging Laboratory, State University of New York at Buffalo, 102 Ketter Hall, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Ragab, Tarek [Electronic Packaging Laboratory, State University of New York at Buffalo, 102 Ketter Hall, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Nanotechnology Research Laboratory, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, 71491, Saudi Arabia and Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria University, Alexandria 21526 (Egypt)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene and carbon nanotubes are materials with large potentials for applications in flexible electronics. Such devices require a high level of sustainable strain and an understanding of the materials electrical properties under strain. Using supercell theory in conjunction with a comprehensive molecular mechanics model, the full band phonon dispersion of carbon nanotubes under uniaxial strain is studied. The results suggest an overall phonon softening and open up the possibility of phonon quantization tuning with uniaxial strain. The change in phonon quantization and the resulting increase in electron-phonon and phonon-phonon scattering rates offer further explanation and theoretical basis to the experimental observation of electrical properties degradation for carbon nanotubes under uniaxial strain.

  18. The effect of metal-contacts on carbon nanotube for high frequency interconnects and devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chimowa, George; Bhattacharyya, Somnath [Nano-Scale Transport Physics laboratory and DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, P. Bag 3, Wits 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High frequency characterisation of platinum and tungsten contacts on individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) is performed from 10 MHz to 50 GHz. By measuring the scattering parameters of aligned individual MWNTs, we show that metal contacts enhance an inductive response due to the improved MWNT-electrode coupling reducing the capacitive effect. This behaviour is pronounced in the frequency below 10 GHz and strong for tungsten contacts. We explain the inductive response as a result of the interaction of stimulus current with the localized (or defects) states present at the contact region resulting in the current lagging behind the voltage. The results are further supported by direct current measurements that show tungsten to significantly increase carbon nanotube-electrode coupling. The immediate consequence is the reduction of the contact resistance, implying a reduction of electron tunnelling barrier from the electrode to the carbon nanotube.

  19. Nanofiltration of Electrolyte Solutions by Sub-2nm Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Kim, S; In, J B; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Both MD simulations and experimental studies have shown that liquid and gas flow through carbon nanotubes with nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast. For applications in separation technology, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In this work, we use pressure-driven filtration experiments to study ion exclusion in silicon nitride/sub-2-nm CNT composite membranes as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and ion valence. We show that carbon nanotube membranes exhibit significant ion exclusion at low salt concentration. Our results support a rejection mechanism dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion rejection capabilities.

  20. A Ni-Fe Layered Double Hydroxide-Carbon Nanotube Complex for Water Oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Ming; Wang, Hailiang; Liang, Yongye; Wu, Justin Zachary; Zhou, Jigang; Wang, Jian; Regier, Tom; Wei, Fei; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly active, durable and cost-effective electrocatalysts for water oxidation to evolve oxygen gas hold a key to a range of renewable energy solutions including water splitting and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Here, we report the synthesis of ultrathin nickel iron layered double hydroxide nanoplates on mildly oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Incorporation of Fe into the nickel hydroxide induced the formation of NiFe-layered double hydroxide. The nanoplates were covalently attached to a network of nanotubes, affording excellent electrical wiring to the nanoplates. The ultra-thin Ni-Fe layered double hydroxide nanoplates/carbon nanotube complex was found to exhibit unusually high electro-catalytic activity and stability for oxygen evolution and outperformed commercial precious metal Ir catalysts.

  1. Fabrication of carbon nanotube nanogap electrodes by helium ion sputtering for molecular contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiele, Cornelius, E-mail: Cornelius.Thiele@kit.edu [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany) [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), 76028 Karlsruhe (Germany); Vieker, Henning; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin [Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany)] [Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Flavel, Benjamin S.; Hennrich, Frank [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Muñoz Torres, David; Eaton, Thomas R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, 4056 Basel (Switzerland)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Mayor, Marcel [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany) [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), 76028 Karlsruhe (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Kappes, Manfred M. [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany) [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), 76028 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Löhneysen, Hilbert v. [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany) [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), 76028 Karlsruhe (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut für Festkörperphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); and others

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotube nanogaps have been used to contact individual organic molecules. However, the reliable fabrication of a truly nanometer-sized gap remains a challenge. We use helium ion beam lithography to sputter nanogaps of only (2.8 ± 0.6) nm size into single metallic carbon nanotubes embedded in a device geometry. The high reproducibility of the gap size formation provides a reliable nanogap electrode testbed for contacting small organic molecules. To demonstrate the functionality of these nanogap electrodes, we integrate oligo(phenylene ethynylene) molecular rods, and measure resistance before and after gap formation and with and without contacted molecules.

