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1

Argonne CNM: Manipulation of Nanoscale Materials for Energy & Information  

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Manipulation of Nanoscale Materials for Energy & Information Transduction Manipulation of Nanoscale Materials for Energy & Information Transduction Nanoscale materials absorb, dissipate, and propagate energy very differently from bulk materials. These properties offer unusual opportunities to induce, optimize, and control the conversion and transfer of energy and information at the nanoscale. The CNM applies recent advances in materials, theory, and characterization to create novel nanoscale materials for the control and transfer of energy, charge, and/or spin between homogeneous and heterogeneous materials. Propagation, Localization, and Interaction of Spin, Charge, Photons, and Phonons Realizing the promise of nanoscience hinges on the ability to understand and ultimately control the propagation of, localization of, and interaction between the basic quanta of energy and information - spin, charge, photons, and phonons - at the nanoscale. Key factors include continued advances in generating homogeneous nanoscale building blocks, finding means to hierarchically assemble the building blocks, and advanced scanning probe or other techniques for precisely initiating and monitoring propagation of these quanta at the nanoscale.

2

Argonne CNM: Materials Design and Discovery at the Nanoscale  

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Materials Design and Discovery at the Nanoscale This pillar aligns well with Argonne's overall strategic interest in materials design and discovery. Geometrical confinement and...

3

Argonne CNM: Shipping MaterialsM  

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CNM General In general, users are not permitted to transport hazardous material on the Argonne site or arrange for shipment directly to the CNM. Hazardous materials must be...

4

Argonne CNM News: CNM Participation in Nature of Nano Event  

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Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) Director Amanda Petford-Long and CNM user Adam Khan, of AKHAN Technologies, presented lectures at "The Nature of Nano" event held on...

5

Argonne CNM: Preparing for Your Visit  

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Preparing for Your Visit to the Center for Nanoscale Materials Welcome to Argonne National Laboratory and the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM). This guide provides important...

6

Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials  

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Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials An Office of Science User Facility U.S. Department of Energy Search CNM ... Search CNM Home About CNM Research Facilities People For Users Publications News & Highlights Events Jobs CNM Users Organization Contact Us Other DOE Nanoscale Science Research Centers Casimir force reduction Casimir Force Reduction through Nanostructuring By nanostructuring one of two interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, a new regime in the Casimir force was observed by researchers in the Center for Nanoscale Materials Nanofabrication & Devices Group working with collaborators at NIST, other national laboratories, and universities. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with <100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and,

7

Argonne CNM Highlight: Quasi-Crystalline Order at Nanoscale  

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Quasi-Crystalline Order at Nanoscale Quasi-Crystalline Order at Nanoscale Polyimide Nanofilter TEM showing the two-dimensional dodecagonal quasi-crystalline structure self-assembled from 5-nm Au and 13.4-nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Nanoparticles have a strong tendency to form periodic structures. Mixing and matching of two different types of nanoparticles allows the formation of binary nanoparticle superlattices isostructural to ionic or intermetallic compounds. In addition to periodic superlattices, binary mixtures of nearly spherical nanoparticles could lead to the growth of quasi-crystals. CNM staff in the Nanobio Interfaces Group, together with colleagues from the University of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania, have found that two-dimensional dodecagonal quasi-crystals can be formed in mixtures

8

Argonne CNM: Materials Synthesis Capabilities  

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Materials Synthesis Facilities Materials Synthesis Facilities Capabilities biosynthesis View larger image. Biosynthesis Methods Peptide and DNA synthesis (E. Rozhkova, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Nanobio hybrid synthesis (T. Rajh, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Hierarchal assembly View larger image. Hierarchical Assembly Bottom-up polymeric and bio-templating as well as lithographically directed self-assembly (S. Darling, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group; E. Rozhkova, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Molecular beam epitaxy View high-resolution image. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Complex oxide nanoferroelectric and nanoferromagnetic materials and devices created using a DCA R450D Custom MBE instrument (A. Bhattacharya, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group) Nanoparticle synthesis

9

Argonne CNM Highlight: Graphene Research at the Center for Nanoscale  

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Graphene Research at the Center for Nanoscale Materials Graphene Research at the Center for Nanoscale Materials graphene research The 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics was recently awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov from the University of Manchester "for groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene." Graphene is an extraordinary material made up of hexagonally packed carbon atoms that are sp2 bonded. A sheet of graphene is only one atom thick making it nature's version of an ideal two-dimensional material. At the Center for Nanoscale Materials we are exploring state-of-the-art synthesis, characterization, processing, and novel applications of graphene. With the highest resolution microscopes we are able to characterize the structural, electronic, and chemical properties of

10

Argonne CNM Highlight: Block copolymer lithography approach to nanoscale  

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Block copolymer lithography approach to nanoscale self-assembly Block copolymer lithography approach to nanoscale self-assembly hybrid organic-organomemtalliic block copolymer thin film cast on a silicon nitride membrane substrate This image created by Seth Darling and Nathan Ramanathan was selected for the September 2009 cover of Materials Today. Block copolymer lithography represents a promising next-generation alternative to traditional top-down methodologies. The figure shows an optical micrograph of a hybrid organic-organometallic block copolymer thin film cast on a silicon nitride membrane substrate, which reveals thickness-induced coloring effects reminiscent of art glass. This polymer self-assembles into an ordered nanoscale cylindrical morphology, the orientation of which can be controlled with film thickness. Cylinders

11

Argonne CNM: Industrial Users  

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For Industrial Users For Industrial Users The Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) has specific interest in growing the industrial user program and encourages researchers in industry to consider the capabilities and expertise we have to offer. As a CNM user, you have easy access to sophisticated scientific instrumentation geared toward nanoscience and nanotechnology. Moreover, our widely recognized staff researchers offer support in designing your experiments, using the equipment, and analyzing your data. Access to the CNM is through peer review of user proposals. Before you submit your first user proposal, we encourage you to contact any of our staff researchers, group leaders, the User Office, or division management to discuss the feasibility of your intended research using the expertise and facilities at the CNM. We are here to serve you as part of our user community and will be happy to address any questions you might have.

12

Argonne CNM Highlight: NSTI 2007  

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Successful Fourth Annual CNM Users Meeting Successful Fourth Annual CNM Users Meeting 2007 Student Poster Award at Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials Users Meeting Paul Evans (CNM UEC Chair); Soo-Hyun Tark, Student Poster Prize winner (Northwestern University); and Eric Isaacs (CNM Director) The fourth Annual CNM Users Meeting was held May 10-12, 2007. Events included: workshops, a keynote and plenary science session, and short courses introducing new facilities. Vendor exhibits, poster sessions, and a banquet rounded out the festivities. Workshops Four highly successful technical workshops were held on the topics of: Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe Nanotomography Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Nanomaterials (115kb pdf) Nanelectronics (48kb pdf) Student Recognition Nataliya Yufa of the University of Chicago was selected to give an oral

13

Vortex Dynamics in NanoScale Materials  

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Into the Vortex: Dynamics in Nanoscale Materials Into the Vortex: Dynamics in Nanoscale Materials Micron and nanosized magnets are of great interest for their potential applications in new electronic devices, such as magnetic random access memories. As the size of magnets is reduced to a 1-micron scale and below, the boundaries (surfaces, perimeters, etc) of the objects begin to profoundly influence both the static and dynamic behavior of the materials. Researchers from Argonne's Materials Science Division (MSD), Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), and Advanced Photon Source (APS) have recently examined the dynamics of 3- to 7-micron-diameter NiFe alloy disks with a combination of theoretical calculations and a new time-resolved magnetic imaging technique using synchrotron-based x-ray photoemission electron

14

Safety at the Center for Nanoscale Materials  

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case of emergency or if you need help or assistance case of emergency or if you need help or assistance dial Argonne's Protective Force: 911 (from Argonne phones) or (630) 252-1911 (from cell phones) Safety at Work As a staff member or user at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), you need to be aware of safety regulations at Argonne National Laboratory. You are also required to have taken any safety, orientation, and training classes or courses specified by your User Work Authorization(s) and/or work planning and control documents prior to beginning your work. For safety and security reasons, it is necessary to know of all facility users present in the CNM (Buildings 440 and 441). Users are required to sign in and out in the visitors logbook located in Room A119. Some detailed emergency information is provided on the Argonne National

15

Argonne CNM: Research  

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Research Research The Center for Nanoscale Materials is pursuing world-leading research programs in six major areas. These programs exploit the unique electronic, magnetic, structural, chemical, and optical properties of individual nanostructures and their ordered arrays. The CNM also works with its partner user facilities at Argonne, the Electron Microscopy Center and the Advanced Photon Source, to provide access to world-leading characterization methods. As a principle component of its mission, the center capitalizes on the brilliance of the Advanced Photon Source for a hard X-ray nanoprobe beamline. The capabilities and focus of the CNM complements those of the other U.S. Department of Energy Nanoscale Science Research Centers. Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices

16

Argonne CNM Highlight: Nanoscience Student Cooperative  

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Nanoscience Cooperative for Students Nanoscience Cooperative for Students Nanoscience Collective Students The NanoBusiness Alliance's "Nanoscience High School Talent Fellowship" sponsored 25 students from Illinois, North Carolina and Colorado at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials for one week in June 2010. The NanoBusiness Alliance has partnered with Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) and Division of Educational Programs (DEP) to better prepare high school juniors and seniors pursuing science and engineering careers. Named the Nanoscience High School Talent Fellowship, the program hosted 25 students from Illinois, North Carolina, and Colorado, who participated in a "boot camp" of hands-on laboratory experiments, demonstrations, and lectures by CNM scientists.

17

Argonne CNM: Safety Training  

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Safety at Work Safety at Work (printable pdf version) In case of emergency or if you need help or assistance dial Argonne's Protective Force: 911 (from Argonne phones) or (630) 252-1911 (from cell phones) As a staff member or user at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), you need to be aware of safety regulations at Argonne National Laboratory. You are also required to have taken any safety, orientation, and training classes or courses specified by your User Work Authorization(s) and/or work planning and control documents prior to beginning your work. For safety and security reasons, it is necessary to know of all facility users present in the CNM (Buildings 440 and 441). Users are required to sign in and out in the visitors logbook located in Room A119. Some detailed emergency information is provided on the Argonne National Laboratory web site. Brief instructions and general guidelines follow.

18

Argonne CNM: Electronic and Magnetic Materials and Devices Research  

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Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group Leader: Saw-Wai Hla The objective of the Electronic and Magnetic Materials and Devices (EMMD) group at the CNM is to discover, understand, and utilize new electron and spin-based materials and phenomena in constrained geometries. Potential benefits include reduced power dissipation, new medical imaging methods and therapies, improved efficiency of data storage by spin current and electrical field-assisted writing, and enhanced energy conversion in photovoltaic devices. Research Activities Understanding complex magnetic order and coupling phenomena: Magnetic nanostructures are prone to complex magnetic ordering phenomena that do not occur in the bulk and that will have strong impact on the further development of functional magnetic nanostructures. Basic science on the influence of demagnetizing effects, geometrical frustration, next-nearest neighbor exchange interactions, unusual anisotropy values, and the spin-orbit interaction at reduced dimensionality are performed with a special focus on temperature-dependent magnetic order-disorder transitions.

19

Argonne CNM News: CNM Displays Strong Presence at Argonne's Energy Showcase  

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CNM Displays Strong Presence at Argonne's Energy Showcase CNM Displays Strong Presence at Argonne's Energy Showcase Visitors at Argonne's 2012 Energy Showcase Volker Rose Argonne opened its gates to about 12,000 members of the community on Saturday, September 15, 2012. The Center for Nanoscale Materials was enthusiastically represented by nearly 25 staff volunteers during the Energy Showcase. The CNM exhibits covered solar energy, computational nanoscience, nanostructured carbons for nanoelectronics, visualization at the nanoscale, nanobio materials for energy applications, and general outreach in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The demonstrations of how solar energy can be used to power devices at the "Solar Energy: Today and Tomorrow" booth inspired people to consider how to incorporate solar power in their own lives now and in the future. On the

20

Name: Judi Yaeger Title: Chemical Manager, Center for Nanoscale...  

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Center for Nanoscale Materials Education: BS Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Missouri, 1985 Job Elements: At the CNM, you should contact me if you need or are...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Argonne CNM News: Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar  

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Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar Energy Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar Energy Scanning tunneling microscopy tips A schematic of the Rhodobacter sphaerodes hexameric core, featuring the "special pair" (P) of degenerate bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules, and the active (a) and inactive (b) arms of BChl and bacteriopheophytin (BPh) molecules. The transient absorption (ΔA) spectra acquired following selective excitation of P are shown. Nature's process for storing solar energy occurs in light-absorbing protein complexes called photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs). Across billions of years of evolution, Nature has retained a common light-absorbing hexameric cofactor core for carrying out the very first chemical reaction of photosynthesis, the light-induced electron transfer across approximately 3

22

Argonne CNM News: Developing Smarter STM Tips  

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Developing Smarter STM Tips Developing Smarter STM Tips Scanning tunneling microscopy tips X-ray nanotomography surface rendering of a smart scanning tunneling microscope tip. The platinum-iridium tip (red) has been coated with a SiO2 insulating layer (green). Image obtained using the CNM's Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe beamline at Sector 26 of the Advanced Photon Source. Scientists from the Center for Nanoscale Materials X-Ray Microscopy and Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices groups, in collaboration with Argonne's Electron Microscopy Center and X-Ray Science Division, have used CNM's Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe to obtain for the first time an important three-dimensional view of insulator-coated smart tips that in the future can be utilized in synchrotron X-ray scanning tunneling microscopy (SXSTM).

23

Center for Nanoscale Materials User Access Program Overview  

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Materials User Access Program Overview Materials User Access Program Overview CNM User Access Program Overview 1. Objective ............................................................................................................................................... 1 2. Submission Guidelines .......................................................................................................................... 1 2.1 Proposal Content ............................................................................................................................ 1 3. Proposal Review Process ....................................................................................................................... 2 3.1 Proposal Evaluation Board .............................................................................................................. 2

24

Argonne CNM: Colloquium Series  

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Colloquium Series Colloquium Series The Center for Nanoscale Materials holds a regular biweekly colloquium on alternate Wednesday afternoons at 4:00 p.m. in Bldg. 440, Room A105/106. The goal of the series is to provide a forum for topical multidisciplinary talks in areas of interest to the CNM and also to offer a mechanism for fostering interactions with potential facility users. Refreshments will be served at 3:45. January 15, 2013 "Friction, Brownian Motion, and Energy Dissipation Mechanisms in Adsorbed Molecules and Molecularly Thin Films: Heating, Electrostatic and Magnetic Effects," by Jacquelin Krim, North Carolina State University, hosted by Diana Berman Abstract: In the study of friction at the nanoscale, phononic, electrostatic, conduction electron, and magnetic effects all contribute to the dissipation mechanisms. Electrostatic and magnetic contributions are increasingly alluded to in the current literature, but they remain poorly characterized. I will first overview the nature of these various contribution, and then report on our observations of magnetic and electrostatic contributions to friction for various systems in the presence and absence of external fields. I will also report on the use of a quartz crystal microbalance with a graphene/Ni(111) electrode to probe frictional heating effects in Kr monolayers sliding on the microbalance electrode in response to its oscillatory motion.

25

Argonne CNM: Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Capabilities  

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Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Capabilities Synthesis Colloidal chemistry and self-assembly techniques Complex oxide film synthesis via molecular beam epitaxy (DCA R450 Custom) Physical vapor deposition (Lesker CMS 18 and PVD 250) Spin coating (Laurell WS-400) Characterization Variable-temperature (VT) scanning tunneling microscope with atomic force microscopy capabilities (Omicron VT-AFM/STM), operates in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment with a base pressure of < 1E-10 mbar and 55-400 K. Atomic resolution is routinely obtained at room temperature and below. The AFM capabilities support a range of scanning modes. The analysis chamber also houses a LEED/Auger with an attached preparation chamber for sample cleaning and deposition (sputter cleaning, direct current heating, e-beam heating stage, metal deposition, etc.)

26

Nanoscale Electromechanical Properties of Novel Materials for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Nanoscale Electromechanical Properties of Novel Materials for Actuator and Energy Harvesting Applications. Author(s), Andrei Kholkin.

27

Argonne CNM News: Charge Separation in Silver Clusters  

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Charge Separation in Silver Clusters Charge Separation in Silver Clusters silver clusters Artist's rendering of silver clusters capped with organic ligand molecules. transient kinetics of silver clusters Transient kinetics showing charge recombination in ligand-stabilized silver clusters for different surrounding solvents (water-methanol mixture, acetone, and dichloromethane). Both charge separation and recombination events are faster in more polar solvents. Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) users from the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne in Switzerland, working with the CNM Nanophotonics Group, have demonstrated the existence of long-lived charge-separated states in silver clusters. The clusters, synthesized chemically in solution, consist of exactly 44 silver atoms and are stabilized by exactly

28

Material's Properties Control by Nano-Scale Surface Functionalization...  

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Material's Properties Control by Nano-Scale Surface Functionalization Material's Properties Control by Nano-Scale Surface Functionalization Theme We aim at developing an original...

29

APS, CNM, ANL to Receive $3M for Fuel Cell Research  

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APS, CNM, ANL to Receive $3M for Fuel Cell Research APS, CNM, ANL to Receive $3M for Fuel Cell Research The funding, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, will be used to study the molecular basis of catalysis, with a particular interest in the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. "We are looking to understand the behavior of oxygen in the low-temperature fuel cell cathodes," said Hoydoo You, leader of the group project. "The project builds on Argonne's scientific strengths, bringing collaboration between physicists and chemists, between theorists and experimentalists." The high-intensity X-rays from the Advanced Photon Source and nanoscale science at the Center for Nanoscale Materials are key enabling resources. The project includes researchers from Argonne's Materials Science,

30

Working at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials  

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Working at CNM Working at CNM For information on visiting Argonne National Laboratory, collaborating with us, or becoming an independent outside user of our facilities, please contact the CNM User Office. Hours of Operation The CNM, which is mandated to offer user access only 40 hours per week, provides users with routine access to facilities and instrumentation, as well as technical assistance when needed, between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m., Monday-Friday, except for Laboratory holidays and maintenance shutdowns. These hours are also in place for the availability of staff in the Theory and Modeling and X-Ray Microscopy Groups. The supercomputing facility (Carbon) and the hard X-ray nanoprobe facility at Sector 26 of the APS are available 24 hours, 7 days a week, except for maintenance shutdowns.

31

Center for Nanoscale Materials: Revolutionary Breakthroughs in...  

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for the CNM user community to advance their own research programs Key Capabilities &23; High- and low-voltage electron beam lithography (JEOL 9300 FS and Raith 150) &23; Optical...

32

Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer Workshop (NOMAD 2011)  

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Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer Workshop Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer Workshop NOMAD 2011 September 12 - 13, 2011 High-Flux Isotope Reactor * Spallation Neutron Source * Oak Ridge National Laboratory About the Workshop Contact Information Important Dates Application Form Sample Description NOMAD at SNS filler About the Workshop The acronym NOMAD stands for Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer. It is a diffractometer located at the Spallation Neutron Source and is designed for the determination of pair distribution functions from a wide range of materials spanning from dense gases to long range ordered crystalline materials. It combines a large accessible Q range, large detector coverage with high intensity while maintaining good resolution. For a typical sample of the order of ~0.5cm3 good statistical accuracy can be achieved in minutes or even seconds of data acquisition time.

33

Argonne CNM: 2007 Research Highlights  

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7 Highlights 7 Highlights CNM Research Featured in Journal (November 2007) Heavier hydrogen on the atomic scale reduces friction (November 2007) High-performance, flexible nanotechnology hydrogen sensors (Nanowerk Spotlight, October 11, 2007) CNM Research Highlighted in Scientific Journal (September 2007) Researchers improve ability to write and store information on electronic devices (September 2007) Palladium Nanoparticle Electrodeposition on Nanotubes Results in New Flexible Hydrogen Sensors (August 2007) Nano-boric acid makes motor oil more slippery (August 2007) Nanotechnology helps scientists make bendy sensors for hydrogen vehicles (July 2007) Tightly Packed Molecules Lend Unexpected Strength to Nanothin Sheet of Material (July 2007) Getting the 'Hole' Picture Up Close (photonics.com, June 2007)

34

Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Audit Report Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories DOE/IG-0788 February 2008 Department of Energy Washington, DC 2 0 5 8 5 February 28, 2008 MEMORANDUM FOR FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT: IhTFORMATION: Audit Report on "Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories" BACKGROUND The National Nanotechnology Initiative was established as a multi-agency research and development program in 200 1. As a part of the Initiative, the Department of Energy (Energy) is in the process of constructing Nanoscale Science Research Centers at six national laboratories. In addition to funding the construction and operation of these

35

Argonne CNM Newsletter: February 2011  

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1 1 Director's Note User Matters User Science Highlights Facility Highlight Staff News 1. director's NOTE Amanda Petford-Long I am writing this note to you from my office at the CNM, looking out on the remnants of the heaviest snowstorm Chicago has experienced in decades. It is greatly to the credit of the facilities staff at Argonne that the Lab was closed for only one day, with minimum disruption to our user and staff activities. As always, we have welcomed a wide range of users and visitors over the past few months and it has been a busy period for the CNM, with well over 400 users accessing our facilities during FY 2010. In October, we hosted a visit from the new DOE Program Manager for the Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), Dr. Mihal Gross. Mihal's visit coincided with a workshop on Raman spectroscopy, organized by staff scientist Dave Gosztola and CNM user Vic Maroni. The workshop was very successful; of particular note is that there was at least one invited speaker from each of the five NSRCs (see summary).

36

Argonne CNM News: State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology  

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State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology Licensed to AKHAN Technologies State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology Licensed to AKHAN Technologies The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory announced today that the laboratory has granted AKHAN Technologies, Inc., exclusive diamond semiconductor application licensing rights to breakthrough low-temperature diamond deposition technology developed by Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM). The method allows for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond on a variety of wafer substrate materials at temperatures as low as 400°C, highly advantageous for integration with processed semiconductor electronic materials and resulting in the deposition of low-defect nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films. The combination of CNM's low-temperature diamond technology with the AKHAN Miraj Diamond(tm) process represents the state of the art in diamond semiconductor thin-film technology.

37

Argonne CNM Newsletter: February 2012  

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First week in September following the Labor Day holiday break CNM Awarded Prestigious LEED Green Building Certification The CNM has been awarded Leadership in Energy and...

38

Nano-Scale Materials Design of Pyrochlore for Enhanced Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Nano-scale design strategy is important for developing advanced materials with enhanced performance for nuclear engineering applications.

39

Argonne CNM News: Frequency stabilization in nonlinear micromechanical  

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Frequency Stabilization in Nonlinear Micromechanical Oscillators Frequency Stabilization in Nonlinear Micromechanical Oscillators SEM image of one resonator and finite-element simulations of the dynamic deformation characteristics of the coupled vibrational modes SEM image (center) of one resonator and finite-element simulations of the dynamic deformation characteristics of the coupled vibrational modes. The lengths of the three interconnected beams, between the comb-drive electrodes, range from 10 to 500 µm. Using Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) expertise in the design and fabrication of micro- and nanoscale devices, a new strategy for engineering low-frequency noise oscillators capitalizes on the intrinsic nonlinear phenomena of micro- and nanomechanical resonators. A fundamental limitation of such resonators was addressed by a team of researchers from the

40

Argonne CNM News: Volker Rose Receives 2012 DOE Early Career Research  

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Volker Rose Receives 2012 DOE Early Career Research Program Award Volker Rose Receives 2012 DOE Early Career Research Program Award Volker Rose Volker Rose with the prototype high-resolution microscope at the APS/CNM nanoprobe beamline on APS Sector 26. Volker Rose, assistant physicist with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science's Advanced Photon Source X-Ray Science Division (XSD) and the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) at Argonne National Laboratory, is one of four Argonne researchers who have received 2012 Early Career Research Program awards, granted by DOE to exceptional researchers beginning their careers. "Argonne is extremely proud that four of our young researchers have been chosen for this important award," said Eric D. Isaacs, Argonne Director. "These young scientists and engineers will play a vital role in our nation's future, helping to assure that invention and innovation continue to fuel America's global competitiveness in the years to come."

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners  

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Scientists Close-In on Artificial Spider Silk Scientists Close-In on Artificial Spider Silk Ekiert Earns 2012 APSUO Franklin Award for Studies of Influenza Virus Clever Apes on WBEZ: Breaking the Fossil Record Gerig to Chair Particle Accelerator School Board A Record Run for the APS X-ray Source APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners MAY 16, 2012 Bookmark and Share Volker Rose with the prototype high-resolution microscope at the nanoprobe beamline on APS Sector 26. Volker Rose, assistant physicist with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science's Advanced Photon Source X-ray Science Division (XSD) and Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) at Argonne National Laboratory is

42

Novel materials, computational spectroscopy, and multiscale simulation in nanoscale photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells convert solar energy to electricity using combinations of semiconducting sunlight absorbers and metallic materials as electrical contacts. Novel nanoscale materials introduce new paradigms for ...

Bernardi, Marco, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Argonne CNM: Science Advisory Committee  

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CNM Scientific Advisory Committee CNM Scientific Advisory Committee Donald W. Brenner Kobe Distinguished Professor Associate Department Head North Carolina State University Materials Science and Engineering 911 Partners Way Engineering Building I, Room 3002 Raleigh, NC 27606 brenner@ncsu.edu Franz Himpsel Professor Department of Physics 5108 Chamberlin Hall University of Wisconsin-Madison 1150 University Avenue Madison, WI 53706-1390 fhimpsel@facstaff.wisc.edu Vanita Mani Technology Leader Energy Storage & Conversion Materials GE Global Research 1 Research Circle Niskayuna, NY 12309 maniva@ge.com Peter Mardilovich Hewlett-Packard Company 1000 NE Circle Blvd. Corvallis, OR 97330-4239 peter.mardilovich@hp.com Christopher B. Murray Department of Chemistry University of Pennsylvania 347N (Chem 73) & 322 (LRSM) SME

44

TMS 2010 Tutorial on "Nanoscale Computational Materials Science"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS 2010: Tutorial on Nanoscale Computational Materials Science February 14-18, 2010 Washington State Convention Center Seattle, WA. This tutorial...

45

Nanoscale Interfacial Films in Battery and Ionic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Nanoscale Interfacial Films in Battery and Ionic Materials. Author(s), Jian Luo, Jiajia Huang, Mojtaba Samiee. On-Site Speaker (Planned)...

46

Argonne CNM: Contact Information  

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Katie Carrado Gregar Phone: 630.252.7968 Fax: 630.252.6866 CNM User Office Carrie Clark Phone: 630.252.6952 Fax: 630.252.5739 cnmuseroffice@anl.gov Manager, Building &...

47

Argonne CNM: News  

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CNM News 2013 Ani Sumant Garners Two R&D100 Awards (August 2013) Nanostructures in 19th Century Daguerreotype Photographs (August 2013) DOE Blog Posting: Opening the Eye-Popping...

48

Argonne CNM: Safety Training  

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Safety Training Before performing work at the CNM, you must take certain safety training courses. We encourage you to take these courses remotely before you arrive at Argonne. Go...

49

Argonne CNM News: UChicago Awards to CNM-University Collaborators  

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Group CNM: Richard Schaller, Scientist, Nanophotonics Group "Very Low Pressure Desalination with Ultrathin Nanoparticle Membranes" University of Chicago: Heinrich Jaeger,...

