Sample records for nanotechnology gc5 non-equilibrium

  1. Nanotechnology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy's Nanotechnology Safety provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of nanotechnology safety and health management.

  2. Nanotechnology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruckNanostructuedNanotechnology

  3. Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinwoo, Lee

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation.

  4. Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jinwoo; Hajime Tanaka

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation.

  5. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of superfluids and superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter F. Wreszinski

    2015-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some rigorous results on the equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of superfluids and superconductors.

  6. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of superfluids and superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter F. Wreszinski

    2015-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some rigorous results on the equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of superfluids and superconductors.

  7. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of superfluids and superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter F. Wreszinski

    2015-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some rigorous results on the equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of superfluids and superconductors.

  8. Adaptive Implicit Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Wang, Zhen [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel [ORNL; Pernice, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe methods for accurate and efficient long term time integra- tion of non-equilibrium radiation diffusion systems: implicit time integration for effi- cient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while control- ling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  9. Stimulated emission with a non-equilibrium state of radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Accardi; K. Imafuku; S. V. Kozyrev

    2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The stimulated emission from an atom interacting with radiation in non-equilibrium state is considered. The stochastic limit, applied to the non-relativistic Hamiltonian describing the interaction, shows that the state of atoms, driven by some non-equilibrium state of the field approaches a stationary state which can continuously emit photon, unlike the case with an equilibrium state.

  10. Lithium-ion battery modeling using non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Todd R. (Todd Richard)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this thesis work is the application of non-equilibrium thermodynamics in lithium-ion battery modeling. As the demand for higher power and longer lasting batteries increases, the search for materials suitable ...

  11. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Self-Replicating Protocells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harold Fellermann; Bernat Corominas-Murtra; Per Lyngs Hansen; John Hjort Ipsen; Ricard Solé; Steen Rasmussen

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a non-equilibrium thermodynamic description of the life-cycle of a droplet based, chemically feasible, system of protocells. By coupling the protocells metabolic kinetics with its thermodynamics, we demonstrate how the system can be driven out of equilibrium to ensure protocell growth and replication. This coupling allows us to derive the equations of evolution and to rigorously demonstrate how growth and replication life-cycle can be understood as a non-equilibrium thermodynamic cycle. The process does not appeal to genetic information or inheritance, and is based only on non-equilibrium physics considerations. Our non-equilibrium thermodynamic description of simple, yet realistic, processes of protocell growth and replication, represents an advance in our physical understanding of a central biological phenomenon both in connection to the origin of life and for modern biology.

  12. Fluctuation Spectra Underlie the Behaviour of Non-equilibrium Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpha A Lee; Dominic Vella; John S Wettlaufer

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A diverse set of important physical phenomena, ranging from hydrodynamic turbulence to the collective behaviour of bacteria, are intrinsically far from equilibrium and hence cannot be described by equilibrium statistical physics. The defining feature of such systems is the presence of a constant energy source that drives them into their respective steady states. Despite their ubiquity, there are few general theoretical results that describe these non-equilibrium steady states. Here we argue that a generic signature of non-equilibrium systems is nontrivial fluctuation spectra. Based on this observation, we derive a general relation for the force exerted by a non-equilibrium system on two embedded walls. We find that for a narrow, unimodal spectrum, the force depends solely on the width and the position of the peak in the fluctuation spectrum, and will, in general, oscillate between repulsion and attraction. We demonstrate the generality of our framework by examining two apparently disparate examples. In the first we study the spectrum of wind-water interactions on the ocean surface to reveal force oscillations underlying the Maritime Casimir effect. In the second, we demonstrate quantitative agreement with force generation in recent simulations of active Brownian particles. A key implication of our work is that important non-equilibrium interactions are encoded in the fluctuation spectrum. In this sense the noise becomes the signal.

  13. Steady quantum coherence in non-equilibrium environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng-Wen Li; C. Y. Cai; C. P. Sun

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the steady state of a three-level system in contact with a non-equilibrium environment, which is composed of two independent heat baths at different temperatures. We derive a master equation to describe the non-equilibrium process of the system. For the three level systems with two dipole transitions, i.e., the $\\Lambda$-type and V-type, we find that the interferences of two transitions in a non-equilibrium environment can give rise to non-vanishing steady quantum coherence, namely, there exist non-zero off-diagonal terms in the steady state density matrix (in the energy representation). Moreover, the non-vanishing off-diagonal terms increase with the temperature difference of the two heat baths. Such interferences of the transitions were usually omitted by secular approximation, for it was usually believed that they only take effect in short time behavior and do not affect the steady state. Here we show that, in non-equilibrium systems, such omission would lead to the neglect of the steady quantum coherence.

  14. Nanotechnology & Nanobiotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    1 Nanotechnology & Nanobiotechnology (Global Science, Engineering and Business Perspectives) by G of nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology and their global scientific and business prospects. · My research on design building blocks and their applications in science, engineering and health. What is nanotechnology

  15. Effective Temperature of Non-equilibrium Dense Matter in Holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hironori Hoshino; Shin Nakamura

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study properties of effective temperature of non-equilibrium steady states by using the anti-de Sitter spacetime/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence. We consider non-equilibrium systems with a constant flow of current along an electric field, in which the current is carried by both the doped charges and those pair created by the electric field. We find that the effective temperature agrees with that of the Langevin systems if we take the limit where the pair creation is negligible. The effect of pair creation raises the effective temperature whereas the current by the doped charges contributes to lower the effective temperature in a wide range of the holographic models.

  16. Non-equilibrium Condensation Process in a Holographic Superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiju Murata; Shunichiro Kinoshita; Norihiro Tanahashi

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the non-equilibrium condensation process in a holographic superconductor. When the temperature T is smaller than a critical temperature T_c, there are two black hole solutions, the Reissner-Nordstrom-AdS black hole and a black hole with a scalar hair. In the boundary theory, they can be regarded as the supercooled normal phase and the superconducting phase, respectively. We consider perturbations on supercooled Reissner-Nordstrom-AdS black holes and study their non-linear time evolution to know about physical phenomena associated with rapidly-cooled superconductors. We find that, for Tsuperconducting order parameter. Finally, we study the time evolution of event and apparent horizons and discuss their correspondence with the entropy of the boundary theory. Our result gives a first step toward the holographic understanding of the non-equilibrium process in superconductors.

  17. Non-equilibrium Entanglement and Noise in Coupled Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Lambert; R. Aguado; T. Brandes

    2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study charge entanglement in two Coulomb-coupled double quantum dots in thermal equilibrium and under stationary non-equilibrium transport conditions. In the transport regime, the entanglement exhibits a clear switching threshold and various limits due to suppression of tunneling by Quantum Zeno localisation or by an interaction induced energy gap. We also calculate quantum noise spectra and discuss the inter-dot current correlation as an indicator of the entanglement in transport experiments.

  18. Diffusive mass transfer by non equilibrium fluctuations: Fick's law revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doriano Brogioli; Alberto Vailati

    2000-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental and theoretical works have shown that giant fluctuations are present during diffusion in liquid systems. We use linearized fluctuating hydrodynamics to calculate the net mass transfer due to these non equilibrium fluctuations. Surprisingly the mass flow turns out to coincide with the usual Fick's one. The renormalization of the hydrodynamic equations allows us to quantify the gravitational modifications of the diffusion coefficient induced by the gravitational stabilization of long wavelength fluctuations.

  19. Thermostat for non-equilibrium multiparticle collision dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chien-Cheng Huang; Anoop Varghese; Gerhard Gompper; Roland G. Winkler

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC), a particle-based mesoscale simulation technique for com- plex fluid, is widely employed in non-equilibrium simulations of soft matter systems. To maintain a defined thermodynamic state, thermalization of the fluid is often required for certain MPC variants. We investigate the influence of three thermostats on the non-equilibrium properties of a MPC fluid under shear or in Poiseuille flow. In all cases, the local velocities are scaled by a factor, which is either determined via a local simple scaling approach (LSS), a Monte Carlo-like procedure (MCS), or by the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of kinetic energy (MBS). We find that the various scal- ing schemes leave the flow profile unchanged and maintain the local temperature well. The fluid viscosities extracted from the various simulations are in close agreement. Moreover, the numerically determined viscosities are in remarkably good agreement with the respective theoretically predicted values. At equilibrium, the calculation of the dynamic structure factor reveals that the MBS method closely resembles an isothermal ensemble, whereas the MCS procedure exhibits signatures of an adi- abatic system at larger collision-time steps. Since the velocity distribution of the LSS approach is non-Gaussian, we recommend to apply the MBS thermostat, which has been shown to produce the correct velocity distribution even under non-equilibrium conditions.

  20. Non-equilibrium Statistical Approach to Friction Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichi Ichinose

    2015-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A geometric approach to the friction phenomena is presented. It is based on the holographic view which has recently been popular in the theoretical physics community. We see the system in one-dimension-higher space. The heat-producing phenomena are most widely treated by using the non-equilibrium statistical physics. We take 2 models of the earthquake. The dissipative systems are here formulated from the geometric standpoint. The statistical fluctuation is taken into account by using the (generalized) Feynman's path-integral.

  1. Is Soret equilibrium a non-equilibrium effect?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alois Würger

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent thermophoretic experiments on colloidal suspensions revived an old debate, namely whether the Soret effect is properly described by thermostatics, or necessarily requires non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Based on colloidal transport theory and the entropy production of the related viscous flow, our analysis leads to the conclusion that the equilibrium approach may work for small ions, yet fails for colloidal particles and polymers. Regarding binary molecular mixtures, our results shed some doubt on the validity of thermostatic approaches that derive the Soret coefficient from equilibrium potentials.

  2. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach to open quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitalii Semin; Francesco Petruccione

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Open quantum systems are studied from the thermodynamical point of view unifying the principle of maximum informational entropy and the hypothesis of relaxation times hierarchy. The result of the unification is a non-Markovian and local in time master equation that provides a direct connection of dynamical and thermodynamical properties of open quantum systems. The power of the approach is illustrated with the application to the damped harmonic oscillator and the damped driven two-level system resulting in analytical expressions for the non-Markovian and non-equilibrium entropy and inverse temperature.

  3. Relation of classical non-equilibrium dynamics and quantum annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidetosni Nishimori

    2015-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-equilibrium dynamics of the Ising model is a classical stochastic process whereas quantum mechanics has no stochastic elements in the classical sense. Nevertheless, it has been known that there exists a close formal relationship between these two processes. We reformulate this relationship and use it to compare the efficiency of simulated annealing that uses classical stochastic processes and quantum annealing to solve combinatorial optimization problems. It is shown that classical dynamics can be efficiently simulated by quantum-mechanical processes whereas the converse is not necessarily true. This may imply that quantum annealing may be regarded as a more powerful tool than simulated annealing for optimization problems.

  4. Ethanol reforming in non-equilibrium plasma of glow discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levko, D

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a detailed kinetic study of the main plasma chemical processes in non-equilibrium ethanol/argon plasma are presented. It is shown that at the beginning of the discharge the molecular hydrogen is mainly generated in the reaction of ethanol H-abstraction. Later hydrogen is formed from active H, CH2OH and CH3CHOH and formaldehyde. Comparison with experimental data has shown that the used kinetic mechanism predicts well the concentrations of main species at the reactor outlet.

  5. Non-equilibrium evolution of a "Tsunami" Dynamical Symmetry Breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyanovsky, D; Holman, R; Kumar, S P; Pisarski, R D; Boyanovsky, Daniel; Vega, Hector J. de; Holman, Richard; Pisarski, Robert D.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to study the non-equilibrium features of heavy-ion collisions by following the evolution of an initial state with a large number of quanta with a distribution around a momentum |\\vec k_0| corresponding to a thin spherical shell in momentum space, a `tsunami'. An O(N); ({\\vec \\Phi}^2)^2 model field theory in the large N limit is used as a framework to study the non-perturbative aspects of the non-equilibrium dynamics including a resummation of the effects of the medium (the initial particle distribution). In a theory where the symmetry is spontaneously broken in the absence of the medium, when the initial number of particles per correlation volume is chosen to be larger than a critical value the medium effects can restore the symmetry of the initial state. We show that if one begins with such a symmetry-restored, non-thermal, initial state, non-perturbative effects automatically induce spinodal instabilities leading to a dynamical breaking of the symmetry. As a result there is explosive particle pro...

  6. Non-equilibrium evolution of a `Tsunami': Dynamical Symmetry Breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Boyanovsky; Hector J. de Vega; Richard Holman; S. Prem Kumar; Robert D. Pisarski

    1997-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to study the non-equilibrium features of heavy-ion collisions by following the evolution of an initial state with a large number of quanta with a distribution around a momentum |\\vec k_0| corresponding to a thin spherical shell in momentum space, a `tsunami'. An O(N); ({\\vec \\Phi}^2)^2 model field theory in the large N limit is used as a framework to study the non-perturbative aspects of the non-equilibrium dynamics including a resummation of the effects of the medium (the initial particle distribution). In a theory where the symmetry is spontaneously broken in the absence of the medium, when the initial number of particles per correlation volume is chosen to be larger than a critical value the medium effects can restore the symmetry of the initial state. We show that if one begins with such a symmetry-restored, non-thermal, initial state, non-perturbative effects automatically induce spinodal instabilities leading to a dynamical breaking of the symmetry. As a result there is explosive particle production and a redistribution of the particles towards low momentum due to the nonlinearity of the dynamics. The asymptotic behavior displays the onset of Bose condensation of pions and the equation of state at long times is that of an ultrarelativistic gas although the momentum distribution is non-thermal.

  7. Non-equilibrium Theory of Arrested Spinodal Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    José Manuel Olais-Govea; Leticia López-Flores; Magdaleno Medina-Noyola

    2015-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Non-equilibrium Self-consistent Generalized Langevin Equation theory of irreversible relax- ation [Phys. Rev. E (2010) 82, 061503; ibid. 061504] is applied to the description of the non- equilibrium processes involved in the spinodal decomposition of suddenly and deeply quenched simple liquids. For model liquids with hard-sphere plus attractive (Yukawa or square well) pair potential, the theory predicts that the spinodal curve, besides being the threshold of the thermo- dynamic stability of homogeneous states, is also the borderline between the regions of ergodic and non-ergodic homogeneous states. It also predicts that the high-density liquid-glass transition line, whose high-temperature limit corresponds to the well-known hard-sphere glass transition, intersects the spinodal curve at lower temperatures and densities, and continues inside the spinodal region as a glass-glass transition line. Within the region bounded from below by this low-temperature glass-glass transition and from above by the spinodal dynamic arrest line we can recognize two distinct domains with qualitatively different temperature dependence of the localization length. In the shallow-quench domain the localization length diverges as a power law as the tempera- ture T approaches the spinodal temperature Ts, whereas in the deep-quench domain, immediately above the glass-glass line, the localization length increases exponentially with T. We conjecture that the upper domain might correspond to full gas-liquid phase separation conditions, whereas the deep-quench domain might correspond to the formation of physical gels by arrested spinodal decomposition.

  8. Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group 1 Microsystems and Nanotechnology Research Group The University of British Columbia Microsystems and Nanotechnology Research Group The University of British Columbia Annual Report ­ 2007 Microsystems and Nanotechnology Research Group 1 About

  9. Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group 1 Microsystems and Nanotechnology Research Group The University of British Columbia Microsystems and Nanotechnology Research Group The University of British Columbia Annual Report ­ 2008 Microsystems and Nanotechnology Research Group 1 About

  10. Strongly interacting Fermi gases : non-equilibrium dynamics and dimensional crossover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommer, Ariel T. (Ariel Tjodolv)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments using ultracold atomic gases address fundamental problems in many-body physics. This thesis describes experiments on strongly-interacting gases of fermionic atoms, with a focus on non-equilibrium physics and ...

  11. Nanotechnology Needs Assessment What is Nanotechnology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    #12;1 Nanotechnology Needs Assessment What is Nanotechnology? The term nanomaterial technically are the inhabitants. Nanotechnology, then, is the design, characterization, production and application of structures, physical, and chemical reactivity is known as "bottom-up" production.2 Nanotechnology is a growing field

  12. PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Nanotechnology for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    4/19/2011 Present PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Nanotechnology for Industry May 31, 2011 9 _____________________________________________________________ _____________The field of nanotechnology continues to be one of the leading forces behind our nation's ability to develop, commercialize, and produce advancements that are enabled by nanotechnology. Therefore, Drexel

  13. The unreasonable effectiveness of equilibrium-like theory for interpreting non-equilibrium experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Dean Astumian

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been great interest in applying the results of statistical mechanics to single molecule experiements. Recent work has highlighted so-called non-equilibrium work-energy relations and Fluctuation Theorems which take on an equilibrium-like (time independent) form. Here I give a very simple heuristic example where an equilibrium result (the barometric law for colloidal particles) arises from theory describing the {\\em thermodynamically} non-equilibrium phenomenon of a single colloidal particle falling through solution due to gravity. This simple result arises from the fact that the particle, even while falling, is in {\\em mechanical} equilibrium (gravitational force equal the viscous drag force) at every instant. The results are generalized by appeal to the central limit theorem. The resulting time independent equations that hold for thermodynamically non-equilibrium (and even non-stationary) processes offer great possibilities for rapid determination of thermodynamic parameters from single molecule experiments.

  14. NANOTECHNOLOGY CERTIFICATE PROGRAM PRE-SURVEY What is Nanotechnology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gisele

    NANOTECHNOLOGY CERTIFICATE PROGRAM PRE-SURVEY What is Nanotechnology? Nanotechnology is the engineering of functional systems at length scales spanning 1 ­ 100 nm.nano.gatech.edu Why should I study Nanotechnology? Nanotechnology education will prepare you for exciting career

  15. Non-equilibrium solidification and ferrite in d-TRIP steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Non-equilibrium solidification and ferrite in d-TRIP steel H. L. Yi1 , S. K. Ghosh1 , W. J. Liu1, designed on the basis of equilibrium to contain substantial amounts of d-ferrite, reveal zero or much transformation of d-ferrite into austenite occurs without the required partitioning of solutes

  16. Thermal recovery from a fractured medium in local thermal non-equilibrium Rachel Geleta,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Australia Abstract Thermal recovery from a hot dry rock reservoir viewed as a deformable fractured mediumThermal recovery from a fractured medium in local thermal non-equilibrium Rachel Geleta phase being made by impermeable solid blocks separated by saturated fractures. The finite element

  17. A Coupled Model for Radiative Transfer: Doppler Effects, Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Diffusion Asymptotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goudon, Thierry

    A Coupled Model for Radiative Transfer: Doppler Effects, Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Diffusion. The interaction terms take into account both scattering and absorption/emission phenomena, as well as Doppler-diffusion equations. Key words. Hydrodynamic limits. Diffusion approximation. Radiative transfer. Doppler correction

  18. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) under non-equilibrium conditions R. C. Oberthr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    663 Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) under non-equilibrium conditions R. C. Oberthür Institut with the times obtained from quasi- elastic neutron and light scattering, which yield information about neutrons aux petits angles (DNPA) pour l'étude des systèmes hors d'équi- libre thermodynamique est

  19. Lyapunov functions, stationary distributions, and non-equilibrium potential for chemical reaction networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyapunov functions, stationary distributions, and non-equilibrium potential for chemical reaction reac- tion systems and Lyapunov functions for their deterministic counterparts. Specifically, we derive the well known Lyapunov function of chemical reaction network theory as a scaling limit of the non

  20. Nanotechnology Commercialization in Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeck, Peter

    Nanotechnology Commercialization in Oregon February 27, 2012 Portland State University Physics Seminar Robert D. "Skip" Rung President and Executive Director #12;2 Nanotechnology Commercialization on "green" nanotechnology and gap fund portfolio company examples #12;3 Goals of the National Nanotechnology

  1. Strongly anisotropic non-equilibrium phase transition in Ising models with friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Angst; Alfred Hucht; Dietrich E. Wolf

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-equilibrium phase transition in driven two-dimensional Ising models with two different geometries is investigated using Monte Carlo methods as well as analytical calculations. The models show dissipation through fluctuation induced friction near the critical point. We first consider high driving velocities and demonstrate that both systems are in the same universality class and undergo a strongly anisotropic non-equilibrium phase transition, with anisotropy exponent \\theta=3. Within a field theoretical ansatz the simulation results are confirmed. The crossover from Ising to mean field behavior in dependency of system size and driving velocity is analyzed using crossover scaling. It turns out that for all finite velocities the phase transition becomes strongly anisotropic in the thermodynamic limit.

  2. Non-equilibrium phase transition in an exactly solvable driven Ising model with friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfred Hucht

    2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A driven Ising model with friction due to magnetic correlations has recently been proposed by Kadau et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 137205 (2008)). The non-equilibrium phase transition present in this system is investigated in detail using analytical methods as well as Monte Carlo simulations. In the limit of high driving velocities $v$ the model shows mean field behavior due to dimensional reduction and can be solved exactly for various geometries. The simulations are performed with three different single spin flip rates: the common Metropolis and Glauber rates as well as a multiplicative rate. Due to the non-equilibrium nature of the model all rates lead to different critical temperatures at $v>0$, while the exact solution matches the multiplicative rate. Finally, the cross-over from Ising to mean field behavior as function of velocity and system size is analysed in one and two dimensions.

  3. Dynamic scaling for the growth of non-equilibrium fluctuations during thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Cerbino; Yifei Sun; Aleksandar Donev; Alberto Vailati

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffusion processes are accompanied by the appearance of non-equilibrium fluctuations, whose size distribution on Earth is strongly affected by the gravity force. In microgravity and at steady state, these fluctuations exhibit generic scale invariance and their size is only limited by the finite dimension of the system. In this work, we investigate experimentally and computationally the development of non-equilibrium fluctuations during a thermophoretic process in microgravity. Both experiments and simulations show that during the onset of fluctuations the scale invariance is present at large wave vectors. In a broader range of wave vectors simulations predict a spinodal-like growth of fluctuations, where the amplitude and length scale of the dominant mode are determined by the thickness of the diffuse layer.

  4. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of damped Timoshenko and damped Bresse systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manh Hong Duong

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we cast damped Timoshenko and damped Bresse systems into a general framework for non-equilibrium thermodynamics, namely the GENERIC (General Equation for Non-Equilibrium Reversible-Irreversible Coupling) framework. The main ingredients of GENERIC consist of five building blocks: a state space, a Poisson operator, a dissipative operator, an energy functional, and an entropy functional. The GENERIC formulation of damped Timoshenko and damped Bresse systems brings several benefits. First, it provides alternative ways to derive thermodynamically consistent models of these systems by construct- ing building blocks instead of invoking conservation laws and constitutive relations. Second, it reveals clear physical and geometrical structures of these systems, e.g., the role of the energy and the entropy as the driving forces for the reversible and irreversible dynamics respectively. Third, it allows us to introduce a new GENERIC model for damped Timoshenko systems that is not existing in the literature.

  5. Quantum Statistical Mechanics. IV. Non-Equilibrium Probability Operator and Stochastic, Dissipative Schrodinger Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phil Attard

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The probability operator for a generic non-equilibrium quantum system is derived. The corresponding stochastic, dissipative Schr\\"odinger equation is also given. The dissipative and stochastic propagators are linked by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem that is derived from the unitary condition on the time propagator. The dissipative propagator is derived from thermodynamic force and entropy fluctuation operators that are in general non-linear.

  6. On the use of stochastic differential geometry for non-equilibrium thermodynamics modeling and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Muratore-Ginanneschi

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the relevance of geometric concepts in the theory of stochastic differential equations for applications to the theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics of small systems. In particular, we show how the Eells-Elworthy-Malliavin covariant construction of the Wiener process on a Riemann manifold provides a physically transparent formulation of optimal control problems of finite-time thermodynamic transitions. Based on this formulation, we turn to an evaluative discussion of recent results on optimal thermodynamic control and their interpretation.

  7. Non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization in 2D simulations of the solar atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Leenaarts; M. Carlsson; V. Hansteen; R. J. Rutten

    2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionization of hydrogen in the solar chromosphere and transition region does not obey LTE or instantaneous statistical equilibrium because the timescale is long compared with important hydrodynamical timescales, especially of magneto-acoustic shocks. We implement an algorithm to compute non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization and its coupling into the MHD equations within an existing radiation MHD code, and perform a two-dimensional simulation of the solar atmosphere from the convection zone to the corona. Analysis of the simulation results and comparison to a companion simulation assuming LTE shows that: a) Non-equilibrium computation delivers much smaller variations of the chromospheric hydrogen ionization than for LTE. The ionization is smaller within shocks but subsequently remains high in the cool intershock phases. As a result, the chromospheric temperature variations are much larger than for LTE because in non-equilibrium, hydrogen ionization is a less effective internal energy buffer. The actual shock temperatures are therefore higher and the intershock temperatures lower. b) The chromospheric populations of the hydrogen n = 2 level, which governs the opacity of Halpha, are coupled to the ion populations. They are set by the high temperature in shocks and subsequently remain high in the cool intershock phases. c) The temperature structure and the hydrogen level populations differ much between the chromosphere above photospheric magnetic elements and above quiet internetwork. d) The hydrogen n = 2 population and column density are persistently high in dynamic fibrils, suggesting that these obtain their visibility from being optically thick in Halpha also at low temperature.

  8. Non-equilibrium condensation process in holographic superconductor with nonlinear electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yunqi; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the non-equilibrium condensation process in a holographic superconductor with nonlinear corrections to the U(1) gauge field. We start with an asymptotic Anti-de-Sitter(AdS) black hole against a complex scalar perturbation at the initial time, and solve the dynamics of the gravitational systems in the bulk. When the black hole temperature T is smaller than a critical value Tc, the scalar perturbation grows exponentially till saturation, the final state of spacetime approaches to a hairy black hole. In the bulk theory, we find the clue of the influence of nonlinear corrections in the gauge field on the process of the scalar field condensation. We show that the bulk dynamics in the non-equilibrium process is completely consistent with the observations on the boundary order parameter. Furthermore we examine the time evolution of horizons in the bulk non-equilibrium transformation process from the bald AdS black hole to the AdS hairy hole. Both the evolution of apparent and event horizons show that the or...

  9. Nanotechnology at Maryland Nanotechnologies technologies using the special

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    Nanotechnology at Maryland Nanotechnologies ­ technologies using the special properties the possibilities of nanotechnology. The center, led by founding Director Gary Rubloff, is an interdisciplinary-of-the-art facilities, guides nanotechnology ducation initiatives, and promotes technology transfer from the university

  10. MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 Nanotechnology 145 Nanotechnology, Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 Nanotechnology 145 Nanotechnology, Nanomaterials Synthesize Silver Metal Chalcogenides ........................................165 #12;146 Nanotechnology MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 #12;MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 Nanotechnology 147 Synthesize Silver Nanoprisms

  11. Canonical Quantization for a Relativistic Neutral Scalar Field in Non-equilibrium Thermo Field Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuichi Mizutani; Tomohiro Inagaki; Yusuke Nakamura; Yoshiya Yamanaka

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic neutral scalar field is investigated in non-equilibrium thermo field dynamics. The canonical quantization is applied to the fields out of equilibrium. Because the thermal Bogoliubov transformation becomes time-dependent, the equations of motion for the ordinary unperturbed creation and annihilation operators are modified. This forces us to introduce a thermal counter term in the interaction Hamiltonian which generates additional radiative corrections. Imposing the self-consistency renormalization condition on the total radiative corrections, we obtain the quantum Boltzmann equation for the relativistic scalar field.

  12. Non-Equilibrium Thermo Field Dynamics for Relativistic Complex Scalar and Dirac Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuichi Mizutani; Tomohiro Inagaki

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic quantum field theories for complex scalar and Dirac fields are investigated in non-equilibrium thermo field dynamics. The thermal vacuum is defined by the Bogoliubov transformed creation and annihilation operators. Two independent Bogoliubov parameters are introduced for a charged field. Its difference naturally induces the chemical potential. Time-dependent thermal Bogoliubov transformation generates the thermal counter terms. We fix the terms by the self-consistency renormalization condition. Evaluating the thermal self-energy under the self-consistency renormalization condition, we derive the quantum Boltzmann equations for the relativistic fields.

  13. Boltzmann Equation for Relativistic Neutral Scalar Field in Non-equilibrium Thermo Field Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuichi Mizutani; Tomohiro Inagaki

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic neutral scalar field is investigated on the basis of the Schwinger-Dyson equation in the non-equilibrium thermo field dynamics. A time evolution equation for a distribution function is obtained from a diagonalization condition for the Schwinger-Dyson equation. An explicit expression of the time evolution equation is calculated in the $\\lambda\\phi^4$ interaction model at the 2-loop level. The Boltzmann equation is derived for the relativistic scalar field. We set a simple initial condition and numerically solve the Boltzmann equation and show the time evolution of the distribution function and the relaxation time.

