Sample records for nanostructured materials 0d

  1. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  2. Nanostructured magnetic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Keith T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetism and Magnetic Materials Conference, Atlanta, GA (Nanostructured Magnetic Materials by Keith T. Chan Doctor ofinduced by a Si-based material occurs at a Si/Ni interface

  3. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Andrew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Reboredo, Fernando A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  4. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    xi Material CharacterizationThermoelectric Materials . . . . . . . . Graphene-Like5 Nanostructured Materials for Electrochemical Energy

  5. Nanostructured Electrode Materials for Supercapacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    and batteries/fuel cells. Nanostructured electrode materials have demonstrated superior electrochemical of polymethine dyes electronic spectra is crucial for successful design of the new molecules with optimized

  6. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  7. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  8. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Frank (Bud) Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to â??real-worldâ?ť materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  9. Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials and High Efficiency Power...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials and High Efficiency Power Generation Modules Home Author: T. Hogan, A. Downey, J. Short, S. D. Mahanti, H. Schock, E. Case Year: 2007...

  10. XPS Analysis of Nanostructured Materials and Biological Surfaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Nanostructured Materials and Biological Surfaces. XPS Analysis of Nanostructured Materials and Biological Surfaces. Abstract: This paper examines the types of...

  11. Innovative Nano-structuring Routes for Novel ThermoelectricMaterials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nano-structuring Routes for Novel Thermoelectric Materials;Phonon Blocking & DOS Engineering Innovative Nano-structuring Routes for Novel Thermoelectric Materials;Phonon Blocking &...

  12. Solution Phase Routes to Functional Nanostructured Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauda, Iris Ester

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nanostructured materials are excellent candidates for integrating into electronic and energy-storage devices,

  13. Synthesis and processing of nanostructured materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, R.W.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant and growing interest is being exhibited in the novel and enhanced properties of nanostructured materials. These materials, with their constituent phase or grain structures modulated on a length scale less than 100 nm, are artificially synthesized by a wide variety of physical, chemical, and mechanical methods. In this NATO Advanced Study Institute, where mechanical behavior is emphasized, nanostructured materials with modulation dimensionalities from one (multilayers) to three (nanophase materials) are mainly considered. No attempt is made in this review to cover in detail all of the diverse methods available for the synthesis of nanostructured materials. Rather, the basic principles involved in their synthesis are discussed in terms of the special properties sought using examples of particular synthesis and processing methodologies. Some examples of the property changes that can result from one of these methods, cluster assembly of nanophase materials, are presented.

  14. Solution Phase Routes to Functional Nanostructured Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauda, Iris Ester

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    synthesis of inorganic semiconductor-based nanostructured materials;inorganic materials. 16,35,62?72 In the synthesis, we begin

  15. Nanostructure material for supercapacitor application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Y.; Chu, C.T.; Wei, Q.; Zheng, H.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition metal nitrides and carbonitride materials were fabricated via sol-gel technology. The transition metal amides were synthesized by two methods: chemical route and electrolysis. The transition metal amides were then further polymerized, sintering to high temperature in an inert or reduced atmosphere. Transition metal nitrides and carbonitrides powders with surface area up to 160 m{sup 2}/g were obtained. The resultant electrode material showed high specific capacitance as crystalline ruthenium oxide.

  16. Aerogel Derived Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell E Rhine, PI; Dong, Wenting; Greg Caggiano, PM

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    America’s dependence on foreign sources for fuel represents a economic and security threat for the country. These non renewable resources are depleting, and the effects of pollutants from fuels such as oil are reaching a problematic that affects the global community. Solar concentration power (SCP) production systems offer the opportunity to harness one of the United States’ most under utilized natural resources; sunlight. While commercialization of this technology is increasing, in order to become a significant source of electricity production in the United States the costs of deploying and operating SCP plants must be further reduced. Parabolic Trough SCP technologies are close to meeting energy production cost levels that would raise interest in the technology and help accelerate its adoption as a method to produce a significant portion of the Country’s electric power needs. During this program, Aspen Aerogels will develop a transparent aerogel insulation that can replace the costly vacuum insulation systems that are currently used in parabolic trough designs. During the Phase I program, Aspen Aerogels will optimize the optical and thermal properties of aerogel to meet the needs of this application. These properties will be tested, and the results will be used to model the performance of a parabolic trough HCE system which uses this novel material in place of vacuum. During the Phase II program, Aspen Aerogels will scale up this technology. Together with industry partners, Aspen Aerogels will build and test a prototype Heat Collection Element that is insulated with the novel transparent aerogel material. This new device will find use in parabolic trough SCP applications.

  17. Workshop in Novel Emitters and Nanostructured Materials | U.S...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Workshop in Novel Emitters and Nanostructured Materials Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events EFRC News EFRC Events...

  18. Chemistry and Processing of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, G A; Baumann, T F; Hope-Weeks, L J; Vance, A L

    2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured materials can be formed through the sol-gel polymerization of inorganic or organic monomer systems. For example, a two step polymerization of tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) was developed such that silica aerogels with densities as low as 3 kg/m{sup 3} ({approx} two times the density of air) could be achieved. Organic aerogels based upon resorcinol-formaldehyde and melamine-formaldehyde can also be prepared using the sol-gel process. Materials of this type have received significant attention at LLNL due to their ultrafine cell sizes, continuous porosity, high surface area and low mass density. For both types of aerogels, sol-gel polymerization depends upon the transformation of these monomers into nanometer-sized clusters followed by cross-linking into a 3-dimensional gel network. While sol-gel chemistry provides the opportunity to synthesize new material compositions, it suffers from the inability to separate the process of cluster formation from gelation. This limitation results in structural deficiencies in the gel that impact the physical properties of the aerogel, xerogel or nanocomposite. In order to control the properties of the resultant gel, one should be able to regulate the formation of the clusters and their subsequent cross-linking. Towards this goal, we are utilizing dendrimer chemistry to separate the cluster formation from the gelation so that new nanostructured materials can be produced. Dendrimers are three-dimensional, highly branched macromolecules that are prepared in such a way that their size, shape and surface functionality are readily controlled. The dendrimers will be used as pre-formed clusters of known size that can be cross-linked to form an ordered gel network.

  19. Rheological and morphological characterization of hierarchically nanostructured materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Benjamin Ning-Haw

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hierarchically nanostructured materials exhibit order on multiple length scales, with at least one of a few nanometers. The expected enhancements for applications using these materials include improved mechanical, thermal ...

  20. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Electrochemical Energy Storage Nanostructured ElectrodesCells for Energy Storage and Generation . . . . . . . . . .batteries and their energy storage efficiency. vii Contents

  1. Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials: From Superlattices to Nanocomposites Ronggui Yang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Gang

    Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials: From Superlattices to Nanocomposites Ronggui Yang1 conductivity led to a large increase in the thermoelectric figure of merit in several superlattice systems. Materials with a large thermoelectric figure of merit can be used to develop efficient solid-state devices

  2. Nanostructured Tin Dioxide Materials for Gas Sensor Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Margaret S.

    CHAPTER 30 Nanostructured Tin Dioxide Materials for Gas Sensor Applications T. A. Miller, S. D) levels for some species. Tin dioxide (also called stannic oxide or tin oxide) semi- conductor gas sensors undergone extensive research and development. Tin dioxide (SnO2) is the most important material for use

  3. Preparation of nanostructured materials having improved ductility

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yonghao; Zhu, Yuntian T.

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing a nanostructured aluminum alloy involves heating an aluminum alloy workpiece at temperature sufficient to produce a single phase coarse grained aluminum alloy, then refining the grain size of the workpiece at a temperature at or below room temperature, and then aging the workpiece to precipitate second phase particles in the nanosized grains of the workpiece that increase the ductility without decreasing the strength of the workpiece.

  4. Nanostructured Materials as Anodes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash,EnergyNanophosphateas Anodes Nanostructured

  5. Potential applications of nanostructured materials in nuclear waste management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braterman, Paul S. (The University of North Texas, Denton, TX); Phol, Phillip Isabio; Xu, Zhi-Ping (The University of North Texas, Denton, TX); Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Yang, Yi (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Charles R.; Yu, Kui; Xu, Huifang (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Wang, Yifeng; Gao, Huizhen

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results obtained from a Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) project entitled 'Investigation of Potential Applications of Self-Assembled Nanostructured Materials in Nuclear Waste Management'. The objectives of this project are to (1) provide a mechanistic understanding of the control of nanometer-scale structures on the ion sorption capability of materials and (2) develop appropriate engineering approaches to improving material properties based on such an understanding.

  6. Group Members Synthesis of Nanostructured Materials Advanced Characterization Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of nanostructured materials. · Applications in nanophotonics, nanoelectronics, and energy. Experimental techniques, S. Gradecak,"Graphene cathode-based ZnO nanowire hybrid solar cells", Nano Letters 13, 233-239 (2013 particle composition to control structural and optical properties of GaN nanowires", Nanotechnology 23

  7. Novel thermal properties of nanostructured materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eastman, J. A.

    1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of heat transfer fluids, termed nanofluids, has been developed by suspending nanocrystalline particles in liquids. Due to the orders-of-magnitude larger thermal conductivities of solids compared to those of liquids such as water, significantly enhanced thermal properties are obtained with nanofluids. For example, an approximately 20% improvement in effective thermal conductivity is observed when 5 vol.% CuO nanoparticles are added to water. Even more importantly, the heat transfer coefficient of water under dynamic flow conditions is increased more than 15% with the addition of less than 1 vol.% CuO particles. The use of nanofluids could impact many industrial sectors, including transportation, energy supply and production, electronics, textiles, and paper production by, for example, decreasing pumping power needs or reducing heat exchanger sizes. In contrast to the enhancement in effective thermal transport rates that is obtained when nanoparticles are suspended in fluids, nanocrystalline coatings are expected to exhibit reduced thermal conductivities compared to coarse-grained coatings. Reduced thermal conductivities are predicted to arise because of a reduction in the mean free path of phonons due to presence of grain boundaries. This behavior, combined with improved mechanical properties, makes nanostructured zirconia coatings excellent candidates for future applications as thermal barriers. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films are being produced by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition techniques. Preliminary results have indicated that the thermal conductivity is reduced by approximately a factor-of-two at room temperature in 10 nm grain-sized YSZ compared to coarse-grained or single crystal YSZ.

  8. Thermoelectric energy conversion using nanostructured materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Gang

    High performance thermoelectric materials in a wide range of temperatures are essential to broaden the application spectrum of thermoelectric devices. This paper presents experiments on the power and efficiency characteristics ...

  9. High volume production of nanostructured materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for high volume production of nanoparticles, nanotubes, and items incorporating nanoparticles and nanotubes. Microwave, radio frequency, or infrared energy vaporizes a metal catalyst which, as it condenses, is contacted by carbon or other elements such as silicon, germanium, or boron to form agglomerates. The agglomerates may be annealed to accelerate the production of nanotubes. Magnetic or electric fields may be used to align the nanotubes during their production. The nanotubes may be separated from the production byproducts in aligned or non-aligned configurations. The agglomerates may be formed directly into tools, optionally in compositions that incorporate other materials such as abrasives, binders, carbon-carbon composites, and cermets.

  10. Chemistry Controls Material's Nanostructure | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of theChemistry Oxide Interfaces

  11. Nanomanufacturing : nano-structured materials made layer-by-layer.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, James V.; Cheng, Shengfeng; Grest, Gary Stephen; Tjiptowidjojo, Kristianto (University of New Mexico); Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Fan, Hongyou; Schunk, Peter Randall; Chandross, Michael Evan; Roberts, Scott A.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale, high-throughput production of nano-structured materials (i.e. nanomanufacturing) is a strategic area in manufacturing, with markets projected to exceed $1T by 2015. Nanomanufacturing is still in its infancy; process/product developments are costly and only touch on potential opportunities enabled by growing nanoscience discoveries. The greatest promise for high-volume manufacturing lies in age-old coating and imprinting operations. For materials with tailored nm-scale structure, imprinting/embossing must be achieved at high speeds (roll-to-roll) and/or over large areas (batch operation) with feature sizes less than 100 nm. Dispersion coatings with nanoparticles can also tailor structure through self- or directed-assembly. Layering films structured with these processes have tremendous potential for efficient manufacturing of microelectronics, photovoltaics and other topical nano-structured devices. This project is designed to perform the requisite R and D to bring Sandia's technology base in computational mechanics to bear on this scale-up problem. Project focus is enforced by addressing a promising imprinting process currently being commercialized.

  12. Nanostructuring superconductors by ion beams: A path towards materials engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerbaldo, Roberto; Ghigo, Gianluca; Gozzelino, Laura; Laviano, Francesco [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino c.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino, Italy and INFN Sez. Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Amato, Antonino; Rovelli, Alberto [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Cherubini, Roberto [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, viale dell'Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with nanostructuring of superconducting materials by means of swift heavy ion beams. The aim is to modify their structural, optical and electromagnetic properties in a controlled way, to provide possibility of making them functional for specific applications. Results are presented concerning flux pinning effects (implantation of columnar defects with nanosize cross section to enhance critical currents and irreversibility fields), confined flux-flow and vortex guidance, design of devices by locally tailoring the superconducting material properties, analysis of disorder-induced effects in multi-band superconductors. These studies were carried out on different kinds of superconducting samples, from single crystals to thin films, from superconducting oxides to magnesium diboride, to recently discovered iron-based superconductors.

  13. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A high performance capacitor is described which is fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a ``notepad`` configuration composed of 200--300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The ``notepad`` capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density. 5 figs.

  14. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high performance capacitor fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a "notepad" configuration composed of 200-300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The "notepad" capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density.

  15. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high performance capacitor fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a "notepad" configuration composed of 200-300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The "notepad" capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density.

  16. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A high performance capacitor is fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a ``notepad`` configuration composed of 200-300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The notepad capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density. 5 figs.

  17. Chemical Functionalization of Nanostructured Materials Using Supercritical Reaction Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zemanian, Thomas S.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Liu, Jun; Mattigod, Shas V.; Shin, Yongsoon; Franz, James A.; Ustyugov, Oleksiy A.; Nie, Zimin

    2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a need for durable and thin functional coatings to utilize the afforded surface area of highly porous ceramic materials. Deposition of silane-based Self Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) has thus far been limited to maximum coverages of 4-5 molecules/nm2 and long processing times (up to 2 weeks), due to the restricted internal geometry of the substrates. Results are presented for SAMs deposited on high surface area silica from supercritical fluids (SCFs). The SAMs so produced display unprecedented coverages, high monolayer integrity, and extremely low surface defect density. Moreover, the depositions and subsequent removal of reaction byproducts are complete in a matter of minutes rather than days. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra of the surface modified silica are presented, demonstrating the SAM integrity and evolution over time. Sorption of aqueous metal ions is demonstrated, and results are given demonstrating the broad pH stability of the deposited SAMs. A chemical explanation for the enhanced deposition is posited, and the kinetics of mass transport into and out of the nanostructured spaces are discussed.Related experiments using zeolite substrates show deposition of thiol-terminated silanes to internal surfaces of 6? microporous material. After oxidation of the thiol functional group size selective chemistry was demonstrated using the produced catalyst, proving the efficacy of the supercritical reaction medium for installing functional coatings inside pores of similar diameters to the chain length of the deposited molecule[]. Comparisons are made between the response of the different substrates to the supercritical fluid-based processing, and remarks on the utility of SCF based processing of nanostructured materials are presented.

  18. Nanostructured materials for energy storage and energy conversion devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reisner, D.E.; Xiao, T.D.; Strutt, P.R. [US Nanocorp, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States); Salkind, A.J. [Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    US Nanocorp, Inc. (USN) has developed an aqueous solution reaction (ASR) technique scalable for high volume production of nanostructured materials (n-materials) for a wide range of applications. By definition, nanophase materials have at least one physical dimension less than 10 nanometers (nm) in length, an attribute which imparts exceptional properties to them because the particle dimensions are close to atomic dimensions and there are a very high fraction of atoms residing at nanocrystalline grain boundaries. The high surface area of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage devices with electrochemical active sites (batteries, ultracapacitors) and energy conversion devices depending on catalytic sites or defect structure (e.g., fuel cells and thermoelectric devices). Potential application areas in both energy conversion and energy storage are discussed. Morphological studies of manganese dioxide have revealed the existence of both nanoporosity and mesoporosity within unusual superstructures comprised of nanorod building blocks. Nanophase nickel hydroxide has also been synthesized. Preliminary electrochemical studies are reported.

  19. Characterization of nanostructured materials for lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustyn, Veronica

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reactivity of vanadium oxide aerogels." Electrochimica Acta,B. Dunn. “Vanadium Oxide Aerogels: Nanostructured MaterialsE. & Dunn, B. V 2 O 5 aerogel as a versatile host for metal

  20. Adaptive Hierarchical Multiscale Framework for Modeling the Deformation of Ultra-Strong Nano-structured Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    , we plan to investigate the deformation characteris- tics of two classes of nano-structured materials. The proposed research will also impact graduate education world-wide by the developme

  1. Tuning energy transport in solar thermal systems using nanostructured materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenert, Andrej

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar thermal energy conversion can harness the entire solar spectrum and theoretically achieve very high efficiencies while interfacing with thermal storage or back-up systems for dispatchable power generation. Nanostructured ...

  2. Method of making nanopatterns and nanostructures and nanopatterned functional oxide materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dravid, Vinayak P; Donthu, Suresh K; Pan, Zixiao

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for nanopatterning of inorganic materials, such as ceramic (e.g. metal oxide) materials, and organic materials, such as polymer materials, on a variety of substrates to form nanopatterns and/or nanostructures with control of dimensions and location, all without the need for etching the materials and without the need for re-alignment between multiple patterning steps in forming nanostructures, such as heterostructures comprising multiple materials. The method involves patterning a resist-coated substrate using electron beam lithography, removing a portion of the resist to provide a patterned resist-coated substrate, and spin coating the patterned resist-coated substrate with a liquid precursor, such as a sol precursor, of the inorganic or organic material. The remaining resist is removed and the spin coated substrate is heated at an elevated temperature to crystallize the deposited precursor material.

  3. Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity and Conductivity in Advanced Nanostructured Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teweldebrhan, Desalegne Bekuretsion

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Magnetic Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viimportants of understanding materials properties typicallyY.S. Ju, Annual Review of Materials Science, 29, 261 (1999).

  4. Electrochemical Synthesis and Characterization of Nanostructured Chalcogenide Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chong Hyun

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superlattice Thermoelectric Materials and Devices. ScienceCarbon Nanotube Composite Materials. Langmuir 2004, 20, (nanotubes composite materials in solution. Chem. Phys. Lett.

  5. SPECIAL ISSUE: NANOSTRUCTURED MATERIALS 2010 Cyclodextrin modified gold nanoparticles-based open-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miksik, Ivan

    SPECIAL ISSUE: NANOSTRUCTURED MATERIALS 2010 Cyclodextrin modified gold nanoparticles-based open Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract In this study, spherical gold nanoparticles (GNPs) of 14 Capillary electrochromatography Á Gold nanoparticles Á b-Cyclodextrin Á Stationary phase Introduction

  6. Development of Nanostructured Materials with Improved Radiation Tolerance for Advanced Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinghang Zhang; K. Ted Hartwig

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will explore the fundamental mechanisms through which interfaces in nanolayered structures and grain boundaries of bulk nanomaterials are able to attract and rapidly eliminate point defects and unwanted foreign species. Candidate materials that will be studied include both nanostructured multilayer composites synthesized by magnetron sputtering and structural bulk nanomaterials produced by severed plastic deformation, equal channel angular extrusion.

  7. Post-doc position : Nanostructured materials for the realization of enhanced micro-supercapacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingrand, François

    Post-doc position : Nanostructured materials for the realization of enhanced micro-supercapacitors and temperature range. The integration of low-profile, miniaturized supercapacitors could, CDC, CNT, RuO2...) for the development of micro-supercapacitors. An attractive

  8. Novel applications exploiting the thermal properties of nanostructured materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eastman, J. A.

    1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of heat transfer fluids, termed nanofluids, has been developed by suspending nanocrystalline particles in liquids. Due to the orders-of-magnitude larger thermal conductivities of solids compared to those of liquids such as water, significantly enhanced thermal properties are obtained with nanofluids. The use of nanofluids could impact many industrial sectors, including transportation, energy supply and production, electronics, textiles, and paper production by, for example, decreasing pumping power needs or reducing heat exchanger sizes. In contrast to the enhancement in effective thermal transport rates that is obtained when nanoparticles are suspended in fluids, nanocrystalline coatings are expected to exhibit reduced thermal conductivities compared to coarse-grained coatings. Reduced thermal conductivities are predicted to arise because of a reduction in the mean free path of phonons due to presence of grain boundaries. This behavior, combined with improved mechanical properties, makes nanostructured zirconia coatings excellent candidates for future applications as thermal barriers.

  9. Nanostructured materials for lithium-ion batteries: Surface conductivity vs. bulk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Dominic

    Nanostructured materials for lithium-ion batteries: Surface conductivity vs. bulk ion cathode materials for high capacity lithium-ion batteries. Owing to their inherently low electronic-ion batteries. Lithium transition metal phosphates such as LiFePO4,1 LiMnPO4,2 Li3V2(PO4)3 3 and LiVPO4F4 have

  10. Exciton transport and coherence in molecular and nanostructured materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akselrod, Gleb M. (Gleb Markovitch)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 20 years a new classes of optically active materials have been developed that are composites of nano-engineered constituents such as molecules, polymers, and nanocrystals. These disordered materials have ...

  11. Solution Phase Routes to Functional Nanostructured Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauda, Iris Ester

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bridge between the structural complexity of templated porous materials, and the electronic and optical complexity of semiconductor

  12. Solution Phase Routes to Functional Nanostructured Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauda, Iris Ester

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based materials are used as EDLC electrodes due to theiror “mirror” behavior. In an EDLC, the adsorption of ions on

  13. Method of producing catalytic materials for fabricating nanostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of fabricating nano-catalysts are described. In some embodiments the nano-catalyst is formed from a powder-based substrate material and is some embodiments the nano-catalyst is formed from a solid-based substrate material. In some embodiments the substrate material may include metal, ceramic, or silicon or another metalloid. The nano-catalysts typically have metal nanoparticles disposed adjacent the surface of the substrate material. The methods typically include functionalizing the surface of the substrate material with a chelating agent, such as a chemical having dissociated carboxyl functional groups (--COO), that provides an enhanced affinity for metal ions. The functionalized substrate surface may then be exposed to a chemical solution that contains metal ions. The metal ions are then bound to the substrate material and may then be reduced, such as by a stream of gas that includes hydrogen, to form metal nanoparticles adjacent the surface of the substrate.

  14. High-capacity nanostructured germanium-containing materials and lithium alloys thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graetz, Jason A. (Upton, NY); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Ahn, Channing (Pasadena, CA); Yazami, Rachid (Los Angeles, CA)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrodes comprising an alkali metal, for example, lithium, alloyed with nanostructured materials of formula Si.sub.zGe.sub.(z-1), where 0

  15. Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qinghui

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    band impact ionization and solar cell efficiency,” J. Appl.Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 92, 273, (2008). [28]third generation solar cells Solar cells may be formed using

  16. Methods for high volume production of nanostructured materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ludtka, Gerald M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for high volume production of nanoparticles, nanotubes, and items incorporating nanoparticles and nanotubes. Microwave, radio frequency, or infrared energy vaporizes a metal catalyst which, as it condenses, is contacted by carbon or other elements such as silicon, germanium, or boron to form agglomerates. The agglomerates may be annealed to accelerate the production of nanotubes. Magnetic or electric fields may be used to align the nanotubes during their production. The nanotubes may be separated from the production byproducts in aligned or non-aligned configurations. The agglomerates may be formed directly into tools, optionally in compositions that incorporate other materials such as abrasives, binders, carbon-carbon composites, and cermets.

  17. JOM, 2013, Vol. 65, No. 2, pp. TBD. Modeling and simulation in composite materials integration from nanostructure to component level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    . In the long term, these resources are expected to enable development of new materials for critical application1 JOM, 2013, Vol. 65, No. 2, pp. TBD. Modeling and simulation in composite materials ­ integration from nanostructure to component level design Nikhil Gupta Composite Materials and Mechanics Laboratory

  18. Nanostructure multilayer dielectric materials for capacitors and insulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A capacitor is formed of at least two metal conductors having a multilayer dielectric and opposite dielectric-conductor interface layers in between. The multilayer dielectric includes many alternating layers of amorphous zirconium oxide (ZrO.sub.2) and alumina (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3). The dielectric-conductor interface layers are engineered for increased voltage breakdown and extended service life. The local interfacial work function is increased to reduce charge injection and thus increase breakdown voltage. Proper material choices can prevent electrochemical reactions and diffusion between the conductor and dielectric. Physical vapor deposition is used to deposit the zirconium oxide (ZrO.sub.2) and alumina (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3) in alternating layers to form a nano-laminate.

  19. Nanostructured material for advanced energy storage : magnesium battery cathode development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigmund, Wolfgang M. (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Woan, Karran V. (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnesium batteries are alternatives to the use of lithium ion and nickel metal hydride secondary batteries due to magnesium's abundance, safety of operation, and lower toxicity of disposal. The divalency of the magnesium ion and its chemistry poses some difficulties for its general and industrial use. This work developed a continuous and fibrous nanoscale network of the cathode material through the use of electrospinning with the goal of enhancing performance and reactivity of the battery. The system was characterized and preliminary tests were performed on the constructed battery cells. We were successful in building and testing a series of electrochemical systems that demonstrated good cyclability maintaining 60-70% of discharge capacity after more than 50 charge-discharge cycles.

  20. Reactive Ballistic Deposition of Nanostructured Model Materials for Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flaherty, David W.; Hahn, Nathan T.; May, Robert A.; Berglund, Sean P.; Lin, Yong-Mao; Stevenson, Keith J.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.; Mullins, C. Buddie

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Finely structured, supported thin films offer a host of opportunities for fundamental and applied research. Nanostructured materials often exhibit physical properties which differ from their bulk counterparts due to the increased importance of the surface in determining the thermodynamics and behavior of the system. Thus, control of the characteristic size, porosity, morphology, and surface area presents opportunities to tailor new materials which are useful platforms for elucidating the fundamental processes related to energy conversion and storage. The ability to produce high purity materials with direct control of relevant film parameters such as porosity, film thickness, and film morphology is of immediate interest in the fields of electrochemistry, photocatalysis, and thermal catalysis. Studies of various photoactive materials have introduced questions concerning the effects of film architecture and surface structure on the performance of the materials, while recent work has demonstrated that nanostructured, mesoporous, or disordered materials often deform plastically, making them robust in applications where volumetric expansion and phase transformations occur, such as in materials for lithium-ion batteries. Moreover, renewed emphasis has been placed on the formation of semi-conductive electrodes with controlled pore-size and large surface areas for the study and application of pseudo-capacitance and cation insertion processes for electrical energy storage. Understanding how the performance of such materials depends on morphology, porosity, and surface structure and area requires a synthesis technique which provides for incremental variations in structure and facilitates assessment of the performance with the appropriate analytical tools, preferably those that provide both structural information and kinetic insight into photoelectrochemical processes.

  1. Electrospray neutralization process and apparatus for generation of nano-aerosol and nano-structured materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bailey, Charles L. (Cross Junction, VA); Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA); Vsevolodov, Nikolai N. (Kensington, MD)

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The claimed invention describes methods and apparatuses for manufacturing nano-aerosols and nano-structured materials based on the neutralization of charged electrosprayed products with oppositely charged electrosprayed products. Electrosprayed products include molecular ions, nano-clusters and nano-fibers. Nano-aerosols can be generated when neutralization occurs in the gas phase. Neutralization of electrospan nano-fibers with molecular ions and charged nano-clusters may result in the formation of fibrous aerosols or free nano-mats. Nano-mats can also be produced on a suitable substrate, forming efficient nano-filters.

  2. The optical applications of 3D sub-wavelength block-copolymer nanostructured functional materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, Zsolt; Ohodnicki, Paul; Chen, Kevin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to engineer the refractive indices of functional materials (TiO2, ZnO, SnO2, SiO2), by nanostructuring in the deep sub-wavelength regime (optical design techniques such as thin film optimization methods, transformation optics and conformal mapping. Refractive index optimized multi-layer anti-reflection coatings on crystalline silicon, which reduce light reflections from 38% down to ~3% with a wide angular span, are demonstrated with the developed wet processing route. A high temperature oxygen free fiber optic hydrogen sensor realized by accessing nano-engine...

  3. Electrochemical Properties of Nanostructured Al1-xCux Alloys as Anode Materials for Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    controlling these two properties is the mag- nitude of interaction between the active and the inactiveElectrochemical Properties of Nanostructured Al1-xCux Alloys as Anode Materials for Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Batteries C. Y. Wang,a, * Y. S. Meng,b, * G. Ceder,c, *,z and Y. Lia,d,z a Advanced Materials

  4. Final Technical Summary: Center for Fundamental and Applied Research in Nanostructured and Lightweight Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Mullins, Tony Rogers, Julia King, Jason Keith, Bahne Cornilsen, Jeffrey Allen, Ryan Gilbert, Joseph Holles.

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The core projects for this DOE-sponsored Center at Michigan Tech have focused on several of the materials problems identified by the NAS. These include: new electrode materials, enhanced PEM materials, lighter and more effective bipolar plates, and improvement of the carbon used as a current carrier. This project involved fundamental and applied research in the development and testing of lightweight and nanostructured materials to be used in fuel cell applications and for chemical synthesis. The advent of new classes of materials engineered at the nanometer level can produce materials that are lightweight and have unique physical and chemical properties. The grant was used to obtain and improve the equipment infrastructure to support this research and also served to fund seven research projects. These included: 1. Development of lightweight, thermally conductive bipolar plates for improved thermal management in fuel cells; 2. Exploration of pseudomorphic nanoscale overlayer bimetallic catalysts for fuel cells; 3. Development of hybrid inorganic/organic polymer nanocomposites with improved ionic and electronic properties; 4. Development of oriented polymeric materials for membrane applications; 5. Preparation of a graphitic carbon foam current collectors; 6. The development of lightweight carbon electrodes using graphitic carbon foams for battery and fuel cell applications; and 7. Movement of water in fuel cell electrodes.

  5. NiO-silica based nanostructured materials obtained by microemulsion assisted sol-gel procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihaly, M.; Comanescu, A.F. [University POLITEHNICA Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, 1 Polizu, 011061 Bucharest (Romania)] [University POLITEHNICA Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, 1 Polizu, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Rogozea, A.E. [ILIE MURGULESCU Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Romanian Academy, 202 Splaiul Independentei, 060021 Bucharest (Romania)] [ILIE MURGULESCU Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Romanian Academy, 202 Splaiul Independentei, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Vasile, E. [METAV Research and Development, 31 C.A. Rosetti, 020011 Bucharest (Romania)] [METAV Research and Development, 31 C.A. Rosetti, 020011 Bucharest (Romania); Meghea, A., E-mail: a.meghea@gmail.com [University POLITEHNICA Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, 1 Polizu, 011061 Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: TEM micrograph of NiO/SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Highlights: {yields} Microemulsion assisted sol-gel procedure for NiO silica nanomaterials synthesis. {yields} Controlling the size and shape of nanoparticles and avoiding their aggregation. {yields} Narrow band-gap semiconductors (energies <3 eV) absorbing VIS or near-UV light biologically and chemically inert semiconductors entrapping/coating in silica network. {yields} Low cost as the microemulsion is firstly used in water metallic cation extraction. -- Abstract: NiO-silica based materials have been synthesized by microemulsion assisted sol-gel procedure. The versatility of these soft nanotechnology techniques has been exploited in order to obtain different types of nanostructures, such as NiO nanoparticles, NiO silica coated nanoparticles and NiO embedded in silica matrix. These materials have been characterized by adequate structural and morphology techniques: DLS, HR-TEM/SAED, BET, AFM. Optical and semiconducting properties (band-gap values) of the synthesized materials have been quantified by means of VIS-NIR diffuse reflectance spectra, thus demonstrating their applicative potential in various electron transfer phenomena such as photocatalysis, electrochromic thin films, solid oxide fuel cells.