50

Argonne CNM Highlight: Nanomechanical Resonator Self-Assembled from  

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Nanomechanical Resonator Self-Assembled from Nanoparticles Nanomechanical Resonator Self-Assembled from Nanoparticles thermal motion of self-assembled membranes Power spectral distribution of the thermal motion of membranes self-assembled from gold nanoparticles taken at the center (black) and halfway along the radius (red) in air; inset shows TEM images of the membranes Membrane motion under mechanical excitation Phase-sensitive image of one mode of membrane motion under mechanical excitation. The self-assembly of nanoscale structures from functional nanoparticles has provided a powerful path to developing devices with emergent properties from the bottom up. Users from the University of Chicago, together with researchers from the University of Melbourne and CNM's Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group, demonstrate that free-standing sheets

51

2011 CNM Workshop: Emergent Interfacial Phenomena  

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APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting, May 2-5, 2011 APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting, May 2-5, 2011 Thematic Workshop B: Emergent Interfacial Phenomena Organizers: Tiffany Santos (formerly CNM, now Hitachi GST), Olle Heinonen (MSD), Paul Fenter (CSE), and Robert Klie (UIC) Sponsors: Argonne Photon Sciences Directorate, Argonne Physical Sciences and Engineering Directorate Heterostructures in which different materials are layered together display a range of emergent phenomena, which can be controlled through effects such as geometric confinement and interface structure. Both of these effects can lead to charge transfer and band structure modification giving rise to novel behavior. Understanding and control of these phenomena require advanced deposition and characterization methods, as well as state-of-the-art modeling

52

Argonne CNM: Events  

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Events Events Seminars Colloquium Series Workshops Past CNM Users Meetings Save the Date! The annual combined APS/CNM Users Meeting will be held May 12-15, 2014, at Argonne National Laboratory. More than 500 people register for these cross-cutting meetings, which include 40-50 vendor exhibits, workshops, poster sessions, and short courses. Anyone is welcome to register for these meetings. Planning is under way to develop thematic and facility-specific workshops to highlight, promote, and stimulate user science from these two premier user facilities. Your suggestions for workshop topics are welcome; please send them to the CNM User Office. CNM Journal Club: Biweekly meetings are held on Wednesday afternoons at 4:00 p.m., alternating with the CNM colloquium series. The Club provides an informal setting to share and discuss recent (or not so recent) papers that may be of general interest to others. If you are interested in suggesting a paper for the future journal club meetings, contact Yu-Chih Tseng.

53

Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exceeding Plancks blackbody radiation law. Applied PhysicsA] I b ? spectral blackbody radiation intensity [W/m 2 ] kNanoscale radiation blackbody radiation limit. In addition,

Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Argonne CNM News: CNM Awarded Prestigious LEED Green Building...  

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CNM Awarded Prestigious LEED Green Building Certification The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory recently received a green building designation for the Center...

55

Center for Nanoscale Materials Director Petford-Long chats with...  

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to use to look at them and the more data you produce - CNM is therefore generating truly "big data" and managing this is a huge priority. Nanoscience is also important outside the...

56

Argonne CNM Newsletter: June 2009  

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that Eric Isaacs, former CNM Director, has assumed his new role as Director of Argonne National Laboratory. Finally, DOE just hosted its first NSRC Contractors' Meeting,...

57

Peering into the Interfaces of Nanoscale Polymeric Materials | Advanced  

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Ironing Out the Details of the Earth's Core Ironing Out the Details of the Earth's Core Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Peering into the Interfaces of Nanoscale Polymeric Materials JANUARY 6, 2012 Bookmark and Share Schematic configuration of the marker XPCS experiments. The use of resonance enhanced X-ray scattering for XPCS enables one to intensify, by more than one order of magnitude, the probing electrical field in the regions of interest within single nanometer polymer films. The development of polymer nanostructures and nanoscale devices for a wide variety of applications could emerge from new information about the interplay between nanoscale interfaces in polymeric materials, thanks to

58

Argonne CNM News: Batteries Get a Quick Charge with New Anode Technology  

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Batteries Get a Quick Charge with New Anode Technology Batteries Get a Quick Charge with New Anode Technology Tijana Rajh Argonne nanoscientist Tijana Rajh holds a strip of material created from titanium dioxide nanotubes. A team of researchers led by Tijana Rajh (Group Leader, Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials NanoBio Interfaces Group), and Christopher Johnson (Argonne's Chemical Sciences & Engineering Division), working under a CNM user science project, discovered that nanotubes composed of titanium dioxide can switch their phase as a battery is cycled, gradually boosting their operational capacity. New batteries produced with this material can be recharged up to half of their original capacity in less than 30 seconds. By switching out conventional graphite anodes with titanium nanotube anodes, a surprising phenomenon occurs. As the battery cycles through

59

Argonne CNM News: Visualizing Short-Range Charge Transfer at Interfaces  

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Visualizing Short-Range Charge Transfer at Interfaces Visualizing Short-Range Charge Transfer at Interfaces STM image of oxide superlattice STM image that provides insight into topography as well as electronic properties; cross-sections of an oxide superlattice where peaks correspond to layers of cuprate superconductor and valleys to metallic manganites (bottom region). The precise mechanisms governing the relationships between superconductivity and magnetism were examined by using advanced scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at the Center for Nanoscale Materials by users from Argonne's Advanced Photon Source working with CNM's Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group. Using cross-sectional STM and spectroscopy together with atomic-resolution electron microscopy, the team developed a clearer picture of the physical and chemical behavior of

60

Argonne CNM News: STM of individual grains in CVD-grown graphene  

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STM of individual grains in CVD-grown graphene STM of individual grains in CVD-grown graphene SEM of 3d supercrystals The first scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of graphene synthesized on copper foil. (b-d) show atomic-resolution images at various locations of the large graphene domain shown in (a). NMAT June 2011 Users from Purdue University, working collaboratively with staff in the Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group, studied CVD-grown graphene on polycrystalline copper foil for the first time at the atomic-scale. The ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM) findings performed at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) will help to guide the optimization of synthesis towards defect-free graphene. The focus of this study was to investigate the quality of the films and

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61

Argonne CNM News: NanoBio Technology for Alternative Medical Applications  

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NanoBio Technology for Alternative Medical Applications NanoBio Technology for Alternative Medical Applications Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. This video is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Lab Breakthroughs series, which brings together video produced by each of the national laboratories about their innovations and discoveries. A collaborative team comprised of Center for Nanoscale Materials users from the University of Chicago, Argonne's Materials Science Division, and the CNM NanoBio Interfaces Group is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an

62

The Nanoscale-Ordered Materials Diffractometer at SNS  

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Nanoscale-Ordered Materials Diffractometer Nanoscale-Ordered Materials Diffractometer Inside the NOMAD detector tank. Inside the NOMAD detector tank. NOMAD is a high-flux, medium-resolution diffractometer that uses a large bandwidth of neutron energies and extensive detector coverage to carry out structural determinations of local order in crystalline and amorphous materials. It enables studies of a large variety of samples ranging from liquids, solutions, glasses, polymers, and nanocrystalline materials to long-range-ordered crystals. The enhanced neutron flux at SNS, coupled with the advanced neutron optics and detector features of NOMAD, allows for unprecedented access to high-resolution pair distribution functions, small-contrast isotope substitution experiments, small sample sizes, and parametric studies.

63

Argonne CNM: 2008 Research Highlights  

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(June 2008) Also reported in: PhysOrg.com Science Daily Scientist Live R&D Magazine Photonics Online CNM Researchers Win Micrograph Contest (June 2008) Graphene sheet observed...

64

Argonne CNM: Scheduled Maintenance Periods  

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the CNM will not be available for user activities in laboratories or on the High-Performance Computing Cluster. Please plan your work visits and schedules accordingly. To better...

65

Argonne CNM Highlight: NSTI 2007  

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DOE Nanoscale Centers Meet at NSTI 2007 DOE Nanoscale Centers Meet at NSTI 2007 Representatives of the five U.S. Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Science (DOE-BES) Nanoscale Science Research Centers came together on May 22 and 23, 2007, at the 10th Annual Nanoscience and Technology Institute (NSTI) meeting in Santa Clara, California. An exhibitor booth was staffed by Jim Bustillo of the Molecular Foundry at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Katie Carrado and Carrie Clark of the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory, Tony Haynes of the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Neal Shinn of the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National Laboratories Representatives of DOE Nanoscience Centers at NSTI 2007

66

TMS 2010: Nanoscale and Amorphous Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strong emphasis will be on energy, with symposia addressing alternative and ... Carbon management, nuclear power technologies and policy aspects will also be ... Modeling, Simulation, and Theory of Nanomechanical Materials Behavior

67

Argonne CNM Newsletter: February 2009  

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09 09 Director's Note Call for Proposals Deadline: March 6, 2009 CNM Users Meeting: October 5-7, 2009 Urgent Call for Publication Citations: Due February 20, 2009 User Science Highlights 1. DIRECTOR'S NOTE Stephen Streiffer On behalf of everyone at the CNM and our user community, I'm very happy to report that our scientific program is thriving and demand from users for the CNM's capabilities continues to increase. The CNM is well into our second year of full operations, and the number of user proposals and active user projects has shown sustained growth. We are also pleased to acknowledge our many returning users, and the importance of our partnership with users as we attempt to realize the promise of nanoscience. The CNM is proud to have helped its users' research programs move forward, and while budgets for science are uncertain in this distressing economic climate, we look forward to the unique contributions the CNM will make to our users' science in the upcoming year.

68

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Nanoscale Measurements of  

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Nanoscale Measurements of Glass Transition Temperature and Nanoscale Measurements of Glass Transition Temperature and Temperature-Dependent Mechanical Properties in Polymers M.P. Nikiforov, S. Jesse, L.T. Germinario (CNMS user, Eastman Chemical Co.), and S.V. Kalinin Achievement We report a novel method for local measurements of glass transition temperatures and the temperature dependence of elastic and loss moduli of polymeric materials. The combination of Anasys Instruments' heated tip technology, ORNL-developed band excitation scanning probe microscopy, and a "freeze-in" thermal profile technique allows quantitative thermomechanical measurements at high spatial resolution on the order of ~100 nm. Here, we developed an experimental approach for local thermomechanical probing that reproducibly tracks changes in the mechanical properties of

69

Argonne CNM Newsletter: June 2012  

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2 2 Director's Note User Matters User Science Highlights Facility Highlight Staff News 1. director's NOTE Amanda Petford-Long I am writing to you following a very busy period at CNM. The Argonne Users Meeting was held at the start of May, and the CNM played a very active role in the organization and running of the meeting, hosting joint symposia with APS and EMC. In addition, we hosted our own symposium and a number of very successful short courses, including one on scanning probe microscopy that attracted five vendors who brought instruments to the CNM. During the last week in May, we completed our second planned maintenance period, which allowed us to carry out a number of essential maintenance activities. The CNM was closed to users for the duration, but by planning ahead in this way, we are able to make much more effective use of the time during these three yearly one-week closures. During the May period, CNM staff worked with the Argonne facilities staff to carry out preventive maintenance on the solvent exhaust system, installed a process cooling water manifold in one of the laser labs, upgraded the warm water system for the building heat supply, and upgraded the fire alarm system software, in addition to a number of other smaller but important activities. The third maintenance period will occur in the first week of September, following the Labor Day Holiday, so please plan your visits accordingly.

70

Argonne CNM Highlight: Nanopatterning of Graphene  

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Nanopatterning of Graphene Nanopatterning of Graphene Hydrogen-passivated graphene Hydrogen passivated graphene imaged and patterned at the atomic scale with STM CNM users from Politecnico di Milano in Italy, working collaboratively with researchers in the Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group, have demonstrated the reversible and local modification of the electronic properties of graphene by hydrogen passivation and subsequent electron-stimulated hydrogen desorption with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip. Graphene is a nearly ideal two-dimensional conductor consisting of a single sheet of hexagonally packed carbon atoms. The hydrogen passivation modifies graphene's electronic properties, opening a gap in the local density of states. The insulating state is reversed by

71

Argonne CNM Newsletter: June 2013  

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nanoMATTERS: June 2013 Director's Note User Matters: call for proposals, meeting news, UEC updates, NUFO, and more User Science Highlights: nanoparticle resonators, polarization X-ray imaging, nanoparticle catalyst tuning Facility Highlight: Renishaw inVia Raman Microscope Staff News: Wiederrecht, Rozhkova, Wood, Roelofs, Rose 1. director's NOTE Amanda Petford-Long As I write to you in early June, the CNM is in the process of preparing for our triennial DOE Basic Energy Sciences (BES) review this August. I am impressed by the incredibly high standard of user projects taking place at the CNM, and I am grateful to all of you who contribute highlights that we can include. At the onsite review, we will host a poster session featuring both user and staff research, and I hope that you will consider making yourselves available to support CNM in this important activity if called upon.

72

International Symposium on Multifunctional Nanoscalel Materials for the 21st Century  

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"Multifunctional Nanoscale Materials for the 21 "Multifunctional Nanoscale Materials for the 21 st Century", March 2009 The Center for Nanoscale Materials hosted this March 6-7, 2009 event at Argonne National Laboratory. It was co-organized by Elena Rozhkova (CNM), Dr. Abhijit Sarkar (Michigan Molecular Institute), and Dr. Hirotaka Sugawara (Director, Japan Society for Promotion of Science, Washington DC). This symposium focused on the research advances and information exchange among Japan and U.S. researchers and was specifically targeted to benefit young researchers and scientists in their early careers. The 2-day symposium featured leading researchers from Japan, the United States and Europe. The symposium was sponsored by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science- USA Alumni Association. All CNM and Argonne employees were welcome to attend with no

73

Argonne CNM Newsletter: June 2011  

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1 1 Director's Note User Matters User Science Highlights Facility Highlight Staff News 1. director's NOTE Amanda Petford-Long The CNM is always an exciting venue in which to work, and this has certainly been the case over the past few months. We have welcomed many new and returning users, hosted a number of high-level tours and visits, and participated in a very successful Users Meeting. Regarding the latter, we co-organized several workshops with the Advanced Photon Source and the Electron Microscopy Center, which made for a unique and truly integrated meeting. Amongst the Argonne visitors who toured CNM facilities recently were Secretary of Energy Steven Chu; U.S. Senator Dick Durbin (D-Ill.); Illinois Governor Pat Quinn; and a delegation of industrialists from BP, Dow Chemicals, and IBM. As always, the excellence of the staff and user science at CNM were highlighted. The past few months were also a period of some concern to us all because of the uncertainty in the budget situation. I am happy to report that the CNM has been fortunate and, for at least the remainder of FY2011, our budget is healthy. I greatly appreciate the efforts of our staff to keep the facility fully operational and at the cutting edge of nanoscience, even during these difficult times.

74

Argonne CNM: 2007 CNM Users Meeting  

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Nanomaterials in Energy Storage: Recent Achievements & Future Prospects Prof. Yet-Ming Chiang, Kyocera Professor Ceramics Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering Massachusetts...

75

2004 Users Meeting for the CNM  

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Sponsor Registration Form General Information Travel and Housing Arrangements CNM Home Page Security and Privacy Notice Dear Colleague, On behalf of the Scientific Theme...

76

Argonne CNM Highlight: CNM scientist receives presidential award for  

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scientist receives presidential award for advancement of science scientist receives presidential award for advancement of science Yugang Sun receives a PECASE award Yugang Sun (left) with Dr. Altaf Carim, DOE program manager for the five Nanoscale Science Research Centers, during the December 19, 2008, PECASE award ceremony at DOE headquarters Assistant chemist Yugang Sun received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) to recognize his contribution to the advancement of science. Dr. Sun, a member of the Nanophotonics Group in Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials, was recognized for developing ground-breaking techniques for chemical synthesis and nanofabrication of metal and semiconductor nanomaterials, as well as for community educational activities. The Presidential Awards are intended to recognize and nurture

77

Argonne CNM Newsletter: October 2012  

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2 2 Director's Note User Matters: call for proposals, surveys, publications, save the dates, NUFO news User Science Highlights: ptychography, X-ray imaging, graphene, MnO2 batteries Facility Highlights: ptychography, GPU nodes Staff News: Carrado Gregar, O'Rourke, Harutyunyan, Barry 1. director's NOTE Amanda Petford-Long Fall has arrived and as I look out of my office window at CNM, the trees are changing color and the air is noticeably cooler. Our users and staff have had a busy summer, and it has been a pleasure to welcome so many visitors to the CNM. I am particularly happy that we are continuing our association with the Illinois Math and Science Academy as two of their high school students are working as users in the Nanofabrication & Devices Group.

78

Argonne CNM Highlight: Mixing up surface properties  

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Mixing up surface properties Mixing up surface properties Mixed self-assembled monolayers This image was selected for the "Back Scatter" back cover feature of Physics Today, Vol. 62, No. 2 (Feb. 2009) Mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) offer the intriguing possibility of tailoring wetting properties, surface energy, and other interfacial characteristics by combining suitable molecular constituents. This atomic force micrograph, 800 nm tall, shows the onset of nanoscopic phase separation in an ideally mixed two-component SAM. The small domains of each material can be distinguished with topographic contrast because of their 2-Å length difference. The larger domains are due to atomic terracing of the underlying gold surface. Seth Darling (CNM) and Steven Sibener (University of Chicago) are working

79

Argonne CNM: Research Highlights  

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Recent Research Highlights Recent Research Highlights Optimizing Self-Assembly to Enable Photocatalysis (December 2013) Casimir Force Reduction through Nanostructuring (December 2013) South Pole Telescope Detector Aids Study of the Universe (November 2013) Surface Plasmon Resonance in Interfaced Heterodimers (October 2013) Visualizing Short-Range Charge Transfer at Interfaces (September 2013) Bio-Assisted Nanophotocatalyst for Hydrogen Production (August 2013) Large Wave-Vector Phonon Modes in Silicon Nanomembranes (July 2013) Nanomechanical Resonator Self-Assembled from Nanoparticles (June 2013) Scientists Detect Residue that has Hindered Efficiency of Promising Type of Solar Cell (May 2013) Imaging Nanoscale Polarization in Ferroelectrics with Coherent X-Rays (May 2013) Chiral "Pinwheels" Self-Assembled from C60 and Pentacene (April 2013)

80

Safe Handling of Engineering Nanoscale Materials: DOE Office...  

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A. H. Carim A. H. Carim Basic Energy Sciences Basic Energy Sciences 5 DOE Policy 456.1: DOE Policy 456.1: Secretarial Policy Statement On Nanoscale Safety Secretarial...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Micro- and Nanoscale Tensile Testing of Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pertinent questions at the micro- and nanoscale become: What ..... Understanding the fundamental response of the building blocks of complex ... Y. Gogotsi, editor, Nanomaterials Handbook (Oxford, U.K.: Taylor and Francis, Inc., 2006). 2.

82

Argonne CNM Publications  

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C, September 2011 ChemCatChem Sept 2011 Cover EES September 2011 cover angewandte chemie Journal of Materials Chemistry 82811 cover NMAT June 2011 Applied Materials...

83

3D/4D/5D visualization of material at nano-scale using Transmission...  

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3D4D5D visualization of material at nano-scale using Transmission X-ray Microscopy Wednesday, May 22, 2013 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Yijin Liu, SSRL The...

84

Argonne CNM: Workshops  

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focus on oxides and related materials relevant for energy applications. As power consumption for computing, data storage, and electronics applications are projected to increase...

85

Argonne CNM: 2010 Seminar Series  

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10 10 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 December 17, 2010 "Microsystems for Control of Light-Matter Interaction at the Nanoscale," Il Woong Jung, hosted by Daniel Lopez Abstract: It has been shown that electromagnetic fields incident upon metal particles can be confined over dimensions on the order of or smaller than the wavelength of light. This strong light-matter interaction leads to an enhanced optical near-field at metallic interfaces or in small metallic nanostructures. These highly enhanced fields can be used to probe materials with subwavelength resolution (near-field scanning optical microscopy) and allow single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy detection. The ability to control these interactions (i.e., tune the plasmonic resonance) is highly desirable for developing ultrasensitive Raman and fluorescence detectors, highly efficient optical antennas, tunable single-emitters, nano-patterning, and novel nanophotonic devices.

86

Argonne CNM News: Picasso CSI  

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"Picasso CSI" "Picasso CSI" Pablo Picasso, Red Armchair Picasso used Ripolin commercial house paint in this work, The Red Armchair (1931). A collaboration between the Art Institute of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory, nicknamed "Picasso CSI," has produced an answer to a heated topic that has vexed the art world for decades: Pablo Picasso was the first artist to use common house paint in his work and spread that practice widely. It also has drawn the two distant worlds of cultural heritage experts and scientists together with the potential to rewrite art history. Starting in the summer of 2010 and continuing through the summer of 2011, Volker Rose (of Argonne's Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials' X-Ray Microscopy Group) and Art Institute conservation

87

Argonne CNM: 2008 Colloquium Series  

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an innovative approach for converting nanoscale mechanical energy into electric energy by piezoelectric zinc oxide nanowire arrays. The operation mechanism of the...

88

Argonne CNM: Publications 2005  

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5 Publications 5 Publications A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z B Barber R., Ghantasala M., Divan R., Vora K., Harvey E. and Mancini D., "Optimisation of SU-8 Processing Parameters for Deep X-Ray Lithography," Microsystem Technologies, 11, pp303-310, 2005 Barnard A., Lin X. and Curtiss L., "Equilibrium Morphology of FCC Gold Nanoparticles >3nm and Shape Changes Induced by Temperature," J. Phys. Chem. B, 109, pp24465-24472, 2005 Barnard A., Russo S. and Snook I., "Visualization of Hybridization in Nanocarbon Systems," Journal of Computer Theory and Nanoscience, 2, pp68-74, 2005 Barnard A., Saponjic Z., Tiede D., Rajh T. and Curtiss L., "Multiscale modeling of titanium dioxide: Controlling shape with surface chemistry," Review of Advanced Materials Science, 10, pp21-27, 2005

89

Argonne CNM: Publications 2008  

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8 Publications 8 Publications A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Adiga S. P., Curtiss L., Elam J. W., Pellin M. J., Shih C. C., Shih C. M., Lin S. J., Su Y. Y., Gittard S. A., Zhang J. and Narayan R., "Nanoporous Materials for Biomedical Devices," JOM, 60, pp26-32, 2008 ( Link) B Baca A. J., Ahn J., Sun Y., Meitl M. A., Menard E., Kim H., Choi W., Kim D., Huang Y. and Rogers J. A., "Semiconductor wires and ribbons for high-performance flexible electronics," Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 47, pp5524-5542, 2008 ( Link) Barnard A. and Sternberg M. G., "Vacancy Induced Structural Changes in Diamond Nanoparticles," J. Comput. Theor. Nanosci., 5, pp2089-2095, 2008 ( Link) Belkin A. V., Novosad V., Iavarone M., Pearson J. and Karapetrov G., "Superconductor/Ferromagnet Bilayers: Influence of Magnetic Domain Structure on Vortex Dynamics," Phys. Rev. B, 77, pp180506-180509, 2008 ( Link)

90

Electrical and Optical Characterization of Nanoscale Materials for Electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to a lack of fundamental knowledge about the role of molecular structures in molecular electronic devices, this research is focused on the development of instruments to understand the relation between device design and the electronic properties of electroactive components. The overall goal is to apply this insight to obtain a more efficient and reliable scheme and greater functional control over each component. This work developed a fabrication method for porphyrinoids on graphene-based field effect transistors (FETs), and a chemical sensing platform under an ambient environment by integrating a tip-enhanced Raman spectroscope (TERS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and electronic testing circuit. The study is divided into three aspects. The first is aimed at demonstrating fabrication processes of nanoscale FETs of graphene and porphyrinoid composites based entirely on scanning probe lithography (SPL). A nanoshaving mechanism was used to define patterns on octadecanethiol self-assembled monolayers on gold film evaporated on graphene flakes, followed by metal wet etching and/or oxygen plasma etching to develop patterns on Au films and graphene, respectively. The integrity and optoelectronic properties were examined to validate the processes. The second area of study focused on the development of the chemical sensing platform, enabling chemical changes to be monitored during charge transports under an ambient environment. The localized Raman enhancement was induced by exciting surface plasmon resonance in nanoscale silver enhancing probes made by thermal silver evaporation on sharp AFM tips. As the system was designed along an off-axis illumination/collection scheme, it was demonstrated that it was capable of observing molecular decomposition on opaque and conductive substrates induced by an electric bias. The third line of work proposed a novel TERS system and a probe preparation method. Silver nanowires mounted on AFM tips were used to locally enhance the Raman scattering. The observed Raman enhancement allows quick chemical analysis from a nanoscale region, and thus enables chemical mapping beyond the diffraction limit. Compared with other TERS geometries, the new optical design not only allows analysis on large or opaque samples, but also simplifies the design of the optical components and the alignment processes of the setup.

Chang, Chi-Yuan 1980-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Argonne CNM Newsletter: June 2010  

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wear. The results show the potential of UNCD for AFM probes and demonstrate a systematic approach to studying wear at the nanoscale. J. Liu et al., Small, 6(10), 1140...

92

Parallel nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A New Device for Combinatorial Analysis of Complex nano-Scale Material Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Parallel nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A New Device for Combinatorial Analysis of Complex nano-Scale Material Systems Patrick James McCluskey, and Joost J. Vlassak Division of Engineering is presented for the combinatorial analysis of complex nano-scale material systems. The parallel nano

93

Capacitance: A property of nanoscale materials based on spatial symmetry of discrete electrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capacitance is a measure of the ability to store electrons and is conventionally considered to be a constant dependent upon the shape of metal contacts and the dimensions of the system. In general, however, equipotentials of dielectric systems without ... Keywords: Capacitance, Discrete charges, Nanoscale materials, Periodic table

Tim LaFave, Jr.; Raphael Tsu

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

TMS 2013: Technical Area - Nanoscale and Amorphous Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanostructured and advanced materials potentially offer new possibilities in drilling, exploration and production. In this symposium both academia and industry...

95

Argonne CNM Highlight: High-Performance Nano-Bio Photocatalyst...  

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A High-Performance Nano-Bio Photocatalyst for Targeted Brain Cancer Therapy Nano-Bio Photocatalyst for Targeted Brain Cancer Therapy Scientists from the CNM's Nanobio Interfaces...

96

Argonne CNM Highlight: Award for Ultrafast Imaging of Solar Energy...  

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CNM's Nanophotonics Group and Argonne Chemical Sciences and Engineering's (CSE's) Photosynthesis Group, presented her poster, "Ultrafast Imaging of Solar Energy Flow in...

97

Final Report: Imaging of Buried Nanoscale Optically Active Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a final report covering work done at University of Maryland to develop a Ballistic Electron Emission Luminescence (BEEL) microscope. This technique was intended to examine the carrier transport and photon emission in deeply buried optically-active layers and thereby provide a means for materials science to unmask the detailed consequences of experimentally controllable growth parameters, such as quantum dot size, statistics and orientation, and defect density and charge recombination pathways.

Appelbaum, Ian

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nano-scale Optical Spectroscopy of PV Materials: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Micro-PL, solid immersion lens microscopy, and near-field microscopy characterized the low-temperature PL of PV materials and devices with sub-micron spatial resolution. A variety of novel high-spatial resolution techniques, including micro-PL, solid immersion lens microscopy and near-field microscopy have been used to characterize the low-temperature photoluminescence of photovoltaic materials and devices with sub-micron spatial resolution. The spatial variation of the energy and time-resolved photoluminescence spectra along the cleaved-edge of CdTe/CdS solar cell structures showed an enhancement in low-energy emission offset an estimated 1-2 microns from the material heterojunction for CdCl2 treated devices, concomitant with a decrease in PL decay time at the CdTe exciton peak. Substantial spatial variations in PL spectra of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells were also observed to occur on a micron length scale.

