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Sample records for nanoscale materials cnm

  1. Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nanoscale Materials (CNM) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) The Molecular Foundry (TMF) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home

  2. Center for Nanoscale Materials | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials About Research Capabilities For Users People...

  3. Materials synthesis at the CNM | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials synthesis at the CNM Titiania Nanoparticles 1 of 5 Titiania Nanoparticles Molecular model of titania nanoparticles covalently bound to biological molecules at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials. Image: Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Titiania Nanoparticles 1 of 5 Titiania Nanoparticles Molecular model of titania nanoparticles covalently bound to biological molecules at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials. Image: Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory SEM

  4. CNM Scientific Contact List | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CNM Scientific Contact List A list of scientific contacts for the Center for Nanoscale Materials PDF icon CNM Scientific Contact sheet 716

  5. Argonne Site Map Showing CNM Location | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Site Map Showing CNM Location Find your way to the Center for Nanoscale Materials on the Argonne National Laboratory campus. PDF icon CNM-Argonne_map

  6. CNM User Access Program Overview | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Access Program Overview The Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) user program provides access to equipment, facilities, and personnel that support CNM's overall focus on nanoscale materials. The CNM makes access available to the international scientific community through a general user access program. Proposals are submitted through a web-based process. PDF icon CNM User Access Program Overview

  7. Center for Nanoscale Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC. www.anl.gov CENTER FOR NANOSCALE MATERIALS A premier user facility providing expertise, instruments, and infrastructure for interdisciplinary nanoscience and nanotechnology research. The Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) is a premier user facility operating as one of the five centers built across the nation as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Nanoscale Science Research Center program under

  8. 2011 CNM Users Meeting | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings 2015 Users Meeting 2014 Users Meeting 2013 Users Meeting 2012 Users Meeting 2011 Users Meeting 2009 Users Meeting 2008 Users Meeting 2007 Users Meeting Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials About Research Capabilities For Users People Publications News & Events News & Events

  9. 2012 CNM Users Meeting | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings 2015 Users Meeting 2014 Users Meeting 2013 Users Meeting 2012 Users Meeting 2011 Users Meeting 2009 Users Meeting 2008 Users Meeting 2007 Users Meeting Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials About Research Capabilities For Users People Publications News & Events News & Events

  10. Electronic & magnetic materials and devices at the CNM | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Electronic & magnetic materials and devices at the CNM Graphene Micrograph 1 of 24 Graphene Micrograph Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy image of a point defect in graphene that has been epitaxially grown on 6H-SiC(0001) (Nathan Guisinger, EMMD Group) at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials. Image: Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Graphene Micrograph 1 of 24 Graphene Micrograph Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy image of a point

  11. Center for Nanoscale Materials | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rewritable artificial magnetic charge ice More Butterfly Effects: X-rays reveal the photonic crystals in butterfly wings that create color More The Friendly Faces of CNM More A Lithium-Air Battery Based on Lithium Superoxide More Borophene: Atomically Thin Metallic Boron More Video Highlight A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials BROCHURES & NEWSLETTERS CNM Overview Brochure CNM Fact Sheet Key Research Areas Nanofabrication & Devices Nanophotonics & Biofunctional

  12. 2015 APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Users Meeting 2014 Users Meeting 2013 Users Meeting 2012 Users Meeting 2011 Users Meeting 2009 Users Meeting 2008 Users Meeting 2007 Users Meeting Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials About Research Capabilities For Users People Publications News & Events News & Events RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS COLLOQUIUM SERIES SEMINAR SERIES Argonne Press

  13. CNM Users Executive Committee By-Laws | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Users Executive Committee By-Laws This charter defines the roles and responsibilities of Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials Users Executive Committee. PDF icon CNM_users_organization_bylaws

  14. CNM Strategic Plan | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strategic Plan As a Department of Energy funded research center, the CNM is at the forefront of discovery research that addresses national grand challenges encompassing the topics of energy, materials and the environment. Under the overarching scientific theme of "Manipulating Nanoscale Interactions for Energy Efficient Processes", we seek to discover new materials, visualize events with high resolution as they occur, understand the physics and chemistry of energetic processes at the

  15. CNM End-of-Experiment Survey | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diversity Directory Argonne National Laboratory About Safety News Careers Education Community Diversity Directory Energy Environment Security User Facilities Science Work with Argonne CNM End-of-Experiment Survey Please let us know about your experience as a facility user at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials. Project Information What is your proposal number? * Administrative Support The processing of my experiment proposal was * Excellent Satisfactory Marginal Unsatisfactory The

  16. Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Audit Services Audit Report Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's ... SUBJECT: IhTFORMATION: Audit Report on "Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's ...

  17. X-ray microscopy at CNM | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jorg Maser, CNM XMG Group Leader; Dean Carbaugh (APS); Robert Winarski (CNM); Rodney Porter (CNM); Brian Stephenson (APS and CNM); Volker Rose (APS); missing - Martin Holt (CNM)....

  18. NSS-8 Workshop Summary International Workshop on Nanoscale Spectroscopy and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotechnology | Argonne National Laboratory NSS-8 Workshop Summary International Workshop on Nanoscale Spectroscopy and Nanotechnology August 1, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint Organized by Center for Nanoscale Materials and Advanced Photon Source The International Workshop on Nanoscale Spectroscopy and Nanotechnology 8 (NSS-8), organized by the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) and Advanced Photon Source (APS), was held under sunny, summer skies from July 28-31, 2014, in the world-class Gleacher

  19. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-03-18

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. Our mini review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reducemore » angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods.« less

  20. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-03-18

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. Our mini review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reduce angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods.

  1. 2009 CNM Users Meeting | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 CNM Users Meeting October 5-7, 2009 Full Information Available Here Meeting Summary Plenary Session Views from DOE and Washington Keynote Presentations Stephen Chou (Princeton University), "Nanostructure Engineering: A Path to Discovery and Innovation" Andreas Heinrich (IBM Almaden Research Center), "The Quantum Properties of Magnetic Nanostructures on Surfaces" User Science Highlights Focus Sessions Nanostructured Materials for Solar Energy Utilization Materials and

  2. Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with polarized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with polarized X-rays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with ...

  3. Probing nanoscale behavior of magnetic materials with soft x...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Probing nanoscale behavior of magnetic materials with soft x-ray spectromicroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Probing nanoscale behavior of magnetic materials with soft ...

  4. Center for Nanoscale Materials Brochure | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brochure Changing the World with Nanoscience PDF icon CNM Brochure 2014

  5. CNM Participates in 2014 NanoDays Outreach Event | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory CNM Participates in 2014 NanoDays Outreach Event May 1, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint On April 14, 2014, the CNM held a Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network (NISE) NanoDays Event for 62 local fifth-grade science students and their teachers. CNM has a strong committment to activities that increase science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) literacy and enthusiasm among students, their families, and educators. The NanoDays kits were an excellent resource for this audience,

  6. Atom Probe Tomography of Nanoscale Electronic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, David J.; Prosa, Ty J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Inoue, Hidekazu; Mangelinck, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a mass spectrometry based on time-of-flight measurements which also concurrently produces 3D spatial information. The reader is referred to any of the other papers in this volume or to the following references for further information 4–8. The current capabilities of APT, such as detecting a low number of dopant atoms in nanoscale devices or segregation at a nanoparticle interface, make this technique an important component in the nanoscale metrology toolbox. In this manuscript, we review some of the applications of APT to nanoscale electronic materials, including transistors and finFETs, silicide contact microstructures, nanowires, and nanoparticles.

  7. A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials Share Topic Programs Materials science Nanoscience

  8. Filter casting nanoscale porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayes, Joel Ryan; Nyce, Gregory Walker; Kuntz, Jushua David

    2013-12-10

    A method of producing nanoporous material includes the steps of providing a liquid, providing nanoparticles, producing a slurry of the liquid and the nanoparticles, removing the liquid from the slurry, and producing monolith.

  9. Filter casting nanoscale porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayes, Joel Ryan; Nyce, Gregory Walker; Kuntz, Joshua David

    2012-07-24

    A method of producing nanoporous material includes the steps of providing a liquid, providing nanoparticles, producing a slurry of the liquid and the nanoparticles, removing the liquid from the slurry, and producing a monolith.

  10. 2008 CNM Users Meeting | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 CNM Users Meeting Tuesday, May 6, 2008 4:45-5:45 CNM Facility Tour 7:00-9:30 Users Week Banquet Wednesday, May 7, 2008 CNM Plenary and Science Session Bldg. 402 Lecture Hall 8:45-8:50 Welcome, Paul Evans, University of Wisconsin-Madison, CNM UEC Chair 8:50-9:00 Welcome from Laboratory Directorate,Al Sattelberger, Associate Laboratory Director for Energy Sciences & Engineering, Argonne National Laboratory 9:00-9:30 Update from Washington: Eric Rohlfing, Associate Director of Science for

  11. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) The Molecular Foundry (TMF) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators'

  12. DOE A9024 Final Report Functional and Nanoscale Materials Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: DOE A9024 Final Report Functional and Nanoscale Materials Systems: Frontier Programs of Science at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory Citation...

  13. Nanoscale Imaging of Strain using X-Ray Bragg Projection Ptychography |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Nanoscale Imaging of Strain using X-Ray Bragg Projection Ptychography October 1, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint Users of the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) from IBM exploited nanofocused X-ray Bragg projection ptychography to determine the lattice strain profile in an epitaxial SiGe stressor layer of a silicon prototype device. The theoretical and experimental framework of this new coherent diffraction strain imaging approach was developed by Argonne's Materials

  14. Working at CNM | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working at CNM For information on visiting Argonne National Laboratory, collaborating with us, or becoming an independent outside user of our facilities, please contact the CNM User Office. Hours of Operation The CNM, which is mandated to offer user access only 40 hours per week, provides users with routine access to facilities and instrumentation, as well as technical assistance when needed, between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m., Monday-Friday, except for Laboratory holidays and

  15. Proprietary Research at the Center for Nanoscale Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proprietary R esearch a t t he C enter f or N anoscale M aterials ( CNM) This handout provides details on the mechanism for carrying out proprietary user research at the CNM at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). * Access to the CNM User Facility is granted via a peer-reviewed proposal system. * Users provide sufficient information to ensure that each planned experiment can be performed safely. Argonne personnel provide appropriate safety training and oversight. * Users are charged for

  16. 2014 APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting May 12-15, 2014 Meeting web site CNM-Specific Events Andreas Roelofs, Interim CNM Director CNM Facility Status Update CNM Plenary Session Keynote Speaker : Federico Capasso Robert L. Wallace Professor of Applied Physics and Vinton Hayes Senior Research Fellow in Electrical Engineering Harvard University "Flat Optics with Metasurfaces" David Schuster Physics Department and James Franck Institute University of Chicago "Hybrid Quantum Computing with

  17. Scientists use world's fastest computer to simulate nanoscale material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    failure Nanoscale material failure Scientists use world's fastest computer to simulate nanoscale material failure With this new tool, scientists can better study what nanowires do under stress. October 29, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National

  18. A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Divan, Ralu; Rosenthal, Dan; Rose, Volker; Wai Hla, Saw; Liu, Yuzi

    2014-09-15

    At a very small, or "nano" scale, materials behave differently. The study of nanomaterials is much more than miniaturization - scientists are discovering how changes in size change a material's properties. From sunscreen to computer memory, the applications of nanoscale materials research are all around us. Researchers at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials are creating new materials, methods and technologies to address some of the world's greatest challenges in energy security, lightweight but durable materials, high-efficiency lighting, information storage, environmental stewardship and advanced medical devices.

  19. A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Divan, Ralu; Rosenthal, Dan; Rose, Volker; Wai Hla, Saw; Liu, Yuzi

    2014-01-29

    At a very small, or "nano" scale, materials behave differently. The study of nanomaterials is much more than miniaturization - scientists are discovering how changes in size change a material's properties. From sunscreen to computer memory, the applications of nanoscale materials research are all around us. Researchers at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials are creating new materials, methods and technologies to address some of the world's greatest challenges in energy security, lightweight but durable materials, high-efficiency lighting, information storage, environmental stewardship and advanced medical devices.

  20. Nanoscale Material Properties | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Symposium and Exhibition Focuses on Materials, Surfaces and Interfaces IMG0475 Innovation 247: We're Always Open a57-v-zero-liquid-discharge Reverse Osmosis (RO)...