  6. Converting environmentally hazardous materials into clean energy using a novel nanostructured photoelectrochemical fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Yong X., E-mail: yong.gan@utoledo.edu [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Gan, Bo J. [Ottawa Hills High School, 2532 Evergreen Road, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)] [Ottawa Hills High School, 2532 Evergreen Road, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Clark, Evan; Su, Lusheng [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Zhang, Lihua [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)] [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? A photoelectrochemical fuel cell has been made from TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. ? The fuel cell decomposes environmentally hazardous materials to produce electricity. ? Doping the anode with a transition metal oxide increases the visible light sensitivity. ? Loading the anode with a conducting polymer enhances the visible light absorption. -- Abstract: In this work, a novel photoelectrochemical fuel cell consisting of a titanium dioxide nanotube array photosensitive anode and a platinum cathode was made for decomposing environmentally hazardous materials to produce electricity and clean fuel. Titanium dioxide nanotubes (TiO{sub 2} NTs) were prepared via electrochemical oxidation of pure Ti in an ammonium fluoride and glycerol-containing solution. Scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the morphology of the nanotubes. The average diameter, wall thickness and length of the as-prepared TiO{sub 2} NTs were determined. The photosensitive anode made from the highly ordered TiO{sub 2} NTs has good photo-catalytic property, as proven by the decomposition tests on urea, ammonia, sodium sulfide and automobile engine coolant under ultraviolet (UV) radiation. To improve the efficiency of the fuel cell, doping the TiO{sub 2} NTs with a transition metal oxide, NiO, was performed and the photosensitivity of the doped anode was tested under visible light irradiation. It is found that the NiO-doped anode is sensitive to visible light. Also found is that polyaniline-doped photosensitive anode can harvest photon energy in the visible light spectrum range much more efficiently than the NiO-doped one. It is concluded that the nanostructured photoelectrochemical fuel cell can generate electricity and clean fuel by decomposing hazardous materials under sunlight.

  7. Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods Nanostructure, Chemistry and...

  8. Diffusion and related phenomena in bulk nanostructured materials Corresponding author: A. P. Zhilyaev, e-mail: AlexZh@mail.rb.ru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovid'ko Ilya A.

    the paper on finding of low temperature and/or high strain rate superplasticity in nanocrystalline metals Chernogolovka, Moscow District, Russia 6 Institute for Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation and their microstructural characterization, evolution of bulk nanostructured materials during heating. Experimental study

  9. Surface Anchoring of Nematic Phase on Carbon Nanotubes: Nanostructure of Ultra-High Temperature Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogale, Amod A

    2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear energy is a dependable and economical source of electricity. Because fuel supply sources are available domestically, nuclear energy can be a strong domestic industry that can reduce dependence on foreign energy sources. Commercial nuclear power plants have extensive security measures to protect the facility from intruders [1]. However, additional research efforts are needed to increase the inherent process safety of nuclear energy plants to protect the public in the event of a reactor malfunction. The next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) is envisioned to utilize a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design with an operating temperature of 650-1000�°C [2]. One of the most important safety design requirements for this reactor is that it must be inherently safe, i.e., the reactor must shut down safely in the event that the coolant flow is interrupted [2]. This next-generation Gen IV reactor must operate in an inherently safe mode where the off-normal temperatures may reach 1500�°C due to coolant-flow interruption. Metallic alloys used currently in reactor internals will melt at such temperatures. Structural materials that will not melt at such ultra-high temperatures are carbon/graphtic fibers and carbon-matrix composites. Graphite does not have a measurable melting point; it is known to sublime starting about 3300�°C. However, neutron radiation-damage effects on carbon fibers are poorly understood. Therefore, the goal of this project is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the role of nanotexture on the properties of resulting carbon fibers and their neutron-damage characteristics. Although polygranular graphite has been used in nuclear environment for almost fifty years, it is not suitable for structural applications because it do not possess adequate strength, stiffness, or toughness that is required of structural components such as reaction control-rods, upper plenum shroud, and lower core-support plate [2,3]. For structural purposes, composites consisting of strong carbon fibers embedded in a carbon matrix are needed. Such carbon/carbon (C/C) composites have been used in aerospace industry to produce missile nose cones, space shuttle leading edge, and aircraft brake-pads. However, radiation-tolerance of such materials is not adequately known because only limited radiation studies have been performed on C/C composites, which suggest that pitch-based carbon fibers have better dimensional stability than that of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based fibers [4]. The thermodynamically-stable state of graphitic crystalline packing of carbon atoms derived from mesophase pitch leads to a greater stability during neutron irradiation [5]. The specific objectives of this project were: (i) to generating novel carbonaceous nanostructures, (ii) measure extent of graphitic crystallinity and the extent of anisotropy, and (iii) collaborate with the Carbon Materials group at Oak Ridge National Lab to have neutron irradiation studies and post-irradiation examinations conducted on the carbon fibers produced in this research project.

  10. Three-dimensional graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} nanostructures as cathode materials for flexible lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y.H., E-mail: yhding@xtu.edu.cn [College of Chemical Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Institute of Rheology Mechanics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Ren, H.M. [Institute of Rheology Mechanics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Huang, Y.Y. [BTR New Energy Materials Inc., Shenzhen 518000 (China); Chang, F.H.; Zhang, P. [Institute of Rheology Mechanics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} composites as a high-performance cathode material for flexible lithium-ion batteries have been prepared by using a co-precipitation method to synthesize graphene/LiFePO4 powders as precursors and then followed by a solvent evaporation process. - Highlights: • Flexible LiFePO{sub 4}/graphene films were prepared first time by a solvent evaporation process. • The flexible electrode exhibited a high discharge capacity without conductive additives. • Graphene network offers the electrode adequate strength to withstand repeated flexing. - Abstract: Three-dimensional graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} nanostructures for flexible lithium-ion batteries were successfully prepared by solvent evaporation method. Structural characteristics of flexible electrodes were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrochemical performance of graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} was examined by a variety of electrochemical testing techniques. The graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} nanostructures showed high electrochemical properties and significant flexibility. The composites with low graphene content exhibited a high capacity of 163.7 mAh g{sup ?1} at 0.1 C and 114 mAh g{sup ?1} at 5 C without further incorporation of conductive agents.

  11. Graphene and its Hybrid Nanostructures for Nanoelectronics and Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIN, JIAN

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructure for Enhanced Hydrogen Storage. Nano Letters,Electrochemical storage of hydrogen in nanotube materials.

  12. Synthesis of nanostructured materials in supercritical ammonia: nitrides, metals and oxides Desmoulins-Krawiec S., Aymonier C., Loppinet-Serani A., Weill F., Grosse S., Etourneau J., Cansell F.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    N in supercritical cryogenic nitrogen by self-propagating-high- temperature synthesis (6.21 MPa, ­141 °C);19 (ii) GaSynthesis of nanostructured materials in supercritical ammonia: nitrides, metals and oxides. Abstract : In this study, the synthesis of nanostructured particles of nitrides (Cr2N, Co2N, Fe4N, Cu3N, Ni

  13. Deeply-trapped molecules in self-nanostructured gas-phase material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alharbi, M; Debord, B; Gerome, F; Benabid, F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the advent of atom laser-cooling, trapping or cooling natural molecules has been a long standing and challenging goal. Here, we demonstrate a method for laser-trapping molecules that is radically novel in its configuration, in its underlined physical dynamics and in its outcomes. It is based on self-optically spatially-nanostructured high pressure molecular hydrogen confined in hollow-core photonic-crystal-fibre. An accelerating molecular-lattice is formed by a periodic potential associated with Raman saturation except for a 1-dimentional array of nanometer wide and strongly-localizing sections. In these sections, molecules with a speed of as large as 1800 m/s are trapped, and stimulated Raman scattering in the Lamb-Dicke regime occurs to generate high power forward and backward-Stokes continuous-wave laser with sideband-resolved sub-Doppler emission spectrum. The spectrum exhibits a central line with a sub-recoil linewidth of as low as 14 kHz, more than 5 orders-of-magnitude narrower than in convention...

  14. Deeply-trapped molecules in self-nanostructured gas-phase material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Alharbi; A. Husakou; B. Debord; F. Gerome; F. Benabid

    2015-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the advent of atom laser-cooling, trapping or cooling natural molecules has been a long standing and challenging goal. Here, we demonstrate a method for laser-trapping molecules that is radically novel in its configuration, in its underlined physical dynamics and in its outcomes. It is based on self-optically spatially-nanostructured high pressure molecular hydrogen confined in hollow-core photonic-crystal-fibre. An accelerating molecular-lattice is formed by a periodic potential associated with Raman saturation except for a 1-dimentional array of nanometer wide and strongly-localizing sections. In these sections, molecules with a speed of as large as 1800 m/s are trapped, and stimulated Raman scattering in the Lamb-Dicke regime occurs to generate high power forward and backward-Stokes continuous-wave laser with sideband-resolved sub-Doppler emission spectrum. The spectrum exhibits a central line with a sub-recoil linewidth of as low as 14 kHz, more than 5 orders-of-magnitude narrower than in conventional Raman scattering, and sidebands comprising Mollow triplet, molecular motional-sidebands and four-wave-mixing.

  15. Characterization of nanostructured materials for lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustyn, Veronica

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of High Energy-Density Batteries. Electrochemistry: Past and1971). Huggins, R. A. Advanced Batteries: Materials ScienceC. A. & Scrosati, B. Modern Batteries: An Introduction to

  16. An Experimental Study of Deformation and Fracture of a Nanostructured Metallic Material 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel Al, Nisrin Rizek

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    with the finest microstructure. They also point to the need for careful characterization of temperature effects before such materials can be considered in structural applications....

  17. Nanostructured thin film thermoelectric composite materials using conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuryak, Chris A. (Chris Adam)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoelectric materials have the ability to convert heat directly into electricity. This clean energy technology has advantages over other renewable technologies in that it requires no sunlight, has no moving parts, and ...

  18. Molecular Level Assessment of Thermal Transport and Thermoelectricity in Materials: From Bulk Alloys to Nanostructures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinaci, Alper

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    applications. Carbon- and boron nitride-based nanomaterials also offer new opportunities in many applications from thermoelectrics to fast heat removers. For these materials, molecular dynamics calculations are used to evaluate lattice thermal transport. To do...

  19. Incorporation of Novel Nanostructured Materials into Solar Cells and Nanoelectronic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Rene; Pak, Joshua; Holland, Andrew; Hunt, Alan; Bitterwolf, Thomas; Qiang, You; Bergman, Leah; Berven, Christine; Punnoose, Alex; Tenne, Dmitri

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Each of the investigators on this project has had significant accomplishments toward the production of semiconductor nanoparticles, particles, and thin films and attempts to incorporate these materials into photovoltaics or sensors; to use them for improving fluorescence diagnostics; or to employ them as cancer fighting agents. The synthesis and characterization of the nanomaterials, and more recently the device construction and testing of these materials, have been the subject of several publications and presentations by team members. During the course of the investigations, several students were fully involved as part of their graduate and undergraduate training. The nature of these projects in material development dictates that the students have gained significant experience in a diverse array of material-related topics.

  20. A facile route for 3D aerogels from nanostructured 1D and 2D materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Sung Mi

    Aerogels have numerous applications due to their high surface area and low densities. However, creating aerogels from a large variety of materials has remained an outstanding challenge. Here, we report a new methodology ...

  1. Facile synthesis of nanostructured vanadium oxide as cathode materials for efficient Li-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    -ion batteries Yanyi Liu,a Evan Uchaker,a Nan Zhou,ab Jiangang Li,ac Qifeng Zhanga and Guozhong Cao*a Received 23 and VO2 (B) nanorods were tested as active cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. The V2O5 sheet for efficient Li-ion batteries. Introduction The expansion and demands for energy use in the past several

  2. Vanadium oxide based nanostructured materials for catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation of propane : effect of heterometallic centers on the catalyst performance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, M. I.; Deb, S.; Aydemir, K.; Alwarthan, A. A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Miller, J. T.; Marshall, C. L. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Illinois Inst. of Tech.); (King Saud Univ.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic properties of a series of new class of catalysts materials-[Co{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 12}V{sub 18}O{sub 42} (XO{sub 4})].24H{sub 2}O (VNM-Co), [Fe{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 12}V{sub 18}O{sub 42}(XO{sub 4})].24H{sub 2}O (VNM-Fe) (X = V, S) and [H{sub 6}Mn{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 12}V{sub 18}O{sub 42}(VO{sub 4})].30H{sub 2}O for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane is studied. The open-framework nanostructures in these novel materials consist of three-dimensional arrays of {l_brace}V{sub 18}O{sub 42}(XO{sub 4}){r_brace} (X = V, S) clusters interconnected by {l_brace}-O-M-O-{r_brace} (M = Mn, Fe, Co) linkers. The effect of change in the heterometallic center M (M = Mn, Co, Fe) of the linkers on the catalyst performance was studied. The catalyst material with Co in the linker showed the best performance in terms of propane conversion and selectivity at 350 C. The material containing Fe was most active but least selective and Mn containing catalyst was least active. The catalysts were characterized by Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR), BET surface area measurement, Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy, and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. TPR results show that all three catalysts are easily reducible and therefore are active at relatively low temperature. In situ X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) studies revealed that the oxidation state of Co(II) remained unchanged up to 425 C (even after pretreatment). The reduction of Co(II) into metallic form starts at 425 C and this process is completed at 600 C.

  3. Density-Enthalpy Phase Diagram 0D Boiler Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Diagram 0D Boiler Simulation Finite Element Method Further Research Mass and Heat balances V d dt = i - eDensity-Enthalpy Phase Diagram 0D Boiler Simulation Finite Element Method Further Research Finite Transitions #12;Density-Enthalpy Phase Diagram 0D Boiler Simulation Finite Element Method Further Research

  4. Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods DOE 2011 Vehicle Technologies...

  5. Metal oxide nanostructures with hierarchical morphology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Yu (Saline, MI); Banerjee, Debasish (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to metal oxide materials with varied symmetrical nanostructure morphologies. In particular, the present invention provides metal oxide materials comprising one or more metallic oxides with three-dimensionally ordered nanostructural morphologies, including hierarchical morphologies. The present invention also provides methods for producing such metal oxide materials.

  6. Nanostructured Materials for Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    on an already stretched world energy infrastructure. One alternative ener- gy/power source under serious consid of electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). High energy and high power densities for such electrochemical energy stor- age and conversion. It has been inten- sively studied for use as power supplies

  7. Materials Synthesis and Characterization | Center for Functional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility materials synthesis The Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility includes laboratories for producing nanostructured...

  8. First observation of the decay B-0 -> D*D+*(-)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed four fully reconstructed B-0 --> D*+D*- candidates in 5.8 x 10(6) Y(4S) --> B (B) over bar decays recorded with the CLEO detector. The background is estimated to be 0.31 +/- 0.10 events. The probability that the background could...

  9. Novel photonic phenomena in nanostructured material systems with applications and mid-range efficient insensitive wireless energy-transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karalis, Aristeidis, 1978-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of novel mechanisms for the manipulation of light in the nanoscale is provided. In the class of all-dielectric material systems, techniques for the suppression of radiative loss from incomplete-photonic-bandgap ...

  10. Biomedical applications of nanostructured polymer films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Jonathan Brian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Functional polymeric thin films are often stratified with nanometer level structure and distinct purposes for each layer. These nanostructured polymeric materials are useful in a wide variety of applications including drug ...

  11. Branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays B[over-bar] 0 to D[superscript (*)0?0, D[superscript (*)0]?, D[superscript (*)0]?, and D[superscript(*)0]?? and measurement of the polarization in the decay B[over-bar] 0-->D[superscript *0]?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Ray Franklin

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays B? 0-->D0?0, D*0?0, D0?, D*0?, D0?, D*0?, D0??, and D*0??. We measure the branching fractions (×10-4): B(B? 0?D0?0)=2.69±0.09±0.13, B(B? ...

  12. Dendritic metal nanostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Song, Yujiang (Albuquerque, NM); Pereira, Eulalia F. (Vila Nova de Gaia, PT); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dendritic metal nanostructures made using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.

  13. Mesoporous Carbon-based Materials for Alternative Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, Kimberly Michelle

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured materials for advanced energy conversion and storage devices."devices for energy harvesting, storage, and conversion are based on the incorporation of nanostructured

  14. Reliability of Nano-Structured Nickel Interconnections Replacing FlipChip Solder Assembly without Underfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Madhavan

    Reliability of Nano-Structured Nickel Interconnections Replacing FlipChip Solder Assembly without nano-structured nickel as the primary interconnection material. Assembly was accomplished materials such as nanostructured copper and nickel, novel bonding and barrier layers to provide both

  15. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN)

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  16. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in nanostructured materials. Fieldstechniques include scanning probe microscopy, neutron scattering, optical spectroscopy and soft-matter electron and helium ion...

  17. Nanostructures DOI: 10.1002/anie.200600429

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Moore, Yong Ding, and Zhong Lin Wang* Wurtzite-structured materials, such as ZnO, ZnS, GaN, and Al, these nanostructures have been mainly observed for ZnO, although nanosprings of wurtzite-structured AlN[5] and rutile member in the wurtzite family and one of the most important materials in photonics, is a direct wide

  18. First observation of the decays B-0 -> D*- p(p)over-tilde pi(+) and B-0 -> D*- p(n)over-bar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhao, X.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measure the branching fractions B(B-0 --> D*(-) p (p) over bar pi (+)) = (6.5(-1.2)(+1.3) +/- 1.0) X 10(-4) and B(B-0 --> D*(-) p (n) over bar) = (14.5(-3.0)(+3.4) +/- 2.7) X 10(-4). Antineutrons are identified by their annihilation in the Cs...

  19. Synthesis and Enhanced Intercalation Properties of Nanostructured Vanadium Oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    intercalation properties of nanostructured vanadium oxides for energy storage as well as other applications-volume, and environment friendly energy storage/conversion devices are developed, and nanomaterials are attracting great-18 The nanostructured form of this material has been employed in FETs,19 sensors,20,21 spintronic devices,22

  20. Stepwise Nanopore Evolution in One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    dielectric layers in microelectronic devices,5 hydrogen storage materi- als,6 supercapacitor electrodes,7Stepwise Nanopore Evolution in One-Dimensional Nanostructures Jang Wook Choi,, James Mc be used to produce nanopores inside various useful one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures such as zinc oxide

  1. Oriented Nanostructures for Energy Conversion and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun; Cao, Guozhong H.; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Donghai; DuBois, Daniel L.; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Graff, Gordon L.; Pederson, Larry R.; Zhang, Jiguang

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the role of nanostructured materials in addressing the challenges in energy and natural resources has attracted wide attention. In particular, oriented nanostructures have demonstrated promising properties for energy harvesting, conversion and storage. The purpose of the paper is to review the synthesis and application of oriented nanostructures in a few key areas of energy technologies, namely photovoltaics, batteries, supercapacitors and thermoelectrics. Although the applications differ from field to field, one of the fundamental challenges is to improve the generation and transport of electrons and ions. We will first briefly review the several major approaches to attain oriented nanostructured films that are applicable for energy applications. We will then discuss how such controlled nanostructures can be used in photovoltaics, batteries, capacitors, thermoelectrics, and other unconventional ways of energy conversion. We will highlight the role of high surface area to maximize the surface activity, and the importance of optimum dimension and architecture, controlled pore channels and alignment of the nanocrystalline phase to optimize the electrons and ion transport. Finally, the paper will discuss the challenges in attaining integrated architectures to achieve the desired performance. Brief background information will be provided for the relevant technologies, but the emphasis is focused mainly on the nanoeffects of mostly inorganic based materials and devices.

  2. Colloidal Manipulation of Nanostructures: Stable Dispersion and Self-assembly 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Dazhi

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation work addresses two important aspects of nanotechnology - stable dispersion and self-assembly of colloidal nanostructures. Three distinctly different types of nano-scaled materials have been studied: 0-dimensional ZnO quantum dots...

  3. Towards electroformed nanostructured aluminum alloys with high strength and ductility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruan, Shiyun

    Nanostructured Al–Mn alloys are proposed as high-strength low-density materials, which can be electroformed (i.e., produced electrolytically and removed from the substrate) from ionic liquid. A variety of current waveforms, ...

  4. Models of the formation of oxide phases in nanostructured materials based on lead chalcogenides subjected to treatment in oxygen and iodine vapors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maraeva, E. V., E-mail: jenvmar@mail.ru; Moshnikov, V. A.; Tairov, Yu. M. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University 'LETI' (Russian Federation)] [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University 'LETI' (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Model concepts concerning control over the formation of oxide layers during the course of oxidation are developed on the basis of experimental results of studies of systematic features of the formation of nanostructured layers after diffusion annealing. Data on a variation in the composition of oxide phases as the extent of deviation from stoichiometry is changed in the initial lead chalcogenide are presented. Model concepts related to the possibility of varying the thickness of the coating oxide phases using annealing in an oxygen-containing medium are developed. It is shown that annealing in an iodine atmosphere ensures the effective penetration of oxygen into the grains, which is necessary for an increase in the photoluminescence efficiency.

  5. Magnetic/metallic thin films and nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    examples. During the past decade applications of nano-scale magnetic devices to data storage have hadMagnetic/metallic thin films and nanostructures The College of William and MarY;'l Virginia http://www.as.wm.cdu/Faculty/Lukaszcw.html It is widely believed that revolutionary progress can be made as materials and devices are developed to operate

  6. Patterned Magnetic Nanostructures and Quantized Magnetic Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -increasing demands in data storage and to new applications of magnetic devices in the field of sensors. NewPatterned Magnetic Nanostructures and Quantized Magnetic Disks STEPHEN Y. CHOU Invited Paper, opens up new opportunities for engineering innovative magnetic materials and devices, developing ultra

  7. Phonon engineering for nanostructures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubry, Sylvie (Stanford University); Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sullivan, John Patrick; Peebles, Diane Elaine; Hurley, David H. (Idaho National Laboratory); Shinde, Subhash L.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Emerson, John Allen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the physics of phonon transport at small length scales is increasingly important for basic research in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, nanomechanics, and thermoelectrics. We conducted several studies to develop an understanding of phonon behavior in very small structures. This report describes the modeling, experimental, and fabrication activities used to explore phonon transport across and along material interfaces and through nanopatterned structures. Toward the understanding of phonon transport across interfaces, we computed the Kapitza conductance for {Sigma}29(001) and {Sigma}3(111) interfaces in silicon, fabricated the interfaces in single-crystal silicon substrates, and used picosecond laser pulses to image the thermal waves crossing the interfaces. Toward the understanding of phonon transport along interfaces, we designed and fabricated a unique differential test structure that can measure the proportion of specular to diffuse thermal phonon scattering from silicon surfaces. Phonon-scale simulation of the test ligaments, as well as continuum scale modeling of the complete experiment, confirmed its sensitivity to surface scattering. To further our understanding of phonon transport through nanostructures, we fabricated microscale-patterned structures in diamond thin films.

  8. Nanostructures in Skutterudites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In-situ synthesis by thermodynamic means such as phase segregation, for fabricating skutterudite-based nanocomposites yield robust and stable nanostructure phases likely to survive harsh thermoelectric power generation environments

  9. Trends in Thermoelectric Properties with Nanostructure: Ferecrystals...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric Properties with Nanostructure: Ferecrystals with Designed Nanoarchitecture Trends in Thermoelectric Properties with Nanostructure: Ferecrystals with Designed...

  10. Soot Nanostructure: Definition, Quantification, and Implications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soot Nanostructure: Definition, Quantification, and Implications Soot Nanostructure: Definition, Quantification, and Implications 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

  11. Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric Modules Application Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric Modules Application...

  12. Testing CPT Invariance in B^0_d-\\bar{B}^0_d and B^0_s-\\bar{B}^0_s Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ping Ren; Zhi-zhong Xing

    2007-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent CDF and D0 measurements of B^0_s-\\bar{B}^0_s mixing make it possible to search for CP violation and test CPT symmetry in a variety of B_s decays. Considering both coherent B^0_d\\bar{B}^0_d decays at the \\Upsilon (4S) resonance and coherent B^0_s\\bar{B}^0_s decays at the \\Upsilon (5S) resonance, we formulate their time-dependent and time-integrated rates by postulating small CPT violation in B^0_d-\\bar{B}^0_d and B^0_s-\\bar{B}^0_s oscillations. We show that the opposite-sign dilepton events from either C-odd or C-even B^0_q\\bar{B}^0_q states (for q = d or s) can be used to determine or constrain the CPT-violating parameter at a super-B factory. The possibility of distinguishing between the effect of CPT violation and that of \\Delta B = -\\Delta Q transitions is also discussed.

  13. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  14. Molecular Variables in the Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    for materials in order to understand some of the central issues in the creation of supramolecular materi- alsMolecular Variables in the Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Nanostructures Martin U. Pralle, Craig M. Whitaker, Paul V. Braun, and Samuel I. Stupp* Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Department

  15. Nanowires, nanostructures and devices fabricated therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA); Shakouri, Ali (Santa Cruz, CA); Sands, Timothy D. (Moraga, CA); Yang, Peidong (Berkeley, CA); Mao, Samuel S. (Berkeley, CA); Russo, Richard E. (Walnut Creek, CA); Feick, Henning (Kensington, CA); Weber, Eicke R. (Oakland, CA); Kind, Hannes (Schaffhausen, CH); Huang, Michael (Los Angeles, CA); Yan, Haoquan (Albany, CA); Wu, Yiying (Albany, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA)

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    One-dimensional nanostructures having uniform diameters of less than approximately 200 nm. These inventive nanostructures, which we refer to as "nanowires", include single-crystalline homostructures as well as heterostructures of at least two single-crystalline materials having different chemical compositions. Because single-crystalline materials are used to form the heterostructure, the resultant heterostructure will be single-crystalline as well. The nanowire heterostructures are generally based on a semiconducting wire wherein the doping and composition are controlled in either the longitudinal or radial directions, or in both directions, to yield a wire that comprises different materials. Examples of resulting nanowire heterostructures include a longitudinal heterostructure nanowire (LOHN) and a coaxial heterostructure nanowire (COHN).

  16. Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 628 2000 Materials Research Society Hybrid Inorganic/Organic Diblock Copolymers. Nanostructure in Polyhedral Oligomeric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Our main approach to the synthesis and study of hybrid organic/inorganic materials involvesMat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 628 © 2000 Materials Research Society CC2.6.1 Hybrid Inorganic the synthesis of melt processable, linear hybrid polymers containing pendent inorganic clusters, and allows us

  17. Anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Meduri, Praveen; Sumanasekera, Gamini

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An anode material for lithium-ion batteries is provided that comprises an elongated core structure capable of forming an alloy with lithium; and a plurality of nanostructures placed on a surface of the core structure, with each nanostructure being capable of forming an alloy with lithium and spaced at a predetermined distance from adjacent nanostructures.

  18. Process Development for Nanostructured Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic manufacturing is an emerging industry that promises a carbon-free, nearly limitless source of energy for our nation. However, the high-temperature manufacturing processes used for conventional silicon-based photovoltaics are extremely energy-intensive and expensive. This high cost imposes a critical barrier to the widespread implementation of photovoltaic technology. Argonne National Laboratory and its partners recently invented new methods for manufacturing nanostructured photovoltaic devices that allow dramatic savings in materials, process energy, and cost. These methods are based on atomic layer deposition, a thin film synthesis technique that has been commercialized for the mass production of semiconductor microelectronics. The goal of this project was to develop these low-cost fabrication methods for the high efficiency production of nanostructured photovoltaics, and to demonstrate these methods in solar cell manufacturing. We achieved this goal in two ways: 1) we demonstrated the benefits of these coatings in the laboratory by scaling-up the fabrication of low-cost dye sensitized solar cells; 2) we used our coating technology to reduce the manufacturing cost of solar cells under development by our industrial partners.

  19. Multiscale materials design of natural exoskeletons : fish armor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Juha

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological materials have developed hierarchical and heterogeneous material nanostructures and microstructures to provide protection against various environmental threats that, in turn, provide bioinspired clues to man-made, ...

  20. NANO EXPRESS Fabrication of Large Area Periodic Nanostructures Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Hooman

    , such as photonic band-gap materials, high dense data storage, and photonic devices. We have developed a maskless areas, such as photonic band-gap materials [1], high dense data storage [2], and photonic devices [3NANO EXPRESS Fabrication of Large Area Periodic Nanostructures Using Nanosphere Photolithography

  1. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  2. Un-Nanostructuring Solar Cells | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Un-Nanostructuring Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Un-Nanostructuring Solar Cells...

  3. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 44, NO. 7, JULY 2008 1935 Reversal Mechanisms in Ferromagnetic Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeyeye, Adekunle

    devices. A major challenge for technological applications of magnetic nanostructures arrays is the precise Nanostructures A. O. Adeyeye, S. Goolaup, N. Singh, W. Jun, C. C. Wang, S. Jain, and D. Tripathy Information Storage Materials Laboratory (ISML), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National

  4. NANOSTRUCTURED SOLAR CELLS FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY PHOTOVOLTAICS Christiana B. Honsberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honsberg, Christiana

    mechanisms and device structures and materials to implement nanostructured solar cells, and low cost to lattice matching and; (3) the potential for low cost solar cell structures using self to circumvent both existing efficiency and cost drivers. While nanostructured solar cells have significant

  5. Methods for and products of processing nanostructure nitride, carbonitride and oxycarbonitride electrode power materials by utilizing sol gel technology for supercapacitor applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Yuhong (West Hills, CA); Wei, Oiang (West Hills, CA); Chu, Chung-tse (Chatsworth, CA); Zheng, Haixing (Oak Park, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder with high surface area (up to 150 m.sup.2 /g) is prepared by using sol-gel process. The metal organic precursor, alkoxides or amides, is synthesized firstly. The metal organic precursor is modified by using unhydrolyzable organic ligands or templates. A wet gel is formed then by hydrolysis and condensation process. The solvent in the wet gel is then be removed supercritically to form porous amorphous hydroxide. This porous hydroxide materials is sintered to 725.degree. C. under the ammonia flow and porous nitride powder is formed. The other way to obtain high surface area nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder is to pyrolyze polymerized templated metal amides aerogel in an inert atmosphere. The electrochemical capacitors are prepared by using sol-gel prepared nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder. Two methods are used to assemble the capacitors. Electrode is formed either by pressing the mixture of nitride powder and binder to a foil, or by depositing electrode coating onto metal current collector. The binder or coating is converted into a continuous network of electrode material after thermal treatment to provide enhanced energy and power density. Liquid electrolyte is soaked into porous electrode. The electrochemical capacitor assembly further has a porous separator layer between two electrodes/electrolyte and forming a unit cell.

  6. Search for b--> u transitions in B- -> [K+pi-pi0]_D K-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for decays of a B meson into a neutral D meson and a kaon, with the D meson decaying into K+pi-pi0. This final state can be reached through the b --> c transition B- -> D0K- followed by the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed D0 --> K+pi-pi0, or the b --> u transition B- --> D0bar K- followed by the Cabibbo-favored D0bar --> K+ pi-pi 0. The interference of these two amplitudes is sensitive to the angle gamma of the unitarity triangle. We present preliminary results based on 226 10^{6} e+e- --> Y(4s) --> BBbar events collected with the BABAR detector at SLAC. We find no significant evidence for these decays and we set a limit R_ADS =(BR(B- -->[K+pi-pi0]_D K-)+ BR(B+ --> [K-pi+pi0]_D K+))/(BR(B- -->[K-p i+pi0]_D K-)+ BR(B+ --> [K+pi-pi0]_D K+)) D0bar K-)|/|A(B- --> D0bar K-)| < 0.185 at 95% confidence level.

  7. Search for b--> u transitions in B- -> [K+pi-pi0]_D K-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for decays of a B meson into a neutral D meson and a kaon, with the D meson decaying into K+pi-pi0. This final state can be reached through the b --> c transition B- -> D0K- followed by the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed D0 --> K+pi-pi0, or the b --> u transition B- --> D0bar K- followed by the Cabibbo-favored D0bar --> K+ pi-pi0. The interference of these two amplitudes is sensitive to the angle gamma of the unitarity triangle. We present preliminary results based on 226 10^{6} e+e- --> Y(4s) --> BBbar events collected with the BABAR detector at SLAC. We find no significant evidence for these decays and we set a limit R_ADS =(BR(B- -->[K+pi-pi0]_D K-)+ BR(B- --> [K-pi+pi0]_D K+))/(BR(B- -->[K-pi+pi0]_D K-)+ BR(B- --> [K+pi-pi0]_D K+)) D0bar K-)|/|A(B- --> D0bar K-)| < 0.185 at 95% confidence level.