Smith, S.; Dhere, R.; Ramanathan, K.; Mascarenhas, A.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Argonne CNM Highlight: Research Advances using Ultrananocrystalline Diamond  

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User science highlight: Graphene sheet observed with optical method User science highlight: Graphene sheet observed with optical method Sample confocal microscope images of reflection from the single layer of graphene oxide at different laser wavelengths. A simple approach is needed to identify nanometer-scale layered materials such as graphene, clays, metal dichalcogenides, and self-assembled monolayers. A collaborative CNM user project has developed a simple optical identification method employing standard confocal microscopy. High contrast is obtained by depositing the materials on a substrate consisting of a thin dielectric layer on silicon. By varying the wavelength of light used in the microscope, effective refractive indices and absorption coefficients can be determined. An example has been carried out for graphene, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide. Single-atomic

100

Argonne CNM Highlight: Biofunctionalized magnetic-vortex microdiscs for  

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Biofunctionalized magnetic-vortex microdiscs for targeted cancer-cell destruction Biofunctionalized magnetic-vortex microdiscs for targeted cancer-cell destruction Magnetic microdisks Reflection optical microscope image of a dried suspension of the discs prepared via magnetron sputtering and optical lithography. Magnetic spin vortex Model of magnetic-vortex spin distribution in a disc. Users from Argonne's Materials Science Division and University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Medicine, working collaboratively on a user science project with CNM's Nanobio Interfaces Group, have discovered that nanostructured magnetic materials offer exciting avenues for probing cell mechanics, activating mechanosensitive ion channels, and advancing potential cancer therapies. Their new report describes an approach based on interfacing cells with lithographically defined microdiscs (1-micron

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Argonne CNM: End-of-Experiment Survey  

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End-of-Experiment Survey End-of-Experiment Survey Project Information 1. What is your proposal number? Administrative Support 1. The processing of my experiment proposal was: Excellent Satisfactory Marginal Unsatisfactory 2. The efficiency of the processing and orientation procedure was: Excellent Satisfactory Marginal Unsatisfactory 3. The documentation available on the CNM web site to prepare you for your visit was: Excellent Satisfactory Marginal Unsatisfactory Comments about overall support: Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) 1. The safety review/work authorization process was: Excellent Satisfactory Marginal Unsatisfactory Comments on safety review, including suggested improvements to the forms used: 2. With respect to stated objectives, the content provided in ESH 100U and CNM User Orientation is:

102

Argonne CNM News: Structural Consequences of Nanolithography  

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Structural Consequences of Nanolithography Structural Consequences of Nanolithography Ferroelectric domains written by PFM Ferroelectric domains written by PFM exhibit a subtle structural distortion that can be directly observed using hard X-ray nanodiffraction microscopy. Nanolithography effect on structure Modeling shows that the writing process induces a structural electromechanical response to unscreened charges at surfaces and interfaces, altering the local free energy of written ferroelectric domains. Users from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Center for Nanophase Materials Science, working with the X-Ray Microscopy Group, have discovered structural effects accompanying the nanoscale lithography of ferroelectric polarization domains. The results shed new light on the physics of

103

Wiederrecht-041212 - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence  

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Wiederrecht-041212 Wiederrecht-041212 MATERIALS SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM SPEAKER: Gary Wiederrecht Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) Argonne National Laboratory TITLE: "Nanophotonic approaches to solar energy concentration and conversion" DATE: Thursday, April 12, 2012 TIME: 11:00 a.m. PLACE: Building 212 / A-157 HOST: Alex Martinson Refreshments will be served at 10:45 a.m. ABSTRACT: Nanostructured materials have unique optical and electronic properties that can be utilized advantageously for both solar energy concentration and conversion. In this talk, the confinement of light via cavity modes in bilayer films of nanoscale thickness is described, and the application to a new type of "resonance-shifted" luminescent solar concentrator (RSLSC) is introduced. By spatially varying the thickness of

104

Argonne CNM Highlight: Superhydrophobicity on Silver Nanoplates  

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Superhydrophobicity on Silver Nanoplates Superhydrophobicity on Silver Nanoplates Superhydrophobic silver nanoplates Representations of water droplets on a GaAs substrate covered with the Ag nanoplates; as featured on back cover of the journal issue Gallium arsenide wafers decorated with silver nanoplates result in composite surfaces of varying hydrophobocity. CNM researchers and collaborators at Clemson have accomplished this in part by coating the silver nanoplates with self-assembled monolayers of alkyl thiol molecules. By carefully controlling reaction conditions, the size, thickness, and surface roughness of the individual silver nanoplates are tuned to produce different topographic structures and roughness of the composite surfaces. This in turn influences the surface hydrophobicity. The composite surfaces

105

Nano-scale optical and electrical probes of materials and processes.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the investigations and milestones of the Nano-Scale Optical and Electrical Probes of Materials and Processes Junior/Senior LDRD. The goal of this LDRD was to improve our understanding of radiative and non-radiative mechanisms at the nanometer scale with the aim of increasing LED and solar cell efficiencies. These non-radiative mechanisms were investigated using a unique combination of optical and scanning-probe microscopy methods for surface, materials, and device evaluation. For this research we utilized our new near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) system to aid in understanding of defect-related emission issues for GaN-based materials. We observed micrometer-scale variations in photoluminescence (PL) intensity for GaN films grown on Cantilever Epitaxy pattern substrates, with lower PL intensity observed in regions with higher dislocation densities. By adding electrical probes to the NSOM system, the photocurrent and surface morphology could be measured concurrently. Using this capability we observed reduced emission in InGaN MQW LEDs near hillock-shaped material defects. In spatially- and spectrally-resolved PL studies, the emission intensity and measured wavelength varied across the wafer, suggesting the possibility of indium segregation within the InGaN quantum wells. Blue-shifting of the InGaN MQW wavelength due to thinning of quantum wells was also observed on top of large-scale ({micro}m) defect structures in GaN. As a direct result of this program, we have expanded the awareness of our new NSOM/multifunctional SPM capability at Sandia and formed several collaborations within Sandia and with NINE Universities. Possible future investigations with these new collaborators might include GaN-based compound semiconductors for green LEDs, nanoscale materials science, and nanostructures, novel application of polymers for OLEDs, and phase imprint lithography for large area 3D nanostructures.

Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Argonne CNM: 2008 Seminar Series  

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a synthetic methodology to prepare nanocrystals of LAST materials to investigate the link to enhance TE performance. We have recently developed a new general methodology for...

107

Argonne CNM Newsletter: October 2011  

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of interest are the development of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) actuated by piezoelectric thin films (piezo-MEMS) and alternative memory materials and concepts. Prior...

108

Argonne CNM: 2008 Users Meeting  

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and characterization. This course will also discuss integration of diamond films with piezoelectric materials and their applications in fabricating diamond-based MEMS and NEMS....

109

Argonne CNM HighlightL Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers  

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Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers Calcium Map Calcium map of an activated fly ash geopolymer displays regions of high calcium concentration (circled). Their distribution suggests localization as a discrete calcium-rich phase within the lower-calcium aluminosilicate geopolymer gel. Use of the Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) has provided the first access to the nature of heterogeneity in real fly ash-derived geopolymers at the nanoscale. Direct evidence of the formation of discrete high-calcium nanometer-sized particles within a hydroxide-activated geopolymer synthesized from a low-calcium fly ash has been obtained using HXN fluorescence characterization. Additionally, the team of CNM users from the University of Melbourne, the Universidad del Valle of Colombia, and the

110

Argonne CNM Highlight: Improved Hybrid Solar Cells  

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Improved Hybrid Solar Cells Improved Hybrid Solar Cells inorganic-organic hybrid photovoltaic (PV) cells imade of highly ordered titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube arrays filled with solid organic hole conductors such as conjugated polymers One approach for making inexpensive inorganic-organic hybrid photovoltaic (PV) cells is to fill highly ordered titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube arrays with solid organic hole conductors such as conjugated polymers. Center for Nanoscale Materials researchers and collaborative users from the University of Chicago present a new in situ ultraviolet (UV) polymerization method for growing polythiophene inside TiO2 nanotubes and compare this method to the conventional approach of infiltrating nanotubes with presynthesized polymer. A nanotubular TiO2 substrate is immersed in a 2,5-diiodothiophene (DIT)

111

Argonne CNM News: A better etching technique: sequential infiltration  

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A Better Etching Technique Is Invented A Better Etching Technique Is Invented Mark Holt (Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials) examines a sample in the Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe Deep canyons can be etched into materials at the nanoscale with a new SIS-based lithography technique Nanoscientists at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials and Energy Systems Division have discovered a new way to transfer patterns onto different materials, an innovation that combines new tricks with an old technology. One of the biggest recent questions facing materials science has involved the development of better techniques for high-resolution lithographies such as electron-beam (e-beam) lithography. E-beam lithography is used to manufacture the tiniest of structures, including microelectronics and advanced sensors; beams of electrons are part of a

112

Argonne CNM: Proximal Probes Capabilities  

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Proximal Probes Proximal Probes Capabilities Omicron VT-AFM XA microscope scanning tunneling microscope VIew high-resolution image. Variable-temperature, ultra-high-vacuum, atomic force microscope/scanning tunneling microscope: Omicron VT-AFM XA (N. Guisinger, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group) Measurement modes include: Contact and non-contact AFM Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) Scanning tunneling spectroscopy Preparation tools include: Resistive sample heating Direct current heating E-beam heating Sputter ion etching Gas dosing E-beam evaporation An analysis chamber contains combined four-grid LEED/Auger optics Omicron nanoprobe View high-resolution image Scanning probe/scanning electron microscopy: Omicron UHV Nanoprobe (N. Guisinger, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group)

113

Argonne CNM: Theory and Modeling Capabilities  

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aid in the design of functional nanoscale systems. Our primary facility is a high-performance computing cluster accommodating parallel computer-intensive applications. Capabilities...

114

Argonne CNM: 2013 Colloquium Series  

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3 Colloquium Series 3 Colloquium Series 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | Date Title December 18, 2013 "Monodisperse Carbon Nanomaterial Heterostructures," by Mark Hersam, Northwestern University, hosted by Tijana Rajh Abstract: Improvements in carbon nanomaterial monodispersity have yielded corresponding enhancements in the performance of electronic, optoelectronic, sensing, and energy technologies. However, in all of these cases, carbon nanomaterials are just one of many materials employed, suggesting that further device improvements can be achieved by focusing on the integration of disparate nanomaterials into heterostructures with well-defined interfaces. For example, organic self-assembled monolayers on graphene act as effective seeding layers for atomic layer deposited (ALD) dielectrics, resulting in metal-oxide-graphene capacitors with wafer-scale reliability and uniformity comparable to ALD dielectrics on silicon.

115

Argonne CNM: 2005 Seminar Series  

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5 5 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 Dec. 8, 2005 "Ultrafast spectroscopy of single-walled carbon nanotubes," Libai Huang-Stevenson, University of Rochester, hosted by Gary Wiederrecht Abstract: The optical and electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were studied by ultrafast spectroscopy. The photoexcited carriers in isolated SWNTs relaxed through many channels with decay time ranging from subpicosecond to over 100 ps. The magnitude of the longest-lived component in the ultrafast signal exhibited strong resonance dependence, thus suggesting that this lifetime corresponds to the band-edge relaxation time. Excitons are expected to play an important role in reduced dimension materials. Exciton effects in SWNTs were investigated through Auger recombination. Quantized Auger recombination was observed, and Auger lifetimes for two and three e-h pair states were determined. Auger recombination in SWNTs is extremely fast, with lifetimes of only a few picoseconds for SWNTs excited with two and three e-h pairs. Experimental results conclusively show that Auger recombination in SWNTs is due to interaction between one-dimensional excitons and occurs as a two-particle process; a one-electron picture cannot explain our data. Thus, this provides experimental evidence of discrete one-dimensional exciton-excited states in SWNTs.

116

Argonne CNM: 2006 Seminar Series  

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6 6 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 December 21, 2006 "Metal Clusters: Physics on the 1-Nanometer Scale," Karl-Heinz Meiwes-Broer, University of Rostock Abstract: Metal clusters at surfaces are model systems of nanostructure physics that allow for the study of quantum effects. Exciting material and size-dependent features open the possibility to create novel objects that might serve for future applications ( e.g., in the area of nanoelectronics or quantum information technology). This contribution aims at highlighting few specific features of metal clusters, starting from dynamics in ultracold helium droplets and their interaction with strong femtosecond laser fields. The latter being a playground to study the coupling of strong radiation into matter. In particular, nonstationary plasma effects lead to pronounced dynamics in the optical response. From beam work, it is known that the electron structure of small clusters often has not much to do with the respective bulk. The interaction with a surface, in addition, might change the particular electronic behavior. To investigate electronic properties, we employ the method of tunnelling transport in an STM at low temperatures. The resulting dI/dU curves are distinctly structured, which results from the size-dependent density of states. In addition, the underlying substrate influences the electronic properties, which will be demonstrated with the germanium (100) surface. The magnetic investigations are performed with Kerr effect and absorption with optical and synchrotron radiation. When concentrating onto the ratio of the magnetic orbital to spin moments, a strong cluster size dependence is observed. Even large particles with up to 15 nm show increased magnetic orbital moments.

117

The Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer NOMAD at the Spallation Neutron Source SNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nanoscale Ordered Materials Diffractometer (NOMAD) is neutron time-of-flight diffractometer designed to determine pair dist ribution functions of a wide range of materials ranging from short range ordered liquids to long range ordered crystals. Due to a large neutron flux provided by the Spallation Neutron Source SNS and a large detector coverage neutron count-rates exceed comparable instruments by one to two orders of magnitude. This is achieved while maintaining a relatively high momentum transfer resolution of a $\\delta Q/Q \\sim 0.8\\%$ FWHM (typical), and an achievable $\\delta Q/Q$ of 0.24\\% FWHM (best). The real space resolution is related to the maximum momentum transfer; A maximum momentum transfer of 50\\AA$^{-1}$ can be achieved routinely and the maximum momentum transfer given by the detector configuration and the incident neutron spectrum is 125 \\AA$^{-1}$. High stability of the source and the detector allow small contrast isotope experiments to be performed. A detailed description of the instrument is given and the results of experiments with standard samples are discussed.

Feygenson, Mikhail [ORNL; Carruth, John William [ORNL; Hoffmann, Ron [ORNL; Chipley, Kenneth King [ORNL; Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Atomistic Simulations of Bonding, Thermodynamics, and Surface Passivation in Nanoscale Solid Propellant Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering new solid propellant materials requires optimization of several factors, to include energy density, burn rate, sensitivity, and environmental impact. Equally important is the need for materials that will maintain their mechanical properties and thermal stability during long periods of storage. The nanoscale materials considered in this dissertation are proposed metal additives that may enhance energy density and improve combustion in a composite rocket motor. Density Functional Theory methods are used to determine cluster geometries, bond strengths, and energy densities. The ground-state geometries and electron affinities (EAs) for MnxO?: x = 3, 4, y = 1, 2 clusters were calculated with GGA, and estimates for the vertical detachment energies compare well with experimental results. It was found that the presence of oxygen influences the overall cluster moment and spin configuration, stabilizing ferrimagnetic and antiferromagnetic isomers. The calculated EAs range from 1.29-1.84 eV, which is considerably lower than the 3.0-5.0 eV EAs characteristic of current propellant oxidizers. Their use as solid propellant additives is limited. The structures and bonding of a range of Al-cyclopentadienyl cluster compounds were studied with multilayer quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM:MM) methods. The organometallic Al-ligand bonds are generally 55-85 kcal/mol and are much stronger than Al-Al interactions. This suggests that thermal decomposition in these clusters will proceed via the loss of surface metal-ligand units. The energy density of the large clusters is calculated to be nearly 60% that of pure aluminum. These organometallic cluster systems may provide a route to extremely rapid Al combustion in solid rocket motors. Lastly, the properties of COOH-terminated passivating agents were modeled with the GPW method. It is confirmed that fluorinated polymers bind to both Al(111) and Al(100) at two Al surface sites. The oligomers HCOOH, CH3CH2COOH, and CF3CF2COOH chemisorb onto Al(111) with adsorption energies of 10-45 kcal/mol. The preferred contact angle for the organic chains is 65-85 degrees, and adsorption energy weakens slightly with increasing chain length. Despite their relatively weak adsorption energies, fluorinated polymers have elevated melting temperatures, making them good passivation materials for micron-scale Al fuel particles.

Williams, Kristen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

DOE A9024 Final Report Functional and Nanoscale Materials Systems: Frontier Programs of Science at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The scientific programs of the FSMRL supported under the DOE A9024 Grant consisted of four interdisciplinary research clusters, as described. The clusters were led by Professors Tai Chiang (Physics), Jeffrey Moore (Chemistry), Paul Goldbart (Physics), and Steven Granick (Materials Science and Engineering). The completed work followed a dominant theme--Nanoscale Materials Systems--and emphasized studies of complex phenomena involving surfaces, interfaces, complex materials, dynamics, energetics, and structures and their transformations. A summary of our key accomplishments is provided for each cluster.

Lewis, Jennifer A.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

120

Scientists use world's fastest computer to simulate nanoscale...  

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Nanoscale material failure Scientists use world's fastest computer to simulate nanoscale material failure With this new tool, scientists can better study what nanowires do under...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

End station for nanoscale magnetic materials study: Combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and soft X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

We have constructed an end station for nanoscale magnetic materials study at the soft X-ray beamline HiSOR BL-14 at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center. An ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was installed for an in situ characterization of nanoscale magnetic materials in combination with soft X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopy experiment. The STM was connected to the XMCD experimental station via damper bellows to isolate it from environmental vibrations, thus achieving efficient spatial resolution for observing Si(111) surface at atomic resolution. We performed an in situ experiment with STM and XMCD spectroscopy on Co nanoclusters on an Au(111) surface and explored its practical application to investigate magnetic properties for well-characterized nanoscale magnetic materials.

Ueno, Tetsuro; Sawada, Masahiro; Namatame, Hirofumi [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, 2-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Kishimizu, Yusuke; Kimura, Akio [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Taniguchi, Masaki [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, 2-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Gray-030812 - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence Division  

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Gray-030812 Gray-030812 MATERIALS SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM SPEAKER: Dr. Stephen K. Gray Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) Argonne National Laboratory TITLE: "Quantum Dot - Surface Plasmon Interactions" DATE: Thursday, March 8, 2012 TIME: 11:00 a.m. PLACE: Building 212 / A-157 HOST: TBA Refreshments will be served at 10:45 a.m. ABSTRACT: I discuss theoretical predictions of how quantum dots (QDs) interact with plasmonic systems (e.g. metal nanoparticles). The QD is treated either as a dipole emitter, as an effective, polarizable medium, or with a quantum mechanical density matrix approach. The combined system is modeled with computational electrodynamics. The presence of the quantum dot can significantly alter the optical response of the system. I show how the

123

CNST Researchers Observe Nanoscale Charge Transport in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The efficiency is strongly dependent on the material morphology, making ... of nanoscale charge transport in bulk heterojunction solar cells, BH ...

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

Argonne CNM News: Thinnest Nanofiltration Membrane to Date  

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Thinnest Nanofiltration Membrane to Date Thinnest Nanofiltration Membrane to Date Thinnest membrane to date Close-packed nanoparticle monolayers self-assembled from dodecanethiol-ligated gold nanocrystals. TEM image (left) and atomistic simulation of tryptophan transport through a pore. A recent collaboration between users at the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois at Chicago with the Center for Nanoscale Material's Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group has produced the thinnest nanofiltration membrane achieved thus far, at ~30 nm, made of just four layers of nanoparticles. A separation membrane is a key component in both nanofiltration and reverse osmosis filtration systems. Typically they are microns-thick polymer films. Reducing the thickness of the membrane reduces the pressure that needs to

125

Nanobio Interfaces: From Materials Design to Complex Systems  

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CNM Workshop 7: NanoBio Interfaces: From Materials Design to Complex Systems CNM Workshop 7: NanoBio Interfaces: From Materials Design to Complex Systems Organizers: C hristopher F ry ( CNM) a nd E lena R ozhkova ( CNM) Nature possesses the ability to design highly functioning, regenerative materials that cover every imaginable process and physical characteristic desired in modern materials. Energy production and storage, mechanics, and catalysis are but a few of these processes that nature handles well. This workshop i dentified m any o verlapping t hemes a t t he N anoBio i nterface t hat c ontinue t o p roduce a w ide spectrum of materials attributing their functional inspiration from nature. The eight invited speakers highlighted their current research regarding the biological systems they use or have been inspired by in producing new

126

Perfecting Catalytic Arrays | Advanced Photon Source  

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are much more complicated than that. Now, work carried out at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source (APS), Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), and Electron Microscopy Center...

127

Argonne CNM Highlight: Let a Virus Do All the Work  

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Let a Virus Do All the Work Let a Virus Do All the Work Developing an efficient method to fabricate nanoscale building blocks and organize them into functional architectures is the key to nanoscience and nanotechnology. As a result of millions years of evolution, biological systems can provide spatially defined host systems that can be used as templates for uniform fabrication of structured materials with different length scales. Viruses, in this regard, exemplify an extraordinarily organized nano-architecture: they are complex molecular biosystems in which nucleic acid strands are confined within a nano-size compartment (capsid). This project engages the use of an emptied ligand-displayed phage virus as a template to synthesize magnetic nanoparticles. Benefiting from the phage display technology, the particle generated inside the hollow phage has integrated biorecognition elements with high affinity and specificity for selected target molecules. In addition, the size and shape of the magnetic particles can be highly regulated by molecularly engineering virus capsid.

128

Argonne CNM News: Casimir Force Reduction through Nanostructuring  

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Casimir Force Reduction through Nanostructuring Casimir Force Reduction through Nanostructuring Casimir force reduction (a) Configuration used to measure the Casimir force between a gold-coated sphere and a nanostructured grating. The sphere is attached to the torsional plate of a micromechanical oscillator and the nanostructured grating is fixed to a single-mode optical fiber. SEM images: (b) nanostructured grating limited by two uniform films (scale bar, 100 µm). (c) Magnified grating showing the high spatial uniformity (scale bar, 400 nm). (d) cross-section of a single grating element (scale bar, 100 nm). By nanostructuring one of two interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, a new regime in the Casimir force was observed by researchers in the Center for Nanoscale Materials Nanofabrication & Devices

129

Argonne CNM News: Bifunctional Plasmonic/Magnetic Nanoparticles  

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Bifunctional Plasmonic/Magnetic Nanoparticles Bifunctional Plasmonic/Magnetic Nanoparticles Mark Holt (Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials) examines a sample in the Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe Evolutional pathway from iron particle seeds with thin layers of amorphous iron oxide coating to hybrid nanoparticles composed of solid Ag nanodomains and hollow Fe3O4 nanoshells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images (false colorized) and corresponding schematic illustration (silver: yellow, iron oxide: blue, iron core: black) of the hybrid particles at different stages along the reaction are highlighted on the edge. The TEM image at the center highlights Ag-Fe3O4 hybrid nanoparticles in which Ag and Fe3O4 are false colorized in orange yellow and blue, respectively. TEM analysis was done at Argonne's Electron Microscopy Center

130

Argonne CNM News: Time-Resolved Measurements Show Colloidal Nanoplatelets  

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Time-Resolved Measurements Show Colloidal Nanoplatelets Act Like Quantum Wells Time-Resolved Measurements Show Colloidal Nanoplatelets Act Like Quantum Wells TEM image of CdSe nanoplatelets Schematic and transmission electron microscope (TEM) image of CdSe nanoplatelets with a thickness of 5 monolayers. The relaxation of high-energy carriers (electrons and holes) in colloidal nanoplatelets have been measured by researchers in the Nanophotonics Group at the Center for Nanoscale Materials, working with colleagues at the University of Chicago. The measurements show that the carriers behave like carriers in quantum wells. Quantum wells have found widespread application in optoelectronics, and the new results suggest that colloidal nanoplatelets should find similar applications, with the added advantage that they can be produced at low cost and in large quantities.

131

Charge separation in nanoscale photovoltaic materials: recent insights from first-principles electronic structure theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to obey a single unique model but rather depend on atomistic details. Examples are provided theory for reliably predicting and designing new materials suitable for charge separation in photovoltaic of great interest to explore whether comparable photovoltaic (PV) efficiencies can be achieved using

Wu, Zhigang

132

Argonne CNM Highlight: Mechanical energy dissipation in  

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Mechanical Energy Dissipation in Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Microresonators Mechanical Energy Dissipation in Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Microresonators SEM micrograph of UNCD microresonator SEM micrograph of fabricated UNCD microresonator Researchers in the Nanofabrication and Devices group, in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania, Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., and Innovative Micro Technology, have discovered that defects at the grain boundary in ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) hold primary responsibility for the fundamental mechanism of energy dissipation. Because of a high Young's modulus and high sound propagation velocity, UNCD materials hold potential for fabricating high-frequency microelectromechanical (MEMS) resonators. However, their mechanical dissipation at high frequency, which is important for developing high-frequency resonator applications, is not

133

Argonne CNM News: HMapping Deformation in Buried Semiconductor...  

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CMOS performance. Nano-XRD allows for the first time in situ nanoscale mapping of lattice strain and tilt within a buried semiconductor layer at high spatial resolution...

134

Argonne CNM Highlight: Superparamagnetic Gold Nanoshells with Tunable  

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Superparamagnetic Gold Nanoshells with Tunable Optical Properties Superparamagnetic Gold Nanoshells with Tunable Optical Properties Gold lNanoshells Gold Nanoshells TEM images showing the evolution of Au nanoshells after 12 cycles of seeded growth.; A solution-phase process has been developed by CNM users from the University of California at Riverside, working collaboratively with the Nanophotonics Group, for synthesizing stable multifunctional colloidal particles composed of a superparamagnetic Fe3O4 core, a gold nanoshell, and a mesoporous silica outer layer. The unique porous silica layer is produced by a surface-protected etching process. By tuning the pore structure of the silica networks through etching, the shape and size of the gold nanoparticles can be controlled during the seeded growth, as well as their interparticle plasmon coupling. Controllable interparticle coupling enables

135

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with STXM-multicomponent organic electronic devices that have intrinsically nanoscale dimensions. Understanding where charge transport and recombination occur in these materials helps explain the efficient performance of polymer-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and will lead to a new avenue of research on organic electronic devices, supporting emerging technologies such as molecular computing and promoting increased efficiencies in existing organic technologies (organic LEDs and solar cells).

136

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with STXM-multicomponent organic electronic devices that have intrinsically nanoscale dimensions. Understanding where charge transport and recombination occur in these materials helps explain the efficient performance of polymer-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and will lead to a new avenue of research on organic electronic devices, supporting emerging technologies such as molecular computing and promoting increased efficiencies in existing organic technologies (organic LEDs and solar cells).

137

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with STXM-multicomponent organic electronic devices that have intrinsically nanoscale dimensions. Understanding where charge transport and recombination occur in these materials helps explain the efficient performance of polymer-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and will lead to a new avenue of research on organic electronic devices, supporting emerging technologies such as molecular computing and promoting increased efficiencies in existing organic technologies (organic LEDs and solar cells).

138

Argonne CNM Highlight: Designer Affinity Reagents  

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Designer Affinity Reagents Designer Affinity Reagents B. Kay Single-chain variable fragments (scFv) can be displayed on the surface of the bacteriophage M13 and still function in selectively binding their antigens. Even though these antibody fragments are much smaller (25 vs. 150 kDa) than the intact molecules, they can bind their antigens with exquisite sensitivity and specificity. Libraries of scFv antibodies can be screened by affinity selection for binding to any type of target, such as a protein or an organic molecule. The resulting isolated antibodies can be used in a wide variety of applications (e.g., detectors, crystallization agents, and modifiers of target activity). In addition, such antibodies can be used as adapters that bridge inert materials in a defined manner, and thus may be excellent tools for building nanostructures.

139

Argonne CNM News: Study of Ferroelectric Domain Walls Offers a New  

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Study of Ferroelectric Domain Walls Offers a New Nanoscale Conduction Path Study of Ferroelectric Domain Walls Offers a New Nanoscale Conduction Path Scanning tunneling microscopy tips SPM images of the (110) surface of cleaved h-HoMnO3. (top) PFM image showing in-plane ferroelectric domains (oriented vertically, red arrows). (bottom) cAFM image showing enhanced conduction along tail-to-tail domain walls; images are 4 microns per side. Facility users from Rutgers University together with the Center for Nanoscale Materials' Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group have identified two-dimensional sheets of charge formed at the boundaries of ferroelectric domains in a multiferroic material. These two-dimensional charged sheets are not pinned by unstable defects, chemical dopants, or structural interface, but are formed naturally as the inevitable

140

Argonne CNM News: Using Light to Build Nanoparticles into Superstructures  

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Using Light to Build Nanoparticles into Superstructures Using Light to Build Nanoparticles into Superstructures Scientists in the Center for Nanoscale Materials and Argonne's Biosciences Division have demonstrated a remarkably simple, elegant, and cost-effective way of assembling nanoparticles into larger structures of any desired shape and form at will via a process called "optically directed assembly." Optically directed assembly (ODA) involves suspensions of gold and carbon nanoparticles in water. A small droplet of the suspension is placed on a glass slide, and a low-power laser is focused onto a small region within the droplet near its surface. Through a complex process involving optical trapping, heating, evaporation, convective fluid flow, and chemical interactions, the nanoparticles fuse near the laser focus and as the experimenter moves the laser focus around in the droplet, a continuous filament of the fused material follows. These remarkable structures remain completely intact even after the fluid is drained off. In this manner "handcrafted" filaments of up to millimeter lengths and 10-60 times wider than the original nanoparticles can be formed with arbitrary shape and design. The resulting hierarchical architectures may be useful for a variety of applications, including biological sensing, electronics, optics, and emerging energy technologies. As a first demonstration, the researchers handcrafted a microscopic glyph — the Chinese symbol for "king."