  2. High-Tc superconductivity in entirely end-bonded multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Takesue; J. Haruyama; N. Kobayashi; S. Chiashi; S. Maruyama; T. Sugai; H. Shinohara

    2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We report that entirely end-bonded multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) can show superconductivity with the transition temperature Tc as high as 12K that is approximately 40-times larger than those reported in ropes of single-walled nanotubes. We find that emergence of this superconductivity is very sensitive to junction structures of Au electrode/MWNTs. This reveals that only MWNTs with optimal numbers of electrically activated shells, which are realized by the end-bonding, can allow the superconductivity due to inter shell effects.

  3. Microwave-assisted synthesis of carbon nanotubes from tannin, lignin, and derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of synthesizing carbon nanotubes. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of: (a) dissolving a first amount of a first transition-metal salt and a second amount of a second transition-metal salt in water to form a solution; (b) adding a third amount of tannin to the solution to form a mixture; (c) heating the mixture to a first temperature for a first duration of time to form a sample; and (d) subjecting the sample to a microwave radiation for a second duration of time effective to produce a plurality of carbon nanotubes.

  4. Analytic and computational micromechanics of clustering and interphase effects in carbon nanotube composites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seidel, Gary D.; Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Lagoudas, Dimitris C. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective elastic properties for carbon nanotube reinforced composites are obtained through a variety of micromechanics techniques. Using the in-plane elastic properties of graphene, the effective properties of carbon nanotubes are calculated utilizing a composite cylinders micromechanics technique as a first step in a two-step process. These effective properties are then used in the self-consistent and Mori-Tanaka methods to obtain effective elastic properties of composites consisting of aligned single or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a polymer matrix. Effective composite properties from these averaging methods are compared to a direct composite cylinders approach extended from the work of Hashin and Rosen (1964) and Christensen and Lo (1979). Comparisons with finite element simulations are also performed. The effects of an interphase layer between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix as result of functionalization is also investigated using a multi-layer composite cylinders approach. Finally, the modeling of the clustering of nanotubes into bundles due to interatomic forces is accomplished herein using a tessellation method in conjunction with a multi-phase Mori-Tanaka technique. In addition to aligned nanotube composites, modeling of the effective elastic properties of randomly dispersed nanotubes into a matrix is performed using the Mori-Tanaka method, and comparisons with experimental data are made. Computational micromechanical analysis of high-stiffness hollow fiber nanocomposites is performed using the finite element method. The high-stiffness hollow fibers are modeled either directly as isotropic hollow tubes or equivalent transversely isotropic effective solid cylinders with properties computed using a micromechanics based composite cylinders method. Using a representative volume element for clustered high-stiffness hollow fibers embedded in a compliant matrix with the appropriate periodic boundary conditions, the effective elastic properties are obtained from the finite element results. These effective elastic properties are compared to approximate analytical results found using micromechanics methods. The effects of an interphase layer between the high-stiffness hollow fibers and matrix to simulate imperfect load transfer and/or functionalization of the hollow fibers is also investigated and compared to a multi-layer composite cylinders approach. Finally the combined effects of clustering with fiber-matrix interphase regions are studied. The parametric studies performed herein were motivated by and used properties for single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in an epoxy matrix, and as such are intended to serve as a guide for continuum level representations of such nanocomposites in a multi-scale modeling approach.

  5. Triode carbon nanotube field emission display using barrier rib structure and manufacturing method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, In-taek (Yongin, KR); Kim, Jong-min (Seongnam, KR)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A triode carbon nanotube field emission display (FED) using a barrier rib structure and a manufacturing method thereof are provided. In a triode carbon nanotube FED employing barrier ribs, barrier ribs are formed on cathode lines by a screen printing method, a mesh structure is mounted on the barrier ribs, and a spacer is inserted between the barrier ribs through slots of the mesh structure, thereby stably fixing the mesh structure and the spacer within a FED panel due to support by the barrier ribs.