  8. Engineering nanostructured electrodes away from equilibrium for lithium-ion Yanyi Liu, Dawei Liu, Qifeng Zhang and Guozhong Cao*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    - izations of nanostructured materials for energy storage devices. Dawei Liu Dr Dawei Liu is a postdocEngineering nanostructured electrodes away from equilibrium for lithium-ion batteries Yanyi Liu materials, Li-ion batteries have achieved significant progress in energy storage performance since

  9. Nanostructured metal foams: synthesis and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luther, Erik P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tappan, Bryce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mueller, Alex [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mihaila, Bogdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volz, Heather [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cardenas, Andreas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Papin, Pallas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veauthier, Jackie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stan, Marius [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication of monolithic metallic nanoporous materials is difficult using conventional methodology. Here they report a relatively simple method of synthesizing monolithic, ultralow density, nanostructured metal foams utilizing self-propagating combustion synthesis of novel metal complexes containing high nitrogen energetic ligands. Nanostructured metal foams are formed in a post flame-front dynamic assembly with densities as low as 0.011 g/cc and surface areas as high as 270 m{sup 2}/g. They have produced metal foams via this method of titanium, iron, cobalt, nickel, zirconium, copper, palladium, silver, hafnium, platinum and gold. Microstructural features vary as a function of composition and process parameters. Applications for the metal foams are discussed including hydrogen absorption in palladium foams. A model for the sorption kinetics of hydrogen in the foams is presented.

  10. Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves 2012 R&D 100 Award Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves 2012 R&D 100 Award February...

  11. Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including device integration and assembly, chemical and biological sensing, and photocatalysis. For example, a hybrid nanostructure consisting of a semiconductor rod with a...

  12. NANOSTRUCTURE PATTERNING UNDER ENERGETIC PARTICLE BEAM IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lumin [Regents of the University of Michigan; Lu, Wei [Regents of the University of Michigan

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Energetic ion bombardment can lead to the development of complex and diverse nanostructures on or beneath the material surface through induced self-organization processes. These self-organized structures have received particular interest recently as promising candidates as simple, inexpensive, and large area patterns, whose optical, electronic and magnetic properties are different from those in the bulk materials [1-5]. Compared to the low mass efficiency production rate of lithographic methods, these self-organized approaches display new routes for the fabrication of nanostructures over large areas in a short processing time at the nanoscale, beyond the limits of lithography [1,4]. Although it is believed that surface nanostructure formation is based on the morphological instability of the sputtered surface, driven by a kinetic balance between roughening and smoothing actions [6,7], the fundamental mechanisms and experimental conditions for the formation of these nanostructures has still not been well established, the formation of the 3-D naopatterns beneath the irradiated surface especially needs more exploration. During the last funding period, we have focused our efforts on irradiation-induced nanostructures in a broad range of materials. These structures have been studied primarily through in situ electron microscopy during electron or ion irradiation. In particular, we have performed studies on 3-D void/bubble lattices (in metals and CaF2), embedded sponge-like porous structure with uniform nanofibers in irradiated semiconductors (Ge, GaSb, and InSb), 2-D highly ordered pattern of nanodroplets (on the surface of GaAs), hexagonally ordered nanoholes (on the surface of Ge), and 1-D highly ordered ripple and periodic arrays (of Cu nanoparticles) [3,8-11]. The amazing common feature in those nanopatterns is the uniformity of the size of nanoelements (nanoripples, nanodots, nanovoids or nanofibers) and the distance separating them. Our research focuses on the understanding of fundamental scientific basis for the irradiation-induced self-organization processes. The fundamental physical mechanisms underlying ordered pattern formation, which include defect production and migration, ion sputtering, redeposition, viscous flow and diffusion, are investigated through a combination of modeling and in situ and ex-situ observations [3,9,11]. In addition, these nanostructured materials exhibit considerable improvement of optical properties [9,12,13]. For example, patterned Ge with a hexagonally ordered, honeycomb-like structure of nanoscale holes possesses a high surface area and a considerably blue-shifted energy gap [9], and oxidation of ordered Ga droplets shows noticeable enhancement of optical transmission [12]. This research has addressed nanopattern formation in a variety of materials under ion bombardment and provided a fundamental understanding of the dynamic mechanisms involved. In addition, have also stared to systematically investigate pattern formation under ion irradiation for more systems with varied experimental conditions and computation, including the collaboration with Dr. Veena Tikare of Sandia National Laboratory with a hybrid computation method at the ending this grant. A more detailed relationship between nanostructure formation and experimental conditions will be revealed with our continued efforts.

  13. Luminescent systems based on the isolation of conjugated PI systems and edge charge compensation with polar molecules on a charged nanostructured surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Zhao, Bin; Geohegan, David B.; Styers-Barnett, David J.; Hu, Hui

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A photoluminescent or electroluminescent system and method of making a non-luminescent nanostructured material into such a luminescent system is presented. The method of preparing the luminescent system, generally, comprises the steps of modifying the surface of a nanostructured material to create isolated regions to act as luminescent centers and to create a charge imbalance on the surface; applying more than one polar molecule to the charged surface of the nanostructured material; and orienting the polar molecules to compensate for the charge imbalance on the surface of the nanostructured material. The compensation of the surface charge imbalance by the polar molecules allows the isolated regions to exhibit luminescence.

  14. PTG exam 2322011 short answers 75. For this cyclic process: 0dUQW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    PTG exam 2322011 ­ short answers 75. For this cyclic process: 0dUQW a. Q1 + W2 + Q2 + W3 = 0 W3 = ( Q1 + W2 + Q2) = (180 + 50 200) = 30 J; Given off ­W3 = 30 J. Or, if also taking into consideration input W2, then total given off W3 ­ W2 = 20 J (system gain + 20 J) b

  15. Wetting and phase-change phenomena on micro/nanostructures for enhanced heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro/nanostructures have been extensively studied to amplify the intrinsic wettability of materials to create superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic surfaces. Such extreme wetting properties can influence the heat transfer ...

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of 1-, 2- and 3-Dimensional Chalcogenide Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Hyunsung

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. Yan, Q. Zhang and T. M. Tritt, Unique nanostructures and128: p. 3241-3247 T. M. Tritt, THERMOELECTRIC MATERIALS:B. Zhang, J. He and T. M. Tritt, Size-selective high-yield

  17. Three-dimensional nanostructures fabricated by stacking pre-patterned monocrystalline silicon nanomembranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fucetola, Corey Patrick

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis considers the viability of nanomembrane handling and stacking approaches to enable the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) nano-structured materials. Sequentially stacking previously-patterned membranes to ...

  18. Subwavelength resonant nanostructured films for sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Edwards, Daniel L.; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel subwavelength nanostructure architecture that may be utilized for optical standoff sensing applications. The subwavelength structures are fabricated via a combination of nanoimprint lithography and metal sputtering to create metallic nanostructured films encased within a transparent media. The structures are based on the open ring resonator (ORR) architecture and have their analog in resonant LC circuits, which display a resonance frequency that is inversely proportional to the square root of the product of the inductance and capacitance. Therefore, any perturbation of the nanostructured films due to chemical or environmental effects can alter the inductive or capacitive behavior of the subwavelength features, which can shift the resonant frequency and provide an indication of the external stimulus. This shift in resonance can be interrogated remotely either actively using either laser illumination or passively using hyperspectral or multispectral sensing. These structures may be designed to be either anisotropic or isotropic, which can also provide polarization-sensitive interrogation. Due to the nanometer-scale of the structures, they can be tailored to be optically responsive in the visible or near infrared spectrum with a highly reflective resonant peak that is dependent solely on structural dimensions and material characteristics. We present experimental measurements of the optical response of these structures as a function of wavelength, polarization, and incident angle demonstrating the resonant effect in the near infrared region. Numerical modeling data showing the effect of different fabrication parameters such as structure parameters are also discussed.

  19. Giant coercivity of dense nanostructured spark plasma sintered barium hexaferrite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giant coercivity of dense nanostructured spark plasma sintered barium hexaferrite F. Mazaleyrat and dense material together. In this paper, it is shown that the spark plasma sintering method (SPS) is able, Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) allows to produce nonos- tructured Ba-ferrite with a density close to 90

  20. Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report to the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for DE-EE0000210 covers the period from October 1, 2009 to July 31, 2013. Under this project, DOE awarded UConn about $1,248,242 to conduct the research and development on a new class of 3D composite nanostructure based catalysts for lean NOx emission control. Much of the material presented here has already been submitted to DOE/NETL in quarterly technical reports. In this project, through a scalable solution process, we have successfully fabricated a new class of catalytic reactors, i.e., the composite nanostructure array (nano-array) based catalytic converters. These nanocatalysts, distinct from traditional powder washcoat based catalytic converters, directly integrate monolithic substrates together with nanostructures with well-defined size and shape during the scalable hydrothermal process. The new monolithic nanocatalysts are demonstrated to be able to save raw materials including Pt-group metals and support metal oxides by an order of magnitude, while perform well at various oxidation (e.g., CO oxidation and NO oxidation) and reduction reactions (H{sub 2} reduction of NOx) involved in the lean NOx emissions. The size, shape and arrangement of the composite nanostructures within the monolithic substrates are found to be the key in enabling the drastically reduced materials usage while maintaining the good catalytic reactivity in the enabled devices. The further understanding of the reaction kinetics associated with the unique mass transport and surface chemistry behind is needed for further optimizing the design and fabrication of good nanostructure array based catalytic converters. On the other hand, the high temperature stability, hydrothermal aging stability, as well as S-poisoning resistance have been investigated in this project on the nanocatalysts, which revealed promising results toward good chemical and mechanical robustness, as well as S-poisoning resistance. Further investigation is needed for unraveling the understanding, design and selection principles of this new class of nanostructure based monolithic catalysts.

  1. Materials that Power Our World Nanostructured Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Photovoltaics (OPV) Solar C-FD* Selected Markets & Applications Status Addressable Market (2015) Timing Screens, Displays and Solar Electrodes Energy Storage Electrodes and Additives Fuel Cells Bipolar Plates Customer/ Application Business Model nano-cC-FDs & C-Inks Allows Nano-C to Focus on its Core Competencies

  2. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy generation and battery storage via the use ofenergy generation and battery storage via the use of nanos-and storage (e.g lithium-ion rechargeable battery)

  3. Enhanced Catalytic Activities of Nanostructured Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez De La Hoz, Julibeth Milena

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    , and chemical composition of the catalysts. Fortunately, the development of nanotechnology has allowed researchers to control the structure and morphology of catalyst nanoparticles, as well as that of solid supports. Even though, these approaches have enhanced...

  4. Enhanced Catalytic Activities of Nanostructured Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez De La Hoz, Julibeth Milena

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    . Current reliance of the industrial world on catalysis and rapidly increasing worldwide energy prices have motivated the search for improved catalysts allowing more energy-efficient processes. Catalysts performance is affected by the shape, structure...

  5. Chemistry Controls Material's Nanostructure | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and selenium will form selectively into shapes that look like either tadpoles or drumsticks depending on the relative reactivity of the selenium and sulfur precursors. The more...

  6. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2D Titanium Telluride Crystals for Direct Energy Conversion2D Titanium Telluride Crystals for Direct Energy Conver-

  7. Nanostructured Assemblies of Thermoelectric Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter K. Dorhout; Ellen R. Fisher

    2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    At the end of the funding period (March 2003) for our program in ferroelectric oxide nanomaterials, we had 3 publications in print, one more had been submitted and two more were in preparation in peer-reviewed journals and invited symposia lectures had been given since starting the project in the Fall of 1999. We hired two postdoctoral fellows, Dr. Ki-Seog Chang and Dr. Wenzhong Wang. We have also trained two graduate students, Ms. Keri Williams and Ms. Bernadette Hernandez, and one undergraduate student (Mr. Michael Scancella).

  8. Nanostructured Materials for Renewable Alternative Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, Gregory

    2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has been in effect from July 25th, 2008 to July 24th, 2013. It supported 19 graduate students and 6 post-doctoral students and resulted in 23 publications, 7 articles in preparation, 44 presentations, and many other outreach efforts. Two representative recent publications are appended to this report. The project brought in more than $750,000 in cost share from North Carolina State University. The project funds also supported the purchase and installation of approximately $667,000 in equipment supporting solar energy research.

  9. Intensive Variables & Nanostructuring in Magnetostructural Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Laura

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of this project, fundamental inquiry was carried out to investigate, understand and predict the effects of intensive variables, including the structural scale, on magnetostructural phase transitions in the model system of equiatomic FeRh. These transitions comprise simultaneous magnetic and structural phase changes that have their origins in very strong orbital-lattice coupling and thus may be driven by a plurality of effects.

  10. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of new energy generation and storage technologies arenew energy generation and storage technologies is importantBased Energy Storage and Generation Technologies The world

  11. Nanostructured Materials | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota PriusNSRdiodes

  12. Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials and High Efficiency Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruckNanostructued Glass-CeramicInnovationSolar

  13. Nanostructured Materials by Machining | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash,EnergyNanophosphateas Anodes Nanostructuredby

  14. Subtask 5: Functional nanostructured transparent electrode materials |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ... StrengtheningLabSubmittingProductionCenter for

  15. Scanning Probe Direct-Write of Germanium Nanostructures. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probe Direct-Write of Germanium Nanostructures. Scanning Probe Direct-Write of Germanium Nanostructures. Abstract: Bottom-up nanostructure synthesis has played a pivotal role in...

  16. Method for producing nanostructured metal-oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Simpson, Randall L.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Gash, Alexander

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A synthetic route for producing nanostructure metal-oxide-based materials using sol-gel processing. This procedure employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-metal inorganic salts and environmentally friendly solvents such as water and ethanol. The synthesis involves the dissolution of the metal salt in a solvent followed by the addition of a proton scavenger, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Both critical point (supercritical extraction) and atmospheric (low temperature evaporation) drying may be employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively. Using this method synthesis of metal-oxide nanostructured materials have been carried out using inorganic salts, such as of Fe3+, Cr3+, Al3+, Ga3+, In3+, Hf4+, Sn4+, Zr4+, Nb5+, W6+, Pr3+, Er3+, Nd3+, Ce3+, U3+ and Y3+. The process is general and nanostructured metal-oxides from the following elements of the periodic table can be made: Groups 2 through 13, part of Group 14 (germanium, tin, lead), part of Group 15 (antimony, bismuth), part of Group 16 (polonium), and the lanthanides and actinides. The sol-gel processing allows for the addition of insoluble materials (e.g., metals or polymers) to the viscous sol, just before gelation, to produce a uniformly distributed nanocomposites upon gelation. As an example, energetic nanocomposites of FexOy gel with distributed Al metal are readily made. The compositions are stable, safe, and can be readily ignited to thermitic reaction.

  17. Nanostructured Transparent Conducting Oxides via Blockcopolymer Patterning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joung Youn Ellie

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    . This can lead to new device designs of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDS), fuel cells, displays and solar cells. Moreover, the ability to incorporate other various functional materials to form a hybrid with the nanostructured TCO allows possibilities... cell work and the XPS measurements as well as other scientific insights. I am grateful to Dr. K.K. Banger for the help with conductivity measurements as well as the collaborative work on the amorphous TCO. His insights on sol-gel chemistry as well...

  18. Search for the decay (B)over-bar(0) -> D*(0)gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhao, X.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? B 0 ! D H115690 g (and its charge conjugate state). In the SM framework this decay pro- ceeds via W exchange between b and ? d quarks (Fig. 1). Naively, this transition is suppressed by helicity effects and quantum chromodynamic (QCD) color... was replaced by a silicon vertex detector [10] and the argon-ethane gas of the main drift chamber was changed to a helium-propane mixture. This upgrade led to improved resolutions in momentum and specific ionization energy loss (dEH20862dx). The response...

  19. The Shockley-Queisser limit for nanostructured solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yunlu; Munday, Jeremy N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shockley-Queisser limit describes the maximum solar energy conversion efficiency achievable for a particular material and is the standard by which new photovoltaic technologies are compared. This limit is based on the principle of detailed balance, which equates the photon flux into a device to the particle flux (photons or electrons) out of that device. Nanostructured solar cells represent a new class of photovoltaic devices, and questions have been raised about whether or not they can exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit. Here we show that single-junction nanostructured solar cells have a theoretical maximum efficiency of 42% under AM 1.5 solar illumination. While this exceeds the efficiency of a non- concentrating planar device, it does not exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit for a planar device with optical concentration. We conclude that nanostructured solar cells offer an important route towards higher efficiency photovoltaic devices through a built-in optical concentration.

  20. Electrical and dielectric properties of polyanilineAl2O3 nanocomposites derived from various Al2O3 nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    storage devices.10 Nanomaterials are one kind of materials that have sizes smaller than 100 nm in at least nanostructures Jiahua Zhu,a Suying Wei,b Lei Zhang,a Yuanbing Mao,c Jongeun Ryu,d Neel Haldolaarachchige,e David03908j Four Al2O3 nanostructures (i.e. nanofiber, nanoplatelet, nanorod and nanoflake) have been

  1. 2009 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2009-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    For over thirty years, this Gordon Conference has been the premiere meeting for the field of cluster science, which studies the phenomena that arise when matter becomes small. During its history, participants have witnessed the discovery and development of many novel materials, including C60, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, and nanowires. In addition to addressing fundamental scientific questions related to these materials, the meeting has always included a discussion of their potential applications. Consequently, this conference has played a critical role in the birth and growth of nanoscience and engineering. The goal of the 2009 Gordon Conference is to continue the forward-looking tradition of this meeting and discuss the most recent advances in the field of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. As in past meetings, this will include new topics that broaden the field. In particular, a special emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials related to the efficient use, generation, or conversion of energy. For example, we anticipate presentations related to batteries, catalysts, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In addition, we expect to address the controversy surrounding carrier multiplication with a session in which recent results addressing this phenomenon will be discussed and debated. The atmosphere of the conference, which emphasizes the presentation of unpublished results and lengthy discussion periods, ensures that attendees will enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Because only a limited number of participants are allowed to attend this conference, and oversubscription is anticipated, we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. An invitation is not required. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral presentations. Because of the important role that students and postdocs play in the future of this field, we also anticipate to select several posters from young investigators for oral presentations.

  2. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDisposition | NationalMaterials

  3. Thermorheological properties of nanostructured dispersions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Jeremy B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured dispersions, which consist of nanometer-sized particles, tubes, sheets, or droplets that are dispersed in liquids, have exhibited substantially higher thermal conductivities over those of the liquids alone. ...

  4. Methods of fabricating nanostructures and nanowires and devices fabricated therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA); Shakouri, Ali (Santa Cruz, CA); Sands, Timothy D. (Moraga, CA); Yang, Peidong (Berkeley, CA); Mao, Samuel S. (Berkeley, CA); Russo, Richard E. (Walnut Creek, CA); Feick, Henning (Kensington, CA); Weber, Eicke R. (Oakland, CA); Kind, Hannes (Schaffhausen, CH); Huang, Michael (Los Angeles, CA); Yan, Haoquan (Albany, CA); Wu, Yiying (Albany, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA)

    2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    One-dimensional nanostructures having uniform diameters of less than approximately 200 nm. These inventive nanostructures, which we refer to as "nanowires", include single-crystalline homostructures as well as heterostructures of at least two single-crystalline materials having different chemical compositions. Because single-crystalline materials are used to form the heterostructure, the resultant heterostructure will be single-crystalline as well. The nanowire heterostructures are generally based on a semiconducting wire wherein the doping and composition are controlled in either the longitudinal or radial directions, or in both directions, to yield a wire that comprises different materials. Examples of resulting nanowire heterostructures include a longitudinal heterostructure nanowire (LOHN) and a coaxial heterostructure nanowire (COHN).

  5. Methods of fabricating nanostructures and nanowires and devices fabricated therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA); Shakouri, Ali (Santa Cruz, CA); Sands, Timothy D. (Moraga, CA); Yang, Peidong (Berkeley, CA); Mao, Samuel S. (Berkeley, CA); Russo, Richard E. (Walnut Creek, CA); Feick, Henning (Kensington, CA); Weber, Eicke R. (Oakland, CA); Kind, Hannes (Schaffhausen, CH); Huang, Michael (Los Angeles, CA); Yan, Haoquan (Albany, CA); Wu, Yiying (Albany, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    One-dimensional nanostructures having uniform diameters of less than approximately 200 nm. These inventive nanostructures, which we refer to as "nanowires", include single-crystalline homostructures as well as heterostructures of at least two single-crystalline materials having different chemical compositions. Because single-crystalline materials are used to form the heterostructure, the resultant heterostructure will be single-crystalline as well. The nanowire heterostructures are generally based on a semiconducting wire wherein the doping and composition are controlled in either the longitudinal or radial directions, or in both directions, to yield a wire that comprises different materials. Examples of resulting nanowire heterostructures include a longitudinal heterostructure nanowire (LOHN) and a coaxial heterostructure nanowire (COHN).

  6. Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.; BARBOUR,J. CHARLES; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.

    2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon (a-C) films grown on silicon using pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) is correlated to both growth energetic and film thickness. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray reflectivity probe both the topological nature of 3- and 4-fold coordinated carbon atom bonding and the topographical clustering of their distributions within a given film. In general, increasing the energetic of PLD growth results in films becoming more ``diamondlike'', i.e. increasing mass density and decreasing optical absorbance. However, these same properties decrease appreciably with thickness. The topology of carbon atom bonding is different for material near the substrate interface compared to material within the bulk portion of an a-C film. A simple model balancing the energy of residual stress and the free energies of resulting carbon topologies is proposed to provide an explanation of the evolution of topographical bonding clusters in a growing a-C film.

  7. NANOSTRUCTURES, MAGNETIC SEMICONDUCTORS AND SPINELECTRONICS Paata Kervalishvili

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to data storage, switching, lighting and other devices, can lead to substantially new hardwareNANOSTRUCTURES, MAGNETIC SEMICONDUCTORS AND SPINELECTRONICS Paata Kervalishvili Georgian Technical and manipulation on a nanometre scale, which allows the fabrication of nanostructures with the properties mainly

  8. Key Physical Mechanisms in Nanostructured Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Stephan Bremner

    2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to study both theoretically and experimentally the excitation, recombination and transport properties required for nanostructured solar cells to deliver energy conversion efficiencies well in excess of conventional limits. These objectives were met by concentrating on three key areas, namely, investigation of physical mechanisms present in nanostructured solar cells, characterization of loss mechanisms in nanostructured solar cells and determining the properties required of nanostructured solar cells in order to achieve high efficiency and the design implications.

  9. Modeling resonance interference by 0-D slowing-down solution with embedded self-shielding method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Martin, W. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States); Kim, K. S.; Williams, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The resonance integral table based methods employing conventional multigroup structure for the resonance self-shielding calculation have a common difficulty on treating the resonance interference. The problem arises due to the lack of sufficient energy dependence of the resonance cross sections when the calculation is performed in the multigroup structure. To address this, a resonance interference factor model has been proposed to account for the interference effect by comparing the interfered and non-interfered effective cross sections obtained from 0-D homogeneous slowing-down solutions by continuous-energy cross sections. A rigorous homogeneous slowing-down solver is developed with two important features for reducing the calculation time and memory requirement for practical applications. The embedded self-shielding method (ESSM) is chosen as the multigroup resonance self-shielding solver as an integral component of the interference method. The interference method is implemented in the DeCART transport code. Verification results show that the code system provides more accurate effective cross sections and multiplication factors than the conventional interference method for UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel cases. The additional computing time and memory for the interference correction is acceptable for the test problems including a depletion case with 87 isotopes in the fuel region. (authors)

  10. Measurement of D0-D0bar Mixing and CP Violation at BaBar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giulia Casarosa; for the BaBar Collaboration

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a measurement of D0-D0bar mixing and a search for CP violation in the D0->K+K-, pi+pi- and K+-pi-+ channels. We use D0's coming from D*+ decays, so that the flavour of the D0 at production is tagged by the charge of the pion that is also emitted. We also use an independent set of D0's coming directly from the hadronization of the charm quark, but in this case the flavour of the charmed meson is not known. We analyze events collected by the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb-1. We measure the mixing parameter value to be yCP = [0.72 +- 0.18 (stat) +- 0.12 (syst)]%, and exclude the no-mixing hypothesis at 3.3sigma significance. We find no evidence of CP violation, observing DeltaY = [0.09 +- 0.26 (stat) +- 0.06 syst)]% which is consistent with zero.

  11. Probing structure-induced optical behavior in a new class of self-activated luminescent 0D/1D CaWO? metal oxide – CdSe nanocrystal composite heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyu; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Hoy, Jessica; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Li, Zhuo-Qun; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Taylor, Gordon T.; et al

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we synthesize and characterize the structural and optical properties of novel heterostructures composed of (i) semiconducting nanocrystalline CdSe quantum dot (QDs) coupled with (ii) both one and zero-dimensional (1D and 0D) motifs of self-activated luminescence CaWO? metal oxides. Specifically, ~4 nm CdSe QDs have been anchored onto (i) high-aspect ratio 1D nanowires, measuring ~230 nm in diameter and ~3 ?m in length, as well as onto (ii) crystalline 0D nanoparticles (possessing an average diameter of ~ 80 nm) of CaWO? through the mediation of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a connecting linker. Composite formation was confirmed by complementarymore »electron microscopy and spectroscopy (i.e. IR and Raman) data. In terms of luminescent properties, our results show that our 1D and 0D heterostructures evince photoluminescence (PL) quenching and shortened PL lifetimes of CaWO? as compared with unbound CaWO?. We propose that a photo-induced electron transfer process occurs from CaWO? to CdSe QDs, a scenario which has been confirmed by NEXAFS measurements and which highlights a decrease in the number of unoccupied orbitals in the conduction bands of CdSe QDs. By contrast, the PL signature and lifetimes of MPA-capped CdSe QDs within these heterostructures do not exhibit noticeable changes as compared with unbound MPA-capped CdSe QDs. The striking difference in optical behavior between CaWO? nanostructures and CdSe QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. In addition, the PL quenching behaviors for CaWO? within the heterostructure configuration were examined by systematically varying (i) the quantities and coverage densities of CdSe QDs as well as (ii) the intrinsic morphology (and by extension, the inherent crystallite size) of CaWO? itself.« less

  12. Probing structure-induced optical behavior in a new class of self-activated luminescent 0D/1D CaWO? metal oxide – CdSe nanocrystal composite heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyu [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McBean, Coray [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Wang, Lei [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Hoy, Jessica [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Jaye, Cherno [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Liu, Haiqing [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Li, Zhuo-Qun [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Sfeir, Matthew Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, Daniel A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Taylor, Gordon T. [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Misewich, James A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wong, Stanislaus S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we synthesize and characterize the structural and optical properties of novel heterostructures composed of (i) semiconducting nanocrystalline CdSe quantum dot (QDs) coupled with (ii) both one and zero-dimensional (1D and 0D) motifs of self-activated luminescence CaWO? metal oxides. Specifically, ~4 nm CdSe QDs have been anchored onto (i) high-aspect ratio 1D nanowires, measuring ~230 nm in diameter and ~3 ?m in length, as well as onto (ii) crystalline 0D nanoparticles (possessing an average diameter of ~ 80 nm) of CaWO? through the mediation of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a connecting linker. Composite formation was confirmed by complementary electron microscopy and spectroscopy (i.e. IR and Raman) data. In terms of luminescent properties, our results show that our 1D and 0D heterostructures evince photoluminescence (PL) quenching and shortened PL lifetimes of CaWO? as compared with unbound CaWO?. We propose that a photo-induced electron transfer process occurs from CaWO? to CdSe QDs, a scenario which has been confirmed by NEXAFS measurements and which highlights a decrease in the number of unoccupied orbitals in the conduction bands of CdSe QDs. By contrast, the PL signature and lifetimes of MPA-capped CdSe QDs within these heterostructures do not exhibit noticeable changes as compared with unbound MPA-capped CdSe QDs. The striking difference in optical behavior between CaWO? nanostructures and CdSe QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. In addition, the PL quenching behaviors for CaWO? within the heterostructure configuration were examined by systematically varying (i) the quantities and coverage densities of CdSe QDs as well as (ii) the intrinsic morphology (and by extension, the inherent crystallite size) of CaWO? itself.

  13. Controlled placement and orientation of nanostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex K; Yuzvinsky, Thomas D; Fennimore, Adam M

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for controlled deposition and orientation of molecular sized nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) on substrates is disclosed. The method comprised: forming a thin layer of polymer coating on a substrate; exposing a selected portion of the thin layer of polymer to alter a selected portion of the thin layer of polymer; forming a suspension of nanostructures in a solvent, wherein the solvent suspends the nanostructures and activates the nanostructures in the solvent for deposition; and flowing a suspension of nanostructures across the layer of polymer in a flow direction; thereby: depositing a nanostructure in the suspension of nanostructures only to the selected portion of the thin layer of polymer coating on the substrate to form a deposited nanostructure oriented in the flow direction. By selectively employing portions of the method above, complex NEMS may be built of simpler NEMSs components.

  14. METALLIC AND HYBRID NANOSTRUCTURES: FUNDAMENTALS AND APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murph, S.

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This book chapter presents an overview of research conducted in our laboratory on preparation, optical and physico-chemical properties of metallic and nanohybrid materials. Metallic nanoparticles, particularly gold, silver, platinum or a combination of those are the main focus of this review manuscript. These metallic nanoparticles were further functionalized and used as templates for creation of complex and ordered nanomaterials with tailored and tunable structural, optical, catalytic and surface properties. Controlling the surface chemistry on/off metallic nanoparticles allows production of advanced nanoarchitectures. This includes coupled or encapsulated core-shell geometries, nano-peapods, solid or hollow, monometallic/bimetallic, hybrid nanoparticles. Rational assemblies of these nanostructures into one-, two- and tridimensional nano-architectures is described and analyzed. Their sensing, environmental and energy related applications are reviewed.

  15. In Conversation With Materials Scientist Ron Zuckermann

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ron Zuckerman

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov. 11, 2009: Host Alice Egan of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division interviews scientists about their lives and work in language everyone can understand. Her guest Berkeley Lab's Ron Zuckerman, who discusses biological nanostructures and the world of peptoids.

  16. Elastic strain engineering for unprecedented materials properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ju

    “Smaller is stronger.” Nanostructured materials such as thin films, nanowires, nanoparticles, bulk nanocomposites, and atomic sheets can withstand non-hydrostatic (e.g., tensile or shear) stresses up to a significant ...

  17. In Conversation With Materials Scientist Ron Zuckermann

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ron Zuckerman

    2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov. 11, 2009: Host Alice Egan of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division interviews scientists about their lives and work in language everyone can understand. Her guest Berkeley Lab's Ron Zuckerman, who discusses biological nanostructures and the world of peptoids.

  18. Sintering and ripening resistant noble metal nanostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    van Swol, Frank B; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A; Miller, James E; Challa, Sivakumar R

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Durable porous metal nanostructures comprising thin metal nanosheets that are metastable under some conditions that commonly produce rapid reduction in surface area due to sintering and/or Ostwald ripening. The invention further comprises the method for making such durable porous metal nanostructures. Durable, high-surface area nanostructures result from the formation of persistent durable holes or pores in metal nanosheets formed from dendritic nanosheets.

  19. Comment on "coherence and uncertainty in nanostructured organic photovoltaics"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    provide new probes for photovoltaics. The develop- ment ofin Nanostructured Organic Photovoltaics. J. Phys. Chem. Lettin Nanostructured Organic Photovoltaics” Shaul Mukamel

  20. Highly Reversible Mg Insertion in Nanostructured Bi for Mg Ion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversible Mg Insertion in Nanostructured Bi for Mg Ion Batteries. Highly Reversible Mg Insertion in Nanostructured Bi for Mg Ion Batteries. Abstract: Rechargeable magnesium...

  1. Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  2. Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  3. Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Nanostructured...

  4. Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  5. Liquid Evaporation on Superhydrophobic and Superhydrophilic Nanostructured Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miljkovic, Nenad

    Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) images of water evaporation from superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces are presented. The nanostructured surfaces consiste of an array of equidistant ...

  6. Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Photovoltaic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schriver, Maria Christine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decline in photovoltaic efficiency is less dramatic, butefficiency ? = V OC I ?j SC Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure So- lar Cells For this thesis, I made photovoltaic

  7. Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emission Treatment Catalyst Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental Studies of Emission Treatment Catalyst Poster presented at the 16th Directions in...

  8. Conducting polymer nanostructures for biological applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Electronically Conductive Polymer Nanostructures,” Acc.et al. , “Conjugated-Polymer Micro- and Milliactuators for3. Y. Berdichevsky, Y. -H. Lo, “Polymer Microvalve Based on

  9. Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste...