  14. Similarity of coupled non-equilibrium flows behind normal shock waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalton, James Verne

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at constant pressure Dissociation energy per molecule Average energy gained by vibra- tion due to recombination (per unit mass) Average energy lost from vibra- tion due to dissociation (per unit mass) Vibrational energy per unit mass Same as E (T... reverse reaction-rate cons tant N [N&] p Length of non-equilibrium zone Mach number Mass of an atom of nitrogen Number of vibrational levels in- cluded in dissociation energy Concentration of ni trogen Pressure moles/cc dynes/cmE vii Dei R...

  15. Potential and flux field landscape theory. II. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of spatially inhomogeneous stochastic dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Wei [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Wang, Jin, E-mail: jin.wang.1@stonybrook.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 130022 Changchun, China and College of Physics, Jilin University, 130021 Changchun (China)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have established a general non-equilibrium thermodynamic formalism consistently applicable to both spatially homogeneous and, more importantly, spatially inhomogeneous systems, governed by the Langevin and Fokker-Planck stochastic dynamics with multiple state transition mechanisms, using the potential-flux landscape framework as a bridge connecting stochastic dynamics with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A set of non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations, quantifying the relations of the non-equilibrium entropy, entropy flow, entropy production, and other thermodynamic quantities, together with their specific expressions, is constructed from a set of dynamical decomposition equations associated with the potential-flux landscape framework. The flux velocity plays a pivotal role on both the dynamic and thermodynamic levels. On the dynamic level, it represents a dynamic force breaking detailed balance, entailing the dynamical decomposition equations. On the thermodynamic level, it represents a thermodynamic force generating entropy production, manifested in the non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and more specific examples, the spatial stochastic neuronal model, in particular, are studied to test and illustrate the general theory. This theoretical framework is particularly suitable to study the non-equilibrium (thermo)dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous systems abundant in nature. This paper is the second of a series.

  16. Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology 4 units Prof. Richard Brutchey, Fall 2014 (Lecture = 12:00­12:50 pm MWF) CHEM 455 is an upper-division undergraduate course in Chemical Nanotechnology. The intent

  17. An Integrated Approach to Nanotechnology Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paddock, LeRoy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Integrated Approach to Nanotechnology Governance LeRoyLegal and Social Issues . NANOTECHNOLOGY1. A National Nanotechnology Governance D

  18. Nanotechnology User Facility for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A National Nanotechnology User Facility for Industry Academia Government #12;The National Institute of Commerce's nanotechnology user facility. The CNST enables innovation by providing rapid access to the tools new measurement and fabrication methods in response to national nanotechnology needs. www

  19. Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Markus

    © 2009 APS Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology Published online: 17 July 2009 | doi:10 perfect fluid. Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 025301 (2009). | Article |1. Nature Nanotechnology ISSN 1748 : Nature Nanotechnology http://www.nature.com/nnano/reshigh/2009/0709/full/nnano.2009.222.html 1 of 1 18

  20. Environmental Impacts of Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    Environmental Impacts of Nanotechnology Paul Westerhoff, Ph.D., PE Professor and Chair Civil · Proposed Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEIN) · Successes by ASU researchers #12 of nanotechnology? #12;Nanomaterials are used in everyday life (> 500 products to date) Nano-silver in Bandages

  1. Lower bounds for ballistic current and noise in non-equilibrium quantum steady states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Doyon

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let an infinite, homogeneous, many-body quantum system be unitarily evolved for a long time from a state where two halves are independently thermalized. One says that a non-equilibrium steady state emerges if there are nonzero steady currents in the central region. In particular, their presence is a signature of ballistic transport. We analyze the consequences of the current observable being a conserved density; near equilibrium this is known to give rise to linear wave propagation and a nonzero Drude peak. Using the Lieb-Robinson bound, we derive, under a certain regularity condition, a lower bound for the non-equilibrium steady-state current determined by equilibrium averages. This shows and quantifies the presence of ballistic transport far from equilibrium. The inequality suggests the definition of "nonlinear sound velocities", which specialize to the sound velocity near equilibrium in non-integrable models, and "generalized sound velocities", which encode generalized Gibbs thermalization in integrable models. These are bounded by the Lieb-Robinson velocity. The inequality also gives rise to a bound on the energy current noise in the case of pure energy transport. We show that the inequality is satisfied in many models where exact results are available, and that it is saturated at one-dimensional criticality.

  2. Discrete Boltzmann modeling of multiphase flows: hydrodynamic and thermodynamic non-equilibrium effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanbiao Gan; Aiguo Xu; Guangcai Zhang; Sauro Succi

    2015-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A discrete Boltzmann model (DBM) is developed to investigate the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic non-equilibrium (TNE) effects in phase separation processes. The interparticle force drives changes and the gradient force, induced by gradients of macroscopic quantities, opposes them. In this paper, we investigate the interplay between them by providing detailed inspection of various non-equilibrium observables. Based on the TNE features, we define a TNE strength which roughly estimates the deviation amplitude from the thermodynamic equilibrium. The time evolution of the TNE intensity provides a convenient and efficient physical criterion to discriminate the stages of the spinodal decomposition and domain growth. Via the DBM simulation and this criterion, we quantitatively study the effects of latent heat and surface tension on phase separation. It is found that, the TNE strength attains its maximum at the end of the spinodal decomposition stage, and it decreases when the latent heat increases from zero. The surface tension effects are threefold, to prolong the duration of the spinodal decomposition stage, decrease the maximum TNE intensity, and accelerate the speed of the domain growth stage.

  3. A definition of thermodynamic entropy valid for non-equilibrium states and few-particle systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gian Paolo Beretta; Enzo Zanchini

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    From a new rigorous formulation of the general axiomatic foundations of thermodynamics we derive an operational definition of entropy that responds to the emergent need in many technological frameworks to understand and deploy thermodynamic entropy well beyond the traditional realm of equilibrium states of macroscopic systems. The new definition is achieved by avoiding to resort to the traditional concepts of "heat" (which restricts $a$ $priori$ the traditional definitions of entropy to the equilibrium domain) and of "thermal reservoir" (which restricts $in$ $practice$ our previous definitions of non-equilibrium entropy to the many-particle domain). The measurement procedure that defines entropy is free from intrinsic limitations and can be applied, $in$ $principle$, even to non-equilibrium states of few-particle systems, provided they are separable and uncorrelated. The construction starts from a previously developed set of carefully worded operational definitions for all the basic concepts. Then, through a new set of fully spelled-out fundamental hypotheses (four postulates and five assumptions) we derive the definitions of energy and entropy of any state, and of temperature of any stable equilibrium state. Finally, we prove the principle of entropy non-decrease, the additivity of entropy differences, the maximum entropy principle, and the impossibility of existence of a thermal reservoir.

  4. Non-equilibrium transition from dissipative quantum walk to classical random walk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Nizama; Manuel O. Cáceres

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the time-evolution of a free particle in interaction with a phonon thermal bath, using the tight-binding approach. A dissipative quantum walk can be defined and many important non-equilibrium decoherence properties can be investigated analytically. The non-equilibrium statistics of a pure initial state have been studied. Our theoretical results indicate that the evolving wave-packet shows the suppression of Anderson's boundaries (ballistic peaks) by the presence of dissipation. Many important relaxation properties can be studied quantitatively, such as von Neumann's entropy and quantum purity. In addition, we have studied Wigner's function. The time-dependent behavior of the quantum entanglement between a free particle -in the lattice- and the phonon bath has been characterized analytically. This result strongly suggests the non-trivial time-dependence of the off-diagonal elements of the reduced density matrix of the system. We have established a connection between the quantum decoherence and the dissipative parameter arising from interaction with the phonon bath. The time-dependent behavior of quantum correlations has also been pointed out, showing continuous transition from quantum random walk to classical random walk, when dissipation increases.

  5. Laser induced plasma on copper target, a non-equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oumeziane, Amina Ait, E-mail: a.aitoumeziane@gmail.com; Liani, Bachir [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, Abou Beker Blekaid University, Tlemcen (Algeria)] [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, Abou Beker Blekaid University, Tlemcen (Algeria); Parisse, Jean-Denis [IUSTI UMR CNRS 7343, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille (France)] [IUSTI UMR CNRS 7343, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille (France)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive numerical model for the UV laser ablation of metal targets, it focuses mainly on the prediction of laser induced plasma thresholds, the effect of the laser-plasma interaction, and the importance of the electronic non-equilibrium in the laser induced plume and its expansion in the background gas. This paper describes a set of numerical models for laser-matter interaction between 193-248 and 355?nm lasers and a copper target. Along with the thermal effects inside the material resulting from the irradiation of the latter with the pulsed laser, the laser-evaporated matter interaction and the plasma formation are thoroughly modelled. In the laser induced plume, the electronic nonequilibrium and the laser beam absorption have been investigated. Our calculations of the plasmas ignition thresholds on copper targets have been validated and compared to experimental as well as theoretical results. Comparison with experiment data indicates that our results are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Furthermore, the inclusion of electronic non-equilibrium in our work indicated that this important process must be included in models of laser ablation and plasma plume formation.

  6. Manipulating shear-induced non-equilibrium transitions by feedback control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarlan A. Vezirov; Sascha Gerloff; Sabine H. L. Klapp

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulations we investigate non-equilibrium transitions of sheared colloidal films under controlled shear stress $\\sigma_{\\mathrm{xz}}$. In our approach the shear rate $\\dot\\gamma$ is a dynamical variable, which relaxes on a timescale $\\tau_c$ such that the instantaneous, configuration-dependent stress $\\sigma_{\\mathrm{xz}}(t)$ approaches a pre-imposed value. Investigating the dynamics under this "feedback-control" scheme we find unique behavior in regions where the flow curve $\\sigma_{\\mathrm{xz}}(\\dot\\gamma)$ of the uncontrolled system is monotonic. However, in non-monotonic regions our method allows to {\\em select} between dynamical states characterized by different in-plane structure and viscosities. Indeed, the final state strongly depends on $\\tau_c$ relative to an {\\em intrinsic} relaxation time of the uncontrolled system. The critical values of $\\tau_c$ are estimated on the basis of a simple model.

  7. Dilution and resonance enhanced repulsion in non-equilibrium fluctuation forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bimonte, Giuseppe; Kruger, Matthias; Kardar, Mehran

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In equilibrium, forces induced by fluctuations of the electromagnetic field between electrically polarizable objects (microscopic or macroscopic) in vacuum are always attractive. The force may, however, become repulsive for microscopic particles coupled to thermal baths with different temperatures. We demonstrate that this non-equilibrium repulsion can be realized also between macroscopic objects, as planar slabs, if they are kept at different temperatures. It is shown that repulsion can be enhanced by (i) tuning of material resonances in the thermal region, and by (ii) reducing the dielectric contrast due to "dilution". This can lead to stable equilibrium positions. We discuss the realization of these effects for aerogels, yielding repulsion down to sub-micron distances at realistic porosities.

  8. Dilution and resonance enhanced repulsion in non-equilibrium fluctuation forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Bimonte; Thorsten Emig; Matthias Kruger; Mehran Kardar

    2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In equilibrium, forces induced by fluctuations of the electromagnetic field between electrically polarizable objects (microscopic or macroscopic) in vacuum are always attractive. The force may, however, become repulsive for microscopic particles coupled to thermal baths with different temperatures. We demonstrate that this non-equilibrium repulsion can be realized also between macroscopic objects, as planar slabs, if they are kept at different temperatures. It is shown that repulsion can be enhanced by (i) tuning of material resonances in the thermal region, and by (ii) reducing the dielectric contrast due to "dilution". This can lead to stable equilibrium positions. We discuss the realization of these effects for aerogels, yielding repulsion down to sub-micron distances at realistic porosities.

  9. Exponential approach to, and properties of, a non-equilibrium steady state in a dilute gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric A. Carlen; Joel L. Lebowitz; Clement Mouhot

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate a kinetic model of a system in contact with several thermal reservoirs at different temperatures $T_\\alpha$. Our system is a spatially uniform dilute gas whose internal dynamics is described by the nonlinear Boltzmann equation with Maxwellian collisions. Similarly, the interaction with reservoir $\\alpha$ is represented by a Markovian process that has the Maxwellian $M_{T_\\alpha}$ as its stationary state. We prove existence and uniqueness of a non-equilibrium steady state (NESS) and show exponential convergence to this NESS in a metric on probability measures introduced into the study of Maxwellian collisions by Gabetta, Toscani and Wenberg (GTW). This shows that the GTW distance between the current velocity distribution to the steady-state velocity distribution is a Lyapunov functional for the system. We also derive expressions for the entropy production in the system plus the reservoirs which is always positive.

  10. Dynamic Implicit 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip, Bobby [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Zhen [ORNL] [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel [ORNL] [ORNL; Pernice, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multiphysics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent linear solver convergence.

  11. Will there be future deceleration? A study of particle creation mechanism in non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supriya Pan; Subenoy Chakraborty

    2015-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with non-equilibrium thermodynamics based on adiabatic particle creation mechanism with the motivation of considering it as an alternative choice to explain the recent observed accelerating phase of the universe. Using Friedmann equations, it is shown that the deceleration parameter ($q$) can be obtained from the knowledge of the particle production rate ($\\Gamma$). Motivated from thermodynamical point of view, cosmological solutions are evaluated for the particle creation rates in three cosmic phases, namely, inflation, matter dominated and present late time acceleration. The deceleration parameter ($q$) is expressed as a function of the redshift parameter ($z$), and its variation is presented graphically. Also, statefinder analysis has been presented graphically in three different phases of the universe. Finally, two non-interacting fluids with different particle creation rates are considered as cosmic substratum, and deceleration parameter ($q$) is evaluated. It is examined whether more than one transition of $q$ is possible or not by graphical representations.

  12. Non-equilibrium statistical field theory for classical particles: Basic kinetic theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viermann, Celia; Kozlikin, Elena; Lilow, Robert; Bartelmann, Matthias

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently Mazenko and Das and Mazenko introduced a non-equilibrium field theoretical approach to describe the statistical properties of a classical particle ensemble starting from the microscopic equations of motion of each individual particle. We use this theory to investigate the transition from those microscopic degrees of freedom to the evolution equations of the macroscopic observables of the ensemble. For the free theory, we recover the continuity and Jeans equations of a collisionless gas. For a theory containing two-particle interactions in a canonical perturbation series, we find the macroscopic evolution equations to be described by the Born-Bogoliubov-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy (BBGKY hierarchy) with a truncation criterion depending on the order in perturbation theory. This establishes a direct link between the classical and the field-theoretical approaches to kinetic theory that might serve as a starting point to investigate kinetic theory beyond the classical limits.

  13. NON-EQUILIBRIUM THERMODYNAMIC PROCESSES: SPACE PLASMAS AND THE INNER HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J., E-mail: glivadiotis@swri.edu [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, empirical kappa distribution, commonly used to describe non-equilibrium systems like space plasmas, has been connected with non-extensive statistical mechanics. Here we show how a consistent definition of the temperature and pressure is developed for stationary states out of thermal equilibrium, so that the familiar ideal gas state equation still holds. In addition to the classical triplet of temperature, pressure, and density, this generalization requires the kappa index as a fourth independent thermodynamic variable that characterizes the non-equilibrium stationary states. All four of these thermodynamic variables have key roles in describing the governing thermodynamical processes and transitions in space plasmas. We introduce a novel characterization of isothermal and isobaric processes that describe a system's transition into different stationary states by varying the kappa index. In addition, we show how the variation of temperature or/and pressure can occur through an 'iso-q' process, in which the system remains in a fixed stationary state (fixed kappa index). These processes have been detected in the proton plasma in the inner heliosheath via specialized data analysis of energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations from Interstellar Boundary Explorer. In particular, we find that the temperature is highly correlated with (1) kappa, asymptotically related to isothermal ({approx}1,000,000 K) and iso-q ({kappa} {approx} 1.7) processes; and (2) density, related to an isobaric process, which separates the 'Ribbon', P Almost-Equal-To 3.2 pdyn cm{sup -2}, from the globally distributed ENA flux, P Almost-Equal-To 2 pdyn cm{sup -2}.

  14. Nanotechnology Medical Applications Breakthroughs in nanotechnology promise to revolutionize drug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    Nanotechnology Medical Applications Breakthroughs in nanotechnology promise to revolutionize drug manufacturing, drug delivery, and medical diagnostics. By learning how substances behave differently's Nanotechnology Center are creating novel tools and developing new methods for crucial research areas of drug

  15. A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    artificially fractured hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs requires three main ingredients: (1) a proper thermoA thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR reservoir Rachel Geleta,b , Benjamin Loreta, , Nasser Khalilib aLaboratoire Sols, Solides, Structures, B

  16. Single-Photon Detection, Kinetic Inductance, and Non-Equilibrium Dynamics in Niobium and Niobium Nitride Superconducting Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devoret, Michel H.

    Abstract Single-Photon Detection, Kinetic Inductance, and Non-Equilibrium Dynamics in Niobium and Niobium Nitride Superconducting Nanowires Anthony Joseph Annunziata 2010 This thesis is a study of superconducting niobium and niobium nitride nanowires used as single optical and near-infrared photon detectors

  17. NANOTECHNOLOGY 4 NOVEMBER 2004 NanotechnologyE-Bulletin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    NANOTECHNOLOGY 4 NOVEMBER 2004 NanotechnologyE-Bulletin Three-dimensional nanofabrication for many areas of nanotechnology. An indirect approach to 3D uses the repeti- tive application of steps structures. #12;NANOTECHNOLOGY 4 NOVEMBER 2004 source and the size of the phase mask limit the dimensions

  18. Cosmological QCD phase transition in steady non-equilibrium dissipative Ho?ava-Lifshitz early universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Khodadi; H. R. Sepangi

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phase transition from quark-gluon plasma to hadrons in the early universe in the context of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. According to the standard model of cosmology, a phase transition associated with chiral symmetry breaking after the electro-weak transition has occurred when the universe was about $1-10\\mu s$ old. We focus attention on such a phase transition in the presence of a viscous relativistic cosmological background fluid in the framework of non-detailed balance Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz cosmology within an effective model of QCD. We consider a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe filled with a non-causal and causal bulk viscous cosmological fluid respectively and investigate the effects of the running coupling constants of Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity, $\\lambda$, on the evolution of the physical quantities relevant to a description of the early universe, namely, the temperature $T$, scale factor $a$, deceleration parameter $q$ and dimensionless ratio of the bulk viscosity coefficient to entropy density $\\frac{\\xi}{s}$. We assume that the bulk viscosity cosmological background fluid obeys the evolution equation of the steady truncated (Eckart) and full version of the Israel-Stewart fluid, respectively.

  19. Radiation-induced non-equilibrium redox chemistry of plutonium: implications for environmental migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haschke, J M; Siekhaus, W J

    2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Static concentrations of plutonium oxidation states in solution and at surfaces in oxide-water systems are identified as non-equilibrium steady states. These kinetically controlled systems are described by redox cycles based on irreversible disproportionation of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) in OH-bridged intermediate complexes and at OH-covered oxide surfaces. Steady state is fixed by continuous redox cycles driven by radioactivity-promoted electron-transfer and energetically favorable reactions of Pu(III) and Pu(VII) disproportionation products with H2O. A model based on the redox cycles accounts for the high steady-state [Pu] coexisting with Pu(IV) hydrous oxide at pH 0-15 and for predominance of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) in solution. The steady-state [Pu] depends on pH and the surface area of oxide in solution, but not on the initial Pu oxidation state. PuO{sub 2+x} formation is attributed to high Pu(V) concentrations existing at water-exposed oxide surfaces. Results infer that migration of Pu in an aqueous environment is controlled by kinetic factors unique to that site and that the predominant oxidation states in solution are Pu(V) and Pu(VI).

  20. Dynamic implicit 3D adaptive mesh refinement for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Philip; Z. Wang; M.A. Berrill; M. Birke; M. Pernice

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered often exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multi-physics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multi-physics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton–Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  1. Cosmological QCD phase transition in steady non-equilibrium dissipative Ho?ava–Lifshitz early universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khodadi, M., E-mail: M.Khodadi@sbu.ac.ir; Sepangi, H.R., E-mail: hr-sepangi@sbu.ac.ir

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phase transition from quark–gluon plasma to hadrons in the early universe in the context of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. According to the standard model of cosmology, a phase transition associated with chiral symmetry breaking after the electro-weak transition has occurred when the universe was about 1–10 ?s old. We focus attention on such a phase transition in the presence of a viscous relativistic cosmological background fluid in the framework of non-detailed balance Ho?ava–Lifshitz cosmology within an effective model of QCD. We consider a flat Friedmann–Robertson–Walker universe filled with a non-causal and a causal bulk viscous cosmological fluid respectively and investigate the effects of the running coupling constants of Ho?ava–Lifshitz gravity, ?, on the evolution of the physical quantities relevant to a description of the early universe, namely, the temperature T, scale factor a, deceleration parameter q and dimensionless ratio of the bulk viscosity coefficient to entropy density (?)/s . We assume that the bulk viscosity cosmological background fluid obeys the evolution equation of the steady truncated (Eckart) and full version of the Israel–Stewart fluid, respectively. -- Highlights: •In this paper we have studied quark–hadron phase transition in the early universe in the context of the Ho?ava–Lifshitz model. •We use a flat FRW universe with the bulk viscosity cosmological background fluid obeying the evolution equation of the steady truncated (Eckart) and full version of the Israel–Stewart fluid, respectively.

  2. NON-EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY OF DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING PRESTELLAR CORES. II. IONIZATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Willacy, Karen; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect that non-equilibrium chemistry in dynamical models of collapsing molecular cloud cores has on measurements of the magnetic field in these cores, the degree of ionization, and the mean molecular weight of ions. We find that OH and CN, usually used in Zeeman observations of the line-of-sight magnetic field, have an abundance that decreases toward the center of the core much faster than the density increases. As a result, Zeeman observations tend to sample the outer layers of the core and consistently underestimate the core magnetic field. The degree of ionization follows a complicated dependence on the number density at central densities up to 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} for magnetic models and 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} in non-magnetic models. At higher central densities, the scaling approaches a power law with a slope of -0.6 and a normalization which depends on the cosmic-ray ionization rate {zeta} and the temperature T as ({zeta}T){sup 1/2}. The mean molecular weight of ions is systematically lower than the usually assumed value of 20-30, and, at high densities, approaches a value of 3 due to the asymptotic dominance of the H{sup +}{sub 3} ion. This significantly lower value implies that ambipolar diffusion operates faster.

  3. Non-equilibrium structure and dynamics in a microscopic model of thin film active gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Head; W. J. Briels; G. Gompper

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In the presence of ATP, molecular motors generate active force dipoles that drive suspensions of protein filaments far from thermodynamic equilibrium, leading to exotic dynamics and pattern formation. Microscopic modelling can help to quantify the relationship between individual motors plus filaments to organisation and dynamics on molecular and supra-molecular length scales. Here we present results of extensive numerical simulations of active gels where the motors and filaments are confined between two infinite parallel plates. Thermal fluctuations and excluded-volume interactions between filaments are included. A systematic variation of rates for motor motion, attachment and detachment, including a differential detachment rate from filament ends, reveals a range of non-equilibrium behaviour. Strong motor binding produces structured filament aggregates that we refer to as asters, bundles or layers, whose stability depends on motor speed and differential end-detachment. The gross features of the dependence of the observed structures on the motor rate and the filament concentration can be captured by a simple one-filament model. Loosely bound aggregates exhibit super-diffusive mass transport, where filament translocation scales with lag time with non-unique exponents that depend on motor kinetics. An empirical data collapse of filament speed as a function of motor speed and end-detachment is found, suggesting a dimensional reduction of the relevant parameter space. We conclude by discussing the perspectives of microscopic modelling in the field of active gels.

  4. Non-equilibrium steady state and subgeometric ergodicity for a chain of three coupled rotors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noé Cuneo; Jean-Pierre Eckmann; Christophe Poquet

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a chain of three rotors (rotators) whose ends are coupled to stochastic heat baths. The temperatures of the two baths can be different, and we allow some constant torque to be applied at each end of the chain. Under some non-degeneracy condition on the interaction potentials, we show that the process admits a unique invariant probability measure, and that it is ergodic with a stretched exponential rate. The interesting issue is to estimate the rate at which the energy of the middle rotor decreases. As it is not directly connected to the heat baths, its energy can only be dissipated through the two outer rotors. But when the middle rotor spins very rapidly, it fails to interact effectively with its neighbors due to the rapid oscillations of the forces. By averaging techniques, we obtain an effective dynamics for the middle rotor, which then enables us to find a Lyapunov function. This and an irreducibility argument give the desired result. We finally illustrate numerically some properties of the non-equilibrium steady state.

  5. Nanotechnology Regulation: A Study in Claims Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malloy, Timothy F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Hodge, ‘Governing’ Nanotechnology without Government? ,2003). 22. Patrick Lin, Nanotechnology Bound: Evaluating theKeeping Pace with Nanotechnology: A Proposal for a New

  6. 2nd Workshop on Computations in Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    2nd Workshop on Computations in Nanotechnology Keynote Speakers: Mark J. Biggs (Adelaide), Mark nanotechnology researchers Goal: Exposing computational analysis experts and nanotechnology experimentalists

  7. Nanotechnology Nanotechnology comprises measurement, design, modeling and fabrication of materials and systems at the atomic scale.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glowinski, Roland

    Nanotechnology Nanotechnology comprises measurement, design, modeling and fabrication of materials are able to customize their education by specializing in areas such as nanotechnology, computational

  8. Declaration of Concentration in Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Declaration of Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Undergraduate Records:____________________________ Instructions: ENG students declaring a Concentration in Nanotechnology should complete this form, obtain REQUIRED COURSES (Choose 1) 1. ENG EC 481­ Fundamentals of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology 4.0 ELECTIVES

  9. Nanotechnology with DNA DNA Nanodevices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

    Nanotechnology with DNA DNA Nanodevices Friedrich C. Simmel* and Wendy U. Dittmer A DNA actuator. Introduction.............285 2. Overview: DNA Nanotechnology.......285 3. Prototypes of Nanomechanical DNA overview of DNA nanotechnology as a whole is given. The most important properties of DNA molecules

  10. Nanotechnology: Nanomaterials, Nanomedicine and Nanocars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Nanotechnology: Nanomaterials, Nanomedicine and Nanocars Wednesday March 21, 2012, Babbio 122, 11am and Technology Rice University, Houston, TX An overview of several of the nanotechnology research areas in our Nanotechnology in 2008, the NASA Space Act Award in 2008 for his development of carbon nanotube reinforced

  11. DNA Structural Nanotechnology Duke University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    DNA Structural Nanotechnology John Reif Duke University Graduate Students: Harish Chandran&Caltech Tube Lattices #12;Ned Seeman New York University, USA Ned Seeman: Father of DNA Nanotechnology His Initial Ideas & Motivation for DNA Nanotechnology #12;Cube Chen & Seeman, Nature350:631 (1991) Truncated

  12. Nanotechnology in Head and Neck Cancer: The Race Is On

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Sayed, Ivan H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10.1007/s11912-010-0087-2 Nanotechnology in Head and Neckthe applications of nanotechnology in head and neck cancer,plasmonic gold nanotechnology. Keywords Nanotechnology .

  13. Response Theory for Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics: Causality and Generalized Kramers-Kronig relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerio Lucarini

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the general response theory proposed by Ruelle for describing the impact of small perturbations to the non-equilibrium steady states resulting from Axiom A dynamical systems. We show that the causality of the response functions allows for writing a set of Kramers-Kronig relations for the corresponding susceptibilities at all orders of nonlinearity. Nonetheless, only a special class of observable susceptibilities obey Kramers-Kronig relations. Specific results are provided for arbitrary order harmonic response, which allows for a very comprehensive Kramers-Kronig analysis and the establishment of sum rules connecting the asymptotic behavior of the susceptibility to the short-time response of the system. These results generalize previous findings on optical Hamiltonian systems and simple mechanical models, and shed light on the general impact of considering the principle of causality for testing self-consistency: the described dispersion relations constitute unavoidable benchmarks for any experimental and model generated dataset. In order to connect the response theory for equilibrium and non equilibrium systems, we rewrite the classical results by Kubo so that response functions formally identical to those proposed by Ruelle, apart from the measure involved in the phase space integration, are obtained. We briefly discuss how these results, taking into account the chaotic hypothesis, might be relevant for climate research. In particular, whereas the fluctuation-dissipation theorem does not work for non-equilibrium systems, because of the non-equivalence between internal and external fluctuations, Kramers-Kronig relations might be more robust tools for the definition of a self-consistent theory of climate change.