  6. Tunable carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures by vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Min; Guo, Hongyan; Ge, Changchun [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing (China); Institute of Powder Metallurgy and Advanced Ceramics, Southwest Jiaotong University, 111, 1st Section, Northern 2nd Ring Road, Chengdu (China); Yan, Qingzhi, E-mail: qzyan@ustb.edu.cn; Lang, Shaoting [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing (China)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, versatile route for the synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT)-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures was set up via vapor deposition process. For the first time, amorphous CNTs (?-CNTs) were used to immobilized tungsten carbide nanoparticles. By adjusting the synthesis and annealing temperature, ?-CNTs/amorphous tungsten carbide, ?-CNTs/W{sub 2}C, and CNTs/W{sub 2}C/WC heterostructures were prepared. This approach provides an efficient method to attach other metal carbides and other nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes with tunable properties.

  7. Final report : LDRD project 79824 carbon nanotube sorting via DNA-directed self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, David B; Leung, Kevin; Rempe, Susan B.; Dossa, Paul D.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Martin, Marcus Gary

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown great promise in novel applications in molecular electronics, biohazard detection, and composite materials. Commercially synthesized nanotubes exhibit a wide dispersion of geometries and conductivities, and tend to aggregate. Hence the key to using these materials is the ability to solubilize and sort carbon nanotubes according to their geometric/electronic properties. One of the most effective dispersants is single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), but there are many outstanding questions regarding the interaction between nucleic acids and SWNTs. In this work we focus on the interactions of SWNTs with single monomers of nucleic acids, as a first step to answering these outstanding questions. We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the binding energy of six different nucleotide monophosphates (NMPs) to a (6,0) single-wall carbon nanotube in aqueous solution. We find that the binding energies are generally favorable, of the order of a few kcal/mol. The binding energies of the different NMPs were very similar in salt solution, whereas we found a range of binding energies for NMPs in pure water. The binding energies are sensitive to the details of the association of the sodium ions with the phosphate groups and also to the average conformations of the nucleotides. We use electronic structure (Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Moller-Plesset second order perturbation to uncorrelated Hartree Fock theory (MP2)) methods to complement the classical force field study. With judicious choices of DFT exchange correlation functionals, we find that DFT, MP2, and classical force field predictions are in qualitative and even quantitative agreement; all three methods should give reliable and valid predictions. However, in one important case, the interactions between ions and metallic carbon nanotubes--the SWNT polarization-induced affinity for ions, neglected in most classical force field studies, is found to be extremely large (on the order of electron volts) and may have important consequences for various SWNT applications. Finally, the adsorption of NMPs onto single-walled carbon nanotubes were studied experimentally. The nanotubes were sonicated in the presence of the nucleotides at various weight fractions and centrifuged before examining the ultraviolet absorbance of the resulting supernatant. A distinct Langmuir adsorption isotherm was obtained for each nucleotide. All of the nucleotides differ in their saturation value as well as their initial slope, which we attribute to differences both in nucleotide structure and in the binding ability of different types or clusters of tubes. Results from this simple system provide insights toward development of dispersion and separation methods for nanotubes: strongly binding nucleotides are likely to help disperse, whereas weaker ones may provide selectivity that may be beneficial to a separation process.

  8. Vapor Synthesis and Thermal Modification of Supportless Platinum-Ruthenium Nanotubes and Application as Methanol Electrooxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson III, Robert [University of Tennessee (UT); Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL; Unocic, Kinga A [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Papandrew, Alexander B [ORNL; Zawodzinski, Thomas A [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic, mixed-phase, and alloyed bimetallic Pt-Ru nanotubes were synthesized by a novel route based on the sublimation of metal acetylacetonate precursors and their subsequent vapor deposition within anodic alumina templates. Nanotube architectures were tuned by thermal annealing treatments. As-synthesized nanotubes are composed of nanoparticulate, metallic platinum and hydrous ruthenium oxide whose respective thicknesses depend on the sample chemical composition. The Pt-decorated, hydrous Ru oxide nanotubes may be thermally annealed to promote a series of chemical and physical changes to the nanotube structures including alloy formation, crystallite growth and morphological evolution. Annealed Pt-Ru alloy nanotubes and their as-synthesized analogs demonstrate relatively high specific activities for the oxidation of methanol. As-synthesized, mixed-phase Pt-Ru nanotubes (0.39 mA/cm2) and metallic alloyed Pt64Ru36NTs (0.33 mA/cm2) have considerably higher area-normalized activities than PtRu black (0.22 mA/cm2) at 0.65 V vs. RHE.