  10. Condensation on Superhydrophobic Copper Oxide Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enright, Ryan

    Condensation is an important process in both emerging and traditional power generation and water desalination technologies. Superhydrophobic nanostructures promise enhanced condensation heat transfer by reducing the ...

  11. Condensation on superhydrophobic copper oxide nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dou, Nicholas (Nicholas Gang)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Condensation is an important process in many power generation and water desalination technologies. Superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces have unique condensation properties that may enhance heat transfer through a ...

  12. The Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND NANOSTRUCTURE INFLUENCES ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THERMOELECTRIC MATERIALS Thermoelectric (TE) materials in a device, the thermoelectric material must be able to withstand the applied thermal and mechanical forces

  13. Survey of Materials for Nanoskiving and Influence of the Cutting Process on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    Survey of Materials for Nanoskiving and Influence of the Cutting Process on the Nanostructures materials (metals, ceramics, semiconductors, and conjugated polymers), deposition techniques (evaporation. The materials tested were: aluminum, titanium, nickel, copper, palladium, silver, platinum, gold, lead, bismuth

  14. High energy density capacitors using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, many pulse power and industrial applications are limited by capacitor performance. While incremental improvements are anticipated from existing capacitor technologies, significant advances are needed in energy density to enable these applications for both the military and for American economic competitiveness. We propose a program to research and develop a novel technology for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Nano-structure multilayer technologies developed at LLNL may well provide a breakthrough in capacitor performance. Our controlled sputtering techniques are capable of laying down extraordinarily smooth sub-micron layers of dielectric and conductor materials. With this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density may be achievable. Well-understood dielectrics and new materials will be investigated for use with this technology. Capacitors developed by nano-structure multilayer technology are inherently solid state, exhibiting extraordinary mechanical and thermal properties. The conceptual design of a Notepad capacitor is discussed to illustrate capacitor and capacitor bank design and performance with this technology. We propose a two phase R&D program to address DNA`s capacitor needs for electro-thermal propulsion and similar pulse power programs. Phase 1 will prove the concept and further our understanding of dielectric materials and design tradeoffs with multilayers. Nano-structure multilayer capacitors will be developed and characterized. As our materials research and modeling prove successful, technology insertion in our capacitor designs will improve the possibility for dramatic performance improvements. In Phase 2, we will make Notepad capacitors, construct a capacitor bank and demonstrate its performance in a meaningful pulse power application. We will work with industrial partners to design full scale manufacturing and move this technology to industry for volume production.

  15. Understanding of the contact of nanostructured thermoelectric n-type Bi[subscript 2]Te[subscript 2.7]Se[subscript 0.3] legs for power generation applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weishu

    Traditional processes of making contacts (metallization layer) onto bulk crystalline Bi2Te3-based materials do not work for nanostructured thermoelectric materials either because of weak bonding strength or an unstable ...

  16. Metal-carbon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puretzky, A.A.; Hettich, R.L.; Jin, Changming; Haufler, R.E.; Compton, R.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tuinman, A.A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafine particles formed by XeCl laser photolysis of M(CO){sub 6}, M = V, Cr, Mo, and W, have been analyzed by Fourier transform mass spectrometry and other techniques. Novel metal carbide clusters, (MoC{sub 4}){sub n}, n = 1 {minus} 4 and (WC{sub 4}){sub m}, m = 1 {minus} 8, were detected and studied. The material produced by photolysis of V(CO){sub 6} shows a series of vanadium-oxygen clusters, V{sub x}O{sub 2x+2}, x = 2 {minus} 10. No clusters of any type were detected in the photolysis product of Cr(CO){sub 6}. Structures based on the experimental evidence are proposed and discussed in light of their chemical reactivity.

  17. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  18. Nanostructures produced by phase-separation during growth of (III-V).sub.1-x(IV.sub.2).sub.x alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, Andrew G. (Evergreen, CO); Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO)

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructures (18) and methods for production thereof by phase separation during metal organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE). An embodiment of one of the methods may comprise providing a growth surface in a reaction chamber and introducing a first mixture of precursor materials into the reaction chamber to form a buffer layer (12) thereon. A second mixture of precursor materials may be provided into the reaction chamber to form an active region (14) on the buffer layer (12), wherein the nanostructure (18) is embedded in a matrix (16) in the active region (14). Additional steps are also disclosed for preparing the nanostructure (18) product for various applications.

  19. Chemically Modified Metal Oxide Nanostructure for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gongming

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrogen generation, and can be possibly applied to other applications such as nanostructured tandem photovoltaic

  20. Laser Directed Growth of Carbon-Based Nanostructures by Plasmon Resonant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Steve

    Laser Directed Growth of Carbon-Based Nanostructures by Plasmon Resonant Chemical Vapor Deposition the strong plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles in the catalytic decomposition of CO to grow various forms of carbonaceous materials. Irradiating gold nanoparticles in a CO environment at their plasmon resonant frequency

  1. Block selective grafting of poly(vinylphosphonic acid) from aromatic multiblock copolymers for nanostructured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -13 Various block28,29 and graft30-33 copolymers, inorganic composites34 as well as interpenetrating networks of Chemistry, Polymer & Materials Chemistry, Lund University, P.O.B. 124, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden *Corresponding be used as a general strategy to prepare durable and functional nanostructured polymer membranes

  2. PetaScale Calculations of the Electronic Structures of Nanostructures with Hundreds of Thousands of Processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PetaScale Calculations of the Electronic Structures of Nanostructures with Hundreds of Thousands in the material science category. The DFT can be used to calculate the electronic structure, the charge density. To understand the electronic structures of such systems and the corresponding carrier dynamics is essential

  3. Sub-Nanostructured Non Transition Metal Complex Grids for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Orhan Talu; Dr. Surendra N. Tewari

    2007-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This project involved growing sub-nanostructured metal grids to increase dynamic hydrogen storage capacity of metal hydride systems. The nano particles of any material have unique properties unlike its bulk form. Nano-structuring metal hydride materials can result in: {sm_bullet}Increased hydrogen molecule dissociation rate, {sm_bullet} Increased hydrogen atom transport rate, {sm_bullet} Decreased decrepitation caused by cycling, {sm_bullet} Increased energy transfer in the metal matrix, {sm_bullet} Possible additional contribution by physical adsorption, and {sm_bullet} Possible additional contribution by quantum effects The project succeeded in making nano-structured palladium using electrochemical growth in templates including zeolites, mesoporous silica, polycarbonate films and anodized alumina. Other metals were used to fine-tune the synthesis procedures. Palladium was chosen to demonstrate the effects of nano-structuring since its bulk hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics are well known. Reduced project funding was not sufficient for complete characterization of these materials for hydrogen storage application. The project team intends to seek further funding in the future to complete the characterization of these materials for hydrogen storage.

  4. Hierarchical Silica Nanostructures Inspired by Diatom Algae Yield Superior Deformability, Toughness, and Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehler, Markus J.

    Hierarchical Silica Nanostructures Inspired by Diatom Algae Yield Superior Deformability, Toughness algae that is mainly composed of amorphous silica, which features a hierarchical structure that ranges in diatom algae as a basis to study a bioinspired nanoporous material implemented in crystalline silica. We

  5. Nanostructured Titania-Polymer Photovoltaic Devices Made Using PFPE-Based Nanomolding Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    Nanostructured Titania-Polymer Photovoltaic Devices Made Using PFPE-Based Nanomolding Techniques heterojunction photovoltaic (PV) cells using a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) elastomeric mold to control the donor photovoltaic materials because they are strong light absorbers and solution pro- cessable and can be deposited

  6. Crab Shells as Sustainable Templates from Nature for Nanostructured Battery Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    electrodes is four times that of existing LiCoO2/graphite batteries.3-5 However, lithium reactsCrab Shells as Sustainable Templates from Nature for Nanostructured Battery Electrodes Hongbin Yao materials issues for enabling next-generation high capacity lithium ion batteries for portable electronics

  7. High-Performance Nanostructured Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The High-Performance Nanostructured Coating fact sheet details a SunShot project led by a University of California, San Diego research team working to develop a new high-temperature spectrally selective coating for receiver surfaces. These receiver surfaces, used in concentrating solar power systems, rely on high-temperature SSCs to effectively absorb solar energy without emitting much blackbody radiation.The optical properties of the SSC directly determine the efficiency and maximum attainable temperature of solar receivers, which in turn influence the power-conversion efficiency and overall system cost.

  8. Ferroelectric nanostructure having switchable multi-stable vortex states

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naumov, Ivan I. (Fayetteville, AR); Bellaiche, Laurent M. (Fayetteville, AR); Prosandeev, Sergey A. (Fayetteville, AR); Ponomareva, Inna V. (Fayetteville, AR); Kornev, Igor A. (Fayetteville, AR)

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A ferroelectric nanostructure formed as a low dimensional nano-scale ferroelectric material having at least one vortex ring of polarization generating an ordered toroid moment switchable between multi-stable states. A stress-free ferroelectric nanodot under open-circuit-like electrical boundary conditions maintains such a vortex structure for their local dipoles when subject to a transverse inhomogeneous static electric field controlling the direction of the macroscopic toroidal moment. Stress is also capable of controlling the vortex's chirality, because of the electromechanical coupling that exists in ferroelectric nanodots.

  9. Electron-beam-induced growth of silicon multibranched nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fonseca, Luis F.; Resto, Oscar; Sola, Francisco [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, P. O. Box 23343, San Juan, 00931-3343 (Puerto Rico)

    2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Although successful nanobranching has been demonstrated for some materials using a variety of methods, the controlled fabrication of multibranched nanostructures of silicon is an important challenge faced by nanotechnologist; because it is crucial for the assembly of electronic interconnects at the atomic scale. Here, we report an electron-beam-induced approach that enables to grow silicon nanobranched structures at specific locations and to control the growth process at the nanoscale level. We further present a detailed in situ imaging of the growth dynamics and explain the results by a qualitative model based on local heating and charge concentration processes.

  10. Nanoparticle modifications of photodefined nanostructures for energy applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polsky, Ronen; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Burckel, David Bruce; Brozik, Susan Marie; Washburn, Cody M.; Wheeler, David Roger

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advancement of materials technology towards the development of novel 3D nanostructures for energy applications has been a long-standing challenge. The purpose of this project was to explore photolithographically defineable pyrolyzed photoresist carbon films for possible energy applications. The key attributes that we explored were as follows: (1) Photo-interferometric fabrication methods to produce highly porous (meso, micro, and nano) 3-D electrode structures, and (2) conducting polymer and nanoparticle-modification strategies on these structures to provide enhanced catalytic capabilities and increase conductivity. The resulting electrodes were then explored for specific applications towards possible use in battery and energy platforms.

  11. International Symposium on Clusters and Nanostructures (Energy, Environment, and Health)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jena, Puru [Distinguished Professor of Physics, VCU

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The international Symposium on Clusters and Nanostructures was held in Richmond, Virginia during November 7-10, 2011. The symposium focused on the roles clusters and nanostructures play in solving outstanding problems in clean and sustainable energy, environment, and health; three of the most important issues facing science and society. Many of the materials issues in renewable energies, environmental impacts of energy technologies as well as beneficial and toxicity issues of nanoparticles in health are intertwined. Realizing that both fundamental and applied materials issues require a multidisciplinary approach the symposium provided a forum by bringing researchers from physics, chemistry, materials science, and engineering fields to share their ideas and results, identify outstanding problems, and develop new collaborations. Clean and sustainable energy sessions addressed challenges in production, storage, conversion, and efficiency of renewable energies such as solar, wind, bio, thermo-electric, and hydrogen. Environmental issues dealt with air- and water-pollution and conservation, environmental remediation and hydrocarbon processing. Topics in health included therapeutic and diagnostic methods as well as health hazards attributed to nanoparticles. Cross-cutting topics such as reactions, catalysis, electronic, optical, and magnetic properties were also covered.

  12. Rare-Earth-Free Nanostructure Magnets: Rare-Earth-Free Permanent Magnets for Electric Vehicle Motors and Wind Turbine Generators: Hexagonal Symmetry Based Materials Systems Mn-Bi and M-type Hexaferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: The University of Alabama is developing new iron- and manganese-based composite materials for use in the electric motors of EVs and renewable power generators that will demonstrate magnetic properties superior to today’s best rare-earth-based magnets. Rare earths are difficult and expensive to refine. EVs and renewable power generators typically use rare earths to make their electric motors smaller and more powerful. The University of Alabama has the potential to improve upon the performance of current state-of-the-art rare-earth-based magnets using low-cost and more abundant materials such as manganese and iron. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate improved performance in a full-size prototype magnet at reduced cost.

  13. Materials at UC Santa Barbara Ranked in the top two programs in the country for research impact and citations, materials research at UC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhmedov, Azer

    as semiconductors · Soft cellular materials · Nanostructured materials by molecular beam epitaxy Solid chemistry to synthesize conjugated polymer composites for use in photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices in energy efficiency in Buildings, Lighting, Computing, Electronics & Photonics, Energy Production & Storage

  14. Distinguishing quantum and classical transport through nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neill Lambert; Clive Emary; Yueh-Nan Chen; Franco Nori

    2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the question of how to distinguish quantum from classical transport through nanostructures. To address this issue we have derived two inequalities for temporal correlations in nonequilibrium transport in nanostructures weakly coupled to leads. The first inequality concerns local charge measurements and is of general validity; the second concerns the current flow through the device and is relevant for double quantum dots. Violation of either of these inequalities indicates that physics beyond that of a classical Markovian model is occurring in the nanostructure.

  15. Extreme solid state refrigeration using nanostructured Bi-Te alloys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lima Sharma, Ana L. (San Jose State University, San Jose, CA); Spataru, Dan Catalin; Medlin, Douglas L.; Sharma, Peter Anand; Morales, Alfredo Martin

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials are desperately needed for cryogenic solid state refrigeration. We have investigated nanostructured Bi-Te alloys for their potential use in Ettingshausen refrigeration to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These alloys form alternating layers of Bi{sub 2} and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} blocks in equilibrium. The composition Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} was identified as having the greatest potential for having a high Ettingshausen figure of merit. Both single crystal and polycrystalline forms of this material were synthesized. After evaluating the Ettingshausen figure of merit for a large, high quality polycrystal, we simulated the limits of practical refrigeration in this material from 200 to 77 K using a simple device model. The band structure was also computed and compared to experiments. We discuss the crystal growth, transport physics, and practical refrigeration potential of Bi-Te alloys.

  16. Neutron occupancy of the 0d5/2 orbital and the N=16 shell closure in 24O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Tshoo; Y. Satou; C. A. Bertulani; H. Bhang; S. Choi; T. Nakamura; Y. Kondo; S. Deguchi; Y. Kawada; Y. Nakayama; K. N. Tanaka; N. Tanaka; Y. Togano; N. Kobayashi; N. Aoi; M. Ishihara; T. Motobayashi; H. Otsu; H. Sakurai; S. Takeuchi; K. Yoneda; F. Delaunay; J. Gibelin; F. M. Marqués; N. A. Orr; T. Honda; T. Kobayashi; T. Sumikama; Y. Miyashita; K. Yoshinaga; M. Matsushita; S. Shimoura; D. Sohler; J. W. Hwang; T. Zheng; Z. H. Li; Z. X. Cao

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    One-neutron knockout from 24O leading to the first excited state in 23O has been measured for a proton target at a beam energy of 62 MeV/nucleon. The decay energy spectrum of the neutron unbound state of 23O was reconstructed from the measured four momenta of the 22O fragment and emitted neutron. A sharp peak was found at Edecay=50$\\pm$3 keV, corresponding to an excited state in 23O at 2.78$\\pm$0.11 MeV, as observed in previous measurements. The longitudinal momentum distribution for this state was consistent with d -wave neutron knockout, providing support for a J{\\pi} assignment of 5/2+. The associated spectroscopic factor was deduced to be C2S(0d5/2)=4.1$\\pm$0.4 by comparing the measured cross section (View the MathML source) with a distorted wave impulse approximation calculation. Such a large occupancy for the neutron 0d5/2 orbital is in line with the N=16 shell closure in 24O.

  17. Correlated exciton dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Patrick, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The absorption and dissipation of energy in semiconductor nanostructures are often determined by excited electron dynamics. In semiconductors, one fundamentally important electronic state is an exciton, an excited electron ...

  18. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanostructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    152 6 Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanostructure Characterization S. J. Pennycook. Introduction The scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is an invaluable tool atom. The STEM works on the same principle as the normal scanning electron microscope (SEM), by forming

  19. Self-Assembly of Organic Nanostructures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Albert

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on investigating the morphologies, optical and photoluminescence properties of porphyrin nanostructures prepared by the self-assembly method. The study is divided into three main parts. In the first part, a large variety...

  20. Radiation Damage in Nanostructured Metallic Films 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Kaiyuan

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    with favorable microstructures and to investigate their response to radiation. The goals of this thesis are to study the radiation responses of several nanostructured metallic thin film systems, including Ag/Ni multilayers, nanotwinned Ag and nanocrystalline Fe...

  1. Radiation Damage in Nanostructured Metallic Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Kaiyuan

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    with favorable microstructures and to investigate their response to radiation. The goals of this thesis are to study the radiation responses of several nanostructured metallic thin film systems, including Ag/Ni multilayers, nanotwinned Ag and nanocrystalline Fe...

  2. Magnetic Nanostructures for post-CMOS Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -high density storage devices. Moreover, the semiconductor industry is looking beyond conventional CMOSMagnetic Nanostructures for post-CMOS Electronics NANOMATERIALS Our goal is to address storage technologies, notably magnetoresistive random access memory and bit-patterned media for ultra

  3. Gold nanostructures and methods of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jin Z. (Santa Cruz, CA); Schwartzberg, Adam (Santa Cruz, CA); Olson, Tammy Y. (Santa Cruz, CA)

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is drawn to novel nanostructures comprising hollow nanospheres and nanotubes for use as chemical sensors, conduits for fluids, and electronic conductors. The nanostructures can be used in microfluidic devices, for transporting fluids between devices and structures in analytical devices, for conducting electrical currents between devices and structure in analytical devices, and for conducting electrical currents between biological molecules and electronic devices, such as bio-microchips.

  4. Commercial Implementation of Model-Based Manufacturing of Nanostructured Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, Terry C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational modeling is an essential tool for commercial production of nanostructured metals. Strength is limited by imperfections at the high strength levels that are achievable in nanostructured metals. Processing to achieve homogeneity at the micro- and nano-scales is critical. Manufacturing of nanostructured metals is intrinsically a multi-scale problem. Manufacturing of nanostructured metal products requires computer control, monitoring and modeling. Large scale manufacturing of bulk nanostructured metals by Severe Plastic Deformation is a multi-scale problem. Computational modeling at all scales is essential. Multiple scales of modeling must be integrated to predict and control nanostructural, microstructural, macrostructural product characteristics and production processes.

  5. Nanostructured electrocatalyst for fuel cells : silica templated synthesis of Pt/C composites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stechel, Ellen Beth; Switzer, Elise E.; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov; Cornelius, Christopher James; Hibbs, Michael R.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Platinum-based electrocatalysts are currently required for state-of-the-art fuel cells and represent a significant portion of the overall fuel cell cost. If fuel cell technology is to become competitive with other energy conversion technologies, improve the utilization of precious metal catalysts is essential. A primary focus of this work is on creating enhanced nanostructured materials which improve precious-metal utilization. The goal is to engineer superior electrocatalytic materials through the synthesis, development and investigation of novel templated open frame structures synthesized in an aerosol-based approach. Bulk templating methods for both Pt/C and Pt-Ru composites are evaluated in this study and are found to be limited due to the fact that the nanostructure is not maintained throughout the entire sample. Therefore, an accurate examination of structural effects was previously impossible. An aerosol-based templating method of synthesizing nanostructured Pt-Ru electrocatalysts has been developed wherein the effects of structure can be related to electrocatalytic performance. The aerosol-based templating method developed in this work is extremely versatile as it can be conveniently modified to synthesize alternative materials for other systems. The synthesis method was able to be extended to nanostructured Pt-Sn for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media. Nanostructured Pt-Sn electrocatalysts were evaluated in a unique approach tailored to electrocatalytic studies in alkaline media. At low temperatures, nanostructured Pt-Sn electrocatalysts were found to have significantly higher ethanol oxidation activity than a comparable nanostructured Pt catalyst. At higher temperatures, the oxygen-containing species contribution likely provided by Sn is insignificant due to a more oxidized Pt surface. The importance of the surface coverage of oxygen-containing species in the reaction mechanism is established in these studies. The investigations in this work present original studies of anion exchange ionomers as entrapment materials for rotating disc electrode (RDE) studies in alkaline media. Their significance is linked to the development of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with the same ionomer for a KOH-free alkaline fuel cell (AFC).

  6. Fabrication of nanostructure by physical vapor deposition with glancing angle deposition technique and its applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horprathum, M., E-mail: mati.horprathum@nectec.or.th; Eiamchai, P., E-mail: mati.horprathum@nectec.or.th; Patthanasettakul, V.; Limwichean, S.; Nuntawong, N.; Chindaudom, P. [Optical Thin-Film Laboratory National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, Pathumthani, 12120 (Thailand); Kaewkhao, J. [Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science (CEGM), Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); Chananonnawathorn, C. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Thammasat University, Pathumthani, 12121 (Thailand)

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A nanostructural thin film is one of the highly exploiting research areas particularly in applications in sensor, photocatalytic, and solar-cell technologies. In the past two decades, the integration of glancing-angle deposition (GLAD) technique to physical vapor deposition (PVD) process has gained significant attention for well-controlled multidimensional nanomorphologies because of fast, simple, cost-effective, and mass-production capability. The performance and functional properties of the coated thin films generally depend upon their nanostructural compositions, i.e., large aspect ratio, controllable porosity, and shape. Such structural platforms make the fabricated thin films very practical for several realistic applications. We therefore present morphological and nanostructural properties of various deposited materials, which included metals, i.e., silver (Ag), and oxide compounds, i.e., tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}), titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), and indium tin oxide (ITO). Different PVD techniques based on DC magnetron sputtering and electron-beam evaporation, both with the integrated GLAD component, were discussed. We further explore engineered nanostructures which enable controls of optical, electrical, and mechanical properties. These improvements led to several practical applications in surface-enhanced Raman, smart windows, gas sensors, self-cleaning materials and transparent conductive oxides (TCO)

  7. Titanate and titania nanostructures and nanostructure assemblies, and methods of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Mao, Yuanbing

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to nanomaterials and assemblies including, a micrometer-scale spherical aggregate comprising: a plurality of one-dimensional nanostructures comprising titanium and oxygen, wherein the one-dimensional nanostructures radiate from a hollow central core thereby forming a spherical aggregate.

  8. Modification of phonon processes in nano-structured rare-earth-ion-doped crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Thomas; Thiel, Charles W; Cone, Rufus L; Barclay, Paul E; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-structuring impurity-doped crystals affects the phonon density of states and thereby modifies the atomic dynamics induced by interaction with phonons. We propose the use of nano-structured materials in the form of powders or phononic bandgap crystals to enable, or improve, persistent spectral hole-burning and optical coherence for inhomogeneously broadened absorption lines in rare-earth-ion-doped crystals. This is crucial for applications such as ultra-precise radio-frequency spectrum analyzers and certain approaches to optical quantum memories. We specifically discuss how phonon engineering can enable spectral hole burning in erbium-doped materials operating in the telecommunication band, and present simulations for density of states of nano-sized powders and phononic crystals for the case of Y$_2$SiO$_5$, a widely-used material in current quantum memory research.

  9. Data:8a8c7944-2910-48e5-9b38-f949d0d09d04 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    -f949d0d09d04 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  10. Data:B974b2b8-ef21-4643-a755-ad38f0d4ddc4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5-ad38f0d4ddc4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  11. Data:F09c66e9-260d-43f2-b321-8dadf0d50f7e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    dadf0d50f7e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2....

  12. Data:F1581d23-25c9-4809-8929-157a0d37d5d2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    157a0d37d5d2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2....

  13. Droplet Impingement Cooling Experiments on Nano-structured Surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Yen-Po

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    ), was defined based on the radial temperature profiles inside the impact zone to quantify the effects of the nano-structured surface in droplet cooling. Results indicate that larger effective cooling area can be achieved using nano-structured surface...

  14. Cation dopant distributions in nanostructures of transition-metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dopant distributions in nanostructures of transition-metal doped ZnO:Monte Carlo simulations. Cation dopant distributions in nanostructures of transition-metal doped ZnO:Monte...

  15. Electronic noise in nanostructures: limitations and sensing applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jong Un

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    and their characteristic length is close to acoustical phonon wavelength. Moreover, because nanostructures include significantly fewer charge carriers than microscale structures, electronic noise in nanostructures is enhanced compared to microscale structures. Additionally...

  16. Electronic noise in nanostructures: limitations and sensing applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jong Un

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructures are nanometer scale structures (characteristic length less than 100 nm) such as nanowires, ultra-small junctions, etc. Since nanostructures are less stable, their characteristic volume is much smaller compared to defect sizes...

  17. Nanostructured polymer composites for electronics and sensor applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Nanostructured polymer composites for electronics and sensor applications Wednesday November 10 Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI Nanostructured composites based on polymer matrix and carbon nanotubes (CNT), metallic nanoparticles and polymer core-shell latex systems will play a critical role

  18. Jumping-Droplet-Enhanced Condensation on Scalable Superhydrophobic Nanostructured Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miljkovic, Nenad

    When droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, the resulting droplet can jump from the surface due to the release of excess surface energy. If designed properly, these superhydrophobic nanostructured ...

  19. Jumping Droplet Dynamics on Scalable Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miljkovic, Nenad

    Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and high speed images of coalescence-induced droplet jumping on a nanostructured superhydrophobic copper oxide (CuO) surface are presented. Nanostructured CuO films were ...

  20. PNNL Enhanced Pool-Boiling Heat Transfer Using Nanostructured Surfaces

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Close-up video of boiling taking place on a nanostructured surface in a controlled laboratory experiment.

  1. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and CdS based bifunctional core–shell nanostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Joshy; Nishad, K.K.; Sharma, M.; Gupta, D.K. [Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Bhopal 462026, MP (India)] [Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Bhopal 462026, MP (India); Singh, R.R. [ITM University, NH 75, Jhansi Road, Gwalior 474001, MP (India)] [ITM University, NH 75, Jhansi Road, Gwalior 474001, MP (India); Pandey, R.K., E-mail: prof.rkpandey@gmail.com [ITM University, NH 75, Jhansi Road, Gwalior 474001, MP (India)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? First report on a room temperature aqueous process for growth of a hybrid core shell nanostructure containing a magnetic core and a semiconducting shell. ? Formation of distinct core shell nanostructure revealed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. ? A bifunctional nature combining magnetic as well as photoresponce for the as synthesised core shell nanostructures demonstrated. ? A tendency towards self organisation of the core–shell nanostructure. ? Possible applications including purification and isolation of biological materials, drug delivery system, bio-labels, spintronics, etc. -- Abstract: A room temperature solution process for synthesis of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and their hybrid core shell nanostructures using CdS as the shell material has been described. The as grown particles have been characterised using XRD, Rietveld refinement, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, superconducting quantum interference device, optical absorbance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. A superparamagnetic response revealed from the magnetisation measurements of the as synthesised magnetite nanoparticles was retained even after the growth of the CdS shell. From luminescence and high resolution atomic force microscopy measurements, it is shown that the core–shell structures advantageously combine magnetic as well as fluorescence response with a tendency towards self-organization.

  2. Materials Research Department Annual Report 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Research Department Annual Report 2001 P u b l i s h e d b y t h e M a t e r i a l s R e 1-3 Scientific work 4-24 A multiscale view 4-5 Metal structures 6-7 Materials mechanics 8-9 Composite materials 10-11 Nanostructured materials 12-13 The fuel cell programme 14-17 Biological physics 18

  3. Hydrothermally grown nanostructured WO films and their electrochromic characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Hydrothermally grown nanostructured WO 3 films and their electrochromic characteristics.1088/0022-3727/43/28/285501 Hydrothermally grown nanostructured WO3 films and their electrochromic characteristics Zhihui Jiao1 , Xiao Wei and their electrochromic characteristics. Plate-like monoclinic WO3 nanostructures were grown directly on fluorine

  4. Mn-Substituted Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Materials Based on ZnSe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    for optoelectronics and information storage technology. In this study, we demonstrate that the hybrid nanostructuresMn-Substituted Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Materials Based on ZnSe: Nanostructures That May Lead are highly desirable and extremely attractive in the development of new multifunctional devices

  5. Measurement of D0-D0bar Mixing and CP Violation in Two-Body D0 Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Lees; others

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of D0-D0bar mixing and CP violation using the ratio of lifetimes simultaneously extracted from a sample of D0 mesons produced through the flavor-tagged process D*+ -> D0 pi+, where D0 decays to K-+pi+-, K-K+, or pi-pi+, along with the untagged decays D0 -> K-+pi+- and D0 -> K-K+. The lifetimes of the CP-even, Cabibbo-suppressed modes K-K+ and pi-pi+ are compared to that of the CP-mixed mode K-+pi+- in order to measure yCP and DeltaY. We obtain yCP = [0.72 +- 0.18 (stat) +- 0.12 (syst)]% and DeltaY = [0.09 +- 0.26 (stat) +- 0.06 (syst)]%, where DeltaY constrains possible CP violation. The yCP result excludes the null mixing hypothesis at 3.3 sigma significance. This analysis is based on an integrated luminosity of 468 fb-1 collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  6. Nanostructure and Shape Control in Polymer-Ceramic Hybrids from Poly(ethylene oxide)-block-Poly(hexyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    #12;Nanostructure and Shape Control in Polymer-Ceramic Hybrids from Poly(ethylene oxide: amphiphiles; block copolymers; morphology; nanocomposites; structure-directing agent Introduction The study of amphiphilic block copolymer-derived, organic- inorganic hybrid materials is an emerging research field

  7. From 1D Chain to 3D Network: Tuning Hybrid II-VI Nanostructures and Their Optical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    and synthesized a family of novel organic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposites based on II-VI semiconductorsFrom 1D Chain to 3D Network: Tuning Hybrid II-VI Nanostructures and Their Optical Properties of these nanocomposite materials have been characterized by single crystal and/or powder X-ray diffraction methods. [Zn

  8. Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Indium Under the Nanoscope In this work, Lee et al. investigated the small-scale plastic deformation of indium nanopillars, a previously unstudied material and crystal...

  9. Synthesis of nanostructured SiC using the pulsed laser deposition technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, H.X. [Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 23343, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States); Feng, P.X. [Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931 (Puerto Rico); Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 23343, San Juan, PR 00931 (Puerto Rico)], E-mail: peterxianping@vmail.uprrp.edu; Makarov, V.; Weiner, B.R. [Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931 (Puerto Rico); Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 23346, San Juan, PR 00931 (Puerto Rico); Morell, G. [Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931 (Puerto Rico); Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 23343, San Juan, PR 00931 (Puerto Rico)

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the new results on the direct synthesis of nanostructured silicon carbide (SiC) materials using the pulsed laser deposition technique. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that SiC nanoholes, nanosprouts, nanowires, and nanoneedles were obtained. The crystallographic structure, chemical composition, and bond structure of the nanoscale SiC materials were investigated using X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The transverse optical mode and longitudinal optical mode in Raman spectra were found to become sharper as the substrate temperature was increased, while the material structure evolved from amorphous to crystalline.

  10. Nanoscale topographical replication of graphene architecture by artificial DNA nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Y.; Seo, S.; Park, J.; Park, T.; Ahn, J. R., E-mail: jrahn@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, J.; Dugasani, S. R. [Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, S. H. [College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, S. H., E-mail: sunghapark@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite many studies on how geometry can be used to control the electronic properties of graphene, certain limitations to fabrication of designed graphene nanostructures exist. Here, we demonstrate controlled topographical replication of graphene by artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nanostructures. Owing to the high degree of geometrical freedom of DNA nanostructures, we controlled the nanoscale topography of graphene. The topography of graphene replicated from DNA nanostructures showed enhanced thermal stability and revealed an interesting negative temperature coefficient of sheet resistivity when underlying DNA nanostructures were denatured at high temperatures.