  1. Dynamics of Excitons and Phonons in Disordered Nanoscale Materials |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Excitons and Phonons in Disordered Nanoscale Materials December 15, 2009 at 3pm/36-428 Sergei Tretiak Los Alamos National Laboratory trekiak.003 abstract: Prediction of the optical response and photoinduced processes of molecular and nanomaterials is fundamental to a myriad of technological applications, ranging from sensing, imaging, solar energy harvesting, to future optoelectronic devices. In this talk I will overview several applications of emerging

  2. Shipping Materials | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shipping Materials General Users are not permitted to transport hazardous material on the Argonne site or to arrange for shipment directly to the CNM. Hazardous materials must be processed through Argonne's hazardous materials receiving area. Inbound Shipments Before you ship anything to the CNM, you must notify the User Office and your CNM contact. Nonhazardous Material To ensure that samples and equipment that you ship to the CNM gets here without unnecessary delays, address your shipments as

  3. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Nanoscale Measurement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Measurements of Glass Transition Temperature and Temperature-Dependent Mechanical Properties in Polymers M.P. Nikiforov, S. Jesse, L.T. Germinario (CNMS user, Eastman...

  4. Method for producing electrodes using microscale or nanoscale materials obtained from hydrogendriven metallurgical reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, James J.; Adzic, Gordana D.; Johnson, John R.; Vogt, Thomas; McBreen, James

    2003-09-02

    A method is provided for producing electrodes using microscale and nanoscale metal materials formed from hydrogen driven metallurgical processes; such a the HD (hydriding, dehydriding) process, the HDDR (hydriding, dehydriding, disproportionation, and recombination) process, and variants thereof.

  5. CNM Scientific Contact sheet 8_16.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Materials Quantum & Energy Materials Major Tools Scientific Contacts § UHV SPM (AFM/STM) (Omicron Nanotechnology) § 4-probe SEM (Omicron UHV Nanoprobe) § VT-AFM (Omicron XA), LT-STM § Scanning probe microscope, AFM (Veeco) § Complex Oxide MBE (DCA R450D Custom) § Kurt Lesker electron beam evaporator and sputtering, deposition § Magnetometry (QD PPMS & MPMS) § Solar simulator, QEMS (Oriel) § TGA/DSC § Luminescence/UV-vis-NIR § X-ray diffractometer (Bruker D2 &

  6. DOE A9024 Final Report Functional and Nanoscale Materials Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    as described. The clusters were led by Professors Tai Chiang (Physics), Jeffrey Moore (Chemistry), Paul Goldbart (Physics), and Steven Granick (Materials Science and...

  7. Bioinspired Nanoscale Materials for Biomedical and Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-05-01

    The demand of green, affordable and environmentally sustainable materials has encouraged scientists in different fields to draw inspiration from nature in developing materials with unique properties such as miniaturization, hierarchical organization, and adaptability. Together with the exceptional properties of nanomaterials, over the past century, the field of bioinspired nanomaterials has taken huge leaps. While on one hand, the sophistication of hierarchical structures endow biological systems with multifunctionality, the synthetic control on the creation of nanomaterials enables the design of materials with specific functionalities. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive, up-to-date overview of the field of bioinspired nanomaterials, which we have broadly categorized into biotemplates and biomimics. We will discuss the application of bioinspired nanomaterials as biotemplates in catalysis, nanomedicine, immunoassays and in energy, drawing attention to novel materials such as protein cages. Further, the applications of bioinspired materials in tissue engineering and biomineralization will also be discussed.

  8. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - CNM_CNMS_NatComm-Jan2014.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A research team led by users from Pennsylvania State University, in collaboration with the X-ray Microscopy Group at the Center for Nanoscale Materials and with the Center for ...

  10. Note: Detector collimators for the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tamalonis, A.; Weber, J. K. R.; Neuefeind, J. C.; Carruth, J.; Skinner, L. B.; Alderman, O. L. G.; Benmore, C. J.

    2015-09-09

    We constructed and tested five neutron collimator designs using the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) instrument. Collimators were made from High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) or 5% borated HDPE. In all cases, collimators improved the signal to background ratio and reduced detection of secondary scattering. Moreover, in the Q-range 10-20 Å-1, signal to background ratio improved by factors of approximately 1.6 and 2.0 for 50 and 100 mm deep collimators, respectively. In the Q-range 40-50 Å-1, the improvement factors were 1.8 and 2.7. Secondary scattering as measured at Q similar to 9.5 Å-1 was significantly decreased when the collimators were installed.

  11. Note: Detector collimators for the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamalonis, A.; Weber, J. K. R. Alderman, O. L. G.; Neuefeind, J. C.; Carruth, J.; Skinner, L. B.; Benmore, C. J.

    2015-09-15

    Five neutron collimator designs were constructed and tested at the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) instrument. Collimators were made from High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) or 5% borated HDPE. In all cases, collimators improved the signal to background ratio and reduced detection of secondary scattering. In the Q-range 10-20 Å{sup −1}, signal to background ratio improved by factors of approximately 1.6 and 2.0 for 50 and 100 mm deep collimators, respectively. In the Q-range 40-50 Å{sup −1}, the improvement factors were 1.8 and 2.7. Secondary scattering as measured at Q ∼ 9.5 Å{sup −1} was significantly decreased when the collimators were installed.

  12. 2013 APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Batteries Beyond Lithium" Invited Student Talk ... Technology: Materials Design for Battery Applications: ... Gosztola Modeling and Simulation of Nanofabrication ...

  13. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirth, Brian

    2015-04-08

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to identify and understand the most important physical processes relevant to promoting the “selfhealing” or radiation resistance in advanced materials containing

  14. Piezoelectrically enhanced ferroelectric polymers via nanoscale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    control nanoscale material properties and molecular orientation using intensive local stress. Significance and Impact Nanoscale mechanical annealing process can be used to improve...

  15. Videos | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials About Research Capabilities For Users People Publications News & Events News & Events RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS COLLOQUIUM SERIES SEMINAR SERIES Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Videos Browse

  16. Workshops | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials About Research Capabilities For Users People Publications News & Events News & Events RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS COLLOQUIUM SERIES SEMINAR SERIES Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Workshops September 17-18, 2015 Argonne National Laboratory and the

  17. 2006 Seminars Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 Seminars Archive 2015 Seminars Archive 2014 Seminars Archive 2013 Seminars Archive 2012 Seminars Archive 2011 Seminars Archive 2010 Seminars Archive 2009 Seminars Archive 2008 Seminars Archive 2007 Seminars Archive 2006 Seminars Archive Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials About

  18. 2011 Seminars Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 Seminars Archive 2015 Seminars Archive 2014 Seminars Archive 2013 Seminars Archive 2012 Seminars Archive 2011 Seminars Archive 2010 Seminars Archive 2009 Seminars Archive 2008 Seminars Archive 2007 Seminars Archive 2006 Seminars Archive Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials About

  19. 2013 Seminars Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 Seminars Archive 2015 Seminars Archive 2014 Seminars Archive 2013 Seminars Archive 2012 Seminars Archive 2011 Seminars Archive 2010 Seminars Archive 2009 Seminars Archive 2008 Seminars Archive 2007 Seminars Archive 2006 Seminars Archive Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials About

  20. Nanoscale Materials in Medicine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Inhaled nanoparticles in the brain Drug delivery from a soft contact lens ... imaging contrast was achieved in mice brain tumors using functionalized iron oxide ...

  1. Nanoscale Materials in Medicine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by Auburn University Department of Chemical Engineering held on June 26, 2012

  2. Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with

  3. Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with

  4. Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with

  5. Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with

  6. Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with

  7. Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with

  8. Chemistry of Materials

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Engineering and Materials Science, Dept. of Chemistry, The Smalley Institute for Nanoscale ... University, R.E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Tech., Ajayan, Pulickel; ...

  9. For Industrial Users | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) has specific interest in growing the industrial user program and encourages researchers in industry to consider the capabilities and expertise we have to offer. As a CNM user, you have easy access to sophisticated scientific instrumentation geared toward nanoscience and nanotechnology. Moreover, our widely recognized staff researchers offer support in designing your experiments, using the equipment, and analyzing your data. Access to the CNM is through

  10. Dielectric spectroscopy at the nanoscale by atomic force microscopy: A simple model linking materials properties and experimental response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miccio, Luis A. Colmenero, Juan; Kummali, Mohammed M.; Alegra, ngel; Schwartz, Gustavo A.

    2014-05-14

    The use of an atomic force microscope for studying molecular dynamics through dielectric spectroscopy with spatial resolution in the nanometer scale is a recently developed approach. However, difficulties in the quantitative connection of the obtained data and the material dielectric properties, namely, frequency dependent dielectric permittivity, have limited its application. In this work, we develop a simple electrical model based on physically meaningful parameters to connect the atomic force microscopy (AFM) based dielectric spectroscopy experimental results with the material dielectric properties. We have tested the accuracy of the model and analyzed the relevance of the forces arising from the electrical interaction with the AFM probe cantilever. In this way, by using this model, it is now possible to obtain quantitative information of the local dielectric material properties in a broad frequency range. Furthermore, it is also possible to determine the experimental setup providing the best sensitivity in the detected signal.

  11. Final LDRD report : nanoscale mechanisms in advanced aging of materials during storage of spent %22high burnup%22 nuclear fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Blythe G.; Rajasekhara, Shreyas; Enos, David George; Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Weiner, Ruth F.

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of a three-year LDRD project focused on understanding microstructural evolution and related property changes in Zr-based nuclear cladding materials towards the development of high fidelity predictive simulations for long term dry storage. Experiments and modeling efforts have focused on the effects of hydride formation and accumulation of irradiation defects. Key results include: determination of the influence of composition and defect structures on hydride formation; measurement of the electrochemical property differences between hydride and parent material for understanding and predicting corrosion resistance; in situ environmental transmission electron microscope observation of hydride formation; development of a predictive simulation for mechanical property changes as a function of irradiation dose; novel test method development for microtensile testing of ionirradiated material to simulate the effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties; and successful demonstration of an Idaho National Labs-based sample preparation and shipping method for subsequent Sandia-based analysis of post-reactor cladding.

  12. The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (Other) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    National Laboratory (ORNL) integrates nanoscale science with neutron science; synthesis ... environment for research to understand nanoscale materials and phenomena. ...

  13. Using Plasmon Peaks in Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy to Determine the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Nanoscale Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, James M.

    2013-05-09

    In this program, we developed new theoretical and experimental insights into understanding the relationships among fundamental universality and scaling phenomena, the solid-state physical and mechanical properties of materials, and the volume plasmon energy as measured by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Particular achievements in these areas are summarized as follows: (i) Using a previously proposed physical model based on the universal binding-energy relation (UBER), we established close phenomenological connections regarding the influence of the valence electrons in materials on the longitudinal plasma oscillations (plasmons) and various solid-state properties such as the optical constants (including absorption and dispersion), elastic constants, cohesive energy, etc. (ii) We found that carbon materials, e.g., diamond, graphite, diamond-like carbons, hydrogenated and amorphous carbon films, exhibit strong correlations in density vs. Ep (or maximum of the volume plasmon peak) and density vs. hardness, both from available experimental data and ab initio DFT calculations. This allowed us to derive a three-dimensional relationship between hardness and the plasmon energy, that can be used to determine experimentally both hardness and density of carbon materials based on measurements of the plasmon peak position. (iii) As major experimental accomplishments, we demonstrated the possibility of in-situ monitoring of changes in the physical properties of materials with conditions, e.g., temperature, and we also applied a new plasmon ratio-imaging technique to map multiple physical properties of materials, such as the elastic moduli, cohesive energy and bonding electron density, with a sub-nanometer lateral resolution. This presents new capability for understanding material behavior. (iv) Lastly, we demonstrated a new physical phenomenon - electron-beam trapping, or ?¢????electron tweezers?¢??? - of a solid metal nanoparticle inside a liquid metal

  14. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  15. Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    soft and biological materials; imaging and spectroscopy; and nanoscale integration. ... NSRC resources and capabilities are available to the international academic, industry and ...