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Argonne CNM Highlight: New equation could advance research in solar cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nanoscale organic semiconductor junctions nanoscale organic semiconductor junctions Current-voltage characteristics and energetics of coulombically bound charge carrier pairs (copper phthalocyanine and boron subphthalocyanine chloride donors, and a fullerene acceptor) at the heterojunction in organic semiconductor junctions. New equation could advance research in solar cell materials Scientists in the Nanophotonics Group, the University of Michigan, and Northwestern University have developed a ground-breaking equation for organic semiconductor junctions. Organic, or "plastic" electronics, are a relatively new technology with the prospect of providing ultracheap, lightweight, and flexible electronic applications such as organic solar cells. Their model is successfully applied to two archetype, planar

142

Nano-scale strengthening from grains, subgrains, and particles in Fe-based alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

x ULTRAFINE GRAINED MATERIALS Nano-scale strengthening fromSpringerlink.com Abstract Nano-scale strengthening has beenless than 20 h), develop nano-scale subgrains [15]. These

Lesuer, D. R.; Syn, C. K.; Sherby, O. D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Argonne CNM Highlight: Understanding Nanocrystal Shapes through Simulation  

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Understanding Nanocrystal Shapes through Simulation Understanding Nanocrystal Shapes through Simulation A. Barnard Anatase Nanocrystals Nanoparticles of various materials have been found to possess a number of remarkable properties that depend upon their finite size. In many cases however, these desirable properties may also be a function of the morphology of the nanoparticle. Experimental evidence suggests that the shape of nanomaterials is affected by such factors as size, temperature, pressure, and the chemical environment. Observations of this type invite the question: Can the shape of nanoparticles be controlled, or do thermodynamic processes rule at the nanoscale? Researchers at the Virtual Fab Lab are using theoretical models and high-performance computing to investigate the physical principles responsible for the shape of nanocrystals and ways in which they may be manipulated. Calculations involving isolated nanoparticles (even small structures such as the anatase nanocrystals shown here) can be very computationally intensive, especially when trying to simulate the effects of particles in solution. It may also be difficult to determine whether the results of such calculations are archetypal or are representative only of the particular prototype structure. By developing a new theory for the phase stability of nanomaterials as a function of size and shape, we can eliminate much of this ambiguity. Ab initio computational methods are used to obtain a set of key parameters for the model that may then be used to examine how shape affects processes such as phase transitions. Alternatively, the model may be used to determine the experimental conditions necessary to achieve a particular shape that may be required for a specific application.

144

NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemical and Nanoscale Science  

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Nanoscale Science Nanoscale Science Learn about our research staff including staff profiles, publications, and contact information. The primary goal of the Chemical and Nanoscale Science Group, within NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center, is to understand photoconversion processes in nanoscale, excitonic photoconversion systems, such as semiconductor quantum dots, molecular dyes, conjugated molecules and polymers, nanostructured oxides, and carbon nanotubes. Closely associated with this goal are efforts to gain an understanding of how to use chemistry and physical tools to control and maximize the photoconversion process. The innovative chemistry and physics that evolve from these fundamental studies are used on a number of applied projects, maximizing the benefits from these discoveries.

145

Argonne CNM Highlight: Damping of acoustic vibrations in gold nanoparticles  

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Damping of acoustic vibrations in gold nanoparticles Damping of acoustic vibrations in gold nanoparticles Nanopatterning of STO Vibrations in nanostructures offer applications in molecular-scale biological sensing and ultrasensitive mass detection. To approach single-atom sensing, it is necessary to reduce the dimensions of the structures to the nanometer scale while preserving long-lived vibrations. This requires an understanding of how vibrations in nanoscale objects are damped - or lose their energy to the fluid surroundings and within themselves. Researchers have used fast laser pulses to produce and probe high-frequency vibrations in metal nanoparticles. However, significant variations in particle dimensions complicate measurements. By studying bipyramid-shaped gold nanoparticles with highly uniform sizes

146

Final LDRD report : nanoscale mechanisms in advanced aging of materials during storage of spent %22high burnup%22 nuclear fuel.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of a three-year LDRD project focused on understanding microstructural evolution and related property changes in Zr-based nuclear cladding materials towards the development of high fidelity predictive simulations for long term dry storage. Experiments and modeling efforts have focused on the effects of hydride formation and accumulation of irradiation defects. Key results include: determination of the influence of composition and defect structures on hydride formation; measurement of the electrochemical property differences between hydride and parent material for understanding and predicting corrosion resistance; in situ environmental transmission electron microscope observation of hydride formation; development of a predictive simulation for mechanical property changes as a function of irradiation dose; novel test method development for microtensile testing of ionirradiated material to simulate the effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties; and successful demonstration of an Idaho National Labs-based sample preparation and shipping method for subsequent Sandia-based analysis of post-reactor cladding.

Clark, Blythe G.; Rajasekhara, Shreyas; Enos, David George; Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Weiner, Ruth F.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward...

148

Utilizing Nanoscale Interfacial Films to Tailor Battery and Other Ionic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Such nanoscale intergranular and surficial films can be utilized to engineer lithium-ion battery cathode and anode materials, as well as solid-state ionic...

149

Nanoscale relaxation oscillator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA); Regan, Brian C. (Los Angeles, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA)

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Green method to produce propylene oxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials U.S. Department of Energy Search CNM ... Search Argonne Home > Center for Nanoscale Materials > CNM Home About CNM Research Facilities People For Users Publications News & Highlights News Research Highlights Newsletters CNM Images on Flickr Events Jobs CNM Users Organization Contact Us Other DOE Nanoscale Science Research Centers Green method to produce propylene oxide conversion of propylene to polyene oxide via silver nanoclusters Simulation of propylene to propylene oxide conversion via silver nanoclusters supported on an alumina surface. Propylene oxide is an important chemical whose current industrial production is energy intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Attempts to solve this problem by using catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with

151

2011 CNM Workshop: Frontiers in Imaging and Spectroscopy  

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probes, these capabilities are leading to new discoveries in nanoelectronic devices, energy materials, and environmental systems. Next generation hard x- ray optics...

152

Argonne CNM Highlight: Exploring the limits of antiferromagnetism in  

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spin structure of manganese monolayer ; (Top) Schematic of the spin structure of the Mn monolayer on W(110) (6-nm repeat structure). (a) Topography and (b) differential conductance at 40 K. (Inset) High-resolution topographic data taken with a spin-sensitive tip; stripe contrast is related to the degree of antiferromagnetic order. Exploring the limits of antiferromagnetism in nanostructured materials Researchers in the Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group and at Politecnico di Milano in Italy explored the limits of antiferromagnetism in a nanostructured material for the first time, measuring the temperature required to support antiferromagnetic order in atomic monolayers of manganese on tungsten as the dimensions of the structures are reduced.

153

Center for Nanoscale Materials Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- STM, AFM, ultrafast microscopy " Nathan Guisinger, nguisinger@anl.gov" - STM, AFM, graphene" Saw Wai Hla (Group Leader), shla@anl.gov - LT-STM, SP-STM, AFM" Xiao-Min Lin,...

154

Materials Science Programs and Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Materials Science Programs & Projects. ... In this project we measure the fundamental electrical properties of materials from bulk to nanoscale from ...

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

155

Atomistic Time-Domain Simulations of Light-Harvesting and Charge-Transfer Dynamics in Novel Nanoscale Materials for Solar Hydrogen Production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Funded by the DOE grant (i) we continued to study and analyze the atomistic detail of the electron transfer (ET) across the chromophore-TiO2 interface in Gratzel cell systems for solar hydrogen production. (ii) We extensively investigated the nature of photoexcited states and excited state dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots (QD) designed for photovoltaic applications. (iii) We continued a newly initiated research direction focusing on excited state properties and electron-phonon interactions in nanoscale carbon materials. Over the past year, the results of the DOE funded research were summarized in 3 review articles. 12 original manuscripts were written. The research results were reported in 28 invited talks at conferences and university seminars. 20 invitations were accepted for talks in the near future. 2 symposia at national and international meetings have being organized this year on topics closely related to the DOE funded project, and 2 more symposia have been planned for the near future. We summarized the insights into photoinduced dynamics of semiconductor QDs, obtained from our time-domain ab initio studies. QDs exhibit both molecular and bulk properties. Unlike either bulk or molecular materials, QD properties can be modified continuously by changing QD shape and size. However, the chemical and physical properties of molecular and bulk materials often contradict each other, which can lead to differing viewpoints about the behavior of QDs. For example, the molecular view suggests strong electron-hole and charge-phonon interactions, as well as slow energy relaxation due to mismatch between electronic energy gaps and phonon frequencies. In contrast, the bulk view advocates that the kinetic energy of quantum confinement is greater than electron-hole interactions, that charge-phonon coupling is weak, and that the relaxation through quasi-continuous bands is rapid. By synthesizing the bulk and molecular viewpoints, we clarified the controversies and provided a unified atomistic picture of the nature and dynamics of photoexcited states in semiconductor QDs. We also summarized our recent findings about the photoinduced electron dynamics at the chromophore-semiconductor interfaces from a time-domain ab initio perspective. The interface provides the foundation for a new, promising type of solar cell and presents a fundamentally important case study for several fields, including photo-, electro- and analytical chemistries, molecular electronics, and photography. Further, the interface offers a classic example of an interaction between an organic molecular species and an inorganic bulk material. Scientists employ different concepts and terminologies to describe molecular and solid states of matter, and these differences make it difficult to describe the interface with a single model. At the basic atomistic level of description, however, this challenge can be largely overcome. Recent advances in non-adiabatic molecular dynamics and time-domain density functional theory have created a unique opportunity for simulating the ultrafast, photoinduced processes on a computer very similar to the way that they occur in nature. These state-of-the-art theoretical tools offered a comprehensive picture of a variety of electron transfer processes that occur at the interface, including electron injection from the chromophore to the semiconductor, electron relaxation and delocalization inside the semiconductor, back-transfer of the electron to the chromophore and to the electrolyte, and regeneration of the neutral chromophore by the electrolyte. The ab initio time-domain modeling is particularly valuable for understanding these dynamic features of the ultrafast electron transfer processes, which cannot be represented by a simple rate description. We demonstrated using symmetry adapted cluster theory with configuration interaction (SAC-CI) that charging of small PbSe nanocrystals (NCs) greatly modifies their electronic states and optical excitations. Conduction and valence band transitions that are not available in neutral NCs dominate

Prezhdo, Oleg V.

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

156

Atomistic Time-Domain Simulations of Light-Harvesting and Charge-Transfer Dynamics in Novel Nanoscale Materials for Solar Hydrogen Production.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Funded by the DOE grant (i) we continued to study and analyze the atomistic detail of the electron transfer (ET) across the chromophore-TiO2 interface in Gratzel cell systems for solar hydrogen production. (ii) We extensively investigated the nature of photoexcited states and excited state dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots (QD) designed for photovoltaic applications. (iii) We continued a newly initiated research direction focusing on excited state properties and electron-phonon interactions in nanoscale carbon materials. Over the past year, the results of the DOE funded research were summarized in 3 review articles. 12 original manuscripts were written. The research results were reported in 28 invited talks at conferences and university seminars. 20 invitations were accepted for talks in the near future. 2 symposia at national and international meetings have being organized this year on topics closely related to the DOE funded project, and 2 more symposia have been planned for the near future. We summarized the insights into photoinduced dynamics of semiconductor QDs, obtained from our time-domain ab initio studies. QDs exhibit both molecular and bulk properties. Unlike either bulk or molecular materials, QD properties can be modified continuously by changing QD shape and size. However, the chemical and physical properties of molecular and bulk materials often contradict each other, which can lead to differing viewpoints about the behavior of QDs. For example, the molecular view suggests strong electron-hole and charge-phonon interactions, as well as slow energy relaxation due to mismatch between electronic energy gaps and phonon frequencies. In contrast, the bulk view advocates that the kinetic energy of quantum confinement is greater than electron-hole interactions, that charge-phonon coupling is weak, and that the relaxation through quasi-continuous bands is rapid. By synthesizing the bulk and molecular viewpoints, we clarified the controversies and provided a unified atomistic picture of the nature and dynamics of photoexcited states in semiconductor QDs. We also summarized our recent findings about the photoinduced electron dynamics at the chromophore-semiconductor interfaces from a time-domain ab initio perspective. The interface provides the foundation for a new, promising type of solar cell and presents a fundamentally important case study for several fields, including photo-, electro- and analytical chemistries, molecular electronics, and photography. Further, the interface offers a classic example of an interaction between an organic molecular species and an inorganic bulk material. Scientists employ different concepts and terminologies to describe molecular and solid states of matter, and these differences make it difficult to describe the interface with a single model. At the basic atomistic level of description, however, this challenge can be largely overcome. Recent advances in non-adiabatic molecular dynamics and time-domain density functional theory have created a unique opportunity for simulating the ultrafast, photoinduced processes on a computer very similar to the way that they occur in nature. These state-of-the-art theoretical tools offered a comprehensive picture of a variety of electron transfer processes that occur at the interface, including electron injection from the chromophore to the semiconductor, electron relaxation and delocalization inside the semiconductor, back-transfer of the electron to the chromophore and to the electrolyte, and regeneration of the neutral chromophore by the electrolyte. The ab initio time-domain modeling is particularly valuable for understanding these dynamic features of the ultrafast electron transfer processes, which cannot be represented by a simple rate description. We demonstrated using symmetry adapted cluster theory with configuration interaction (SAC-CI) that charging of small PbSe nanocrystals (NCs) greatly modifies their electronic states and optical excitations. Conduction and valence band transitions that are not available in neutral NCs dominate

Prezhdo, Oleg V.

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

157

Los Alamos National Laboratory Prototype Fabrication Division CNM Briefing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prototype Fabrication Division designs, programs, manufactures, and inspects on-site high quality, diverse material parts and components that can be delivered at the pace the customer needs to meet their mission. Our goal is to bring vision to reality in the name of science.

Hidalgo, Stephen P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keyser, Richard J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

158

Argonne CNM Highlight: New Gas Sensor Based on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes  

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New Gas Sensor Based on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes A new gas sensor based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes Hybrid sensor fabrication process: (top) SEM image of a few MWCNTs spanning across two neighboring Au fingers of the interdigitated electrode; (bottom) HRTEM image of a MWCNT uniformly coated with SnO nanocrystals. Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials staff in the Nanofabrication & Devices Group together with collaborative users from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee have fabricated a miniaturized gas sensor using hybrid nanostructures consisting of SnO2 nanocrystals supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). In contrast to the high-temperature operation required for SnO2 nanocrystals alone, and to the insensitivity towards H2

159

Argonne CNM News: Ambient-Stable Tetragonal Phase in Silver Nanowires  

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Ambient-Stable Tetragonal Phase in Silver Nanowires Ambient-Stable Tetragonal Phase in Silver Nanowires Silver nanowires SEM image of randomly assembled silver nanowires and low-resolution TEM image (inset) of a cross-sectional sample of an individual nanowire. Scale bar represents 500 nm SIlver nanowire with fivefold symmetry Schematic drawing of a silver nanowire with fivefold symmetry. Cross-section of individual silver nanowire High-resolution TEM image of a cross-sectional sample of an individual silver nanowire. Scale bar represents 5 nm. A stable non-face-centered-cubic phase in noble metal nanoparticles has been reported for this first time by researchers at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (Nanophotonics & NanoBio Interfaces Groups) working with colleagues at the Advanced Photon Source and Electron Microscopy

160

Argonne CNM Highlight: Reverse Chemical Switching of a Ferroelectric Film  

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Reverse Chemical Switching of a Ferroelectric Film Reverse Chemical Switching of a Ferroelectric Film Reverse Chemmical Switching of a Ferroelectric Film Ferroelectric materials display a spontaneous electric polarization below the Curie temperature that can be reoriented, typically by applying an electric field. In this study, researchers from Argonne, Northern Illinois University, and The University of Pennsylvania have demonstrated that the chemical environment can control the polarization orientation in an ultrathin ferroelectric film. This is complementary to recent predictions that polarization can affect surface chemistry and illuminates potential applications in sublithographic patterning and electrically tunable catalysts. In situ synchrotron X-ray scattering measurements showed that high or low

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Argonne CNM Highlight: Using Biomolecules to Guide Assembly of Inorganic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Biomolecules to Guide Assembly of Inorganic Nanostructures Using Biomolecules to Guide Assembly of Inorganic Nanostructures Lee Makowski A number of potential methods might be useful in guiding the assembly of inorganic nanostructures. A key objective in this effort is the ability to specify the exact locations of different nanoparticles within a nanostructure, a capability that will be critical in designing and producing future nanodevices. Nanoparticles One technique discussed involves the possibility of using proteins to create a framework on which nanoparticles could then be attached at specified points. Some type of chemical processing could then be used to remove the organics after assembly. Attaching the inorganic particles to a protein framework might be accomplished using binding sites identified via "phage display" techniques where phage-displaying proteins with randomized surfaces are selected for an affinity to a desired inorganic material. The advantages of this method include the ability to isolate a single binding phage and then grow large quantities of it for characterization. A particularly advantageous type of protein for these constructs are diabodies, constructed from fragments of antibodies. These can incorporate binding sites identified through phage display and then be used to attach inorganic materials at preselected places on the protein framework.

162

Argonne CNM News: Large Wave-Vector Phonon Modes in Silicon Nanomembra...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

membranes through synchrotron X-ray TDS demonstrates the potential for fundamentally new experimental insights into the dynamic behavior of nanoscale solids. Large wave-vector...

163

Argonne CNM Highlight: High density, high-aspect-ratio precision polyimide  

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High density, high-aspect-ratio precision polyimide nanofilters High density, high-aspect-ratio precision polyimide nanofilters Polyimide Nanofilter SEM of a polyimide film with holes ~250 nm in diameter and ~10 µm deep. The cross-sectional cut of the channels in the front are made visible by focused ion-beam milling. Collaborative users from Creatv MicroTech, Inc. and Los Alamos National Laboratory, working with CNM's Nanofabrication & Devices Group, have demonstrated a novel fabrication process that produces high-porosity polymer nanofilters with smooth, uniform. and straight pores and high aspect ratios. Nanofilters have a wide range of applications for various size-exclusion-based separations in bioseparation and nanomedicine, such as laboratory assays, removing bacteria and viruses, drug delivery devices,

164

Argonne CNM Highlight: Coupling of Single Quantum Dots to Smooth Metal  

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Coupling of Single Quantum Dots to Smooth Metal Films Single Quantum Dots Coupledl to Smooth Metal Films Artist¹s rendition of semiconductor nanocrystals near a gold film. The metal increases nanocrystal emission rates depending on their orientation. [selected as cover image for Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 11, 5853 (2009)] Staff in the CNM Nanophotonics Group have measured how light emission from individual colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, is modified when in proximity to smooth metal films. Metal nanostructures can strongly modify how quantum dots emit light because of their coupling to electron oscillations in the metal, known as surface plasmons. Emission modification is important for the improvement of light-emitting devices,

165

Argonne CNM Highlight: Solvent-Mediated End-to-End Assembly of Gold  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solvent-Mediated End-to-End Assembly of Gold Nanorods Solvent-Mediated End-to-End Assembly of Gold Nanorods gold nanorods Transmission-electron-microscope image of 70-nm-long gold nanorods assembled end to end via solvent-mediated interactions. CNM scientists have developed a new method for the controlled end-to-end assembly of rod-shaped gold nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are synthesized chemically using an established technique, producing high-quality gold nanorods with lengths of approximately 70 nm and diameters of approximately 15 nm, stabilized in water by hydrophilic surfactant molecules. The sides of the rods are better protected by the surfactants than the ends, so that when additional ligand molecules that bind to gold are added to the solution, they preferentially attach to the ends of the rods. If these ligands are hydrophobic, then the rods will

166

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Wednesday, 21 December 2005 00:00 Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

167

Argonne CNM Highlight: Polarization-modulated rectification at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Images of HoMnO3 Surface Images of HoMnO3 Surface Polarization-modulated rectification at ferroelectric surfaces A combined electrostatic force and conductive atomic force microscopy study on single-crystalline ferroelectric HoMnO3 was recently published by users from Rutgers University and Chung-Ang University in South Korea, working collaboratively with the Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group. By comparing data obtained at the same sample location but at different temperatures - below and above charge carrier freezing - the local Schottky-like rectification effect at the tip-surface junction was shown to be modulated by ferroelectric polarization. Additionally, the crossover to a space-charge limited conduction mechanism at higher voltages in the conductance spectra for both up and down domains was demonstrated. These

168

Argonne CNM Highlight: Patterned Copper Nanowires with Novel Electrical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Patterned Copper Nanowires with Novel Electrical Effects Patterned Copper Nanowires with Novel Electrical Effects Micrograph of copper nanowire A micrograph of the sample layout and the copper nanowire (l = 2.04 um, w = 90 nm, t = 50 nm) between the contact pads. Metallic nanowires have various applications such as sensors and high-density interconnects in field-effect transistors. Monitoring the influence of size and surface effects on material properties, such as electrical resistivity and failure properties, is important in designing new, reliable nanowires. Copper nanowires were patterned with e-beam lithography and fabricated with a copper film deposited by e-beam evaporation. Electrical measurements show that surface and size have effects on the electrical properties. Smaller values for the temperature coefficient of resistance and higher failure

169

Argonne CNM News: Ani Sumant Garners Two R&D100 Awards  

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Ani Sumant Garners Two R&D100 Awards Ani Sumant Garners Two R&D100 Awards Ani Sumant Nanocrystalline diamond-related (NCD) devices developed by Anirudha Sumant of the Nanofabrication & Devices Group garnered two of the 2013 R&D 100 awards. Nicknamed the "Oscars of Innovation," the awards recognize a year's most important scientific and technological breakthroughs. The winners include the Miraj Diamond(tm) platform, a manufacturing process developed with AKHAN Technologies, Inc., and the Nanocrystalline Diamond Technologies NCD Plus coating, developed with NCD Technologies. With these awards, Sumant becomes the first Argonne scientist to win two R&D 100 awards in the same year. The Miraj Diamond(tm) platform resulted from the marriage of two scientific breakthroughs: the ability to deposit nanocrystalline diamond films at relatively low temperatures and a doping process that makes NCD into a good semiconducting material. Sumant and his colleagues developed the low-temperature NCD deposition technology at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials, while the doping technique was developed at AKHAN Technologies, an industry partner based in Illinois. These technologies together will allow manufacturers to create better integrated circuits for telecommunications, defense and aviation electronics.

170

Nanoscale strength distribution in amorphous versus crystalline metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-load nanoindentation can be used to assess not only the plastic yield point, but the distribution of yield points in a material. This paper reviews measurements of the so-called nanoscale strength distribution (NSD) ...

Packard, C.E.

171

Synthesizing High-Quality Calcium Boride at Nanoscale  

N-type thermoelectric materials Synthesizing High-Quality Calcium Boride at Nanoscale (IN-10-044) CaB 6 particles coated for 20 cycles at 1600 C.

172

Nanoelectronics and Nanoscale Electronics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... illustration showing how researhcers watched nanosize batteries with TEM Nanopower: Avoiding Electrolyte Failure in Nanoscale Lithium Batteries. ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

174

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

175

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

176

The NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. CENTER FOR NANOSCALE SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 2010 CENTER FOR NANOSCALE SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 2010 Page 2. ...

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory Print Tuesday, 21 May 2013 00:00 Research at the Advanced Light Source may lead to four-bit magnetic cells housed on nanoscale metal disks, instead of the two-bit magnetic domains of standard magnetic memories. In magnetic vortices, parallel electron spins point either clockwise or counterclockwise, while in their crowded centers the spins point either down or up. "From the scientist's point of view, magnetism is about controlling electron spin," says Peter Fischer of the Materials Sciences Division, who leads the work at beamline 6.1.2. Four orientations could provide multibits in a new kind of memory. The next step is to control the states independently and simultaneously.

178

Nanoscale heat conduction across tunnel junctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?2005? Nanoscale heat conduction across tunnel junctions Y.May 2005? Nanoscale heat conduction across tunnel junctionsprevailing theory of heat conduction in highly disordered

Ju, Y. Sungtaek; Hung, M T; Carey, M J; Cyrille, M C; Childress, J R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Scanning Probe Techniques for Functional Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoscale Electromechanical Properties of Novel Materials for Actuator and Energy Harvesting Applications Optical Imaging of Dielectric Nano-structures with...

180

Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

Ren, Jianhua (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Russell, Scott (California State University, Stanislaus, Turlock, CA); Morishetti, Kiran (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Phase transitions in nanoscale ferroelectric structures.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over decades of effort, investigations of the intrinsic phase transition behavior of nanoscale ferroelectric structures have been greatly complicated by materials processing variations and by the common and uncontrolled occurrence of spacecharge, which interacts directly with the polarization and can obscure fundamental behavior. These challenges have largely been overcome, and great progress in understanding the details of this class of phase transitions has been made, largely based on advances in the growth of high-quality, epitaxial ferroelectric films and in the theory and simulation of ferroelectricity. Here we will discuss recent progress in understanding the ferroelectric phase transition in a particular class of model systems: nanoscale perovskite thin-film heterostructures. The outlook for ferroelectric technology based on these results is promising, and extensions to laterally confined nanostructures will be described.

Streiffer, S. K.; Fong, D. D. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Simulating nanoscale semiconductor devices.  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of electronic devices will be developed at the nanoscale and molecular level, where quantum mechanical effects are observed. These effects must be accounted for in the design process for such small devices. One prototypical nanoscale semiconductor device under investigation is a resonant tunneling diode (RTD). Scientists are hopeful the quantum tunneling effects present in an RTD can be exploited to induce and sustain THz frequency current oscillations. To simulate the electron transport within the RTD, the Wigner-Poisson equations are used. These equations describe the time evolution of the electrons distribution within the device. In this paper, this model and a parameter study using this model will be presented. The parameter study involves calculating the steady-state current output from the RTD as a function of an applied voltage drop across the RTD and also calculating the stability of that solution. To implement the parameter study, the computational model was connected to LOCA (Library of Continuation Algorithms), a part of Sandia National Laboratories parallel solver project, Trilinos. Numerical results will be presented.

Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Zhao, P. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Woolard, D. L. (U. S. Army Research Laboratory, NC); Kelley, C. Tim (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Lasater, Matthew S. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Nanoscale Ferroelectricity in Crystalline -Glycine  

SciTech Connect

Ferroelectrics are multifunctional materials that reversibly change their polarization under an electric field. Recently, the search for new ferroelectrics has focused on organic and bio-organic materials, where polarization switching is used to record/retrieve information in the form of ferroelectric domains. This progress has opened a new avenue for data storage, molecular recognition, and new self-assembly routes. Crystalline glycine is the simplest amino acid and is widely used by living organisms to build proteins. Here, it is reported for the first time that {gamma}-glycine, which has been known to be piezoelectric since 1954, is also a ferroelectric, as evidenced by local electromechanical measurements and by the existence of as-grown and switchable ferroelectric domains in microcrystals grown from the solution. The experimental results are rationalized by molecular simulations that establish that the polarization vector in {gamma}-glycine can be switched on the nanoscale level, opening a pathway to novel classes of bioelectronic logic and memory devices.

Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Agarwal, Pratul K [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

NIST Nanoscale Science and Technology Center Now ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Nanoscale Science and Technology Center Now Accepting Proposals. For Immediate Release: May 1, 2007. ...

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

185

NIST Highlight about investigating nanoscale pattern shape ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST researchers validate new method for investigating nanoscale pattern shape evolution. NIST researchers successfully ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

186

Nanoscale heat transfer - from computation to experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat transfer can differ distinctly at the nanoscale from that at the macroscale. Recent advancement in

Luo, Tengfei

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

187

Available Technologies: Nanoscale Parametric Amplifier  

A research team led by Berkeley Labs Alex Zettl has developed a nanoscale electro-mechanical amplifier that can be used for enhanced radio wave detection and ...