  11. Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qinghui

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geisz, Sarah Kurtz, M. W. Wanlass, J. S. Ward, A. Duda, D.D.J. Aiken, and M.W. Wanlass, “Direct-bonded GaAs/InGaAs

  12. Solution Phase Routes to Functional Nanostructured Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauda, Iris Ester

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    O. 12 % Efficiency CuIn(Se,S) 2 Photovoltaic Device PreparedO. 12% Efficiency CuIn(Se,S) 2 Photovoltaic Device Preparedphotovoltaic devices have demonstrated high power conversion efficiencies

  13. Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qinghui

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prospects for photovoltaic efficiency enhancement using low-Prospects for photovoltaic efficiency enhancement using low-Prospects for photovoltaic efficiency enhancement using low-

  14. Metal Oxide Nanostructured Materials for Optical and Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Michael Christopher

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and solar fuels Sunlight is an abundant source of clean, renewable power that supplies 36,000 terawatts of power to

  15. Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qinghui

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency of solar panels and power to weight ratio insolar cells, there exist two basic processes to convert sunlight power topower to a load connected when charged by Sun. The typical output voltage of a silicon based solar

  16. Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qinghui

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells,” Nano Lett. 8 (electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells,” Nano Letters 8,

  17. Solution Phase Routes to Functional Nanostructured Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauda, Iris Ester

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Performance bySolid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell with an Amphiphilicthe Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells by Co-Grafting

  18. Thermal Characterization of Nanostructures and Advanced Engineered Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Vivek Kumar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene and Graphene Oxide Films,” (In Preparation). 18.TIMs) with Graphene Fillers,” (In Preparation). 35. Yu, W. ,Graphene and Graphene Oxide Films,” (In preparation for

  19. Author's Accepted Manuscript Hybrid nanostructured materials for high-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    consumer electronics, hybrid electric vehicles, to large industrial scale power and energy management of electrochemical energy storage (EES) systems which are critical to a variety of applications ranging from portable. Owing to their capability to deliver high power performance and extremely long cycle life

  20. Thermal Characterization of Nanostructures and Advanced Engineered Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Vivek Kumar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    within Acoustically Hard Polycrystalline Diamond Barriers,”of CVD grown polycrystalline diamond films …………………… 42discovered that polycrystalline diamond films can be grown

  1. Thermal Characterization of Nanostructures and Advanced Engineered Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Vivek Kumar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yan, Y. , Zhang, Q. and Tritt, T.M. , “High ThermoelectricOxford 1963. 3. Tritt, T.M. , “Thermal Conductivity: Theory,

  2. Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qinghui

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1000 suns);23.22%(1 sun) Absorption Energy Overlap (eV) Fig.ways for centuries. The Sun creates its energy through aoptimum energy level separations at 1000 suns and 46050 suns

  3. Thermal Characterization of Nanostructures and Advanced Engineered Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Vivek Kumar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene Oxide 5.0 wt% epoxy resin Wang et al. [36] Grapheneincludes graphene, epoxy (resin+hardener) and surfactant (Density of silver epoxy (resin + hardener) was determined to

  4. Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qinghui

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for concentrator photovoltaic cells (CPV) is 100 K – 200 Kimplementing photovoltaic and photochemical cells on largeConcentrated Photovoltaic (CPV) cells have been demonstrated

  5. Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qinghui

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and intensity. The short circuit current can be expressed byas the sum of short circuit current and dark current, whichcondition that the short circuit current is exactly equal to

  6. Solution Phase Routes to Functional Nanostructured Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauda, Iris Ester

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rate Rechargeable Lithium Batteries. Small 2011, 7, 407–414.Rate Rechargeable Lithium Batteries. Small 2011, 7, 407?414.Rate Rechargeable Lithium Batteries: Relationships among

  7. Solution Phase Routes to Functional Nanostructured Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauda, Iris Ester

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Electrochemical Supercapacitors. ” Oral Presentation atE. Electrochemical Supercapacitors: Scientific FundamentalsOxide Thin Film Based Supercapacitors. Curr. Appl. Phys.

  8. Metal Oxide Nanostructured Materials for Optical and Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Michael Christopher

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    enhancements produced by a bowtie nanoanten- na. NatureOptical Coupling of Single “Bowtie” Nanoantennas Resonant in

  9. Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qinghui

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the intermediate band solar cell under nonideal space chargeInGaP/GaAs tandem solar cells,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 70, 381 (band impact ionization and solar cell efficiency,” J. Appl.

  10. Solution Phase Routes to Functional Nanostructured Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauda, Iris Ester

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon Nanotubes as Supercapacitor Electrodes. J. Phys.Z. Enhancing the Supercapacitor Performance of Graphene/MnO

  11. Solution Phase Routes to Functional Nanostructured Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauda, Iris Ester

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Networks: Ag 2 Se Gels and Aerogels by Cation ExchangeArea Vanadium Oxide Aerogels. Electrochem. Solid State Lett.of a 3D Graphene/Nanoparticle Aerogel. Adv. Mater. 2011, 23,

  12. Thermal Characterization of Nanostructures and Advanced Engineered Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Vivek Kumar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boundary Resistance at GaN/substrate Interface,” Electron.Diamond with GaN Substrate for Improved ThermalDiamond with GaN Substrate for Improved Thermal

  13. Solution Phase Routes to Functional Nanostructured Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauda, Iris Ester

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. ; Li, J. Enhanced Photocatalysis by Doping Cerium intofrom catalysis and photocatalysis to solar energy harvestingenergy harvesting and photocatalysis generally require mid-

  14. Composite, nanostructured, super-hydrophobic material - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the

  15. Multifunctional Nanostructured Materials for Processing of Biomass | The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.SolarUS Dept ofActingMultidimensionalwithAmes

  16. 3D Printing of nanostructured catalytic materials | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, 2014Energy,FNeedDepartmentD Printing3D

  17. Nanostructured materials for advanced catalyst design | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruckNanostructued

  18. Nano-structured Materials as Anodes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash,Energy NRELNamrata Kolachalam About UsAnodes

  19. University of Kentucky Chemical and Materials Engineering Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rankin, Stephen E.

    synthesis and characterization of materials with advanced nanostructure and properties. Examples and control the "bottom- up" formation of these inorganic materials by polymerization, controlled. Understand self-assembly and its use for materials synthesis 6. Be able to apply physical chemical

  20. University of Kentucky Chemical and Materials Engineering Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rankin, Stephen E.

    the chemical synthesis and characterization of materials with advanced nanostructure and properties. Examples and control the "bottom-up" formation of these inorganic materials by polymerization, controlled precipitation. Understand self-assembly and its use for materials synthesis 6. Be able to apply physical chemical

  1. Emerging quasi-0D states at vanishing total entropy of the 1D hard sphere system: a coarse-grained similarity to the car parking problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroshi Frusawa

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A coarse-grained system of one-dimensional (1D) hard spheres (HSs) is created using the Delaunay tessellation, which enables one to define the quasi-0D state. It is found from comparing the quasi-0D and 1D free energy densities that a frozen state due to the emergence of quasi-0D HSs is thermodynamically more favorable than fluidity with a large-scale heterogeneity above crossover volume fraction of $\\phi_c=e/(1+e)=0.731\\cdots$, at which the total entropy of the 1D state vanishes. The Delaunay-based lattice mapping further provides a similarity between the dense HS system above $\\phi_c$ and the jamming limit in the car parking problem.

  2. OPTICAL AND DYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF UNDOPED AND DOPED SEMICONDUCTOR NANOSTRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, C D; Zhang, J Z

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter provides an overview of some recent research activities on the study of optical and dynamic properties of semiconductor nanomaterials. The emphasis is on unique aspects of these properties in nanostructures as compared to bulk materials. Linear, including absorption and luminescence, and nonlinear optical as well as dynamic properties of semiconductor nanoparticles are discussed with focus on their dependence on particle size, shape, and surface characteristics. Both doped and undoped semiconductor nanomaterials are highlighted and contrasted to illustrate the use of doping to effectively alter and probe nanomaterial properties. Some emerging applications of optical nanomaterials are discussed towards the end of the chapter, including solar energy conversion, optical sensing of chemicals and biochemicals, solid state lighting, photocatalysis, and photoelectrochemistry.

  3. Numerical analysis of nanostructures for enhanced light extraction from OLEDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zschiedrich, L; Burger, S; Schmidt, F; 10.1117/12.2001132

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructures, like periodic arrays of scatters or low-index gratings, are used to improve the light outcoupling from organic light-emitting diodes (OLED). In order to optimize geometrical and material properties of such structures, simulations of the outcoupling process are very helpful. The finite element method is best suited for an accurate discretization of the geometry and the singular-like field profile within the structured layer and the emitting layer. However, a finite element simulation of the overall OLED stack is often beyond available computer resources. The main focus of this paper is the simulation of a single dipole source embedded into a twofold infinitely periodic OLED structure. To overcome the numerical burden we apply the Floquet transform, so that the computational domain reduces to the unit cell. The relevant outcoupling data are then gained by inverse Flouqet transforming. This step requires a careful numerical treatment as reported in this paper.

  4. Sonochemically Prepared Nanostructured Amorphous Molybdenum Sulfide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    . CLASSIFICATION form: amorphous, nanostructured fine powder function: hydrodesulfurization catalyst, lubricant and energy diffusion out of the bubble. As a result, extreme temperatures and pressures are achieved within/s. These unique and severe conditions can be used to drive chemical reactions within the bubble; one result

  5. Data:Cd13dc44-d0d6-46f0-bb39-fb84b30f7517 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cd13dc44-d0d6-46f0-bb39-fb84b30f7517 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  6. Data:Cf8bf5b4-fc53-4727-9f68-0d064fea712d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cf8bf5b4-fc53-4727-9f68-0d064fea712d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  7. Data:Ffc4d3a6-0d64-4f98-8247-016b66f80f14 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    >> Category:Categories Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleData:Ffc4d3a6-0d64-4f98-8247-016b66f80f14&oldid606947" Category: Utility Rates What links...

  8. Research News Structured Porous Materials via Colloidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    to Metals** By Orlin D. Velev* and Eric W. Kaler The formation of nanostructured materials by using applications in optical information processing and storage, advanced coatings, catalysis, and other emerging, dried colloidal crystals are very brittle and may disperse in water. Any practical device thus requires

  9. COMMUNICATION www.MaterialsViews.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    materials and other advanced designs in Li ion based storage devices. Graphitic carbon is widely used* Surface-Coverage-Dependent Cycle Stability of Core-Shell Nanostructured Electrodes for Use in Lithium Ion and portable devices. Recently, a dramatic increase in the use of smartphones and hand-held tablet devices

  10. 320 MRS BULLETIN VOLUME 38 APRIL 2013 www.mrs.org/bulletin 2013 Materials Research Society Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    due to the potential applications in electronics, biosensors, and energy storage devices.1­4 Large units with Nanostructured paper for flexible energy and electronic devices Guangyuan Zheng, Yi Cui materials on earth. In the past decade, research on nanostructures of cellu- lose has increased dramatically

  11. Neutron Scattering Studies of Nanomagnetism and Artificially Structured Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Bader, S.D.; Borchers, J.A.; Felcher, G.P.; Furdyna, J.K.; Hoffmann, A.; Kortright, J.B.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Schulthess, T.C.; Sinha, S.K.; Toney, M.F.; Weller, D.; Wolf, S.

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured magnetic materials are intensively studied due to their unusual properties and promise for possible applications. The key issues in these materials relate to the connection between their physical properties (transport, magnetism, mechanical, etc.) and their chemical-physical structure. In principle, a detailed knowledge of the chemical and physical structure allows calculation of their physical properties. Theoretical and computational methods are rapidly evolving so that magnetic properties of nanostructured materials might soon be predicted. Success in this endeavor requires detailed quantitative understanding of the magnetic structure and properties.

  12. Metal oxide and metal fluoride nanostructures and methods of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Stanislaus S. (Stony Brook, NY); Mao, Yuanbing (Los Angeles, CA)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes pure single-crystalline metal oxide and metal fluoride nanostructures, and methods of making same. These nanostructures include nanorods and nanoarrays.

  13. Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emission Control Catalysts Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission Control Ultra-efficient, Robust and Well-defined Nano-Array based Monolithic Catalysts...

  14. Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission Control Monolithic Metal Oxide based Composite Nanowire Lean NOx Emission Control...

  15. Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for...

  16. Direct-Write of Silicon and Germanium Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    They have demonstrated the ability to directly "write" nanostructures of Si, Ge, and SiGe with deterministic size, geometry, and placement control. As purity is essential for...

  17. amorphous biophotonic nanostructure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanostructure Anitescu, Mihai 169 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

  18. Multilevel interference lithography--fabricating sub-wavelength periodic nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chih-Hao, 1980-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Periodic nanostructures have many exciting applications, including high-energy spectroscopy, patterned magnetic media, photonic crystals, and templates for self-assembly. Interference lithography (IL) is an attractive ...

  19. Catalytic Nanostructures | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C lKieling ,CatalysisPortalCatalytic

  20. Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDisposition |MaterialsMatt10Laser,Measuring

  1. Hafnia-Based Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramana, Chintalapalle; Choudhuri, Ahsan

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are critical technologies for future gas turbine engines of advanced coal based power generation systems. TBCs protect engine components and allow further increase in engine temperatures for higher efficiency. In this work, nanostructured HfO{sub 2}-based coatings, namely Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized HfO{sub 2} (YSH), Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized HfO{sub 2} (GSH) and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}-HfO{sub 2} (YSZH) were investigated for potential TBC applications in hydrogen turbines. Experimental efforts are aimed at creating a fundamental understanding of these TBC materials. Nanostructured ceramic coatings of YSH, GSH and YSZH were grown by physical vapor deposition methods. The effects of processing parameters and ceramic composition on the microstructural evolution of YSH, GSH and YSZH nanostructured coatings was studied using combined X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Electron microscopy analyses. Efforts were directed to derive a detailed understanding of crystal-structure, morphology, and stability of the coatings. In addition, thermal conductivity as a function of composition in YSH, YSZH and GSH coatings was determined. Laboratory experiments using accelerated test environments were used to investigate the relative importance of various thermo-mechanical and thermo-chemical failure modes of TBCs. Effects of thermal cycling, oxidation and their complex interactions were evaluated using a syngas combustor rig.

  2. Millifluidics for time-resolved mapping of the growth of gold nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sai Krishna, Katla; Navin, Chelliah; Biswas, Sanchita; Singh, Varshni; Ham, Kyungmin; Bovencamp, L. S.; Theegala, Chandra; Miller, Jeffrey T; Spivey, James J.; Kumar, Challa S.S.R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative in situ characterization tools are essential for understanding the reaction mechanisms leading to the growth of nanoscale materials. Though techniques, such as in situ transmission X-ray microscopy, fast single-particle spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, etc., are currently being developed, these tools are complex, not easily accessible, and do not necessarily provide the temporal resolution required to follow the formation of nanomaterials in real time. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the utility of a simple millifluidic chip for an in situ real time analysis of morphology and dimension-controlled growth of gold nano- and microstructures with a time resolution of 5 ms. The structures formed were characterized using synchrotron radiation-based in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, 3-D X-ray tomography, and high-resolution electron microscopy. These gold nanostructures were found to be catalytically active for conversion of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, providing an example of the potential opportunities for time-resolved analysis of catalytic reactions. While the investigations reported here are focused on gold nanostructures, the technique can be applied to analyze the time-resolved growth of other types of nanostructured metals and metal oxides. With the ability to probe at least a 10-fold higher concentrations, in comparison with traditional microfluidics, the tool has potential to revolutionize a broad range of fields from catalysis, molecular analysis, biodefense, and molecular biology.

  3. Effect of interstitials on tensile strength and creep in nanostructured Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, W.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Polytechnic University, Six Metrotech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Whang, S.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Polytechnic University, Six Metrotech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States)]. E-mail: swhang@poly.edu; Mirshams, R.A. [Department of Engineering Technology, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-0679 (United States)

    2005-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The tensile, creep and anelastic behavior of nanostructured nickel doped and un-doped with boron was investigated. Specimen material with an average grain size of around 30 nm produced by the pulse electrodeposition method contains impurities such as carbon, sulfur and boron. The interstitials content does not have notable impact on the tensile strength at room temperature and 373 K. But, at 473 K, the minor change in sulfur content from 0.03 to 0.061 at.% raises the ultimate strength by 150 MPa while the boron doping further improves the tensile strength. On the other hand, with increasing sulfur content in nanostructured Ni, the ductility decreases. All the specimens exhibit significant anelastic relaxation from room temperature to 473 K. The creep test results show that both minimum creep rate and creep strain significantly decrease with increasing sulfur or by doping boron in nanostructured nickel. The stress exponent in the expression of Coble-type creep increases to around five at 373 and 473 K from two at room temperature. A model for grain boundary sliding, in which grain boundary dislocations and back stress are introduced, has successfully explained the large stress exponents. The calculated back stress indicates that the interstitials in grain boundaries effectively retard the sliding of grain boundary dislocations.

  4. Nanoscience and Nanostructures for Photovoltaics and Solar Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    Nanoscience and Nanostructures for Photovoltaics and Solar Fuels Arthur J. Nozik National Renewable to enhance the power conversion efficiency of solar cells for photovoltaic and solar fuels production of the technological status of nanocrystals and nanostructures for third generation photovoltaic cells and solar fuels

  5. Nickel Electroplating for Nanostructure Mold Fabrication * Xiaohui Lin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    Nickel Electroplating for Nanostructure Mold Fabrication * Xiaohui Lin1 , Xinyuan Dou1 , Xiaolong demonstrated a practical process of fabricating nickel molds for nanoimprinting. Dual-side polished glass is chosen as the substrate on which nickel nanostructures are successfully electroplated. Photonic crystal

  6. The 2013 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures Gordon Research Conference/Gordon Research Seminar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauss, Todd D. [University of Rochester

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental properties of small particles and their potential for groundbreaking applications are among the most exciting areas of study in modern physics, chemistry, and materials science. The Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures Gordon ResearchConference and Gordon Research Seminar synthesize contributions from these inter-related fields that reflect the pivotal role of nano-particles at the interface between these disciplines. Size-dependent optical, electronic, magnetic and catalytic properties offer prospects for applications in many fields, and possible solutions for many of the grand challenges facing energy generation, consumption, delivery, and storage in the 21st century. The goal of the 2013 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures Gordon Research Conference and Gordon Research Seminar is to continue the historical interdisciplinary tradition of this series and discuss the most recent advances, basic scientific questions, and emerging applications of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. The Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC/GRS traditionally brings together the leading scientific groups that have made significant recent advances in one or more fundamental nanoscience or nanotechnology areas. Broad interests of the DOE BES and Solar Photochemistry Program addressed by this meeting include the areas of solar energy to fuels conversion, new photovoltaic systems, fundamental characterization of nanomaterials, magnetism, catalysis, and quantum physics. The vast majority of speakers and attendees will address either directly the topic of nanotechnology for photoinduced charge transfer, charge transport, and catalysis, or will have made significant contributions to related areas that will impact these fields indirectly. These topics have direct relevance to the mission of the DOE BES since it is this cutting-edge basic science that underpins our energy future.

  7. Matrix-assisted energy conversion in nanostructured piezoelectric arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sirbuly, Donald J.; Wang, Xianying; Wang, Yinmin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nanoconverter is capable of directly generating electricity through a nanostructure embedded in a polymer layer experiencing differential thermal expansion in a stress transfer zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or substantially vertically aligned on a substrate. The resulting nanoforest is then embedded with the polymer layer, which transfers stress to the nanostructures in the stress transfer zone, thereby creating a nanostructure voltage output due to the piezoelectric effect acting on the nanostructure. Electrodes attached at both ends of the nanostructures generate output power at densities of .about.20 nW/cm.sup.2 with heating temperatures of .about.65.degree. C. Nanoconverters arrayed in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured transition metal oxides for energy storage devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jong Woung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nanostructured transition metal oxides for energy storage devicesnanostructured transition metal oxides for energy storage devices

  9. Gradient nanostructures for interfacing microfluidics and nanofluidics Nanostructure Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gradient nanostructures for interfacing microfluidics and nanofluidics Han Caoa) Nanostructure to emerge.2,3 In order to uniformly stretch long DNA, the dimensions of nanofluidic structures should the performance of the nanofluidic devices Fig. 1 a . One solution is to fabricate a micropost array in front

  10. Thermal conductivity of bulk nanostructured lead telluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hori, Takuma [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Chen, Gang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Shiomi, Junichiro, E-mail: shiomi@photon.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal conductivity of lead telluride with embedded nanoinclusions was studied using Monte Carlo simulations with intrinsic phonon transport properties obtained from first-principles-based lattice dynamics. The nanoinclusion/matrix interfaces were set to completely reflect phonons to model the maximum interface-phonon-scattering scenario. The simulations with the geometrical cross section and volume fraction of the nanoinclusions matched to those of the experiment show that the experiment has already reached the theoretical limit of thermal conductivity. The frequency-dependent analysis further identifies that the thermal conductivity reduction is dominantly attributed to scattering of low frequency phonons and demonstrates mutual adaptability of nanostructuring and local disordering.

  11. Nanostructures in Skutterudites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash,EnergyNanophosphateas AnodesNanostructures in

  12. Nanostructured bilayered vanadium oxide electrodes for rechargeable sodium-ion batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tepavcevic, S.; Xiong, H.; Stamenkovic, V.R.; Zuo, X.; Balasubramanian, M.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Johnson, C.S.; Rajh, T. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); ( CNM); ( MSD); (University of Chicago)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tailoring nanoarchitecture of materials offers unprecedented opportunities in utilization of their functional properties. Nanostructures of vanadium oxide, synthesized by electrochemical deposition, are studied as a cathode material for rechargeable Na-ion batteries. Ex situ and in situ synchrotron characterizations revealed the presence of an electrochemically responsive bilayered structure with adjustable intralayer spacing that accommodates intercalation of Na{sup +} ions. Sodium intake induces organization of overall structure with appearance of both long- and short-range order, while deintercalation is accompanied with the loss of long-range order, whereas short-range order is preserved. Nanostructured electrodes achieve theoretical reversible capacity for Na{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 5} stoichiometry of 250 mAh/g. The stability evaluation during charge-discharge cycles at room temperature revealed an efficient 3 V cathode material with superb performance: energy density of {approx}760 Wh/kg and power density of 1200 W/kg. These results demonstrate feasibility of development of the ambient temperature Na-ion rechargeable batteries by employment of electrodes with tailored nanoarchitectures.

  13. A Roadmap to Control Penguin Effects in $B^0_d\\to J/?K_{\\rm S}^0$ and $B^0_s\\to J/??$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristof De Bruyn; Robert Fleischer

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of CP violation in $B^0_d\\to J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0$ and $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi \\phi$ decays play key roles in testing the quark-flavour sector of the Standard Model. The theoretical interpretation of the corresponding observables is limited by uncertainties from doubly Cabibbo-suppressed penguin topologies. With continuously increasing experimental precision, it is mandatory to get a handle on these contributions, which cannot be calculated reliably in QCD. In the case of the measurement of $\\sin2\\beta$ from $B^0_d\\to J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0$, the $U$-spin-related decay $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0$ offers a tool to control the penguin effects. As the required measurements are not yet available, we use data for decays with similar dynamics and the $SU(3)$ flavour symmetry to constrain the size of the expected penguin corrections. We predict the CP asymmetries of $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0$ and present a scenario to fully exploit the physics potential of this decay, emphasising also the determination of hadronic parameters and their comparison with theory. In the case of the benchmark mode $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi \\phi$ used to determine the $B^0_s$-$\\bar B^0_s$ mixing phase $\\phi_s$ the penguin effects can be controlled through $B^0_d\\to J/\\psi \\rho^0$ and $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi \\bar{K}^{*0}$ decays. The LHCb collaboration has recently presented pioneering results on this topic. We analyse their implications and present a roadmap for controlling the penguin effects.

  14. Nanostructured Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sholklapper, Tal Zvi

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to directly and efficiently convert the chemical energy in hydrocarbon fuels to electricity places the technology in a unique and exciting position to play a significant role in the clean energy revolution. In order to make SOFC technology cost competitive with existing technologies, the operating temperatures have been decreased to the range where costly ceramic components may be substituted with inexpensive metal components within the cell and stack design. However, a number of issues have arisen due to this decrease in temperature: decreased electrolyte ionic conductivity, cathode reaction rate limitations, and a decrease in anode contaminant tolerance. While the decrease in electrolyte ionic conductivities has been countered by decreasing the electrolyte thickness, the electrode limitations have remained a more difficult problem. Nanostructuring SOFC electrodes addresses the major electrode issues. The infiltration method used in this dissertation to produce nanostructure SOFC electrodes creates a connected network of nanoparticles; since the method allows for the incorporation of the nanoparticles after electrode backbone formation, previously incompatible advanced electrocatalysts can be infiltrated providing electronic conductivity and electrocatalysis within well-formed electrolyte backbones. Furthermore, the method is used to significantly enhance the conventional electrode design by adding secondary electrocatalysts. Performance enhancement and improved anode contamination tolerance are demonstrated in each of the electrodes. Additionally, cell processing and the infiltration method developed in conjunction with this dissertation are reviewed.

  15. Controlled nanostructuration of polycrystalline tungsten thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girault, B. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Institut de Recherche en Genie Civil et Mecanique (UMR CNRS 6183), LUNAM Universite, Universite de Nantes, Centrale Nantes, CRTT, 37 Bd de l'Universite, BP 406, 44602 Saint-Nazaire Cedex (France); Eyidi, D.; Goudeau, P.; Guerin, P.; Bourhis, E. Le; Renault, P.-O. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Sauvage, T. [CEMHTI/CNRS (UPR 3079 CNRS), Universite d'Orleans, 3A rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured tungsten thin films have been obtained by ion beam sputtering technique stopping periodically the growing. The total thickness was maintained constant while nanostructure control was obtained using different stopping periods in order to induce film stratification. The effect of tungsten sublayers' thicknesses on film composition, residual stresses, and crystalline texture evolution has been established. Our study reveals that tungsten crystallizes in both stable {alpha}- and metastable {beta}-phases and that volume proportions evolve with deposited sublayers' thicknesses. {alpha}-W phase shows original fiber texture development with two major preferential crystallographic orientations, namely, {alpha}-W<110> and unexpectedly {alpha}-W<111> texture components. The partial pressure of oxygen and presence of carbon have been identified as critical parameters for the growth of metastable {beta}-W phase. Moreover, the texture development of {alpha}-W phase with two texture components is shown to be the result of a competition between crystallographic planes energy minimization and crystallographic orientation channeling effect maximization. Controlled grain size can be achieved for the {alpha}-W phase structure over 3 nm stratification step. Below, the {beta}-W phase structure becomes predominant.

  16. Silicon enhancement mode nanostructures for quantum computing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of silicon, enhancement mode nanostructures for solid-state quantum computing will be described. A primary motivation of this research is the recent unprecedented manipulation of single electron spins in GaAs quantum dots, which has been used to demonstrate a quantum bit. Long spin decoherence times are predicted possible in silicon qubits. This talk will focus on silicon enhancement mode quantum dot structures that emulate the GaAs lateral quantum dot qubit but use an enhancement mode field effect transistor (FET) structure. One critical concern for silicon quantum dots that use oxides as insulators in the FET structure is that defects in the metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) stack can produce both detrimental electrostatic and paramagnetic effects on the qubit. Understanding the implications of defects in the Si MOS system is also relevant for other qubit architectures that have nearby dielectric passivated surfaces. Stable, lithographically defined, single-period Coulomb-blockade and single-electron charge sensing in a quantum dot nanostructure using a MOS stack will be presented. A combination of characterization of defects, modeling and consideration of modified approaches that incorporate SiGe or donors provides guidance about the enhancement mode MOS approach for future qubits and quantum circuit micro-architecture.

  17. Nanowires and Nanostructures That Grow Like Polymer Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, Santosh [Iowa State University; Cademartiri, Ludovico [Ames Laboratory

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Unique properties (e.g., rubber elasticity, viscoelasticity, folding, reptation) determine the utility of polymer molecules and derive from their morphology (i.e., one-dimensional connectivity and large aspect ratios) and flexibility. Crystals do not display similar properties because they have smaller aspect ratios, they are rigid, and they are often too large and heavy to be colloidally stable. We argue, with the support of recent experimental studies, that these limitations are not fundamental and that they might be overcome by growth processes that mimic polymerization. Furthermore, we (i) discuss the similarities between crystallization and polymerization, (ii) critically review the existing experimental evidence of polymer-like growth kinetic and behavior in crystals and nanostructures, and (iii) propose heuristic guidelines for the synthesis of “polymer-like” crystals and assemblies. Understanding these anisotropic materials at the boundary between molecules and solids will determine whether we can confer the unique properties of polymer molecules to crystals, expanding them with topology, dynamics, and information and not just tuning them with size.

  18. Porous Materials Porous Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Porous Materials x Porous Materials · Physical properties * Characteristic impedance p = p 0 e -jk xa- = vej[ ] p x - j ; Zc= p ve = c ka 0k = c 1-j #12;2 Porous Materials · Specific acoustic impedance Porous Materials · Finite thickness ­ blocked p e + -jk (x-d)a p e - jk (x-d)a d x #12

  19. Tunable nanostructured composite with built-in metallic wire-grid electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Micheli, Davide, E-mail: davide.micheli@uniroma1.it; Pastore, Roberto; Marchetti, Mario [Department of Astronautics, Electrical and Energy Engineering, University of Rome Sapienza Via Eudossiana, 18, 00184 – Rome (Italy)] [Department of Astronautics, Electrical and Energy Engineering, University of Rome Sapienza Via Eudossiana, 18, 00184 – Rome (Italy); Gradoni, Gabriele [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Paint Branch Drive, MD-20740 (United States)] [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Paint Branch Drive, MD-20740 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the authors report an experimental demonstration of microwave reflection tuning in carbon nanostructure-based composites by means of an external voltage supplied to the material. DC bias voltages are imparted through a metal wire-grid. The magnitude of the reflection coefficient is measured upon oblique plane-wave incidence. Increasing the bias from 13 to 700 V results in a lowering of ?20 dB, and a “blueshift” of ?600 MHz of the material absorption resonance. Observed phenomena are ascribed to a change of the dielectric response of the carbon material. Inherently, the physical role of tunneling between nanofillers (carbon nanotubes) is discussed. Achievements aim at the realization of a tunable absorber. There are similar studies in literature that focus on tunable metamaterials operating at either optical or THz wavelengths.

  20. Nanostructured Composite Electrodes for Lithium Batteries (Final Technical Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meilin Liu, James Gole

    2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to explore new ways to create nanostructured electrodes for rechargeable lithium batteries. Of particular interests are unique nanostructures created by electrochemical deposition, etching and combustion chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). Three-dimensional nanoporous Cu6Sn5 alloy has been successfully prepared using an electrochemical co-deposition process. The walls of the foam structure are highly-porous and consist of numerous small grains. This represents a novel way of creating porous structures that allow not only fast transport of gas and liquid but also rapid electrochemical reactions due to high surface area. The Cu6Sn5 samples display a reversible capacity of {approx}400 mAhg-1. Furthermore, these materials exhibit superior rate capability. At a current drain of 10 mA/cm2(20C rate), the obtainable capacity was more than 50% of the capacity at 0.5 mA/cm2 (1C rate). Highly open and porous SnO2 thin films with columnar structure were obtained on Si/SiO2/Au substrates by CCVD. The thickness was readily controlled by the deposition time, varying from 1 to 5 microns. The columnar grains were covered by nanoparticles less than 20 nm. These thin film electrodes exhibited substantially high specific capacity. The reversible specific capacity of {approx}3.3 mAH/cm2 was demonstrated for up to 80 cycles at a charge/discharge rate of 0.3 mA/cm2. When discharged at 0.9 mA/cm2, the capacity was about 2.1 mAH/cm2. Tin dioxide box beams or tubes with square or rectangular cross sections were synthesized using CCVD. The cross-sectional width of the SnO2 tubules was tunable from 50 nm to sub-micrometer depending on synthesis temperature. The tubes are readily aligned in the direction perpendicular to the substrate surface to form tube arrays. Silicon wafers were electrochemically etched to produce porous silicon (PS) with honeycomb-type channels and nanoporous walls. The diameters of the channels are about 1 to 3 microns and the depth of the channels can be up to 100 microns. We have successfully used the PS as a matrix for Si-Li-based alloy. Other component(s) can be incorporated into the PS either by an electroless metallization or by kinetically controlled vapor deposition.

  1. Metal-polymer composites comprising nanostructures and applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Jeon, Sea Ho (Dracut, MA); Mack, Nathan H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-polymer composites, and methods of making and use thereof, said composites comprising a thermally-cured dense polyaniline substrate; an acid dopant; and, metal nanostructure deposits wherein the deposits have a morphology dependent upon the acid dopant.

  2. Metal-polymer composites comprising nanostructures and applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Jeon, Sea Ho (Dracut, MA); Mack, Nathan H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-polymer composites, and methods of making and use thereof, said composites comprising a thermally-cured dense polyaniline substrate; an acid dopant; and, metal nanostructure deposits wherein the deposits have a morphology dependent upon the acid dopant.