  16. CNEEC - TRG3: Nanoscale Control in Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TRG3: Nanoscale control in catalysis TRG3 Leader: Thomas F. Jaramillo Participating CNEEC PI’s: Stacey Bent, Bruce Clemens, Arthur Grossman, Thomas F. Jaramillo, Jens Nørskov, Friedrich Prinz, Jennifer Wilcox The grand challenge in TRG3 is the manipulation of catalyst materials at the nanoscale to significantly improve activity and selectivity for energy conversion reactions. A number of promising renewable energy technologies such as fuel cells and solar fuel reactors depend upon the

  17. Atomistic Time-Domain Simulations of Light-Harvesting and Charge-Transfer Dynamics in Novel Nanoscale Materials for Solar Hydrogen Production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2012-03-22

    Funded by the DOE grant (i) we continued to study and analyze the atomistic detail of the electron transfer (ET) across the chromophore-TiO2 interface in Gratzel cell systems for solar hydrogen production. (ii) We extensively investigated the nature of photoexcited states and excited state dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots (QD) designed for photovoltaic applications. (iii) We continued a newly initiated research direction focusing on excited state properties and electron-phonon interactions in nanoscale carbon materials. Over the past year, the results of the DOE funded research were summarized in 3 review articles. 12 original manuscripts were written. The research results were reported in 28 invited talks at conferences and university seminars. 20 invitations were accepted for talks in the near future. 2 symposia at national and international meetings have being organized this year on topics closely related to the DOE funded project, and 2 more symposia have been planned for the near future. We summarized the insights into photoinduced dynamics of semiconductor QDs, obtained from our time-domain ab initio studies. QDs exhibit both molecular and bulk properties. Unlike either bulk or molecular materials, QD properties can be modified continuously by changing QD shape and size. However, the chemical and physical properties of molecular and bulk materials often contradict each other, which can lead to differing viewpoints about the behavior of QDs. For example, the molecular view suggests strong electron-hole and charge-phonon interactions, as well as slow energy relaxation due to mismatch between electronic energy gaps and phonon frequencies. In contrast, the bulk view advocates that the kinetic energy of quantum confinement is greater than electron-hole interactions, that charge-phonon coupling is weak, and that the relaxation through quasi-continuous bands is rapid. By synthesizing the bulk and molecular viewpoints, we clarified the controversies and

  18. Shaping nanoscale magnetic domain memory in exchange-coupled ferromagnets

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by field cooling (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Shaping nanoscale magnetic domain memory in exchange-coupled ferromagnets by field cooling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Shaping nanoscale magnetic domain memory in exchange-coupled ferromagnets by field cooling The advance of magnetic nanotechnologies relies on detailed understanding of nanoscale magnetic mechanisms in materials. Magnetic domain memory (MDM), that is, the tendency for magnetic domains to repeat the same

  19. Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Wednesday, 21 December 2005 00:00 Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features

  20. Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Wednesday, 27 September 2006 00:00 For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave

  1. Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the

  2. Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the

  3. Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the

  4. Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the

  5. Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the

  6. Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) The Molecular Foundry (TMF) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES

  7. Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) The Molecular Foundry (TMF) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators'

  8. The Molecular Foundry (TMF) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    The Molecular Foundry (TMF) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) The Molecular Foundry (TMF) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home

  9. CNEEC - TRG2: Nanoscale Control over Photons and Electrons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TRG2: Nanoscale Control over Photons and Electrons TRG2 Leader: Mark Brongersma This group’s aim is to boost the efficiency of photovoltaic (PV) and photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices by engineering new materials at the nanoscale that offer excellent light absorption and subsequent charge extraction. The driving mechanism in conventional PV and photocatalytic devices is to convert sunlight into electrons and holes and to collect them in spatially distinct regions. Unfortunately, many of the

  10. Nanoscale, multidimensional artificial magnet created

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale, multidimensional artificial magnet created Nanoscale, multidimensional artificial magnet created Applications might range from general magnetism, such as developing sensors, to information encoding. October 26, 2015 Researchers have created a nanoscale, artificial magnet by arranging an array of magnetic nano-islands along a geometry that is not found in natural magnets. As temperature is reduced, magnetic nanoislands (in blue) reach a one-dimensional static, ordered state, while

  11. Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Lithium-Ion Anodes Novel Lithium Ion Anode Structures: Overview of New DOE BATT Anode Projects Nano-scale ...

  12. ITP Nanomanufacturing: Manufacturing of Surfaces with Nanoscale...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing of Surfaces with Nanoscale and Microscale Features ITP Nanomanufacturing: Manufacturing of Surfaces with Nanoscale and Microscale Features superhydrophobicsurfaces.p...

  13. Nanoscale Investigation of Solid Electrolyte Interphase Inhibition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale Investigation of Solid Electrolyte Interphase Inhibition on Li-ion Battery MnO ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale Investigation of Solid Electrolyte ...

  14. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles ...

  15. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Wednesday, 28 January 2009 00:00 The heterogeneous catalysts used in most ...

  16. Nanophotonic Architectures for Nanoscale Light Control (invited...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanophotonic Architectures for Nanoscale Light Control (invited). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanophotonic Architectures for Nanoscale Light Control (invited). ...

  17. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Jianhua; Russell, Scott; Morishetti, Kiran; Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P.; Kent, Michael Stuart

    2011-02-01

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  18. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties. In this talk, I will discuss our recent research in the area of nanoscale materials modeling, using various atomistic simulation techniques, aimed at uncovering the...

  19. Mapping photovoltaic performance with nanoscale resolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kutes, Yasemin; Aguirre, Brandon A.; Bosse, James L.; Cruz-Campa, Jose L.; Zubia, David; Huey, Bryan D.

    2015-10-16

    Photo-conductive AFM spectroscopy (‘pcAFMs’) is proposed as a high-resolution approach for investigating nanostructured photovoltaics, uniquely providing nanoscale maps of photovoltaic (PV) performance parameters such as the short circuit current, open circuit voltage, maximum power, or fill factor. The method is demonstrated with a stack of 21 images acquired during in situ illumination of micropatterned polycrystalline CdTe/CdS, providing more than 42,000 I/V curves spatially separated by ~5 nm. For these CdTe/CdS microcells, the calculated photoconduction ranges from 0 to 700 picoSiemens (pS) upon illumination with ~1.6 suns, depending on location and biasing conditions. Mean short circuit currents of 2 pA, maximummore » powers of 0.5 pW, and fill factors of 30% are determined. The mean voltage at which the detected photocurrent is zero is determined to be 0.7 V. Significantly, enhancements and reductions in these more commonly macroscopic PV performance metrics are observed to correlate with certain grains and grain boundaries, and are confirmed to be independent of topography. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the benefits of nanoscale resolved PV functional measurements, reiterate the importance of microstructural control down to the nanoscale for 'PV devices, and provide a widely applicable new approach for directly investigating PV materials.« less

  20. Mapping photovoltaic performance with nanoscale resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutes, Yasemin; Aguirre, Brandon A.; Bosse, James L.; Cruz-Campa, Jose L.; Zubia, David; Huey, Bryan D.

    2015-10-16

    Photo-conductive AFM spectroscopy (‘pcAFMs’) is proposed as a high-resolution approach for investigating nanostructured photovoltaics, uniquely providing nanoscale maps of photovoltaic (PV) performance parameters such as the short circuit current, open circuit voltage, maximum power, or fill factor. The method is demonstrated with a stack of 21 images acquired during in situ illumination of micropatterned polycrystalline CdTe/CdS, providing more than 42,000 I/V curves spatially separated by ~5 nm. For these CdTe/CdS microcells, the calculated photoconduction ranges from 0 to 700 picoSiemens (pS) upon illumination with ~1.6 suns, depending on location and biasing conditions. Mean short circuit currents of 2 pA, maximum powers of 0.5 pW, and fill factors of 30% are determined. The mean voltage at which the detected photocurrent is zero is determined to be 0.7 V. Significantly, enhancements and reductions in these more commonly macroscopic PV performance metrics are observed to correlate with certain grains and grain boundaries, and are confirmed to be independent of topography. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the benefits of nanoscale resolved PV functional measurements, reiterate the importance of microstructural control down to the nanoscale for 'PV devices, and provide a widely applicable new approach for directly investigating PV materials.

  1. Long Range Interactions in Nanoscale Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Roger H; Parsegian, V Adrian; Podgonik, Rudolph; Rajter, Rick; Jagota, Anand; Luo, Jian; Asthagiri, Dilip; Chaudhury, Manoj; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Granick, Steve; Kalinin, Sergei V; Kardar, Mehran; Kjellander, Roland; Langreth, David C.; Lewis, Jennifer; Lustig, Steve; Wesolowski, David J; Wettlaufer, John; Ching, Wai-Yim; Finnis, Mike; Houlihan, Frank; Von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Van Oss, Carel; Zemb, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the long range electrodynamic, electrostatic, and polar interactions that dominate the organization of small objects at separations beyond an interatomic bond length is reviewed. From this basic-forces perspective, a large number of systems are described from which one can learn about these organizing forces and how to modulate them. The many practical systems that harness these nanoscale forces are then surveyed. The survey reveals not only the promise of new devices and materials, but also the possibility of designing them more effectively.

  2. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of Zinc Oxide Nanowire Corrosion ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of Zinc Oxide Nanowire Corrosion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of Zinc Oxide Nanowire Corrosion Nanoscale ...

  3. Nanoscale Materials and Architectures for Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grulke, Eric A.; Sunkara, Mahendra K.

    2011-05-25

    The Kentucky EPSCoR Program supported an inter-university, multidisciplinary energy-related research cluster studying nanomaterials for converting solar radiation and residual thermal energy to electrical energy and hydrogen. It created a collaborative center of excellence based on research expertise in nanomaterials, architectures, and their synthesis. The project strengthened and improved the collaboration between the University of Louisville, the University of Kentucky, and NREL. The cluster hired a new faculty member for ultra-fast transient spectroscopy, and enabled the mentoring of one research scientist, two postdoctoral scholars and ten graduate students. Work was accomplished with three focused cluster projects: organic and photoelectrochemical solar cells, solar fuels, and thermionic energy conversion.

  4. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Wednesday, 29 August 2012 00:00 Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a

  5. Summary report for nanoscale magnetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, J.G.; Waddill, G.D.; Jankowski, A.F.; Tamura, E.; Sterne, P.A.; Pappas, D.P.; Tong, S.Y.

    1993-09-23

    We have probed the electronic, geometric, and magnetic nanoscale structure of ultrathin magnetic films, both monolayers and multilayers (Fe/Cu(001), FePt, FeCoPt, UFe{sub 2}, U-S). Techniques used included the MCD (magnetic circular dichroism)-variants of of x-ray absorption, core-level photoemission, and photoelectron diffraction. Progress has been made on nanoscale structure-property relations, in part of coupling of world-class experimentation and theoretical modeling. Feasibility of investigations of 5f magnetism using bulk uranium samples also has been demonstrated.

  6. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Helble, Joseph J.; Moniz, Gary A.; Morse, Theodore F.

    1997-02-04

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

  7. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helble, J.J.; Moniz, G.A.; Morse, T.F.

    1995-09-05

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles. 5 figs.

  8. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Helble, Joseph J.; Moniz, Gary A.; Morse, Theodore F.

    1995-09-05

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

  9. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helble, J.J.; Moniz, G.A.; Morse, T.F.

    1997-02-04

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles. 5 figs.

  10. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  11. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  12. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  13. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  14. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  15. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  16. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  17. CNEEC - TRG1: Nanoscale Control of Thermodynamic Potentials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TRG1: Nanoscale Control of Thermodynamic Potentials TRG1 Leaders: Bruce Clemens and David Goldhaber-Gordon Energy storage and conversion involve charge transport, charge storage and conversion of materials from one phase to another. At the nanometer regime, size can have a dramatic effect on these processes and properties. Our program develops fundamental understanding of the effect of size on thermodynamics, kinetic processes, electronic structure and charge transport. Material systems

  18. Nanoscale mass conveyors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2008-03-11

    A mass transport method and device for individually delivering chargeable atoms or molecules from source particles is disclosed. It comprises a channel; at least one source particle of chargeable material fixed to the surface of the channel at a position along its length; a means of heating the channel; and a means for applying an controllable electric field along the channel, whereby the device transports the atoms or molecules along the channel in response to applied electric field. In a preferred embodiment, the mass transport device will comprise a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT), although other one dimensional structures may also be used. The MWNT or other structure acts as a channel for individual or small collections of atoms due to the atomic smoothness of the material. Also preferred is a source particle of a metal such as indium. The particles move by dissociation into small units, in some cases, individual atoms. The particles are preferably less than 100 nm in size.