188

Nanoscale Heat Conduction across Metal-Dielectric Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

006 " Nanoscale Heat Conduction across Metal-Dielectricdirectly. Nanoscale Heat Conduction across Metal-Dielectricstudy of nanoscale heat conduction across nanolaminates

Ju, Y. Sungtaek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

ATTACHMENT CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SMALL-SCALE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS USING NANOSCALE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SMALL-SCALE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS USING NANOSCALE MATERIALS, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, RICHLAND,WASH[NGTON Proposed Adion: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to conduct indoor small-scale research and development projects and small-scale pilot projects using nanoscale materials. Nanoscale materials are engineered materials consisting of, or containing structures of between 1 and 100 nanometers (nm) that make use of properties unique to nanoscale forms of materials. Location of Action: The proposed action would occur on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site and in the vicinity ofPNNL facilities in the State of Washington. Description of the Proposed Action:

190

Introduction & History The Center for Nanoscale Science exploits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the control of light in nanostructures, Center activities involve forty eight students and post behavior of nanoscale systems with common themes of new materials synthesis and nano- fabrication, theory ferroelectric ferromagnetic, highly tunable dipole-spring ferroics, and other systems with new physical proper

Yener, Aylin

191

Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. , 1999. Electrical properties and power considerationsciency and 0.84 mW/cm 2 electrical power output for the colde average generated electrical power [mW/cm 2 ] W p average

Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effective volumetric heat capacity of the composite PEThe effective volumetric heat capacity ( ? c p ) e f f inc p ) i is the volumetric heat capacity of medium i be it

Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Probing Nanoscale Correlations in Crystalline Materials Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of single crystal diffuse neutron scattering with energy discrimination, which will be implemented in a new instrument, Corelli, under construction at SNS.

194

Nanoscale Measurement Methods for Novel Material ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Novel combined electrical and optical techniques needed Page 14. Organic PV Cell ? Donor and acceptor separate charge carriers ...

195

Strain Determination in Nanoscale Microelectronic Materials Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synchrotron-based x-ray microbeam diffraction provides us with the ... Advances in Orientation Imaging Microscopy in Transmission Electron Microscope.

196

Nanoscale Thermoelectric Materials and Devices for Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by Thermogravimetric Analysis ... A2: Anode Properties of MgH2 for All Solid State Lithium Ion Battery.

197

Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light Title Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Choi, Jong Hyun, Donald Lucas, and Catherine P. Koshland Journal Journal of Physics: Conference Series Volume 59 Start Page 54 Issue 1 Pagination 54-59 Abstract Laser interaction with nanoscale particles is distinct and different from laser-bulk material interaction, where a hot plasma is normally created. Here, we review our studies on 193 nm laser ablation of various nanoscale particles including NaCl, soot, polystyrene, and gold. The 20 ns laser beam with fluences up to 0.3 J/cm2 irradiates nanoparticles in a gas stream at laser repetition rates from 10 to 100 Hz. The particle size distributions before and after irradiation are measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and particle morphology is examined with electron microscopy. All the nanomaterials studied exhibit a similar disintegration pattern and similar particle formation characteristics. No broadband emission associated with particle heating or optical breakdown is observed. The nanoparticles formed after irradiation have a smaller mean diameter and an order of magnitude higher number concentration with a more spherical shape compared to the original particles. We use the photon-atom ratio (PAR) to interpret the laser-particle interaction energetics.

198

2-5 Interfacial & Nanoscale Science Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INSF Overview INSF Overview Interfacial & Nanoscale Science Facility The Interfacial & Nanoscale Science (I&NS) Facility is a world-class resource for scientific expertise and instrumentation related to the study of interfacial phenomena and nanoscience and technology. This section summarizes the capabilities that exist in the I&NS Facility, along with research programs associated with facility users. Activities in the I&NS Facility address national needs in environmental restoration, waste management, pollution preven- tion, energy, and national security through research that specializes in preparation, charac- terization, interactions, and reactivity of interfaces and nanoscale materials. The range of scientific expertise and instrumentation within the I&NS Facility provides a unique envi-

199

Facilities | Materials Research Laboratory at Illinois  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the Nanoscale Programming Function via Soft Materials Materials for Extreme Irradiation Environments Directory Faculty Staff Operations Safety News MRL Newsletters Events...

200

Session 8A: Radiation Resistant Materials III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoscale Multilayers'13: Session 8A: Radiation Resistant Materials III Program Organizers: Jon Molina-Aldareguia, IMDEA Materials Institute; Javier LLorca,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Session 3: Radiation Resistant Materials I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 1, 2013 ... Nanoscale Multilayers'13: Session 3: Radiation Resistant Materials I Program Organizers: Jon Molina-Aldareguia, IMDEA Materials Institute;...

202

Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

Helble, Joseph J. (Andover, MA); Moniz, Gary A. (Windham, NH); Morse, Theodore F. (Little Compton, RI)

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

203

Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles. 5 figs.

Helble, J.J.; Moniz, G.A.; Morse, T.F.

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

204

Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

Helble, Joseph J. (Andover, MA); Moniz, Gary A. (Windham, NH); Morse, Theodore F. (Little Compton, RI)

1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

205

Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles. 5 figs.

Helble, J.J.; Moniz, G.A.; Morse, T.F.

1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

206

Magnetoresistance of Nanoscale Molecular Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are of fundamental nature, leading to the understanding of current-voltage relations. Due to their small flux is how to set up a nanoscale device so that the magnetic field can control the current flowing through it, Jerusalem 91904, Israel Received April 5, 2005 ABSTRACT Affecting the current through a molecular

Rabani, Eran

207

Available Technologies: Improving the Efficiency of Nanoscale ...  

Alex Zettl, Jeffrey Grossman, and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have developed several approaches for improving the conversion efficiency of nanoscale photovoltaic devices.

208

Nanoscale Characterization of Polymer Precursor Derived Silicon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Nano-scale mechanical properties of silicon carbide derived ... Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites.

209

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When...

210

Catalysis on the Nanoscale: Preparation, Characterization and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis on the Nanoscale: Preparation, Characterization and Reactivity of Metal-Based Nanostructures The purpose of this program is to explore and manipulate the size, morphology...

211

PNNL Nanoscale Research Safety Program Brown Bag  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PNNL's Nanoscale Research Safety Program Brown Bag Carbon nanotube research is a critical research capability at Pacifi c North- west National Laboratory (Digisource) Do you work...

212

Nanoscale Heat Transfer: from Computation to Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat transfer can differ distinctly at the nanoscale from that at the macroscale. Recent advancement in computational and experimental techniques has enabled a large number of interesting observations and understanding of heat transfer processes at the nanoscale. In this review, we will first discuss recent advances in computational and experimental methods used in nanoscale thermal transport studies, followed by reviews of novel thermal transport phenomena at the nanoscale observed in both computational and experimental studies, and discussion on current understanding of these novel phenomena. Our perspectives on challenges and opportunities on computational and experimental methods are also presented.

Luo, Tengfei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The NSCL is delivering on its mission providing Laboratory programs with scientific solutions through the use of nanoscale synthesis and characterization. While this annual report summarizes 2007 activities, we have focused on nanoporous materials, advanced high strength, nanostructured metals, novel 3-dimensional lithography and characterization at the nanoscale for the past 3 years. In these three years we have synthesized the first monolithic nanoporous metal foams with less than 10% relative density; we have produced ultrasmooth nanocrystalline diamond inertial confinement fusion capsules; we have synthesized 3-dimensional graded density structures from full density to 5% relative density using nanolithography; and we have established ultrasmall angle x-ray scattering as a non-destructive tool to determine the structure on the sub 300nm scale. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and to train personnel for Lab programs. The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory. Andrew Detor from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sutapa Ghosal from the University of California, Irvine, Xiang Ying Wang from Shanghai Institute of Technology, and Arne Wittstock from University of Bremen joined the NSCL this year. The NSCL is pursuing four science and technology themes: nanoporous materials, advanced nanocrystalline materials, novel three-dimensional nanofabrication technologies, and nondestructive characterization at the mesoscale. The NSCL is also pursuing building new facilities for science and technology such as nanorobotics and atomic layer deposition.

Hamza, A V

2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

214

Probabilistic neural computing with advanced nanoscale MOSFETs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of intrinsic nanoscale MOSFET noise for probabilistic computation is explored, using the continuous restricted Boltzmann machine (CRBM), a probabilistic neural model, as the exemplar architecture. The CRBM is modified by localising noise in its ... Keywords: Nanoscale MOSFET noise, Neuromorphic VLSI systems, Probabilistic computing

Nor Hisham Hamid; Tong Boon Tang; Alan F. Murray

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Wednesday, 29 August 2012 00:00 Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

216

A robot-based detector manipulator system for a hard x-ray nanoprobe instrument.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the design of a robot-based detector manipulator for microdiffraction applications with a hard X-ray nanoprobe instrument system being constructed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) for the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) being constructed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Applications for detectors weighing from 1.5 to 100 kg were discussed in three configurations.

Shu, D., Maser, J., Holt, M. , Winarski, R., Preissner, C.,Lai, B., Vogt, S., Stephenson, G.B.

2007-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

217

Argonne CNM News: Chiral Pinwheels Self-Assembled from C60 and Pentacene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chiral "Pinwheels" Self-Assembled from C60 and Pentacene Chiral "Pinwheels" Self-Assembled from C60 and Pentacene Chiral Pinwheels UHV STM image of C60-Pn in-plane chiral heterojunctions, overlaid with molecular models showing the orientation and the chirality (right-handed green, left-handed blue). Chiral Pinwheels Map Calculated map of the electron density changes due to the heterojunction showing electron transfer to the C60 in the center. In a recent study from the Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices and Theory & Modeling groups, C60 and pentacene (Pn) molecules, two workhorses of organic electronics and opto-electronics, are observed to self-assemble on a Cu(111) surface into in-plane "pinwheel"-shaped and chiral heterojunctions. Calculations confirm that the heterostructures are

218

Nanoscale design to enable the revolution in renewable energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The creation of a sustainable energy generation, storage, and distribution infrastructure represents a global grand challenge that requires massive transnational investments in the research and development of energy technologies that will provide the amount of energy needed on a sufficient scale and timeframe with minimal impact on the environment and have limited economic and societal disruption during implementation. In this opinion paper, we focus on an important set of solar, thermal, and electrochemical energy conversion, storage, and conservation technologies specifically related to recent and prospective advances in nanoscale science and technology that offer high potential in addressing the energy challenge. We approach this task from a two-fold perspective: analyzing the fundamental physicochemical principles and engineering aspects of these energy technologies and identifying unique opportunities enabled by nanoscale design of materials, processes, and systems in order to improve performance and reduce costs. Our principal goal is to establish a roadmap for research and development activities in nanoscale science and technology that would significantly advance and accelerate the implementation of renewable energy technologies. In all cases we make specific recommendations for research needs in the near-term (25 years), mid-term (510 years) and long-term (>10 years), as well as projecting a timeline for maturation of each technological solution.

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Nanoscale Strontium Titanate Photocatalysts for Overall Water Splitting  

SciTech Connect

SrTiO3 (STO) is a large band gap (3.2 eV) semiconductor that catalyzes the overall water splitting reaction under UV light irradiation in the presence of a NiO cocatalyst. As we show here, the reactivity persists in nanoscale particles of the material, although the process is less effective at the nanoscale. To reach these conclusions, Bulk STO, 30 5 nm STO, and 6.5 1 nm STO were synthesized by three different methods, their crystal structures verified with XRD and their morphology observed with HRTEM before and after NiO deposition. In connection with NiO, all samples split water into stoichiometric mixtures of H2 and O2, but the activity is decreasing from 28 ?mol H2 g1 h1 (bulk STO), to 19.4 ?mol H2 g1 h1 (30 nm STO), and 3.0 ?mol H2 g1 h1 (6.5 nm STO). The reasons for this decrease are an increase of the water oxidation overpotential for the smaller particles and reduced light absorption due to a quantum size effect. Overall, these findings establish the first nanoscale titanate photocatalyst for overall water splitting.

Townsend, Troy K.; Browning, Nigel D.; Osterloh, Frank

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

220

Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

Rajendra Bordia

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Nanoscale Structure and Modification of Biomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... et al, Adv Mater 20, 1488 (2008)[6]C Brown et al, Nanoscale 3, 3805 (2011)[7] C Brown et al, ACS Nano 6, 1961 (2012)[8]O Seddiki et al, in preparation.

222

Session 2: Nanoscale Multilayers II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 1, 2013... Institute; Javier LLorca, Polytechnic University of Madrid/IMDEA Materials Institute; Ignacio Martin-Bragado, IMDEA Materials Institute

223

Assembly of biological building blocks for nano- and micro-fabrication of materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental studies were performed to fabricate various material structures using genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage. This virus template showed superior controls of material syntheses from nanoscale to microscale. ...

Chiang, Chung-Yi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - >ES&H  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

default.aspx CNMS adheres to the DOE Policy on Nanoscale Materials, DOE Order 456.1 THE SAFE HANDLING OF UNBOUND ENGINEERED NANOPARTICLES, and ORNL requirements....

225

Argonne CNM: Publications 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

p 45415, 2003 Guslienko K. and Novosad V., "Comments on 'Scaling Approach to the Magnetic Phase Diagram of Nanosized Systems," Physical Review Letters (Comments), 91, p 139701,...

226

Argonne CNM: Publications 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Publications 6 Publications A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Alvine K., Pontoni D., Shpyrko O., Pershan P., Cookson D., Shin K., Russell T., Brunnbauer M., Stellacci F. and Gang O., "Solvent Mediated Assembly of Nanoparticles Confined in Mesoporous Alumina," Phys. Rev. B, 73, p 125412, 2006 Alvine K., Shpyrko O., Pershan P., Shin K. and Russell T., "Capillary Filing of Anodized Alumina Nanopore Arrays," Phys. Rev. Lett., 97, p 175503, 2006 Angadi M., Watanabe T., Bodapati A., Xiao X., Auciello O., Carlisle J., Eastman J., Schelling P. and Phillpot S., "Thermal Transport and Grain Boundary Conductance in Ultrananocry Stalline Diamond Thin Films," J. Appl. Phys., 99, p 114301, 2006

227

Argonne CNM: Publications 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Publications 9 Publications A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Adiga S. P., Jin C., Curtiss L. A., Monteiro-riviere N. A. and Narayan R. J., "Nanoporous Membranes for Medical and Biological Applications," Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology, 1, pp568-581, 2009 ( Link) Adiga V. P., Sumant A. V., Suresh S., Gudeman C., Auciello O., Carlisle J. A. and Carpick R. W."Temperature dependence of mechanical stiffness and dissipation in ultrananocrystalline diamond," Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications, [7318], (SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, USA), 2009 ( Link) Adiga V. P., Sumant A. V., Suresh S., Gudeman C., Auciello O., Carlisle J. A. and Carpick R. W., "Mechanical Stiffness and Dissipation in Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Microresonators," Phys. Rev. B, 79, p 245403, 2009 ( Link)

228

Argonne CNM: Publications 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Publications 1 Publications A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Antonio D. and Lopez O."Micromechanical Magnetometers Based on Clamped-clamped High-Q Nonlinear Resonators ,"IEEE Conf. Proc. Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (2011) (Link) Aschauer U. J. and Selloni A., "Structure of the Rutile TiO2(011) Surface in Aqueous Environment," Phys. Rev. Lett., 106, 166102-166105 (2011) (Link) Awuah S. G., Polreis J., Biradar V. and You Y., "Singlet Oxygen Generation by Novel NIR BODIPY Dyes," Org. Lett., 13, 3884-3887 (2011) (Link) Aytug T., Chen Z., Maroni V. A., Miller D. J., Cantoni C., Specht E. D., Kropf A. J., Zaluzec N., Zhang Y., Zuev Y. and Paranthaman M., "Nano-engineered Defect Structures in Ce- and Ho-doped Metal-organic Chemical Vapor Deposited YBa2Cu3O6+x Films: Correlation of Structure and Chemistry with Flux Pinning Performance," J. Appl. Phys., 109, 113923-113934 (2011) (Link)

229

Argonne CNM: Publications 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Publications 3 Publications A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A An C., Wang J., Liu J., Wang S. and Sun Y., "Hollow AgI:Ag Nanoframes as Solar Photocatalysts for Hydrogen Generation from Water Reduction," Chem Sus Chem, 6, 1931-1937 (2013) (Link) (Back to top B Bairu S. G., Mghanga E., Hasan J., Kola S., Rao V. J., Bhanuprakash K., Giribabu L., Wiederrecht G. P., Da Silva R., Rego L. G. and Ramakrishna G., "Ultrafast Interfacial Charge-Transfer Dynamics in a Donor-?-Acceptor Chromophore Sensitized TiO2 Nanocomposite," J. Phys. Chem. C, 117, 4824-4835 (2013) (Link) Balasubramanian S., Wang P., Schaller R. D., Rajh T. and Rozhkova E. A., "High-Performance Bioassisted Nanophotocatalyst for Hydrogen Production," Nano Letters, 13, 3365-3371 (2013) (Link)

230

Argonne CNM: Publications 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Publications 4 Publications A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z Publications for 2004 B Barber R., Ghantasala M., Divan R., Mancini D. and Harvey E., "An Investigation of SU-8 Resist Layer Adhesion in Deep X-Ray Lithography of High-Aspect-Ratio Structures," Proc. SPIE, 5276, pp85-91, 2004 Barnard A., "Shape and energetics of TiN nanoparticles," Journal of Computational and Theoretical Nanoscience, 1, pp334-339, 2004 Bhattacharjee S., Booske J., Kory C., Van Der Weide D., Limbach S., Gallagher S., Welter J., Lopez M., Gilgenbach R., Ives R., Read M., Divan R. and Mancini D., "Folded Waveguide Traveling Wave Tube Sources for THz Radiation," IEEE Transaction of Plasma Science, Special Issue on High Power Microwaves, 32, pp1002-1014, 2004

231

Argonne CNM: Publications 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Publications 2 Publications A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Ade P., Datesman A. M., Novosad V. and Yefremenko V. G."Performance and on-sky optical characterization of the SPTpol instrument," Proc. SPIE: Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VI, 8452 (84521F-1) (2012) (Link) Ade P., Datesman A. M., Novosad V. and Yefremenko V. G., "An Overview of the SPTpol Experiment," J. Low Temp. Phys., 167, 859-864 (2012) (Link) Ade P., Novosad V. and Yefremenko V. G."Detectors for the South Pole Telescope," Proc. 2nd Int. Conf. Technology and Instrumentation in Particle Physics,37 (1381-1388) (2012) (Link) Antonio D., Zanette D. and Lopez O., "Frequency Stabilization in Nonlinear Micromechanical Oscillators," Nature, 3, 806 (2012) (Link)

232

CNM - Proposal System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CN NM M - - P Pr ro op po os sa all S Sy ys st te em m P Pr ro op po os sa all P Po olliic cy y | F FA AQ Qs s | L Lo og go ou ut t | Your badge number appears on the back of your...

233

Argonne CNM: Publications 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A An C., Peng S. and Sun Y., "Facile Synthesis of Sunlight-Driven AgCl:Ag Plasmonic Nanophotocatalyst," Adv....

234

Argonne CNM: Seminar Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

molecule. December 10, 2013 3:00 p.m. Bldg. 440, A105-106 "Study of Molecules on Graphene by Low-Temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy," by Haigang Zhang, University of...

235

Argonne CNM: Publications 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R., Preissner C., Lai B., Vogt S., and Stephenson B., "A Robot-Based Detector Manipulator System for a Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe Instrument," Nucl. Instrum. Methods A, 582,...

236

Characterization of atomic layer deposited nanoscale structure on dense dielectric substrates by X-ray reflectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interfaces play a crucial role in determining the ultimate properties of nanoscale structures. However, the characterization of such structures is difficult, as the interface can no longer be defined as the separation between two materials. The high ... Keywords: ALD, Density, Dielectrics, XRR

Y. Travaly; J. Schuhmacher; A. Martin Hoyas; T. Abell; V. Sutcliffe; A. M. Jonas; M. Van Hove; K. Maex

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Nano-magnetic non-volatile CMOS circuits for nano-scale FPGAs (abstract only)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanotechnology promises to open up new ways of scaling CMOS circuits by introducing new materials. For example, a hybrid circuit of CMOS gates and carbon nano-tubes (CNT), NEMS relay logic and emerging memory devices have been proposed for future nano-scale ... Keywords: fpga, spin-torque devices, spintronics

Larkhoon Leem; James A. Weaver; Metha Jeeradit; James S. Harris

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The Properties of Confined Water and Fluid Flow at the Nanoscale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has been focused on the development of accurate computational tools to study fluids in confined, nanoscale geometries, and the application of these techniques to probe the structural and electronic properties of water confined between hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates, including the presence of simple ions at the interfaces. In particular, we have used a series of ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations and quantum Monte Carlo calculations to build an understanding of how hydrogen bonding and solvation are modified at the nanoscale. The properties of confined water affect a wide range of scientific and technological problems - including protein folding, cell-membrane flow, materials properties in confined media and nanofluidic devices.

Schwegler, E; Reed, J; Lau, E; Prendergast, D; Galli, G; Grossman, J C; Cicero, G

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

239

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Wednesday, 28 January 2009 00:00 The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

240

Seminar Announcement Nanoscale High Field Chemistry with the Atomic Force Microscope and Patterning January 15, 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEMINAR SEMINAR ANNOUNCMENT Thursday, January 15, 2009 11:00am - 12:00 noon EMSL Boardroom Nanoscale High Field Chemistry With the Atomic Force Microscope and Patterning Marco Rolandi Assistant Professor Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 Facile and affordable processes for the fabrication of nanostructures are fundamental to future endeavors in nanoscale science and engineering. The atomic force microscope was designed primarily for imaging, and has evolved into a versatile tool for nanoscale surface modification. We have developed an AFM based scheme capable of direct writing of glassy carbon nanowires as fast as 1 cm/s. In brief, when a bias is applied across the tip-sample gap a molecular precursor undergoes high field reactions that result in the deposition of a cross- linked product on the surface. In order to gain a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NANO AT HOME: An Experiment That You Can Try PLEASE NOTE: The Center for Nano-and Molecular Science and Technology (CNM) at The  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NANO AT HOME: An Experiment That You Can Try PLEASE NOTE: The Center for Nano- and Molecular for Nano: A Cubic Foot of Air The production of many nanoscale devices requires a very clean environment

Ben-Yakar, Adela

242

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

243

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

244

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

245

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

246

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

247

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

248

Nanoscale Center Dedication | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nanoscale Center Dedication Nanoscale Center Dedication Nanoscale Center Dedication May 6, 2005 - 12:44pm Addthis Remarks by Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Thank you, Bob [Rosner] for that introduction. And let me also thank you, along with [University of Chicago] President Randel, for the leadership you are showing here. Argonne has long been a world class institution. It will soar to new heights under your joint direction. I also want to acknowledge Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich. Thank you for being here. More than that, thank you for your strong backing of Argonne and its employees. Congresswoman Judy Biggert, who chairs the Science Subcommittee on Energy, is also a good friend to this lab, and we value her support as well. I took over as Secretary of Energy three months ago, and I have to say this

249

Nanoscale Center Dedication | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nanoscale Center Dedication Nanoscale Center Dedication Nanoscale Center Dedication May 6, 2005 - 12:44pm Addthis Remarks by Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Thank you, Bob [Rosner] for that introduction. And let me also thank you, along with [University of Chicago] President Randel, for the leadership you are showing here. Argonne has long been a world class institution. It will soar to new heights under your joint direction. I also want to acknowledge Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich. Thank you for being here. More than that, thank you for your strong backing of Argonne and its employees. Congresswoman Judy Biggert, who chairs the Science Subcommittee on Energy, is also a good friend to this lab, and we value her support as well. I took over as Secretary of Energy three months ago, and I have to say this

250

Carbon nanotube-based nanoscale ad hoc networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent developments in nanoscale electronics allow current wireless technologies to function in nanoscale environments. Especially due to their incredible electrical and electromagnetic properties, carbon nanotubes are promising physical phenomenon that ...

Baris Atakan; Ozgur B. Akan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NANO LAB ... to be determined with unprecedented spatial and energy resolution. ... Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology National Institute of ...

2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

252

CNST Co-sponsors Global Workshop on Nanoscale ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The other sponsors include the ASME, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE ...

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

253

NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under NYSTAR Contract # C020071 CENTER FOR NANOSCALE SYSTEMS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES #12;2 NSEC Annual Report 2007 ­ 2008 and Continuation Request for FY2008 Center for Nanoscale Systems in Information and Patents #12;1. PROJECT SUMMARY The Center for Nanoscale Systems (CNS) has assembled interdisciplinary

Gaeta, Alexander L.

254

NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NYSTAR Contract # C020071 CENTER FOR NANOSCALE SYSTEMS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES #12;Annual Report: 2005 - 2006 Center for Nanoscale Systems in Information Technologies Table of Contents 1. Project Annual Report 2005 ­ 2006 3 1. PROJECT SUMMARY The Center for Nanoscale Systems (CNS) has assembled

Gaeta, Alexander L.

255

Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2005  

SciTech Connect

The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The initial emphasis of the NSCL has been on development of scientific solutions in support of target fabrication for the NIF laser and other stockpile stewardship experimental platforms. Particular emphasis has been placed on the design and development of innovative new materials and structures for use in these targets. Projects range from the development of new high strength nanocrystalline alloys to graded density materials to high Z nanoporous structures. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and train personnel for Lab programs such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Defense and Nuclear Technologies (DNT), and Nonproliferation, Arms control and International security (NAI). The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory.

Hamza, A V; Lesuer, D R

2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

256

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials and methods are available as supplementary materials on Science Online. 16. W. Benz, A. G. W. Cameron, H. J. Melosh, Icarus 81, 113 (1989). 17. S. L. Thompson, H. S. Lauson, Technical Rep. SC-RR-710714, Sandia Nat. Labs (1972). 18. H. J. Melosh, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 42, 2079 (2007). 19. S. Ida, R. M. Canup, G. R. Stewart, Nature 389, 353 (1997). 20. E. Kokubo, J. Makino, S. Ida, Icarus 148, 419 (2000). 21. M. M. M. Meier, A. Reufer, W. Benz, R. Wieler, Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society LXXIV, abstr. 5039 (2011). 22. C. B. Agnor, R. M. Canup, H. F. Levison, Icarus 142, 219 (1999). 23. D. P. O'Brien, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Icarus 184, 39 (2006). 24. R. M. Canup, Science 307, 546 (2005). 25. J. J. Salmon, R. M. Canup, Lunar Planet. Sci. XLIII, 2540 (2012). Acknowledgments: SPH simulation data are contained in tables S2 to S5 of the supplementary materials. Financial support

257

Thermal Profiling of Nanoscale Circuitry  

Real-time atomic-resolution imaging of the nano-objects shows how they evolve at temperatures of up to 4,000K, how the atoms of the material shift, ...

258

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

259

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

260

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

262

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

263

Traceable nanoscale measurement at NML-SIRIM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of national metrology institute (NMI) has always been very crucial in national technology development. One of the key activities of the NMI is to provide traceable measurement in all parameters under the International System of Units (SI). Dimensional measurement where size and shape are two important features investigated, is one of the important area covered by NMIs. To support the national technology development, particularly in manufacturing sectors and emerging technology such nanotechnology, the National Metrology Laboratory, SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), has embarked on a project to equip Malaysia with state-of-the-art nanoscale measurement facility with the aims of providing traceability of measurement at nanoscale. This paper will look into some of the results from current activities at NML-SIRIM related to measurement at nanoscale particularly on application of atomic force microscope (AFM) and laser based sensor in dimensional measurement. Step height standards of different sizes were measured using AFM and laser-based sensors. These probes are integrated into a long-range nanoscale measuring machine traceable to the international definition of the meter thus ensuring their traceability. Consistency of results obtained by these two methods will be discussed and presented. Factors affecting their measurements as well as their related uncertainty of measurements will also be presented.

Dahlan, Ahmad M.; Abdul Hapip, A. I. [National Metrology Laboratory SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), Lot PT 4803, Bandar Baru Salak Tinggi, 43900 Sepang (Malaysia)

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

264

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

265

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - National Security - Nanoscale  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Engineering Nanoscale Engineering * Members * Contact * Publications * Overview * Nanospheres * Gel for Radioactive Decontamination * Advanced Radionuclide Sensor * Removal/Decontamination of Metal Substrates * Advanced Water Purification National Security Home National Security - Nanoscale Engineering Nanoscale Engineering Physical chemist Carol Mertz mixes a polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating for synthesized polymer nanospheres as polymer chemist Martha Finck examines a different PEG formulation. The coated nanospheres can be injected into humans following exposure to chemical, biological, or radiological toxins. The nanospheres selectively pick up these toxins and then are drawn out through a magnetic filtration system outside the body. Researchers in Nanoscale Engineering seek to bridge the gap between

266

Material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Li(Ni{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}Mn{sub 0.4})O{sub 2} was investigated to understand the effect of replacement of the cobalt by aluminum on the structural and electrochemical properties. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed, utilizing a novel in situ electrochemical cell, specifically designed for long-term X-ray experiments. The cell was cycled at a moderate rate through a typical Li-ion battery operating voltage range. (1.0-4.7 V) XAS measurements were performed at different states of charge (SOC) during cycling, at the Ni, Co, and the Mn edges, revealing details about the response of the cathode to Li insertion and extraction processes. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) region of the spectra revealed the changes of bond distance and coordination number of Ni, Co, and Mn absorbers as a function of the SOC of the material. The oxidation states of the transition metals in the system are Ni{sup 2+}, Co{sup 3+}, and Mn{sup 4+} in the as-made material (fully discharged), while during charging the Ni{sup 2+} is oxidized to Ni{sup 4+} through an intermediate stage of Ni{sup 3+}, Co{sup 3+} is oxidized toward Co{sup 4+}, and Mn was found to be electrochemically inactive and remained as Mn{sup 4+}. The EXAFS results during cycling show that the Ni-O changes the most, followed by Co-O, and Mn-O varies the least. These measurements on this cathode material confirmed that the material retains its symmetry and good structural short-range order leading to the superior cycling reported earlier.