  9. Electrostatic waves in carbon nanotubes with an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdikian, Alireza [Department of Physics, Malayer University, Malayer 65719-95863 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Malayer University, Malayer 65719-95863 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Mehran [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19835-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19835-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a linearized hydrodynamic model and within the quasi-static approximation, the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating through single-walled carbon nanotubes subject to an axial magnetic field is theoretically explored. In the classical limit, we obtain two main possible waves which in turn are divided into two branches, a low-frequency acoustical and a high-frequency optical plasmon branch. In the quantum case, we have found that the dispersion relation is substantially modified when the electron wavelength becomes large enough compared to the propagation wavelength of the electrostatic waves in the quantum plasma. We also show that the axial magnetic field manifest itself on the perturbed electron density through the quantum term and gives rise to the propagation of the electrostatic waves within the quantum plasma. As a result, the effect of the magnetic field is pronounced in the plasma dispersion relations in such a way that their curves approach to zero when the magnetic field is weak; and for the strong magnetic field, they asymptotically meet the constant lines.

  10. Paper-based ultracapacitors with carbon nanotubes-graphene composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jian, E-mail: lijian@gwu.edu, E-mail: keidar@gwu.edu; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Brand, Cameron; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael, E-mail: lijian@gwu.edu, E-mail: keidar@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Sun, Jianwei; Reeves, Mark [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a paper-based ultracapacitors were fabricated by the rod-rolling method with the ink of carbon nanomaterials, which were synthesized by arc discharge under various magnetic conditions. Composites of carbon nanostructures, including high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene flakes were synthesized simultaneously in a magnetically enhanced arc. These two nanostructures have promising electrical properties and synergistic effects in the application of ultracapacitors. Scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures and their thin films. The sheet resistance of the SWCNT and composite thin films was also evaluated by four-point probe from room temperature to the cryogenic temperature as low as 90?K. In addition, measurements of cyclic voltammetery and galvanostatic charging/discharging showed the ultracapacitor based on composites possessed a superior specific capacitance of up to 100?F/g, which is around three times higher than the ultracapacitor entirely fabricated with SWCNT.

  11. Mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes in crossed junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yadong; Chen, Xiaoming; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Park, Cheol [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Fay, Catharine C. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States); Stupkiewicz, Stanislaw [Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in crossed junctions. The structure and deformation of the crossed tubes in the junction are characterized by using atomic force microscopy. Our results show that the total tube heights are reduced by 20%–33% at the crossed junctions formed by double-walled BNNTs with outer diameters in the range of 2.21–4.67?nm. The measured tube height reduction is found to be in a nearly linear relationship with the summation of the outer diameters of the two tubes forming the junction. The contact force between the two tubes in the junction is estimated based on contact mechanics theories and found to be within the range of 4.2–7.6 nN. The Young's modulus of BNNTs and their binding strengths with the substrate are quantified, based on the deformation profile of the upper tube in the junction, and are found to be 1.07?±?0.11 TPa and 0.18–0.29 nJ/m, respectively. Finally, we perform finite element simulations on the mechanical deformations of the crossed BNNT junctions. The numerical simulation results are consistent with both the experimental measurements and the analytical analysis. The results reported in this paper contribute to a better understanding of the structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and to the pursuit of their applications.

  12. Analytical solutions to the free vibration of a double-walled carbon nanotube carrying a bacterium at its tip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storch, Joel A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330-8348 (United States); Elishakoff, Isaac [Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a cantilevered double-walled carbon nanotube carrying a rigid body—representative of a bacterium or virus—at the tip of the outer nanotube. By idealizing the nanotubes as Bernoulli-Euler beams, we are able to obtain exact expressions for both the mode shapes and characteristic frequency equation. Separate analyses are performed for the special case of a concentrated tip mass and the more complicated situation where the tip body also exhibits inertia and mass center offset from the beam tip.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of the elastic properties of polymer/carbon nanotube composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, James

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the elastic properties of polymer/carbon nanotube composites Yue composite. However, improvements in properties are by no means guaranteed, and the results are often in the composite. In this paper, we present classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of model polymer

  14. Nano Res (2010) 3: 170173170 Synthesis and Characterization of WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano Res (2010) 3: 170­173170 Synthesis and Characterization of WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes]. Folding and bonding of edge atoms on the periphery of the quasi two-dimensional planar nano- structure this nanotubular structure is suitable for capillary filling using molten metal halides. Nano Res (2010) 3: 170

  15. Layer-by-layer carbon nanotube electrodes for flexible chemical sensor and energy storage applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saetia, Kittipong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spray-assisted layer-by-layer (LbL) technique has been investigated for creating multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) films on porous electrospun fiber mats via LbL assembly of surface-functionalized MWNTs. Negative and ...