  14. Influence of Penning effect on the plasma features in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Zhengshi; Zhang, Guanjun [School of Electrical Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Jiang, Nan; Cao, Zexian, E-mail: zxcao@iphy.ac.cn [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a cold plasma source that promises various innovative applications. The influence of Penning effect on the formation, propagation, and other physical properties of the plasma bullets in APPJ remains a debatable topic. By using a 10?cm wide active electrode and a frequency of applied voltage down to 0.5?Hz, the Penning effect caused by preceding discharges can be excluded. It was found that the Penning effect originating in a preceding discharge helps build a conductive channel in the gas flow and provide seed electrons, thus the discharge can be maintained at a low voltage which in turn leads to a smaller propagation speed for the plasma bullet. Photographs from an intensified charge coupled device reveal that the annular structure of the plasma plume for He is irrelevant to the Penning ionization process arising from preceding discharges. By adding NH{sub 3} into Ar to introduce Penning effect, the originally filamentous discharge of Ar can display a rather extensive plasma plume in ambient as He. These results are helpful for the understanding of the behaviors of non-equilibrium APPJs generated under distinct conditions and for the design of plasma jet features, especially the spatial distribution and propagation speed, which are essential for application.

  15. A complete cosmic scenario from inflation to late time acceleration: Non-equilibrium thermodynamics in the context of particle creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subenoy Chakraborty; Subhajit Saha

    2015-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with the mechanism of particle creation in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. The second order non-equilibrium thermodynamical prescription of Israel and Stewart has been presented with particle creation rate, treated as the dissipative effect. In the background of a flat FRW model, we assume the non-equilibrium thermodynamical process to be isentropic so that the entropy per particle does not change and consequently the dissipative pressure can be expressed linearly in terms of the particle creation rate. Here the dissipative pressure behaves as a dynamical variable having a non-linear inhomogeneous evolution equation and the entropy flow vector satisfies the second law of thermodynamics. Further, using the Friedmann equations and by proper choice of the particle creation rate as a function of the Hubble parameter, it is possible to show (separately) a transition from the inflationary phase to the radiation era and also from matter dominated era to late time acceleration. Also, in analogy to analytic continuation, it is possible to show a continuous cosmic evolution from inflation to late time acceleration by adjusting the parameters. It is found that in the de Sitter phase, the comoving entropy increases exponentially with time, keeping entropy per particle unchanged. Subsequently, the above cosmological scenarios has been described from field theoretic point of view by introducing a scalar field having self interacting potential. Finally, we make an attempt to show the cosmological phenomenon of particle creation as Hawking radiation, particularly during the inflationary era.

  16. Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Plan to complete the experiential component as a requirement for the concentration in Nanotechnology to complete the experiential component for the Nanotechnology Concentration by: Research Experience in Lab

  17. New Developments in Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanotechnology**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    New Developments in Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanotechnology** By Zhong Lin Wang* 1. Electron Microscopy and Nanotechnology Nanotechnology, as an international initiative for science manufacturing are the foundation of nanotechnology. Tracking the historical background of why nanotechnology

  18. Non-Newtonian behavior and molecular structure of Cooee bitumen under shear flow: a non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemarchand, Claire A; Todd, Billy D; Daivis, Peter J; Hansen, Jesper S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rheology and molecular structure of a model bitumen (Cooee bitumen) under shear is investigated in the non-Newtonian regime using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The shear viscosity and normal stress differences of the bitumen mixture are computed at different shear rates and different temperatures. The model bitumen is shown to be a shear-thinning fluid. The corresponding molecular structure is studied at the same shear rates and temperatures. The Cooee bitumen is able to reproduce experimental results showing the formation of nanoaggregates composed of stacks of flat aromatic molecules. These nanoaggregates are immersed in a solvent of saturated hydrocarbon molecules. The nanoaggregates are shown to break up at very high shear rates, leading only to a minor effect on the viscosity of the mixture. At low shear rates, bitumen can be seen as a colloidal suspension of nanoaggregates in a solvent. The slight anisotropy of the whole sample due to the nanoaggregates is considered and quantified...

  19. The non-equilibrium response of a superconductor to pair-breaking radiation measured over a broad frequency band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Visser, P J; Guruswamy, T; Goldie, D J; Withington, S; Neto, A; Llombart, N; Baryshev, A M; Klapwijk, T M; Baselmans, J J A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the absorption of terahertz radiation in a BCS superconductor over a broad range of frequencies from 200 GHz to 1.1 THz, using a broadband antenna-lens system and a tantalum microwave resonator. From low frequencies, the response of the resonator rises rapidly to a maximum at the gap edge of the superconductor. From there on the response drops to half the maximum response at twice the pair-breaking energy. At higher frequencies, the response rises again due to trapping of pair-breaking phonons in the superconductor. In practice this is the first measurement of the frequency dependence of the quasiparticle creation efficiency due to pair-breaking in a superconductor. The efficiency, calculated from the different non-equilibrium quasiparticle distribution functions at each frequency, is in agreement with the measurements.

  20. Comparative analysis of quantum cascade laser modeling based on density matrices and non-equilibrium Green's functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindskog, M., E-mail: martin.lindskog@teorfys.lu.se; Wacker, A. [Mathematical Physics, Lund University, Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Wolf, J. M.; Liverini, V.; Faist, J. [ETH Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH-Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Trinite, V.; Maisons, G.; Carras, M. [III-V Lab, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Aidam, R.; Ostendorf, R. [Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the operation of an 8.5??m quantum cascade laser based on GaInAs/AlInAs lattice matched to InP using three different simulation models based on density matrix (DM) and non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formulations. The latter advanced scheme serves as a validation for the simpler DM schemes and, at the same time, provides additional insight, such as the temperatures of the sub-band carrier distributions. We find that for the particular quantum cascade laser studied here, the behavior is well described by simple quantum mechanical estimates based on Fermi's golden rule. As a consequence, the DM model, which includes second order currents, agrees well with the NEGF results. Both these simulations are in accordance with previously reported data and a second regrown device.

  1. Quantum Physics and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir K. Nevolin

    2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies of infinite (unrestricted at least in one direction) quantum particle motion using probe nanotechnologies have revealed the necessity of revising previous concepts of their motion. Particularly, quantum particles transfer quantum motion nonlocality energy beside classical kinetic energy, in other words, they are in two different kinds of motion simultaneously. The quantum component of the motion energy may be quite considerable under certain circumstances. Some new effects were predicted and proved experimentally in terms of this phenomenon. A new prototype refrigerating device was tested, its principle of operation being based on the effect of transferring the quantum component of the motion energy.

  2. BIRCK NANOTECHNOLOGY CENTER ESTABLISHED MARCH, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    BIRCK NANOTECHNOLOGY CENTER ESTABLISHED MARCH, 2001 As one of the first academic nanotechnology research centers in the US, the Birck Nanotechnology Center provides solutions to challenges in healthcare nanotechnology centers in the US; the 187,000 sq.ft. building includes a 25,000 sq. ft. cleanroom that is 45

  3. NANOTECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE Annual Report FY 20092010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NC STATE NANOTECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE Annual Report FY 20092010 In This Report: · Raleigh named top AS AN EMERGING LEADER IN THE FIELD OF NANOTECHNOLOGY." Dr. Gregory Parsons, NC State Nanotechnology Initiative was a period of tremendous growth for nanotechnology activitiesThis past year was a period of tremendous growth

  4. Nanotechnology Applications in Self-Assembly and DNA Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akin, Hayri Engin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    patterned surfaces. Nature Nanotechnology 4, 557-561. doi:Conference on Molecular Nanotechnology Mintmire, J. W. ,Molecule Electronics. Nanotechnology, 175- 212. WILEY-VCH

  5. Disrupting Conventional Policy: The Three Faces of Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malloy, Timothy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the brush sur- rounding nanotechnology policy and suggests aImpli- cations of Nanotechnology). 6. Regarding "governance"Policy: The Three Faces of Nanotechnology Timothy F Malloy*

  6. Ecologic: Nanotechnology, Environmental Assurance Bonding, and Symmetric Humility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kysar, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    315 (2008); James Yeagle, Nanotechnology and the FDA, 12 VA.For Regulation Of Nanotechnology, 34 J.L. MED. & ETHICSUncertainty: The Nanotechnology Environmental, Health, And

  7. Applications of nanotechnology to the central nervous system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumling, James P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silva. Introduction to nanotechnology and its applications220, 2004. 3. GA Silva. Nanotechnology approaches for theSilva. Neuroscience nanotechnology: Progress, opportunities

  8. NANOTECHNOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAM SEMINAR SERIES STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    NANOTECHNOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAM SEMINAR SERIES STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY NANOTECHNOLOGY and Engineering Drexel University Nanofiber technology is a branch of nanotechnology that concerns the processing

  9. Predicting the stellar and non-equilibrium dust emission spectra of high-resolution simulated galaxies with DART-Ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natale, Giovanni; Tuffs, Richard J; Debattista, Victor P; Fischera, Jörg; Grootes, Meiert W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the calculation of the stochastically heated dust emission using the 3D ray-tracing dust radiative transfer code DART-Ray, which is designed to solve the dust radiative transfer problem for galaxies with arbitrary geometries. In order to reduce the time required to derive the non-equilibrium dust emission spectra from each volume element within a model, we implemented an adaptive SED library approach, which we tested for the case of axisymmetric galaxy geometries. To show the capabilities of the code, we applied DART-Ray to a high-resolution N-body+SPH galaxy simulation to predict the appearance of the simulated galaxy at a set of wavelengths from the UV to the sub-mm. We analyse the results to determine the effect of dust on the observed radial and vertical profiles of the stellar emission as well as on the attenuation and scattering of light from the constituent stellar populations. We also quantify the proportion of dust re-radiated stellar light powered by young and old stellar populations, bo...

  10. Non-Newtonian behavior and molecular structure of Cooee bitumen under shear flow: a non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claire A. Lemarchand; Nicholas P. Bailey; Billy D. Todd; Peter J. Daivis; Jesper S. Hansen

    2015-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The rheology and molecular structure of a model bitumen (Cooee bitumen) under shear is investigated in the non-Newtonian regime using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The shear viscosity and normal stress differences of the bitumen mixture are computed at different shear rates and different temperatures. The model bitumen is shown to be a shear-thinning fluid. The corresponding molecular structure is studied at the same shear rates and temperatures. The Cooee bitumen is able to reproduce experimental results showing the formation of nanoaggregates composed of stacks of flat aromatic molecules. These nanoaggregates are immersed in a solvent of saturated hydrocarbon molecules. The nanoaggregates are shown to break up at very high shear rates, leading only to a minor effect on the viscosity of the mixture. At low shear rates, bitumen can be seen as a colloidal suspension of nanoaggregates in a solvent. The slight anisotropy of the whole sample due to the nanoaggregates is considered and quantified. The alignment of docosane molecules due to form and intrinsic birefringence and its effect on the rheological properties of the mixture are discussed. The stress optical rule is shown to be valid only in a limited range of shear rates at high temperatures, because this rule neglects the presence of other molecule types than docosane at high shear rates and the effect of intermolecular alignment, which gets more pronounced at high shear rates.

  11. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 17 (2006) 28912894 doi:10.1088/0957-4484/17/12/011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 17 (2006) 2891­2894 doi:10 new opportunities for exploring nanoscience, nanotechnology, and biotechnology. The assembly

  12. Nanotechnology: Small Matters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cynthia Needham

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project was to engage members of the public in an active and balanced deliberative discussion about the social, ethical, legal, environmental, and policy issues arising from nanotechnologies. A second but equally important objective was to interest members of the public in learning more about science and technology and nanotechnology specifically by understanding how it will affect their lives. The objectives were met through a series of electronic and face-to-face citizen forums conducted in conjunction with three Fred Friendly Seminars being taped on the University of California, Berkeley campus in partnership with Lawrence Hall of Science (this forum was conducted in partnership with the St. Louis Science Center); the Boston Museum of Science in Boston, MA; and the State Museum of South Carolina in Columbia, South Carolina. The topical area for each forum paralleled the content of the Fred Friendly Seminars series being taped at each location, but specific topics/issues were drawn from the concerns and interests of the communities. The three topical areas included Environmental Impact (St. Louis), Privacy vs. Security (Boston), and Health and Enhancement (Columbia). The PI and project leader worked with the local science centers to identify stakeholder groups, such as academic, corporate and government scientists; environmental advocates; business leaders; science and technology journalists; and public policy makers within each community. Representatives from each group along with members of the general public were invited to participate in a series of on line and in person deliberations that were designed to provide basic information about the science, its potential benefits and risks, and avenues for public participation in policy formulation. On line resources were designed and managed by ScienceVIEW at Lawrence Hall of Science and Earth & Sky, Inc. The activities at each site were evaluated by Inverness Research Associates to assess whether they have achieved the objectives.

  13. Stark broadening for diagnostics of the electron density in non-equilibrium plasma utilizing isotope hydrogen alpha lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Lin [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Institute of Electronic Engineering, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tan, Xiaohua; Wan, Xiang; Chen, Lei; Jin, Dazhi; Qian, Muyang [Institute of Electronic Engineering, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Gongping, E-mail: ligp@lzu.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Stark broadening parameters including FWHM (full width at half maximum) and FWHA (full width at half area) of isotope hydrogen alpha lines are simultaneously introduced to determine the electron density of a pulsed vacuum arc jet. To estimate the gas temperature, the rotational temperature of the C{sub 2} Swan system is fit to 2500?±?100?K. A modified Boltzmann-plot method with b{sub i}-factor is introduced to determine the modified electron temperature. The comparison between results of atomic and ionic lines indicates the jet is in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electron temperature is close to 13?000?±?400?K. Based on the computational results of Gig-Card calculation, a simple and precise interpolation algorithm for the discrete-points tables can be constructed to obtain the traditional n{sub e}-T{sub e} diagnostic maps of two Stark broadening parameters. The results from FWHA formula by the direct use of FWHM?=?FWHA and these from the diagnostic map are different. It can be attributed to the imprecise FWHA formula form and the deviation between FWHM and FWHA. The variation of the reduced mass pair due to the non-equilibrium effect contributes to the difference of the results derived from two hydrogen isotope alpha lines. Based on the Stark broadening analysis in this work, a corrected method is set up to determine n{sub e} of (1.10?±?0.08)?×?10{sup 21}?m{sup ?3}, the reference reduced mass ?{sub 0} pair of (3.30?±?0.82 and 1.65?±?0.41), and the ion kinetic temperature of 7900?±?1800?K.

  14. THE ABUNDANCE OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN AND ITS CORRELATION WITH MIDPLANE PRESSURE IN GALAXIES: NON-EQUILIBRIUM, TURBULENT, CHEMICAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Glover, Simon C. O., E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org, E-mail: glover@uni-heidelberg.de [Zentrum der Astrophysik der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of spiral galaxies show a strong linear correlation between the ratio of molecular to atomic hydrogen surface density R{sub mol} and midplane pressure. To explain this, we simulate three-dimensional, magnetized turbulence, including simplified treatments of non-equilibrium chemistry and the propagation of dissociating radiation, to follow the formation of H{sub 2} from cold atomic gas. The formation timescale for H{sub 2} is sufficiently long that equilibrium is not reached within the 20-30 Myr lifetimes of molecular clouds. The equilibrium balance between radiative dissociation and H{sub 2} formation on dust grains fails to predict the time-dependent molecular fractions we find. A simple, time-dependent model of H{sub 2} formation can reproduce the gross behavior, although turbulent density perturbations increase molecular fractions by a factor of few above it. In contradiction to equilibrium models, radiative dissociation of molecules plays little role in our model for diffuse radiation fields with strengths less than 10 times that of the solar neighborhood, because of the effective self-shielding of H{sub 2}. The observed correlation of R{sub mol} with pressure corresponds to a correlation with local gas density if the effective temperature in the cold neutral medium of galactic disks is roughly constant. We indeed find such a correlation of R{sub mol} with density. If we examine the value of R{sub mol} in our local models after a free-fall time at their average density, as expected for models of molecular cloud formation by large-scale gravitational instability, our models reproduce the observed correlation over more than an order-of-magnitude range in density.

  15. NON-EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY OF DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING PRESTELLAR CORES. I. BASIC MAGNETIC AND NON-MAGNETIC MODELS AND PARAMETER STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Willacy, Karen; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine dynamical and non-equilibrium chemical modeling of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores and investigate the evolution of molecular abundances in the contracting core. We model both magnetic cores, with varying degrees of initial magnetic support, and non-magnetic cores, with varying collapse delay times. We explore, through a parameter study, the competing effects of various model parameters in the evolving molecular abundances, including the elemental C/O ratio, the temperature, and the cosmic-ray ionization rate. We find that different models show their largest quantitative differences at the center of the core, whereas the outer layers, which evolve slower, have abundances which are severely degenerate among different dynamical models. There is a large range of possible abundance values for different models at a fixed evolutionary stage (central density), which demonstrates the large potential of chemical differentiation in prestellar cores. However, degeneracies among different models, compounded with uncertainties induced by other model parameters, make it difficult to discriminate among dynamical models. To address these difficulties, we identify abundance ratios between particular molecules, the measurement of which would have maximal potential for discrimination among the different models examined here. In particular, we find that the ratios between NH{sub 3} and CO, NH{sub 2} and CO, and NH{sub 3} and HCO{sup +} are sensitive to the evolutionary timescale, and that the ratio between HCN and OH is sensitive to the C/O ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that measurements of the central deviation (central depletion or enhancement) of abundances of certain molecules are good indicators of the dynamics of the core.

  16. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 375501 (11pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/37/375501

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alaca, B. Erdem

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 375501 (11pp) doi:10 University, R Feneri Yolu, 34450 Sariyer, Istanbul, Turkey 2 Department of Micro and Nanotechnology, Danmarks: Department of Micro and Nanotechnology, Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark. 5

  17. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 145304 (11pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/19/14/145304

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vos, Willem L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 145304 (11pp) doi:10 Systems (COPS), MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Science and Technology, University+ Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science

  18. SUSTAINABLE NANOTECHNOLOGY ORGANIZATION (SNO) Vision The Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization (SNO) is a non-profit, worldwide professional society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUSTAINABLE NANOTECHNOLOGY ORGANIZATION (SNO) Vision The Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization that are engaged in: · Research and development of sustainable nanotechnology · Implementation of sustainable nanotechnology for Environment, Health, and Safety · Advances in nanoscience, methods, protocols and metrology

  19. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 4, NO. 2, MARCH 2005 153 Benchmarking Nanotechnology for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 4, NO. 2, MARCH 2005 153 Benchmarking Nanotechnology Radosavljevic Abstract--Recently there has been tremendous progress made in the research of novel nanotechnology believe that benchmarking is a key element in accelerating the progress of nanotechnology research

  20. SPOTLIGHT on: Lindsay Freeman Chemical Engineering (Nanotechnology)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    SPOTLIGHT on: Lindsay Freeman Chemical Engineering (Nanotechnology) Undergraduate Hometown.D. in chemical engineering with an emphasis in nanotechnology. Lindsay stands out as a very well-balanced student

  1. PROGRAM MANAGER CENTER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY IN SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    PROGRAM MANAGER CENTER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY IN SOCIETY AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY The Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University (CNS-ASU) seeks a Program Manager to organize and coordinate activities, programs, and projects for the Center for Nanotechnology in Society (CNS) at Arizona

  2. Nanowarriors: Military Nanotechnology and Comic Books

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanowarriors: Military Nanotechnology and Comic Books Colin Milburn U N I V E R S I T Y O F C A L I with nanotechnology. The Army Research Office had issued broad agency solicitations for such a center in October 2001 what became dubbed the MIT Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies (ISN). MIT's proposal out- lined

  3. Birck Nanotechnology Center Transforming Light with Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiebig, Peter

    Birck Nanotechnology Center Transforming Light with Metamaterials (with A.V. Kildishev, W. Cai, V.P. Drachev, S. Xiao, U. Chettiar) OUTLINE Birck Nanotechnology Center Vladimir M. Shalaev Purdue University;Birck Nanotechnology Center Meta-Magnetics: from 10GHz to 200THz Terahertz magnetism a) Yen, et al. ~ 1

  4. WHICH MODEL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 WHICH MODEL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY? A Comparison with Biotech.genet@grenoble-em.com Website: www.nanoeconomics.eu Abstract. Nanotechnologies are often presented as breakthrough innovations. This article investigates the model of knowledge transfer in the nanotechnologies in depth, by comparing

  5. Computer-based carbon nanotechnology prophecy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer-based carbon nanotechnology prophecy As device sizes approach atomic dimensions, much that of experimental observations. No surprise that nanotechnology designers are increasingly turning to large in the nanotechnology domain fulfill the same mission as prophecies of old, namely guiding the evolution towards

  6. Nanotechnology: emerging tools for biology and medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    REVIEW Nanotechnology: emerging tools for biology and medicine Ian Y. Wong,1,2,10 Sangeeta N administration of thera- peutic treatments. Nanotechnology has the potential to transform these paradigms and physical functionality at small length scales. Here, we review nanotechnology- based approaches

  7. master's degree NaNotechNology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    master's degree NaNotechNology When choosing a Master's programme, it is wise to look one step topical, incorporating the latest developments in applied physics, nanotechnology, chemical engineering projects will be carried out at the MESA+ institute for nanotechnology, or the MIRA institute

  8. Applications of Nanotechnology to Pharmaceutical Product Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Applications of Nanotechnology to Pharmaceutical Product Development Wednesday January 27, 2010 physical forms can create limitations in terms of product performance and/or safety. Nanotechnology can of the clinical benefits of using nanotechnology in drug product development.. Bill Bosch has been involved

  9. Hindawi Publishing Corporation Journal of Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yan Alexander

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation Journal of Nanotechnology Volume 2010, Article ID 801789, 42 pages a general interest in both fundamental and practical nanotechnology. Over the past 20 years, research's -orbital axis vector (POAV) #12;2 Journal of Nanotechnology (0,0) (1,0) (2,0) (3,0) (4,0) (5,0) (1,1) (2

  10. Societal and Ethical Implications of Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Societal and Ethical Implications of Nanotechnology #12;What is SEI? · Social and Ethical Nanotechnology Research & Development Act of 2003 (PL 108-153) · Established a societal implications research of their research · Provides for public input into nanotechnology research and development #12;Areas of Society

  11. Improving Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Using Nuclear Nanotechnology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jordan Andrew

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPROVING TARGETED RADIONUCLIDE THERAPY USING NUCLEAR NANOTECHNOLOGY A Thesis by JORDAN ANDREW EVANS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of Nanotechnology ................................................. 4 1.3 Paradigm Shift - Improving TRT Using Nuclear Nanotechnology .......... 8 1.4 Cancer Cell Line Investigated in This Study .......................................... 14 1.5 Nano...

  12. Physics-Based Mathematical Models for Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    Physics-Based Mathematical Models for Nanotechnology 2008 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 107, 011001, doi: 10 for their excellent support during the workshop. Nanotechnology is the study and application of phenomena at or below. This workshop put strong emphasis on discussions of the new mathematics needed in nanotechnology especially

  13. Quantum Information Science and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Yu. Vlasov

    2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note is touched upon an application of quantum information science (QIS) in nanotechnology area. The laws of quantum mechanics may be very important for nano-scale objects. A problem with simulating of quantum systems is well known and quantum computer was initially suggested by R. Feynman just as the way to overcome such difficulties. Mathematical methods developed in QIS also may be applied for description of nano-devices. Few illustrative examples are mentioned and they may be related with so-called fourth generation of nanotechnology products.

  14. Nanoscience and nanotechnology as seen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    nanoscience to make a `quantum leap' · Analog circuits · Digital circuits· Digital circuits · Quantum circuits2/13/2012 1 Nanoscience and nanotechnology as seen through quantum dots Pat Kambhampati Department science to technology · MRI ­ a good thing! · But where did it come from? ­ Quantum Mechanics (1920's) ­ I

  15. Science and technology news Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Science and technology news Home Nanotechnology Physics Space & Earth Electronics Technology Smart Toxic Gas Monitor - Plug/Play sensor 10' extender cable NH3, CO, CL2, H2S, PH3, SO2, AsH3 - www to potentially toxic chemicals. The investigators hope to be able to market the wearable sensor within a few

  16. Enhanced heat transfer through filler-polymer interface by surface-coupling agent in heat-dissipation material: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Kouichi [DENSO CORPORATION, Kariya, Aichi 448-8661 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Ogata, Shuji; Kobayashi, Ryo; Tamura, Tomoyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Kitsunezuka, Masashi; Shinma, Atsushi [DENSO CORPORATION, Kariya, Aichi 448-8661 (Japan)

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a composite material of polymers and micrometer-sized fillers with higher heat conductance is crucial to realize modular packaging of electronic components at higher densities. Enhancement mechanisms of the heat conductance of the polymer-filler interfaces by adding the surface-coupling agent in such a polymer composite material are investigated through the non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A simulation system is composed of ?-alumina as the filler, bisphenol-A epoxy molecules as the polymers, and model molecules for the surface-coupling agent. The inter-atomic potential between the ?-alumina and surface-coupling molecule, which is essential in the present MD simulation, is constructed to reproduce the calculated energies with the electronic density-functional theory. Through the non-equilibrium MD simulation runs, we find that the thermal resistance at the interface decreases significantly by increasing either number or lengths of the surface-coupling molecules and that the effective thermal conductivity of the system approaches to the theoretical value corresponding to zero thermal-resistance at the interface. Detailed analyses about the atomic configurations and local temperatures around the interface are performed to identify heat-transfer routes through the interface.

  17. Perspectives Nanotechnology and the public: Effectively communicating nanoscale science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crone, Wendy C.

    Perspectives Nanotechnology and the public: Effectively communicating nanoscale science August 2006 Key words: nanotechnology, communication, public knowledge, public understanding the public on concepts and applications associated with nanotechnology. The goal of our work

  18. PA Nanotechnology 2012 Nanotech's Role in Advancing PA's Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    PA Nanotechnology 2012 Nanotech's Role in Advancing PA's Economy June 5, 2012 Harrisburg University University Drexel Nanotechnology Institute (DNI) Harrisburg Area Community College Harrisburg University of Science and Technology Lehigh University Center for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (CAMN) Penn

  19. Ris-R-1550(EN) Nanotechnology development in Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1550(EN) Nanotechnology development in Denmark - environmental opportunities and risk Maj Munch Andersen and Birgitte Rasmussen Title: Nanotechnology development in Denmark - environmental Products and Materials ­ Challenges from Nanotechnology, Biotechnology and ICT" (Jørgensen et al. 2006

  20. Emerging nanotechnology approaches for HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    Emerging nanotechnology approaches for HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention The emergence of AIDS effects and is ineffective in patients in whom the virus develops resistance. Nanotechnology of nanotechnology to provide more effective treatment and preven

  1. Nanotechnology: a slightly different history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulz, Peter

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many introductory articles and books about nanotechnology have been written to disseminate this apparently new technology, which investigate and manipulates matter at dimension of a billionth of a meter. However, these texts show in general a common feature: there is very little about the origins of this multidisciplinary field. If anything is mentioned at all, a few dates, facts and characters are reinforced, which under the scrutiny of a careful historical digging do not sustain as really founding landmarks of the field. Nevertheless, in spite of these flaws, such historical narratives bring up important elements to understand and contextualize this human endeavor, as well as the corresponding dissemination among the public: would nanotechnology be a cultural imperative?

  2. Nanotechnology Nanotechnology 25 (2014) 155303 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/25/15/155303

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanotechnology Nanotechnology 25 (2014) 155303 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/25/15/155303 Anti-4484/14/155303+07$33.00 1 c 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK #12;Nanotechnology 25 (2014) 155303 J Kim et al we

  3. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 105301 (4pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/19/10/105301

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 105301 (4pp) doi:10 spectrum. 0957-4484/08/105301+04$30.00 © 2008 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK1 #12;Nanotechnology 19

  4. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 055102 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/5/055102

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 055102 (6pp) doi:10-4484/07/055102+06$30.00 1 © 2007 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK #12;Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 055102 D Dosev et al

  5. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 475305 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/20/47/475305

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Weidong

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 475305 (5pp) doi:10 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK1 #12;Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 475305 W Y Fu et al Figure 1

  6. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 105709 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/19/10/105709

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Derek Y C

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 105709 (6pp) doi:10 universal 0957-4484/08/105709+06$30.00 © 2008 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK1 #12;Nanotechnology 19

  7. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 025701 (12pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/19/02/025701

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 025701 (12pp) doi:10 in the UK1 #12;Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 025701 N Sinha et al Figure 1. SEM image showing randomly oriented

  8. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 275603 (13pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/20/27/275603

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, Yiguang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 275603 (13pp) doi:10;Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 275603 J Shan and Y Ju Among various host materials for UCNPs, NaYF4 in either cubic

  9. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 24 (2013) 335703 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/24/33/335703

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 24 (2013) 335703 (7pp) doi:10 in the UK & the USA #12;Nanotechnology 24 (2013) 335703 D Ziegler et al Unfortunately, the poor accuracy

  10. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 165504 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/16/165504

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 165504 (6pp) doi:10-4484/07/165504+06$30.00 1 © 2007 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK #12;Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 165504 T Zhang et al

  11. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 332001 (14pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/19/33/332001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 332001 (14pp) doi:10 Printed in the UK1 #12;Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 332001 Topical Review I I 1-D Nanowire 2-D Thin film

  12. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 365701 (11pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/20/36/365701

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomar, Vikas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 365701 (11pp) doi:10-4484/09/365701+11$30.00 © 2009 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK1 #12;Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 365701 V Samvedi and V Tomar

  13. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 455610 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/19/45/455610

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 455610 (6pp) doi:10-4484/08/455610+06$30.00 © 2008 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK1 #12;Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 455610 S Mao et al Figure 1

  14. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 105303 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/10/105303

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grütter, Peter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 105303 (6pp) doi:10-4484/07/105303+06$30.00 1 © 2007 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK #12;Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 105303 J M Mativetsky et

  15. Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum The Bradbury Science Museum is...