  19. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Wednesday, 28 January 2009 00:00 The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support,

  20. A new regime of nanoscale thermal transport: Collective diffusion increases dissipation efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen M.; Hernandez-Charpak, Jorge N.; Gu, Xiaokun; Frazer, Travis D.; Anderson, Erik H.; Chao, Weilun; Falcone, Roger W.; Yang, Ronggui; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Nardi, Damiano

    2015-03-23

    Understanding thermal transport from nanoscale heat sources is important for a fundamental description of energy flow in materials, as well as for many technological applications including thermal management in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, thermoelectric devices, nanoenhanced photovoltaics, and nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapies. Thermal transport at the nanoscale is fundamentally different from that at the macroscale and is determined by the distribution of carrier mean free paths and energy dispersion in a material, the length scales of the heat sources, and the distance over which heat is transported. Past work has shown that Fourier’s law for heat conduction dramatically overpredicts the rate of heat dissipation from heat sources with dimensions smaller than the mean free path of the dominant heat-carrying phonons. In this work, we uncover a new regime of nanoscale thermal transport that dominates when the separation between nanoscale heat sources is small compared with the dominant phonon mean free paths. Surprisingly, the interaction of phonons originating from neighboring heat sources enables more efficient diffusive-like heat dissipation, even from nanoscale heat sources much smaller than the dominant phonon mean free paths. This finding suggests that thermal management in nanoscale systems including integrated circuits might not be as challenging as previously projected. In conclusion, we demonstrate a unique capability to extract differential conductivity as a function of phonon mean free path in materials, allowing the first (to our knowledge) experimental validation of predictions from the recently developed first-principles calculations.

  1. A new regime of nanoscale thermal transport: Collective diffusion increases dissipation efficiency

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen M.; Hernandez-Charpak, Jorge N.; Gu, Xiaokun; Frazer, Travis D.; Anderson, Erik H.; Chao, Weilun; Falcone, Roger W.; Yang, Ronggui; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; et al

    2015-03-23

    Understanding thermal transport from nanoscale heat sources is important for a fundamental description of energy flow in materials, as well as for many technological applications including thermal management in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, thermoelectric devices, nanoenhanced photovoltaics, and nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapies. Thermal transport at the nanoscale is fundamentally different from that at the macroscale and is determined by the distribution of carrier mean free paths and energy dispersion in a material, the length scales of the heat sources, and the distance over which heat is transported. Past work has shown that Fourier’s law for heat conduction dramatically overpredicts the rate ofmore » heat dissipation from heat sources with dimensions smaller than the mean free path of the dominant heat-carrying phonons. In this work, we uncover a new regime of nanoscale thermal transport that dominates when the separation between nanoscale heat sources is small compared with the dominant phonon mean free paths. Surprisingly, the interaction of phonons originating from neighboring heat sources enables more efficient diffusive-like heat dissipation, even from nanoscale heat sources much smaller than the dominant phonon mean free paths. This finding suggests that thermal management in nanoscale systems including integrated circuits might not be as challenging as previously projected. In conclusion, we demonstrate a unique capability to extract differential conductivity as a function of phonon mean free path in materials, allowing the first (to our knowledge) experimental validation of predictions from the recently developed first-principles calculations.« less

  2. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamza, A V

    2008-04-07

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The NSCL is delivering on its mission providing Laboratory programs with scientific solutions through the use of nanoscale synthesis and characterization. While this annual report summarizes 2007 activities, we have focused on nanoporous materials, advanced high strength, nanostructured metals, novel 3-dimensional lithography and characterization at the nanoscale for the past 3 years. In these three years we have synthesized the first monolithic nanoporous metal foams with less than 10% relative density; we have produced ultrasmooth nanocrystalline diamond inertial confinement fusion capsules; we have synthesized 3-dimensional graded density structures from full density to 5% relative density using nanolithography; and we have established ultrasmall angle x-ray scattering as a non-destructive tool to determine the structure on the sub 300nm scale. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and to train personnel for Lab programs. The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory. Andrew Detor from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sutapa Ghosal from the University of California, Irvine, Xiang Ying Wang from Shanghai Institute of Technology, and Arne Wittstock from University of Bremen joined the NSCL this year. The NSCL is pursuing four science and technology themes: nanoporous materials, advanced nanocrystalline materials, novel three-dimensional nanofabrication technologies, and nondestructive characterization at the mesoscale. The NSCL is also pursuing building new facilities for science and technology such as nanorobotics and atomic layer deposition.

  3. Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric Materials at RTI

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews work in engineered thin-film nanoscale thermoelectric materials and nano-bulk materials with high ZT undertaken by RTI in collaboration with its research partners

  4. Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide Title Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication...

  5. Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) User Facilities User Facilities Home User ... X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers ...

  6. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003-2012 (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. ...

  7. Controlling Motion at the Nanoscale: Rise of the Molecular Machines...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Published Article: Controlling Motion at the Nanoscale: Rise of the Molecular Machines Title: Controlling Motion at the Nanoscale: Rise of the Molecular Machines Authors: ...

  8. Electron Transport at the Nanoscale Spatially Revealed by Four...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electron Transport at the Nanoscale Spatially Revealed by Four-Probe Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electron Transport at the Nanoscale ...

  9. Nanoscale lubrication of ionic surfaces controlled via a strong...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale lubrication of ionic surfaces controlled via a strong electric field Prev Next Title: Nanoscale lubrication of ionic surfaces controlled via a strong electric field ...

  10. Electrochemistry on the nanoscale: the force dimension (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrochemistry on the nanoscale: the force dimension Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electrochemistry on the nanoscale: the force dimension Authors: Black, Jennifer M ...

  11. Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage Lithium-Manganese Rich NMC Composite Cathodes with Cycling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale ...

  12. Seeing through walls at the nanoscale: Microwave microscopy of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Seeing through walls at the nanoscale: Microwave microscopy of enclosed objects and ... Title: Seeing through walls at the nanoscale: Microwave microscopy of enclosed objects and ...

  13. Nanoscale Periodic Modulations on Sodium Chloride Induced by...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Nanoscale Periodic Modulations on Sodium Chloride Induced by Surface Charges Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale Periodic Modulations on Sodium ...

  14. Electrochemistry at the Nanoscale: The Force Dimension (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrochemistry at the Nanoscale: The Force Dimension Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electrochemistry at the Nanoscale: The Force Dimension Authors: Black, Jennifer M ...

  15. Humidity Effect on Nanoscale Electrochemistry in Solid Silver...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale Electrochemistry in Solid Silver Ion Conductors and the Dual Nature of Its Locality Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Humidity Effect on Nanoscale ...

  16. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery ...

  17. Probing Nanoscale Objects in Liquids through Membranes with Near...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Probing Nanoscale Objects in Liquids through Membranes with Near-Field Microwave Microscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Probing Nanoscale Objects in ...

  18. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase formation and preferential growth of lithium metal nanoclusters Prev Next Title: Nanoscale ...

  19. Other: Nanoscale Machines: These Squeaky Wheels Will Get No Grease...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale Machines: These Squeaky Wheels Will Get No Grease Citation Details Title: Nanoscale Machines: These Squeaky Wheels Will Get No Grease

  20. Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory Print Tuesday, 21 May 2013 00:00 Research at the Advanced...

  1. Melt Processing of Covetic Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    www.netl.doe.gov U.S. DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office Program ... of integrally-bound nano-scale carbon phase (i.e., "covetic" nano- materials) in order to produce materials ...

  2. Nanoscale Strontium Titanate Photocatalysts for Overall Water Splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Troy K.; Browning, Nigel D.; Osterloh, Frank

    2012-08-28

    SrTiO3 (STO) is a large band gap (3.2 eV) semiconductor that catalyzes the overall water splitting reaction under UV light irradiation in the presence of a NiO cocatalyst. As we show here, the reactivity persists in nanoscale particles of the material, although the process is less effective at the nanoscale. To reach these conclusions, Bulk STO, 30 5 nm STO, and 6.5 1 nm STO were synthesized by three different methods, their crystal structures verified with XRD and their morphology observed with HRTEM before and after NiO deposition. In connection with NiO, all samples split water into stoichiometric mixtures of H2 and O2, but the activity is decreasing from 28 ?mol H2 g1 h1 (bulk STO), to 19.4 ?mol H2 g1 h1 (30 nm STO), and 3.0 ?mol H2 g1 h1 (6.5 nm STO). The reasons for this decrease are an increase of the water oxidation overpotential for the smaller particles and reduced light absorption due to a quantum size effect. Overall, these findings establish the first nanoscale titanate photocatalyst for overall water splitting.

  3. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  4. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P.J. Kooyman, H.W. Zandbergen, C. Morin, B.M. Weckhuysen, and F.M.F. de Groot, "Nanoscale chemical imaging of a working catalyst by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy," Nature...

  5. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Materials Access to Hopper Phase II (Cray XE6) If you are a current NERSC user, you are enabled to use Hopper Phase II. Use your SSH client to connect to Hopper II:...

  6. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Materials Understanding and manipulating the most fundamental properties of materials can lead to major breakthroughs in solar power, reactor fuels, optical computing, telecommunications. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Yu Seung Kim (left) and Kwan-Soo Lee (right) New class of fuel cells offer increased flexibility, lower cost A new class of fuel cells based on a newly discovered polymer-based material could bridge

  7. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction

  8. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction

  9. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction

  10. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction

  11. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction

  12. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction

  13. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction

  14. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction

  15. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction

  16. Nanoscale Center Dedication | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoscale Center Dedication Nanoscale Center Dedication May 6, 2005 - 12:44pm Addthis Remarks by Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Thank you, Bob [Rosner] for that introduction. And let me also thank you, along with [University of Chicago] President Randel, for the leadership you are showing here. Argonne has long been a world class institution. It will soar to new heights under your joint direction. I also want to acknowledge Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich. Thank you for being here. More than

  17. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; Charlton, Jennifer; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-rangingmore » lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.« less

  18. Development of Nanoscale Ceramics for Advanced Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miriam Leffler; Joseph Helble

    1999-09-30

    Bulk structures of unstabilized ZrO{sub 2-x}, with x in the range of 0 {<=} x {<=} 0.44, at ambient pressure have been found to exist in three different structures. (monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic.). At ambient temperature and elevated pressures above 3.5 GPa, unstabilized zirconia at these same compositions is found as a fourth phase, the orthorhombic phase. Work done in this project has demonstrated that nanoscale zirconia particles containing the orthorhombic phase in addition to amorphous material can be produced through solgel methods. Extensive characterization of this material including recent high temperature x-ray diffraction work has indicated that the structure of the synthesized zirconia appears to be linked to the oxygen vacancy population in the material, and that water appears to be a critical factor in determining the type of material formed during synthesis. These results suggest that surface energy alone is not the controlling factor in determining crystal phase.

  19. Nanophotonics at CNM | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Artist's rendition of semiconductor nanocrystals near a gold film representing work by ... Artist's rendition of semiconductor nanocrystals near a gold film representing work by ...

  20. Access to CNM | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complete the user work submittal form (UWS, this is coordinated by the User Office). Take the online core training courses for Argonne facility users; you must have an Argonne ...

  1. 2007 CNM Users Meeting | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    List of Tables Main Report | Methodology | FAQ | List of Tables CBECS 2007 - Release date: August 17, 2012 Table H1: Structural and Geographical Information for Large Hospitals Table H2: Fuels and End Uses in Large Hospitals Table H3: End Use Equipment in Large Hospitals Table H4: Lighting and Window Features in Large Hospitals Table H5: Major Fuels Usage for Large Hospitals Table H6: Electricity Usage for Large Hospitals Table H7: Natural Gas Usage for Large Hospitals Table H8: Water

  2. CNM Organization Chart | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural gas is a clean-burning, abundant, and domestically produced energy source. In the fleet world, these attributes have garnered growing interest in compressed natural gas (CNG) for medium- and heavy- duty vehicles 1 . CNG can also reduce operating costs and offer relative price stability compared to conventional petroleum fuels. For fleets considering a transition to CNG, there are many aspects of CNG vehicles and fueling infrastructure that impact the viability and financial soundness of

  3. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: Coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2016-04-15

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surfacemore » as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single-and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. As a result, a multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.« less

  4. Optoacoustic Microscopy for Investigation of MaterialNanostructures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    be used for quantitative imaging of nanoscale material features - including features that may be buried so as to be inaccessible to conventional lightwave or electron microscopies. ...

  5. The Properties of Confined Water and Fluid Flow at the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwegler, E; Reed, J; Lau, E; Prendergast, D; Galli, G; Grossman, J C; Cicero, G

    2009-03-09

    This project has been focused on the development of accurate computational tools to study fluids in confined, nanoscale geometries, and the application of these techniques to probe the structural and electronic properties of water confined between hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates, including the presence of simple ions at the interfaces. In particular, we have used a series of ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations and quantum Monte Carlo calculations to build an understanding of how hydrogen bonding and solvation are modified at the nanoscale. The properties of confined water affect a wide range of scientific and technological problems - including protein folding, cell-membrane flow, materials properties in confined media and nanofluidic devices.