  16. One dimensional Si/Sn -based nanowires and nanotubes for lithium-ion energy storage materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    One dimensional Si/Sn - based nanowires and nanotubes for lithium-ion energy storage materials Nam of advanced energy storage applications. In this feature article, we review recent progress on Si-based NWs to their uneven energy production. From this perspective, the interest in energy storage technology is on the rise

  17. Growth of a single freestanding multiwall carbon nanotube on each nanonickel dot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Mark

    that the structures are indeed hollow nanotubes. The diameter and height depend on the nickel dot size and growth time displays FEDs . Attempts to manipulate nano- tubes for these applications have been made by postgrowth deposition CVD on mesopo- rous silica with imbedded iron particles.9 The growth of large arrays of well

  18. Directing and Sensing Changes in Molecular Conformation on Individual Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    and drain electrodes on a silicon oxide surface. The doped silicon wafer serves as a global back of the carbon nanotubes with functional molecules that can be toggled back-and-forth between different molecular of thermally grown SiO2 on their surface.10 Source and drain electrodes (5 nm of Cr followed by 50 nm of Au

  19. Complex structure of carbon nanotubes and their implications for formation mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Lee

    phenomena and the amorphous carbon residue inside the hollow core of carbon nanotubes, a two-step growth of carbon nano- tubes prepared by an arc discharge has been the subject of some controversy, particularly observations of open-ended nano- tubes, Iijima et al.10 proposed an open-ended growth model in which carbon

  20. Self-Metallization of Photocatalytic Porphyrin Nanotubes Zhongchun Wang,, Craig J. Medforth, and John A. Shelnutt*,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.

    , light-energy conversion, and ca- talysis. Porphyrins are attractive building blocks for these nano in vertical orientations confirm a hollow tubular structure with open ends rather than a solid cylindrically(I)-thiourea complex, the metal is deposited exclusively within the hollow interior of the nanotubes, forming

  1. Breathing coherent phonons and caps fragmentation in carbon nanotubes following ultrafast laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrica,Traian

    driven by ultrafast laser pulses.1­3 The necessary conditions for generating such coherent phonons are i is larger than the duration of currently available ultrafast pulses. ii Measurements4­7 determinedBreathing coherent phonons and caps fragmentation in carbon nanotubes following ultrafast laser

  2. Impact of carbon nanotubes on the ingestion and digestion of bacteria by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Impact of carbon nanotubes on the ingestion and digestion of bacteria by ciliated protozoa PARNIAN,4 by ecotoxicologists because of its role in the regulation of microbial populations through the ingestion and digestion to aggregate, which impedes their ability to ingest and digest their prey bacteria species, although it might

  3. amyloid water-filled nanotubes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amyloid water-filled nanotubes First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Impairment of...

  4. Space-charge waves in magnetized and collisional quantum plasma columns confined in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagheri, Mehran, E-mail: mh-bagheri@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19835-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19835-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdikian, Alireza, E-mail: abdykian@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Malayer University, Malayer 65719-95863 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Malayer University, Malayer 65719-95863 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating in a column of quantum magnetized collisional plasma embraced completely by a metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes. The analysis is based on the quantum linearized hydrodynamic formalism of collective excitations within the quasi-static approximation. It is shown when the electronic de Broglie's wavelength of the plasma is comparable in the order of magnitude to the radius of the nanotube, the quantum effects are quite meaningful and our model anticipates one acoustical and two optical space-charge waves which are positioned into three propagating bands. With increasing the nanotube radius, the features of the acoustical branch remain unchanged, yet two distinct optical branches are degenerated and the classical behavior is recovered. This study might provide a platform to create new finite transverse cross section quantum magnetized plasmas and to devise nanometer dusty plasmas based on the metallic carbon nanotubes in the absence of either a drift or a thermal electronic velocity and their existence could be experimentally examined.