Rumble, C.; Conry, T.E.; Doeff, Marca; Cairns, Elton J.; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Deb, Aniruddha

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

267

User Facilities for Industry 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Satellite!Workshop!10!-!User!Facilities!for!Industry!101! Satellite!Workshop!10!-!User!Facilities!for!Industry!101! Organizers:+Andreas+Roelofs+(CNM),+Jyotsana+Lal+(APS),+Katie+Carrado+Gregar+(CNM),+and+Susan+Strasser+ (APS)! ! In! order! to! increase! awareness! of! the! industrial! community! to! Argonne! National! Laboratory! user! facilities,!the!Advanced!Photon!Source!(APS),!the!Center!for!Nanoscale!Materials!(CNM)!and!the!Electron! Microscopy!Center!(EMC)!welcomed!industrial!scientists,!engineers!and!related!professionals!to!a!oneC day! workshop! to! learn! more! about! Argonne's! National! Laboratory! and! the! capabilities/techniques! available! for! their! use.! The! workshop! showcased! several! successful! industrial! user! experiments,! and! explained! the! different! ways! in! which! industrial! scientists! can! work! at! Argonne! or! with! Argonne!

268

Engineered Nano-scale Ceramic Supports for PEM Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Engineered Nano-scale Ceramic Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Eric L. Brosha, Anthony Burrell, Neil Henson, Jonathan Phillips, and Tommy Rockward Los Alamos National Laboratory Timothy Ward, Plamen Atanassov University of New Mexico Karren More Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fuel Cell Technologies Program Kick-off Meeting September 30 - October 1, 2009 Washington DC Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Fuel Cell Technologies Objectives  Develop a ceramic alternative to carbon material supports for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathode that exhibits an enhanced resistance to corrosion and Pt coalescence while preserving positive attributes of carbon such as

269

Los Alamos scientists detect and track single molecules with nanoscale  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanotube "glowsticks" transform surface science tool kit Nanotube "glowsticks" transform surface science tool kit Los Alamos scientists detect and track single molecules with nanoscale carbon cylinders Researchers have now shown that semiconducting carbon nanotubes have the potential to detect and track single molecules in water. January 10, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

270

NERSC Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanocontrol of CO2 Nanocontrol of CO2 Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Goals * Collect experimental 2D-3D imaging data in order to investigate fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions; * Provide algorithms for better understanding of processes governing fluid-fluid and fluid-rock systems, related to geologic sequestration of CO2; * Develop image processing methods for analyzing experimental data and comparing it to simulations; * Detect/reconstruct material interfaces, quantify contact angles, derive contact angle distribution, etc. Impact * Unveil knowledge required for developing technology to store CO2 safely in deep surface rock formations, thus reducing amount of CO2 in atmosphere; More Personnel * CRD: Wes Bethel, Dani Ushizima, Gunther Weber (SciDAC-e award)

271

Atomic Calligraphy: The Direct Writing of Nanoscale Structures using MEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) based method for the resist free patterning of nano-structures. Using a focused ion beam (FIB) to customize larger MEMS machines, we fabricate apertures as small as 50 nm on plates that can be moved with nanometer precision over an area greater than 20x20 {\\mu}m^2. Depositing thermally evaporated gold atoms though the apertures while moving the plate results in the deposition of nanoscale metal patterns. Adding a shutter only microns above the aperture, enables high speed control of not only where but also when atoms are deposited. Using a shutter, different sized apertures can be selectively opened and closed for nano-structure fabrication with features ranging from nano- to micrometers in scale. The ability to evaporate materials with high precision, and thereby fabricate circuits and structures in situ, enables new kinds of experiments based on the interactions of a small number of atoms and eventually even single atoms.

Matthias Imboden; Han Han; Jackson Chang; Flavio Pardo; Cristian A. Bolle; Evan Lowell; David J. Bishop

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Cold Welding Discovery at the Nanoscale - Materials Technology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 25, 2010 ... The discovery of these phenomena could be useful in development of high- density electronic devices, since heat-induced welds on the...

274

Nanoscale Metallic Foams, a New Class of Materials for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... absorb and annihilate point and line defects can provide a way to recover or control the ... From Modeling of Cationic Ordering and Phase Behavior of the High-voltage ... Ab Initio Studies of Hetero-junctions of TiO2 and Graphene Based 2D...

275

Plasticity and Strength of Nanostructured and Nanoscale Materials II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 15, 2010 ... Reaction Rate Theory Prediction of Dislocation Nucleation in Aluminum at Room Temperature: Linh Nguyen1; Derek Warner1; 1Cornell...

276

Plasticity and Strength of Nanostructured and Nanoscale Materials III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2010... Approach: Siu Sin Quek1; Rajeev Ahluwalia1; David Srolovitz2; 1Institute of High Performance Computing Singapore; 2Yeshiva University

277

The Nanoscale-Ordered Materials Diffractometer at SNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Samples previously measured with neutrons will not be accepted, even if released by SNS or your local radiation protection officer. 11-ID-B is dedicated to collection of...

278

Nanoscale fabrication and modification of selected battery materials  

SciTech Connect

Carbon is an integral part of many battery electrodes. We explored the use of semiconductor-processing techniques that involve photolithography to pattern photoresists and subsequent pyrolysis to form carbon microstructures that function as microelectrodes. In this study, we describe the status of the fabrication of carbon microelectrodes obtained by pyrolysis of photoresist. Electrochemical nanometer-scale patterning of the surface of a conducting lithium manganese oxide (LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}) by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) was studied. We show that a localized surface chemical change can be confined to a depth which depends on the oxide-tip voltage difference and ambient humidity The ability to produce nanometer-size patterns of chemically modified oxide or nanometer-sized alterations of the oxide morphology is demonstrated and discussed with reference to possible mechanisms.

Kostecki, Robert; Song, Xiang Yun; Kinoshita, Kim; McLarnon, Frank

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

279

Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

brightness of the third generation source combined with highThe new generation synchrotron radiation sources producingthird generation synchrotron radiation sources. In addition

Guo, J.-H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Novel Nanoscale Materials Reduce Electricity Needed for Sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sludge Digestion Dewatering (Centrifuge/ Belt Filter Press) Solids for Drying/Disposal Return Centrate. Finally, there will be a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions during shipment for disposal. Project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Project Name: Center for Nanoscale Energy Related Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some major accomplishments of the program are: (1) First crystal structures of Si{sub 6}H{sub 12}-related molecules; (2) PECVD of both a-Si and alloys (i.e., SiN and SiO{sub x}) using Si{sub 6}H{sub 12}; (3) Establishment of a system that couples a printing methodology with laser annealing; and (4) Developed schematics and electrical models for power-point tracking system and filed invention disclosure.

Douglas L. Schulz; Philip R. Boudjouk

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nanoscale Vise Puts the Squeeze on Ferroelectric Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 26, 2009... State University, Northwestern University, Motorola, Ames Laboratory, Intel Corporation, and Tricorn Tech contributed to this development.

283

Second harmonic nano-particles for femtosecond coherent control on the nanoscale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a complete toolkit for coherent control experiments on the nano-scale. By exploiting the second harmonic emission from single (150 nm) nonlinear nano-particles, we show that ultrafast femtosecond laser pulses can be compressed and controlled in time with unprecedented spatial accuracy. The method is tested on various nano-particles of different sizes, shapes and materials, both dielectric BaTiO3, Fe(IO3)3) and metallic (Au) thus demonstrating its robustness and versatility.

Accanto, Nicol; Piatkowski, Lukasz; Castro-Lopez, Marta; Pastorelli, Francesco; Brinks, Daan; van Hulst, Niek F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Pushing the Boundaries in Energy Technbology: Materials Design for Battery Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pushing the Boundaries in Energy Technology: Materials Design for Battery Applications" Pushing the Boundaries in Energy Technology: Materials Design for Battery Applications" Co-Organizers: Elena Shevchenko (CNM), Mitra Taheri (Drexel University), and Mali Balasubramanian (APS) Batteries are a key element for storing and supplying energy. Transformational battery technologies require tailoring novel materials and/or incorporating new chemical processes. Energy storage devices are intrinsically complex with the relevant materials processes covering time-scales from picoseconds to years and length-scales from angstroms to millimeters. Advanced x-ray and electron microscopy methods have opened a new window by which vital structural and electronic properties of battery materials can be obtained at the appropriate spatio- temporal scales using spectroscopic, scattering and imaging techniques under real world

285

Sol-gel processing of nanostructured inorganic scintillating materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of scintillating materials is believed to reach a new step by controlling their preparation on a nanometric level. Sol-Gel chemistry offers very unique tools for nanoscale mastering of the materials preparation. In particular, shaping ...

J. M. Nedelec

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Electric potential distribution in nanoscale electroosmosis: from molecules to continuum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

correlations in the electric double layer. 1. Counterionsand correlations in the electric double layer. 2 . SymmetricElectric potential distribution in nanoscale electroosmosis:

Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Chen, S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Method for Mass Production of Nanoscale Carbon Tips with Cylinder ...  

A method for fabricating nanoscale carbon tips with improved shape is described. The tips have excellent mechanical ... field emission at low applied electric fields.

288

Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cells housed on nanoscale metal disks, instead of the two-bit magnetic domains of standard magnetic memories. In magnetic vortices, parallel electron spins point either...

289

Mapping Nanoscale Variations in the Photoresponse of an ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for high-performance, next-generation solar cells. *The Origin of Nanoscale Variations in Photoresponse of an Organic Solar Cell, BH Hamadani, S ...

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

290

Nano-scale magnetic film formation by decompression of supercritical CO?/ferric acetylacetonate solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GROWTH OF NANO-SCALE MAGNETIC FILMS USING CO 2 RESS EX-113 GROWTH OF NANO-SCALE MAGNETIC FILMS USING A SUPERCRIT-of EDX analysis on nano-scale ?lms. . . . . . . . . . . 109

De Dea, Silvia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the development of light emitters and potential solar cells as well as on a new type of optical fiber which under NYSTAR Contract # C020071 CENTER FOR NANOSCALE SYSTEMS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES #12;NSEC Annual Report 2008 ­ 2009 and Continuation Request for FY2009 Center for Nanoscale Systems in Information

Gaeta, Alexander L.

292

NSF -Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the development of light emitters and potential solar cells as well as on a new type of optical fiber which under NYSTAR Contracts # C020071, C070106 CENTER FOR NANOSCALE SYSTEMS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES #12;NSEC Annual Report 2009 ­ 2010 and Continuation Request for FY2010 Center for Nanoscale Systems

Gaeta, Alexander L.

293

Method to determine thermal profiles of nanoscale circuitry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A platform that can measure the thermal profiles of devices with nanoscale resolution has been developed. The system measures the local temperature by using an array of nanoscale thermometers. This process can be observed in real time using a high resolution imagining technique such as electron microscopy. The platform can operate at extremely high temperatures.

Zettl, Alexander K; Begtrup, Gavi E

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Energy Bounds for Fault-Tolerant Nanoscale Designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of determining lower bounds for the energy cost of a given nanoscale design is addressed via a complexity theory-based approach. This paper provides a theoretical framework that is able to assess the trade-offs existing in nanoscale designs ...

Diana Marculescu

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A mesoscopic description of radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a formulation of the nanoscale radiative heat transfer (RHT) using concepts of mesoscopic physics. We introduce the analog of the Sharvin conductance using the quantum of thermal conductance. The formalism provides a convenient framework to analyse the physics of RHT at the nanoscale. Finally, we propose a RHT experiment in the regime of quantized conductance.

Svend-Age Biehs; Emmanuel Rousseau; Jean-Jacques Greffet

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

296

Volker Rose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dr. Volker Rose holds an advanced degree in physics (Dipl.-Phys.) and received a doctoral degree Dr. Volker Rose holds an advanced degree in physics (Dipl.-Phys.) and received a doctoral degree (Dr.rer.nat.) from RWTH Aachen, Germany in 2005. During this time he conducted research at Research Center Julich, the largest interdisciplinary research center in Europe. After a postdoctoral appointment at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), he joined the Microscopy Group at the Advanced Photon

297

PHOTOELECTROCHEMISTRY AND PHOTOCATALYSIS IN NANOSCALE INORGANIC CHEMICAL SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of our DOE-supported research has been to explore the use of solid state materials as organizing media for, and as active components of, artificial photosynthetic systems. In this work we strive to understand how photoinduced electron and energy transfer reactions occur in the solid state, and to elucidate design principles for using nanoscale inorganic materials in photochemical energy conversion schemes. A unifying theme in this project has been to move beyond the study of simple transient charge separation to integrated chemical systems that can effect permanent charge separation in the form of energy-rich chemicals. This project explored the use of zeolites as organizing media for electron donor-acceptor systems and artificial photosynthetic assemblies. Layer-by-layer synthetic methods were developed using lamellar semiconductors, and multi-step, visible light driven energy/electron transfer cascades were studied by transient specroscopic techniques. By combining molecular photosensitizers with lamellar semiconductors and intercalated catalyst particles, the first non-sacrificial systems for visible light driven hydrogen evolution were developed and studied. Oxygen evolving catalyst particles and semiconductor nanowires were also studied with the goal of achieving photocatalytic water splitting using visible light.

Thomas E. Mallouk

2007-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Materials Genome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antiferromagnetic Thickness Dependence of Blocking Temperature in Exchange ... Engineering of Nano-scale Superlattice of Glass and Polymer Using Pulsed...

299

Optical bistability in artificial composite nanoscale molecules: Towards all optical processing at the nanoscale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical response of artificial composite nanoscale molecules comprising a closely spaced noble metal nanoparticle and a semiconductor quantum dot have been studied theoretically. We consider a system composed of an Au particle and CdSe or CdSe/ZnSe quantum dot and predict optical bistability and hysteresis in its response, which suggests various applications, in particular, all-optical processing and optical memory.

A. V. Malyshev; V. A. Malyshev

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

2007 Synthesis and Self-assembly of Nanomaterials Workshop Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthesis and Self-assembly of Nanomaterials Synthesis and Self-assembly of Nanomaterials Co-Organizers: Xiao-Min Lin (CNM) and Moonsub Shim (UIUC) A combination of advanced synthesis and assembly of molecular and nanoscale building blocks is one of the most promising routes to new macroscopic hybrid materials with unique and complex functionalities. During the past decade, many molecular and nanoscale building blocks have been synthesized with different morphologies and compositions, including conjugated polymers, inorganic nanocrystals, nanowires and nanotubes. Despite the continued advances in various aspects, many challenges remain to be addressed at different stages en route to applications. This full day workshop, organized by Xiao-Min Lin (CNM) and Moonsub Shim (UIUC), focused on how to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nanoscale characterization of engineered cementitious composites (ECC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered cementitious composites (ECC) are ultra-ductile fiber-reinforced cementitious composites. The nanoscale chemical and mechanical properties of three ECC formulae (one standard formula, and two containing nanomaterial additives) were studied using nanoindentation, electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Nanoindentation results highlight the difference in modulus between bulk matrix ({approx} 30 GPa) and matrix/fiber interfacial transition zones as well as between matrix and unreacted fly ash ({approx} 20 GPa). The addition of carbon black or carbon nanotubes produced little variation in moduli when compared to standard M45-ECC. The indents were observed by electron microscopy; no trace of the carbon black particles could be found, but nanotubes, including nanotubes bridging cracks, were easily located in ultrafine cracks near PVA fibers. Elemental analysis failed to show a correlation between modulus and chemical composition, implying that factors such as porosity have more of an effect on mechanical properties than elemental composition.

Sakulich, Aaron Richard, E-mail: asakulic@umich.edu; Li, Victor C.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxides and their tailored structures are at the heart of electrochemical energy storage technologies and advances in understanding and controlling the dynamic behaviors in the complex oxides, particularly at the interfaces, during electrochemical processes will catalyze creative design concepts for new materials with enhanced and better-understood properties. Such knowledge is not accessible without new analytical tools. New innovative experimental techniques are needed for understanding the chemistry and structure of the bulk and interfaces, more importantly how they change with electrochemical processes in situ. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used extensively to study electrode materials ex situ and is one of the most powerful tools to obtain structural, morphological, and compositional information at nanometer scale by combining imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy, e.g., EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (EELS). Determining the composition/structure evolution upon electrochemical cycling at the bulk and interfaces can be addressed by new electron microscopy technique with which one can observe, at the nanometer scale and in situ, the dynamic phenomena in the electrode materials. In electrochemical systems, for instance in a lithium ion battery (LIB), materials operate under conditions that are far from equilibrium, so that the materials studied ex situ may not capture the processes that occur in situ in a working battery. In situ electrochemical operation in the ultra-high vacuum column of a TEM has been pursued by two major strategies. In one strategy, a 'nano-battery' can be fabricated from an all-solid-state thin film battery using a focused ion beam (FIB). The electrolyte is either polymer based or ceramic based without any liquid component. As shown in Fig. 1a, the interfaces between the active electrode material/electrolyte can be clearly observed with TEM imaging, in contrast to the composite electrodes/electrolyte interfaces in conventional lithium ion batteries, depicted in Fig.1b, where quantitative interface characterization is extremely difficult if not impossible. A second strategy involves organic electrolyte, though this approach more closely resembles the actual operation conditions of a LIB, the extreme volatility In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry by Ying Shirley Meng, Thomas McGilvray, Ming-Che Yang, Danijel Gostovic, Feng Wang, Dongli Zeng, Yimei Zhu, and Jason Graetz of the organic electrolytes present significant challenges for designing an in situ cell that is suitable for the vacuum environment of the TEM. Significant progress has been made in the past few years on the development of in situ electron microscopy for probing nanoscale electrochemistry. In 2008, Brazier et al. reported the first cross-section observation of an all solid-state lithium ion nano-battery by TEM. In this study the FIB was used to make a 'nano-battery,' from an all solid-state battery prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In situ TEM observations were not possible at that time due to several key challenges such as the lack of a suitable biasing sample holder and vacuum transfer of sample. In 2010, Yamamoto et al. successfully observed changes of electric potential in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery in situ with electron holography (EH). The 2D potential distribution resulting from movement of lithium ions near the positive-electrode/electrolyte interface was quantified. More recently Huang et al. and Wang et al. reported the in situ observations of the electrochemical lithiation of a single SnO{sub 2} nanowire electrode in two different in situ setups. In their approach, a vacuum compatible ionic liquid is used as the electrolyte, eliminating the need for complicated membrane sealing to prevent the evaporation of carbonate based organic electrolyte into the TEM column. One main limitation of this approach is that EELS spectral imaging is not possible due to the high plasmon signal of the ionic li

Graetz J.; Meng, Y.S.; McGilvray, T.; Yang, M.-C.; Gostovic, D.; Wang, F.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, Y.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Nanoscale structure and transport : from atoms to devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoscale structures present both unique physics and unique theoretical challenges. Atomic-scale simulations can find novel nanostructures with desirable properties, but the search can be difficult if the wide range of ...

Evans, Matthew Hiram

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Stable Storage of Helium in Nanoscale Platelets at Semicoherent Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

He implanted into metals precipitates into nanoscale bubbles that may later grow into voids, degrading the properties of engineering alloys. Using multiscale modeling, we show that a different class of He precipitates may ...

Kashinath, Abishek

305

A Probabilistic-Based Design Methodology for Nanoscale Computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As current silicon-based techniques fast approach their practicallimits, the investigation of nanoscale electronics, devices andsystem architectures becomes a central research priority. It is expectedthat nanoarchitectures will confront devices and interconnectionswith ...

R. Iris Bahar; Joseph Mundy; Jie Chen

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Design and implementation of nanoscale fiber mechanical testing apparatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid growth in the synthetic manufacturing industry demands higher resolution mechanical testing devices, capable of working with nanoscale fibers. A new device has been developed to perform single-axis tensile tests ...

Brayanov, Jordan, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Understanding Li-ion battery processes at the atomic to nano-scale.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing battery materials to nano-scale dimensions may improve battery performance while maintaining the use of low-cost materials. However, we need better characterization tools with atomic to nano-scale resolution in order to understand degradation mechanisms and the structural and mechanical changes that occur in these new materials during battery cycling. To meet this need, we have developed a micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS)-based platform for performing electrochemical measurements using volatile electrolytes inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM). This platform uses flip-chip assembly with special alignment features and multiple buried electrode configurations. In addition to this platform, we have developed an unsealed platform that permits in situ TEM electrochemistry using ionic liquid electrolytes. As a test of these platform concepts, we have assembled MnO{sub 2} nanowires on to the platform using dielectrophoresis and have examined their electrical and structural changes as a function of lithiation. These results reveal a large irreversible drop in electronic conductance and the creation of a high degree of lattice disorder following lithiation of the nanowires. From these initial results, we conclude that the future full development of in situ TEM characterization tools will enable important mechanistic understanding of Li-ion battery materials.

Zhan, Yongjie (Rice University, Houston, TX); Subramanian, Arunkumar; Hudak, Nicholas; Sullivan, John Patrick; Shaw, Michael J.; Huang, Jian Yu

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nanoscience Images from the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

DOE's Nanoscale Science Research Centers to support the synthesis, processing, fabrication, and analysis of materials at the nanoscale are also National User Facilities. The Center for Nanophase Materials Science is currently one of five ceterns for interdisciplinary research at the nanoscale. These centers are laboratories for nanofabrication, may have one-of-a-kind signature instruments, including nanopatterning tools and research-grade probe microscopes. The images produced by nanoscience research and the technologies involved are beautiful and unique. This website makes available a very small collection but very high quality, public domain images

309

Nanopower: Avoiding Electrolyte Failure in Nanoscale Lithium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... most of which is the battery itselfwhich ... widesolid-state lithium ion batteries to see just ... cathode material, electrolyte, and anode materials with ...

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

310

Nanoscale devices for solid state refrigeration and power generation, Twentieth Annual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief review of various techniques to engineer nanoscale thermal and electrical properties of materials is given. The main emphasis is on various energy conversion mechanisms, particularly, thermo electric refrigeration and power generation. Recent experimental and theoretical results on superlattice and quantum dot thermoelectrics and solidstate and vacuum thermionic thin film devices are reviewed. We also present an overview of the research activities at the multi university Thermionic Energy Conversion Center on the design of solid-state and vacuum devices that could convert heat into electricity with hot side temperatures ranging from 300 to 650C and with high conversion efficiency.

Ali Shakouri

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Argonne CNM: 2012 Colloquium Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Colloquium Series 2 Colloquium Series 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | Date Title Special Colloquium December 13, 2012 "Pathways to Complex Matter Far-Away-From Equilibrium: Developing Spatiotemporal Tools," by Gopal Shenoy, Argonne National Laboratory, hostged by Daniel Lopez Abstract: From the Big Bang to the coming of humankind, every manifestation of nature has exhibited processes far-away-from equilibrium leading to increasingly complex structural orders from geological to atomic length and time scales. Examples include the evolution of galaxies, hurricanes, stars, and planets; prebiotic reactions; cyclical reactions; photosynthesis; and life itself. The organizational spatiotemporal evolution in soft, hard, and biological matter also follows the same path. It begins from a far-from-equilibrium state and develops over time into organizations with length scales between atoms and small molecules on the one hand and mesoscopic matter on the other.

312

Argonne CNM: 2011 Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archive: 2011 Research Highlights Archive: 2011 Research Highlights Monitoring the Transformation of Silver Nanowires into Gold Nanotubes with in situ Transmission X-Ray Microscopy (December 2011) Batteries Get a Quick Charge with New Anode Technology (November 2011) Small Defects Mean Big Problems for Industrial Solar Cells (October 2011) Luminescent Solar Concentrators Improved by Microcavity Effects (September 2011) New Etching Technique: Sequential Infiltration Synthesis (August 2011) Bifunctional Plasmonic/Magnetic Nanoparticles (August 2011) Structural Consequences of Nanolithography (August 2011) Thinnest Nanofiltration Membrane to Date (July 2011) STM of individual grains in CVD-grown graphene (June 2011) New Inorganic Semiconductor Layers Hold Promise for Solar Energy (June 2011)

313

Argonne CNM: 2011 Colloquium Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Colloquium Series 1 Colloquium Series 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | Date Title December 21, 2011 "Film Thickness and Elastic Strain Measurements on Silicon-on-Insulator Thin Films," I. Cevdet Noyan, Columbia University, hosted by Jorg Maser Abstract: Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) composites consist of two semiconductor-grade silicon layers bonded to each other via a SiO2 interface. One of these silicon layers is quite thin; it is possible to get thicknesses between 5 and 150 nm. Since this value is much thinner than the extinction distance of X-rays in silicon for commonly used energies, this layer diffracts in the kinematical mode. The second layer is much thicker, around 700 micrometers, and diffracts in the dynamical mode. Both layers can be considered almost perfect, with negligible mosaic structures and no dislocations.

314

Argonne CNM: 2010 Colloquium Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Colloquium Series 0 Colloquium Series 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | Date Title November 10, 2010 "Anisotropic Semiconductor Nanocrystal Synthesis and Chemical and Biological Functionalization," Preston T. Snee, University of Illinois - Chicago, hosted by Richard Schaller Abstract: Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs, or quantum dots) are very bright chromophores that possess significant potential in alternative energy generation and for biological sensing and imaging applications. Our group has made significant advances in the synthesis of rods and multi-pods of near-infrared emitting PbSe NCs through a previously unobserved mechanism. Characterization of anisotropic PbSe NCs show that they have much more robust chemical properties compared to cubic or "dot"-shaped NCs.

315

Argonne CNM: 2004 Seminar Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nov. 10, 2004 "Electronic Transport in Molecule-Electrode Interfaces: Current Understanding and Open Questions," Vladimiro Mujica, Universidad Central de Venezuela, hosted by...

316

Argonne CNM: 2007 Colloquium Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of flexibility in photonic integration in all-optical circuits since with surface plasmons the problem of light manipulation can be reduced from three to two dimensions....

317

Argonne CNM: 2005 Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Highlights Mixed Metals not so Mixed Up at the Nano Level (November 2005) Diamond Nanotube Technology Promises New Electronics Products (September 2005) Argonne researchers...

318

Argonne CNM: 2006 Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

up Possibilities for Advanced Electronics (June 2006) New environmental chamber aids nano-studies of metal oxides (April 2006) New nano-finding points to new computer...

319

Argonne CNM: 2013 Seminar Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(i.e., multiferroicity). April 10, 2013 "Scanning probe characterization of energy nanomaterials and devices," by Liwei Chen, Suzhou Institute of Nanotech and Nanobionics,...

320

Argonne CNM: 2007 Seminar Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the Activity of MetalOxide and Catalyst Searching for Multistep Reactions using DFT Simulation," Tao Song, University of California San Diego, hosted by Jeffrey Greeley...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Argonne CNM: 2009 Seminar Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hosted by Matthew Pelton Abstract: The Ru-dye based champion dye-sensitized solar cell (11% efficiency) faces the challenge of gaining more photovoltage without enhancing...

322

Argonne CNM: 2012 Seminar Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2012 Joint CNMAPS Seminar "Unrippling and Imaging of Extra-Large Free-Standing Graphene with Atomic Precision," Woei Wu Larry Pai, National Taiwan University, hosted by...

323

Argonne CNM: Executive Committee Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Drexel University sjm95@drexel.edu 2011-2014 Matthew Grayson Matthew Grayson Electrical Engineenring & Computer Science Northwestern University mgrayson@eecs.northwest...

324

Argonne CNM: 2011 Users Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focused Ion Beam Lithography Introduction to Sputtering and PECVD Techniques Fundamentals of Pattern Transfer Fundamentals of Atomic Layer Deposition Poster Session Best...