  6. 2007 Colloquium Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 Colloquium Archgive 2015 Colloquium Archive 2014 Colloquium Archive 2013 Colloquium Archive 2012 Colloquium Archive 2011 Colloquium Archive 2010 Colloquium Archive 2009 Colloquium Archive 2008 Colloquium Archive 2007 Colloquium Archive SEMINAR SERIES Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale

  7. 2007 Seminars Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SEMINAR SERIES 2016 Seminars Archive 2015 Seminars Archive 2014 Seminars Archive 2013 Seminars Archive 2012 Seminars Archive 2011 Seminars Archive 2010 Seminars Archive 2009 Seminars Archive 2008 Seminars Archive 2007 Seminars Archive 2006 Seminars Archive Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale

  8. 2008 Colloquium Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 Colloquium Archgive 2015 Colloquium Archive 2014 Colloquium Archive 2013 Colloquium Archive 2012 Colloquium Archive 2011 Colloquium Archive 2010 Colloquium Archive 2009 Colloquium Archive 2008 Colloquium Archive 2007 Colloquium Archive SEMINAR SERIES Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale

  9. 2009 Colloquium Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 Colloquium Archgive 2015 Colloquium Archive 2014 Colloquium Archive 2013 Colloquium Archive 2012 Colloquium Archive 2011 Colloquium Archive 2010 Colloquium Archive 2009 Colloquium Archive 2008 Colloquium Archive 2007 Colloquium Archive SEMINAR SERIES Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale

  10. 2009 Seminars Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SEMINAR SERIES 2016 Seminars Archive 2015 Seminars Archive 2014 Seminars Archive 2013 Seminars Archive 2012 Seminars Archive 2011 Seminars Archive 2010 Seminars Archive 2009 Seminars Archive 2008 Seminars Archive 2007 Seminars Archive 2006 Seminars Archive Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale

  11. 2010 Colloquium Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 Colloquium Archgive 2015 Colloquium Archive 2014 Colloquium Archive 2013 Colloquium Archive 2012 Colloquium Archive 2011 Colloquium Archive 2010 Colloquium Archive 2009 Colloquium Archive 2008 Colloquium Archive 2007 Colloquium Archive SEMINAR SERIES Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale

  12. 2010 Seminars Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SEMINAR SERIES 2016 Seminars Archive 2015 Seminars Archive 2014 Seminars Archive 2013 Seminars Archive 2012 Seminars Archive 2011 Seminars Archive 2010 Seminars Archive 2009 Seminars Archive 2008 Seminars Archive 2007 Seminars Archive 2006 Seminars Archive Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale

  13. 2011 Colloquium Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 Colloquium Archgive 2015 Colloquium Archive 2014 Colloquium Archive 2013 Colloquium Archive 2012 Colloquium Archive 2011 Colloquium Archive 2010 Colloquium Archive 2009 Colloquium Archive 2008 Colloquium Archive 2007 Colloquium Archive SEMINAR SERIES Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale

  14. 2012 Colloquium Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 Colloquium Archgive 2015 Colloquium Archive 2014 Colloquium Archive 2013 Colloquium Archive 2012 Colloquium Archive 2011 Colloquium Archive 2010 Colloquium Archive 2009 Colloquium Archive 2008 Colloquium Archive 2007 Colloquium Archive SEMINAR SERIES Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale

  15. 2013 Colloquium Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 Colloquium Archgive 2015 Colloquium Archive 2014 Colloquium Archive 2013 Colloquium Archive 2012 Colloquium Archive 2011 Colloquium Archive 2010 Colloquium Archive 2009 Colloquium Archive 2008 Colloquium Archive 2007 Colloquium Archive SEMINAR SERIES Argonne Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Users Meetings Workshops Photos Videos Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Career Opportunities CNM Intranet CNM on Facebook Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale

  16. Downloads | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Bioluminescence more accurate, forgiving than typical targeting methods October 6, 2015 CNM Scientific Contact List A list of scientific contacts for the Center for Nanoscale ...

  17. Discovery Could Dramatically Boost Efficiency of Perovskite Solar Cells: Nanoscale images by Berkeley Lab researchers yield surprise that could push efficiency to 31 percent

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scientists from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have discovered a possible secret to dramatically boosting the efficiency of perovskite solar cells hidden in the nanoscale peaks and valleys of the crystalline material.

  18. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamza, A V; Lesuer, D R

    2006-01-03

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The initial emphasis of the NSCL has been on development of scientific solutions in support of target fabrication for the NIF laser and other stockpile stewardship experimental platforms. Particular emphasis has been placed on the design and development of innovative new materials and structures for use in these targets. Projects range from the development of new high strength nanocrystalline alloys to graded density materials to high Z nanoporous structures. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and train personnel for Lab programs such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Defense and Nuclear Technologies (DNT), and Nonproliferation, Arms control and International security (NAI). The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory.

  19. Design Optimization of Radionuclide Nano-Scale Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenfeld, D.W.; Tulenko, J.S.; Wang, J.; Smith, B.

    2004-10-06

    Radioisotopes have been used for power sources in heart pacemakers and space applications dating back to the 50's. Two key properties of radioisotope power sources are high energy density and long half-life compared to chemical batteries. The tritium battery used in heart pacemakers exceeds 500 mW-hr, and is being evaluated by the University of Florida for feasibility as a MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) power source. Conversion of radioisotope sources into electrical power within the constraints of nano-scale dimensions requires cutting-edge technologies and novel approaches. Some advances evolving in the III-V and II-IV semiconductor families have led to a broader consideration of radioisotopes rather free of radiation damage limitations. Their properties can lead to novel battery configurations designed to convert externally located emissions from a highly radioactive environment. This paper presents results for the analytical computational assisted design and modeling of semiconductor prototype nano-scale radioisotope nuclear batteries from MCNP and EGS programs. The analysis evaluated proposed designs and was used to guide the selection of appropriate geometries, material properties, and specific activities to attain power requirements for the MEMS batteries. Plans utilizing high specific activity radioisotopes were assessed in the investigation of designs employing multiple conversion cells and graded junctions with varying band gap properties. Voltage increases sought by serial combination of VOC s are proposed to overcome some of the limitations of a low power density. The power density is directly dependent on the total active areas.

  20. Nanoscale Silicon as a Catalyst for Graphene Growth: Mechanistic Insight from in Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Share, Keith; Carter, Rachel E.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Hooper, Daylong; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P.; Rao, Rahul; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Maruyama, Benji; et al

    2016-06-08

    Nanoscale carbons are typically synthesized by thermal decomposition of a hydrocarbon at the surface of a metal catalyst. Whereas the use of silicon as an alternative to metal catalysts could unlock new techniques to seamlessly couple carbon nanostructures and semiconductor materials, stable carbide formation renders bulk silicon incapable of the precipitation and growth of graphitic structures. In this article, we provide evidence supported by comprehensive in situ Raman experiments that indicates nanoscale grains of silicon in porous silicon (PSi) scaffolds act as catalysts for hydrocarbon decomposition and growth of few-layered graphene at temperatures as low as 700 K. Self-limiting growthmore » kinetics of graphene with activation energies measured between 0.32–0.37 eV elucidates the formation of highly reactive surface-bound Si radicals that aid in the decomposition of hydrocarbons. Nucleation and growth of graphitic layers on PSi exhibits striking similarity to catalytic growth on nickel surfaces, involving temperature dependent surface and subsurface diffusion of carbon. Lastly, this work elucidates how the nanoscale properties of silicon can be exploited to yield catalytic properties distinguished from bulk silicon, opening an important avenue to engineer catalytic interfaces combining the two most technologically important materials for modern applications—silicon and nanoscale carbons.« less

  1. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, Bradley R.; Talley, Chad E.

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  2. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  3. Method and system for nanoscale plasma processing of objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Hua, Xuefeng; Stolz, Christian

    2008-12-30

    A plasma processing system includes a source of plasma, a substrate and a shutter positioned in close proximity to the substrate. The substrate/shutter relative disposition is changed for precise control of substrate/plasma interaction. This way, the substrate interacts only with a fully established, stable plasma for short times required for nanoscale processing of materials. The shutter includes an opening of a predetermined width, and preferably is patterned to form an array of slits with dimensions that are smaller than the Debye screening length. This enables control of the substrate/plasma interaction time while avoiding the ion bombardment of the substrate in an undesirable fashion. The relative disposition between the shutter and the substrate can be made either by moving the shutter or by moving the substrate.

  4. Methods and devices for fabricating three-dimensional nanoscale structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.; Jeon, Seokwoo; Park, Jangung

    2010-04-27

    The present invention provides methods and devices for fabricating 3D structures and patterns of 3D structures on substrate surfaces, including symmetrical and asymmetrical patterns of 3D structures. Methods of the present invention provide a means of fabricating 3D structures having accurately selected physical dimensions, including lateral and vertical dimensions ranging from 10s of nanometers to 1000s of nanometers. In one aspect, methods are provided using a mask element comprising a conformable, elastomeric phase mask capable of establishing conformal contact with a radiation sensitive material undergoing photoprocessing. In another aspect, the temporal and/or spatial coherence of electromagnetic radiation using for photoprocessing is selected to fabricate complex structures having nanoscale features that do not extend entirely through the thickness of the structure fabricated.

  5. AUDIT REPORT Follow-up Audit of Nanoscale Materials Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    over the handling of nanomaterials, we recommend that the Acting Director, Office of Science and the Associate Administrator for Safety, Infrastructure, and Operations,...

  6. Center for Nanoscale Materials Fact Sheet | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    instruments, and infrastructure for interdisciplinary nanoscience and nanotechnology research. Academic, industrial, and international researchers can access the center...

  7. Growth of and defect reduction in nanoscale materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, Kenneth J.; Mickelson, William E.; Zettl, Alex K.

    2011-01-04

    Methods by which the growth of a nanostructure may be precisely controlled by an electrical current are described here. In one embodiment, an interior nanostructure is grown to a predetermined geometry inside another nanostructure, which serves as a reaction chamber. The growth is effected by a catalytic agent loaded with feedstock for the interior nanostructure. Another embodiment allows a preexisting marginal quality nanostructure to be zone refined into a higher-quality nanostructure by driving a catalytic agent down a controlled length of the nanostructure with an electric current. In both embodiments, the speed of nanostructure formation is adjustable, and the growth may be stopped and restarted at will. The catalytic agent may be doped or undoped to produce semiconductor effects, and the bead may be removed via acid etching.

  8. Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with polarized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The clock signal of the synchrotron triggers a fast electronic pulsar, which launches pulses with a rise time of about 100ps into a waveguide structure. These pump pulses create ...

  9. Materials Science Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Materials Science Applications VASP VASP is a plane wave ab initio code for quantum mechanical molecular dynamics. It is highly scalable and shows very good parallel performance for a variety of chemical and materials science calculations. VASP is available to NERSC users who already have a VASP license. Read More » Quantum ESPRESSO/PWscf Quantum Espresso is an integrated suite of computer codes for electronic structure calculations and materials modeling at the nanoscale. It builds on

  10. Nondestructive volumetric 3-D chemical mapping of nickel-sulfur compounds at the nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris W. M.; Chu Y.; Nelson, G.J.; Kiss, A.M.; Izzo Jr, J.R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, M.; Wang, S.; Chiu W.K.S.

    2012-04-04

    Nano-structures of nickel (Ni) and nickel subsulfide (Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}) materials were studied and mapped in 3D with high-resolution x-ray nanotomography combined with full field XANES spectroscopy. This method for characterizing these phases in complex microstructures is an important new analytical imaging technique, applicable to a wide range of nanoscale and mesoscale electrochemical systems.

  11. Nanoscale Imaging of Lithium Ion Distribution During In Situ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale Imaging of Lithium Ion Distribution ... energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), hydrogen and fuel ...

  12. Humidity Effect on Nanoscale Electrochemistry in Solid Silver...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and the Dual Nature of Its Locality Prev Next Title: Humidity Effect on Nanoscale Electrochemistry in Solid Silver Ion Conductors and the Dual Nature of Its Locality ...

  13. Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage Lithium-Manganese Rich NMC ... must understand the evolution of chemical composition and morphology of battery ...

  14. Flow Batteries Enabled by Nanoscale Percolating Conductor Networks...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2014, Research Highlights Flow Batteries Enabled by Nanoscale Percolating Conductor Networks Images for Flow Batteries Scientific Achievement Created novel electronically ...