  3. Porous Core-Shell Nanostructures for Catalytic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewers, Trevor David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C.Y Mou. Catalytic nano-rattle of Au@ hollow silica: towardshollow nanostructures induced by the Kirkendall effect: The basic concept. NanoHollow mesoporous aluminosilica spheres with perpendicular pore channels as catalytic nanoreactors. ACS Nano,

  4. Ballistic Transport in Nanostructures, and its Application to Functionalized Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzari, Nicola

    We developed and implemented a first-principles based theory of the Landauer ballistic conductance, to determine the transport properties of nanostructures and molecular-electronics devices. Our approach starts from a ...

  5. Electric-Field-Enhanced Condensation on Superhydrophobic Nanostructured Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miljkovic, Nenad

    When condensed droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, the resulting droplet can jump due to the conversion of excess surface energy into kinetic energy. This phenomenon has been shown to enhance ...

  6. Aktuelle Veranstaltungen Thema: Ab initio description of transport in nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Ralf

    transport also phonon transport is important for example in nanostructured thermoelectrics. Further-135 Vortragender: Erandy Ramirez ICN-UNAM Mexico Inhalt: We calculate perturbed and background quantities for two

  7. Fourier Analysis and Autocorrelation Function Applied to Periodical Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockett, Angus

    Fourier Analysis and Autocorrelation Function Applied to Periodical Nanostructures E. Cruz Microscopy (AFM) Image Fast Fourier Transformation Autocorrelation Function(AC) Angular Distribution] Fourier Analysis: analytical and geometrical aspects, Bray William O ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, 1994

  8. Growth of nanostructures with controlled diameter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfefferle, Lisa; Haller, Gary; Ciuparu, Dragos

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition metal-substituted MCM-41 framework structures with a high degree of structural order and a narrow pore diameter distribution were reproducibly synthesized by a hydrothermal method using a surfactant and an anti-foaming agent. The pore size and the mesoporous volume depend linearly on the surfactant chain length. The transition metals, such as cobalt, are incorporated substitutionally and highly dispersed in the silica framework. Single wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow diameter distribution that correlates with the pore diameter of the catalytic framework structure were prepared by a Boudouard reaction. Nanostructures with a specified diameter or cross-sectional area can therefore be predictably prepared by selecting a suitable pore size of the framework structure.

  9. Nanostructures from hydrogen implantation of metals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWatters, Bruce Ray (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on hydrogen and helium implantations of aluminum, including complementary experimental results and computational modeling of this system. Experimental results show the evolution of the surface morphology as the hydrogen ion fluence increases from 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce porosity on the order of 10 nm. Computational modeling demonstrates the formation of alanes, their desorption, and the resulting etching of aluminum surfaces that likely drives the nanostructures that form in the presence of hydrogen.

  10. Doped carbon nanostructure field emitter arrays for infrared imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korsah, Kofi (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Baylor, Larry R (Farragut, TN) [Farragut, TN; Caughman, John B (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Rack, Philip D (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An infrared imaging device and method for making infrared detector(s) having at least one anode, at least one cathode with a substrate electrically connected to a plurality of doped carbon nanostructures; and bias circuitry for applying an electric field between the anode and the cathode such that when infrared photons are adsorbed by the nanostructures the emitted field current is modulated. The detectors can be doped with cesium to lower the work function.

  11. asjc0d2.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not FoundInformation DOEInformation Summary Big*Theea2/316Cap plasticity.6

  12. eodd0d4.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+eGallon:FinalThe State3/%2A,. .,', , !, ,

  13. High Yield Synthesis of Mesoscopic Conductive and Dispersible Carbon Nanostructures via Ultrasonication of Commercial Precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, Vikram K [ORNL] [ORNL; Quinlan, Ronald [ORNL] [ORNL; Agapov, Alexander L [ORNL] [ORNL; Kisliuk, Alexander [ORNL] [ORNL; Bhat, Gajanan [ORNL] [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to produce large quantities of graphenic materials displaying excellent conductivity, thermal resistance, and tunable properties for industrial applications has spurred interest in new techniques for exfoliating graphite. In this paper, sonication-assisted exfoliation of graphitic precursors in the presence of chloroform is shown to produce chemically and structurally unique exfoliated graphitic materials in high yields. These exfoliated graphites, referred to as mesographite and mesographene, respectively, exhibit unique properties which depend on the number of layers and exfoliation conditions. Structural characterization of mesographene reveals the presence of nanoscale two-dimensional graphene layers, and threedimensional carbon nanostructures sandwiched between layers, similar to those found in ball-milled and intercalated graphites. The conductivities of mesographite and mesographene are 2700 and 2000 S/m, respectively, indicating high conductivity despite flake damage. Optical absorption measurements of mesographite sonicated in various solvents showed significant changes in dispersion characteristics, and also indicated significant changes to mesoscopic colloidal behavior. A mechanism for functionalization and formation of capped carbon nanostructures is proposed by integrating the chemical and structural characterization in relation to the various carbon structures observed by electron microscopy. Composites based on common polymers were prepared by solution processing, and changes in thermal properties indicate improved dispersion of mesographite in polar polymers.

  14. Nano-structure multilayer technology fabrication of high energy density capacitors for the power electronic building book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W.; Johnson, G.W.; Wagner, A.V.

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercially available capacitors do not meet the specifications of the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB) concept. We have applied our propriety nanostructure multilayer materials technology to the fabrication of high density capacitors designed to remove this impediment to PEBB progress. Our nanostructure multilayer capacitors will also be enabling technology in many industrial and military applications. Examples include transient suppression (snubber capacitors), resonant circuits, and DC filtering in PEBB modules. Additionally, weapon applications require compact energy storage for detonators and pulsed-power systems. Commercial applications run the gamut from computers to lighting to communications. Steady progress over the last five years has brought us to the threshold of commercial manufacturability. We have demonstrated a working dielectric energy density of > 11 J/cm3 in 20 nF devices designed for 1 kV operation.

  15. Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Photovoltaic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schriver, Maria Christine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Photovoltaic Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amorphous Silicon as a Photovoltaic Material 2.1.2ii Photovoltaic Model . . . . . . . . . . .

  16. Flicker vortex structures in multiferroic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Z.; Ding, X.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    combinations.2 Similar sudden changes of polar and non-polar parameters are well known in disordered materials, where they follow power law distributions with all the characteristics of avalanche dynamics.3 Avalanches form when ferroelastic nanostructures... . Long range Coulomb interactions and short range interatomic potentials govern the interaction between the two sublattices. We calculate the Coulomb interactions in the Ewald construction with a dielectric constant of 1000 which is typical...

  17. anode electrode materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anode electrode materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Nanostructured Electrode...

  18. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries and the CP-Odd Fraction in the Decay B0->D*+D*-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an updated measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and the CP-odd fraction in the decay B{sup 0} D*{sup +}D*{sup -} using 232 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We determine the CP-odd fraction to be 0.125 {+-} 0.044(stat) {+-} 0.007(syst). The time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters C{sub +} and S{sub +} are determined to be 0.06 {+-} 0.17(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) and -0.75 {+-} 0.25(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst), respectively. The Standard Model predicts these parameters to be 0 and -sin2{beta}, respectively, in the absence of penguin amplitude contributions.

  19. Data:Ff96ab4b-b24a-4e86-b1c1-70d4b0d306b5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    b1c1-70d4b0d306b5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  20. Data:C1e3e9f3-1cc3-47bb-9908-5e94b4f0d932 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8-5e94b4f0d932 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  1. Role of size and defects in ultrafast broadband emission dynamics of ZnO nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Liu, Mingzhao; Sfeir, Matthew Y., E-mail: msfeir@bnl.gov [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As wide bandgap materials are nanostructured for optoelectronics and energy technologies, understanding how size and defects modify the carrier dynamics becomes critical. Here, we examine broadband ultraviolet-visible subpicosecond emission dynamics of prototypical ZnO in bulk, nanowire and nanosphere geometries. Using a high-sensitivity transient emission Kerr-based spectrometer, we probe exciton dynamics in the low fluence regime to determine how defects states impact thermalization and recombination rates. In contrast to steady-state measurements, we transiently identify low-energy emission features that originate from localized excitonic states rather than mid-gap states, characterized by distinct recombination kinetics, and correlate to longer thermalization times. These states are critical for understanding the overall excited state lifetime of materials in this size regime, where crystallinity rather than dimensionality plays a primary role in dictating recombination dynamics.

  2. Reversible nano-structuring of SrCrO3-? through oxidization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nano-structuring of SrCrO3- through oxidization and reduction at low temperatures. Reversible nano-structuring of SrCrO3- through oxidization and reduction at low temperatures....

  3. Two-color Laser Desorption of Nanostructured MgO Thin Films....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two-color Laser Desorption of Nanostructured MgO Thin Films. Two-color Laser Desorption of Nanostructured MgO Thin Films. Abstract: Neutral magnesium atom emission from...

  4. Covalent Stabilization of Nanostructures: Robust Block Copolymer Templates from Novel Thermoreactive Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harth, Eva M.

    platforms for the fabrication of nanostruc- tured devices for advanced storage and microelec- tronicCovalent Stabilization of Nanostructures: Robust Block Copolymer Templates from Novel, crosslinked nanostructure with greater processing and fabrication potential. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J

  5. Self-assembled TiO2-Graphene Hybrid Nanostructures for Enhanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TiO2-Graphene Hybrid Nanostructures for Enhanced Li-ion Insertion . Self-assembled TiO2-Graphene Hybrid Nanostructures for Enhanced Li-ion Insertion . Abstract: We used anionic...

  6. Size-dependent polarization distribution in ferroelectric nanostructures: Phase field simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    to memory and storage devices, sen- sors, and actuators. The properties of low-dimensional ferro- electricsSize-dependent polarization distribution in ferroelectric nanostructures: Phase field simulations distribution in ferroelectric nanostructures embedded in a nonferroelectric medium. The simulation results

  7. Final report: high resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Final report on the project "High resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays"

  8. Supercapacitors specialities - Materials review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreja, Vasile V. N. [National Research and Development Institute for Microtechnologies (IMT-Bucuresti), Bucharest, 126A Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, 077190 (Romania)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrode material is a key component for supercapacitor cell performance. As it is known, performance comparison of commercial available batteries and supercapacitors reveals significantly lower energy storage capability for supercapacitor devices. The energy density of commercial supercapacitor cells is limited to 10 Wh/kg whereas that of common lead acid batteries reaches 35-40 Wh/kg. For lithium ion batteries a value higher than 100 Wh/kg is easily available. Nevertheless, supercapacitors also known as ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors have other advantages in comparison with batteries. As a consequence, many efforts have been made in the last years to increase the storage energy density of electrochemical capacitors. A lot of results from published work (research and review papers, patents and reports) are available at this time. The purpose of this review is a presentation of the progress to date for the use of new materials and approaches for supercapacitor electrodes, with focus on the energy storage capability for practical applications. Many reported results refer to nanostructured carbon based materials and the related composites, used for the manufacture of experimental electrodes. A specific capacitance and a specific energy are seldom revealed as the main result of the performed investigation. Thus for nanoprous (activated) carbon based electrodes a specific capacitance up to 200-220 F/g is mentioned for organic electrolyte, whereas for aqueous electrolyte, the value is limited to 400-500 F/g. Significant contribution to specific capacitance is possible from fast faradaic reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface in addition to the electric double layer effect. The corresponding energy density is limited to 30-50 Wh/kg for organic electrolyte and to 12-17 Wh/kg for aqueous electrolyte. However such performance indicators are given only for the carbon material used in electrodes. For a supercapacitor cell, where two electrodes and also other materials for cell assembling and packaging are used, the above mentioned values have to be divided by a factor higher than four. As a consequence, the specific energy of a prototype cell, hardly could exceed 10 Wh/kg because of difficulties with the existing manufacturing technology. Graphene based materials and carbon nanotubes and different composites have been used in many experiments reported in the last years. Nevertheless in spite of the outstanding properties of these materials, significant increase of the specific capacitance or of the specific energy in comparison with activated or nanoporous carbon is not achieved. Use of redox materials as metal oxides or conducting polymers in combination with different nanostructured carbon materials (nanocomposite electrodes) has been found to contribute to further increase of the specific capacitance or of the specific energy. Nevertheless, few results are reported for practical cells with such materials. Many results are reported only for a three electrode system and significant difference is possible when the electrode is used in a practical supercapacitor cell. Further improvement in the electrode manufacture and more experiments with supercapacitor cells with the known electrochemical storage materials are required. Device prototypes and commercial products with an energy density towards 15-20 Wh/kg could be realized. These may be a milestone for further supercapacitor device research and development, to narrow the storage energy gap between batteries and supercapacitors.

  9. Toward Nanostructured Thermoelectrics: Synthesis and Characterization of Lead Telluride Gels and Aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganguly, Shreyashi; Brock, Stephanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthesis and characterization of lead telluride (PbTe) gels and aerogels with nanostructured features of potential benefit for enhanced thermoelectrics is reported. In this approach, discrete thiolate-capped PbTe nanoparticles were synthesized by a solution-based approach followed by oxidation-induced nanoparticle assembly with tetranitromethane or hydrogen peroxide to form wet gels. Drying of the wet gels by supercritical CO{sub 2} extraction yielded aerogels, whereas xerogels were produced by ambient pressure bench top drying. The gels consist of an interconnected network of colloidal nanoparticles and pores with surface areas up to 74 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1}. The thermal stability of the nanostructures relative to nanoparticles was probed with the help of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The aerogels were observed to sublime at a higher temperature and over a larger range (425–500 °C) relative to the precursor nanoparticles. TGA-DSC suggests that organic capping groups can be removed in the region 250–450 °C, and melting of PbTe nanoparticles occurs near the temperature for bulk materials (ca. 920 °C). The good thermal stability combined with the presence of nanoscale interfaces suggests PbTe gels may show promise in thermoelectric devices.

  10. Synthesis of thin films and materials utilizing a gaseous catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Daniel E; Schwenzer, Birgit; Gomm, John R; Roth, Kristian M; Heiken, Brandon; Brutchey, Richard

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the fabrication of nanostructured semiconducting, photoconductive, photovoltaic, optoelectronic and electrical battery thin films and materials at low temperature, with no molecular template and no organic contaminants. High-quality metal oxide semiconductor, photovoltaic and optoelectronic materials can be fabricated with nanometer-scale dimensions and high dopant densities through the use of low-temperature biologically inspired synthesis routes, without the use of any biological or biochemical templates.

  11. Measurement of D0-D0bar Mixing using the Ratio of Lifetimes for the Decays D0->K-pi+ and K+K-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the rate of D0-D0bar mixing with the observable yCP=(tauKpi/tauKK)-1, where tauKK and tauKpi are respectively the mean lifetimes of CP-even D0->K+K- and CP-mixed D0->K-pi+ decays, using a data sample of 384/fb collected by the Babar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory. From a sample of D0 and D0bar decays where the inital flavor of the decaying meson is not determined, we obtain yCP = [1.12 +/- 0.26 (stat) +/- 0.22 (sys)]%, which excludes the no-mixing hypothesis at 3.3 sigma, including both statistical and systematic uncertainties. This result is in good agreement with a previous Babar measurement of yCP obtained from a sample of D*+->D0pi+ events, where the D0 decays to K-pi+, K+K-, and pi+pi-, which is disjoint with the untagged D0 events used here. Combining the two results taking into account statistical and systematic uncertainties, where the systematic uncertainties are assumed to be 100% correlated, we find yCP = [1.16 +/- 0.22 (stat) +/- 0.18 (sys)]%, which excludes the no-mixing hypothesis at 4.1 sigma.

  12. Nanostructure templating using low temperature atomic layer deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubbs, Robert K. (Albuquerque, NM); Bogart, Gregory R. (Corrales, NM); Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are described for making nanostructures that are mechanically, chemically and thermally stable at desired elevated temperatures, from nanostructure templates having a stability temperature that is less than the desired elevated temperature. The methods comprise depositing by atomic layer deposition (ALD) structural layers that are stable at the desired elevated temperatures, onto a template employing a graded temperature deposition scheme. At least one structural layer is deposited at an initial temperature that is less than or equal to the stability temperature of the template, and subsequent depositions made at incrementally increased deposition temperatures until the desired elevated temperature stability is achieved. Nanostructure templates include three dimensional (3D) polymeric templates having features on the order of 100 nm fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning (PnP) methods.

  13. Bulk Nanostructured FCC Steels With Enhanced Radiation Tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xinghang; Hartwig, K. Ted; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase radiation tolerance in austenitic steels through optimization of grain size and grain boundary (GB) characteristics. The focus will be on nanocrystalline austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys with an fcc crystal structure. The long-term goal is to design and develop bulk nanostructured austenitic steels with enhanced void swelling resistance and substantial ductility, and to enhance their creep resistance at elevated temperatures via GB engineering. The combination of grain refinement and grain boundary engineering approaches allows us to tailor the material strength, ductility, and resistance to swelling by 1) changing the sink strength for point defects, 2) by increasing the nucleation barriers for bubble formation at GBs, and 3) by changing the precipitate distributions at boundaries. Compared to ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels (SS) possess good creep and fatigue resistance at elevated temperatures, and better toughness at low temperature. However, a major disadvantage of austenitic SS is that they are vulnerable to significant void swelling in nuclear reactors, especially at the temperatures and doses anticipated in the Advanced Burner Reactor. The lack of resistance to void swelling in austenitic alloys led to the switch to ferritic/martensitic steels as the preferred material for the fast reactor cladding application. Recently a type of austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS, was developed at ORNL, and is expected to show enhanced void swelling resistance through the trapping of point defects at nanometersized carbides. Reducing the grain size and increasing the fraction of low energy grain boundaries should reduce the available radiation-produced point defects (due to the increased sink area of the grain boundaries), should make bubble nucleation at the boundaries less likely (by reducing the fraction of high-energy boundaries), and improve the strength and ductility under radiation by producing a higher density of nanometer sized carbides on the boundaries. This project will focus on void swelling but advances in processing of austenitic steels are likely to also improve the radiation response of the mechanical properties.

  14. Surface nanostructuring by ion-induced localized plasma expansion in zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Said, A. S., E-mail: elsaid@kfupm.edu.sa, E-mail: a.s.el-said@hzdr.de [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), 01328 Dresden (Germany); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt); Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt); Djebli, M. [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Physics USTHB, B.P. 32 Bab Ezzour, 16079 Algiers (Algeria)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Creation of hillock-like nanostructures on the surface of zinc oxide single crystals by irradiation with slow highly charged ions is reported. At constant kinetic energy, the nanostructures were only observed after irradiation with ions of potential energies above a threshold between 19.1?keV and 23.3?keV. The size of the nanostructures increases as a function of potential energy. A plasma expansion approach is used to explain the nanostructures creation. The calculations showed that the surface nanostructures became taller with the increase of ionic temperature. The influence of charged cluster formation and the relevance of their polarity are discussed.

  15. Charge-free method of forming nanostructures on a substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffbauer; Mark (Los Alamos, NM), Akhadov; Elshan (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A charge-free method of forming a nanostructure at low temperatures on a substrate. A substrate that is reactive with one of atomic oxygen and nitrogen is provided. A flux of neutral atoms of least one of oxygen and nitrogen is generated within a laser-sustained-discharge plasma source and a collimated beam of energetic neutral atoms and molecules is directed from the plasma source onto a surface of the substrate to form the nanostructure. The energetic neutral atoms and molecules in the beam have an average kinetic energy in a range from about 1 eV to about 5 eV.

  16. Fabrication of gold nanostructures through pulsed laser interference patterning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Dajun, E-mail: dajun.yuan@gmail.com; Acharya, Ranadip, E-mail: racharya@gatech.edu [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Das, Suman, E-mail: sumandas@gatech.edu [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States) [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we report on the experimental development and computational modeling of a simple, one-step method for the fabrication of diverse 2D and 3D periodic nanostructures derived from gold films on silicon substrates and over areas spanning 1?cm{sup 2}. These nanostructures can be patterned on films of thickness ranging from 50?nm to 500?nm with pulsed interfering laser beams. A finite volume-based inhomogeneous multiphase model of the process shows reasonable agreement with the experimentally obtained topographies and provides insights on the flow physics including normal and radial expansion that results in peeling of film from the substrate.

  17. Improved Solar Cell Efficiency Through the Use of an Additive Nanostructure-Based Optical Downshifter: Final Subcontract Report, January 28, 2010 -- February 28, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtin, J.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes all SpectraWatt's progress in achieving a boost in solar cell efficiency using an optical downshifter. Spectrawatt's downshifting technology is based on a nanostructured material system which absorbs high energy (short wavelength) light and reemits it at a lower energy (long wavelength) with high efficiency. This system has shown unprecedented performance parameters including near unity quantum yield and high thermal stability.

  18. 2011 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Small particles have been at the heart of nanoscience since the birth of the field and now stand ready to make significant contributions to the big challenges of energy, health and sustainability. Atomic clusters show exquisite size-dependent electronic and magnetic properties and offer a new level of control in catalyses, sensors and biochips; functionalised nanocrystals offer remarkable optical properties and diverse applications in electronic devices, solar energy, and therapy. Both areas are complemented by a raft of recent advances in fabrication, characterization, and performance of a diversity of nanomaterials from the single atom level to nanowires, nanodevices, and biologically-inspired nanosystems. The goal of the 2011 Gordon Conference is thus to continue and enhance the interdisciplinary tradition of this series and discuss the most recent advances, fundamental scientific questions, and emerging applications of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. A single conference covering all aspects of nanoscience from fundamental issues to applications has the potential to create new ideas and stimulate cross fertilization. The meeting will therefore provide a balance among the three sub-components of the conference, true to its title, with a selection of new topics added to reflect rapid advances in the field. The open atmosphere of a Gordon conference, emphasizing the presentation of unpublished results and extensive discussions, is an ideal home for this rapidly developing field and will allow all participants to enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Historically, this Gordon conference has been oversubscribed, so we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral presentations. Given the important role students and postdocs play in the future of this field, we also anticipate several talks of this kind from young investigators.

  19. Templated Self Assemble of Nano-Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suo, Zhigang [Harvard University

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will identify and model mechanisms that template the self-assembly of nanostructures. We focus on a class of systems involving a two-phase monolayer of molecules adsorbed on a solid surface. At a suitably elevated temperature, the molecules diffuse on the surface to reduce the combined free energy of mixing, phase boundary, elastic field, and electrostatic field. With no template, the phases may form a pattern of stripes or disks. The feature size is on the order of 1-100 nm, selected to compromise the phase boundary energy and the long-range elastic or electrostatic interaction. Both experimental observations and our theoretical simulations have shown that the pattern resembles a periodic lattice, but has abundant imperfections. To form a perfect periodic pattern, or a designed aperiodic pattern, one must introduce a template to guide the assembly. For example, a coarse-scale pattern, lithographically defined on the substrate, will guide the assembly of the nanoscale pattern. As another example, if the molecules on the substrate surface carry strong electric dipoles, a charged object, placed in the space above the monolayer, will guide the assembly of the molecular dipoles. In particular, the charged object can be a mask with a designed nanoscale topographic pattern. A serial process (e.g., e-beam lithography) is necessary to make the mask, but the pattern transfer to the molecules on the substrate is a parallel process. The technique is potentially a high throughput, low cost process to pattern a monolayer. The monolayer pattern itself may serve as a template to fabricate a functional structure. This project will model fundamental aspects of these processes, including thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, templated self-assembly, and self-assembly on unconventional substrates. It is envisioned that the theory will not only explain the available experimental observations, but also motivate new experiments.

  20. UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA MICROWAVE ABSORPTION IN NANOSTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belanger, David P.

    -magnetic interference and materials that provide cheap and effective shielding from the unwanted radiation. In aerospace is an essential part of the stealth technology where it is used to minimize the reflection of a radar beam from A Data Formatting 28 B Material Analysis 31 Bibliography 39 #12;v List of Figures 2.1 Boundary components

  1. High energy density capacitors for power electronic applications using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power electronics applications are currently limited by capacitor size and performance. Only incremental improvements are anticipated in existing capacitor technologies, while significant performance advances are required in energy density and overall performance to meet the technical needs of the applications which are important for U.S. economic competitiveness. One application, the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB), promises a second electronics revolution in power electronic design. High energy density capacitors with excellent electrical thermal and mechanical performance represent an enabling technology in the PEBB concept. We propose a continuing program to research and develop LLNL`s nano-structure multilayer technologies for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Our controlled deposition techniques are capable of synthesizing extraordinarily smooth sub-micron thick layers of dielectric and conductor materials. We have demonstrated that, with this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density are achievable.

  2. 5D Data Storage by Ultrafast Laser Nanostructuring in Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    5D Data Storage by Ultrafast Laser Nanostructuring in Glass Jingyu Zhang* , Mindaugas Gecevicius-assembled form birefringence and retrieved in glass opening the era of unlimited lifetime data storage. © 2013 laser writing in glass were proposed for the polarization multiplexed optical memory, where

  3. Nanostructured shells DOI: 10.1002/smll.200600098

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    by Replicating ZnO Nano-objects: A Technique for Producing Hollow Nanostructures of Desired Shape** Jun Zhou, Jin Liu, Rusen Yang, Changshi Lao, Puxian Gao, Rao Tummala, Ning Sheng Xu, and Zhong Lin Wang* Hollow-con- fined nanoscale reactions and transport processes. The sim- plest hollow structures are nanoparticle

  4. Hollow Nanostructures DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602403

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.

    of these approaches is that the hollow nanospheres are mainly composed of discrete nano- particles, making themHollow Nanostructures DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602403 Synthesis of Platinum Nanocages by Using. KGaA, Weinheim Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2006, 45, 8126 ­8130 #12;Hollow nanospheres are of interest

  5. Shape memory and nanostructure in poly(norbornyl-POSS) copolymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Shape memory and nanostructure in poly(norbornyl-POSS) copolymers HG Jeon,1 * PT Mather2 and TS Blvd., Edwards AFB, CA 93524­7680, USA Abstract: The microstructure and shape-memory properties by rapid quenching in LN2. Shape-memory properties of such drawn samples were explored by measuring

  6. Meta-DNA: synthetic biology via DNA nanostructures and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Meta-DNA: synthetic biology via DNA nanostructures and hybridization reactions Harish Chandran1 of DNA manipulations achieved by protein enzymes be simulated via simple DNA hybridization chemistry? In this work, we develop a biochemical system which we call meta-DNA (abbreviated as mDNA), based on strands

  7. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  8. NANO REVIEW Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    include dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum- dot-sensitized solar cells, and p-n junction solar cells their efficiencies more practical. Now the third-generation solar cells, such as dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCsNANO REVIEW Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures Kehan Yu Ă? Junhong Chen

  9. Enhanced radiative heat transfer between nanostructured gold plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Guérout; J. Lussange; F. S. S. Rosa; J. -P. Hugonin; D. A. R. Dalvit; J. -J. Greffet; A. Lambrecht; S. Reynaud

    2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between nanostructured gold plates in the framework of the scattering theory. We predict an enhancement of the heat transfer as we increase the depth of the corrugations while keeping the distance of closest approach fixed. We interpret this effect in terms of the evolution of plasmonic and guided modes as a function of the grating's geometry.

  10. Light Trapping in Solar Cells Using Resonant Nanostructures P. Spinelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Rooij, Robert

    and by improving their photovoltaic conversion efficiency. For Si solar cells, both challenges can be achievedLight Trapping in Solar Cells Using Resonant Nanostructures P. Spinelli #12;Summary Photovoltaics of energy for our society. In order for this to happen, photovoltaics needs to be economically competitive

  11. Plasmonic Nanostructure Design for Efficient Light Coupling into Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    Plasmonic Nanostructure Design for Efficient Light Coupling into Solar Cells Vivian E. Ferry, Luke sunlight into guided modes in thin film Si and GaAs plasmonic solar cells whose back interface is coated. These findings show promise for the design of ultrathin solar cells that exhibit enhanced absorption

  12. Dielectric nanostructures for broadband light trapping in organic solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    Dielectric nanostructures for broadband light trapping in organic solar cells Aaswath Raman, Zongfu@stanford.edu Abstract: Organic bulk heterojunction solar cells are a promising candidate for low-cost next lying on top of the organic solar cell stack produce a 8-15% increase in photocurrent for a model

  13. Array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chi, Miaofang; Ivanov, Ilia N; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization includes a plurality of nanotubes, each nanotube including an outer layer coaxial with an inner layer, where the inner layer comprises p-type titanium dioxide and the outer layer comprises n-type titanium dioxide. An interface between the inner layer and the outer layer defines a p-n junction.

  14. Three Dimensional Dielectrophoretic Assembly of Nanostructures on a Micromachined Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokmeci, Mehmet

    Three Dimensional Dielectrophoretic Assembly of Nanostructures on a Micromachined Platform University, Boston, MA-02115, USA ABSTRACT In this paper, we introduce a novel platform for selectively. The microfabricated platform based nanoscale assembly is quite versatile and has potential applications in fabricating

  15. Hierarchical nanostructured conducting polymer hydrogel with high electrochemical activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    and have been used in many applications such as bioelectronics and energy storage devices. They are often demonstrated great potential for a broad range of applications from energy storage devices such as biofuelHierarchical nanostructured conducting polymer hydrogel with high electrochemical activity Lijia

  16. Composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures for high electrochromic activity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, Karla Rosa; Stephens, Zachary Dan.; Robinson, David B.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite material consisting of TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) with WO3 electrodeposited homogeneously on its surface has been fabricated, detached from its substrate, and attached to a fluorine-doped tin oxide film on glass for application to electrochromic (EC) reactions. A paste of TiO2 made from commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles creates an interface for the TiO2 NT film to attach to the FTO glass, which is conductive and does not cause solution-phase ions in an electrolyte to bind irreversibly with the material. The effect of NT length on the current density and the EC contrast of the material were studied. The EC redox reaction seen in this material is diffusion- limited, having relatively fast reaction rates at the electrode surface. The composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures showed higher ion storage capacity, better stability, enhanced EC contrast and longer memory time compared with the pure WO3 and TiO2.

  17. Excitonic Processes in Nanostructured Optoelectronic Devices...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    At UDC he worked on the application of organic materials to LEDs for full color flat panel displays and thin film photovoltaics for solar cell and detector applications. His...

  18. Scanned probe characterization of semiconductor nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Law, James Jeremy MacDonald

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mismatch between GaN and the growth substrate and arepreferred substrate for growth of GaN and related materials.involved in growing GaN on a sapphire substrate necessitate

  19. nature materials | VOL 2 | OCTOBER 2003 | www.nature.com/naturematerials 689 ver the past decade great progress has been made on synthesis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubarev, Eugene

    the past decade great progress has been made on synthesis of nanostructures as a tool-set for new materials containing ZnO nanocrystals as the inorganic component, both phases are oriented in the hybrid materialARTICLES nature materials | VOL 2 | OCTOBER 2003 | www.nature.com/naturematerials 689 O ver

  20. Method and apparatus for ion sequestration and a nanostructured metal phosphate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattigod, Shas V. (Richland, WA); Fryxell, Glen E. (Kennewic, WA); Li, Xiaohong (Richland, WA); Parker, Kent E. (Kennewick, WA); Wellman, Dawn M. (West Richland, WA)

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A nanostructured substance, a process for sequestration of ionic waste, and an ion-sequestration apparatus are disclosed in the specification. The nanostructured substance can comprise a Lewis acid transition metal bound to a phosphate, wherein the phosphate comprises a primary structural component of the substance and the Lewis acid transition metal is a reducing agent. The nanostructured substance has a Brunner-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area greater than or equal to approximately 100 m.sup.2/g, and a distribution coefficient for an analyte, K.sub.d, greater than or equal to approximately 5000 ml/g. The process can comprise contacting a fluid and a nanostructured metal phosphate. The apparatus can comprise a vessel and a nanostructured metal phosphate. The vessel defines a volume wherein a fluid contacts the nanostructured metal phosphate.