  16. answers cancer nanotechnology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: 2nd Workshop on Computations in Nanotechnology Keynote Speakers: Mark J. Biggs (Adelaide), Mark nanotechnology researchers Goal: Exposing computational analysis...

  17. Nanotechnology in Cancer Treatment and Detection Richard Acosta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    Nanotechnology in Cancer Treatment and Detection Richard Acosta #12;Motivation ·Ineffectiveness or roughly 100 times smaller than most human cells Cancer Nanotechnology research is interdisciplinary

  18. The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Annual Conference 2014 Royal your work during the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center Yearly Conference, which will be held

  19. The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Emmanuel

    The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Annual Conference 2015 Holiday Inn your work during the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center Yearly Conference, which will be held

  20. Northern California Nanotechnology Center Chemical Hygiene Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Northern California Nanotechnology Center Chemical Hygiene Plan Rev 11/12 Page 1 Northern California Nanotechnology Center Chemical Hygiene Plan 1.0 Introduction Cal-OSHA (Title 8 CCR 5191) and campus regulations require that all laboratories have a written Chemical Hygiene Plan. The Chemical

  1. Birck Nanotechnology Center Vladimir M. Shalaev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shalaev, Vladimir M.

    -Space Black hole #12;V. M. Shalaev, Oct. 26, 2007 5 Birck Nanotechnology Center Invisibility to Radar: Stealth Technology Stealth technique: Radar cross-section reductions by absorbing paint / non- metallic frame / shape 14 Birck Nanotechnology Center Natural Optical Materials Semiconductors Crystals Water Air metals #12

  2. Using Nanotechnology in Viscoelastic Surfactant Stimulation Fluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurluk, Merve Rabia 1986-

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    USING NANOTECHNOLOGY IN VISCOELASTIC SURFACTANT STIMULATION FLUIDS A Thesis by MERVE RABIA GURLUK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... .......................................... 9 1.7 Kinetics of Micellization ......................................................................... 10 1.8 Nanotechnology ....................................................................................... 16...

  3. Nanowires As Building Blocks for Bottom-Up Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    #12;Nanowires As Building Blocks for Bottom-Up Nanotechnology The field of nanotechnology/or combinations of function in an integrated nanosystem. To enable this bottom-up approach for nanotechnology-dimensional (1D) nanostruc- tures at the forefront of nanoscience and nanotechnology. NWs and NBs are typi- cally

  4. Nanotechnology for Life Sciences Vol. 4: Nanodevices for Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, William O.

    Nanotechnology for Life Sciences Vol. 4: Nanodevices for Life Sciences Protein-based nanotechnology such as semiconductors into functional materials.11,12 Another example of protein based nanotechnology is the push in nanotechnology18,19 and on applications of kinesin motors in microscale transport.4 Finally, there is a paralle

  5. 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Definition of Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Definition of Nanotechnology Nanotechnology is the art and science improvements in technologies for protecting the environment. While many definitions for nanotechnology exist Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), a U.S. Government research and development (R&D) program established

  6. Level MSc 2013/14 Nanoscience to Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Level MSc 2013/14 Nanoscience to Nanotechnology MSc Nanoscience to Nanotechnology Coordinator: Dr Nanoscale Structures and Devices 10 Credits Mr. TGG Maffeis/Dr. L Li/Dr. KS Teng EGNM02 Soft Nanotechnology Nano(geno)toxicology 10 Credits Dr. SH Doak EGNM05 Bio-nanotechnology 10 Credits Dr. CJ Wright PM-M23

  7. www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    1 www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology: nanofluids at NIU www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Dry- vs. Wet-nanotechnology · Fluids (gases & liquids) vs. Solids in Nature and (Chemical & Bio, and processes · Synergy of dry-nanotechnology (solid-state) & wet-nanotechnology (POLY-nanofluids) #12;2 www

  8. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 335707 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/19/33/335707

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehske, Holger

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 335707 (6pp) doi:10 for nanotechnology. However, since the discovery of stable multi-layers and single layers of graphene [2], the latter quickly shifted into the focus of nanotechnology as well. For carbon nanotubes a simple tight

  9. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 255501 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/20/25/255501

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 255501 (5pp) doi:10. Nanotechnology offers the promise of improved gas sensors with low-power consumption, fast response time which;Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 255501 T Zhang et al Figure 1. AFM images and diameter histograms of CSA-d

  10. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 21 (2010) 405704 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/21/40/405704

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xinwei

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 21 (2010) 405704 (6pp) doi:10 Online at stacks.iop.org/Nano/21/405704 Abstract Although nanoscience and nanotechnology have been in the UK & the USA1 #12;Nanotechnology 21 (2010) 405704 W Mai and X Deng difficult, prohibiting

  11. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 17 (2006) 57175721 doi:10.1088/0957-4484/17/23/001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vos, Willem L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 17 (2006) 5717­5721 doi:10), MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Science and Technology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, NL-7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands 2 MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University

  12. Precautionary Governance and the Limits of Scientific Knowledge: A Democratic Framework for Regulating Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Oren

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the scientific study of nanotechnology should also include aStakeholder Forum and Nanotechnology Engagement Group, whichFramework for Regulating Nanotechnology Oren Perez * I.

  13. When Less Liability May Mean More Precaution: The Case of Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dana, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More Precaution: The Case of Nanotechnology David Dana* I.II. FRAMING THE NANOTECHNOLOGY PROBLEM A. TheApproach to Nanotechnology 1. Mandatory

  14. Marine Bio-Nanotechnology: High-Performance Materials from Sponge Silicatein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morse, Daniel E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title: Marine Bio-Nanotechnology: High-Performance MaterialsChemical Biology (2005); Nanotechnology Review (2005, 2006);Marine biotechnology; nanotechnology; sponge; silica;

  15. July/August 200412 21 (nanotechnology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ji Man

    , . (1999) , (1999- 2000) (2000-2001) , 2001 . (jimankim@ajou.ac.kr) Nanoporous Materials (Mesoporous Material) 1. . #12; July/August 2004 13 1 nm 30 nm . , .[3-6] . (nanochemistry) (nanotechnology), (supramolecular chemistry

  16. Nanotechnology-mediated targeting of tumor angiogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Deboshri

    Abstract Angiogenesis is disregulated in many diseased states, most notably in cancer. An emerging strategy for the development of therapies targeting tumor-associated angiogenesis is to harness the potential of nanotechnology ...

  17. Nanotechnology in Science and Art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearinger, J

    2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The burgeoning field of nanotechnology opens windows between science and art. Exploration of this interplay encourages interaction between scientists, artists and educators alike. The image below serves as an example of the fertile ground for exchange. The substrate that this image captures is made of silicon, the material from which computer chips are made. A thin ({approx}1 nm thick) chemical coating was applied homogeneously to the silicon. Specific regions of the coating, 600 nm wide (approximately 150 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair), were then locally removed from the silicon via photocatalytic nanolithography (PCNL(Bearinger, Hiddessen et al. 2005)). PCNL engages light, such as from a light emitting diode or an ultraviolet source, to activate molecules that are attached to a transparent mask above the silicon substrate. These molecules can be compounds similar to chlorophyll, the photoactive material that aids plants in photosynthesis, or may be semiconductor materials, such as TiO{sub 2}. Once these molecules are activated, chemical reactions result in local destruction of the coating on the silicon. Thus, only regions of the coated silicon in close contact with mask are affected. A non-fouling polymer hydrogel ({approx}10 nm thick) was then grafted to the retained coating. Hydrogels are superabsorbent and are therefore used on the bulk scale in common items including contact lenses and diapers. They also find utility in topical drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Because the hydrogel is so absorbent, exposing the silicon chip with patterned hydrogel to water vapor from one's breath reveals the pattern that the lithography dictates(Lopez, Biebuyck et al. 1993). The myriad of colors seen in the image are due to optical interference. The thickness of the swollen layer determines the colors that are visible. While the field of view immediately following hydration appears like a big drop of oil shining in the sun, the oil drop appearance breaks up into many small domains as the water vapor evaporates. The base silicon does not retain the water in the same way that the way the hydrogel does, due to differences in surface tension. Thus, the pattern stands out from the background. In addition to bringing together nanotechnology, polymer chemistry, materials science and optics, this image suggests imposing order to an otherwise chaotic world. This is a repeated theme in nature across multiple orders of magnitude. The interface of this order and chaos is amorphous, and render a Klimt-like vision of reflected light. As this image is just a still in time, it also reminds us that all things and states are transient and that the materials of the earth, just as we individuals, are constantly evolving.

  18. From Consumer Resistance to Stakeholder Resistance The case of nanotechnology*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 From Consumer Resistance to Stakeholder Resistance The case of nanotechnology* Caroline Gauthier proposes to study the resistance of stakeholders, by exploring the nanotech field. Nanotechnology is today in the resistance context. Keywords. Nanotechnology; Resistance Bio. Caroline Gauthier is currently Professor

  19. Applications of nanotechnology in water and wastewater treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Applications of nanotechnology in water and wastewater treatment Xiaolei Qu, Pedro J.J. Alvarez Accepted 11 September 2012 Available online 26 March 2013 Keywords: Nanotechnology Nanomaterials Water. Nanotechnology holds great potential in advancing water and wastewater treatment to improve treatment efficiency

  20. DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING LONDON CENTRE FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING LONDON CENTRE FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY Chair/Readership in Nanoelectronics/Nanophotonics Ref:1335861 UCL Department / Division: London Centre for Nanotechnology / Department of nanotechnology for electronics and/or photonics. The appointment will be at Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, Reader

  1. Engineering Nanotechnology at Rice University has been huge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Engineering Abstract Nanotechnology at Rice University has been huge since the discovery by a revolution in nanotechnology. Solving the world's energy (and climate, and water) challenges will demand revolutionary breakthroughs in the physical sciences and engineering, and nanotechnology offers unprecedented

  2. updated 3/17/08 Birck Nanotechnology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    updated 3/17/08 1 Birck Nanotechnology Center This script assumes that the tour begins at the Birck Nanotechnology Center Main Entrance on Level 1, and continues through the major open areas of the facility Nanotechnology Center is very safe, but as a precaution, we are asking you to explain the information below

  3. PA Nanotechnology 2012: Nanotech's Role in Advancing PA's Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    PA Nanotechnology 2012: Nanotech's Role in Advancing PA's Economy Date: June 5, 2012 Time: 7:30 am collaborative nanotechnology research, education, technology transfer, entrepreneurship, and commercialization within the Commonwealth. · Publicize and promote PA leadership in nanotechnology R&D, workforce education

  4. PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Collaborating in Today's Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    4/23/2009 Present PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Collaborating in Today's Economy May 27 of green technologies and alternative energy. The PA Initiative for Nanotechnology (PIN), established organizations - Drexel University's DNI, the LNN of Lehigh University, and The Nanotechnology Institute (NTI

  5. Research Priorities to Advance Eco-Responsible Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Research Priorities to Advance Eco- Responsible Nanotechnology Pedro J. J. Alvarez,, * Vicki Colvin nanotechnology revolution has great potential to enhance a wide variety of products, services, and in- dustries than a future environmental liability, the Interna- tional Council on Nanotechnology (ICON

  6. Fundamental enabling issues in nanotechnology :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floro, Jerrold Anthony; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Hearne, Sean Joseph; Hoyt, Jeffrey John; Seel, Steven Craig; Webb, Edmund Blackburn,; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To effectively integrate nanotechnology into functional devices, fundamental aspects of material behavior at the nanometer scale must be understood. Stresses generated during thin film growth strongly influence component lifetime and performance; stress has also been proposed as a mechanism for stabilizing supported nanoscale structures. Yet the intrinsic connections between the evolving morphology of supported nanostructures and stress generation are still a matter of debate. This report presents results from a combined experiment and modeling approach to study stress evolution during thin film growth. Fully atomistic simulations are presented predicting stress generation mechanisms and magnitudes during all growth stages, from island nucleation to coalescence and film thickening. Simulations are validated by electrodeposition growth experiments, which establish the dependence of microstructure and growth stresses on process conditions and deposition geometry. Sandia is one of the few facilities with the resources to combine experiments and modeling/theory in this close a fashion. Experiments predicted an ongoing coalescence process that generates signficant tensile stress. Data from deposition experiments also supports the existence of a kinetically limited compressive stress generation mechanism. Atomistic simulations explored island coalescence and deposition onto surfaces intersected by grain boundary structures to permit investigation of stress evolution during later growth stages, e.g. continual island coalescence and adatom incorporation into grain boundaries. The predictive capabilities of simulation permit direct determination of fundamental processes active in stress generation at the nanometer scale while connecting those processes, via new theory, to continuum models for much larger island and film structures. Our combined experiment and simulation results reveal the necessary materials science to tailor stress, and therefore performance, in nanostructures and, eventually, integrated nanocomponents.

  7. DNA nanotechnology: understanding and optimisation through simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas E. Ouldridge

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA nanotechnology promises to provide controllable self-assembly on the nanoscale, allowing for the design of static structures, dynamic machines and computational architectures. In this article I review the state-of-the art of DNA nanotechnology, highlighting the need for a more detailed understanding of the key processes, both in terms of theoretical modelling and experimental characterisation. I then consider coarse-grained models of DNA, mesoscale descriptions that have the potential to provide great insight into the operation of DNA nanotechnology if they are well designed. In particular, I discuss a number of nanotechnological systems that have been studied with oxDNA, a recently developed coarse-grained model, highlighting the subtle interplay of kinetic, thermodynamic and mechanical factors that can determine behaviour. Finally, new results highlighting the importance of mechanical tension in the operation of a two-footed walker are presented, demonstrating that recovery from an unintended `overstepped' configuration can be accelerated by three to four orders of magnitude by application of a moderate tension to the walker's track. More generally, the walker illustrates the possibility of biasing strand-displacement processes to affect the overall rate.

  8. What is nanotechnology ? | About | Contact | Affiliates | Advertising | Companies Products People News Books Jobs Newsletter Services Login/Register

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    What is nanotechnology ? | About | Contact | Affiliates | Advertising | Companies Products People Company Products Nanotechnology courses Nanotechnology Jobs Partners Wanted Jobs Wanted Articles - English: Nanotechnology offers unique opportunities to advance the life sciences by facilitating the delivery

  9. Nanotechnology Research, Education, and Outreach by the Integrated Nanosystems Development Institute (INDI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Nanotechnology Research, Education, and Outreach by the Integrated Nanosystems Development IUPUI's Signature Center Initiative to advance nanotechnology-based systems research and spark student interest in this emerging STEM field. Innovation in the field of nanotechnology arises from

  10. Control Banding and Nanotechnology Synergist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Paik, S

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The average Industrial Hygienist (IH) loves a challenge, right? Okay, well here is one with more than a few twists. We start by going through the basics of a risk assessment. You have some chemical agents, a few workers, and the makings of your basic exposure characterization. However, you have no occupational exposure limit (OEL), essentially no toxicological basis, and no epidemiology. Now the real handicap is that you cannot use sampling pumps, cassettes, tubes, or any of the media in your toolbox, and the whole concept of mass-to-dose is out the window, even at high exposure levels. Of course, by the title, you knew we were talking about nanomaterials (NM). However, we wonder how many IHs know that this topic takes everything you know about your profession and turns it upside down. It takes the very foundations that you worked so hard in college and in the field to master and pulls it out from underneath you. It even takes the gold standard of our profession, the quantitative science of exposure assessment, and makes it look pretty darn rusty. Now with NM there is the potential to get some aspect of quantitative measurements, but the instruments are generally very expensive and getting an appropriate workplace personal exposure measurement can be very difficult if not impossible. The potential for workers getting exposures, however, is very real, as evidenced by a recent publication reporting worker exposures to polyacrylate nanoparticles in a Chinese factory (Song et al. 2009). With something this complex and challenging, how does a concept as simple as Control Banding (CB) save the day? Although many IHs have heard of CB, most of their knowledge comes from its application in the COSHH Essentials toolkit. While there is conflicting published research on COSHH Essentials and its value for risk assessments, almost all of the experts agree that it can be useful when no OELs are available (Zalk and Nelson 2008). It is this aspect of CB, its utility with uncertainty, that attracted international NM experts to recommend this qualitative risk assessment approach for NM. However, since their CB recommendation was only in theory, we took on the challenge of developing a working toolkit, the CB Nanotool (see Zalk et al. 2009 and Paik et al. 2008), as a means to perform a risk assessment and protect researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. While it's been acknowledged that engineered NM have potentially endless benefits for society, it became clear to us that the very properties that make nanotechnology so useful to industry could also make them dangerous to humans and the environment. Among the uncertainties and unknowns with NM are: the contribution of their physical structure to their toxicity, significant differences in their deposition and clearance in the lungs when compared to their parent material (PM), a lack of agreement on the appropriate indices for exposure to NM, and very little background information on exposure scenarios or populations at risk. Part of this lack of background information can be traced to the lack of risk assessments historically performed in the industry, with a recent survey indicating that 65% of companies working with NM are not doing any kind of NM-specific risk assessment as they focus on traditional PM methods for IH (Helland et al. 2009). The good news is that the amount of peer-reviewed publications that address environmental, health and safety aspects of NM has been increasing over the last few years; however, the percentage of these that address practical methods to reduce exposure and protect workers is orders of magnitude lower. Our intent in developing the CB Nanotool was to create a simplified approach that would protect workers while unraveling the mysteries of NM for experts and non-experts alike. Since such a large part of the toxicological effects of both the physical and chemical properties of NM were unknown, not to mention changing logarithmically as new NM research continues growing, we needed to account for this lack of information as part of the CB Nano

  11. The National Nanotechnology Initiative's nanoEHS Workshop Series: February 24-25, 2009: Human and Environmental Exposure Assessment of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The National Nanotechnology Initiative's nanoEHS Workshop Series: February 24-25, 2009: Human & Ethical, Legal, and Societal Implications of Nanotechnology National Nanotechnology Initiative Save in the National Nanotechnology Initiative's Strategy for Nanotechnology-related Environmental, Health, and Safety

  12. Requirements for a Concentration in Nanotechnology The concentration in Nanotechnology can be earned by any student within the College of Engineering by fulfilling the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Requirements for a Concentration in Nanotechnology The concentration in Nanotechnology can. As an introduction to the concentration, one of the (proposed) EK 131/132 nanotechnology modules is recommended but not required. Students planning to pursue a concentration in Nanotechnology should declare their intent

  13. afm-based nanotechnology elucidates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: 2nd Workshop on Computations in Nanotechnology Keynote Speakers: Mark J. Biggs (Adelaide), Mark nanotechnology researchers Goal: Exposing computational analysis...

  14. nature nanotechnology | VOL 4 | MARCH 2009 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology 139 researchhighlights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    nature nanotechnology | VOL 4 | MARCH 2009 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology 139) The demand for nanotechnology is rapid, and this growth comes with concerns about health risks

  15. Research Institute of Micro/Nanometer Science & Technology Multiple Openings : Chemistry, Materials Science, Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Science, Nanotechnology Shanghai, China We have several job openings for experienced polymer chemists / nanotechnology. We will consider hiring chemists who are skillful in macromolecular synthesis ("click chemistry

  16. Post-Genomics Nanotechnology Is Gaining Momentum: Nanoproteomics and Applications in Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Weihong

    Post-Genomics Nanotechnology Is Gaining Momentum: Nanoproteomics and Applications in Life Sciences of nanotechnology applications, including nanoporous structures, functionalized nanoparticles, quantum dots

  17. National Nanotechnology Initiative's Signature Initiative Sustainable Nanomanufacturing: Creating the Industries of the Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by National Nanotechnology Coordination Office held on June 26, 2012

  18. Nanotechnology Today 2010: NanoReg & Keller and Heckman Announce Continuation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Nanotechnology Today 2010: NanoReg & Keller and Heckman Announce Continuation of Popular Nanotechnology Webinar Series Building on last year's popular webinars on the regulation of nanotechnology, Keller and Heckman & NanoReg are pleased to announce Nanotechnology Today 2010, a series of four new

  19. at the NatioNal iNstitutes of health Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    at the NatioNal iNstitutes of health Nanotechnology New UNderstaNdiNg, New Capabilities, & New (2007) 318:430-43 - Researchers at the Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence focused of Professor Shan X. Wang, PhD, and Sebastian J. Osterfeld, PhD. #12;what is nanotechnology? Nanotechnology

  20. Muddling-Through on the Cutting-Edge: How California and the European Union are Coping with the Risks of Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Margaret; Barandiaran, Javiera

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. Banfield, 2006. Environmental Risks of Nanotechnology:National Nanotechnology Initiative Funding 2000-04.a European strategy for nanotechnology, in: DG, R. (Ed. ).

  1. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: From Energy Applications to Advanced Medical Therapies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tijana Rajh

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Rajh will present a general talk on nanotechnology ? an overview of why nanotechnology is important and how it is useful in various fields. The specific focus will be on Solar energy conversion, environmental applications and advanced medical therapies. She has broad expertise in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials that are used in nanotechnology including novel hybrid systems connecting semiconductors to biological molecules like DNA and antibodies. This technology could lead to new gene therapy procedures, cancer treatments and other medical applications. She will also discuss technologies made possible by organizing small semiconductor particles called quantum dots, materials that exhibit a rich variety of phenomena that are size and shape dependent. Development of these new materials that harnesses the unique properties of materials at the 1-100 nanometer scale resulted in the new field of nanotechnology that currently affects many applications in technological and medical fields.

  2. ig research into the tiny world of nanotechnology received a giant boost with the establishment of the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute (RBNI) at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rimon, Elon

    B ig research into the tiny world of nanotechnology received a giant boost with the establishment of the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute (RBNI) at the Technion. "The Technion's ranking as a world leader in nanotechnology strongly influenced our decision," said Angelica Berrie, president of the Russell Berrie

  3. Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruckNanostructuedNanotechnologyNanotechnology: Small Materials

  4. UNDERGRADUATE JOURNAL IN NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY Professor Mark Hersam, editor; Kathleen Cook, managing editor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    UNDERGRADUATE JOURNAL IN NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY Professor Mark Hersam, editor; Kathleen journal dedicated to nanoscience and nanotechnology. Aspiring authors went through a peer-review process fashioned after professional journals around the country. They gained valuable educational experience

  5. Nanotechnology in our Daily Life Iridescent car paint: Based on interference colors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Himpsel, Franz J.

    Nanotechnology in our Daily Life Iridescent car paint: Based on interference colors (like a butterly, no bleaching after 5 years Miami) #12;Nanotechnology on our Desktops Hard Disk Sensor Medium

  6. 176 nature nanotechnology | VOL 5 | MARCH 2010 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology news & views

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buratto, Steve

    176 nature nanotechnology | VOL 5 | MARCH 2010 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology news & views P humidity. Writing in Nature Nanotechnology, Saeed Moghaddam, Mark Shannon and colleagues1 at the University

  7. Problems on Non-Equilibrium Statistical Physics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Moochan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    weakly interacting Boson gas. In the single-photon heat engine, we have derived the equation of state similar to that in classical ideal gas and applied it to construct the Carnot cycle with a single photon, and showed the Carnot efficiency in this single...

  8. Entanglement Production in Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Vedral

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We define and analyse the concept of entanglement production during the evolution of a general quantum mechanical dissipative system. While it is important to minimise entropy production in order to achieve thermodynamical efficiency, maximising the rate of change of entanglement is important in quantum information processing. Quantitative relations are obtained between entropy and entanglement productions, under specific assumptions detailed in the text. We apply these to the processes of dephasing and decay of correlations between two initially entangled qubits. Both the Master equation treatment as well as the higher Hilbert space analysis are presented. Our formalism is very general and contains as special cases many reported individual instance of entanglement dynamics, such as, for example, the recently discovered notion of the sudden death of entanglement.

  9. Master thesis Non-equilibrium Solidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Metallurgy Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology Pohang University of Science and Technology 2011 #12 ferrite fraction is increased under higher cooling rates, the accuracy of diffusivity database or the cell and ferrite of the same composition have the same free energy As , but accounting for the stored energy

  10. Problems on Non-Equilibrium Statistical Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Moochan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    energy functional, similar to the problem in dimensional scaling in the H-atom. For the C-atom, we got the ground state energy -37:82 eV with a relative error less than 6 %. The simplest molecular ion, H+ 2 , has been investigated by the quasi...

  11. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of gravitational screens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Freidel; Yuki Yokokura

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Einstein gravity equations projected on a timelike surface, which represents the time evolution of what we call a gravitational screen. We show that such a screen possesses a surface tension and an internal energy, and that the Einstein equations reduce to the thermodynamic equations of a viscous bubble. We also provide a complete dictionary between gravitational and thermodynamical variables. In the non-viscous cases there are three thermodynamic equations which characterise a bubble dynamics: These are the first law, the Marangoni flow equation and the Young-Laplace equation. In all three equations the surface tension plays a central role: In the first law it appears as a work term per unit area, in the Marangoni flow its gradient drives a force, and in the Young-Laplace equation it contributes to a pressure proportional to the surface curvature. The gravity equations appear as a natural generalization of these bubble equations when the bubble itself is viscous and dynamical. In particular, it shows that the mechanism of entropy production for the viscous bubble is mapped onto the production of gravitational waves. We also review the relationship between surface tension and temperature, and discuss the usual black-hole thermodynamics from this point of view.