  5. Reliability of Wireless On-Chip Interconnects Based on Carbon Nanotube Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Partha Pratim

    Reliability of Wireless On-Chip Interconnects Based on Carbon Nanotube Antennas A. Nojeh1 , P Engineering University of British Columbia 2332 Main Mall Vancouver, BC, Canada 2 School of Electrical of the research effort in the emerging area of nanoelectronics has revolved around creating novel devices

  6. Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b , Y.F. Zheng a , C.S. Lee a , N of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China b Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada N6A 5B7 Received 17 February 2001 Abstract Carbon monoxide

  7. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 155417 (2011) Phonon-assisted transport through suspended carbon nanotube quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 155417 (2011) Phonon-assisted transport through suspended carbon nanotube, Lanzhou 730000, China 2 Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, China 3 Beijing Computation Science Research Center, Beijing 100080, China (Received 14 August 2011; revised manuscript

  8. Cobalt Ultrathin Film Catalyzed Ethanol Chemical Vapor Deposition of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    Cobalt Ultrathin Film Catalyzed Ethanol Chemical Vapor Deposition of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) using a cobalt ultrathin film (1 nm) as the catalyst and ethanol as carbon feedstock flow during the growth. The trace amount of self-contained water (0.2-5 wt %) in ethanol may act

  9. Effects of oxygen on the growth characteristics of carbon nanotubes on conductive substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonaparte, Ryan K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of oxygen on Fe-catalyzed carbon nanotube (CNT) growth on Ta substrates was studied. CNTs were grown on Fe thin-film catalysts deposited on silicon substrates via exposure to C?H? in a thermal chemical vapor ...

  10. Finite Element Modelling and Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Carbon nanotubes/ Polymer Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaddamanugu, Dhatri

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    the velocities of carbon atoms in the nanotube. Results show that the Young's modulus increases with tube diameter in molecular mechanics whereas decreases in molecular dynamics since the inter-atomic potential due to chemical reactions between the atoms is taken...

  11. Testing Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes on Ion Erosion for Advanced Space Yoke Khin Yap 1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Lyon B.

    erosion in advanced space propulsion systems. We have compared polycrystalline diamond films with MWNTs]. Recently, Meezan, et. al. found that polycrystalline diamond plates had 25% better resistance to sputtering: lbking@mtu.edu ABSTRACT Are carbon nanotubes more resistant than diamonds against ion erosion? Here, we

  12. ULTRA-HIGH SURFACE AREA SINGLE AND MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE 3-DIMENSIONAL HYBRID STRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    flexible electronic devices, membranes, sensors, and energy storage devices, the primary reason being surface area 3-dimensional hybrid nanostructure by combining carbon nanotube growth on two templates. This novel hybrid carbon nanostructure demonstrates an enhanced conductive surface area that paves the way

  13. Enhanced Thermal Conductivity of Water with Surfactant Encapsulated and Individualized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Dispersions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    experimentally using a transient hot wire technique at room temperature. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs] Maruyama.S, Kojima.R, Miyauchi.Y, Chiashi.S, Kohno.M, Low temperature synthesis of high purity singleEnhanced Thermal Conductivity of Water with Surfactant Encapsulated and Individualized Single

  14. Anisotropic thermal transport in highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays Liying Guo,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    including biomedical implant devices,3 biomedical diagnostic applications, gas sensors, so- lar cells, fuel nanotubes have the great potential to control the lateral spacing geometry and regulate cell fate,3 cells, lean-burn gasoline engines, and photocatalyst.9­14 Concerns have arisen about severe thermal

  15. Dependence of exciton transition energy of single-walled carbon nanotubes on surrounding dielectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Dependence of exciton transition energy of single-walled carbon nanotubes on surrounding dielectric 11, 2007) We theoretically investigate the dependence of exciton transition energies on dielectric transition energy dependence on dielectric constant of various surrounding materials. PACS numbers: 78.67.Ch

  16. CNT-SI HETEROJUNCTION SOLAR CELLS WITH STRUCTURE-CONTROLLED SINGLE-WALL CARBON NANOTUBE FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    CNT-SI HETEROJUNCTION SOLAR CELLS WITH STRUCTURE- CONTROLLED SINGLE-WALL CARBON NANOTUBE FILMS solar cells. We proposed a water-vapor treatment to build up SWNTs to a self-assembled micro- honeycomb network for the application of solar cells [1]. The micro-honeycomb network consists of vertical