  15. Nanoscale nickel oxide/ nickel heterostructures for active hydrogen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for active hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale nickel oxide nickel heterostructures for active hydrogen evolution ...

  16. Ravi R. Gupta | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ravi R. Gupta Postdoctoral Appointee Dr. Ravi Gupta is a postdoc studying Type Ia supernovae and their host galaxies as part of the Dark Energy Survey (www.darkenergysurvey.org). He also spends part of his time nanofabricating ring resonators at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (www.anl.gov/cnm/) for future near-infrared astronomy applications. EDUCATION Ph.D. in Physics & Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 2013 B.S. in Physics, Stanford University, 2007 Telephone (630) 252-6218

  17. Andreas Roelofs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Andreas Roelofs is the Interim Division Director and Industrial Liaison of Argonne's Nanoscience and Technology Division (NST) as well as the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), a Department of Energy national user facility. He holds an advanced degree in physics (Dipl.-Phys) from the University of Cologne and received his doctoral degree (Dr.rer.nat.) in physics from the RWTH Aachen in Germany. Dr. Roelofs thesis work focused on the investigation of scaling effects of ferroelectric thin films

  18. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  19. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-07-14

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  20. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-11-03

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  1. In situ characterization of nanoscale catalysts during anodic redox processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Renu; Crozier, Peter; Adams, James

    2013-09-19

    Controlling the structure and composition of the anode is critical to achieving high efficiency and good long-term performance. In addition to being a mixed electronic and ionic conductor, the ideal anode material should act as an efficient catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and dry hydrocarbons without de-activating through either sintering or coking. It is also important to develop novel anode materials that can operate at lower temperatures to reduce costs and minimized materials failure associated with high temperature cycling. We proposed to synthesize and characterize novel anode cermets materials based on ceria doped with Pr and/or Gd together with either a Ni or Cu metallic components. Ceria is a good oxidation catalyst and is an ionic conductor at room temperature. Doping it with trivalent rare earths such as Pr or Gd retards sintering and makes it a mixed ion conductor (ionic and electronic). We have developed a fundamental scientific understanding of the behavior of the cermet material under reaction conditions by following the catalytic oxidation process at the atomic scale using a powerful Environmental Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (ESTEM). The ESTEM allowed in situ monitoring of structural, chemical and morphological changes occurring at the cermet under conditions approximating that of typical fuel-cell operation. Density functional calculations were employed to determine the underlying mechanisms and reaction pathways during anode oxidation reactions. The dynamic behavior of nanoscale catalytic oxidation of hydrogen and methane were used to determine: ? Fundamental processes during anodic reactions in hydrogen and carbonaceous atmospheres ? Interfacial effects between metal particles and doped ceria ? Kinetics of redox reaction in the anode material

  2. New Imaging Technique Shows Nanoscale Workings of Rechargeable Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Imaging Technique Shows Nanoscale Workings of Rechargeable Batteries There's a new tool in the push to engineer rechargeable batteries that last longer and charge more quickly. An X-ray microscopy technique recently developed at Advanced Light Source has given scientists the ability to image nanoscale changes inside lithium-ion battery particles as they charge and discharge. ← Previous Next →

  3. Synthesizing High-Quality Calcium Boride at Nanoscale | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory High-Quality Calcium Boride at Nanoscale Technology available for licensing: An innovative method for synthesizing compositionally pure calcium boride at the nanoscale by using two different precursors. Process increases stability, hardness and conductivity of high-melting-point calcium boride Makes calcium boride readily available for manufacturing processes in many industries PDF icon calcium_chloride

  4. Method to determine thermal profiles of nanoscale circuitry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K; Begtrup, Gavi E

    2013-04-30

    A platform that can measure the thermal profiles of devices with nanoscale resolution has been developed. The system measures the local temperature by using an array of nanoscale thermometers. This process can be observed in real time using a high resolution imagining technique such as electron microscopy. The platform can operate at extremely high temperatures.

  5. PHOTOELECTROCHEMISTRY AND PHOTOCATALYSIS IN NANOSCALE INORGANIC CHEMICAL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas E. Mallouk

    2007-05-27

    The goal of our DOE-supported research has been to explore the use of solid state materials as organizing media for, and as active components of, artificial photosynthetic systems. In this work we strive to understand how photoinduced electron and energy transfer reactions occur in the solid state, and to elucidate design principles for using nanoscale inorganic materials in photochemical energy conversion schemes. A unifying theme in this project has been to move beyond the study of simple transient charge separation to integrated chemical systems that can effect permanent charge separation in the form of energy-rich chemicals. This project explored the use of zeolites as organizing media for electron donor-acceptor systems and artificial photosynthetic assemblies. Layer-by-layer synthetic methods were developed using lamellar semiconductors, and multi-step, visible light driven energy/electron transfer cascades were studied by transient specroscopic techniques. By combining molecular photosensitizers with lamellar semiconductors and intercalated catalyst particles, the first non-sacrificial systems for visible light driven hydrogen evolution were developed and studied. Oxygen evolving catalyst particles and semiconductor nanowires were also studied with the goal of achieving photocatalytic water splitting using visible light.

  6. Control of friction at the nanoscale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barhen, Jacob; Braiman, Yehuda Y.; Protopopescu, Vladimir

    2010-04-06

    Methods and apparatus are described for control of friction at the nanoscale. A method of controlling frictional dynamics of a plurality of particles using non-Lipschitzian control includes determining an attribute of the plurality of particles; calculating an attribute deviation by subtracting the attribute of the plurality of particles from a target attribute; calculating a non-Lipschitzian feedback control term by raising the attribute deviation to a fractionary power .xi.=(2m+1)/(2n+1) where n=1, 2, 3 . . . and m=0, 1, 2, 3 . . . , with m strictly less than n and then multiplying by a control amplitude; and imposing the non-Lipschitzian feedback control term globally on each of the plurality of particles; imposing causes a subsequent magnitude of the attribute deviation to be reduced.

  7. Nanoscale temperature mapping in operating microelectronic devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Hubbard, William A.; White, E. R.; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, B. C.

    2015-02-05

    We report that modern microelectronic devices have nanoscale features that dissipate power nonuniformly, but fundamental physical limits frustrate efforts to detect the resulting temperature gradients. Contact thermometers disturb the temperature of a small system, while radiation thermometers struggle to beat the diffraction limit. Exploiting the same physics as Fahrenheit’s glass-bulb thermometer, we mapped the thermal expansion of Joule-heated, 80-nanometer-thick aluminum wires by precisely measuring changes in density. With a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), we quantified the local density via the energy of aluminum’s bulk plasmon. Rescaling density to temperature yields maps with amore » statistical precision of 3 kelvin/hertz₋1/2, an accuracy of 10%, and nanometer-scale resolution. Lastly, many common metals and semiconductors have sufficiently sharp plasmon resonances to serve as their own thermometers.« less

  8. Nanoscale temperature mapping in operating microelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Hubbard, William A.; White, E. R.; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, B. C.

    2015-02-05

    We report that modern microelectronic devices have nanoscale features that dissipate power nonuniformly, but fundamental physical limits frustrate efforts to detect the resulting temperature gradients. Contact thermometers disturb the temperature of a small system, while radiation thermometers struggle to beat the diffraction limit. Exploiting the same physics as Fahrenheit’s glass-bulb thermometer, we mapped the thermal expansion of Joule-heated, 80-nanometer-thick aluminum wires by precisely measuring changes in density. With a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), we quantified the local density via the energy of aluminum’s bulk plasmon. Rescaling density to temperature yields maps with a statistical precision of 3 kelvin/hertz₋1/2, an accuracy of 10%, and nanometer-scale resolution. Lastly, many common metals and semiconductors have sufficiently sharp plasmon resonances to serve as their own thermometers.

  9. Environmental Assessment for Enhanced Operations of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-06-27

    This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with continued and enhanced operation of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), including modifications, upgrades, and new facilities, at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois. This proposed action is needed to meet DOE's mission of sponsoring cutting-edge science and technology. Continued operation would include existing research activities. In 2002, 23 user teams had beamlines in use in 28 sectors of the experiment hall, and approximately 2,000 individual users visited annually (see Section 3.1.1). Enhanced scientific capabilities would include research on Biosafety Level-3 (BSL-3) materials in an existing area originally constructed for such work, and would not require new construction or workforce (see Section 3.1.2). A new experimental unit, the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), would be constructed along the west side of the APS facility and would be used for bench-scale research in nanoscience (see Section 3.1.3). Under the No Action Alternative, current APS operations would continue. However, initiation of BSL-3 research would not occur, and the proposed CNM research facility would not be constructed. The environmental consequences of the Proposed Action are minor. Potential effects to the environment are primarily related to ecological effects during construction and operation of the proposed CNM and human health effects during BSL-3 activities. The potential ecological effects of construction and operation of the CNM would be impacts of stormwater runoff into a restored wetland to the north of the CNM. DOE would minimize stormwater impacts during construction of the CNM by ensuring adequate erosion control before and during construction. Stormwater impacts would be minimized during operation of the CNM by

  10. Humidity Effect on Nanoscale Electrochemistry in Solid Silver...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Dual Nature of Its Locality Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Humidity Effect on Nanoscale Electrochemistry in Solid Silver Ion Conductors and the Dual Nature of Its ...

  11. Nanoscale selective area growth of thick, dense, uniform, In...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Nanoscale selective area growth of thick, dense, uniform, In-rich, InGaN nanostructure arrays on GaNsapphire template Authors: Sundaram, S. 1 ; Puybaret, R. 2 ; El ...

  12. Synthesizing High-Quality Calcium Boride at Nanoscale - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boride at Nanoscale Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology CaB6 particles coated for 20 cycles at 1600 C. CaB6 particles...

  13. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Wednesday, 28 May 2014 00:00 Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have difficulty simultaneously identifying and spatially resolving this realm of matter, which ranges from about 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. But ALS researchers recently developed a broadband imaging technique that looks

  14. Non-Equilibrium Nanoscale Self-Organization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aziz, Michael J

    2006-03-09

    Self-organized one- and two-dimensional arrays of nanoscale surface features ("ripples" and "dots") sometimes form spontaneously on initially flat surfaces eroded by a directed ion beam in a process called "sputter patterning". Experiments on this sputter patterning process with focused and unfocused ion beams, combined with theoretical advances, have been responsible for a number of scientific advances. Particularly noteworthy are (i) the discovery of propagative, rather than dissipative, behavior under some ion erosion conditions, permitting a pattern to be fabricated at a large length scale and propagated over large distances while maintaining, or even sharpening, the sharpest features; (ii) the first demonstration of guided self-organization of sputter patterns, along with the observation that defect density is minimized when the spacing between boundaries is near an integer times the natural spatial period; and (iii) the discovery of metastability of smooth surfaces, which contradicts the nearly universally accepted linear stability theory that predicts that any surface is linearly unstable to sinusoidal perturbations of some wave vector.

  15. Trimodal Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy. Simultaneous 4D Mapping of Conservative and Dissipative Probe-Sample Interactions of Energy-Relevant Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2015-09-18

    This project focused on the development of single-pass multifrequency atomic force microscopy methods for the rapid multi-function nanoscale characterization of energy-relevant materials.

  16. Materials Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Videos Materials

  17. Ultrashort-pulse laser generated nanoparticles of energetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welle, Eric J.; Tappan, Alexander S.; Palmer, Jeremy A.

    2010-08-03

    A process for generating nanoscale particles of energetic materials, such as explosive materials, using ultrashort-pulse laser irradiation. The use of ultrashort laser pulses in embodiments of this invention enables one to generate particles by laser ablation that retain the chemical identity of the starting material while avoiding ignition, deflagration, and detonation of the explosive material.

  18. Nanoscale imaging of photocurrent and efficiency in CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leite, Marina S.; Abashin, Maxim; Lezec, Henri J.; Gianfrancesco, Anthony; Talin, A. Alec; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.

    2014-10-15

    The local collection characteristics of grain interiors and grain boundaries in thin film CdTe polycrystalline solar cells are investigated using scanning photocurrent microscopy. The carriers are locally generated by light injected through a small aperture (50-300 nm) of a near-field scanning optical microscope in an illumination mode. Possible influence of rough surface topography on light coupling is examined and eliminated by sculpting smooth wedges on the granular CdTe surface. By varying the wavelength of light, nanoscale spatial variations in external quantum efficiency are mapped. We find that the grain boundaries (GBs) are better current collectors than the grain interiors (GIs). The increased collection efficiency is caused by two distinct effects associated with the material composition of GBs. First, GBs are charged, and the corresponding built-in field facilitates the separation and the extraction of the photogenerated carriers. Second, the GB regions generate more photocurrent at long wavelength corresponding to the band edge, which can be caused by a smaller local band gap. As a result, resolving carrier collection with nanoscale resolution in solar cell materials is crucial for optimizing the polycrystalline device performance through appropriate thermal processing and passivation of defect and surfaces.