  12. Research review paper Point-of-care assays for tuberculosis: Role of nanotechnology/microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirci, Utkan

    Research review paper Point-of-care assays for tuberculosis: Role of nanotechnology/microfluidics Keywords: Tuberculosis Point-of-care Nanotechnology Microfluidics Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most for TB diagnosis, and highlight the recent advances in nanotechnology and microfluidics that potentially

  13. NANOTECHNOLOGY CENTER Eine Partnerschaft in Nanotechnologie von IBM Research und ETH Zrich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cachin, Christian

    NANOTECHNOLOGY CENTER Eine Partnerschaft in Nanotechnologie von IBM Research und ETH Zürich and Rohrer Nanotechnology Center is part of a strategic partnership in nanosciences with ETH Zurich, one FACT SHEET Above: The campus of IBM Research - Zurich Right: The Binnig and Rohrer Nanotechnology

  14. "Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center Makes Rapid Progress" here is no question that great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fall 2001 "Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center Makes Rapid Progress" here is no question such structures. The applica- tion of nanoscale materials and devices is denoted by the term nanotechnology. It is widely believed that nanotechnology will have an enormous impact on indus- trial technologies

  15. in: Nanotechnology 7(1), pp. 307314, 1996 Emergent Computation by Catalytic Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittrich, Peter

    in: Nanotechnology 7(1), pp. 307­314, 1996 Emergent Computation by Catalytic Reactions Wolfgang the idea behind the chemical computational metaphor and outline its relevance for nanotechnology. We set up within this context. The implications of this approach for nanotechnology, parallel computers based on mo

  16. Big Science, Small Scale Western University has made significant investments in nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denham, Graham

    Big Science, Small Scale Western University has made significant investments in nanotechnology in materials and biomaterials. Nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize and advance many vital sectors in nanotechnology and photonics · Houses state-of-the-art instruments, with tools for SEM capabilities and focused

  17. Boundary spanning, knowledge dynamics and emerging innovation systems early lessons from nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nanotechnology DIME Workshop "Industrial innovation dynamics and knowledge characteristics, exploring systems. Using nanotechnology as a case the paper focuses on analysing boundary spanning effects to capture possible changes in the knowledge base and search modes related to the rise of nanotechnology

  18. nature nanotechnology | VOL 5 | DECEMBER 2010 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology 825 correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Minghua

    nature nanotechnology | VOL 5 | DECEMBER 2010 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology 825 purpose of publishing research papers in various areas of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Many­4 . This article will quantify the growth over time in the number of nanotechnology journals using three databases

  19. Nanotechnology is defined as materi-als and systems ranging from 1 to 100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    Nanotechnology is defined as materi- als and systems ranging from 1 to 100 nm which exhibit novel in the potentially revo- lutionary impacts that nanotechnology has to offer clinical medicine, particu- larly oncology. Numerous proof of concept appli- cations of nanotechnology have been described for high impact

  20. Int. J. Nanotechnology, Vol. 1, No. 4, 2004 431 Copyright 2004 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Int. J. Nanotechnology, Vol. 1, No. 4, 2004 431 Copyright © 2004 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd) `Nanobelt and nanosaw structures of II-VI semiconductors', Int. J. Nanotechnology, Vol. 1, No. 4, pp.431 Fellow, and a Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Fellow (2003­2004). Currently, his research interests

  1. Application of Nanotechnology to liquid crystal displays H S Kwok, Z L Xie and Fion Yeung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of Nanotechnology to liquid crystal displays H S Kwok, Z L Xie and Fion Yeung Center shall report new results on the application of nanotechnology to LCD. Specifically we shall discuss as the alignment layer. Summary We describe here two experiments on the application of nanotechnology to liquid

  2. Kelvin Nanotechnology Ltd (KNT) GUIDE TO INFORMATION AVAILABLE THROUGH OUR PUBLICATION SCHEME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    Kelvin Nanotechnology Ltd (KNT) GUIDE TO INFORMATION AVAILABLE THROUGH OUR PUBLICATION SCHEME it might cost. Kelvin Nanotechnology Ltd has adopted the Model Publication Scheme 2011 produced publication and explain why. Copyright Where Kelvin Nanotechnology Ltd holds the copyright in its published

  3. Nanotechnology the debate all direct quotes from: The Social and Economic Challenges of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeck, Peter

    1 Nanotechnology ­ the debate all direct quotes from: The Social and Economic Challenges of Nanotechnology, ISBN 0-86226-294-1. Economic & Social Research Council of UK government one end: clear to become realms of human endeavor" G.H. Reynolds, Forward to the Future: Nanotechnology and regulatory

  4. Nanotechnology-Based Trusted Remote Sensing James B. Wendt and Miodrag Potkonjak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potkonjak, Miodrag

    Nanotechnology-Based Trusted Remote Sensing James B. Wendt and Miodrag Potkonjak Computer Science nanotechnology PPUF-based architecture for trusted remote sensing. Current public physical unclonable function the authentication process. Our novel nanotechnology- based architecture ensures fast authentication through partial

  5. ECPE/PHYS 4984: Nanotechnology Randy Heflin 1-4504 108 Robeson rheflin@vt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heflin, Randy

    ECPE/PHYS 4984: Nanotechnology Randy Heflin 1-4504 108 Robeson rheflin@vt.edu Stephane Evoy 1 of instructor Course Number: ECPE 4984 PHYS 4984 Transcript Title: SS: Nanotechnology II. Rationale of course/ECPE 4984: Nanotechnology Course pack, edited by S. Rayyan , W. Barnhart, J. R. Heflin, and S. Evoy

  6. IBM NANOTECHNOLOGY CENTER Location: Campus of IBM Research -Zurich in Rschlikon, Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUILDING FACT SHEET IBM NANOTECHNOLOGY CENTER · Location: Campus of IBM Research - Zurich/normal labs: 1500 m2 PROJECT AREAS Working with partners, the Nanotechnology Center will focus on several Nanotechnology Center will continue IBM's tradition of environmental awareness and has been granted the use

  7. TECHNOLOGICAL AGGLOMERATION AND THE EMERGENCE OF CLUSTERS AND NETWORKS IN NANOTECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - 1 - TECHNOLOGICAL AGGLOMERATION AND THE EMERGENCE OF CLUSTERS AND NETWORKS IN NANOTECHNOLOGY clusters in nanotechnologies (MESA+ (Twente) and other centres in the Netherlands and Minatec in Grenoble nanotechnology-linked developments. We will use our ongoing studies of regions with a high concentration

  8. NIOSH -Nanotechnology Research Center Active in the lab and in the field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    NIOSH - Nanotechnology Research Center Active in the lab and in the field Laura Hodson, MSPH, CIH Kenneth F. Martinez, MSEE, CIH Charles Geraci, PhD, CIH Nanotechnology Research Center Education and should not be construed to represent any agency determination or policy. #12;Nanotechnology

  9. Nanotechnology has variously been described as a transformative technology, an enabling technology, and the next technological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeck, Peter

    Nanotechnology has variously been described as a transformative technology, an enabling technology nanotechnology having a significant impact on society over the coming decades. However, enthusiasm over the rate. As nanotechnology moves toward widespread commercialization, not only is the debate over preventing adverse

  10. Professor Horacio Espinosa discusses his laboratory's advanced engineering approaches at the intersection of nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    at the intersection of nanotechnology and biological systems in search of biomedical solutions and knowledge this helped nanotechnology? The nanoscale material testing concepts we developed had a direct and significant to be successfully synthesised. The field of nanotechnology has grown rapidly ever since. The application of new

  11. "The Role of Standardisation in the Shaping of a Vision for Nanotechnology"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 "The Role of Standardisation in the Shaping of a Vision for Nanotechnology" Aurélie Delemarle1 for Consumer Research (SIFO) harald.throne-holst@sifo.no Abstract Nanotechnologies are known as emerging first introduce the question of regulation in nanotechnologies, then describe the standardisation

  12. Revolutionary Research Advances The Georgia Tech Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology (IEN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    and Nanotechnology (IEN) brings together top researchers, thought leaders, and infrastructure to advance the fields of electronics and nanotechnology. INDUSTRY FRIENDLY CUSTOMER FOCUSED RESPONSIVE UNIQUELY VALUABLE Today and nanotechnology, we are focused on advancing research, creating human capital, informing state and national policy

  13. Nanotechnology finding its way into flame retardancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schartel, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.schartel@bam.de [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanotechnology is one of the key technologies of the 21{sup st} century. The exploitation of 'new' effects that arise from materials structured on the nano-scale has also been proposed successfully for flame retardancy of polymers since the end of the 90s. Of all of the approaches these include, at this time the use of nanocomposites offers the best potential for industrial application, also some other ideas are sketched, such as using electrospun nanofibers mats or layer-by-layer deposits as protection coatings, as well as sub-micrometer multilayer coatings as effective IR-mirrors. The general phenomena, inducing a flow limit in the pyrolysing melt and changing the fire residue, are identified in nanocomposites. Key experiments are performed such as quasi online investigation of the protection layer formation to understand what is going on in detail. The flame retardancy mechanisms are discussed and their impact on fire behaviour quantified. With the latter, the presentation pushes forward the state of the art. For instance, the heat shielding is experimentally quantified for a layered silicate epoxy resin nanocomposite proving that it is the only import mechanism controlling the reduction in peak heat release rate in the investigated system for different irradiations. The flame retardancy performance is assessed comprehensively illuminating not only the strengths but also the weak points of the concepts. Guidelines for materials development are deduced and discussed. Apart from inorganic fillers (layered silicate, boehmite, etc.) not only carbon nanoobjects such as multiwall carbon nanotubes, multilayer graphene and graphene are investigated, but also nanoparticles that are more reactive and harbor the potential for more beneficial interactions with the polymer matrix.

  14. "Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced Industrial Heat Transfer Fluids"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Amit Singhal; Mr. Kenneth Eberts; Mr. Damian Sobrevilla; Prof. Jerry Shan; Stephen Tse; Toby Rossmann

    2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced industrial Heat Transfer Fluids” Improving the efficiency of Industrial Heat Exchangers offers a great opportunity to improve overall process efficiencies in diverse industries such as pharmaceutical, materials manufacturing and food processing. The higher efficiencies can come in part from improved heat transfer during both cooling and heating of the material being processed. Additionally, there is great interest in enhancing the performance and reducing the weight of heat exchangers used in automotives in order to increase fuel efficiency. The goal of the Phase I program was to develop nanoparticle containing heat transfer fluids (e.g., antifreeze, water, silicone and hydrocarbon-based oils) that are used in transportation and in the chemical industry for heating, cooling and recovering waste heat. Much work has been done to date at investigating the potential use of nanoparticle-enhanced thermal fluids to improve heat transfer in heat exchangers. In most cases the effect in a commercial heat transfer fluid has been marginal at best. In the Phase I work, we demonstrated that the thermal conductivity, and hence heat transfer, of a fluid containing nanoparticles can be dramatically increased when subjected to an external influence. The increase in thermal conductivity was significantly larger than what is predicted by commonly used thermal models for two-phase materials. Additionally, the surface of the nanoparticles was engineered so as to have a minimal influence on the viscosity of the fluid. As a result, a nanoparticle-laden fluid was successfully developed that can lead to enhanced heat transfer in both industrial and automotive heat exchangers

  15. Boosting medicine with nanotechnology to destroy cancers http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-04-boosting-medicine-nanotechnology-cancers.html[4/21/2011 11:29:07 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    Boosting medicine with nanotechnology to destroy cancers http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-04-boosting-medicine-nanotechnology-cancers.html[4/21/2011 11:29:07 AM] Sign in Register Home Nanotechnology into a separate site. Read more Boosting medicine with nanotechnology to destroy cancers April 18, 2011 The figure

  16. Coarse-graining DNA for simulations of DNA nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doye, Jonathan P K; Louis, Ard A; Romano, Flavio; Sulc, Petr; Matek, Christian; Snodin, Benedict E K; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Schreck, John S; Harrison, Ryan M; Smith, William P J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To simulate long time and length scale processes involving DNA it is necessary to use a coarse-grained description. Here we provide an overview of different approaches to such coarse graining, focussing on those at the nucleotide level that allow the self-assembly processes associated with DNA nanotechnology to be studied. OxDNA, our recently-developed coarse-grained DNA model, is particularly suited to this task, and has opened up this field to systematic study by simulations. We illustrate some of the range of DNA nanotechnology systems to which the model is being applied, as well as the insights it can provide into fundamental biophysical properties of DNA.

  17. Potential impacts of nanotechnology on energy transmission applications and needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of nanotechnologies to energy transmission has the potential to significantly impact both the deployed transmission technologies and the need for additional development. This could be a factor in assessing environmental impacts of right-of-way (ROW) development and use. For example, some nanotechnology applications may produce materials (e.g., cables) that are much stronger per unit volume than existing materials, enabling reduced footprints for construction and maintenance of electricity transmission lines. Other applications, such as more efficient lighting, lighter-weight materials for vehicle construction, and smaller batteries having greater storage capacities may reduce the need for long-distance transport of energy, and possibly reduce the need for extensive future ROW development and many attendant environmental impacts. This report introduces the field of nanotechnology, describes some of the ways in which processes and products developed with or incorporating nanomaterials differ from traditional processes and products, and identifies some examples of how nanotechnology may be used to reduce potential ROW impacts. Potential environmental, safety, and health impacts are also discussed.

  18. National Aeronautics and Space Administration NaNotechNology Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration · NaNotechNology Roadmap Technology Area 10 Michael A-27 #12;Foreword NASA's integrated technology roadmap, including both technology pull and technology push state of this effort is documented in NASA's DRAFT Space Technology Roadmap, an integrated set

  19. The Navy's Program in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology A Look Ahead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    The Navy's Program in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology ­ A Look Ahead Robert Kavetsky Office of Naval Research 800 North Quincy Street, Arlington, VA., USA Robert_Kavetsky@onr.navy.mil ABSTRACT The Navy to building the "Navy After Next". The Office of Naval Research provided a leadership role in exploring those

  20. Last Revised: 01/08/2014 UNDERGRADUATE MINOR IN "NANOTECHNOLOGY"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    of Engineering and Applied Science and several in the School of Arts and Sciences. It is open to any UG student pursuing an Engineering or Arts & Sciences (Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Environmental Studies, Pre SCIENCE Available to any UG pursuing an Arts and Science or Engineering degree I. Objective Nanotechnology

  1. DNA Nanotechnology DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206389

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    DNA Nanotechnology DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206389 Assembly of Heterogeneous Functional Nanomaterials on DNA Origami Scaffolds** Risheng Wang,* Colin Nuckolls, and Shalom J. Wind* Hybrid nanomaterial systems;[1] selective growth;[4,9] and DNA-mediated assem- bly,[3,8] including the formation of 3D

  2. DNA nanotechnology DOI: 10.1002/smll.200500464

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiali

    DNA nanotechnology DOI: 10.1002/smll.200500464 Towards Rapid DNA Sequencing: Detecting Single- Stranded DNA with a Solid-State Nanopore Hao Yan* and Bingqian Xu* Keywords: · DNA · sequencing · single for rapid detection of single DNA molecules and their sequences. Two types of nanopores have been used

  3. International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10) 15 - 17th Since the discovery of the carbon nanotube (CNT) about two decades ago, research related to its of Materials and Process Engineering Kanpur Chapter hosted the `International Conference on Carbon

  4. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 395604 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/19/39/395604

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nanocomposites have potential applications in catalysis and solar energy conversion systems. S Supplementary data that make them useful for applications in catalysis, sensors, molecular electronics, and solar energy-4484/08/395604+06$30.00 © 2008 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK1 #12;Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 395604 Z Wang et al Figure 1

  5. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 265703 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/19/26/265703

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .1088/0957-4484/19/26/265703 In situ nanoscale mapping of the chemical composition of surfaces and 3D nanostructures by photoelectron de la Recherche Scientifique--Energie, Mat´eriaux et T´el´ecommunications (INRS-EMT), Universit´e du conditions. 0957-4484/08/265703+07$30.00 © 2008 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK1 #12;Nanotechnology 19

  6. 05/05/2014 11:01Nanotechnology's Revolutionary Next Phase Page 1 of 7http://www.forbes.com/sites/brucedorminey/2013/02/26/nanotechnologys-civilization-changing-revolutionary-next-phase/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    05/05/2014 11:01Nanotechnology's Revolutionary Next Phase Page 1 of 7http://www.forbes.com/sites/brucedorminey/2013/02/26/nanotechnologys-civilization-changing-revolutionary-next-phase/ TECH (/TECHNOLOGY) 5:01Nanotechnology's Revolutionary Next Phase Page 2 of 7http://www.forbes.com/sites/brucedorminey/2013

  7. The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Emmanuel

    The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art Annual Conference of works of art based on nanotechnology. Prizes will be awarded to top three selected works. Nano-Art features nanolandscapes, natural or manmade structures of matter at the nano (sub- micro) scale, e

  8. The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art Annual Conference of art based on nanotechnology. Prizes will be awarded to top three selected works. Nano-Art features nanolandscapes, natural or manmade structures of matter at the nano scale, e.g., molecular and atomic scales

  9. Life Cycle Energy and Climate Change Implication of Nanotechnologies: A Critical Review Hyung Chul Kim and Vasilis Fthenakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and health impacts of nano-technologies triggered a recent surge of life cycle assessment (LCA) studies in parallel with the progress of nanotechnologies by employing life-cycle assessment (LCA) that is widely1 Life Cycle Energy and Climate Change Implication of Nanotechnologies: A Critical Review Hyung

  10. Nanotechnology through the Lenses of Science-Fiction Case Study of a Manga: Ganmu (Battle Angel Alita) by Kishiro Yukito.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Nanotechnology through the Lenses of Science-Fiction Case Study of a Manga: Ganmu (Battle Angel of room at the bottom" and Taniguchi Norio's coining of the term in 1974, nanotechnology has emerged. Most of the articles dealing with nanotechnology stress out the fascinating progress made by those who

  11. nature nanotechnology | VOL 4 | JANUARY 2009 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology 5 From two cultures to new cultures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nature nanotechnology | VOL 4 | JANUARY 2009 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology 5 thesis From in academic circles for decades. chris toumey explores how nanotechnology fits into this picture and how where does nanotechnology fit into arguments about the two cultures? Much has changed since 1959

  12. Nanotechnology through the Lenses of Science Fiction Case Study of the Manga Ganmu (Battle Angel Alita) by Kishiro Yukito.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Nanotechnology through the Lenses of Science Fiction Case Study of the Manga Ganmu (Battle Angel of room at the bottom" and Taniguchi Norio's coining of the term in 1974, nanotechnology has emerged. Most of the articles dealing with nanotechnology stress out the fascinating progress made by those who

  13. Faculty of Mechanical Science and Engineering At the Institute of Materials Science, Chair of Materials Science and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubart, Christoph

    of Materials Science and Nanotechnology (Prof. G. Cuniberti), is open to work in the field of biomaterials and / or biologically inspired nanotechnology the position of a Senior Lecturer and Research Group leader (max. E 14 TV (Wissenschaftszeitvertragsgesetz ­ WissZeitVG). The scientific activities of the Chair of Materials Science and Nanotechnology

  14. Safe Nanotechnology in the Work Space Different types of nanoparticles are made or used in various industrial processes. To

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Safe Nanotechnology in the Work Space Different types of nanoparticles are made or used://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2008-112/pdfs/2008-112.pdf http://www.nanoshel.com/buy-nanotubes.php #12;Safety Safe Nanotechnology-112/pdfs/2008-112.pdf #12;Safety Safe Nanotechnology in the Work Space Exposure: Inhalation--The most

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 4, NO. 1, JANUARY 2005 1 THIS Special Issue contains papers from the 2004 IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Privman, Vladimir

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 4, NO. 1, JANUARY 2005 1 Foreword THIS Special Issue contains papers from the 2004 IEEE Nanotechnology Council (NTC) Quantum Device Tech- nology Workshop, which interests span broad areas of nanotechnology, including physics of semiconductor nanodevices, spintronics

  16. Nanotechnology Alert. Nanofountain for Treatment of Cancer; Nanocomposites To Improve Computers' Life Span; Lithium Sulfur Batteries Using Nanocarbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Nanotechnology Alert. Nanofountain for Treatment of Cancer; Nanocomposites To Improve Computers/29/2009 Nanotechnology Alert. Nanofountain f... frost.com/.../market-service-segment... 1/2 #12;Learn how we can provide/29/2009 Nanotechnology Alert. Nanofountain f... frost.com/.../market-service-segment... 2/2 #12;

  17. Nanotechnology and Quasicrystals: From self assembly to photonic applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ron Lifshitz

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    After providing a concise overview on quasicrystals and their discovery more than a quarter of a century ago, I consider the unexpected interplay between nanotechnology and quasiperiodic crystals. Of particular relevance are efforts to fabricate artificial functional micro- or nanostructures, as well as efforts to control the self-assembly of nanostructures, where current knowledge about the possibility of having long-range order without periodicity can provide significant advantages. I discuss examples of systems ranging from artificial metamaterials for photonic applications, through self-assembled soft matter, to surface waves and optically-induced nonlinear photonic quasicrystals.

  18. APPLICATIONS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY IN DEVELOPMENT OF BIOMATERIALS: NANOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOFILMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigmon, R.; Berry, T.; Narayan, R.

    2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Biotechnology is the application of biological techniques to develop new tools and products for medicine and industry. Due to various properties including chemical stability, biocompatibility, and specific activity, e.g. antimicrobial properties, many new and novel materials are being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. Many of these materials are less than 100 nanometers in size. Nanotechnology is the engineering discipline encompassing designing, producing, testing, and using structures and devices less than 100 nanometers. One of the challenges associated with biomaterials is microbial contamination that can lead to infections. In recent work we have examined the functionalization of nanoporous biomaterials and antimicrobial activities of nanocrystalline diamond materials. In vitro testing has revealed little antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria and associated biofilm formation that enhances recalcitrance to antimicrobial agents including disinfectants and antibiotics. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies further demonstrated properties and characteristics of the material with regard to biofilm formation.

  19. 12 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 1, NO. 1, MARCH 2002 Scanning the Controls: Genomics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 1, NO. 1, MARCH 2002 Scanning the Controls: Genomics and topological complexity is the complexity of the genome itself, consisting of about one billion basepairs. The Human Genome Proj

  20. NANOTECHNOLOGY LAW & BUSINESS MARCH 2007 585 Carbon Nanotube-Based Supercapacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gisele

    NANOTECHNOLOGY LAW & BUSINESS · MARCH 2007 585 Carbon Nanotube-Based Supercapacitors: Technologies-layer capacitors (also known as "supercapacitors" or "ultracapacitors") have tremendous potential as high double layer (ECDL) capacitors (also abbreviated EDLC), commonly called "supercapacitors

  1. At EMSL, nanoscience and nanotechnology play a critical, crosscutting role in our mission to integrate experimental and computational resources for innovations that support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation. As a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    At EMSL, nanoscience and nanotechnology play a critical, crosscutting role in our mission capabilities with various applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Along with in-house staff expertise

  2. Developing nanotechnology for biofuel and plant science applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenstein, Justin

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents the research on the development of mesoporous silica based nanotechnology for applications in biofuels and plant science. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have been the subject of great interest in the last two decades due to their unique properties of high surface area, tunable pore size and particle morphology. The robust nature of the silica framework is easily functionalized to make the MSNs a promising option for selective separations. Also, the independent channels that form the pores of MSN have been exploited in the use of particles as platforms for molecular delivery. Pore size and organic functionality are varied to identify the ideal adsorbent material for free fatty acids (FFAs). The resulting material is able to sequester FFAs with a high degree of selectivity from a simulated solution and microalgal oil. The recyclability and industrial implications are also explored. A continuation of the previous material, further tuning of MSN pore size was investigated. Particles with a smaller diameter selectively sequester polyunsaturated free fatty acids (PUFAs) over monounsaturated FFAs and saturated FFAs. The experimental results were verified with molecular modeling. Mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials with a pore diameter of 10 nm (MSN-10) were decorated with small gold nanoparticles. The resulting materials were shown to deliver proteins and DNA into plant cells using the biolistic method.

  3. Discovery Park's Birck Nanotechnology Center (BNC) has assumed a leadership role in K-12 STEM activities. Faculty, administrators, and graduate students work together to provide K-12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Discovery Park's Birck Nanotechnology Center (BNC) has assumed a leadership role in K-12 STEM that are fun, interactive and educational. Birck Nanotechnology Center led a workshop for K-12 teachers in 2009, the Birck Nanotechnology Center continued to build this relationship by hosting NanoDays, a nationwide

  4. Copyright c 2002 Tech Science Press CMES, vol.3, no.5, pp.539-555, 2002 Multiscale Modeling of Laser Ablation: Applications to Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    of Laser Ablation: Applications to Nanotechnology Leonid V. Zhigilei1 and Avinash M. Dongare 1 Abstract-driven methods in nanotechnology. In this pa- per we discuss two computational schemes developed for simulation, applications of laser ablation have been extended into emerging area of nanotechnology. In particular, laser

  5. Boosting medicine with nanotechnology strengthens drug cocktail many times over http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=21055.php[4/21/2011 11:18:27 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    Boosting medicine with nanotechnology strengthens drug cocktail many times over http a report of consumers' views on the use of nanotechnology Posted: Apr 21st, 2011 Using niosomes: Apr 18th, 2011 Boosting medicine with nanotechnology strengthens drug cocktail many times over

  6. Supersonic turbulent boundary layers with periodic mechanical non-equilibrium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekoto, Isaac Wesley

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    questions have been raised. The fundamental questions this dissertation addressed are: (1) What are the effects of wall topology with sharp versus blunt leading edges? and (2) Is it possible that a further reduction of turbulent scales can occur if surface...

  7. Non-equilibrium singlettriplet Kondo effect in carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    ­2 ­1 0 1 2 Si gate SiO2 Source Drain Nanotube a c b Figure 1 Experimental setup and shell/Au source and drain electrodes, spaced 250nm apart. Highly doped silicon below the SiO2 cap layer acted as a back-gate electrode. Room-temperature measurements of conductance as a function of back-gate voltage

  8. Is Soret Equilibrium a Non-Equilibrium Effect? Alois Wrger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    'Aquitaine, Université de Bordeaux & CNRS, 351 cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence, France Recent thermophoretic

  9. Non-equilibrium fluctuation induced-phenomena in quantum electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golyk, Vladyslav Alexander

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study fluctuation-induced phenomena in systems out of thermal equilibrium, resulting from the stochastic nature of quantum and thermal fluctuations of electromagnetic currents and waves. Specifically, we study radiative ...

  10. Non-Equilibrium Pathways during Electrochemical Phase Transformations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    level, where incomplete reactions and failure are prone to occur. Micrometric-sized lithium-manganese spinel cathode material - Li1+xMn2-xO4 - is one of the state-of-the-art...

  11. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium emission of complex fragments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, D.R.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex fragment emission (Z{gt}2) has been studied in the reactions of 50, 80, and 100 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C, and 80 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au. Charge, angle, and energy distributions were measured inclusively and in coincidence with other complex fragments, and were used to extract the source rapidities, velocity distributions, and cross sections. The experimental emission velocity distributions, charge loss distributions, and cross sections have been compared with calculations based on statistical compound nucleus decay. The binary signature of the coincidence events and the sharpness of the velocity distributions illustrate the primarily 2-body nature of the {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C reaction mechanism between 50 and 100 MeV/u. The emission velocities, angular distributions, and absolute cross sections of fragments of 20{le}Z{le}35 at 50 MeV/u, 19{le}Z{le}28 at 80 MeV/u, and 17{le}Z{le}21 at 100 MeV/u indicate that these fragments arise solely from the binary decay of compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion reactions in which the {sup 139}La projectile picks up about one-half of the {sup 12}C target. In the 80 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au reactions, the disappearance of the binary signature in the total charge and velocity distributions suggests and increase in the complex fragment and light charged particle multiplicity with increasing target mass. As in the 80 and 100 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C reactions, the lighter complex fragments exhibit anisotropic angular distributions and cross sections that are too large to be explained exclusively by statistical emission. 143 refs., 67 figs.

  12. Supersonic turbulent boundary layers with periodic mechanical non-equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekoto, Isaac Wesley

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    questions have been raised. The fundamental questions this dissertation addressed are: (1) What are the effects of wall topology with sharp versus blunt leading edges? and (2) Is it possible that a further reduction of turbulent scales can occur if surface...

  13. Non-equilibrium Lorentz gas on a curved space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felipe Barra; Thomas Gilbert

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The periodic Lorentz gas with external field and iso-kinetic thermostat is equivalent, by conformal transformation, to a billiard with expanding phase-space and slightly distorted scatterers, for which the trajectories are straight lines. A further time rescaling allows to keep the speed constant in that new geometry. In the hyperbolic regime, the stationary state of this billiard is characterized by a phase-space contraction rate, equal to that of the iso-kinetic Lorentz gas. In contrast to the iso-kinetic Lorentz gas where phase-space contraction occurs in the bulk, the phase-space contraction rate here takes place at the periodic boundaries.

  14. Thermal non-equilibrium transport in colloids Alois Wrger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to an Onsager cross coefficient that describes the coupling between heat and particle flows. In the last decade. Boundary layer approximation 6 B. Double-layer forces 7 C. Transport velocity 8 D. Non-uniform electrolyte condition 15 I. Size dependence 16 III. Dispersion and depletion forces 18 A. Colloid-polymer mixtures 18 B

  15. Non-equilibrium sedimentation of colloids on the particle scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Patrick Royall; Joachim Dzubiella; Matthias Schmidt; Alfons van Blaaderen

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate sedimentation of model hard sphere-like colloidal dispersions confined in horizontal capillaries using laser scanning confocal microscopy, dynamical density functional theory, and Brownian dynamics computer simulations. For homogenized initial states we obtain quantitative agreement of the results from the respective approaches for the time evolution of the one-body density distribution and the osmotic pressure on the walls. We demonstrate that single particle information can be obtained experimentally in systems that were initialized further out-of-equilibrium such that complex lateral patterns form.

  16. Non-Equilibrium Pathways during Electrochemical Phase Transformations in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project Taps HPCNew4 NewsSecurityNomination

  17. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 7, NO. 1, JANUARY 2008 91 Graphene Terahertz Plasmon Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afshari, Ehsan

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 7, NO. 1, JANUARY 2008 91 Graphene Terahertz Plasmon on charge density wave (plasmon) amplifi- cation in two-dimensional graphene. The coupling of the plasmons to interband electron­hole transitions in population inverted graphene layers can lead to plasmon amplification

  18. Bridging nanotechnological opportunities and construction needs A survey of nanoinnovation in Danish construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridging nanotechnological opportunities and construction needs NanoByg A survey of nanoinnovation in Danish construction Executive summary, Dansk Maj 2007 #12;NanoByg Author: Maj Munch Andersen, Måns Molin Title: NanoByg ­ A survey of nanoinnovation in Danish construction ­ Executive summary Dansk Department

  19. Bridging nanotechnological opportunities and construction needs A survey of nanoinnovation in Danish construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridging nanotechnological opportunities and construction needs NanoByg A survey of nanoinnovation in Danish construction Executive summary, English May 2007 #12;NanoByg Author: Maj Munch Andersen, Måns Molin Title: NanoByg ­ A survey of nanoinnovation in Danish construction ­ Executive summary English

  20. Bridging nanotechnological opportunities and construction needs A survey of nanoinnovation in Danish Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridging nanotechnological opportunities and construction needs NanoByg A survey of nanoinnovation in Danish Construction Risø-R-1602 (EN) Risø National Laboratory Technical University of Denmark Roskilde in Danish construction Department: Systems Analysis Department Risø-R-1602 (EN) May 2007 ISSN 0106-2840 ISBN

  1. Savage et al. (eds.), Nanotechnology Applications for Clean Water, 561582, 2009 William Andrew Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    561 Savage et al. (eds.), Nanotechnology Applications for Clean Water, 561­582, © 2009 William, energy, and toxicity intensive aspects of the application, and provides a basis for improvement. To date are quantified and a particular application, photovoltaic solar panels, is examined. #12;562 Societal Issues 37

  2. Connecticut State University System Initiative for Nanotechnology-Related Equipment, Faculty Development and Curriculum Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broadbridge, Christine C. [Southern Connecticut State University

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE grant used for partial fulfillment of necessary laboratory equipment for course enrichment and new graduate programs in nanotechnology at the four institutions of the Connecticut State University System (CSUS). Equipment in this initial phase included variable pressure scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis capability [at Southern Connecticut State University]; power x-ray diffractometer [at Central Connecticut State University]; a spectrophotometer and spectrofluorimeter [at Eastern Connecticut State University; and a Raman Spectrometer [at Western Connecticut State University]. DOE's funding was allocated for purchase and installation of this scientific equipment and instrumentation. Subsequently, DOE funding was allocated to fund the curriculum, faculty development and travel necessary to continue development and implementation of the System's Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology (GCNT) program and the ConnSCU Nanotechnology Center (ConnSCU-NC) at Southern Connecticut State University. All of the established outcomes have been successfully achieved. The courses and structure of the GCNT program have been determined and the program will be completely implemented in the fall of 2013. The instrumentation has been purchased, installed and has been utilized at each campus for the implementation of the nanotechnology courses, CSUS GCNT and the ConnSCU-NC. Additional outcomes for this grant include curriculum development for non-majors as well as faculty and student research.