325

Argonne CNM Newsletter: February 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lithography patterned the nanostructures. A collaborative team from the University of Puerto Rico, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Northwestern University,...

326

Argonne CNM: User Office Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Argonne's Chemistry Division, including Group Leader of Catalyst Design Group Carrie Clark, (STA) Coordinator, User & Outreach Programs Phone: 630.252.6952, Fax: 630.252.5739,...

327

Argonne CNM: 2011 Seminar Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

forms a hexamer - a six-member superamolecule - via attractive, cooperative, multicentral weak CHpi bondings between ethyne groups. STM and theoretical calculations help us to...

328

Argonne CNM Newsletter: October 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects get underway. We also extend our gratitude to all who responded to the recent query for survey responses and publication citations - this information is critical to...

329

Argonne CNM: 2008 Colloquium Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I will present experimental results from our transport measurements on amorphous indium oxide thin films that can be controllably tuned between the insulating and...

330

Argonne CNM: 2003 Seminar Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research in templated self assembly will be described along with efforts to develop advanced lithography techniques that achieve nanometer-level accuracy. June 6, 2003 "Metal...

331

Argonne CNM Newsletter: February 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reduce unplanned downtime at other points during the year. An organizational change at Argonne has been the creation of the Nanoscience and Technology Division, which now houses...

332

Argonne CNM: 2010 Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archives: 2010 Research Highlights Quantum Dot-Induced Transparency (December 2010) Molecular Stencils Bring New Possibilities for Solar Energy (November 2010) New equation could...

333

Argonne CNM: Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities Synthesis Synthesis of metal oxide, semiconducting, metallic, and magnetic nanoparticles Self-assembly of monodisperse nanoparticles into two- and three-dimensional crystals and binary superlattices Bioconjugation and biochemical techniques with a focus on the synthetic biology and recombinant DNA/protein techniques Peptide synthesis (CSBio CS136XT) Functionalization of nanocrystalline surfaces with biomolecules, such as DNA, peptides, proteins and antibodies, using biochemical, electrochemical, and photochemical techniques Equipment Centrifuges (Beckman Coulter Optima L-100 XP Ultracentrifuge and Avanti J-E Centrifuge) Biological safety cabinets [Labconco Purifier Delta Series (Class II, B2)] Glovebox (MBraun LabMaster 130)

334

Non-Equilibrium Nanoscale Self-Organization  

SciTech Connect

Self-organized one- and two-dimensional arrays of nanoscale surface features ("ripples" and "dots") sometimes form spontaneously on initially flat surfaces eroded by a directed ion beam in a process called "sputter patterning". Experiments on this sputter patterning process with focused and unfocused ion beams, combined with theoretical advances, have been responsible for a number of scientific advances. Particularly noteworthy are (i) the discovery of propagative, rather than dissipative, behavior under some ion erosion conditions, permitting a pattern to be fabricated at a large length scale and propagated over large distances while maintaining, or even sharpening, the sharpest features; (ii) the first demonstration of guided self-organization of sputter patterns, along with the observation that defect density is minimized when the spacing between boundaries is near an integer times the natural spatial period; and (iii) the discovery of metastability of smooth surfaces, which contradicts the nearly universally accepted linear stability theory that predicts that any surface is linearly unstable to sinusoidal perturbations of some wave vector.

Aziz, Michael J

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

335

Development of nano-scale and biomimetic surfaces for biomedical applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work described in this dissertation details the development of a biomimetic materials for use in sensors and therapeutics, based on new advances in material science. The sensors developed herein target neurodegenerative diseases. Two of the diseases, the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and Alzheimerâ??s disease (AD), are diseases associated with the abnormal folding of a protein, thus detecting the disease is dependent upon developing structure specific sensor technologies. Both sensors developed in this work take advantage of the unique optical properties associated with nanoscale metal particles, however they use different types of spectroscopies for optical detection of the presence of the disease associated abnormal protein, and different types of recognition elements that bring the disease associated proteins close to the nanoscale metal particles. In the case of TSEs, the recognition element was a commercially available antibody. In the case of AD, the recognition element was a molecular scale self-assembled surface. A therapeutic for AD was developed based on the molecular scale materials developed for the AD biosensor. Mathematical models were developed that facilitated the rational design of the biosensors described in this work that could also be used in future biosensor development.

Henry, James Edward

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Nanoscale Multilayers'13 - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... as irradation-resistant materials in nuclear engineering, tribological coatings, high performance capacitors for energy storage, integrated circuit interconnects,

337

Nanoscale Carbon in Metals for Energy Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Nanotechnology for Energy, Healthcare and Industry. Presentation Title...

338

Cobalt oxide hollow microspheres with micro- and nano-scale composite structure: Fabrication and electrochemical performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} hollow microspheres with micro- and nano-scale composite structure self-assembled by nanosheets were successfully fabricated by the template-free wet-chemical approach. This method is simple, facile and effective. The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} hollow microspheres with good purity and homogeneous size were well characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform IR (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP). The formation mechanism was deeply studied. The micro- and nano-scale composite structure constructed by the porous nanosheets promotes to improve the electrochemical properties of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} hollow microspheres. The high discharge capacity of 1048 mAh g{sup -1} indicates it to be the potential application in electrode materials of Li-ion battery. - Graphical Abstract: Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} hollow microspheres self-assembled by nanosheets are successfully fabricated by a template-free wet-chemical approach. The hollow microspheres are in good morphology purity and homogeneous size. Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} hollow microspheres constructed by porous nanosheets show the high discharge capacity of 1048 mAh g{sup -1}, indicating it to be the potential electrode material of Li-ion battery.

Tao Feifei [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaoxing University, Shaoxing 312000 (China); Gao Cuiling [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wen Zhenhai; Wang Qiang; Li Jinghong [Department of Chemistry, Qinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu Zheng, E-mail: zhengxu@netra.nju.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of thin films: sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy at buried interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

free interfaces due to chemical and environmental effects.Nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of thin2006 Nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of

Kweskin, S.J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Energy Bounds for Fault-Tolerant Nanoscale Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of determining lower bounds for the energy cost of a given nanoscale design is addressed via a complexity theory-based approach. This paper provides a theoretical framework that is able to assess the trade-offs existing in nanoscale designs between the amount of redundancy needed for a given level of resilience to errors and the associated energy cost. Circuit size, logic depth and error resilience are analyzed and brought together in a theoretical framework that can be seamlessly integrated with automated synthesis tools and can guide the design process of nanoscale systems comprised of failure prone devices. The impact of redundancy addition on the switching energy and its relationship with leakage energy is modeled in detail. Results show that 99% error resilience is possible for fault-tolerant designs, but at the expense of at least 40% more energy if individual gates fail independently with probability of 1%.

Marculescu, Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nano-scale positioning, control and motion planning in hard disk drives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Nano-scale Positioning, Control andABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION Nano-scale Positioning, Controlmm) height (mm) mini micro nano pico femto Figure 2.8:

Boettcher, Uwe

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nanoscale Carbon in Metals for Energy Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Porous Material Fabrication Using Ice Particles as a Pore Forming Agent Random-hole optical fiber sensors and their sensing applications Stabilization of...

343

Device Physics of Nanoscale Interdigitated Solar Cells (Poster)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoscale interdigitated solar cell device architectures are being investigated for organic and inorganic solar cell devices. Due to the inherent complexity of these device designs quantitative modeling is needed to understand the device physics. Theoretical concepts have been proposed that nanodomains of different phases may form in polycrystalline CIGS solar cells. These theories propose that the nanodomains may form complex 3D intertwined p-n networks that enhance device performance.Recent experimental evidence offers some support for the existence of nanodomains in CIGS thin films. This study utilizes CIGS solar cells to examine general and CIGS-specific concepts in nanoscale interdigitated solar cells.

Metzger, W.; Levi, D.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Toward in vivo nanoscale communication networks: utilizing an active network architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A safe and reliable in vivo nanoscale communication network will be of great benefit for medical diagnosis and monitoring as well as medical implant communication. This review article provides a brief introduction to nanoscale and molecular ... Keywords: active network, in vivo network, molecular communication, molecular motor, nanoscale network, neural coding

Stephen F. Bush

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Monte Carlo study of self-heating in nanoscale devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress in device miniaturization combined with the increase in integrated circuit packing density, as described by Moore's law, have been accompanied by an exponential increase in on-chip heat generation. In this context, there is an increasing demand ... Keywords: Electron transport, Electrothermal modeling, Monte Carlo, Nanoscale semiconductor devices, Nanowire MISFETs, Self-heating, Si/III-V heterostructure FETs, Thermal transport

Toufik Sadi; Robert W. Kelsall; Neil J. Pilgrim; Jean-Luc Thobel; Franois Dessenne

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Bioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale Zero-valent Iron Angela Athey Advisers: Dr. Reyes Undergraduate Student Fellowship Program April 15, 2011 #12;Main Sources of Uranium Natural · Leaching from(IV) (UO2[s], uraninite) Anthropogenic · Release of mill tailings during uranium mining - Mobilization

Cushing, Jim. M.

347

Nanoscale Advances in Catalysis and Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect

In this perspective, we present an overview of nanoscience applications in catalysis, energy conversion, and energy conservation technologies. We discuss how novel physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials can be applied and engineered to meet the advanced material requirements in the new generation of chemical and energy conversion devices. We highlight some of the latest advances in these nanotechnologies and provide an outlook at the major challenges for further developments.

Li, Yimin; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

348

Thermal and Non-thermal Physiochemical Processes in Nanoscale Films of Amorphous Solid Water  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous solid water (ASW) is a metastable form of water created by vapor deposition onto a cold substrate (typically less than 130 K). Since this unusual form of water only exists on earth in laboratories with highly specialized equipment, it is fair to ask why there is any interest in studying this esoteric material. Much of the scientific interest involves using ASW as a model system to explore the physical and reactive properties of liquid water and aqueous solutions. Other researchers are interested in ASW because it is believed to be the predominate form of water in the extreme cold temperatures found in many astrophysical and planetary environments. In addition, ASW is a convenient model system for studying the stability of metastable systems (glasses) and the properties of highly porous materials. A fundamental understanding of such properties has applications in a diverse range of disciplines including cryobiology, food science, pharmaceuticals, astrophysics and nuclear waste storage among others.There exist several excellent reviews on the properties of ASW and supercooled liquid water and a new comprehensive review is beyond the scope of this Account. Instead, we focus on our research over the past 15 years using molecular beams and surface science techniques to probe the thermal and non thermal properties of nanoscale films of ASW. We use molecular beams to precisely control the deposition conditions (flux, incident, energy, incident angle) to create compositionally-tailored, nanoscale films of ASW at low temperatures. To study the transport properties (viscosity, diffusivity), the amorphous films can be heated above their glass transition temperatures, Tg, at which time they transform into deeply supercooled liquids prior to crystallization. The advantage of this approach is that at temperatures near Tg the viscosity is approximately 15 orders of magnitude larger than a normal liquid, and therefore the crystallization kinetics are dramatically slowed, increasing the time available for experiments. For example, near Tg, on a typical laboratory time scale (e.g. {approx}1000 s), a water molecule moves less than a molecular distance. For this reason, nanoscale films help to probe the behavior and reactions of supercooled liquid at these low temperatures. ASW films can be used for investigating the non-thermal reactions relevant to radiolysis. In this account we will present a survey of our research on the thermal and non thermal properties of ASW using this approach.

Smith, R. Scott; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Kay, Bruce D.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

349

Nanoscale Switching Characteristics of Nearly Tetragonal BiFeO3 Thin Films  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the nanoscale switching properties of strain-engineered BiFeO3 thin films deposited on LaAlO3 substrates using a combination of scanning probe techniques. Polarized Raman spectral analysis indicates that the nearly tetragonal films have monoclinic (Cc) rather than P4mm tetragonal symmetry. Through local switching-spectroscopy measurements and piezoresponse force microscopy, we provide clear evidence of ferroelectric switching of the tetragonal phase, but the polarization direction, and therefore its switching, deviates strongly from the expected (001) tetragonal axis. We also demonstrate a large and reversible, electrically driven structural phase transition from the tetragonal to the rhombohedral polymorph in this material, which is promising for a plethora of applications.

Mazumdar, Dipanjan [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; Shelke, Vilas [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; Iliev, Milko [University of Houston, Houston; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kumar, Amit [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Gupta, Dr. Arunava [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Using Dynamic Quantum Clustering to Analyze Hierarchically Heterogeneous Samples on the Nanoscale  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic Quantum Clustering (DQC) is an unsupervised, high visual data mining technique. DQC was tested as an analysis method for X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) data from the Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) group. The TXM group images hierarchically heterogeneous materials with nanoscale resolution and large field of view. XANES data consists of energy spectra for each pixel of an image. It was determined that DQC successfully identifies structure in data of this type without prior knowledge of the components in the sample. Clusters and sub-clusters clearly reflected features of the spectra that identified chemical component, chemical environment, and density in the image. DQC can also be used in conjunction with the established data analysis technique, which does require knowledge of components present.

Hume, Allison; /Princeton U. /SLAC

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

351

Controlling magnetoelectric coupling by nanoscale phase transformation instrain engineered bismuth ferrite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials is promising for a wide range of applications, yet manipulating magnetic ordering by electric field proves elusive to obtain and difficult to control. In this paper, we explore the prospect of controlling magnetic ordering in misfit strained bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3, BFO) films, combining theoretical analysis, numerical simulations, and experimental characterizations. Electric field induced transformation from a tetragonal phase to a distorted rhombohedral one in strain engineered BFO films has been identified by thermodynamic analysis, and realized by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) experiment. By breaking the rotational symmetry of a tip-induced electric field as suggested by phase field simulation, the morphology of distorted rhombohedral variants has been delicately controlled and regulated. Such capabilities enable nanoscale control of magnetoelectric coupling in strain engineered BFO films that is difficult to achieve otherwise, as demonstrated by phase field simulations.

Liu, Y. Y. [University of Washington, Seattle; Vasudevan, Rama K [ORNL; Pan, K. [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; Xie, S. H. [University of Washington, Seattle; Liang, W. -I. [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Kumar, Amit [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Chen, Y. -C. [National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; Chu, Y.-H. [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Nagarajan, Valanoor [University of New South Wales; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Li, J. Y. [University of Washington, Seattle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hybrid Solar Cells with Prescribed Nanoscale Morphologies Based onHyperbranched Semiconductor Nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, the search to develop large-area solar cells at low cost has led to research on photovoltaic (PV) systems based on nanocomposites containing conjugated polymers. These composite films can be synthesized and processed at lower costs and with greater versatility than the solid state inorganic semiconductors that comprise today's solar cells. However, the best nanocomposite solar cells are based on a complex architecture, consisting of a fine blend of interpenetrating and percolating donor and acceptor materials. Cell performance is strongly dependent on blend morphology, and solution-based fabrication techniques often result in uncontrolled and irreproducible blends, whose composite morphologies are difficult to characterize accurately. Here we incorporate 3-dimensional hyper-branched colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals in solution-processed hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells, yielding reproducible and controlled nanoscale morphology.

Gur, Ilan; Fromer, Neil A.; Chen, Chih-Ping; Kanaras, AntoniosG.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2006-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

353

ST ATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS Nanoscale Science Research Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ST ST ATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS Nanoscale Science Research Center Class Waiver, W(C)-200S-001 The 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act, 15 U.S.c. §7501 et seq., (the "Nanotechnology Act"), signed into lawon December 3,2003, codifies programs and activities supported by the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) and provides for the establishment of a network of advanced technology user facilities and centers. An "advanced technology user facility" is defined as "a nanotechnology research development facility supported, in whole or in part, by Federal funds that is open to all United States researchers on a competitive, merit- reviewed basis." 15 U.S.c. § 7509(5). DOE has established five user facilities under the Nanotechnology Act, known as Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), which are funded by the

354

New Nanoscale Engineering Breakthrough Points to Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Patterning High-density Arrays of Nanospheres with Self Assembly Patterning High-density Arrays of Nanospheres with Self Assembly Cells Forming Blood Vessels Send Their Copper to the Edge A Molecular Cause for One Form of Deafness Water Theory is Watertight Nanowire Micronetworks from Carbon-Black Nanoparticles Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Nanoscale Engineering Breakthrough Points to Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles MARCH 7, 2007 Bookmark and Share Nenad Markovic and Vojislav Stamenkovic with the new three-chamber UHV system at Argonne. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have developed an advanced concept in nanoscale catalyst engineering - a

355

Electrical Transport Through a Single Nanoscale SemiconductorBranch Point  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Semiconductor tetrapods are three dimensional branched nanostructures, representing a new class of materials for electrical conduction. We employ the single electron transistor approach to investigate how charge carriers migrate through single nanoscale branch points of tetrapods. We find that carriers can delocalize across the branches or localize and hop between arms depending on their coupling strength. In addition, we demonstrate a new single-electron transistor operation scheme enabled by the multiple branched arms of a tetrapod: one arm can be used as a sensitive arm-gate to control the electrical transport through the whole system. Electrical transport through nanocrystals, molecules, nanowires and nanotubes display novel quantum phenomena. These can be studied using the single electron transistor approach to successively change the charge state by one, to reveal charging energies, electronic level spacings, and coupling between electronic, vibrational, and spin degrees of freedom. The advent of colloidal synthesis methods that produce branched nanostructures provides a new class of material which can act as conduits for electrical transport in hybrid organic-inorganic electrical devices such as light emitting diodes and solar cells. Already, the incorporation of branched nanostructures has yielded significant improvements in nanorod/polymer solar cells, where the specific pathways for charge migration can have a significant impact on device performance. Progress in this area requires an understanding of how electrons and holes migrate through individual branch points, for instance do charges delocalize across the branches or do they localize and hop between arms. Here we employ the single electron transistor approach to investigate the simplest three dimensional branched nanostructure, the semiconductor tetrapod, which consists of a pyramidal shaped zinc blende-structured ''core'' with four wurzite-structured arms projecting out at the tetrahedral angle. Monodisperse CdTe tetrapods with arms 8 nm in diameter and 150 nm in length were synthesized as previously reported. The tetrapods dispersed in toluene were deposited onto {approx}10 nm thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} dielectrics with alignment markers and a back gate (see Supporting Information). A tetrapod spontaneously orients with one arm pointing perpendicularly away from the substrate and three arms projecting down towards the surface. Individual 60 nm-thick Pd electrodes were placed by EBL onto each of the three arms downwards so that there are four terminals (three arms and a back gate) as shown schematically in Fig. 1 top inset. Figure 1 bottom inset shows a typical scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the devices. The center brighter spot is due to the fourth arm pointing up away from the substrate although its controlled breaking is possible. The separation between the metal electrodes and the tetrapod branch point ranges from 30 to 80 nm in our devices. The devices were loaded into a He{sup 4}-flow cryostat for low-temperature ({approx}5K) electrical measurements.

Cui, Yi; Banin, Uri; Bjork, Mikael T.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

356

Nano-Scale Nitride-Particle Strengthened High-Temperature Ferritic ...  

Nano-Scale Nitride-Particle Strengthened High-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels Produced by a Thermo-Mechanical Treatment Process Note: The technology ...

357

DOE Designated User Facilities Multiple Laboratories * ARM Climate Research Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designated User Facilities Designated User Facilities Multiple Laboratories * ARM Climate Research Facility Argonne National Laboratory * Advanced Photon Source (APS) * Electron Microscopy Center for Materials Research * Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) * Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) * Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) * Brookhaven National Laboratory * National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) * Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) * Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) * Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) * National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II ) (under construction) Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory * Fermilab Accelerator Complex Idaho National Laboratory * Advanced Test Reactor ** * Wireless National User Facility (WNUF)

358

Novel photonic phenomena in nanostructured material systems with applications and mid-range efficient insensitive wireless energy-transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A set of novel mechanisms for the manipulation of light in the nanoscale is provided. In the class of all-dielectric material systems, techniques for the suppression of radiative loss from incomplete-photonic-bandgap ...

Karalis, Aristeidis, 1978-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Real-time observation of lithium fibers growth inside a nanoscale lithium-ion battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real-time observation of lithium fibers growth inside a nanoscale lithium-ion battery Hessam August 2011; accepted 29 August 2011; published online 22 September 2011) Formation of lithium dendrite to observe the real-time nucleation and growth of the lithium fibers inside a nanoscale Li-ion battery. Our

Endres. William J.

360

Beyond biology: designing a new mechanism for self-replication and evolution at the nanoscale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As biology demonstrates, evolutionary algorithms are an extraordinarily powerful way to design complex nanoscale systems. While we can harness the biological apparatus for replicating and selecting DNA sequences to evolve enzymes and to some extent, ... Keywords: nanoscale systems, self-replication

Rebecca Schulman

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Guisinger-081612 - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guisinger-081612 Guisinger-081612 MATERIALS SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM SPEAKER: Dr. Nathan Guisinger Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory TITLE: "Current Trends in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy at Argonne National Laboratory"" DATE: Thursday,August 16, 2012 TIME: 11:00 am PLACE: Building 212 / A-157 ABSTRACT:Low-dimensional materials functioning at the nanoscale are a critical component for a variety of current and future technologies. From the optimization of light harvesting solar technologies to large-scale catalytic processes, key physical phenomena are occurring at the nanometer and atomic length-scales and predominately at interfaces. For instance, graphene is a nearly ideal two-dimensional conductor that is comprised of a single sheet of hexagonally packed carbon atoms. In order fully realize the

362

Nanoscale Science Research Centers | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nanoscale Science Research Centers Nanoscale Science Research Centers Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers Electron-Beam Microcharacterization Centers Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home User Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The five NSRCs are DOE's premier user centers for interdisciplinary research at the nanoscale, serving as the basis for a national program that encompasses new science, new tools, and new computing capabilities. Each center has particular expertise and capabilities in selected theme areas, such as synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials; catalysis; theory,

363

Monitoring charge storage processes in nanoscale oxides using electrochemical scanning probe microscopy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in electrochemical energy storage science require the development of new or the refinement of existing in situ probes that can be used to establish structure - activity relationships for technologically relevant materials. The drive to develop reversible, high capacity electrodes from nanoscale building blocks creates an additional requirement for high spatial resolution probes to yield information of local structural, compositional, and electronic property changes as a function of the storage state of a material. In this paper, we describe a method for deconstructing a lithium ion battery positive electrode into its basic constituents of ion insertion host particles and a carbon current collector. This model system is then probed in an electrochemical environment using a combination of atomic force microscopy and tunneling spectroscopy to correlate local activity with morphological and electronic configurational changes. Cubic spinel Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are grown on graphite surfaces using vacuum deposition methods. The structure and composition of these particles are determined using transmission electron microscopy and Auger microprobe analysis. The response of these particles to initial de-lithiation, along with subsequent electrochemical cycling, is tracked using scanning probe microscopy techniques in polar aprotic electrolytes (lithium hexafluorophosphate in ethylene carbonate:diethylcarbonate). The relationship between nanoparticle size and reversible ion insertion activity will be a specific focus of this paper.

Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Lu, Ping; Huang, Jian Yu

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Research Areas, Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science Department,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Studies of Nanoscale Structure and Structural Defects in Advanced Materials: The goal of this program is to study property sensitive structural defects in technologically-important materials such as superconductors, magnets, and other functional materials at nanoscale. Advanced quantitative electron microscopy techniques, such as coherent diffraction, atomic imaging, spectroscopy, and phase retrieval methods including electron holography are developed and employed to study material behaviors. Computer simulations and theoretical modeling are carried out to aid the interpretation of experimental data. Electron Spectroscopy Group's primary focus is on the electronic structure and dynamics of condensed matter systems. The group carries out studies on a range materials including strongly correlated systems and thin metallic films. A special emphasis is placed on studies of high-Tc superconductors and related materials.

365

ADVANCED HEAT EXCHANGERS USING TUNABLE NANOSCALE-MOLECULAR ASSEMBLY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam condensation heat transfer on smooth horizontal tubes and enhanced tubes (TURBO-CDI and TURBO-CSL) along with nanoscale hydrophobic coated tubes was studied experimentally. Hydrophobic coatings have been created through self-assembled mono layers (SAMs) on copper alloy (99.9% Cu, 0.1% P) surfaces to enhance steam condensation through dropwise condensation. In general, a SAM system with a long-chain, hydrophobic group is nano-resistant, meaning that such a system forms a protective hydrophobic layer with negligible heat transfer resistance but a much stronger bond. When compared to complete filmwise condensation, the SAM coating on a plain tube increased the condensation heat transfer rate by a factor of 3 for copper alloy surfaces, under vacuum pressure (33.86 kPa) and by a factor of about 8 times when operated at atmospheric pressure (101 kPa). Lifetime of maintaining dropwise condensation is greatly dependent on the processing conditions.

Kwang J. Kim; Thomas W. Bell; Srinivas Vemuri; Sailaja Govindaraju

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemical and Materials Science Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical and Materials Science Staff Chemical and Materials Science Staff The Chemical and Materials Science staff members at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory work within one of five groups: the Chemical and Nanoscale Science Group, the Theoretical Materials Science Group, the Materials Science Group, the Process Technology and Advanced Concepts Group, and the Fuel Cells Group. Access the staff members' background, areas of expertise, and contact information below. Jao van de Lagemaat Director Marisa Howe Project Specialist Chemical & Nanoscale Science Group Nicole Campos Administrative Professional Paul Ackerman Natalia Azarova Brian Bailey Matthew C. Beard Matt Bergren Raghu N. Bhattacharya Julio Villanueva Cab Rebecca Callahan Russ Cormier Ryan Crisp Alex Dixon Andrew J. Ferguson Arthur J. Frank

367

THERMAL HEAT TRANSPORT AT THE NANO-SCALE LEVEL AND ITS APPLICATION TO NANO-MACHINING.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nano-manufacturing is receiving significant attention in industry due to the ever-growing interest in nanotechnology in research institutions. It is hypothesized that single-step or direct-write nano-scale (more)

Wong, Basil T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals as nanoscale emissive probes in light emitting diodes and cell biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis employs colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) as nanoscale emissive probes to investigate the physics of light emitting diodes (LEDs), as well as to unveil properties of cells that conventional imaging ...

Huang, Hao, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Simulated nanoscale peeling process of monolayer graphene sheet: effect of edge structure and lifting position  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nanoscale peeling of the graphene sheet on the graphite surface is numerically studied by molecular mechanics simulation. For center-lifting case, the successive partial peelings of the graphene around the lifting center appear as discrete jumps ...

Naruo Sasaki; Hideaki Okamoto; Shingen Masuda; Kouji Miura; Noriaki Itamura

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Robert P. Winarski  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P. Winarski P. Winarski Physicist X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline X-ray Microscopy Group Phone: 630-252-9921 Fax: 630-252-5739 E-Mail: winarski@anl.gov Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 6043 Research summary: I am interested in developing a full-field and tomographic x-ray research program using the unique capabilities associated with the design of the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline (http://www.cnm.anl.gov/research/xray.html). Awards: R&D 100 Award for the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (2009). Selected Recent Publications: Martin Holt, Ross Harder, Robert Winarski, Volker Rose, Nanoscale Hard X-Ray Microscopy Methods for Materials Studies, Annual Review of Materials Research, Volume 43(1), (2013).

371

Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CINT SNL Center for Integrated Nanotechnology CNM ANL Center for Nanoscience Materials DOE U.S. Department of Energy DOT Department of Transportation EM Office of Environmental...

372

Microsoft Word - Final formatted Nano-Vol_II-Field_Reports.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Safety Plan CINT SNL Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies CIS SNL Chemical Inventory System CMS Chemical Management System CNM ANL Center for Nanoscience Materials CNMS...