  19. Nanoscale imaging of photocurrent and efficiency in CdTe solar cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leite, Marina S.; National Inst. of Standards and Technology; Abashin, Maxim; National Inst. of Standards and Technology; Lezec, Henri J.; Gianfrancesco, Anthony; Talin, A. Alec; Sandia National Lab.; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.

    2014-10-15

    The local collection characteristics of grain interiors and grain boundaries in thin film CdTe polycrystalline solar cells are investigated using scanning photocurrent microscopy. The carriers are locally generated by light injected through a small aperture (50-300 nm) of a near-field scanning optical microscope in an illumination mode. Possible influence of rough surface topography on light coupling is examined and eliminated by sculpting smooth wedges on the granular CdTe surface. By varying the wavelength of light, nanoscale spatial variations in external quantum efficiency are mapped. We find that the grain boundaries (GBs) are better current collectors than the grain interiors (GIs).more » The increased collection efficiency is caused by two distinct effects associated with the material composition of GBs. First, GBs are charged, and the corresponding built-in field facilitates the separation and the extraction of the photogenerated carriers. Second, the GB regions generate more photocurrent at long wavelength corresponding to the band edge, which can be caused by a smaller local band gap. As a result, resolving carrier collection with nanoscale resolution in solar cell materials is crucial for optimizing the polycrystalline device performance through appropriate thermal processing and passivation of defect and surfaces.« less

  20. Nanoscale elastic changes in 2D Ti3C2Tx (MXene) pseudocapacitive electrodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Come, Jeremy; Xie, Yu; Naguib, Michael; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Gogotsi, Yury; Kent, Paul R. C.; Balke, Nina

    2016-02-01

    Designing sustainable electrodes for next generation energy storage devices relies on the understanding of their fundamental properties at the nanoscale, including the comprehension of ions insertion into the electrode and their interactions with the active material. One consequence of ion storage is the change in the electrode volume resulting in mechanical strain and stress that can strongly affect the cycle life. Therefore, it is important to understand the changes of dimensions and mechanical properties occurring during electrochemical reactions. While the characterization of mechanical properties via macroscopic measurements is well documented, in-situ characterization of their evolution has never been achieved atmore » the nanoscale. Two dimensional (2D) carbides, known as MXenes, are promising materials for supercapacitors and various kinds of batteries, and understating the coupling between their mechanical and electrochemical properties is therefore necessary. Here we report on in-situ imaging, combined with density functional theory of the elastic changes, of a 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) electrode in direction normal to the basal plane during cation intercalation. The results show a strong correlation between the Li+ ions content and the elastic modulus, whereas little effects of K+ ions are observed. Moreover, this strategy enables identifying the preferential intercalation pathways within a single particle.« less

  1. Modeling nanoscale hydrodynamics by smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Huan; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos

    2015-05-21

    Thermal fluctuation and hydrophobicity are two hallmarks of fluid hydrodynamics on the nano-scale. It is a challenge to consistently couple the small length and time scale phenomena associated with molecular interaction with larger scale phenomena. The development of this consistency is the essence of mesoscale science. In this study, we develop a nanoscale fluid model based on smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that accounts for the phenomena of associated with density fluctuations and hydrophobicity. We show consistency in the fluctuation spectrum across scales. In doing so, it is necessary to account for finite fluid particle size. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the present model can capture of the void probability and solvation free energy of apolar particles of different sizes. The present fluid model is well suited for a understanding emergent phenomena in nano-scale fluid systems.

  2. In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graetz J.; Meng, Y.S.; McGilvray, T.; Yang, M.-C.; Gostovic, D.; Wang, F.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, Y.

    2011-10-31

    Oxides and their tailored structures are at the heart of electrochemical energy storage technologies and advances in understanding and controlling the dynamic behaviors in the complex oxides, particularly at the interfaces, during electrochemical processes will catalyze creative design concepts for new materials with enhanced and better-understood properties. Such knowledge is not accessible without new analytical tools. New innovative experimental techniques are needed for understanding the chemistry and structure of the bulk and interfaces, more importantly how they change with electrochemical processes in situ. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used extensively to study electrode materials ex situ and is one of the most powerful tools to obtain structural, morphological, and compositional information at nanometer scale by combining imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy, e.g., EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (EELS). Determining the composition/structure evolution upon electrochemical cycling at the bulk and interfaces can be addressed by new electron microscopy technique with which one can observe, at the nanometer scale and in situ, the dynamic phenomena in the electrode materials. In electrochemical systems, for instance in a lithium ion battery (LIB), materials operate under conditions that are far from equilibrium, so that the materials studied ex situ may not capture the processes that occur in situ in a working battery. In situ electrochemical operation in the ultra-high vacuum column of a TEM has been pursued by two major strategies. In one strategy, a 'nano-battery' can be fabricated from an all-solid-state thin film battery using a focused ion beam (FIB). The electrolyte is either polymer based or ceramic based without any liquid component. As shown in Fig. 1a, the interfaces between the active electrode material/electrolyte can be clearly observed with TEM imaging, in contrast to the

  3. Predictive modeling of synergistic effects in nanoscale ion track formation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-08-05

    Molecular dynamics techniques and the inelastic thermal spike model are used to study the coupled effects of inelastic energy loss due to 21 MeV Ni ion irradiation and pre-existing defects in SrTiO3. We determine the dependence on pre-existing defect concentration of nanoscale track formation occurring from the synergy between the inelastic energy loss and the pre-existing atomic defects. We show that the nanoscale ion tracks’ size can be controlled by the concentration of pre-existing disorder. This work identifies a major gap in fundamental understanding concerning the role played by defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron–lattice coupling.

  4. Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0kumta.pdf (1.9 MB) More Documents & Publications Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible Anodes for Lithium-ion Batteries Nanoscale ...

  5. Nanoscale dynamics and aging of fibrous peptide-based gels (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale dynamics and aging of fibrous peptide-based gels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale dynamics and aging of fibrous peptide-based gels Authors: Dudukovic, ...

  6. Nanoscale Spin-State Ordering in LaCoO3 Epitaxial Thin Films...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale Spin-State Ordering in LaCoO3 Epitaxial Thin Films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale Spin-State Ordering in LaCoO3 Epitaxial Thin Films Authors: Kwon, ...

  7. Stripe-like nanoscale structural phase separation in superconducting BaPb1-xBixO3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Zhang, Y.; Parra, C.; Manoharan, H. C.; Beasley, M. R.; Geballe, T. H.; Kramer, M. J.; Fisher, I. R.

    2015-09-16

    The phase diagram of BaPb1-xBixO3 exhibits a superconducting “dome” in the proximity of a charge density wave phase. For the superconducting compositions, the material coexists as two structural polymorphs. Here we show, via high resolution transmission electron microscopy, that the structural dimorphism is accommodated in the form of partially disordered nanoscale stripes. Identification of the morphology of the nanoscale structural phase separation enables determination of the associated length scales, which we compare to the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length. Thus, we find that the maximum Tc occurs when the superconducting coherence length matches the width of the partially disordered stripes, implying amore » connection between the structural phase separation and the shape of the superconducting dome.« less

  8. Acoustic Detection of Phase Transitions at the Nanoscale

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vasudevan, Rama K.; Khassaf, Hamidreza; Cao, Ye; Zhang, Shujun; Tselev, Alexander; Carmichael, Ben D.; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Jesse, Stephen; Chen, Long-Qing; Alpay, S. Pamir; et al

    2016-01-25

    On page 478, N. Bassiri-Gharb and co-workers demonstrate acoustic detection in nanoscale volumes by use of an atomic force microscope tip technique. Elastic changes in volume are measured by detecting changes in resonance of the cantilever. Also, the electric field in this case causes a phase transition, which is modeled by Landau theory.

  9. Visualizing nanoscale excitonic relaxation properties of disordered edges and grain boundaries in monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bao, Wei; Borys, Nicholas J.; Ko, Changhyun; Suh, Joonki; Fan, Wen; Thron, Andrew; Zhang, Yingjie; Buyanin, Alexander; Zhang, Jie; Cabrini, Stefano; et al

    2015-08-13

    The ideal building blocks for atomically thin, flexible optoelectronic and catalytic devices are two-dimensional monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductors. Although challenging for two-dimensional systems, sub-diffraction optical microscopy provides a nanoscale material understanding that is vital for optimizing their optoelectronic properties. We use the ‘Campanile’ nano-optical probe to spectroscopically image exciton recombination within monolayer MoS2 with sub-wavelength resolution (60 nm), at the length scale relevant to many critical optoelectronic processes. Moreover, synthetic monolayer MoS2 is found to be composed of two distinct optoelectronic regions: an interior, locally ordered but mesoscopically heterogeneous two-dimensional quantum well and an unexpected ~300-nm wide, energetically disorderedmore » edge region. Further, grain boundaries are imaged with sufficient resolution to quantify local exciton-quenching phenomena, and complimentary nano-Auger microscopy reveals that the optically defective grain boundary and edge regions are sulfur deficient. In conclusion, the nanoscale structure–property relationships established here are critical for the interpretation of edge- and boundary-related phenomena and the development of next-generation two-dimensional optoelectronic devices.« less

  10. Ultrafast Chemistry under Nonequilibrium Conditions and the Shock to Deflagration Transition at the Nanoscale

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wood, Mitchell A.; Cherukara, Mathew J.; Kober, Edward M.; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-13

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to describe the chemical reactions following shock-induced collapse of cylindrical pores in the high-energy density material RDX. For shocks with particle velocities of 2 km/s we find that the collapse of a 40 nm diameter pore leads to a deflagration wave. Molecular collisions during the collapse lead to ultrafast, multistep chemical reactions that occur under nonequilibrium conditions. WE found that exothermic products formed during these first few picoseconds prevent the nanoscale hotspot from quenching. Within 30 ps, a local deflagration wave develops. It propagates at 0.25 km/s and consists of an ultrathin reaction zone ofmore » only ~5 nm, thus involving large temperature and composition gradients. Contrary to the assumptions in current models, a static thermal hotspot matching the dynamical one in size and thermodynamic conditions fails to produce a deflagration wave indicating the importance of nonequilibrium loading in the criticality of nanoscale hot spots. These results provide insight into the initiation of reactive decomposition.« less

  11. Ultrafast Chemistry under Nonequilibrium Conditions and the Shock to Deflagration Transition at the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Mitchell A.; Cherukara, Mathew J.; Kober, Edward M.; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-13

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to describe the chemical reactions following shock-induced collapse of cylindrical pores in the high-energy density material RDX. For shocks with particle velocities of 2 km/s we find that the collapse of a 40 nm diameter pore leads to a deflagration wave. Molecular collisions during the collapse lead to ultrafast, multistep chemical reactions that occur under nonequilibrium conditions. WE found that exothermic products formed during these first few picoseconds prevent the nanoscale hotspot from quenching. Within 30 ps, a local deflagration wave develops. It propagates at 0.25 km/s and consists of an ultrathin reaction zone of only ~5 nm, thus involving large temperature and composition gradients. Contrary to the assumptions in current models, a static thermal hotspot matching the dynamical one in size and thermodynamic conditions fails to produce a deflagration wave indicating the importance of nonequilibrium loading in the criticality of nanoscale hot spots. These results provide insight into the initiation of reactive decomposition.

  12. Imaging thermal conductivity with nanoscale resolution using a scanning spin probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laraoui, Abdelghani; Aycock-Rizzo, Halley; Gao, Yang; Lu, Xi; Riedo, Elisa; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2015-11-20

    The ability to probe nanoscale heat flow in a material is often limited by lack of spatial resolution. Here, we use a diamond-nanocrystal-hosted nitrogen-vacancy centre attached to the apex of a silicon thermal tip as a local temperature sensor. We apply an electrical current to heat up the tip and rely on the nitrogen vacancy to monitor the thermal changes the tip experiences as it is brought into contact with surfaces of varying thermal conductivity. By combining atomic force and confocal microscopy, we image phantom microstructures with nanoscale resolution, and attain excellent agreement between the thermal conductivity and topographic maps. The small mass and high thermal conductivity of the diamond host make the time response of our technique short, which we demonstrate by monitoring the tip temperature upon application of a heat pulse. Our approach promises multiple applications, from the investigation of phonon dynamics in nanostructures to the characterization of heterogeneous phase transitions and chemical reactions in various solid-state systems.