  3. Research Profile The Nanotechnology Group is involved in research in several

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoghdar, Vahid

    .nanotechnology.ethz.ch Advanced Microscopy, Instrumentation, Biofuel Cells, Patterning and Directed Assembly MRCMaterials Research science and technology, with a special focus on: surface analysis and the development of advanced­ sensing colloidal and molecular building blocks) platforms to harvest electric power from human cells­ (biofuel cell

  4. Graphene oxide/hydroxyapatite composite coatings fabricated by electrophoretic nanotechnology for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Graphene oxide/hydroxyapatite composite coatings fabricated by electrophoretic nanotechnology April 2013 Accepted 27 September 2013 Available online 8 October 2013 A B S T R A C T Graphene oxide (GO and uncoated Ti substrate. Ó 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Graphene oxide (GO

  5. NANOTECHNOLOGY LAW & BUSINESS MARCH 2007 569 Carbon Nanotube-Based Supercapacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ning

    NANOTECHNOLOGY LAW & BUSINESS · MARCH 2007 569 Carbon Nanotube-Based Supercapacitors CHUNSHENG DU and NING PAN ABSTRACT Due to the need for increased power performance, supercapacitors are emerging nanotubes are a promising material for next generation supercapacitors. Specifically, the use of nanotubes

  6. Nanotechnology Now -Press Release: "Sandia and UNM lead effort to destroy cancers: Boosting medicine with nanotechnology strengthens drug cocktail many times over" http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=42258[4/21/2011 11:23:41 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    Nanotechnology Now - Press Release: "Sandia and UNM lead effort to destroy cancers: Boosting medicine with nanotechnology strengthens drug cocktail many times over" http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=42258[4/21/2011 11:23:41 AM] About Us Nanotechnology News Columns Products Directories Career Center

  7. Robotic-Lab.COM Nanotechnology boosts anticancer drug cocktail many times over http://www.robotic-lab.com/en/2011/04/22/nanotechnology-boosts-anticancer-drug-cocktail-many-times-over/[5/2/2011 12:11:22 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    Robotic-Lab.COM » Nanotechnology boosts anticancer drug cocktail many times over http://www.robotic-lab.com/en/2011/04/22/nanotechnology-boosts-anticancer-drug-cocktail-many-times-over/[5/2/2011 12:11:22 PM] Nanotechnology boosts anticancer drug cocktail many times over Writte by Jim Lewis the 22/04/2011 Using

  8. 4.3.2 DEVELOPMENT OF MUSEUM EXHIBIT ON NANOSCIENCE & NANOTECHNOLOGY Barry Aprison, Museum of Science & Industry, Chicago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    4.3.2 DEVELOPMENT OF MUSEUM EXHIBIT ON NANOSCIENCE & NANOTECHNOLOGY Barry Aprison, Museum is through self-directed, voluntary exploration, the NU- NSEC entered into a partnership with the Museum

  9. Nanotechnology applications to desalination : a report for the joint water reuse & desalination task force.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Mayer, Tom; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanomaterials and nanotechnology methods have been an integral part of international research over the past decade. Because many traditional water treatment technologies (e.g. membrane filtration, biofouling, scale inhibition, etc.) depend on nanoscale processes, it is reasonable to expect one outcome of nanotechnology research to be better, nano-engineered water treatment approaches. The most immediate, and possibly greatest, impact of nanotechnology on desalination methods will likely be the development of membranes engineered at the near-molecular level. Aquaporin proteins that channel water across cell membranes with very low energy inputs point to the potential for dramatically improved performance. Aquaporin-laced polymer membranes and aquaporin-mimicking carbon nanotubes and metal oxide membranes developed in the lab support this. A critical limitation to widespread use of nanoengineered desalination membranes will be their scalability to industrial fabrication processes. Subsequent, long-term improvements in nanoengineered membranes may result in self-healing membranes that ideally are (1) more resistant to biofouling, (2) have biocidal properties, and/or (3) selectively target trace contaminants.

  10. Potential nanotechnology applications for reducing freshwater consumption at coal fired power plants : an early view.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

    2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the overall research effort of the Existing Plants Research Program by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. A growing challenge to the economic production of electricity from coal-fired power plants is the demand for freshwater, particularly in light of the projected trends for increasing demands and decreasing supplies of freshwater. Nanotechnology uses the unique chemical, physical, and biological properties that are associated with materials at the nanoscale to create and use materials, devices, and systems with new functions and properties. It is possible that nanotechnology may open the door to a variety of potentially interesting ways to reduce freshwater consumption at power plants. This report provides an overview of how applications of nanotechnology could potentially help reduce freshwater use at coal-fired power plants. It was developed by (1) identifying areas within a coal-fired power plant's operations where freshwater use occurs and could possibly be reduced, (2) conducting a literature review to identify potential applications of nanotechnology for facilitating such reductions, and (3) collecting additional information on potential applications from researchers and companies to clarify or expand on information obtained from the literature. Opportunities, areas, and processes for reducing freshwater use in coal-fired power plants considered in this report include the use of nontraditional waters in process and cooling water systems, carbon capture alternatives, more efficient processes for removing sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, coolants that have higher thermal conductivities than water alone, energy storage options, and a variety of plant inefficiencies, which, if improved, would reduce energy use and concomitant water consumption. These inefficiencies include air heater inefficiencies, boiler corrosion, low operating temperatures, fuel inefficiencies, and older components that are subject to strain and failure. A variety of nanotechnology applications that could potentially be used to reduce the amount of freshwater consumed - either directly or indirectly - by these areas and activities was identified. These applications include membranes that use nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials for improved water purification and carbon capture; nano-based coatings and lubricants to insulate and reduce heat loss, inhibit corrosion, and improve fuel efficiency; nano-based catalysts and enzymes that improve fuel efficiency and improve sulfur removal efficiency; nanomaterials that can withstand high temperatures; nanofluids that have better heat transfer characteristics than water; nanosensors that can help identify strain and impact damage, detect and monitor water quality parameters, and measure mercury in flue gas; and batteries and capacitors that use nanotechnology to enable utility-scale storage. Most of these potential applications are in the research stage, and few have been deployed at coal-fired power plants. Moving from research to deployment in today's economic environment will be facilitated with federal support. Additional support for research development and deployment (RD&D) for some subset of these applications could lead to reductions in water consumption and could provide lessons learned that could be applied to future efforts. To take advantage of this situation, it is recommended that NETL pursue funding for further research, development, or deployment for one or more of the potential applications identified in this report.

  11. The Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University (CNS-ASU) facilitates the involvement of the general public in nanoscale research and development, to build new capabilities for understanding and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    The Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University (CNS-ASU) facilitates for understanding and governing the power of nanotechnology to transform society. CNS-ASU is affiliated

  12. Nanotechnology Now -News Story: "Fast heat dissipation in gold" http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=07985 1 of 2 3/9/2005 4:51 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Nanotechnology Now - News Story: "Fast heat dissipation in gold" http Nano-Enabled Drug Discovery Market to Reach $1.3B by 2009 March 8th, 2005 Nanotechnology promises around the world, free Subscribe "N" is for Nanotechnology BUY NOW Subscribe to the Forbes/Wolfe Nanotech

  13. 4/10/2014 NANOTECHNOLOGY: World's Smallest Windmill Is Smaller Than A Grain Of Rice http://nanotech2day.blogspot.com/2014/04/worlds-smallest-windmill-is-smaller.html 1/4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    4/10/2014 NANOTECHNOLOGY: World's Smallest Windmill Is Smaller Than A Grain Of Rice http://nanotech2day.blogspot.com/2014/04/worlds-smallest-windmill-is-smaller.html 1/4 NANOTECHNOLOGY UNLIK THE MOST In #12;4/10/2014 NANOTECHNOLOGY: World's Smallest Windmill Is Smaller Than A Grain Of Rice http

  14. The Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University (CNS-ASU) facilitates the involvement of the general public in nanoscale research and development, to build new capabilities for understanding and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Subbarao

    The Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University (CNS-ASU) facilitates for understanding and governing the power of nanotechnology to transform society. CNS-ASU is affiliated concerns. The Center for Nanotechnology in Society A R I Z O N A S T A T E U N I V E R S I T Y A computer

  15. Nanotechnology and Innovation, Recent status and the strategic implication for the formation of high tech clusters in Greece, in between a global economic crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gkanas, Evangelos I; Makridis, Sofoklis S; Stubos, Athanasios K; Bakouros, Ioannis

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanotechnology is the first major worldwide research initiative of the 21st century and probably is the solution vector in the economic environment. Also, innovation is widely recognized as a key factor in the economic development of nations, and is essential for the competitiveness of the industrial firms as well. Policy and management of innovation are necessary in order to develop innovation and it involves processes. It is essential to develop new methods for nanotechnology development for better understanding of nanotechnology based innovation. Nanotechnologies reveal commercialization processes, from start ups to large firms in collaboration with public sector research. In the current paper, a study in the present status of innovation in nanotechnology and the affection of global economic crisis in this section is made and also the potential of increase the innovation via the presence of clusters in a small country like Greece which is in the eye of tornado from the global crisis is studied.

  16. Nanotechnology and textiles engineered by carbon nanotubes for the realization of advanced personal protective equipments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andretta, Antonio, E-mail: Antonio-Andretta@klopman.com [Klopman International S.R.L., Via Mola dei Frati, 03100 Frosinone (Italy); Terranova, Maria Letizia; Lavecchia, Teresa; Gay, Stefano; Tamburri, Emanuela [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Minima lab, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma (Italy); Picano, Alfredo; Mascioletti, Alessandro; Stirpe, Daniele [Labor - Industrial Research Lab, Via Giacomo Peroni, 386 C/O Tecnopolo Tiburtino, 00131 Roma (Italy); Cucchiella, Cristian; Pascucci, Eddy [InfoSolution S.p.A, Via Zoe Fontana 10, 00131 Roma, Via Luigi Cadorna 67, 20090 Vimodrone (MI) (Italy); Dugnani, Giovanni; Gatti, Davide [Tpa Spa - Tecnologie e Prodotti per l'Automazione, Via Carducci 221, 20099 Sesto San Giovanni (MI) (Italy); Laria, Giuseppe [Centre of Research for Pure and Applied Mathematics, via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Codenotti, Barbara [Lavanderie dell'Alto Adige S.p.A., via Nazionale 55, 39040 Ora (Italy); Maldini, Giorgio [Meta System S.p.A., Via Galimberti 8, 42124 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Roth, Siegmar [SINEUROP-Nanotech GmbH, TBC Kernerstrasse 34, 70182 Stuttgart (Germany); Passeri, Daniele; Rossi, Marco [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base ed Applicate per l'Ingegneria and CNIS, Sapienza Università di Roma, Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy)

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and CNT-based active materials have been used to assemble the gas sensing unit of innovative platforms able to detect toxic atmospheres developing in confined workplaces. The main goal of the project was to realize a full-featured, operator-friendly safety detection and monitoring system based on multifunctional textiles nanotechnologies. The fabricated sensing platform consists of a multiple gas detector coupled with a specifically designed telecommunication infrastructure. The portable device, totally integrated in the workwear, offers several advantages over the conventional safety tools employed in industrial work activities.

  17. This issue of Topics in Catalysis is devoted to ``Nanotechnology in Catalysis'' and covers some of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resasco, Daniel

    silica, catalyst supports and catalytic membranes. Nanosized hollow spheres (silica or carbon) have been crystal structures, electronic configurations, or surface compositions that can only be obtained with nano of Nanotechnology. A well-known advan- tage of reducing particle size is the increase in surface area per unit

  18. NANOTECHNOLOGY Shortstraws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    , could find application in solar cells and light-emitting diodes. George Whitesides and his team used

  19. nanotechnologies | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of strong brown carbon chromophores. Citation: Laskin J, A Laskin, S Nizkorodov, PJ Roach, PA Eckert, MK Gilles, B Wang, HJ Lee, and Q Hu.2014."Molecular Selectivity of Brown...

  20. Molecular & Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-18 Magnetic Nanostructures for Data Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15 Building Three-dimensional Nanostructures via Membrane Folding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19 Organic Floating-gate Memory Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  1. Enhancing Graduate Student Communication to General Audiences through Blogging about Nanotechnology and Sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, Lee M.; Tillman, Ayesha S.; Geiger, Franz M.; Haynes, Christy L.; Klaper, Rebecca D.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Pedersen, Joel A.; DeStefano, Lizanne; Hamers, Robert J.

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed and assessed a multiauthor science blog on the topic of nanotechnology and sustainability as a tool to improve the written communication and public engagement skills of graduate students. Focus group studies revealed that after participation in the blog, student authors felt more confident and capable of communicating technical topics to general audiences. Students' research mentors viewed this as an important component of their students' education, as indicated by survey data. Important design aspects of this effort include participation of an editor as well as having flexible content and target-audience guidelines. We have explicitly outlined aspects of the effort we see as critical in order to enable others to replicate this model in related settings.

  2. Novel microwave near-field sensors for material characterization, biology, and nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joffe, R; Shavit, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wide range of interesting electromagnetic behavior of contemporary materials requires that experimentalists working in this field master many diverse measurement techniques and have a broad understanding of condensed matter physics and biophysics. Measurement of the electromagnetic response of materials at microwave frequencies is important for both fundamental and practical reasons. In this paper, we propose a novel near-field microwave sensor with application to material characterization, biology, and nanotechnology. The sensor is based on a subwavelength ferrite-disk resonator with magnetic-dipolar-mode (MDM) oscillations. Strong energy concentration and unique topological structures of the near fields originated from the MDM resonators allow effective measuring material parameters in microwaves, both for ordinary structures and objects with chiral properties.

  3. Nanotechnology for Solar-hydrogen Production via Photoelectrochemical Water-splitting: Design, Synthesis, Characterization, and Application of Nanomaterials and Quantum Dots 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alenzi, Naser D.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    NANOTECHNOLOGY FOR SOLAR-HYDROGEN PRODUCTION VIA PHOTOELECTROCHEMICAL WATER-SPLITTING: DESIGN, SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION, AND APPLICATION OF NANOMATERIALS AND QUANTUM DOTS A Dissertation by NASER D. ALENZI Submitted... to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering NANOTECHNOLOGY FOR SOLAR-HYDROGEN PRODUCTION VIA...

  4. Highlights from theHighlights from the YamboYambo project:project: Excitonic polarons and non-equilibriumExcitonic polarons and non-equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Andrea

    -gap insulators, PRB(R) 70,insulators, PRB(R) 70, 081103 (2004)081103 (2004) 2005 The Self-Consistent Module. TheThe band gap problem in DFT.band gap problem in DFT. PRB(R) 74, 161013 (2006)PRB(R) 74, 161013 (2006) ACFDT

  5. USC TROJAN FAMILY MAGAZINE winter 2006 2928 USC TROJAN FAMILY MAGAZINE spring 2007 POPULAR INTRODUCTIONS to nanotechnology usually crow about the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    , such naïveté forces an invol- untary guffaw out of Timothy Triche, chief pathologist at Childrens Hospital Los manageable than lab work at the atomic level. But science does not * For the record, nanas is Greek has scored impressive breakthroughs in fund- ing. ("Nanotechnology," an Oxford don reportedly sneered

  6. Please see LNN website (www.lehigh.edu/lnn/events.shtml) for full list of events. Center for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology(CAMN) Open House

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    , 2012 Time: 7:30am-6.15pm Location: Harrisburg University of Science and Technology 326 Market Street Harrisburg, PA 17101 Cost: TBD Sponsored by: Carnegie Mellon University Drexel Nanotechnology Institute Harrisburg Area Community College Harrisburg University Lehigh University CAMN Penn State Nanofabrication

  7. The 4th International Symposium on Mechanical Science based on Nanotechnology, Sendai, Japan, February 2007, pp. 143-146, published by Tohoku University, 21st Century COE programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    The 4th International Symposium on Mechanical Science based on Nanotechnology, Sendai, Japan susceptible to thermal fatigue, especially in thick sections of the kind frequent in power generation in the expectation that nuclear fusion will deliver energy within the life time of the present generation of human

  8. Sensitivity Analysis and Stochastic Simulations of Non-equilibrium Plasma Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Guang; Karniadakis, George E.

    2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study parametric uncertainties involved in plasma flows and apply stochastic sensitivity analysis to rank the importance of all inputs to guide large-scale stochastic simulations. Specifically, we employ different gradient-based sensitivity methods, namely Morris, multi-element probabilistic collocation method (ME-PCM) on sparse grids, Quasi-Monte Carlo, and Monte Carlo methods. These approaches go beyond the standard ``One-At-a-Time" sensitivity analysis and provide a measure of the nonlinear interaction effects for the uncertain inputs. The objective is to perform systematic stochastic simulations of plasma flows treating only as {\\em stochastic processes} the inputs with the highest sensitivity index, hence reducing substantially the computational cost. Two plasma flow examples are presented to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of the stochastic sensitivity analysis. The first one is a two-fluid model in a shock tube while the second one is a one-fluid/two-temperature model in flow past a cylinder.

  9. Non-Equilibrium Magnetohydrodynamic Behavior of Plasmas having Complex, Evolving Morphology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellan, Paul M. [Caltech] [Caltech

    2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Our main activity has been doing lab experiments where plasmas having morphology and behavior similar to solar and astrophysical plasmas are produced and studied. The solar experiment is mounted on one end of a large vacuum chamber while the astrophysical jet experiment is mounted on the other end. Diagnostics are shared between the two experiments. The solar experiment produces arched plasma loops that behave very much like solar corona loops. The astrophysical jet experiment produces plasma jets that are very much like astrophysical jets. We have also done work on plasma waves, including general wave dispersions, and specific properties of kinetic Alfven waves and of whistler waves.

  10. Radiative transfer within non Beerian porous media with semitransparent and opaque phases in non equilibrium;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    equilibrium; Application to reflooding of a nuclear reactor. Miloud Chahlafia,b,c , Fabien Belleta,b , Florian Transfer 55, 13-14 (2012) 3666-3676" DOI : 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2012.02.067 #12;nuclear reactor flux Indexes - At the calculation point -+ Dimensionless 3 hal-00680676,version1-19Mar2012 #12;-(j) jth

  11. High-Efficiency Solid State Cooling Technologies: Non-Equilibrium Asymmetic Thermoelectrics (NEAT) Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEETIT Project: Sheetak is developing a thermoelectric-based solid state cooling system to replace typical air conditioners that use vapor compression to cool air. With noisy mechanical components, vapor compression systems use a liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the external environment. With no noisy moving parts or polluting refrigerants, thermoelectric systems rely on an electrical current being passed through the junction of the two different conducting materials to change temperature. Using advanced semiconductor technology, Sheetak is improving solid state cooling systems by using proprietary thermoelectric materials along with other innovations to achieve significant energy efficiency. Sheetak’s new design displaces compressor-based technology; improves reliability; and decreases energy usage. Sheetak’s use of semiconductor manufacturing methods leads to less material use—facilitating cheaper production.

  12. The Application of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced NMR to Non-Equilibrium Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, Sean Michael

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    tool for kinetic analysis. It is shown that the DNP-NMR method agrees with the conventional UV method within the uncertainty of the measurement. Hyperpolarization in this modality presents both challenges and opportunities, each of which motivate...

  13. Adjoint-Based Aerothermodynamic Shape Design of Hypersonic Vehicles in Non-Equilibrium Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Juan J.

    switch parameter 0 Lax-Friedrich artificial dissipation parameter Domain boundary Diagonal matrix aerodynamic performance metrics (lift, drag, stability, etc.) and surface thermal conditions that are fed

  14. Geometry and temperature dependent thermal conductivity of diamond nanowires: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    plasma etching of polycrystalline diamond films [7], microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition. For theoretical calculations of proper- ties of nanosized diamond materials, polycrystalline diamond thin filmsGeometry and temperature dependent thermal conductivity of diamond nanowires: A non

  15. The behavior of matter under non-equilibrium conditions: Fundamental aspects and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prigogine, I.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly discusses concepts of chaotic systems. The topics discusses are: Bernoulli maps; mathematical aspects of the complex spectral representations; and large poincare systems. (LSP)

  16. Calculating free energy profiles in biomolecular systems from fast non-equilibrium processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forney, Michael; Kosztin, Ioan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Often gaining insight into the functioning of biomolecular systems requires to follow their dynamics along a microscopic reaction coordinate (RC) on a macroscopic time scale, which is beyond the reach of current all atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A practical approach to this inherently multiscale problem is to model the system as a fictitious overdamped Brownian particle that diffuses along the RC in the presence of an effective potential of mean force (PMF) due to the rest of the system. By employing the recently proposed FR method [I. Kosztin et al., J. of Chem. Phys. 124, 064106 (2006)], which requires only a small number of fast nonequilibrium MD simulations of the system in both forward and time reversed directions along the RC, we reconstruct the PMF: (1) of deca-alanine as a function of its end-to-end distance, and (2) that guides the motion of potassium ions through the gramicidin A channel. In both cases the computed PMFs are found to be in good agreement with previous results obtained by ...

  17. Isospin-tracing: A probe of non-equilibrium in central heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Rami; Y. Leifels; B. de Schauenburg; A. Gobbi; B. Hong; the FOPI Collaboration

    1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Four different combinations of $^{96}_{44}$Ru and $^{96}_{40}$Zr nuclei, both as projectile and target, were investigated at the same bombarding energy of 400$A$ MeV using a $4 \\pi$ detector. The degree of isospin mixing between projectile and target nucleons is mapped across a large portion of the phase space using two different isospin-tracer observables, the number of measured protons and the ${\\rm t}/^{3}{\\rm He}$ yield ratio. The experimental results show that the global equilibrium is not reached even in the most central collisions. Quantitative measures of stopping and mixing are extracted from the data. They are found to exhibit a quite strong sensitivity to the in-medium (n,n) cross section used in microscopic transport calculations.

  18. Preparation of Non-equilibrium Nuclear Spin States in Double Quantum Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gullans; J. J. Krich; J. M. Taylor; B. I. Halperin; M. D. Lukin

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study the dynamic polarization of lattice nuclear spins in GaAs double quantum dots containing two electrons. In our prior work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 226807 (2010)] we identified three regimes of long-term dynamics, including the build up of a large difference in the Overhauser fields across the dots, the saturation of the nuclear polarization process associated with formation of so-called "dark states," and the elimination of the difference field. In particular, when the dots are different sizes we found that the Overhauser field becomes larger in the smaller dot. Here we present a detailed theoretical analysis of these problems including a model of the polarization dynamics and the development of a new numerical method to efficiently simulate semiclassical central-spin problems. When nuclear spin noise is included, the results agree with our prior work indicating that large difference fields and dark states are stable configurations, while the elimination of the difference field is unstable; however, in the absence of noise we find all three steady states are achieved depending on parameters. These results are in good agreement with dynamic nuclear polarization experiments in double quantum dots.

  19. Formulation of a Model Accounting for Capillary Non-Equilibrium in Naturally Fractured Subsurface Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Thomas F.

    , in the matrix. To #12;x ideas, consider a typical set of mass-conservation equations for a two-phase oil in Darcy's law usually being most important, followed by gravitational and capillary forces denote water and oil phases, respectively. Assuming that water is the wetting phase, the capillary

  20. Stochastic thermodynamics of fluctuating density fields: Non-equilibrium free energy differences under coarse-graining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, T.; Lander, B.; Seifert, U. [II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)] [II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Speck, T. [Institut für Theoretische Physik II, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstraße 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)] [Institut für Theoretische Physik II, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstraße 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the stochastic thermodynamics of systems that are described by a time-dependent density field, for example, simple liquids and colloidal suspensions. For a time-dependent change of external parameters, we show that the Jarzynski relation connecting work with the change of free energy holds if the time evolution of the density follows the Kawasaki-Dean equation. Specifically, we study the work distributions for the compression and expansion of a two-dimensional colloidal model suspension implementing a practical coarse-graining scheme of the microscopic particle positions. We demonstrate that even if coarse-grained dynamics and density functional do not match, the fluctuation relations for the work still hold albeit for a different, apparent, change of free energy.

  1. Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rocks Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhotra, Vivak

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The USA is embarking upon tackling the serious environmental challenges posed to the world by greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). The dimension of the problem is daunting. In fact, according to the Energy Information Agency, nearly 6 billion metric tons of CO2 were produced in the USA in 2007 with coal-burning power plants contributing about 2 billion metric tons. To mitigate the concerns associated with CO2 emission, geological sequestration holds promise. Among the potential geological storage sites, unmineable coal seams and shale formations in particular show promise because of the probability of methane recovery while sequestering the CO2. However. the success of large-scale sequestration of CO2 in coal and shale would hinge on a thorough understanding of CO2's interactions with host reservoirs. An important parameter for successful storage of CO2 reservoirs would be whether the pressurized CO2 would remain invariant in coal and shale formations under reasonable internal and/or external perturbations. Recent research has brought to the fore the potential of induced seismicity, which may result in caprock compromise. Therefore, to evaluate the potential risks involved in sequestering CO2 in Illinois bituminous coal seams and shale, we studied: (i) the mechanical behavior of Murphysboro (Illinois) and Houchin Creek (Illinois) coals, (ii) thermodynamic behavior of Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ? T ? 300oC, (iii) how high pressure CO2 (up to 20.7 MPa) modifies the viscosity of the host, (iv) the rate of emission of CO2 from Illinois bituminous coal and shale cores if the cores, which were pressurized with high pressure (? 20.7 MPa) CO2, were exposed to an atmospheric pressure, simulating the development of leakage pathways, (v) whether there are any fractions of CO2 stored in these hosts which are resistance to emission by simply exposing the cores to atmospheric pressure, and (vi) how compressive shockwaves applied to the coal and shale cores, which were pressurized with high pressure CO2, determine the fate of sequestered CO2 in these cores. Our results suggested that Illinois bituminous coal in its unperturbed state, i.e., when not pressurized with CO2, showed large variations in the mechanical properties. Modulus varied from 0.7 GPa to 3.4 GPa even though samples were extracted from a single large chunk of coal. We did not observe any glass transition for Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ? T ? 300oC, however, when the coal was pressurized with CO2 at ambient ? P ? 20.7 MPa, the viscosity of the coal decreased and inversely scaled with the CO2 pressure. The decrease in viscosity as a function of pressure could pose CO2 injection problems for coal as lower viscosity would allow the solid coal to flow to plug the fractures, fissures, and cleats. Our experiments also showed a very small fraction of CO2 was absorbed in coal; and when CO2 pressurized coals were exposed to atmospheric conditions, the loss of CO2 from coals was massive. Half of the sequestered gas from the coal cores was lost in less than 20 minutes. Our shockwave experiments on Illinois bituminous coal, New Albany shale (Illinois), Devonian shale (Ohio), and Utica shale (Ohio) presented clear evidence that the significant emission of the sequestered CO2 from these formations cannot be discounted during seismic activity, especially if caprock is compromised. It is argued that additional shockwave studies, both compressive and transverse, would be required for successfully mapping the risks associated with sequestering high pressure CO2 in coal and shale formations.

  2. Hydrodynamic multi-phase model for simulation of laser-induced non-equilibrium phase transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    atomistic simulations of the complete sequence of melting ­ liquid flow ­ resolidification are not practical-gas coexistence, as well as for explicit tracking of interfaces between the phases. The model accounts for both propagation of the liquid-crystal interface in recrystallization. Computational results are in a good

  3. A non-equilibrium model for fixed-bed multi-component adiabatic adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harwell, Jeffrey Harry

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to enter the bed. Solutions along a z ~ constant char- acteristic are the history of the. volumn element of the bed located a s constant, This physical interpretat1on is a physical approximation of the real world where adsorber discontinuities... 1 3. 3. 2 3e3e3 3. 3. 4 3. 3. 5 Solution of the multi-component adiabatic adsorption equation, . ~ ~ ~ Fluid phase equations. Fixed-bed solid phase equations. , ~ Construction of the solution surface by stepwise integra- tion...