  17. Prying Apart Ruddlesden-Popper Phases: Exfoliation into Sheets and Nanotubes for Assembly of Perovskite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prying Apart Ruddlesden-Popper Phases: Exfoliation into Sheets and Nanotubes for Assembly ) Na, Ca, Sr, La; B ) Ta, Ti) that have acidic interlayer protons were exfoliated using tetra(n- butyl and titanoniobates have weakly acidic interlayer protons and exfoliate only to a limited extent. TBAxH2-xSrNb2O7

  18. ccsd-00005824,version1-5Jul2005 Exfoliation of singlewall carbon nanotubes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ccsd-00005824,version1-5Jul2005 Exfoliation of singlewall carbon nanotubes in aqueous surfactant of the suspensions with respect to powders, and of exfoliated tubes with respect to bundles. The radial breathing, no shift is observed in the RBM spectra after exfoliation in the suspensions. However, we demonstrate

  19. Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) Produced by CO Disproportionation on Co-Mo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resasco, Daniel

    Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) Produced by CO Disproportionation on Co Received November 15, 2001. Revised Manuscript Received February 6, 2002 The disproportionation of CO over Co-Mo/SiO2 catalysts with low Co/Mo ratios results in a high selectivity to single-walled carbon

  20. Composites of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Polystyrene: Preparation and Electrical Conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resasco, Daniel

    and nitric acid oxidized SWNT. From measurements of the electrical conductivities of the composites over of SWNT, composites made with HiPco tubes had the highest conductivity. Introduction Carbon nanotubes conductivi- ties of CNT-polymer composites have percolation thresholds ranging from 0.0025%5 to several

  1. Conductivity enhancement of carbon nanotube and nanofiber-based polymer nanocomposites by melt annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    Conductivity enhancement of carbon nanotube and nanofiber-based polymer nanocomposites by melt and CNF-based composites in polystyrene (PS). The mech- anism behind the conductivity increase­CNF nano- composites, and impressive conductivities have been reported. For example, conductivities around

  2. INTER-CARBON NANOTUBE CONTACT IN THERMAL TRANSPORT OF CONTROLLED-MORPHOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    conductivities of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) polymer nano-composites were calculated using a random walk-isotropic heat conduction in aligned-CNT polymeric composites, because this geometry is an ideal thermal layer-CNT contact, volume fraction and thermal boundary resistance on the effective conductivities of CNT-composites

  3. Thermal resistance and phonon scattering at the interface between carbon nanotube and amorphous polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, James

    dynamics study of heat conduction in carbon nanotube (CNT)/polyethylene (PE) composites. Particular thermal conductivity of a macroscopic CNT/PE composite is quantified based on an effective medium approximation model. Ó 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Polymer composites are employed

  4. Modifying the Electronic Character of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Through Anisotropic Polymer Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Julie P.

    , single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)±polymer composites have received much attention due to their im is at least 10±6 S m±1 . Composites of SWNTs have been proposed as a possible way to increase the conductivity of the SWNT±PMMA composite. Structural changes of both SWNTs and polymers resulting from their interactions

  5. Electronic properties of carbon nanotube/fabric composites David S. Hecht, Liangbing Hu, George Gruner *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, George

    the mechanical and electronic properties of the polymer matrix. Two dimen- sional networks of conducting by a non- conducting fabric. This composite material has ­ aside from the interest as a model systemElectronic properties of carbon nanotube/fabric composites David S. Hecht, Liangbing Hu, George Gru

  6. Reinforcement Mechanisms in Polymer Nanotube Composites: Simulated Non-Bonded and Cross-Linked Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bebendorf, Mario

    of magnitude larger than the non-bonded composites. INTRODUCTION Composite materials consisting of carbon of three simulations related to the issue of load transfer in carbon nanotube/polymer composites is given the conditions under which stress transfer may occur in composite materials, and therefore provide insight on how

  7. Short communication The composite rods of MnO and multi-walled carbon nanotubes as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    Short communication The composite rods of MnO and multi-walled carbon nanotubes as anode materialsO as an anode material for lithium ion batteries are significantly improved. The MnO/MWNTs composite shows a Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Xi'an Jiaotong

  8. Can photo excitations heal defects in carbon nanotubes? Yoshiyuki Miyamoto a,*, Savas Berber b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    components by monitoring the response of carbon na- notubes with atomic vacancies to electronic excitations of electronic excitations in these nanostructures to be several orders of magnitude longer than in solids a concern about the perfor- mance and reliability of nanotube-based devices. Theo- retical studies showed