  13. Imaging thermal conductivity with nanoscale resolution using a scanning spin probe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Laraoui, Abdelghani; Aycock-Rizzo, Halley; Gao, Yang; Lu, Xi; Riedo, Elisa; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2015-11-20

    The ability to probe nanoscale heat flow in a material is often limited by lack of spatial resolution. Here, we use a diamond-nanocrystal-hosted nitrogen-vacancy centre attached to the apex of a silicon thermal tip as a local temperature sensor. We apply an electrical current to heat up the tip and rely on the nitrogen vacancy to monitor the thermal changes the tip experiences as it is brought into contact with surfaces of varying thermal conductivity. By combining atomic force and confocal microscopy, we image phantom microstructures with nanoscale resolution, and attain excellent agreement between the thermal conductivity and topographic maps.more » The small mass and high thermal conductivity of the diamond host make the time response of our technique short, which we demonstrate by monitoring the tip temperature upon application of a heat pulse. Our approach promises multiple applications, from the investigation of phonon dynamics in nanostructures to the characterization of heterogeneous phase transitions and chemical reactions in various solid-state systems.« less

  14. Nanoscale Molecules Under Thermodynamic Control:" Digestive Ripening" or " Nanomachining"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klabunde, Kenneth J.

    2015-06-04

    Overall Research Goals and Specific Objectives: Nanoscale materials are becoming ubiquitous in science and engineering, and are found widely in nature. However, their formation processes and uniquely high chemical reactivities are not understood well, indeed are often mysterious. Over recent years, a number of research teams have described nanoparticle synthesis, and aging, thermal treatment, or etching times have been mentioned. We have used the terms “digestive ripening” and “nanomachining” and have suggested that thermodynamics plays an important part in the size adjustment to monodisperse arrays being formed. Since there is scant theoretical understanding of digestive ripening, the overall goal in our research is to learn what experimental parameters (ligand used, temperature, solvent, time) are most important, how to control nanoparticle size and shape after initial crude nanoparticles have been synthesized, and gain better understanding of the chemical mechanism details. Specific objectives for the past twentynine months since the grant began have been to (1) Secure and train personnel;as of 2011, a postdoc Deepa Jose, female from the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore, India; Yijun Sun, a second year graduate student, female from China; and Jessica Changstrom, female from the USA, GK12 fellow (program for enhancing teaching ability) are actively carrying out research. (2) Find out what happens to sulfur bound hydrogen of thiol when it interacts with gold nanoparticles. Our findings are discussed in detail later. (3) Determine the effect of particle size, shape, and temperature on dodecyl thiol assited digestive ripening of gold nanoparticles. See our discussions later. (4) To understand in detail the ligand interaction in molecular clusters and nanoparticles (5) Determine the effect of chain length of amines on Au nanoparticle size under digestive ripening conditions (carbon chain length varied from 4-18). (6) Determine the catalytic activity

  15. Nanoscale Studies of Pyroelectric and Thermoelectric Phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruverman, Alexei; Ducharme, Stephen

    2014-07-31

    This research project is focused on (1) development of novel scanning probe microscopy techniques for investigation of the thermally and electrically induced changes in the physical properties of organic polymer ferroelectrics; (2) fabrication of ferroelectric nanostructures and investigation of their functional behavior; (3) fabrication and testing of the organic photovoltaic devices with enhanced energy conversion efficiency. Research activities throughout this project resulted in novel effects and exciting physics reported in 10 papers published in high-profile journals, including Nature Materials, Nano Letters, Advanced Materials, Energy and Environmental Science and Applied Physics Letters. These findings have been presented at a number of domestic and international conferences such as MRS Spring and Fall meetings, International Symposium on Integrated Functionalities, International Symposium on Applications of Ferroelectrics (in total 9 presentations). Below we summarize the most important findings of this project.

  16. Nanoscale Advances in Catalysis and Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yimin; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-05-12

    In this perspective, we present an overview of nanoscience applications in catalysis, energy conversion, and energy conservation technologies. We discuss how novel physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials can be applied and engineered to meet the advanced material requirements in the new generation of chemical and energy conversion devices. We highlight some of the latest advances in these nanotechnologies and provide an outlook at the major challenges for further developments.

  17. History-dependent ion transport through conical nanopipettes and the implications in energy conversion dynamics at nanoscale interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Dengchao; Kvetny, Maksim M.; Brown, Warren; Liu, Juan; Wang, Gangli

    2014-08-20

    The dynamics of ion transport at nanostructured substrate–solution interfaces play vital roles in high-density energy conversion, stochastic chemical sensing and biosensing, membrane separation, nanofluidics and fundamental nanoelectrochemistry. Advancements in these applications require a fundamental understanding of ion transport at nanoscale interfaces. The understanding of the dynamic or transient transport, and the key physical process involved, is limited, which contrasts sharply with widely studied steady-state ion transport features at atomic and nanometer scale interfaces. Here we report striking time-dependent ion transport characteristics at nanoscale interfaces in current–potential (I–V) measurements and theoretical analyses. First, a unique non-zero I–V cross-point and pinched I–V curves are established as signatures to characterize the dynamics of ion transport through individual conical nanopipettes. Moreoever, ion transport against a concentration gradient is regulated by applied and surface electrical fields. The concept of ion pumping or separation is demonstrated via the selective ion transport against concentration gradients through individual nanopipettes. Third, this dynamic ion transport process under a predefined salinity gradient is discussed in the context of nanoscale energy conversion in supercapacitor type charging–discharging, as well as chemical and electrical energy conversion. Our analysis of the emerging current–potential features establishes the urgently needed physical foundation for energy conversion employing ordered nanostructures. The elucidated mechanism and established methodology can be generalized into broadly-defined nanoporous materials and devices for improved energy, separation and sensing applications.

  18. History-dependent ion transport through conical nanopipettes and the implications in energy conversion dynamics at nanoscale interfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Dengchao; Kvetny, Maksim M.; Brown, Warren; Liu, Juan; Wang, Gangli

    2014-08-20

    The dynamics of ion transport at nanostructured substrate–solution interfaces play vital roles in high-density energy conversion, stochastic chemical sensing and biosensing, membrane separation, nanofluidics and fundamental nanoelectrochemistry. Advancements in these applications require a fundamental understanding of ion transport at nanoscale interfaces. The understanding of the dynamic or transient transport, and the key physical process involved, is limited, which contrasts sharply with widely studied steady-state ion transport features at atomic and nanometer scale interfaces. Here we report striking time-dependent ion transport characteristics at nanoscale interfaces in current–potential (I–V) measurements and theoretical analyses. First, a unique non-zero I–V cross-point and pinched I–Vmore » curves are established as signatures to characterize the dynamics of ion transport through individual conical nanopipettes. Moreoever, ion transport against a concentration gradient is regulated by applied and surface electrical fields. The concept of ion pumping or separation is demonstrated via the selective ion transport against concentration gradients through individual nanopipettes. Third, this dynamic ion transport process under a predefined salinity gradient is discussed in the context of nanoscale energy conversion in supercapacitor type charging–discharging, as well as chemical and electrical energy conversion. Our analysis of the emerging current–potential features establishes the urgently needed physical foundation for energy conversion employing ordered nanostructures. The elucidated mechanism and established methodology can be generalized into broadly-defined nanoporous materials and devices for improved energy, separation and sensing applications.« less

  19. Deterministic, Nanoscale Fabrication of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jr., R M; Shirk, M; Gilmer, G; Rubenchik, A

    2004-09-24

    Neither LLNL nor any other organization has the capability to perform deterministic fabrication of mm-sized objects with arbitrary, {micro}m-sized, 3-dimensional features with 20-nm-scale accuracy and smoothness. This is particularly true for materials such as high explosives and low-density aerogels. For deterministic fabrication of high energy-density physics (HEDP) targets, it will be necessary both to fabricate features in a wide variety of materials as well as to understand and simulate the fabrication process. We continue to investigate, both in experiment and in modeling, the ablation/surface-modification processes that occur with the use of laser pulses that are near the ablation threshold fluence. During the first two years, we studied ablation of metals, and we used sub-ps laser pulses, because pulses shorter than the electron-phonon relaxation time offered the most precise control of the energy that can be deposited into a metal surface. The use of sub-ps laser pulses also allowed a decoupling of the energy-deposition process from the ensuing movement/ablation of the atoms from the solid, which simplified the modeling. We investigated the ablation of material from copper, gold, and nickel substrates. We combined the power of the 1-D hydrocode ''HYADES'' with the state-of-the-art, 3-D molecular dynamics simulations ''MDCASK'' in our studies. For FY04, we have stretched ourselves to investigate laser ablation of carbon, including chemically-assisted processes. We undertook this research, because the energy deposition that is required to perform direct sublimation of carbon is much higher than that to stimulate the reaction 2C + O{sub 2} => 2CO. Thus, extremely fragile carbon aerogels might survive the chemically-assisted process more readily than ablation via direct laser sublimation. We had planned to start by studying vitreous carbon and move onto carbon aerogels. We were able to obtain flat, high-quality vitreous carbon, which was easy to work on

  20. Predictive modeling of synergistic effects in nanoscale ion track formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-08-05

    Molecular dynamics techniques and the inelastic thermal spike model are used to study the coupled effects of inelastic energy loss due to 21 MeV Ni ion irradiation and pre-existing defects in SrTiO3. We determine the dependence on pre-existing defect concentration of nanoscale track formation occurring from the synergy between the inelastic energy loss and the pre-existing atomic defects. We show that the nanoscale ion tracks’ size can be controlled by the concentration of pre-existing disorder. This work identifies a major gap in fundamental understanding concerning the role played by defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron–lattice coupling.

  1. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have difficulty simultaneously identifying and spatially resolving this realm of matter, which ranges from about 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. But ALS researchers recently developed a broadband imaging technique that looks inside the mesoscale realm with unprecedented sensitivity and range. The new technique,

  2. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have difficulty simultaneously identifying and spatially resolving this realm of matter, which ranges from about 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. But ALS researchers recently developed a broadband imaging technique that looks inside the mesoscale realm with unprecedented sensitivity and range. The new technique,

  3. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have difficulty simultaneously identifying and spatially resolving this realm of matter, which ranges from about 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. But ALS researchers recently developed a broadband imaging technique that looks inside the mesoscale realm with unprecedented sensitivity and range. The new technique,

  4. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have difficulty simultaneously identifying and spatially resolving this realm of matter, which ranges from about 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. But ALS researchers recently developed a broadband imaging technique that looks inside the mesoscale realm with unprecedented sensitivity and range. The new technique,

  5. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects of both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.

  6. Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lithium-Manganese Rich NMC Composite Cathodes with Cycling | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage Lithium-Manganese Rich NMC Composite Cathodes with Cycling Friday, August 29, 2014 Renewable energy is critical for the future of humankind. One bottleneck is energy storage because the harvest and consumption of energy are typically separated in time and/or location. Hence, efficient, low-cost, safe and durable batteries are

  7. Nanoscale Traffic Rules for Metals on Graphene | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Traffic Rules for Metals on Graphene Researchers have shown how the motion of individual atoms on surfaces of graphene-a one atom thick layer of carbon-can be controlled. The adatom diffusion rate and hopping direction can be tuned by lowering the diffusion barrier using an effective electric field. This was shown using in situ scanning tunneling microscopy at low temperatures and the mechanism was elucidated using first-principles calculations. The electric field is locally tuned by

  8. Nanoscale engineering boosts performance of quantum dot light emitting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diodes Quantum dot light emitting diodes Nanoscale engineering boosts performance of quantum dot light emitting diodes Quantum dots are nano-sized semiconductor particles whose emission color can be tuned by simply changing their dimensions. October 25, 2013 Postdoctoral researcher Young-Shin Park characterizing emission spectra of LEDs in the Los Alamos National Laboratory optical laboratory. Postdoctoral researcher Young-Shin Park characterizing emission spectra of LEDs in the Los Alamos

  9. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have difficulty simultaneously identifying and spatially resolving this realm of matter, which ranges from about 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. But ALS researchers recently developed a broadband imaging technique that looks inside the mesoscale realm with unprecedented sensitivity and range. The new technique,

  10. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have difficulty simultaneously identifying and spatially resolving this realm of matter, which ranges from about 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. But ALS researchers recently developed a broadband imaging technique that looks inside the mesoscale realm with unprecedented sensitivity and range. The new technique,