  4. Non-equilibrium fluctuations and mechanochemical couplings of a molecular motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. C. Lau; D. Lacoste; K. Mallick

    2007-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate theoretically the violations of Einstein and Onsager relations, and the efficiency for a single processive motor operating far from equilibrium using an extension of the two-state model introduced by Kafri {\\em et al.} [Biophys. J. {\\bf 86}, 3373 (2004)]. With the aid of the Fluctuation Theorem, we analyze the general features of these violations and this efficiency and link them to mechanochemical couplings of motors. In particular, an analysis of the experimental data of kinesin using our framework leads to interesting predictions that may serve as a guide for future experiments.

  5. Oblique and conical shock similarity laws for non-equilibrium flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holster, Jesse Louis

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . IV. VI. INTRODUCTION REVIEN OF PREVIOUS WORK. OBl I'VE SHOCK VIBRATIONAL SIMILITUDE CHEilllCAL iNOZ -EQUILI BRIIVl EXTENSIOiN TO CONICAL FLON. RE1IARKS AND CONCLUSIONS. REFERENCES APPENDIX Page 12 22 31 37 39 LIST OF FIGUWHS Figure... Normal Shock Vibrational Similarity Param ter Normal Shock Dissociation Similarity Parameter Page 10 Oblique Shock Vibrational Similarity Law 19 Oblique Shock Dissociation Similarity Parameter Conical Shock Dissociation Similarity Parameter...

  6. Thermal non-equilibrium in dispersed flow film boiling in a vertical tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forslund, Robert Paul

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The departure from thermal equilibrium between a dispersed liquid phase and its vapor at high quality during film boiling is investigated, The departure from equilibruim is manifested by the high resistance to heat transfer ...

  7. Boiling Crisis as a Non-Equilibrium Drying V. S. Nikolayev, D. A. Beysens, J. Hegseth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolayev, Vadim S.

    crisis is the formation of a vapor film between the heater and the liquid when the heat supply exceeds in the coordinates heat supply ­ heater temperature is sketched in Fig. 1 for the case of stationary boiling experiment, the so called "pool boiling". When the heat supply to the fluid pool is small, only a fluid

  8. CHF as a Non-Equilibrium Drying Transition V. S. Nikolayev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolayev, Vadim S.

    film between the heater and the liquid when the heat supply exceeds a critical value, the critical heat

  9. Effects of non-equilibrium plasma discharge on counterflow diffusion flame extinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, Yiguang

    of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA b U.S. Air Force and resulted in an increase of extinction strain rates through the coupling between thermal and kinetic effects produces heat, rad- icals, excited species, ions/electrons, and other intermediate species simultaneously

  10. Kinetic effects of non-equilibrium plasma-assisted methane oxidation on diffusion flame extinction limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, Yiguang

    08544, USA b US Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 plasma assisted combustion resulted in fast chemical heat release and extended the extinction limits processes in plasma­flame interactions [1­17]. However, plasma assisted combustion involves strong coupling

  11. Newton Institute Workshop NonEquilibrium Dynamics of Interacting Particle Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Denis

    be derived from Gauss' Principle of Least Constraint (Evans, Hoover, Failor, Moran & Ladd (1983)). The formBT / 2( )-1[ ]/ 2 then , in an ergodic system the equilibrium distribution is canonical f() ~ exp[-H0;Thermostatted Response theory Assume system is canonical at t=0. f(,0) = exp[-H0()] d exp[-H0()] f(,t) = exp

  12. Lattice ellipsoidal statistical BGK model for thermal non-equilibrium flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Jianping

    A thermal lattice Boltzmann model is constructed on the basis of the ellipsoidal statistical Bhatnagar–Gross–Krook (ES-BGK) collision operator via the Hermite moment representation. The resulting lattice ES-BGK model uses ...

  13. Mixing from Fickian Diffusion and Natural Convection in Binary Non-Equilibrium Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    of applications such as improved oil recovery and carbon sequestration. Gas injection into oil reservoirs has long: 1336­1345, 2012 Keywords: two-phase systems, mixing, carbon dioxide, density-driven flow, diffusion of the most important challenges of our time. Underground injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geological

  14. Study of Methane Reforming in Warm Non-Equilibrium Plasma Discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parimi, Sreekar

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , temperature and other variables determine efficiency of conversion. An efficient process is identified by a high yield and low specific energy of production for the desired product. A study of previous work reveals that higher energy density systems are more...

  15. Fe Atomic Data for Non-equilibrium Ionization Plasmas | SciTech Connect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFYRANDOMFailure ModesflowFe Atomic Data for

  16. NANOTECHNOLOGY AT USC ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    -Campus Interviews Career Fairs Company Information Sessions Strategic Recruitment Planning Help the next generation The Best and the Brightest Meet Engineering Contour Crafting Construction Technology for the Future with a guaranteed income stream for life while also helping to secure the future of the USC School of Engineering

  17. NANOTECHNOLOGY Peering into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falge, Eva

    the finches, above all the sub-species of giant tortoises, each specifically adapted to the ecological for Ornithology attach GPS loggers and ultramodern 3-D accelerometers to the shells of some of the tortois- es. This allows them to precisely track the animals over long periods and compare their observations with climate

  18. NANOTECHNOLOGY 19 (2008) 405607

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the electrodeposition yield of nickel nanoparticles/nanowires at low voltage. As an illustration, the pore filling of electrodeposited Ni nanoparticles/nanowires inside porous anodic alumina templates by an exponential anodization the density of pores filled with metal (by electrodeposition) rather than the pore density itself. This could

  19. Nanotechnology | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancy Sutley About Us Nancy Sutley

  20. Contribution to Nanotechnology Manufacturing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution And Bylaws

  1. Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o .FornlA SeriesNanocrystalNewsMPA-CINT Center for

  2. National Nanotechnology Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar EnergyKambara /performancesequestrationNational

  3. Temporal and Dose Kinetics of Tunnel Relaxation of Non-Equilibrium Near-Interfacial Charged Defects in Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zebrev, Gennady I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted mainly to mathematical aspects of modeling and simulation of tunnel relaxation of nonequilibrium charged oxide traps located at/near the interface insulator - conductive channel, for instance in irradiated MOS devices. The generic form of the tunnel annealing response function was derived from the rate equation for the charged defect buildup and annealing as a linear superposition of the responses of different defects with different time constants. Using this linear response function, a number of important practical problems are analyzed and discussed. Combined tunnel and thermal or RICN annealing, power-like temporal relaxation after a single ion strike into the gate oxide, are described in context of general approach.

  4. Materials Science and Engineering A 449451 (2007) 1217 Non-equilibrium solidification of concentrated FeGe alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    with the interface diffusive speed (VD) for diffusion-limited or speed of sound (Vs) for collision-limited growth phase change like peritectic reaction during liquid to solid transformation. The Fe-rich part of Fe-equilibrium conditions. The deviation of the chemical equilibrium at the solid­liquid interface and the kinetic

  5. Interpreting the drying kinetics of a soil using a macroscopic thermodynamic non-equilibrium of water between the liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by diffusion mechanisms within the material [1]. When modelling this second phase, the state variable chosen about liquid-gas phase change in porous media that suggest that the establishment of equilibrium, 9]. Vapour diffusion and liquid-vapour phase change are considered as the main phenomena

  6. Within-island differentiation and between-island homogeneity: non-equilibrium population structure in the seaweed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the seaweed Cladophoropsis membranacea (Chlorophyta) in the Canary Islands HAN J. VAN DER STRATE1, 2 , LOUIS stone model at larger spatial scales. In the present survey, 23 sites were sampled in the Canary Islands among the Canary Islands regardless of how geographic distances were computed. Only when the Canary

  7. Non-Equilibrium Vibrational Kinetics in Radiofrequency H2 Plasmas: a Comparison Between Theoretical and Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capitelli, M. [Department of Chemistry-University of Bari (Italy); IMIP CNR - Bari (Italy); De Pascale, O. [IMIP CNR - Bari (Italy); Shakatov, V. [Centro Laser s.r.l. - Valenzano (Italy); Hassouni, K.; Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A. [LIMHP-CNRS Universite Paris Nord - Villetaneuse (France)

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibrational and rotational experimental temperatures of molecular hydrogen obtained by Coherent Anti-Stokes Spectroscopy (CARS) in Radiofrequency Inductive Plasmas have been analyzed and interpreted in terms of vibration, electron, dissociation-recombination and attachment kinetics. The analysis clarifies the role of atomic hydrogen and its heterogeneous recombination in affecting the vibrational content of the molecules.

  8. Indirect heating of Pt by non-equilibrium electrons in Au in a nanoscale Pt/Au bilayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, David G.

    -line equivalent-circuit. For optical exciation of either the Pt or Au side of the bilayer, the majority of energy excitations which are then driven out of thermal equilibrium with the vibrations of the atomic lattice.1

  9. Application of Semi-Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (SGMC) methods to describe non-equilibrium polymer systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardin, Frederick E

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the structure of materials, and how this structure affects their properties, is an important step towards the understanding that is necessary in order to apply computational methods to the end of designing ...

  10. A parallel multistate framework for atomistic non-equilibrium reaction dynamics of solutes in strongly interacting organic solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glowacki, David R; Harvey, Jeremy N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a parallel linear-scaling computational framework developed to implement arbitrarily large multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) calculations within CHARMM. Forces are obtained using the Hellman-Feynmann relationship, giving continuous gradients, and excellent energy conservation. Utilizing multi-dimensional Gaussian coupling elements fit to CCSD(T)-F12 electronic structure theory, we built a 64-state MS-EVB model designed to study the F + CD3CN -> DF + CD2CN reaction in CD3CN solvent. This approach allows us to build a reactive potential energy surface (PES) whose balanced accuracy and efficiency considerably surpass what we could achieve otherwise. We use our PES to run MD simulations, and examine a range of transient observables which follow in the wake of reaction, including transient spectra of the DF vibrational band, time dependent profiles of vibrationally excited DF in CD3CN solvent, and relaxation rates for energy flow from DF into the solvent, all of which agree well with experime...

  11. Non-equilibrium deposition of phase pure Cu{sub 2}O thin films at reduced growth temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subramaniyan, Archana, E-mail: asubrama@mymail.mines.edu [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Perkins, John D.; Lany, Stephan; Stevanovic, Vladan; Ginley, David S.; Zakutayev, Andriy [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); O’Hayre, Ryan P. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) is actively studied as a prototypical material for energy conversion and electronic applications. Here we reduce the growth temperature of phase pure Cu{sub 2}O thin films to 300?°C by intentionally controlling solely the kinetic parameter (total chamber pressure, P{sub tot}) at fixed thermodynamic condition (0.25 mTorr pO{sub 2}). A strong non-monotonic effect of P{sub tot} on Cu-O phase formation is found using high-throughput combinatorial-pulsed laser deposition. This discovery creates new opportunities for the growth of Cu{sub 2}O devices with low thermal budget and illustrates the importance of kinetic effects for the synthesis of metastable materials with useful properties.

  12. Nano Patents and Innovations: Sandia And UNM Lead Effort To Use Nanotechnology To Destroy Cancers http://nanopatentsandinnovations.blogspot.com/2011/04/sandia-and-unm-lead-effort-to-use.html[4/21/2011 11:20:54 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    Nano Patents and Innovations: Sandia And UNM Lead Effort To Use Nanotechnology To Destroy Cancers http://nanopatentsandinnovations.blogspot.com/2011/04/sandia-and-unm-lead-effort-to-use.html[4/21/2011 11:20:54 AM] M O N D A Y , A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 1 Sandia And UNM Lead Effort To Use Nanotechnology

  13. Flame aerosol nano-technology has been developed to preparation of thin and defect-free porous membrane from the gas phase as a one step method in preparation of membrane for gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Flame aerosol nano-technology has been developed to preparation of thin and defect on deposition of nano particles (-Al2O3, MgO or spinel MgAl2O4), formed in the premixed flame reactor through/or aluminium precursors in the flame to form nano-particles of -Al2O3, MgO or MgAl2O4 spinel. The generated

  14. Navillum Nanotechnologies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by light or applied electrical source. Semiconducting nanocrystals can make solar panels up to 45 percent more efficient, which is more than a two-fold increase over existing...

  15. Navillum Nanotechnologies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Systems Massachusetts Institute of Technology SolidEnergy Systems developed cutting-edge battery technologies to meet the world's growing energy storage demand. The Polymer Ionic...

  16. Science and technology news Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Stretchable electronics device holds promise for treating irregular heart rhythms March 24, 2010 Enlarge A new-Champaign and the University of Pennsylvania are the first to demonstrate a flexible silicon electronics device used and microfluidic devices. "The heart is dynamic and not flat, but electronics currently used for monitoring

  17. Separation Nanotechnology of Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), helium ion microscopy (HIM), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry, and X-ray diffractometry. The coated and...

  18. Navillum Nanotechnologies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mesdi Systems developed revolutionary equipment for manufacturing lithium-ion batteries, solar cells, and other high precision products that will improve their performance and...

  19. Navillum Nanotechnologies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota1ResourceloadingOur MissionNavillum

  20. Advanced Materials / Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    range from superconductors to insulators, from emitters to sensors and from static to THz or even opticO metallic, TiO2 insulator · SrTiO3: insulator, SrTiO3:Nb (0.5 %wt) metallic and superconducting below 900 mCu3O7-d : superconductor high Tc : 93K #12;Composition · Small compositional variations can

  1. Navillum Nanotechnologies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide CaptureSeeNUCLEAR SCIENCENationalNaval

  2. Svaya Nanotechnologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By FaultSunpods IncEuropeSustainable UrbanSvaya

  3. Simulation of effect of interfacial lithium flux on miscibility gap in non-equilibrium phase transformation of LiFePO4 particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Fuqiang

    history: Received 14 May 2013 Received in revised form 12 June 2013 Accepted 13 June 2013 Available online technological applications such as automobiles and portable electronics. To achieve a real breakthrough

  4. The behavior of matter under non-equilibrium conditions: Fundamental aspects and applications. Progress report, July 15, 1991--July 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prigogine, I.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly discusses concepts of chaotic systems. The topics discusses are: Bernoulli maps; mathematical aspects of the complex spectral representations; and large poincare systems. (LSP)

  5. Evaluation of technical feasibility of closed-cycle non-equilibrium MHD power generation with direct coal firing. Final report, Task I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program accomplishments in a continuing effort to demonstrate the feasibility of direct coal-fired, closed-cycle MHD power generation are reported. This volume contains the following appendices: (A) user's manual for 2-dimensional MHD generator code (2DEM); (B) performance estimates for a nominal 30 MW argon segmented heater; (C) the feedwater cooled Brayton cycle; (D) application of CCMHD in an industrial cogeneration environment; (E) preliminary design for shell and tube primary heat exchanger; and (F) plant efficiency as a function of output power for open and closed cycle MHD power plants. (WHK)

  6. J. fhys. D:Appl. fhys. 28 (1995)1903-1918.Printed in he UK 1 Non-equilibrium coupled kinetics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Vasco

    equation coupled to the rate balance equationsfor the vibrationally excited molecules N2(X 'E;, v) and 02(X are studied with the purpose of material treatments or in order to test coating materials for space vehicles

  7. Non-Equilibrium Beta Processes in Neutron Stars: A Relationship between the Net Reaction Rate and the Total Emissivity of Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Flores-Tulian; Andreas Reisenegger

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Several different processes could be changing the density in the core of a neutron star, leading to a departure from $\\beta$ equilibrium, quantified by the chemical potential difference $\\delta\\mu\\equiv\\mu_n-\\mu_p-\\mu_e$. The evolution of this quantity is coupled to that of the star's interior temperature $T$ by two functions that quantify the rate at which neutrino-emitting reactions proceed: the net reaction rate (difference between $\\beta$ decay and capture rates), $\\Gamma_{\\rm net}(T,\\delta\\mu)$, and the total emissivity (total energy emission rate in the form of neutrinos and antineutrinos), $\\epsilon_{\\rm tot}(T,\\delta\\mu)$. Here, we present a simple and general relationship between these variables, ${\\partial\\epsilon_{\\rm tot}/\\partial\\delta\\mu=3\\Gamma_{\\rm net}}$, and show that it holds even in the case of superfluid nucleons. This relation may simplify the numerical calculation of these quantities, including superfluid reduction factors.

  8. International Symposium on Advanced Nanodevices and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Sung Woo

    to the role of Kondo physics in quantum point contacts near pinch-off Shaohua Xiang1 , Shiran Xiao2 , Sungwoo Hwang2 , and Sangsig Kim1 1 Korea University, 2 Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (Korea Institute of Technology, 3 Kookmin University (Korea) PI-12 Suppression of Drain-Induced Barrier Lowering

  9. Solar Cell Nanotechnology Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Biswajit [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop a low cost nonlithographic nanofabrication technology for the fabrication of thin film porous templates as well as uniform arrays of semiconductor nanostructures for the implementation of high efficiency solar cells. Solar cells based on semiconductor nanostructures are expected to have very high energy conversion efficiencies due to the increased absorption coefficients of semiconductor nanostructures. In addition, the thin film porous template can be used for optimum surface texturing of solar cells leading to additional enhancement in energy conversion efficiency. An important requirement for these applications is the ability to synthesize nanostructure arrays of different dimensions with good size control. This project employed nanoporous alumina templates created by the anodization of aluminum thin films deposited on glass substrates for the fabrication of the nanostructures and optimized the process parameters to obtain uniform pore diameters. An additional requirement is uniformity or regularity of the nanostructure arrays. While constant current anodization was observed to provide controlled pore diameters, constant voltage anodization was needed for regularity of the nanostructure arrays. Thus a two-step anodization process was investigated and developed in this project for improving the pore size distribution and pore periodicity of the nanoporous alumina templates. CdTe was selected to be the active material for the nanowires, and the process for the successful synthesis of CdTe nanowires was developed in this project. Two different synthesis approaches were investigated in this project, electrochemical and electrophoretic deposition. While electrochemical synthesis was successfully employed for the synthesis of nanowires inside the pores of the alumina templates, the technique was determined to be non-optimum due to the need of elevated temperature that is detrimental to the structural integrity of the nanoporous alumina templates. In order to eliminate this problem, electrophoretic deposition was selected as the more appropriate technique, which involves the guided deposition of semiconductor nanoparticles in the presence of ultrasonic energy to form the crystalline nanowires. Extensive experimental research was carried out to optimize the process parameters for formation of crystalline nanowires. It was observed that the environmental bath temperature plays a critical role in determining the structural integrity of the nanowires and hence their lengths. Investigation was carried out for the formation of semitransparent ohmic contacts on the nanowires to facilitate photocurrent spectroscopy measurements as well as for solar cell implementation. Formation of such ohmic contacts was found to be challenging and a process involving mechanical and electrochemical polishing was developed to facilitate such contacts. The use of nanoporous alumina templates for the surface texturing of mono- and multi-crystalline solar cells was extensively investigated by electrochemical etching of the silicon through the pores of the nanoporous templates. The processes for template formation as well as etching were optimized and the alumina/silicon interface was investigated using capacitance-voltage characterization. The process developed was found to be viable for improving solar cell performance.

  10. Using Nanotechnology in Viscoelastic Surfactant Stimulation Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurluk, Merve Rabia 1986-

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Viscoelastic surfactant (VES) fluids are preferred for many applications in the oil industry. Their viscoelastic behavior is due to the overlap and entanglement of very long wormlike micelles. The growth of these wormlike micelles depends...

  11. Micro and nanotechnology for cancer treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullal, Adeeti (Adeeti Vedantham)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cancer is responsible for over 7.6 million deaths worldwide; the majority of patients fail to respond to drugs or become resistant over time. In order to gain a better understanding of drug efficacy in patients, we developed ...

  12. Nanotechnology Regulation: A Study in Claims Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malloy, Timothy F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanomaterials: Principles, Regulation, and Renegotiating theJoseph Rees, Industry Self-Regulation: An InstitutionalDarren Sinclair, Self-Regulation Versus Command and Control?

  13. Hindawi Publishing Corporation Journal of Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M.

    of carbon tetrachloride with these materials has been investigated using gas chromatography. It is seen due to their resistance to nat- ural attenuation by microbiological degradation. Carbon tetrachloride Nanocatalyst: Palladium Nanoparticles Supported on Hierarchical Carbon Nanostructures Hema Vijwani,1 Abinash

  14. RESEARCHARTICLE JOURNAL OF NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fonoberov, Vladimir

    and characterization of different types of GaN QDs.1­8 Stranski-Krastanov growth of wurtzite GaN/AlN QDs has been to the growth of wurtzite GaN/AlxGa1xN QDs.314 The polar [0001] axis in the above-mentioned QDs is parallel, wurtzite GaN/dielectric QDs have been prepared.8 Despite this large number of reports of fabrication

  15. A systems approach to engineering cancer nanotechnologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Von Maltzahn, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    therapy. Over the past three decades, advances in nanomaterial synthesis have produced impressive nanostructures with unique electromagnetic and therapeutic properties. These represent a powerful toolkit of building blocks ...

  16. Ali Shakouri Director, Birck Nanotechnology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    -resolution thermal imaging, micro refrigerators on a chip and waste-heat recovery. At the University of Santa Cruz. Shakouri's research focuses on nanoscale heat and current transport in semiconductor devices, high materials to channel the random jostling of heat energy into the orderly flow of electricity. The research

  17. Improving Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Using Nuclear Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jordan Andrew

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    . The general formulae can be applied to any tumor size, any radionuclide, and any pharmacokinetic nanoparticle distribution throughout the body, ultimately allowing a quick method of approximating the necessary activation time and treatment dosage parameters...

  18. Nanotechnology in the Regeneration of Complex Tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassidy, John W.

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    also exists from the pharmaceuticals industry. In an attempt to improve on existing methods of toxicol- ogy screening, Lee and colleagues have described a novel hepatocyte culture device based on microfluidic channels etched by photolithography.75... ,76 Here, liver microsomes are encapsulated in a 3D hydrogel matrix on a PEG diacrylate surface. Nanoscale microfluidic channels are employed to recapitulate the in vivo exchange of nutrients and waste in a liver-on-a-chip format. By modeling cytochrome...

  19. Fourier Diffusion and Special Relativity in Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marciak-Kozlowska; M. Kozlowski

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the transport phenomena in On-Chip-Transmission Line are investigated . The transport equation are developed and solved. The near light speed phenomena in OCTL are investigated Key words: On-chip transmission line, transport phenomena, near light speed phenomena

  20. Nanoelectronics Innovations in nanotechnology promise to revolutionize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    -fast electrochemistry needed to develop super-capacitors. Williams and Fuhrer develop materials and manufacturing

  1. High anisotropy materials for magnetic nanotechnologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipton, Erik G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    anisotropy in rare earth transition metal alloys originatesfor transition metals than for rare earth. The atomicmetal sublattice and negative exchange between the CoPd and the rare earth

  2. PHYS 4574 -Nanotechnology Reading List -Spring 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heflin, Randy

    . 382, 607-609 (1996). A8: Organization of Nanocrystal Molecules Using DNA Reference: A. Alivisatos, et

  3. PHYS 4984 -Nanotechnology Reading List -Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heflin, Randy

    -609 (1996). B6: Organization of Nanocrystal Molecules Using DNA Reference: A. Alivisatos, et al, Nature Vol

  4. PHYS 4574 -Nanotechnology Reading List -Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heflin, Randy

    . 382, 607-609 (1996). A8: Organization of Nanocrystal Molecules Using DNA Reference: A. Alivisatos, et

  5. PHYS 4574 -Nanotechnology Reading List -Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heflin, Randy

    . 382, 607-609 (1996). A8: Organization of Nanocrystal Molecules Using DNA Reference: A. Alivisatos, et

  6. PHYS 4984 -Nanotechnology Reading List -Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heflin, Randy

    . 382, 607-609 (1996). A8: Organization of Nanocrystal Molecules Using DNA Reference: A. Alivisatos, et

  7. Nanotechnology: emerging tools for biology and medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Ian Y.

    Historically, biomedical research has been based on two paradigms. First, measurements of biological behaviors have been based on bulk assays that average over large populations. Second, these behaviors have then been ...

  8. Birck Nanotechnology Center Birck and NCN Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    in this study is a bowtie nanoaperture that has been shown to produce concentrated and enhanced field. The near- and far-field distributions from a bowtie aperture are also calculated and compared with what would be ob distorting the spectral distribu- tion of the near field. A nanoscale bowtie aperture is selected

  9. Nanoscale Spectroscopy and Nanotechnology 8 Scientific Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    & Nanometer Structure Consortium, and ,QuNano AB, Glo AB & Sol Voltaics AB, Ideon Science Park, Lund, Sweden

  10. Hindawi Publishing Corporation Journal of Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, MA 11821 Sterling Panorama Ter, Austin, TX 78738, USA 4 Omega Optics, 10306 Sausalito Drive, Austin, TX, USA 6 Electrical Engineering, Ingram School of Engineering, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX

  11. Northern California Nanotechnology Center Safety Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    our vacuum systems clean, only put in clean dry samples that don't give off any odor. Odiferous samples can typically be made clean by baking them, or drying them overnight with a fan. Label chemicals chemicals, label all chemicals with your name and the date in which they were brought into the lab

  12. Challenges and opportunities for structural DNA nanotechnology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos LaboratoryCertified Reference Materials

  13. Approaches to Safe Nanotechnology | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication of SyntheticPowerManagementOpportunity

  14. Altair Nanotechnologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place: Wayne,Energy Information

  15. Putting Science to Work BUILDING NANOTECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITY AEROSOL: Shale naturalTechnical(continued on

  16. Non-equilibrium vibrational and electron energy distributions functions in atmospheric nitrogen ns pulsed discharges and \\mus post-discharges: the role of electron molecule vibrational excitation scaling-laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colonna, Gianpiero; Celiberto, Roberto; Capitelli, Mario; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of the electron energy distribution function in nanosecond atmospheric nitrogen discharges is investigated by means of self-consistent solution of the chemical kinetics and the Boltzmann equation for free electrons. The post-discharge phase is followed to few microseconds. The model is formulated in order to investigate the role of the cross section set, focusing on the vibrational-excitation by electron-impact through resonant channel. Four different cross section sets are considered, one based on internally consistent vibrational-excitation calculations which extend to the whole vibrational ladder, and the others obtained by applying commonly used scaling-laws.

  17. Information Nano-Technologies: Transition from Classical to Quantum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Yu. Vlasov

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this presentation are discussed some problems, relevant with application of information technologies in nano-scale systems and devices. Some methods already developed in quantum information technologies may be very useful here. Here are considered two illustrative models: representation of data by quantum bits and transfer of signals in quantum wires.

  18. Using Nanotechnology in Agriculture Kent Pinkerton, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Danh

    sensors & microchips · Cell and tissue scaffolds Industrial Molecular switches Battery electrodes Solar purification Animal food and health #12;Risk Characterization Dose-Response Assessment Risk Management Hazard

  19. Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities User Facilities Dev X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for...

  20. Micro- & Nano-Technologies Enabling More Compact, Lightweight...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced thermoelectric energy recovery and cooling system weight and volume improvements with low-cost microtechnology heat and mass transfer devices are presented hendricks...

  1. Nanomanufacturing: Realizing the Promise of Nanotechnology for Energy Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Company C3's MIST (Metal Infusion Surface Treatment) technology is a low-temperature coating process that infuses a new alloy several hundred nanometers (nm) deep into the surface of a metal to create enhanced

  2. asme nanotechnology institute: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010 3rd Joint US-European Fluids Engineering Summer Meeting and 8th International Conference1 Copyright 2010 by ASME Proceedings of ASME 2010 3rd Joint US-European Fluids...

  3. High-pressure imaging breakthrough a boon for nanotechnology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For inquiries on commercializing Argonne technologies, please contact partners@anl.gov. Next article: Argonne researchers uncover structure of new protein implicated in diabetes...