  9. Field emission of individual carbon nanotube with in situ tip image and real work function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Field emission of individual carbon nanotube with in situ tip image and real work function Zhi Xu August 2005; published online 10 October 2005 The field emission properties of individual multiwalled work functions at tips by the in situ transmission electron microscopy method. The field emission

  10. Hidden features of the catalyst nanoparticles favorable for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    nanotube growth by using chemical vapor deposition synthesis augmented by an attached mass spectrometer MS,16 Fig. 1 a , a widely debated issue in the literature.7­10 Based on the cal- culated Fe­C liquidus lines to mention that in our studies we use methane gas. Unlike methane, the dehydrogenation reactions of other

  11. DNA Sensing by Field-Effect Transistors Based on Networks of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    DNA Sensing by Field-Effect Transistors Based on Networks of Carbon Nanotubes Ee Ling Gui, Lain mechanism of electrical detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization for Au- and Cr level alignment between electrode and SWCNTs can be affected by DNA immobilization and hybridization

  12. Photo-assisted electrodeposition of an electrochemically active polypyrrole layer on anatase type titanium dioxide nanotube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    titanium dioxide nanotube arrays E. Ngaboyamahinaa,b , H. Cacheta,b , A. Paillereta,b , E.M.M. Suttera,b* a of pyrrole from aqueous electrolytic solutions on titanium oxide NTAs, a well-known large specific area n-type semiconductor substrate. As titanium dioxide is known to be poorly conducting in the anodic potential range, we

  13. Non-Fourier heat conduction in a single-walled carbon nanotube: Classical molecular dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Non-Fourier heat conduction in a single-walled carbon nanotube: Classical molecular dynamics of the simulations exhibit non-Fourier heat conduction where the distinct amount of heat is transported in a wavelike called non-Fourier heat conduction equations in order to investigate the applicability

  14. 12 American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 85, No. 7 Nanotube `Sandwiches' Could

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    12 American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 85, No. 7 Nanotube `Sandwiches' Could Lead to Better Composites Reinforced composite fabrics made from woven ceramic fibers have been used for decades. The fabric layers are infiltrated with a high-temperature epoxy matrix, and then several layers of cloth

  15. Strengthening and toughening of carbon nanotube reinforced alumina nanocomposite fabricated by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    rights reserved. Keywords: Carbon nanotube; Ceramic matrix composite; Molecular level mixing; Spark: one is the weak bonding between CNTs and ceramic matrix and the other is the inhomogeneous distribution of CNTs within the ceramic matrix. Recently, CNTs have been homoge- neously dispersed within

  16. CNT-Si heterojunction solar cell with single-walled carbon nanotubes Shigeo Maruyama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    CNT-Si heterojunction solar cell with single-walled carbon nanotubes Shigeo Maruyama Department solar cells. We proposed a water vapor treatment to build up SWNTs to a self-assembled micro-honeycomb network for the application of solar cells [1]. The micro- honeycomb network consists of vertical

  17. Controlled Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for CNT-Si heterojunction solar cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Controlled Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for CNT-Si heterojunction solar cell Shigeo two different SWNT assemblies for SWNT-Si heterojuction solar cells. We proposed a water vapor treatment to build up SWNTs to a self-assembled micro-honeycomb network for the application of solar cells

  18. CVD growth control and solar cell application of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    CVD growth control and solar cell application of single-walled carbon nanotubes ( CVD ) #12;#12; Doctoral Dissertation CVD Growth Control and Solar Cell Application of Single is supposed to be a very promising candidate for next-generation solar cell applications. However, three main

  19. Journal of Power Sources 160 (2006) 14871494 Supercapacitors using carbon nanotubes films by electrophoretic deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ning

    Journal of Power Sources 160 (2006) 1487­1494 Supercapacitors using carbon nanotubes films in this study. The supercapacitors built from such thin film electrodes have exhibited near-ideal rectangular kW kg-1 . More importantly, the supercapacitors showed superior frequency response, with a frequency

  20. Stretchable Supercapacitors Based on Buckled Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Macrofilms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Hanqing

    Stretchable Supercapacitors Based on Buckled Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Macrofilms By Cunjiang to accommodate large strains while retaining intact function. Of various power-source devices, supercapacitors in supercapacitors is the development of new electrode materials. Recently, CNTs have been studied as good candidates