  1. Volatile Organic Compound Detection Using Nanostructured Copolymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Lee E.

    conductivity of these copolymers increased or decreased depending upon the polymer composition and the specific,3-6 conductive poly- mers (CPs),7-12 and carbon black-polymer composites.13,14 Metal oxide materials Carbon black-polymer composites have also attracted a lot of research interest as a promising sensing

  2. Postdoctoral Research Associate Functional Hybrid Nanostructures Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    for Nanophase Materials Sciences (865) 576-7406 shaom@ornl.gov Education Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China Optoelectronics Engr. B.S., 2003 Shanghai University, Shanghai, China Microelectronics Engr, ASM ­ Oak Ridge Chapter, Poster Competition 2005 Guanghua Fellowship, Shanghai University, China 2000

  3. Blue-phase templated fabrication of three-dimensional nanostructures for photonic applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Castles; F. V. Day; S. M. Morris; D. -H. Ko; D. J. Gardiner; M. M. Qasim; S. Nosheen; P. J. W. Hands; S. S. Choi; R. H. Friend; H. J. Coles

    2013-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A promising approach to the fabrication of materials with nanoscale features is the transfer of liquid-crystalline structure to polymers. However, this has not been achieved in systems with full three-dimensional periodicity. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of self-assembled three-dimensional nanostructures by polymer templating blue phase I, a chiral liquid crystal with cubic symmetry. Blue phase I was photopolymerized and the remaining liquid crystal removed to create a porous free-standing cast which retains the chiral three-dimensional structure of the blue phase, yet contains no chiral additive molecules. The cast may in turn be used as a hard template for the fabrication of new materials. By refilling the cast with an achiral nematic liquid crystal, we created templated blue phases which have unprecedented thermal stability in the range -125 to 125 [degrees symbol]C, and that act both as mirrorless lasers and switchable electro-optic devices. Blue-phase templated materials will facilitate advances in device architectures for photonics applications in particular.

  4. Covetic Materials

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Can re-melt, dilute, alloy... Fabrication of Covetic Materials - Nanocarbon Infusion 3 4 Technical Approach Unusual Characteristics of Covetic Materials ("covalent" &...

  5. Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge films for high capacity Li ion battery anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudawski, N. G.; Darby, B. L.; Yates, B. R.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6400 (United States); Elliman, R. G. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Volinsky, A. A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa Florida 33620 (United States)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge electrodes fabricated directly on Ni current collector substrates were found to exhibit excellent specific capacities during electrochemical cycling in half-cell configuration with Li metal for a wide range of cycling rates. Structural characterization revealed that the nanostructured electrodes lose porosity during cycling but maintain excellent electrical contact with the metallic current collector substrate. These results suggest that nanostructured Ge electrodes have great promise for use as high performance Li ion battery anodes.

  6. The interplay of structure and optical properties in individual semiconducting nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewster, Megan Marie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor nanostructures exhibit distinct properties by virtue of nano-scale dimensionality, allowing for investigations of fundamental physics and the improvement of optoelectronic devices. Nanoscale morphological ...

  7. CVD Growth of Carbon Nanostructures from Zirconia: Mechanisms and a Method for Enhancing Yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudo, Akira

    By excluding metals from synthesis, growth of carbon nanostructures via unreduced oxide nanoparticle catalysts offers wide technological potential. We report new observations of the mechanisms underlying chemical vapor ...

  8. Effect of Droplet Morphology on Growth Dynamics and Heat Transfer during Condensation on Superhydrophobic Nanostructured Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miljkovic, Nenad

    Condensation on superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces offers new opportunities for enhanced energy conversion, efficient water harvesting, and high performance thermal management. These surfaces are designed to be Cassie ...

  9. Enhanced anomalous photo-absorption from TiO{sub 2} nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solanki, Vanaraj; Majumder, Subrata; Mishra, Indrani; Varma, Shikha, E-mail: shikha@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Dash, P. [Utkal University, Bhubaneswar 751004 (India); Singh, C. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Two dimensional nanostructures have been created on the rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) surfaces via ion irradiation technique. Enhanced anomalous photo- absorption response is displayed, where nanostructures of 15?nm diameter with 0.5?nm height, and not the smaller nanostructures with larger surface area, delineate highest absorbance. Comprehensive investigations of oxygen vacancy states, on ion- irradiated surfaces, display a remarkable result that the number of vacancies saturates for higher fluences. A competition between the number of vacancy sites on the nanostructure in conjunction with its size is responsible for the observed anomalous photo-absorption.

  10. Ternary oxide nanostructures and methods of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Stanislaus S. (Stony Brook, NY); Park, Tae-Jin (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A single crystalline ternary nanostructure having the formula A.sub.xB.sub.yO.sub.z, wherein x ranges from 0.25 to 24, and y ranges from 1.5 to 40, and wherein A and B are independently selected from the group consisting of Ag, Al, As, Au, B, Ba, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Cl, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Dy, Er, Eu, F, Fe, Ga, Gd, Ge, Hf, Ho, I, In, Ir, K, La, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Nd, Ni, Os, P, Pb, Pd, Pr, Pt, Rb, Re, Rh, Ru, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sm, Sn, Sr, Ta, Tb, Tc, Te, Ti, Tl, Tm, U, V, W, Y, Yb, and Zn, wherein the nanostructure is at least 95% free of defects and/or dislocations.

  11. High Brightness Plasmon-Enhanced Nanostructured Gold Photoemitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Kong, Lingmei; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmonic nanohole arrays are fabricated in gold thin films by focused ion beam (FIB) lithography. Subsequent heat treatment creates sub 100 nm nanometric structures including tips, rods and flakes, all localized in the nanohole array region. The combined nanohole array and nanostructured surface comprise an efficient photoemitter. High brightness photoemission is observed from this construct using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), following 780 nm femtosecond (fs) laser irradiation. By comparing our observables to results of finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations, we demonstrate that photoemission from the sub-100 nm structures is enhanced in the region of propagating surface plasmons launched from the nanohole arrays. Additionally, by tuning hole diameter and separation in the nanohole array, the photoemission intensity of nanostructured photoemitters can be controlled. We observe a photoemission enhancement of over 108, relative to photoemission from the flat region of the gold substrate at laser intensities well below the ablation threshold.

  12. Nanostructure Determination by Co-Refining Models to Multiple Datasets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billinge, Simon

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the work are contained in the publications resulting from the grant (which are listed below). Here I summarize the main findings from the last period of the award, 2006-2007: • Published a paper in Science with Igor Levin outlining the “Nanostructure Problem”, our inability to solve structure at the nanoscale. • Published a paper in Nature demonstrating the first ever ab-initio structure determination of a nanoparticle from atomic pair distribution function (PDF) data. • Published one book and 3 overview articles on PDF methods and the nanostructure problem. • Completed a project that sought to find a structural response to the presence of the so-called “intermediate phase” in network glasses which appears close to the rigidity percolation threshold in these systems. The main result was that we did not see convincing evidence for this, which drew into doubt the idea that GexSe1-x glasses were a model system exhibiting rigidity percolation.

  13. Atomically flat single-crystalline gold nanostructures for plasmonic nanocircuitry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jer-Shing Huang; Victor Callegari; Peter Geisler; Christoph Brüning; Johannes Kern; Jord C. Prangsma; Xiaofei Wu; Thorsten Feichtner; Johannes Ziegler; Pia Weinmann; Martin Kamp; Alfred Forchel; Paolo Biagioni; Urs Sennhauser; Bert Hecht

    2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep subwavelength integration of high-definition plasmonic nanostructures is of key importance for the development of future optical nanocircuitry for high-speed communication, quantum computation and lab-on-a-chip applications. So far the experimental realization of proposed extended plasmonic networks consisting of multiple functional elements remains challenging, mainly due to the multi-crystallinity of commonly used thermally evaporated gold layers. Resulting structural imperfections in individual circuit elements will drastically reduce the yield of functional integrated nanocircuits. Here we demonstrate the use of very large (>100 micron^2) but thin (substrate. Using this methodology we obtain high-definition ultrasmooth gold nanostructures with superior optical properties and reproducible nano-sized features over micrometer length scales. Our approach provides a possible solution to overcome the current fabrication bottleneck and to realize high-definition plasmonic nanocircuitry.

  14. Nanocomposite Magnets: Transformational Nanostructured Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GE is using nanomaterials technology to develop advanced magnets that contain fewer rare earth materials than their predecessors. Nanomaterials technology involves manipulating matter at the atomic or molecular scale, which can represent a stumbling block for magnets because it is difficult to create a finely grained magnet at that scale. GE is developing bulk magnets with finely tuned structures using iron-based mixtures that contain 80% less rare earth materials than traditional magnets, which will reduce their overall cost. These magnets will enable further commercialization of HEVs, EVs, and wind turbine generators while enhancing U.S. competitiveness in industries that heavily utilize these alternatives to rare earth minerals.

  15. Advanced Materials . 2012, 24, 25922597 High-Rate Capability Silicon Decorated Vertically AlignedCarbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a leading technology for medical and electronic devices as well as electric vehicles. The increasing demand.[1] Then, as nanotechnology develops, various Si-nanostructures have emerged as an appropriate anode material. Specific charge storage capacity about 2000 mAh g-1 is available and stable after one

  16. Electrochemical phenomena provide unique methods for materials synthesis and surface modification. Within this framework, the group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    components for information storage, sensors and energy conversion devices. "Further the understanding to tailor to specification materials and components for a variety of devices, focusing on micro of a variety of self-assembled nanostructures, as well as the development and integration of suitable

  17. Nano-structured polymer composites and process for preparing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hillmyer, Marc; Chen, Liang

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing a polymer composite that includes reacting (a) a multi-functional monomer and (b) a block copolymer comprising (i) a first block and (ii) a second block that includes a functional group capable of reacting with the multi-functional monomer, to form a crosslinked, nano-structured, bi-continuous composite. The composite includes a continuous matrix phase and a second continuous phase comprising the first block of the block copolymer.

  18. Many-body Interactions in Magnetic Films and Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen D. Kevan

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe results supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-04ER46158, which focused on magnetic interaction at surfaces, in thin films, and in metallic nanostructures. We report on three general topics: 1) The Rashba spin splitting at magnetic surfaces of rare earth metals, 2) magnetic nanowires self-assembled on stepped tungsten single crystals, and 3) magnetic interaction in graphene films doped with hydrogen atoms.

  19. Supporting Information Hybrid Tin Oxide-SWNT Nanostructures Based Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S1 Supporting Information Hybrid Tin Oxide-SWNT Nanostructures Based Gas Sensor Syed Mubeen1 , Min) and (c) showing high magnification SEM images of bare SWNTs and SWNTs coated with tin oxide (-0.4 V vs of bare SWNTs and SWNTs coated with tin oxide (-0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl wire, 5 µC) towards a) H2S, b) acetone

  20. Materials Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternate Title(s):Materials Research Engineer; Metallurgical/Chemical Engineer; Product Development Manager;

  1. Interface and nanostructure evolution of cobalt germanides on Ge(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grzela, T., E-mail: grzela@ihp-microelectronics.com; Schubert, M. A. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Koczorowski, W. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH,United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Institute of Physics, Poznan University of Technology, Nieszawska 13A, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Capellini, G. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Dipartimento di Scienze, Universitŕ degli Studi Roma Tre, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Czajka, R. [Institute of Physics, Poznan University of Technology, Nieszawska 13A, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Radny, M. W. [Institute of Physics, Poznan University of Technology, Nieszawska 13A, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan NSW, 2308 (Australia); Curson, N.; Schofield, S. R. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH,United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Schroeder, T. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); BTU Cottbus, Konrad-Zuse Str. 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Cobalt germanide (Co{sub x}Ge{sub y}) is a candidate system for low resistance contact modules in future Ge devices in Si-based micro and nanoelectronics. In this paper, we present a detailed structural, morphological, and compositional study on Co{sub x}Ge{sub y} formation on Ge(001) at room temperature metal deposition and subsequent annealing. Scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction clearly demonstrate that room temperature deposition of approximately four monolayers of Co on Ge(001) results in the Volmer Weber growth mode, while subsequent thermal annealing leads to the formation of a Co-germanide continuous wetting layer which evolves gradually towards the growth of elongated Co{sub x}Ge{sub y} nanostructures. Two types of Co{sub x}Ge{sub y} nanostructures, namely, flattop- and ridge-type, were observed and a systematic study on their evolution as a function of temperature is presented. Additional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements allowed us to monitor the reaction between Co and Ge in the formation process of the Co{sub x}Ge{sub y} continuous wetting layer as well as the Co{sub x}Ge{sub y} nanostructures.

  2. Jumping-Droplet-Enhanced Condensation on Scalable Superhydrophobic Nanostructured Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miljkovic, N; Enright, R; Nam, Y; Lopez, K; Dou, N; Sack, J; Wang, E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, the resulting droplet can jump from the surface due to the release of excess surface energy. If designed properly, these superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces can not only allow for easy droplet removal at micrometric length scales during condensation but also promise to enhance heat transfer performance. However, the rationale for the design of an ideal nanostructured surface as well as heat transfer experiments demonstrating the advantage of this jumping behavior are lacking. Here, we show that silanized copper oxide surfaces created via a simple fabrication method can achieve highly efficient jumping-droplet condensation heat transfer. We experimentally demonstrated a 25% higher overall heat flux and 30% higher condensation heat transfer coefficient compared to state-of-the-art hydrophobic condensing surfaces at low supersaturations (<1.12). This work not only shows significant condensation heat transfer enhancement but also promises a low cost and scalable approach to increase efficiency for applications such as atmospheric water harvesting and dehumidification. Furthermore, the results offer insights and an avenue to achieve high flux superhydrophobic condensation.

  3. Retained austenite thermal stability in a nanostructured bainitic steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avishan, Behzad, E-mail: b_avishan@sut.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Garcia-Mateo, Carlos, E-mail: cgm@cenim.csic.es [Department of Physical Metallurgy, National Centre for Metallurgical Research (CENIM-CSIC), MATERALIA Research Group, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Yazdani, Sasan, E-mail: yazdani@sut.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Caballero, Francisca G., E-mail: fgc@cenim.csic.es [Department of Physical Metallurgy, National Centre for Metallurgical Research (CENIM-CSIC), MATERALIA Research Group, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The unique microstructure of nanostructured bainite consists of very slender bainitic ferrite plates and high carbon retained austenite films. As a consequence, the reported properties are opening a wide range of different commercial uses. However, bainitic transformation follows the T{sub 0} criteria, i.e. the incomplete reaction phenomena, which means that the microstructure is not thermodynamically stable because the bainitic transformation stops well before austenite reaches an equilibrium carbon level. This article aims to study the different microstructural changes taking place when nanostructured bainite is destabilized by austempering for times well in excess of that strictly necessary to end the transformation. Results indicate that while bainitic ferrite seems unaware of the extended heat treatment, retained austenite exhibits a more receptive behavior to it. - Highlights: • Nanostructured bainitic steel is not thermodynamically stable. • Extensive austempering in these microstructures has not been reported before. • Precipitation of cementite particles is unavoidable at longer austempering times. • TEM, FEG-SEM and XRD analysis were used for microstructural characterization.

  4. Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 /Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium Ion Batteries. Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium Ion Batteries. Abstract:...

  5. Intrinsic electrostatic effects in nanostructured ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stanek, Chris R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nerikar, Pankaj V [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using empirical potentials, we have found that electrostatic dipoles can be created at grain boundaries formed from non-polar surfaces of fluorite-structured materials. In particular, the {Sigma}5(310)/[001] symmetric tilt grain boundary reconstructs to break the symmetry in the atomic structure at the boundary, forming the dipole. This dipole results in an abrupt change in electrostatic potential across the boundary. In multilayered ceramics composed of stacks of grain boundaries, the change in electrostatic potential at the boundary results in profound electrostatic effects within the crystalline layers, the nature of which depends on the electrostatic boundary conditions. For open-circuit boundary conditions, layers with either high or low electrostatic potential are formed. By contrast, for short-circuit boundary conditions, electric fields can be created within each layer, the strength of which then depends on the thickness of the layers. These electrostatic effects may have important consequences for the behavior of defects and dopants within these materials and offer the possibility of interesting technological applications.

  6. Formation of Carbon Nanostructures in Cobalt- and Nickel-Doped Carbon Aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, R; Baumann, T F; Cronin, S; Dresselhaus, G; Dresselhaus, M; Satcher, Jr., J H

    2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have prepared carbon aerogels (CAs) doped with cobalt or nickel through sol-gel polymerization of formaldehyde with the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, followed by ion-exchange with M(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (where M = Co{sup 2+} or Ni{sup 2+}), supercritical drying with liquid CO{sub 2} and carbonization at temperatures between 400 C and 1050 C under an N{sub 2} atmosphere. The nanostructures of these metal-doped carbon aerogels were characterized by elemental analysis, nitrogen adsorption, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Metallic nickel and cobalt nanoparticles are generated during the carbonization process at about 400 C and 450 C, respectively, forming nanoparticles that are {approx}4 nm in diameter. The sizes and size dispersion of the metal particles increase with increasing carbonization temperatures for both materials. The carbon frameworks of the Ni- and Co-doped aerogels carbonized below 600 C mainly consist of interconnected carbon particles with a size of 15 to 30 nm. When the samples are pyrolyzed at 1050 C, the growth of graphitic nanoribbons with different curvatures is observed in the Ni and Co-doped carbon aerogel materials. The distance of graphite layers in the nanoribbons is about 0.38 nm. These metal-doped CAs retain the overall open cell structure of metal-free CAs, exhibiting high surface areas and pore diameters in the micro and mesoporic region.

  7. Wafer-scale selective area growth of GaN hexagonal prismatic nanostructures on c-sapphire substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ;2 ABSTRACT Selective area growth of GaN nanostructures has been performed on full 2" c-sapphire substrates on GaN layer template grown on c-sapphire substrate and usually result in pyramid-shaped nanostructures of homogeneity of the nucleation selectivity of SAG GaN nanostructures on c- sapphire substrate remains an issue

  8. Method of making nanostructured glass-ceramic waste forms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gao, Huizhen; Wang, Yifeng; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Bencoe, Denise N.

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of rendering hazardous materials less dangerous comprising trapping the hazardous material in nanopores of a nanoporous composite material, reacting the trapped hazardous material to render it less volatile/soluble, sealing the trapped hazardous material, and vitrifying the nanoporous material containing the less volatile/soluble hazardous material.

  9. Nanostructured Basic Catalysts: Opportunities for Renewable Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, William C; Huber, George; Auerbach, Scott

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research studied and developed novel basic catalysts for production of renewable chemicals and fuels from biomass. We focused on the development of unique porous structural-base catalysts zeolites. These catalysts were compared to conventional solid base materials for aldol condensation, that were being commercialized for production of fuels from biomass and would be pivotal in future biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals. Specifically, we had studied the aldolpyrolysis over zeolites and the trans-esterification of vegetable oil with methanol over mixed oxide catalysts. Our research has indicated that the base strength of framework nitrogen in nitrogen substituted zeolites (NH-zeolites) is nearly twice as strong as in standard zeolites. Nitrogen substituted catalysts have been synthesized from several zeolites (including FAU, MFI, BEA, and LTL) using NH3 treatment.

  10. Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through an intensity-modulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through an intensity-dimensional nano-structure arrays by passing a pulsed atomic beam through an intensity-modulated continuous of ``cooling'' along the longitudinal direction. This enables fabrication of vertically heterogeneous nano

  11. Coherent ExcitonSurface-Plasmon-Polariton Interaction in Hybrid Metal-Semiconductor Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    Coherent Exciton­Surface-Plasmon-Polariton Interaction in Hybrid Metal-Semiconductor Nanostructures 2008; published 8 September 2008) We report measurements of a coherent coupling between surface plasmon when placed close to a metallic nanostructure due to its coupling to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs

  12. Spurious Solutions in the Multiband Effective Mass Theory Applied to Low Dimensional Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    solutions, low dimensional semiconductor nanostructures 1 Introduction The electronic structure calculation.01.07-06.07.07 2 and to bridge modelling scales [27, 26]. One such theory, derived with the application, that is the low-dimensional (semiconductor) nanostructures where the motion of electrons is restricted, forcing

  13. Thermoelectric properties of high quality nanostructured Ge:Mn thin D. Tanoff2*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Thermoelectric properties of high quality nanostructured Ge:Mn thin films D. Taďnoff2* , A. Barski2 nanostructured thin films and the measurement of their thermoelectric properties. We investigate the growth of Ge temperature thermoelectric properties of these layers containing spherical inclusions are discussed regarding

  14. You are here: Home / News / 3D view of 1D nanostructures More services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    properties The nanowire battery Hybrid energy storage device is as small as it can possibly get ResearchersYou are here: Home / News / 3D view of 1D nanostructures Share More services Related LinksD nanostructures 09 January 2012 Nanowires show strong piezoelectricity Just 100 nanometers

  15. Reversal mechanisms of coupled bi-component magnetic nanostructures G. Shimon,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeyeye, Adekunle

    in applications such as high density information storage,1­3 domain wall (DW) logic,4,5 and memory devices.6Reversal mechanisms of coupled bi-component magnetic nanostructures G. Shimon,1,2 A. O. Adeyeye,1 Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4747446] Thin film ferromagnetic nanostructures have been

  16. Nanostructural considerations in giant magnetoresistive Co-Cu-based symmetric spin valves Harsh Deep Chopra*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chopra, Harsh Deep

    , for example, magnetic-field sensors and read-heads in data- storage devices.11 A key impedimentNanostructural considerations in giant magnetoresistive Co-Cu-based symmetric spin valves Harsh, on the nanostructure and resulting giant magnetoresistive properties of symmetric spin valves of the type Ni

  17. Electrochemical Nanoscale Templating: Laterally Self-Aligned Growth of Organic-Metal Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borguet, Eric

    attractive for a wide range of applications such as the fabrication of nanoscale devices, energy storage of nanostructures into 2D or 3D arrays is necessary for the further hierarchical development of devices. TemplatingElectrochemical Nanoscale Templating: Laterally Self-Aligned Growth of Organic-Metal Nanostructures

  18. Nanostructures of Boron, Carbon and Magnesium Diboride for High Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfefferle, Lisa [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Fang, Fang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Iyyamperumal, Eswarmoorthi [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Keskar, Gayatri [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures is achieved by employing metal (Ni,Mg) incorporated MCM-41 in the Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) reaction. Different reaction conditions are tested to optimize the fabrication process. TEM analysis shows the fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures starting at the reaction temperature of 600oC, with the yield of the nanostructures increasing with increasing reaction temperature. The as-synthesized MgxBy nanostructures have the diameters in the range of 3-5nm, which do not increase with the reaction temperature consistent with templated synthesis. EELS analysis of the template removed nanostructures confirms the existence of B and Mg with possible contamination of Si and O. NEXAFS and Raman spectroscopy analysis suggested a concentric layer-by-layer MgxBy nanowire/nanotube growth model for our as-synthesized nanostructures. Ni k-edge XAS indicates that the formation of MgNi alloy particles is important for the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth of MgxBy nanostructures with fine diameters, and the presence of Mg vapor not just Mg in the catalyst is crucial for the formation of Ni-Mg clusters. Physical templating by the MCM-41 pores was shown to confine the diameter of the nanostructures. DC magnetization measurements indicate possible superconductive behaviors in the as-synthesized samples.

  19. Methods of making metal oxide nanostructures and methods of controlling morphology of same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Hongjun, Zhou

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes a method of producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure. The method comprises providing a metal salt solution and providing a basic solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal salt solution and the basic solution, wherein metal cations of the metal salt solution and hydroxide ions of the basic solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure.

  20. Theoretical Investigation of Self-Assembled Peptide Nanostructures for Biotechnological and Biomedical Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvajal Diaz, Jennifer Andrea

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF SELF-ASSEMBLED PEPTIDE NANOSTRUCTURES FOR BIOTECHNOLOGICAL AND BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS A Dissertation... THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF SELF-ASSEMBLED PEPTIDE NANOSTRUCTURES FOR BIOTECHNOLOGICAL AND BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS A Dissertation by JENNIFER ANDREA CARVAJAL DIAZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  1. Dynamic thermo-mechanical coupling and size effects in finite shape memory alloy nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    Dynamic thermo-mechanical coupling and size effects in finite shape memory alloy nanostructures R 2012 Accepted 24 May 2012 Keywords: Shape memory effects Thermo-mechanical coupling Nanowires Phase of martensitic transformations in shape memory alloy (SMA) constrained finite nanostructures is studied using

  2. New Nanostructured Li2S/Silicon Rechargeable Battery with High Specific Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    -ion batteries based on LiCoO2 cathodes and graphite anodes (410 Wh kg-1 ). The nanostructured design of bothNew Nanostructured Li2S/Silicon Rechargeable Battery with High Specific Energy Yuan Yang,,§ Matthew, California 94305 ABSTRACT Rechargeable lithium ion batteries are important energy storage devices; however

  3. Forster-Type Nonradiative Energy Transfer for Assemblies of Arrayed Nanostructures: Confinement Dimension vs Stacking Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    -20 Excitons play an important role in optical devices. They can be used for storage reservoir of light energyForster-Type Nonradiative Energy Transfer for Assemblies of Arrayed Nanostructures: Confinement nanostructures with high efficiency under certain conditions. Nevertheless, the well-known Forster theory

  4. Thermally modulated nanostructure of poly(-caprolactone)ePOSS multiblock thermoplastic polyurethanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    polymer coatings, devices with enlarged data storage capacity, drug delivery systems and tissueThermally modulated nanostructure of poly(-caprolactone)ePOSS multiblock thermoplastic-angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed to study the nanostructures of those samples

  5. Thermoelectric infrared microsensors based on a periodically suspended thermopile integrating nanostructured Ge/SiGe quantum dots superlattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziouche, K., E-mail: katir.ziouche@iemn.univ-lille1.fr, E-mail: Zahia.bougrioua@iemn.univ-lille1.fr; Bougrioua, Z., E-mail: katir.ziouche@iemn.univ-lille1.fr, E-mail: Zahia.bougrioua@iemn.univ-lille1.fr; Lejeune, P.; Lasri, T.; Leclercq, D. [IEMN, Institute of Electronics, Microelectronics and Nanotechnology, CNRS and Lille 1 University, F-59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); Savelli, G.; Hauser, D.; Michon, P.-M. [CEA, LITEN, Thermoelectricity Laboratory, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an original integration of polycrystalline SiGe-based quantum dots superlattices (QDSL) into Thermoelectric (TE) planar infrared microsensors (?SIR) fabricated using a CMOS technology. The nanostructuration in QDSL results into a considerably reduced thermal conductivity by a factor up to 10 compared to the one of standard polysilicon layers that are usually used for IR sensor applications. A presentation of several TE layers, QDSL and polysilicon, is given before to describe the fabrication of the thermopile-based sensors. The theoretical values of the sensitivity to irradiance of ?SIR can be predicted thanks to an analytical model. These findings are used to interpret the experimental measurements versus the nature of the TE layer exploited in the devices. The use of nanostructured QDSL as the main material in ?SIR thermopile has brought a sensitivity improvement of about 28% consistent with theoretical predictions. The impact of QDSL low thermal conductivity is damped by the contribution of the thermal conductivity of all the other sub-layers that build up the device.

  6. Long-Time Feedback in the Formation of Self-Organized Nanostructures upon Multipulse Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reif, Juergen; Varlamova, Olga [Brandenburgische Technische Universitaet (BTU) Cottbus Universitaetsstr. 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Cottbus JointLab, Erich-Weinert-Str. 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Bounhalli, Mourad [Brandenburgische Technische Universitaet (BTU) Cottbus Universitaetsstr. 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Universite Jean Monnet, Saint-Etienne (France); Arguirov, Tzanimir [Cottbus JointLab, Erich-Weinert-Str. 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); IHP-Leibniz-Institut fuer innovative Mikroelektronik, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The self-organization feedback in nanostructures (ripples) formation upon femtosecond laser ablation is investigated in detail, with particular emphasis on its dynamics. We study the influence of time separation between successive pulses on both the size and complexity of the nanostructures and on the size of the modified surface area. By varying the pulse separation between 1 ms and 1 s (rep. rate between 1 kHz and 1 Hz), we find that both modified area as well as pattern feature size and complexity decrease with increasing pulse-to-pulse delay, indicating that the coupling efficiency between laser and target increases with increasing repetition rate. Structure formation resulting from surface instability, induced by the laser impact, suggests that the laser-induced instability results in a transient increase of absorption probability, slowly decaying in time. The stronger this transient absorption, the better is the coupling for the succeeding pulse, thus resulting in a positive feedback. Experimental results indicate that the lifetime of the feedback can last up to one second and longer.In addition, a persisting modulated spatial modification of crystalline properties is observed well beyond the ablation spot, though no apparent influence on surface morphology is seen. Mapping the band-to-band photoluminescence from silicon indicates a dramatic increase of non-radiative recombination compared to unaffected material.

  7. Investigation of some new hydro(solvo)thermal synthesis routes to nanostructured mixed-metal oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, David L.; Harunsani, Mohammad H. [Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kashtiban, Reza J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Playford, Helen Y. [Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Sloan, Jeremy [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Hannon, Alex C. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Walton, Richard I., E-mail: r.iwalton@warwick.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of two new solvothermal synthesis approaches to mixed-metal oxide materials and structural characterisation of the products formed. The solvothermal oxidation of metallic gallium by a diethanolamine solution of iron(II) chloride at 240 °C produces a crystalline sample of a spinel-structured material, made up of nano-scale particles typically 20 nm in dimension. XANES spectroscopy at the K-edge shows that the material contains predominantly Fe{sup 2+} in an octahedral environment, but that a small amount of Fe{sup 3+} is also present. Careful analysis using transmission electron microscopy and powder neutron diffraction shows that the sample is actually a mixture of two spinel materials: predominantly (>97%) an Fe{sup 2+} phase Ga{sub 1.8}Fe{sub 1.2}O{sub 3.9}, but with a minor impurity phase that is iron-rich. In contrast, the hydrothermal reaction of titanium bis(ammonium lactato)dihydroxide in water with increasing amounts of Sn(IV) acetate allows nanocrystalline samples of the SnO{sub 2}–TiO{sub 2} solid solution to be prepared directly, as proved by powder XRD and Raman spectroscopy. - Graphical abstract: New solvothermal synthesis approaches to spinel and rutile mixed-metal oxides are reported. - Highlights: • Solvothermal oxidation of gallium metal in organic iron(II) solution gives a novel iron gallate spinel. • Hydrothermal reaction of titanium(IV) complex and tin(IV) acetate produces the complete SnO{sub 2}–TiO{sub 2} solid solution. • Nanostructured mixed-metal oxide phases are produced directly from solution.

  8. Electrodes synthesized from carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal metal adlayer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adzic, Radoslav; Harris, Alexander

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The preferred manufacturing process involves the initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by a surface preparation process involving immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing a suitable quantity of non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means. The nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. The process can be controlled and repeated to obtain a desired film coverage. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  9. Nanostructuring of molybdenum and tungsten surfaces by low-energy helium ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Temmerman, Gregory; Bystrov, Kirill; Zielinski, Jakub J.; Balden, Martin; Matern, Gabriele; Arnas, Cecile; Marot, Laurent [FOM Institute DIFFER, Ducth Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Laboratoire PIIM, CNRS/Aix-Marseille Universit, 13397 Marseille (France); Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, CH-4056 (Switzerland)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of metallic nanostructures by exposure of molybdenum and tungsten surfaces to high fluxes of low energy helium ions is studied as a function of the ion energy, plasma exposure time, and surface temperature. Helium plasma exposure leads to the formation of nanoscopic filaments on the surface of both metals. The size of the helium-induced nanostructure increases with increasing surface temperature while the thickness of the modified layer increases with time. In addition, the growth rate of the nanostructured layer also depends on the surface temperature. The size of the nanostructure appears linked with the size of the near-surface voids induced by the low energy ions. The results presented here thus demonstrate that surface processing by low-energy helium ions provides an efficient route for the formation of porous metallic nanostructures.