  4. MEMSNANO-2005 International conference on MEMS and Semiconductor Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Prabhat

    in place of polycrystalline metal oxide lead to large increase of free surface energy which in turn leads-22,2005,IIT Kharagpur,India MEMS BASED NANOCRYSTALLINE METAL OXIDE GAS SENSORS FOR COALMINE ENVIRONMENT P Metal Oxide gas sensors commonly used for sensing inflammable hydrocarbon gases and other toxic gases

  5. Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Graduate Student Talent Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    .D. Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 2009 M.S. Materials Science Program, Indian Institute.D., Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 2011 (expected) M.E., Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, 2007 B.E., Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering

  6. University Seminar Series Sponsored by the Nanotechnology Graduate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and their applications in energy storage and generation. Particularly of multifunctional metal-graphene-CNTs and 3D graphene/CNTs will be presented. The three-dimensional nanostructured electronics Device" project with more than $1.0 M/year support from SAMSUNG and the Government of Korea. One

  7. Ecologic: Nanotechnology, Environmental Assurance Bonding, and Symmetric Humility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kysar, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Price Biodivers- ity? Economic Incentives and Biodiversityeducation, and economic incentives. Years of experience haveJ. Webber, Promoting Economic Incentives for Environmental

  8. University Seminar Series Sponsored by the Nanotechnology Graduate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    and the development of efficient thermal management, water desalination, and solar thermal energy systems. Her work transport processes for a variety of applications including lab-on- a-chip, thermal management, and energy next generation thermal and energy systems. BIOGRAPHY Evelyn N. Wang is an Associate Professor

  9. Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Graduate Student Talent Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    include efficiency enhancement in dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) with microlens arrays. 12:40-1:10 p

  10. University Seminar Series Sponsored by the Nanotechnology Graduate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    materials system, which can be generated to increase the half-life of the particle in the bloodstream by preventing adsorption of proteins via hydrated outer layers, thus acting as a "stealth" layer that prevents complementary interactions to generate functional materials with highly controlled architecture. Applications

  11. Micro- & Nano-Technologies Enabling More Compact, Lightweight...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compares thermo-hydraulic performance and cost of micro-honeycombs to conventional heat exchange structures to highlight performance enhancement mechanisms hendricksam...

  12. Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Invent Breakthrough Technique in Nanotechnology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For many years, scientists have searched for ways to assemble nanoparticles (millions of times smaller than the tip of a pencil) into larger structures of any shape and design. Argonne's team created an assembled, continuous filament of carbon and gold nanoparticles that followed the path of the laser as if it was a magic wand.

  13. Nanotechnology Applications in Self-Assembly and DNA Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akin, Hayri Engin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009). Compact and light supercapacitors from a surface-onlyOne example is CNT- based supercapacitors where a CNT’s

  14. Applications of nanotechnology to the central nervous system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumling, James P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Baker, H Mutoh, D Dimitrov, W Akemann, A Perron, Y Iwamoto, L Jin, LB Cohen, EY Isacoff, VA Pieribone, T Hughes,Baker, H Mutoh, D Dimitrov, W Akemann, A Perron, Y Iwamoto, L Jin, LB Cohen, EY Isacoff, VA Pieribone, T Hughes,

  15. Sponsored by Nanotechnology Seminar Program Fulfilling a Dream: Low Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    material for low cost, thin film, solar cell absorber layers is the quaternary compound of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS for the development of low cost Cu2ZnSn(Se,S)4 thin film solar cells with even higher efficiency. BIOGRAPHY Lili electronics and in flexible solar panels with applications in electric cars, smarter buildings and data

  16. University Seminar Series Sponsored by the Nanotechnology Graduate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    of multifunctional suprastructures with synergistic properties and performance and applications in energy conversion & storage, optics, photonics, display, water purification, sensing and biomedical applications. One Chemistry Division, the NSF CAREER Award (2011), the 2011 Korean-American Scientists and Engineers

  17. Wet-Nanotechnology: fl id t NIUnanofluids at NIU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    .kostic.niu.edu 4 Mechanical Engineering NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY #12;One Step Nanofluid Production ImprovementOne-Step Nanofluid Production Improvement Insulated and vertically-adjustable boat- heater evaporator NIU with i fl id heater evaporatorLaboratoryLaboratory S.S. ChoiChoi J. Hull,J. Hull, and othersand others

  18. Micro- & Nano-Technologies Enabling More Compact, Lightweight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMayEnergyInstituteMicro and

  19. Micro- & Nano-Technologies Enabling More Compact, Lightweight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMayEnergyInstituteMicro andThermoelectric

  20. Akinc Working to Save Energy with Nanotechnology Insulation | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973Managed by ORAU

  1. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 465701 (4pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/46/465701

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, J. Ping

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co17 and SmCo5 systems have been successfully produced using a surfactant-assisted ball milling on the SmCo5 and Sm2Co17 systems have the highest magnetocrystalline anisotropy (up to 20 × 106 J m-3 ) [3, SmCo5 and Sm2Co17, both commercially available, have been studied in our experiments. The raw

  2. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 115608 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/11/115608

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    to hollow spherical nanoparticles Zhi-Chuan Xu1,2 , Cheng-Min Shen1 , Cong-Wen Xiao1 , Tian-Zhong Yang1 February 2007 Online at stacks.iop.org/Nano/18/115608 Abstract A seed-mediated method was employed here. These spheres were further studied by TEM and found to all be hollow structures. It was suggested

  3. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 335605 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/33/335605

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    2007, in final form 22 June 2007 Published 25 July 2007 Online at stacks.iop.org/Nano/18 networks [4], rings [5], dandelion- shaped hollow structures [6], strips [7], tubes [8] and flower

  4. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 115707 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/11/115707

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    .1088/0957-4484/18/11/115707 Characterizing the elasticity of hollow metal nanowires Changjiang Ji and Harold S Park Department of Civil.park@vanderbilt.edu Received 30 November 2006, in final form 9 January 2007 Published 7 February 2007 Online at stacks.iop.org/Nano/18/115707 Abstract We have performed atomistic simulations on solid and hollow copper nanowires

  5. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 325711 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/19/32/325711

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Te nanowires with controlled composition were cathodically electrodeposited using track-etched polycarbonate enhanced conductance. 1. Introduction Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is a II­VI semiconductor that has been

  6. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 15 (2004) 949952 PII: S0957-4484(04)78002-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ], transparent conducting coatings [3], acousto-optical devices [4] and surface acoustic wave transducers [5

  7. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 17 (2006) 33753379 doi:10.1088/0957-4484/17/14/006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and microfluidic techniques [8], have been used, with mixed success. Biological assembly of nanostructures

  8. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 23 (2012) 055709 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/23/5/055709

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, William P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    opportunities for combining integrated cantilever actuation with other cantilever functions, such as self-heating. This paper presents magnetic actuation of a self-heating cantilever using the Lorentz force. The first papers

  9. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 115705 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/20/11/115705

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used the self-heating effect to achieve the appropriate sensing temperature [15]. In addition, fully

  10. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 15 (2004) 16651670 PII: S0957-4484(04)85144-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorke, Axel

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was measured in situ by time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (TR-LII) and ex situ by rapid thermophoretic distribution and particle morphology was also examined by rapid thermophoretic particle sampling

  11. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 155601 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/20/15/155601

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorke, Axel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .iop.org/Nano/20/155601 Abstract We show that it is possible to prepare and identify ultra-thin sheets of graphene to produce. The easy preparation of graphene is not only due to the simple mechanical exfoliation process it is very easy to identify even sheets of graphene a single layer thick. As a consequence, the preparation

  12. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 22 (2011) 435204 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/22/43/435204

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The latter is placed on a movable piezotube enabling 3D motion toward the STM probe. work, we have used extensively investigated over the last decade for applications ranging from electronics, photonics, energy at about 500 C [7]. In the present 0957-4484/11/435204+06$33.00 © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed

  13. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 485302 (4pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/48/485302

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Hooman

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    devices [5], nanofiltration [6], fuel cells [7] and artificial kidneys [8]. Conventional photolithography evaporation and prevent successful lift-off [5]. Second, the size and spacing of the holes are coupled

  14. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 265705 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/19/26/265705

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and light-emitting diodes. Si nanoparticles of several nanometers in size have to date been synthesized

  15. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 295702 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/29/295702

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    . Compositional analysis using electron energy loss spectroscopic elemental mapping and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry of a single nanocolumn showed alternating bands of Co and Cu, indicating a multilayer structure. X) and a minor hexagonal close packed (hcp) Co phase was also detected. The hcp phase may be due to a high

  16. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 17 (2006) 39843988 doi:10.1088/0957-4484/17/15/063

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Limin

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .1088/0957-4484/17/15/063 Low-temperature, template-free synthesis of wurtzite ZnS nanostructures with hierarchical wurtzite ZnS architectures assembled from nanosheets and nanorods, such as branched flowers and fluffy route. The growth of wurtzite ZnS nanostructures at temperatures as low as 4 C without any organic

  17. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 23 (2012) 015301 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/23/1/015301

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy storage devices having high power density (e.g. 14 kW kg-1 ), fast charge storage (rate capability This paper describes the fabrication and characterization of a hybrid nanostructure comprised of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on graphene layers for supercapacitor applications. The entire nanostructure (CNTs

  18. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 21 (2010) 055304 (11pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/21/5/055304

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in practical technological applications is mass production at low cost as well as the ability to accurately on porous templates, e-beam and conventional lithography often have to balance the trade- off between good biological building blocks to guide the assembly of inorganic materials include low cost and structural

  19. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 455301 (4pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/19/45/455301

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in their fabrication methods (figure 1(a)). Next, SPEL is used, where a laser pulse selectively melts the Cr pads by selectively melting nanostructures for a short period of time (hundreds of nanoseconds) during which of EBL patterned metal nanodots [11], SPEL uses a single laser pulse to cause a thorough melting

  20. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 205704 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/20/205704

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Limin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    N nanotubes. This finding suggests that a SCSNT is potentially a good photo-sensor material as well as a very of device exhibits I­ V characteristics suitable for photo-sensor and photo-cell ap- plications. 2 device. Together with the photo-excitation of the carrier under different light intensities, this type

  1. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 495101 (10pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/19/49/495101

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter, Yves-Alain

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the smallest fraction of particles which were conjugated to the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (Dox) and taken up concentration of Dox. S Supplementary data are available from stacks.iop.org/Nano/19/495101 (Some figures

  2. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 17 (2006) 31113115 doi:10.1088/0957-4484/17/13/005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorke, Axel

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties of single chains are investigated under air using impedance spectroscopy (IS). It is found that the conductivity of the iron is in the same range as that of the bulk material. Temperature dependent measurements of the furnace. The formation, growth and in situ characterization is described in detail by Knipping et al [10

  3. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 065706 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/6/065706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrica,Traian

    experimental data on graphite (equilibrium interlayer spacing, Z-axis compressibility, and the interlayer shear-mode frequency), tight-binding is extended to model the interlayer interactions of graphitic structures. (Some to be accounted for. CNTs are conformal mappings of a graphite layer onto the surface of a cylinder with nanometre

  4. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 23 (2012) 075705 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/23/7/075705

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    components such as energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) detectors, cold traps, gas inlets and outlets, the present in situ illumination are developed to study light-induced phenomena in photoactive materials, systems and photocatalysts at the nanoscale under working conditions. The technological development of the holders

  5. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 24 (2013) 365604 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/24/36/365604

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photoelectrodes and, accordingly, both the photocurrent and power-conversion efficiency of the DSSC were notably showing inferior properties as DSSC-photoelectrodes compared to the nanoparticulate-TiO2 films [22, 23

  6. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 505705 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/50/505705

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or nanoclays. Our motivation for this work is the potential use of polymer/CNT composites as conductive, strong of this continuous phase present in the PS/MWCNT composite, electrical conductivity data at various MWCNT of the interpenetrating phase polymer nanocomposite, the PS/MWCNT composite is treated as a combination of two phases

  7. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 16 (2005) 267272 doi:10.1088/0957-4484/16/2/015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Beijing 100080, People's Republic of China E-mail: hjgao@aphy.iphy.ac.cn Received 5 November 2004. Introduction Shape and size are important factors in determining the struc- tural, physical and chemical.1. Materials Cetyltrimethylammonium (CTAB, ACROS), copper sulfate (CuSO4, Beijing Chemicals), sodium hydroxide

  8. The Critical Importance ofThe Critical Importance of Nanotechnology to the NationalNanotechnology to the National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeck, Peter

    presence and talent search are the main drivers of overseas presence · But lower costs (labor, regulation opportunity, the best solutions/ideas ­ then intensive risk mitigation · Troubling signs in US ­ regulation, litigation, high costs, immigration restrictions, weak STEM pipeline · "Clean Tech" (energy, water

  9. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 115301 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/20/11/115301

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, John W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    features on the surface of polyimide--a common polymer in electronics, large scale structures­18]. In this paper, we examine for the first time the effect of focused ion beam irradiation on a polyimide (PI [19]). Polyimide, due to its unique propert

  10. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 15 (2004) 227231 PII: S0957-4484(04)66186-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ning

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a very high second-electron emission, which is very desirable for use in vacuum electronic devices. 1 display panels (PDPs) [1­5]. It protects the dielectric layer above the electrodes from sputtering while to the absence of free electrons in insulators [2]. Due to its large SEE yield and good resistance to sputtering

  11. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 095708 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/9/095708

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .1088/0957-4484/18/9/095708 Controlled nanostructure and high loading of single-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced polycarbonate and filtration method, and then impregnated with polycarbonate solution to make thermoplastic nanocomposites. High loading of nanotubes was achieved by controlling the viscosity of polycarbonate solution. SEM

  12. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 21 (2010) 445202 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/21/44/445202

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devoret, Michel H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Gianluigi Catelani2 , Michael J Rooks1 , Aviad Frydman3 and Daniel E Prober1,2 1 Department of Applied

  13. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 16 (2005) 350353 doi:10.1088/0957-4484/16/4/003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ning

    .1088/0957-4484/16/4/003 High power density supercapacitors using locally aligned carbon nanotube electrodes Chunsheng Du1 supercapacitors and other similar electronic devices. 1. Introduction Carbon nanotubes are attractive materials], and for supercapacitors [7­18]. As unique energy storage devices, supercapacitors are able to provide a huge amount

  14. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 20 (2009) 264012 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/20/26/264012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grütter, Peter

    of both inorganic structures [6, 7] and model dye-sensitized solar cell materials [8, 9]. In many cases

  15. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 025602 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/19/02/025602

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the original fly eyes. A reflection peak was discovered in the near-ultraviolet (UV) region due to the periodic and near-infrared (IR) range (400­1100 nm). An optical diffractive equation was used to explain it replica. By measuring the reflective spectra of the replica, we demonstrated that the alumina replica

  16. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 245305 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/24/245305

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ilsoon

    on those hydrophilic edges. Then the electroless deposition of nickel is used to create nickel nanowires.1088/0957-4484/18/24/245305 Step-edge like template fabrication of polyelectrolyte supported nickel nanowires Devesh Srivastava/245305 Abstract A method to produce novel polymer supported nickel nanowires, which are asymmetric (or anisotropic

  17. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 23 (2012) 235604 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/23/23/235604

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Limin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    find a wide range of applica- tions such as catalysis, adsorption, sensing, energy storage Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Stable and Unstable Species, College of Chemistry, Peking University and conversion, and biomedicine [1­6]. In this regard, a variety of colloidal synthetic strategies including

  18. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 21 (2010) 105107 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/21/10/105107

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .1088/0957-4484/21/10/105107 An experimental study on ferromagnetic nickel nanowires functionalized with antibodies for cell separation Ning, ferromagnetic nickel (Ni) nanowires have been introduced in magnetic cell manipulation [10­18] to utilize the fabrication of Ni nanowires using an electrodeposition technique [19, 20] has been widely studied

  19. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 18 (2007) 044009 (9pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/4/044009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a reverse-selective membrane nanocomposite system. (Some figures in this article are in colour only diode materials [18, 7], nanoelectromechanicalsystems (NEMS) [42], and organic and inorganic hybrid systems, such as nanocomposites [3, 38, 54]. A common way to gain fundamental insight into material

  20. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 17 (2006) 54355440 doi:10.1088/0957-4484/17/21/025

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottino, Julio M.

    consisting of a gold core, a tunable silica spacer layer and an outermost gold shell, which is approximately, nanoshells of small dimensions offer advantages in terms of delivery to target sites in living tissues

  1. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 15 (2004) 404409 PII: S0957-4484(04)70484-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for applications in solar cell [14], photo-catalysts [15], etc. One-dimensional ZnO nanowires have a lower (mixture of ZnO and graphite powder)-to-collector (graphite flakes) ratio, etc. We also report a detailed-4484(04)70484-5 Synthesis and photoluminescence studies on ZnO nanowires D Banerjee1 , J Y Lao1 , D Z Wang1 , J Y Huang1 , D

  2. IOP PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 24 (2013) 135501 (10pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/24/13/135501

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, William P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .1088/0957-4484/24/13/135501 Fast nanotopography imaging using a high speed cantilever with integrated heater­thermometer Byeonghee a high speed tapping cantilever with an integrated heater­thermometer for fast nanotopography imaging frequency of 1.4 MHz. The mechanical response time is characterized by scanning over a backward-facing step

  3. Thermal Trap for DNA Replication Christof B. Mast and Dieter Braun*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kersting, Roland

    and simultaneously accumulates the replicated molecules in an efficient thermophoretic trap. The non- equilibrium

  4. Operationalizing Anticipatory Governance: Steering Emerging Technologies Towards Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philbrick, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    focused on “nanotechnology applications for solar energy”, “Nanotechnology Applications for Solar Energy” and “

  5. Produced by the Health and Safety Department, the University of Edinburgh Nanotechnologies Health and Safety Guidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Nick

    for use to control nanoparticles such as enclosures, local exhaust ventilation (LEV), fume cupboards and general ventilation therefore need to be of similar quality and specification to that which is normally

  6. Roberta Zobbi Policy officer Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies, materials and new production technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Cindio, Fiorella

    production technologies 5. Energy 6. Environment (including climate change) 7. Transport (including aeronautics) 8. Socio-economic sciences and the humanities 9. Security and space + Euratom: Fusion energy. Hazard reduction in plant & storage Knowl-based, sust. proc., eco-innovation Public awareness, sust

  7. Nano-Bio-Genesis: Tracing the rise of nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology as 'big science'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Rajan P

    2007-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    sequences into three-dimension struc- tures and the attempt to create biological transistors [1,2]. These projects highlighted the potential for creating novel devices, though fully functional applications would require significantly more research. The NNI... circumvented this problem by creating nanomachines made solely of natural molecules; two notable examples were Nadrian Seeman's complex 3- D structures created solely of DNA and Leonard Adle- man's utilization of DNA to perform computation [9,10]. Others...

  8. NEWS & VIEWS 190 nature nanotechnology | VOL 3 | APRIL 2008 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -terminal device the current flowing between a pair of electrodes (called the source and drain) can be switched and travels along the line to the drain electrode of the transistor. This pulse effectively acts. By adjusting the top-gate potential to n-dope the centre of the nanotube, and the back-gate potential to p

  9. Synthesis and Optimization of Threshold Logic Networks with Application to Nanotechnologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    of this work is to bridge the wide gap that currently exists between research on the development of nanoscale networks are well-balanced, and hence delay-optimized. I. INTRODUCTION The Semiconductor Industries Association (SIA) roadmap [1] predicts that complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) chips will continue

  10. 2004 4th IEEEConferenceon Nanotechnology Dissipative effects in a DNA ladder model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    . As a result the temperature dependence of the transmission near the Fermi energy manifests activated Arrehnius

  11. "Special Joint Condensed Matter Physics and BIRCK Nanotechnology Center Seminar" Friday, October 18, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    Member, Ohio Eminent Scholar, Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Professor of Physics The Ohio State is conducted mostly by phonons. Historically, impeding their transport has been achieved by alloying TE Eminent Scholar and professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department and in the Physics

  12. Tools for decoding the structure-function relationships of biopolymers in nanotechnology and glycobiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soundararajan, Venkataramanan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, new tools have been developed for decoding structure-function relationships governing complex biopolymers that have emerged as key players in biology, biotechnology, and medicine. Specifically: (1.) The ...

  13. Fuel and cladding nano-technologies based solutions for long life heat-pipe based reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popa-Simil, L. [LAVM LLC, Los Alamos (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel nuclear reactor concept, unifying the fuel pipe with fuel tube functionality has been developed. The structure is a quasi-spherical modular reactor, designed for a very long life. The reactor module unifies the fuel tube with the heat pipe and a graphite beryllium reflector. It also uses a micro-hetero-structure that allows the fission products to be removed in the heat pipe flow and deposited in a getter area in the cold zone of the heat pipe, but outside the neutron flux. The reactor operates as a breed and burn reactor - it contains the fuel pipe with a variable enrichment, starting from the hot-end of the pipe, meant to assure the initial criticality, and reactor start-up followed by area with depleted uranium or thorium that get enriched during the consumption of the first part of the enriched uranium. (authors)

  14. 238 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 4, NO. 2, MARCH 2005 Structures and Electrical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    storage. Index Terms--Electrical switching, hysteresis. I. INTRODUCTION THE TREND of miniaturization of electronics is greatly accelerated by the discovery of new nanostructured materials. Instead of using circuits [6], [7] and memory devices [8] based on carbon nan- otube and semiconducting nanowires have been

  15. NATURE NANOTECHNOLOGY | VOL 7 | MAY 2012 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology 275 research highlights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebling, Michael

    could be exploited to make dissipationless electrical switches or functional devices for memory storage applied to the device, or changes in the magnetic field applied along the nanowire. However, as predicted compounds, such as an azobenzene derivative, or nanostructures, such as a porphyrin­nanotube composite

  16. Signin Register Home Nanotechnology Physics Space & Earth Electronics Technology Chemistry Biology Medicine & Health Other Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    by the oil and gas industry for remote detection with long deep sea pipelines. "This new technology could be dangerous to nearby oil rigs, shipping and for shore-based gas distribution facilities," comments Professor gas, acoustic signals, carbon emissions, gas extraction, oil rigs, seabed, gas Related Stories Plants

  17. Micro and Nanotechnology Lab UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    Chips · Disposable, one-time-use devices · Highly sensitive · Detection and monitoring of target entities, disease

  18. The Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences invites you to its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    conjugation to the cancer chemotherapeutic Doxorubicin (Dox) and other small hydrophobic molecules of hydrophobic small molecules, including Dox, leads to the spontaneous formation of nanoparticles for a range of CP compositions and molecular weights. The CP-Dox nanoparticles are ~40 nm in diameter, release drug

  19. NEWS & VIEWS 140 nature nanotechnology | VOL 2 | MARCH 2007 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    for artificial model systems that can be tightly controlled and defined with high precision. In particular nanotubes can be used to manipulate and sense proteins in experiments that might shed new light on important membranes also host the proteins that regulate molecular interactions between these regions, including

  20. Abstract--In the Structuring Nanotechnology Knowledge project, a material-independent platform for supporting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) funded national project [1], has been-materials and Products". It is neither a database, nor a set of simulation tools nor a knowledge base received December 31, 2006. This work was supported in part by the Japanese New Energy and Industrial

  1. ENERGETIC SYSTEMS AND NANOTECHNOLOGY -A LOOK AHEAD Robert Kavetsky*, Davinder Anand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    the development time for new systems, including those with energetic materials, to be deployed into the fleet. 1-looking vision for the application of new and advanced energetic materials for Naval applications. The Navy has. In the 1990s, 12 new energetic materials developed by the Navy were transitioned into 43 weapons systems

  2. last updated June 13, 2013 BASc in Electrical Engineering, Option in Nanotechnology & Microsystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    3 Global Engineering Leadership MATH 220 3 Mathematical Proof MATH 300 3 Introduction to Complex Applied Nonlinear Dynamics & Chaos MATH 361 3 Introduction to Mathematical Biology MATH 400 3 Applied of Variations MATH 405 3 Numerical Methods for Differential Equations MATH 415 3 Introduction to Mathematical

  3. Ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy: a new tool for surface science and nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    our synchrotron facilities ALS and BESSY and their staff forin Berkeley (ALS), and one at BESSY in Berlin. Section 5 isat beamline U49/2-PGM1 at BESSY, in Berlin, Germany. The

  4. Published in Technovation 33, 108 (2013) by Elsevier Nanotechnology for Electronics & Photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Nai-Chang

    energy (e.g., photovoltaic and fuel cells, light-emitting diodes, batteries), biotechnology and medicine to commercial products will require tough standards of reproducibility, reliability and safety. It is therefore

  5. University of California at Berkeley Shop Safety Policy Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center Machine Shop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    by the manufacturer and within the equipment's Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL) listing. · All shop

  6. n his 1959 lecture on nanotechnology (though before the actual phrase was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leake, Mark C.

    over many millions of years to perform very diverse tasks: some motors shunt mate- rial around inside separate functioning parts whose collective properties ultimately transform energy from a chemical form power output is much higher in a mac- ro-motor than in a single biological one, the efficiency

  7. NANO TOOLS & PRODUCTS IN MICRO & NANOTECHNOLOGY Engineered Carbon Nanotube (CNT) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the ability to make functional devices in solution. Metal Infusion Surface Treatment (MIST)--C-3 International, LLC www.cccintl.com MIST is an advanced, low-cost infused coat- ing technology. The process takes any elements and their unique properties are diffused into surfaces, along with a 0.1- to 0.5-µm infusion

  8. nature nanotechnology | ADVANCE ONLINE PUBLICATION | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology 1 news & views

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehler, Markus J.

    hierarchical biomaterials by exploiting the self- assembling properties of amyloid fibrils, which are a class such as algae5 . The fibrils that were cast into thin films aligned and stacked in the plane of the film to form configuration (for example, as enzymes or hormones) and form fibres with a typical hydrogen-bonded cross- beta

  9. Research Interests: Application of nanotechnology to create novel permanent magnets (spring magnets)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    on Curved Pt(111), Ruihua Cheng, S.D. Bader, F.Y. Fradin, Phys. Rev. B77, 024404 (Jan. 2008) pp. 1 Mn moment due to canted spins at SrRuO3/SrMnO3 interfaces, Y. Choi, Y. Z. Yoo , O. Chmaissem , A

  10. Path creation in the making the case of nanotechnology DRUID 2005 Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and search rules placed within a wider analysis of the organisation of (nano) knowledge production within is brought on how environmental issues enter into the strategies and heuristics of Danish nano researchers, we have a case of early technology evolution with possible long term monumental impacts on the econon

  11. Sponsored by Nanotechnology Seminar Program An Electroplating-Based Approach to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Nanomanufacturing And Its Application to Energy Conversion and Storage By Prof. Mark G. Allen Department in energy storage and conversion applications, including batteries and magnetic-material-based ultracompact in chemistry, the B.S.E. degree in chemical engineering, and the B.S.E. degree in electrical engineering from

  12. nature nanotechnology | VOL 4 | JULY 2009 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology 401 research highlights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    are equally spaced. Although the electrons in graphene are also confined to two dimensions, they differ spacer and a head group that can be a fluorescent molecule, a drug or a peptide that binds to plaques

  13. Formation of a memristor matrix based on titanium oxide and investigation by probe-nanotechnology methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avilov, V. I.; Ageev, O. A.; Kolomiitsev, A. S.; Konoplev, B. G., E-mail: kbg@sfedu.ru; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G. [Southern Federal University, Institute of Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of investigation of a memristor-matrix model on the basis of titanium-oxide nanoscale structures (ONSs) fabricated by methods of focused ion beams and atomic-force microscopy (AFM) are presented. The effect of the intensity of interaction between the AFM probe and the sample surface on the memristor effect in the titanium ONS is shown. The memristor effect in the titanium ONS is investigated by an AFM in the mode of spreading-resistance map. The possibility of the recording and erasure of information in the submicron cells is shown on the basis of using the memristor effect in the titanium ONS, which is most promising for developing the technological processes of the formation of resistive operation memory cells.

  14. The Semantics of Jitter in Anticipating Time Itself within Nano-Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadler, Philip

    and dynamics where idealised concepts like mean solar time, International Atomic Time and Newton's dynamical when we are able to encapsulate all activity within one system. #12;FIGURE 1. The Correspondence

  15. Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota PriusNSRdiodesScience Museum

  16. NATURE NANOTECHNOLOGY | VOL 6 | AUGUST 2011 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology 465 news & views

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruck, Jehoshua (Shuki)

    , T., Hsu, A. & Wang, H. IEEE Commun. Mag. 48, 122­128 (June 2010). 4. Lin, Y-M. et al. Science 332. IEEE International Microwave Symposium (Baltimore, 5­10 June 2011). 11. Xia, F., Mueller, T., Lin, Y-M., Valdes-Garcia, A. & Avouris, P. Nature Nanotech. 4, 839­843 (2009). 12.

  17. NATURE NANOTECHNOLOGY | VOL 6 | JUNE 2011 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology 331 news & views

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunch, Scott

    , resonant electrical circuits and molecular vibrations. In micro and nanomechanical systems,3 . However, energy losses in these atomically thin resonators are notoriously high at room temperature, so and the Technical University of Munich -- measured how the damping changed as the amplitude of the oscillations

  18. Micro- & Nano-Technologies Enabling More Compact, Lightweight Thermoelectric Power Generation & Cooling Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced thermoelectric energy recovery and cooling system weight and volume improvements with low-cost microtechnology heat and mass transfer devices are presented

  19. In the OSTI Collections: Nanotechnology | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » ImportantOfficeof Scientific and Technical

  20. DOE Science Showcase - Nanotechnology | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART IScientificScientificScientific and