  10. LDRD final report on adaptive-responsive nanostructures for sensing applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelnutt, John Allen; van Swol, Frank B.; Wang, Zhongchun; Medforth, Craig J.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Functional organic nanostructures such as well-formed tubes or fibers that can easily be fabricated into electronic and photonic devices are needed in many applications. Especially desirable from a national security standpoint are nanostructures that have enhanced sensitivity for the detection of chemicals and biological (CB) agents and other environmental stimuli. We recently discovered the first class of highly responsive and adaptive porphyrin-based nanostructures that may satisfy these requirements. These novel porphyrin nanostructures, which are formed by ionic self-assembly of two oppositely charged porphyrins, may function as conductors, semiconductors, or photoconductors, and they have additional properties that make them suitable for device fabrication (e.g., as ultrasensitive colorimetric CB microsensors). Preliminary studies with porphyrin nanotubes have shown that these nanostructures have novel optical and electronic properties, including strong resonant light scattering, quenched fluorescence, and electrical conductivity. In addition, they are photochemically active and capable of light-harvesting and photosynthesis; they may also have nonlinear optical properties. Remarkably, the nanotubes and potentially other porphyrin nanostructure are mechanically responsive and adaptive (e.g., the rigidity of the micrometers-long nanotubes is altered by light, ultrasound, or chemicals) and they self-heal upon removal the environmental stimulus. Given the tremendous degree of structural variation possible in the porphyrin subunits, additional types of nanostructures and greater control over their morphology can be anticipated. Molecular modification also provides a means of controlling their electronic, photonic, and other functional properties. In this work, we have greatly broadened the range of ionic porphyrin nanostructures that can be made, and determined the optical and responsivity properties of the nanotubes and other porphyrin nanostructures. We have also explored means for controlling their morphology, size, and placement on surfaces. The research proposed will lay the groundwork for the use of these remarkable porphyrin nanostructures in micro- and nanoscale devices, by providing a more detailed understanding of their molecular structure and the factors that control their structural, photophysical, and chemical properties.

  11. Sensitive And Selective Chemical Sensor With Nanostructured Surfaces.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pipino, Andrew C. R. (Gaithersburg, MD)

    2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical sensor is provided which includes an optical resonator including a nanostructured surface comprising a plurality of nanoparticles bound to one or more surfaces of the resonator. The nanoparticles provide optical absorption and the sensor further comprises a detector for detecting the optical absorption of the nanoparticles or their environment. In particular, a selective chemical interaction is provided which modifies the optical absorption of the nanoparticles or their environment, and an analyte is detected based on the modified optical absorption. A light pulse is generated which enters the resonator to interrogate the modified optical absorption and the exiting light pulse is detected by the detector.

  12. Method of making nanostructured glass-ceramic waste forms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gao, Huizhen; Wang, Yifeng; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Bencoe, Denise N.

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A waste form for and a method of rendering hazardous materials less dangerous is disclosed that includes fixing the hazardous material in nanopores of a nanoporous material, reacting the trapped hazardous material to render it less volatile/soluble, and vitrifying the nanoporous material containing the less volatile/soluble hazardous material.

  13. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  14. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  15. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  16. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  17. Hybrid chromophore/template nanostructures: A customizable platform material for solar energy storage and conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolpak, Alexie M.

    Challenges with cost, cyclability, and/or low energy density have largely prevented the development of solar thermal fuels, a potentially attractive alternative energy technology based on molecules that can capture and ...

  18. Structure-Property Relations in Nanostructured Materials: From Solar Cells to Gecko Adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong, Zhuxia

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    , I would really like to thank my PhD supervisor Prof. Ullrich Steiner for not only offering me the opportunity to study in his group, but also for giving me all the guidance and support over four years. He offered me with freedom in pursuit of various... research projects and collaboration opportunities. I would not be able to finish my PhD without his encouragement especially during the most difficult times when all directions seemed lost. The advice and assistance I have received from almost everybody...

  19. Molecular Level Assessment of Thermal Transport and Thermoelectricity in Materials: From Bulk Alloys to Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinaci, Alper

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction in thermal conductivity is observed at 50% chemical mixture in dot superlattices. The dot radius appears to have little effect on the magnitude of reduction around large concentrations while smaller dots are more influential at dilute systems....

  20. Characterization of nanostructured materials for lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustyn, Veronica

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a 2 V Rechargeable Lithium Battery. Journal of Thein a rechargeable lithium battery. Journal of Power Sourcesexception being the lithium-ion battery (Table 2.1). Table

  1. Nano-structured anode material for high-power battery system in electric vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amine, K.; Belharouak, I.; Chen, Z.; Taison, T.; Yumoto, H.; Ota, N.; Myung, S.-T.; Sun, Y.-K. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Enerdel Lithium Power Systems); (Iwate Univ.); (Hanyang Univ.)

    2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new MSNP-LTO anode is developed to enable a high-power battery system that provides three times more power than any existing battery system. It shows excellent cycle life and low-temperature performance, and exhibits unmatched safety characteristics.

  2. An Experimental Study of Deformation and Fracture of a Nanostructured Metallic Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel Al, Nisrin Rizek

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    in structural applications. v DEDICATION To my mothe r who devot e d herse l f to bring me up, to encour a g e me, and to suppo r t me all the time To my husba n d who sacri f i c e s a lot for me to reach this point....3.2 Sharp Notched Bars ......................................................... 83 4.4 Fractographs of Fracture Surfaces and Stable Crack Growth? 89 4.4.1 Shallow Notched Bars ..................................................... 90...

  3. Michigan Technological Center for Nanostructured and Lightweight Materials in the Department of Chemical Engineering (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, M.; Rogers, T.; King, J.; Holles, J.; Keith, J.; Heiden, P.; Cornilsen, B.; Allen, J.

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Summaries of the followings tasks are given in this report: Task 1 - Lightweight, Thermally Conductive Bipolar Plates for Improved Thermal Management in Fuel Cells; Task 2 - Exploration of pseudomorphic nanoscale overlayer bimetallic catalysts; Task 3 - Hybrid inorganic/organic polymer nanocomposites; Task 4 - Carbonaceous Monolithic Electrodes for Fuel Cells and Rechargeable Batteries; and Task 5 - Movement and Freeze of Water in Fuel Cell Electrodes.

  4. Evolution of the nanostructure OF VVER-1000 RPV materials under neutron irradiation and post irradiation annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Chernobaeva, A. A. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Shtrombakh, Ya. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Erak, D. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Zabusov, Oleg O. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Russell, Kaye F [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high nickel VVER-1000 (15Kh2NMFAA) base metal (1.34 wt% Ni, 0.47% Mn, 0.29% Si and 0.05% Cu), and a high nickel (12Kh2N2MAA) weld metal (1.77 wt% Ni, 0.74% Mn, 0.26% Si and 0.07% Cu) have been characterized by atom probe tomography to determine the changes in the microstructure during neutron irradiation to high fluences. The base metal was studied in the unirradiated condition and after neutron irradiation to fluences between 2.4 and 14.9 x 10{sup 23} m{sup -2} (E > 0.5 MeV), and the weld metal was studied in the unirradiated condition and after neutron irradiation to fluences between 2.4 and 11.5 x 10{sup 23} m{sup -2} (E > 0.5 MeV). High number densities of 2-nm-diameter Ni-, Si- and Mn-enriched nanoclusters were found in the neutron irradiated base and weld metals. No significant copper enrichment was associated with these nanoclusters and no copper-enriched precipitates were observed. The number densities of these nanoclusters correlate with the shifts in the {Delta}T{sub 41 J} ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. These nanoclusters were present after a post irradiOffice of Science (US)C, but had dissolved into the matrix after 24 h at 450 C. Phosphorus, nickel, silicon and to a lesser extent manganese were found to be segregated to the dislocations.

  5. Materials and Design 50 (2013) 38-43 Regeneration Technique for Welding Nanostructured Bainite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by spark wire cutting. Bead-on-plate welds with autogenous gas tungsten arc welding were perform by the heat input during welding, from transforming into brittle martensite. The microstructures of the fusion to the formation of brittle, untempered martensite. Hong et al. [6] attempted a rapid post-weld heat treatment

  6. Nanostructured multifunctional materials for control of light transport and surface wettability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Hyungryul

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological surfaces have evolved to optimize their structures and physical and chemical properties at the micro/nanoscale for adaptation to different environments, exhibiting a wide variety of beneficial functions, ranging ...

  7. Nanostructured Systems > Complex Oxides > Research > The Energy Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide CaptureSee theOilNREL

  8. Workshop in Novel Emitters and Nanostructured Materials | U.S. DOE Office

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhavenMassachusetts RegionsPaulShadesVirginia RegionsWisconsinWorkingof

  9. Critical Materials:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    lighting. 14 (bottom) Criticality ratings of shortlisted raw 76 materials. 15 77 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 78 This section reviews the major trends within...

  10. Solid-to-solid phase transformations of nanostructured selenium-tin thin films induced by thermal annealing in oxygen atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serra, A. [Physics Applied to Material Science interdepartmental Laboratory (PAMS-Lab) - Dipartimento di Beni Culturali - Universitŕ del Salento - Lecce (Italy); Rossi, M. [Dipartimento Scienze di Base ed Applicate all'Ingegneria, and CNIS - Sapienza Universitŕ di Roma, Roma (Italy); Buccolieri, A.; Manno, D. [Physics Applied to Material Science interdepartmental Laboratory (PAMS-Lab) - Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali - Universitŕ del Salento - Lecce (Italy)

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural and morphological evolution of nanostructured thin films obtained from thermal evaporation of polycrystalline Sn-Se starting charge as a function of the subsequent annealing temperature in an oxygen flow has been analysed. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, small area electron diffraction, digital image processing, x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy have been employed in order to investigate the structure and the morphology of the obtained films. The results evidenced, in the temperature range from RT to 500°C, the transition of the material from a homogeneous mixture of SnSe and SnSe{sub 2} nanocrystals, towards a homogeneous mixture of SnO{sub 2} and SeO{sub 2} nanocrystals, with an intermediate stage in which only SnSe{sub 2} nanocrystals are present.

  11. Phase diagram for stimulus-responsive materials containing dipolar colloidal particles Amit Goyal, Carol K. Hall,* and Orlin D. Velev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    the potential to serve as the foundation for the next generation of micro- and nanostructures with remarkable due to their tunable materials properties and their potential applications as storage media and display devices 4,5 . Dipolar colloids are ideal building blocks for the assembly of long-range ordered

  12. Materials Science and Engineering B 138 (2007) 224227 Synthesis of single crystalline europium-doped ZnO nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bongsoo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials Science and Engineering B 138 (2007) 224­227 Synthesis of single crystalline europium; ZnO; Europium doping; XPS 1. Introduction Synthesizing one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures in semi and studies of the luminescent properties of europium (Eu)-doped semicon- ductors in various morphologies

  13. High-efficiency photovoltaics based on semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Paul K.L. [University of California, San Diego; Yu, Edward T. [University of Texas at Austin; Wang, Deli [University of California, San Diego

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to exploit a variety of semiconductor nanostructures, specifically semiconductor quantum wells, quantum dots, and nanowires, to achieve high power conversion efficiency in photovoltaic devices. In a thin-film device geometry, the objectives were to design, fabricate, and characterize quantum-well and quantum-dot solar cells in which scattering from metallic and/or dielectric nanostructures was employed to direct incident photons into lateral, optically confined paths within a thin (~1-3um or less) device structure. Fundamental issues concerning nonequilibrium carrier escape from quantum-confined structures, removal of thin-film devices from an epitaxial growth substrate, and coherent light trapping in thin-film photovoltaic devices were investigated. In a nanowire device geometry, the initial objectives were to engineer vertical nanowire arrays to optimize optical confinement within the nanowires, and to extend this approach to core-shell heterostructures to achieve broadspectrum absorption while maintaining high opencircuit voltages. Subsequent work extended this approach to include fabrication of nanowire photovoltaic structures on low-cost substrates.

  14. Isotopically Enriched Films and Nanostructures by Ultrafast Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Pronko

    2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This project involved a systematic study to apply newly discovered isotopic enrichment effects in laser ablation plumes to the fabrication of isotopically engineered thin films, superlattices, and nanostructures. The approach to this program involved using ultrafast lasers as a method for generating ablated plasmas that have preferentially structured isotopic content in the body of the ablation plasma plumes. In examining these results we have attempted to interpret the observations in terms of a plasma centrifuge process that is driven by the internal electro-magnetic fields of the plasma itself. The research plan involved studying the following phenomena in regard to the ablation plume and the isotopic mass distribution within it: (1) Test basic equations of steady state centrifugal motion in the ablation plasma. (2) Investigate angular distribution of ions in the ablation plasmas. (3) Examine interactions of plasma ions with self-generated magnetic fields. (3) Investigate ion to neutral ratios in the ablation plasmas. (5) Test concepts of plasma pumping. (6) Fabricate isotopically enriched nanostructures.

  15. Nanostructured High Performance Ultraviolet and Blue Light Emitting Diodes for Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arto V. Nurmikko; Jung Han

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and near ultraviolet for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the second 12 month contract period include (i) new means of synthesizing AlGaN and InN quantum dots by droplet heteroepitaxy, (ii) synthesis of AlGaInN nanowires as building blocks for GaN-based microcavity devices, (iii) progress towards direct epitaxial alignment of the dense arrays of nanowires, (iv) observation and measurements of stimulated emission in dense InGaN nanopost arrays, (v) design and fabrication of InGaN photonic crystal emitters, and (vi) observation and measurements of enhanced fluorescence from coupled quantum dot and plasmonic nanostructures. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

  16. NANOSTRUCTURED HIGH PERFORMANCE ULTRAVIOLET AND BLUE LIGHT EMITTING DIODES FOR SOLID STATE LIGHTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arto V. Nurmikko; Jung Han

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and near ultraviolet for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the first 12 month contract period include (1) new means of synthesizing zero- and one-dimensional GaN nanostructures, (2) establishment of the building blocks for making GaN-based microcavity devices, and (3) demonstration of top-down approach to nano-scale photonic devices for enhanced spontaneous emission and light extraction. These include a demonstration of eight-fold enhancement of the external emission efficiency in new InGaN QW photonic crystal structures. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

  17. Plasma Spray Synthesis Of Nanostructured V2O5 Films For Electrical Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanda, Jagjit [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate for the first time, the synthesis of nanostructured vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) films and coatings using plasma spray technique. V2O5 has been used in several applications such as catalysts, super-capacitors and also as an electrode material in lithium ion batteries. In the present studies, V2O5 films were synthesized using liquid precursors (vanadium oxychloride and ammonium metavanadate) and powder suspension. In our approach, the precursors were atomized and injected radially into the plasma gun for deposition on the substrates. During the flight towards the substrate, the high temperature of the plasma plume pyrolyzes the precursor particles resulting into the desired film coatings. These coatings were then characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Among the precursors, vanadium oxychloride gave the best results in terms of nanocrystalline and monophasic films. Spraying of commercial powder suspension yielded multi-phasic mixture in the films. Our approach enables deposition of large area coatings of high quality nanocrystalline films of V2O5 with controllable particle morphology. This has been optimized by means of control over precursor composition and plasma spray conditions. Initial electrochemical studies of V2O5 film electrodes show potential for energy storage studies.

  18. Metallic nanospheres embedded in nanowires initiated on nanostructures and methods for synthesis thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaidi, Saleem (Albuquerque, NM); Tringe, Joseph W. (Walnut Creek, CA); Vanamu, Ganesh (Sunnyvale, CA); Prinja, Rajiv (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A nanostructure includes a nanowire having metallic spheres formed therein, the spheres being characterized as having at least one of about a uniform diameter and about a uniform spacing there between. A nanostructure in another embodiment includes a substrate having an area with a nanofeature; and a nanowire extending from the nanofeature, the nanowire having metallic spheres formed therein, the spheres being characterized as having at least one of about a uniform diameter and about a uniform spacing there between. A method for forming a nanostructure is also presented. A method for reading and writing data is also presented. A method for preparing nanoparticles is also presented.

  19. Imaging of buried phosphorus nanostructures in silicon using scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberbeck, Lars [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); TOTAL Marketing Services, New Energies, La Défense 10, 92069 Paris La Défense Cedex (France); Reusch, Thilo C. G.; Hallam, Toby; Simmons, Michelle Y., E-mail: n.curson@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: michelle.simmons@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Schofield, Steven R. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); London Centre for Nanotechnology, UCL, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Curson, Neil J., E-mail: n.curson@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: michelle.simmons@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); London Centre for Nanotechnology, UCL, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the locating and imaging of single phosphorus atoms and phosphorus dopant nanostructures, buried beneath the Si(001) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy. The buried dopant nanostructures have been fabricated in a bottom-up approach using scanning tunneling microscope lithography on Si(001). We find that current imaging tunneling spectroscopy is suited to locate and image buried nanostructures at room temperature and with residual surface roughness present. From these studies, we can place an upper limit on the lateral diffusion during encapsulation with low-temperature Si molecular beam epitaxy.

  20. Cermet materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-cleaning porous cermet material, filter and system utilizing the same may be used in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The porous cermet filter may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an alumina phase. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The porous filter may also be electrically conductive so that a current may be passed therethrough to heat the filter during use. Further, a heating element may be incorporated into the porous cermet filter during manufacture. This heating element can be coated with a ceramic material to electrically insulate the heating element. An external heating element may also be provided to heat the cermet filter during use.

  1. Composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Solihull, GB); Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  2. Failure by fracture and fatigue in 'NANO' and 'BIO'materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, R.O.; Muhlstein, C.L.; Nalla, R.K.

    2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of nanostructured materials/small-volumestructures and biologi-cal/bio-implantable materials, so-called "nano"and "bio" materials, is currently much in vogue in materials science. Oneaspect of this field, which to date has received only limited attention,is their fracture and fatigue properties. In this paper, we examine twotopics in this area, namely the premature fatigue failure ofsilicon-based micron-scale structures for microelectromechanical systems(MEMS), and the fracture properties of mineralized tissue, specificallyhuman bone.

  3. Condensed phase conversion and growth of nanorods and other materials instead of from vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Geohegan, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Puretzky, Alex A. (Knoxville, TN); Fan, Xudong (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions, systems and methods are described for condensed phase conversion and growth of nanorods and other materials. A method includes providing a condensed phase matrix material; and activating the condensed phase matrix material to produce a plurality of nanorods by condensed phase conversion and growth from the condensed phase matrix material instead of from vapor. The compositions are very strong. The compositions and methods provide advantages because they allow (1) formation rates of nanostructures necessary for reasonable production rates, and (2) the near net shaped production of component structures.

  4. Graphene and its Hybrid Nanostructures for Nanoelectronics and Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIN, JIAN

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modification of graphene. Advanced Materials, 2008. 20 (16):S. Novoselov. The rise of graphene. Nature Materials, 2007.transport in suspended graphene. Nature Nanotechnology,

  5. Material Symbols 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Andy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What is the relation between the material, conventional symbol structures that we encounter in the spoken and written word, and human thought? A common assumption, that structures a wide variety of otherwise competing ...

  6. Complex Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  7. Two-dimensional polymer synthesis : towards a two-dimensional replicating system for nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosley, David W

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The general concept of a replicating monolayer system is introduced as a new method of nanostructure synthesis. One possible implementation of a 2-D replicating system is pursued which uses a diacetylene moiety for ...

  8. Condensation on Hydrophilic, Hydrophobic, Nanostructured Superhydrophobic and Oil-Infused Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenad, Miljkovic

    Color images of steady state water vapor condensing on smooth and nanostructured hydrophobic surfaces are presented. Figure 1a shows a snapshot of classical filmwise condensation on hydrophilic copper. A thin liquid film ...

  9. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Study on Graphene-Coated Metallic Nanostructure Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Study on Graphene-Coated Metallic Nanostructure Substrates University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Graphene, we combine graphene with conventional metallic surface- enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates

  10. Fabrication and characterization of nanostructured magnetic particles for applications in data storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farhoud, Maya S. (Maya Sami)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arrays of nanostructured magnetic particles ('nanomagnets') have potential applications in ultra-high-density data storage devices and dynamic magnetic memories, and are model systems for the study of magnetic phenomena ...

  11. Excitation and Far field Spectroscopy of surface plasmons in Gold nanostructures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Siying

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of surface plasmons (SPs) and their excitation by a light wave are considered. The interaction of light with a metal nanostructure resulted in transmission, reflection and diffraction of light. The spectra of light obtained from...

  12. Development of a nanostructure thermal property measurement platform compatible with a transmission electron microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, C. Thomas (Charles Thomas)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the electrical and thermal transport properties of one-dimensional nanostructures (e.g., nanotubes and nanowires) typically are obtained without detailed knowledge of the specimen's atomicscale structure ...

  13. Periodic Metallic Nanostructures as Plasmonic Chemical Sensors Chiara Valsecchi and Alexandre G. Brolo*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brolo, Alexandre G.

    ;evaluation as chemical sensors and a brief comparison of the pPeriodic Metallic Nanostructures as Plasmonic Chemical Sensors Chiara Valsecchi and Alexandre G generation of low- cost and efficient chemical sensors and biosensors. The extensive variety

  14. Hard and tough electrodeposited aluminum-manganese alloys with tailored nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruan, Shiyun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tailoring the nanostructure of electrodeposited Al-Mn films to achieve high hardness and toughness is the overarching goal of this thesis. Binary Al-Mn alloys are electrodeposited using a conventional current waveform in ...

  15. Fabrication and characterization of novel nanostructures based on block copolymer lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Vivian Peng-Wei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microphase-separation of block copolymers into periodic nanoscale structures has drawn considerable attention as a method for pattern generation in nanolithography. One of the main challenges is to create complex nanostructures ...

  16. Tailoring plasmon resonances in the deep-ultraviolet by size-tunable fabrication of aluminum nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taguchi, Atsushi [Nanophotonics Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Saito, Yuika; Watanabe, Koichi; Yijian, Song [Department of Applied Physics, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kawata, Satoshi [Nanophotonics Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Localized surface plasmon resonances were controlled at deep-ultraviolet (DUV) wavelengths by fabricating aluminum (Al) nanostructures in a size-controllable manner. Plasmon resonances were obtained at wavelengths from near-UV down to 270 nm (4.6 eV) depending on the fabricated structure size. Such precise size control was realized by the nanosphere lithography technique combined with additional microwave heating to shrink the spaces in a close-packed monolayer of colloidal nanosphere masks. By adjusting the microwave heating time, the sizes of the Al nanostructures could be controlled from 80 nm to 50 nm without the need to use nanosphere beads of different sizes. With the outstanding controllability and versatility of the presented fabrication technique, the fabricated Al nanostructure is promising for use as a DUV plasmonic substrate, a light-harvesting platform for mediating strong light-matter interactions between UV photons and molecules placed near the metal nanostructure.

  17. Surface nanostructuring of Ni/Cu foils by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korol'kov, V P; Ionin, Andrei A; Kudryashov, Sergei I; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Samsonov, R V; Maslii, A I; Medvedev, A Zh; Gol'denberg, B G

    2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examines the effect of high-power femtosecond laser pulses on Ni/Cu bilayer foils produced by electrodeposition. We consider nanostructures formed at different laser beam parameters and under different ambient conditions. The surface nanostructures obtained in air and water have mostly the form of quasi-periodic ripples with a characteristic period of 400 - 450 and 370 - 390 nm, respectively, at a laser wavelength of 744 nm, whereas the nanostructures produced in ethanol and benzine have the form of spikes, typically spaced 400 - 700 nm apart. Femtosecond laser nanostructuring of metals is for the first time proposed, and experimentally tested, as a viable approach to producing anti-reflective coatings on the surface of polymer replicas. (laser nanotechnologies)

  18. Fabrication of high aspect ratio silicon nanostructure arrays by metal-assisted etching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-wei, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to explore and understand the mechanisms involved in the fabrication of silicon nanostructures using metal-assisted etching. We developed a method utilizing metal-assisted etching in conjunction ...

  19. Alignment and actuation of compliant nanostructures and diffractive optics by inter-nanomagnet forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deterre, Martin (Martin Michel Jacques)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a novel method to stretch flexible nanostructures by nanomagnets interaction forces. We discuss the ability of different types of nanomagnets to distort several types of structures in two different ...

  20. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure. The metal is a transitional metal or a Group IV metal. In the method, a porous membrane is placed between a metal precursor solution and a sulfur precursor solution. The metal cations of the metal precursor solution and sulfur ions of the sulfur precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure.

  1. Multiferroic BaTiO3-CoFe2O4 Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramesh, R.

    an additional degree of freedom in the design of actuators, transducers, and storage devices. HoweverMultiferroic BaTiO3-CoFe2O4 Nanostructures H. Zheng,1 J. Wang,1 S. E. Lofland,3 Z. Ma,1 L. Mohaddes and magnetic order param- eters in a nanostructured BaTiO3-CoFe2O4 ferroelectromagnet. This facilitates

  2. Hardfacing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by GMZ Energy Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about nanostructured high...

  4. Au-Pt heteroaggregate dendritic nanostructures and Au-Pt alloy nanoparticles and their use as catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eichhorn, Bryan W. (University Park, MD); Zhou, Shenghu (Greenbelt, MD); Jackson, Gregory Scott (University Park, MD)

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Au--Pt heteroaggregate dendritic nanostructures and AuPt alloy nanoparticles, and their use as anodic catalysts in fuel cells.

  5. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a New 183-GHzMARSecurityMaterials Science Materials

  6. Materials compatibility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives are to enable development and implementation of codes and standards for H{sub 2} containment components: (1) Evaluate data on mechanical properties of materials in H{sub 2} gas - Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials; (2) Generate new benchmark data on high-priority materials - Pressure vessel steels, stainless steels; and (3) Establish procedures for reliable materials testing - Sustained-load cracking, fatigue crack propagation. Summary of this presentation are: (1) Completed measurement of cracking thresholds (K{sub TH}) for Ni-Cr-Mo pressure vessel steels in high-pressure H{sub 2} gas - K{sub TH} measurements required in ASME Article KD-10 (2) Crack arrest test methods appear to yield non-conservative results compared to crack initiation test methods - (a) Proposal to insert crack initiation test methods in Article KD-10 will be presented to ASME Project Team on Hydrogen Tanks, and (b) Crack initiation methods require test apparatus designed for dynamic loading of specimens in H{sub 2} gas; and (3) Demonstrated ability to measure fatigue crack growth of pressure vessel steels in high-pressure H{sub 2} gas - (a) Fatigue crack growth data in H{sub 2} required in ASME Article KD-10, and (b) Test apparatus is one of few in U.S. or abroad for measuring fatigue crack growth in >100 MPa H{sub 2} gas.

  7. / www.sciencexpress.org / 2 April 2009/ Page 1 / 10.1126/science.1171541 Development of materials that deliver more energy at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    portable electronic devices and hybrid electric vehicles. Reducing materials dimensions for lithium ion batteries can boost Li+ ion and electron transfer in nanostructured electrodes. We developed a strategy transport of Li+ ions and electrons in electrodes can enhance energy storage at high charge and discharge

  8. Novel patterning techniques for manufacturing organic and nanostructured electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jianglong, 1976-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular organic semiconductors and nanometer size particles are two new classes of functional materials allowing fabrication of electronic devices on low-cost and large area substrates. Patterning these electronic materials ...

  9. Accelerated sintering in phase-separating nanostructured alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Mansoo

    Sintering of powders is a common means of producing bulk materials when melt casting is impossible or does not achieve a desired microstructure, and has long been pursued for nanocrystalline materials in particular. ...

  10. Energy Materials & Processes | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Materials & Processes Overview Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Biosystem Dynamics & Design Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Energy Materials &...

  11. Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis of nanostructured Na-birnessites and phase transformation by arsenic(III) oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias, Anderson [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, 35400-000 Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: anderson_dias@iceb.ufop.br; Sa, Rodrigo G.; Spitale, Matheus C.; Athayde, Maycon; Ciminelli, Virginia S.T. [DEMET, UFMG, Rua Espirito Santo 35, Sala 206, 30160-030 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis was employed to produce Na-birnessites. Crystalline, single-phase materials were obtained at temperatures as low as 120 deg. C and times as short as 1 min. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the structural features of the nanostructured powders. Birnessites possessed a monoclinic structure in space group C2/m with nine Raman-active bands, all of which were observed for the first time due to optimized acquisition of the spectroscopic data. The highly reactive materials produced were submitted to sorption experiments with As(III). An oxidative precipitation occurred with the production of Mn(II) arsenate at higher arsenic concentrations. In addition, the formation of hausmannite (Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}) was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman analyses of the reacted solid phase. The observed 14 Raman-active modes were adjusted according to the tetragonal I4{sub 1}/amd space group for hausmannite. An additional band related to the breathing mode of the arsenate was observed, leading to the conclusion that adsorption onto hausmannite takes place in addition to the oxidative precipitation of manganese arsenate.

  12. Superhard nanophase cutter materials for rock drilling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voronov, O.; Tompa, G.; Sadangi, R.; Kear, B.; Wilson, C.; Yan, P.

    2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low Pressure-High Temperature (LPHT) System has been developed for sintering of nanophase cutter and anvil materials. Microstructured and nanostructured cutters were sintered and studied for rock drilling applications. The WC/Co anvils were sintered and used for development of High Pressure-High Temperature (HPHT) Systems. Binderless diamond and superhard nanophase cutter materials were manufactured with help of HPHT Systems. The diamond materials were studied for rock machining and drilling applications. Binderless Polycrystalline Diamonds (BPCD) have high thermal stability and can be used in geothermal drilling of hard rock formations. Nanophase Polycrystalline Diamonds (NPCD) are under study in precision machining of optical lenses. Triphasic Diamond/Carbide/Metal Composites (TDCC) will be commercialized in drilling and machining applications.

  13. Platinum-based electrocatalysts synthesized by depositing contiguous adlayers on carbon nanostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adzic, Radoslav; Harris, Alexander

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The preferred manufacturing process involves the initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means and the nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. Subsequent film growth may be performed via the initial quasi-underpotential deposition of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a more noble metal. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  14. Self-aligned nanostructures created by swift heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehrke, Hans-Gregor; Nix, Anne-Katrin; Hofsaess, Hans [2. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hundplatz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Krauser, Johann [Hochschule Harz, Friedrichstrasse 57-59, D-38855 Wernigerode (Germany); Trautmann, Christina [GSI Helmholzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Weidinger, Alois [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) swift heavy ions create conducting tracks of about 8 nm in diameter. To apply these nanowires and implement them into nanodevices, they have to be contacted and gated. In the present work, we demonstrate the fabrication of conducting vertical nanostructures in ta-C together with self-aligned gate electrodes. A multilayer assembly is irradiated with GeV heavy ions and subsequently exposed to several selective etching processes. The samples consist of a Si wafer as substrate covered by a thin ta-C layer. On top is deposited a SiN{sub x} film for insulation, a Cr layer as electrode, and finally a polycarbonate film as ion track template. Chemical track etching opens nanochannels in the polymer which are self-aligned with the conducting tracks in ta-C because they are produced by the same ions. Through the pores in the polymer template, the Cr and SiN{sub x} layers are opened by ion beam sputtering and plasma etching, respectively. The resulting structure consists of nanowires embedded in the insulating carbon matrix with a built in gate electrode and has potential application as gated field emission cathode.

  15. In-situ TEM studies of magnetization reversal processes in magnetic nanostructures Amanda K Petford-Long1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    nanostructure is that used in devices based on the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) or tunnel magnetoresistanceIn-situ TEM studies of magnetization reversal processes in magnetic nanostructures Amanda K Petford storage applications, often in the form of layered structures containing many thin layers. This has been

  16. Novel Contrast Mechanism in Cross-Sectional Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of GaSb/GaAs Type-II Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    very interesting both for fundamental physics23 and applications as e.g. charge storage devices24-II Nanostructures R. Timm,1, R. M. Feenstra,2 H. Eisele,1 A. Lenz,1 L. Ivanova,1 E. Lenz,3 and M. D¨ahne1 1, sharply defined contrast of the nanostructure at negative sample bias, but a smoothly broadened contrast

  17. Surface plasmon resonance method for probing interactions in nanostructures: CdS nanoparticles linked to Au and Ag substrates by self-assembled hexanedithiol and aminoethanethiol monolayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutter, E.; Fendler, J. H.; Roy, D.

    2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-assembled hexanedithiol (HDT) and aminoethanethiol (AET) monolayers (SAMs), {approx}0.4--0.8 nm in thickness, are used to link {approx}5 nm diam CdS nanoparticles covalently and electrostatically onto Au and Ag substrates. The resulting nanostructures are probed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements. The CdS nanoparticle--SAM--substrate interactions manifesting themselves in the dielectric functions of the multilayered systems, are detected in the SPR data, and are discussed in terms of a phenomenological six-layer model. The SPR response of the Ag substrate is more sensitive to neighboring interactions than the Au substrate. The SEM images show that the CdS, connected either by HDT or AET onto Ag substrates, forms crystalline structures. The interactions responsible for this crystallization are absent in samples employing Au substrates, in which case only {approx}5 nm diam CdS nanoparticles are detected by SEM. The experimental results of the present article, analyzed in detail using Fresnel and Maxwell equations, demonstrate how the SPR technique can be used to characterize layered nanostructured materials. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Alloy materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo (Westborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Acton, MA); Cameron, Robert D. (Franklin, MA); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  19. Construction material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Antink, Allison L. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  20. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenter (LMI-EFRC) -PublicationsMaterials Science