373

Nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation fot nanoscale heat and mass transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation for heat and mass transport in nanoscale was proposed and solved. It was shown that for ultra-short laser pulses nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation is reduced to nonlinear d`Alembert equation. The implicit solution of the d`Alembert equation for ultrashort laser pulses was obtained Key words: nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation, d`Alembert equation, nanoscale transport

Janina Kozlowska; Miroslaw Kozlowski; Magdalena Pelc

2006-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science Department, Brookhaven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

People People Facilities Publications Presentations Organizational Chart Other Information Basic Energy Sciences Directorate BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? :: Next CMPMS Seminar There are no seminars scheduled at this time. Advanced Energy Materials Group We study both the microscopic and macroscopic properties of complex and nano-structured materials with a view to understanding and developing their application in different energy related technologies Group Leader: Qiang Li Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York 11973-5000 (631) 344-4490 qiangli@bnl.gov AEM group news: Current research topics include: Superconducting Materials Nano-scale Materials (S. Wong) Applied Superconductivity Thermoelectric Materials

375

Argonne CNM: X-Ray Microscopy Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Microscopy Facilities X-Ray Microscopy Facilities The Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) facility provides scanning fluorescence, scanning diffraction, and full-field transmission and tomographic imaging capabilities with a spatial resolution of 30 nm over a spectral range of 6-12 keV. Modes of Operation Full-Field Transmission Imaging and Nanotomography X-ray transmission imaging uses both the absorption and phase shift of the X-ray beam by the sample as contrast mechanisms. Absorption contrast is used to map the sample density. Elemental constituents can be located by using differential edge contrast in this mode. Phase contrast can be highly sensitive to edges and interfaces even when the X-ray absorption is weak. These contrast mechanisms are exploited to image samples rapidly in full-field transmission mode under various environmental conditions, or combined with nanotomography methods to study the three-dimensional structure of complex and amorphous nanomaterials with the HXN.

376

CNM Highlight: Quantum Dot-Induced Transparency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantum Dot-Induced Transparency Quantum Dot-Induced Transparency Using rigorous and realistic numerical simulations, staff in the Nanophotonics and Theory and Modeling groups have recently demonstrated that a single semiconductor nanocrystal, or quantum dot, can cancel the scattering and absorption by a much larger metal nanostructure. Placing a quantum dot near a metal is known to strongly modify the rate at which the dot emits light. If the interaction between the dot and the metal is strong enough, scattering and absorption by the metal can be nearly eliminated at the quantum-dot resonance frequency, according to the simulations. This occurs even though the dot by itself simply absorbs light, and even though this absorption is nearly 100,000 times smaller than absorption by the metal nanostructure.

377

Argonne CNM Highlight: Light Scattering by Nanoparticles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Scattering by Nanoparticles: Understanding Confinement of Light for Nanophotonics Applications through Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy Light Scattering by Nanoparticles: Understanding Confinement of Light for Nanophotonics Applications through Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy Schematic of the apertureless near-field optical microscope Schematic of the apertureless near-field optical microscope. The optical scattering from the AFM probe tip provides the subdiffraction-limited optical field information. One of the motivations of nanoscience is to achieve sufficient control over photon propagation in nanostructures so as to effectively replace the electron with the photon in all-optical integrated circuits. The much greater speed and bandwidth of light pulses versus electrons promise new capabilities and size reduction of photon based “electronics.” Arrays of metal nanoparticles are currently considered a leading candidate for photon

378

Argonne CNM: Nanofabrication and Devices Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PECVD System for CNT and Graphene Synthesis Dry Etching RIE Oxford PlasmaLab 100, Chlorine Chamber RIE Oxford PlasmaLab 100, Fluorine Chamber RIE March CS-1701, Chlorine...

379

Argonne CNM: Call for User Proposals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research program provides users with access to a broad range of capabilities for design, synthesis, characterization, and theory & modeling in order to significantly...

380

Argonne CNM: Theory and Modeling Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theory and Modeling Group Leader: Stephen Gray An exciting aspect of nanoscience is the close interplay between theory and experiment. In the Theory and Modeling Group, we focus on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Argonne CNM: Theory and Modeling Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theory and Modeling Staff To read a PDF biography, click name. To send a message, click on e-mail address. Stephen Gray, Group Leader Phone: 630.252.3594, Fax: 630.252.4646,...

382

Argonne CNM Highlight: Flexible Hydrogen Sensors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sheets reduces their overall weight and increases their mechanical flexibility and shock resistance. Flexible hydrogen sensors show a change of 75% in their resistance when...

383

Argonne CNM News: Developing Smarter STM Tips  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from IBM exploited nanofocused X-ray Bragg projection ptychography to determine the lattice strain profile in an epitaxial SiGe stressor layer of a silicon prototype device. The...

384

Argonne CNM News: Top 100 Chemists  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mentors help nurture a passion for science Mentors help nurture a passion for science Written by Tijana Rajh Remember the feeling when you entered a laboratory for the first time? You didn't know much beyond college books and everything you saw looked so interesting. Personally, I felt like a kid in a candy store. I wanted to do everything! So many questions raced through my mind. How do you choose what you want to work with? What is a good problem to work on? Do you even know what it is that you want from your science experience? This is why mentors are so important. They help you focus your thoughts and balance your priorities. They help you learn how to navigate the world of science, tussle with scientist rivalries, maneuver through science administrations and steer through the complexities of life.

385

Center for Nanoscale Materials Director Petford-Long chats with 'Science in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Experts Guide Media Contacts Social Media Photos Videos Fact Sheets, Brochures and Reports Summer Science Writing Internship Petford-Long (background, arms folded) looks on as a group of eighth-grade girls makes a trial run of their toy car - a car for which they built and installed a pulley transmission - during Argonne's 2012 "Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day." To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Petford-Long (background, arms folded) looks on as a group of eighth-grade girls makes a trial run of their toy car - a car for which they built and installed a pulley transmission - during Argonne's 2012 "Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day." To view a larger version of the image, click on it.

386

A Lensless X-ray Camera for Nanoscale Materials and Biological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel injectors for automobiles? Poxvirus Potency Uncovered in New Atomic Map Striking Nano Gold Oldest Known Magnet's Secrets Revealed Under High Pressures Shedding Light on...

387

Aerogels: A Green thermo?acoustic insulation material with nanoscale properties.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerogels are a well?known class of thermal insulation derived from nanoscience that has green benefits including translucence

James Satterwhite

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Next Generation Optical Fiber for IR Applications: Novel Materials and NanoScale Textures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fiberoptic reflective position sensor system inspired by the Omron system tested here to fit size, accuracy, and bandwidth needs. III. FIBEROPTIC POSITION SENSING Using fiberoptics to transport light to and from) as used with the Omron fiberoptic amplifier were used in the custom system. These PMMA (polymethyl

Van Stryland, Eric

389

Solid State Theory of Photovoltaic Materials: Nanoscale Grain Boundaries and Doping CIGS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We use modern first-principles electronic structure theory to investigate (1) why are grain boundaries in chalcopyrites passive; (2) can chalcopyrites be doped by transition metals, and; (3) can hot electrons and carrier multiplication be efficient in quantum-dot solar cells.

Zunger, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heat Transfer In Nanoscale Liquid Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of nano-scale flows typically utilize fixed lattice crystal interactions between the fluid and stationary wall molecules. This approach cannot properly model thermal interactions at the wall-fluid interface. In order to properly simulate the flow and heat transfer in nano-scale channels, an interactive thermal wall model is developed. Using this model, the Fouriers law of heat conduction is verified in a 3.24 nm height channel, where linear temperature profiles with constant thermal conductivity is obtained. The thermal conductivity is verified using the predictions of Green-Kubo theory. MD simulations at different wall wettability ( ??f /? ) and crystal bonding stiffness values (K) have shown temperature jumps at the liquid/solid interface, corresponding to the well known Kapitza resistance. Using systematic studies, the thermal resistance length at the interface is characterized as a function of the surface wettability, thermal oscillation frequency, wall temperature and thermal gradient. An empirical model for the thermal resistance length, which could be used as the jump-coefficient of a Navier boundary condition, is developed. Temperature distributions in the nano-channels are predicted using analytical solution of the continuum heat conduction equation subjected to the new temperature jump condition, and validated using the MD results. Momentum and heat transfer in shear driven nanochannel flows are also investigated. Work done by the viscous stresses heats the fluid, which is dissipated through the channel walls, maintained at isothermal conditions. Spatial variations in the fluid density, kinematic viscosity, shear- and energy dissipation rates are presented. The energy dissipation rate is almost a constant for ??f /? < 0.6, which results in parabolic temperature profiles in the domain with temperature jumps due to the Kapitza resistance at the liquid/solid interfaces. Using the energy dissipation rates predicted by MD simulations and the continuum energy equation subjected to the temperature jump boundary conditions developed in this study, the analytical solutions are obtained for the temperature profiles, which agree well with the MD results.

Kim, Bo Hung

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than Fe into the structure of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) has been shown to greatly enhance the magnetic properties of the particles, tailoring them to different commercial uses. However, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is often carried out at high temperatures with toxic solvents resulting in high environmental and energy costs. Additionally, these ferrite nanoparticles are not intrinsically biocompatible, and to make them suitable for insertion into the human body is a rather intricate task. A relatively unexplored resource for magnetic nanomaterial production is subsurface Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, as these microorganisms are capable of producing large quantities of nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at ambient temperatures. Metal-reducing bacteria live in environments deficient in oxygen and conserve energy for growth through the oxidation of hydrogen or organic electron donors, coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals such as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. This can result in the formation of magnetite via the extracellular reduction of amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides causing the release of soluble Fe(II) and resulting in complete recrystallization of the amorphous mineral into a new phase. Some previous studies have reported altering the composition of biogenic magnetite produced by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for industrial and environmental applications. However, research into the commercial exploitation of bacteria to form magnetic minerals has focused primarily on magnetotactic bacteria which form magnetosomal magnetite internally using very different pathways to those bacteria forming magnetite outside the cell. Magnetotactic bacteria live at the sediment-water interface and use internal nanomagnets to guide them to their preferred environmental niche using the Earth's magnetic field. Since magnetotactic bacteria generally grow optimally under carefully controlled microaerobic conditions, the culturing processes for these organisms are challenging and result in low yields of nanomagnetite. Despite these limitations, magnetotactic bacteria have bee

Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

392

Biological Materials Science Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Session 7: Cell-biomechanics and nano-scale phenomena ... G-4: Effects of Nitrogen Addition on Mechanical Properties of Hot-Forged Biomedical CoCr

393

NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.  

SciTech Connect

The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

SUGAMA,T.

2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

394

Pressure Driven Flow of Polymer Solutions in Nanoscale Slit Pores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polymer solutions subject to pressure driven flow and in nanoscale slit pores are systematically investigated using the dissipative particle dynamics approach. We investigated the effect of molecular weight, polymer concentration and flow rate on the profiles across the channel of the fluid and polymer velocities, polymers density, and the three components of the polymers radius of gyration. We found that the mean streaming fluid velocity decreases as the polymer molecular weight or/and polymer concentration is increased, and that the deviation of the velocity profile from the parabolic profile is accentuated with increase in polymer molecular weight or concentration. We also found that the distribution of polymers conformation is highly anisotropic and non-uniform across the channel. The polymer density profile is also found to be non-uniform, exhibiting a local minimum in the center-plane followed by two symmetric peaks. We found a migration of the polymer chains either from or towards the walls. For relatively long chains, as compared to the thickness of the slit, a migration towards the walls is observed. However, for relatively short chains, a migration away from the walls is observed.

J. A. Millan; W. Jiang; M. Laradji; Y. Wang

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

Materials Synthesis and Characterization | Center for Functional  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility materials synthesis The Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility includes laboratories for producing nanostructured materials and characterizing their basic structural, chemical and optical properties. The facility staff has significant experience in solution-phase chemistry of nanocrystal/nanowire materials, synthesis of polymer materials by a range of controlled polymerization techniques; inorganic synthesis by chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, and atomic layer deposition. The staff includes experts in techniques of nanoscale fabrication by self-assembly. The facility also supports infrastructure and expertise in solution-based processing of organic thin films, including tools for spin-casting, thermal processing, and UV/ozone treatment.

396

David Gosztola  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Gosztola David Gosztola Scientist Nanophotonics Group Phone: (630)252-3541 FAX: (630)252-4646 E-mail: gosztola@anl.gov Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials 9700 S. Cass Ave., Bldg. 440 Argonne, IL 60439-4806 Ph. D., Purdue University Research Summary: My current research involves the development of laser-based instrumentation for investigating the interaction of light with nano-scale materials. Current instruments include a near-field scanning optical microscope, a confocal Raman microscope, and an ultrafast transient absorption system. I also provide user support and training for most of the laser-based instruments at the CNM. Awards: * ANL Pacesetter Award (2011), Workshop on Applications of Raman Microscopy to Nanoscience

397

High-density thermoelectric power generation and nanoscale thermal metrology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoelectric power generation has been around for over 50 years but has seen very little large scale implementation due to the inherently low efficiencies and powers available from known materials. Recent material advances ...

Mayer, Peter (Peter Matthew), 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Revolutionizing Materials for Energy Storage - TMSI Initiative, PNNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a report published in a report published in Chemical Reviews, PNNL researchers say future batteries used by the energy grid to store power from the wind and the sun must be reliable, durable and safe, but affordability is key to wide- spread market deployment. Transformational Materials Science Initiative Revolutionizing Materials for Energy Storage The Transformational Materials Science Initiative at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is elucidating the principles of synthesizing and assembling functional nanostructures, understanding nanoscale-to-macroscale phenomena within materials of interest, and developing multi-scale computational models and unique characterization tools to understand essential phenomena in energy storage materials. Chief among PNNL's

399

TRADITIONAL METALLURGY, NANOTECHNOLOGIES AND STRUCTURAL MATERIALS: A SORBY AWARD LECTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional metallurgical processes are among the many ''old fashion'' practices that use nanoparticles to control the behavior of materials. Many of these practices were developed long before microscopy could resolve nanoscale features, yet the practitioners learned to manipulate and control microstructural elements that they could neither see nor identify. Furthermore, these early practitioners used that control to modify microstructures and develop desired material properties. Centuries old colored glass, ancient high strength steels and medieval organ pipes derived many of their desirable features through control of nanoparticles in their microstructures. Henry Sorby was among the first to recognize that the properties of rocks, minerals, metals and organic materials were controlled by microstructure. However, Mr. Sorby was accused of the folly of trying to study mountains with a microscope. Although he could not resolve nanoscale microstructural features, Mr. Sorby's observations revolutionized the study of materials. The importance of nanoscale microstructural elements should be emphasized, however, because the present foundation for structural materials was built by manipulating those features. That foundation currently supports several multibillion dollar industries but is not generally considered when the nanomaterials revolution is discussed. This lecture demonstrates that using nanotechnologies to control the behavior of metallic materials is almost as old as the practice of metallurgy and that many of the emergent nanomaterials technologists are walking along pathways previously paved by traditional metallurgists.

Louthan, M

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

400

Electromigration of Sintered Nanoscale Silver Films at Elevated ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials for Power Electronics, Power Conditioning, and Power Conversion ... Potential Ceramic Dielectrics for Air Force Applications.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Electronic Transport in Nanoscale Organic/Inorganic Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a way forward is hybrid electronics, which combines ... that influence the electrical properties and ... Electronic and structural material transformations at ...

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

402

In-Situ Studies of Nanoscale Transport and Alloying Phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon-Sulfur Nanocomposite Cathode Materials for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Carbonized Chicken Eggshell Membranes with 3D Architectures as...

403

Nanoscale X-Ray Imaging - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Study of Charge-Ordering in Manganites via Serial Femtosecond Crystallography XFEL Materials Imaging at the LCLS CXI Endstation...

404

Effects and Mechanisms of Mechanical Activation on Hydrogen Sorption/ Desorption of Nanoscale Lithium Nitrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate and develop novel, mechanically activated, nanoscale Li3N-based and LiBH4-based materials that are able to store and release {approx}10 wt% hydrogen at temperatures near 100 C with a plateau hydrogen pressure of less than 10 bar. Four (4) material systems have been investigated in the course of this project in order to achieve the project objective. These 4 systems are (i) LiNH2+LiH, (ii) LiNH2+MgH2, (iii) LiBH4, and (iv) LiBH4+MgH2. The key findings we have obtained from these 4 systems are summarized below. *The thermodynamic driving forces for LiNH2+LiH and LiBH4 systems are not adequate to enable H2 release at temperatures < 100 C. *Hydrogen release in the solid state for all of the four systems is controlled by diffusion, and thus is a slow process. *LiNH2+MgH2 and LiBH4+MgH2 systems, although possessing proper thermodynamic driving forces to allow for H2 release at temperatures < 100 C, have sluggish reaction kinetics because of their diffusion-controlled rate-limiting steps. *Reducing particles to the nanometer length scale (< 50 nm) can improve the thermodynamic driving force to enable H2 release at near ambient temperature, while simultaneously enhancing the reaction kinetics as well as changing the diffusion-controlled rate-limiting step to gas desorption-controlled rate-limiting step. This phenomenon has been demonstrated with LiBH4 and offers the hope that further work along this direction will make one of the material systems, i.e., LiBH4, LiBH4+MgH2 and LiNH2+MgH2, possess the desired thermodynamic properties and rapid H2 uptake/release kinetics for on-board applications. Many of the findings and knowledge gained from this project have been published in archival refereed journal articles [1-15] and are accessible by general public. Thus, to avoid a bulky final report, the key findings and knowledge gained from this project will be succinctly summarized, particularly for those findings and knowledge available in the public domain. However, for those findings and knowledge that have not been published yet, more detailed information will be provided. The report will be divided into 4 major sections based on the material systems investigated.

Shaw, Leon, L.; Yang, Gary, Z.; Crosby, Kyle; Wwan, Xufei. Zhong, Yang; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Osborn, William; Hu, Jianzhi; Kwak, Ja Hun

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

405

Spin Coherence at the Nanoscale: Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces  

SciTech Connect

Breakthrough results were achieved during the reporting period in the areas of organic spintronics. (A) For the first time the giant magnetic resistance (GMR) was observed in spin valve with an organic spacer. Thus we demonstrated the ability of organic semiconductors to transport spin in GMR devices using rubrene as a prototype for organic semiconductors. (B) We discovered the electrical bistability and spin valve effect in a ferromagnet /organic semiconductor/ ferromagnet heterojunction. The mechanism of switching between conducting phases and its potential applications were suggested. (C) The ability of V(TCNE)x to inject spin into organic semiconductors such as rubrene was demonstrated for the first time. The mechanisms of spin injection and transport from and into organic magnets as well through organic semiconductors were elucidated. (D) In collaboration with the group of OSU Prof. Johnston-Halperin we reported the successful extraction of spin polarized current from a thin film of the organic-based room temperature ferrimagnetic semiconductor V[TCNE]x and its subsequent injection into a GaAs/AlGaAs light-emitting diode (LED). Thus all basic steps for fabrication of room temperature, light weight, flexible all organic spintronic devices were successfully performed. (E) A new synthesis/processing route for preparation of V(TCNE)x enabling control of interface and film thicknesses at the nanoscale was developed at OSU. Preliminary results show these films are higher quality and what is extremely important they are substantially more air stable than earlier prepared V(TCNE)x. In sum the breakthrough results we achieved in the past two years form the basis of a promising new technology, Multifunctional Flexible Organic-based Spintronics (MFOBS). MFOBS technology enables us fabrication of full function flexible spintronic devices that operate at room temperature.

Epstein, Arthur J. [Professor

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

406

Recovery Act Provides Big Boost with a Nanoscale Focus | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Provides Big Boost with a Nanoscale Focus Provides Big Boost with a Nanoscale Focus Recovery Act Provides Big Boost with a Nanoscale Focus October 14, 2010 - 9:46am Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? The Center for Functional Nanomaterials is getting a new electron microscope that will be valuable for solar cell research -- one of 7 ARRA-funded additions at the Brookhaven National Laboratory facility. Editor's note: cross posted from the Brookhaven National Laboratory The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is receiving more than $5 million in new equipment and upgrades funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The new acquisitions will fill gaps in the current facility to meet the needs of

407

Recovery Act Provides Big Boost with a Nanoscale Focus | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

studying bio- and soft materials such as polymers, which are valuable in electronic and photovoltaic - solar cell - research. Stach said he's glad that the need for routine...

408

Nanoscale Tantalum Oxide Based Catalysts for PEM Fuel Cell ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Addressing Materials Processing Issues for USC Steam Turbines: Cast Versions of ... Co-Production of Pure Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal Syngas via the...

409

Atomic Scale Imaging of Nanoscale Structures with Elemental ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for these materials, careful measurement of the position and identity of the various constituent atoms becomes essential. ... mml. Facilities/Tools Used: ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

410

Device Physics of Nanoscale Interdigitated Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper uses multidimensional device simulation to explore the physics and solar cell performance of interdigitated p-n junctions for material parameters relevant to the postulated conditions.

Metzger, W. K.; Levi, D.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Andreas Roelofs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Andreas Roelofs is the Deputy Division Director of Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Andreas Roelofs is the Deputy Division Director of Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), a Department of Energy national user facility. He holds a Diploma in physics from the University of Cologne and received his PhD in physics in 2004 from the RWTH Aachen in Germany. Dr. Roelofs' thesis work was on the investigation of scaling effects of ferroelectric thin films and nanoparticles for FeRAM applications. During this time, he was strongly involved in the improvement of piezo-response force microscopy (PFM). In 2003, Dr. Roelofs accepted an assignment as research staff member at Seagate Research in Pittsburgh, PA. During his last year at Seagate, Dr. Roelofs led the probe recording team. During his time at Seagate, his work was focused on developing MEMS-based storage devices

412

Bhattacharya-102512 - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bhattacharya-102512 Bhattacharya-102512 MATERIALS SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM SPEAKER: Anand Bhattacharya Materials Science Division and Center for Nanoscale Materials Argonne National Laboratory TITLE: "Digital Synthesis: A Pathway to New Materials in the Complex Oxides " DATE: Thursday, October 25, 2012 TIME: 11:00 a.m. PLACE: Building 200 / Auditorium Refreshments will be served at 10:45 a.m. ABSTRACT: The complex oxides have set the stage for some of the most striking phenomena in condensed matter, including high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance. These collective properties emerge as a result of strong correlations between the various degrees of freedom within these materials. In recent years, it has become possible to create artificial structures where complex oxides with diverse

413

Materials Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Science. Summary: ... Description: Group focus in materials science (inkjet metrology, micro-macro, advanced characterizations). ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

414

Probing extraordinary nanoscale energy transfer using bimaterial microcantilevers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanostructured materials have recently drawn a great deal of attention in the field of energy research such as for solar photovoltaic, thermophotovoltaic and thermoelectric applications. The energy transport properties of ...

Shen, Sheng, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Analyzing Combined Impacts of Parameter Variations and BTI in Nano-scale Logical Gates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing Combined Impacts of Parameter Variations and BTI in Nano-scale Logical Gates Seyab Khan conclusions. 2 Background and Analysis Framework Fig. 1(a) shows the threshold voltage increment (Vth) due variation, delay model, and presents the analysis framework. First MEDIAN Workshop 2012 7 #12;2 Seyab Khan

Hamdioui, Said

416

Micro-and nanoscale domain engineering in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro- and nanoscale domain engineering in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate Vladimir Ya. Shur investigation of the domain evolution in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate during backswitched electric sources based on quasi-phase matching.11 Lithium niobate LiNbO3 (LN) and lithium tantalate LiTaO3 (LT

Byer, Robert L.

417

NANO-SCALE VISUALIZATION OF LIQUID INTERFACES DURING COALESCENCE AND RAPTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NANO-SCALE VISUALIZATION OF LIQUID INTERFACES DURING COALESCENCE AND RAPTURE Experiments by Jacob viscosity and interfacial tension) and experimental conditions (shear rate or approach velocity), and nano such as fingering and cavitation, both occurring at the nano- or submicron-scales. The two figures below ­ the first

Akhmedov, Azer

418

Structural Materials for Fission and Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

Structural materials represent the key for containment of nuclear fuel and fission products as well as reliable and thermodynamically efficient production of electrical energy from nuclear reactors. Similarly, high-performance structural materials will be critical for the future success of proposed fusion energy reactors, which will subject the structures to unprecedented fluxes of high-energy neutrons along with intense thermomechanical stresses. Advanced materials can enable improved reactor performance via increased safety margins and design flexibility, in particular by providing increased strength, thermal creep resistance and superior corrosion and neutron radiation damage resistance. In many cases, a key strategy for designing highperformance radiation-resistant materials is based on the introduction of a high, uniform density of nanoscale particles that simultaneously provide good high temperature strength and neutron radiation damage resistance.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact December 14, 2010 - 12:35pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs This past Thursday, Secretary Chu delivered remarks to the Nanotechnology Innovation Summit in National Harbor, Maryland on how breakthroughs in nanotechnology are poised to transform the energy landscape. According to the National Nanotechnology Initiative, "Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. Encompassing nanoscale science, engineering, and technology, nanotechnology involves imaging, measuring, modeling, and manipulating matter at this

420

Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact December 14, 2010 - 12:35pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs This past Thursday, Secretary Chu delivered remarks to the Nanotechnology Innovation Summit in National Harbor, Maryland on how breakthroughs in nanotechnology are poised to transform the energy landscape. According to the National Nanotechnology Initiative, "Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. Encompassing nanoscale science, engineering, and technology, nanotechnology involves imaging, measuring, modeling, and manipulating matter at this

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Tailoring the plateau burning rates of composite propellants by the use of nanoscale additives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composite propellants are composed of a solid oxidizer that is mixed into a hydrocarbon binder that when polymerized results in a solid mass capable of self-sustained combustion after ignition. Plateau propellants exhibit burning rate curves that do not follow the typical linear relationship between burning rate and pressure when plotted on a log-log scale, and because of this deviation their burning behavior is classified as anomalous burning. It is not unusual for solid-particle additives to be added to propellants in order to enhance burning rate or other properties. However, the effect of nano-size solid additives in these propellants is not fully understood or agreed upon within the research community. The current project set out to explore what possible variables were creating this result and to explore new additives. This thesis contains a literature review chronicling the last half-century of research to better understand the mechanisms that govern anomalous burning and to shed light on current research into plateau and related propellants. In addition to the review, a series of experiments investigating the use of nanoscale TiO2-based additives in AP-HTPB composite propellants was performed. The baseline propellant consisted of either 70% or 80% monomodal AP (223 ?m) and 30% or 20% binder composed of IPDI-cured HTPB with Tepanol. Propellants burning rates were tested using a strand bomb between 500 and 2500 psi (34.0-170.1 atm). Analysis of the burning rate data shows that the crystal phase and synthesis method of the TiO2 additive are influential to plateau tailoring and to the apparent effectiveness of the additive in altering the burning rate of the composite propellant. Some of the discrepancy in the literature regarding the effectiveness of TiO2 as a tailoring additive may be due to differences in how the additive was produced. Doping the TiO2 with small amounts of metallic elements (Al, Fe, or Gd) showed additional effects on the burning rate that depend on the doping material and the amount of the dopant.

Stephens, Matthew Aaron

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

TAILORING THE PLATEAU BURNING RATES OF COMPOSITE PROPELLANTS BY THE USE OF NANOSCALE ADDITIVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composite propellants are composed of a solid oxidizer that is mixed into a hydrocarbon binder that when polymerized results in a solid mass capable of selfsustained combustion after ignition. Plateau propellants exhibit burning rate curves that do not follow the typical linear relationship between burning rate and pressure when plotted on a log-log scale, and because of this deviation their burning behavior is classified as anomalous burning. It is not unusual for solid-particle additives to be added to propellants in order to enhance burning rate or other properties. However, the effect of nano-size solid additives in these propellants is not fully understood or agreed upon within the research community. The current project set out to explore what possible variables were creating this result and to explore new additives. This thesis contains a literature review chronicling the last half-century of research to better understand the mechanisms that govern anomalous burning and to shed light on current research into plateau and related propellants. In addition to the review, a series of experiments investigating the use of nanoscale TiO2-based additives in AP-HTPB composite propellants was performed. The baseline propellant consisted of either 70% or 80% monomodal AP (223 ?m) and 30% or 20% binder composed of IPDI-cured HTPB with Tepanol. Propellants burning rates were tested using a strand bomb between 500 and 2500 psi (34.0-170.1 atm). Analysis of the burning rate data shows that the crystal phase and synthesis method of the TiO2 additive are influential to plateau tailoring and to the apparent effectiveness of the additive in altering the burning rate of the composite propellant. Some of the discrepancy in the literature regarding the effectiveness of TiO2 as a tailoring additive may be due to differences in how the additive was produced. Doping the TiO2 with small amounts of metallic elements (Al, Fe, or Gd) showed additional effects on the burning rate that depend on the doping material and the amount of the dopant.

Stephens, Matthew

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Availability Technology Express Licensing Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And...

424

Characterization of particulate matter deposited in diesel particulate filters: Visual and analytical approach in macro-, micro- and nano-scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-scale analytical investigations of particulate matter (soot and ash) of two loaded diesel particulate filters (DPF) from (a) a truck (DPF1) and (b) a passenger car (DPF2) reveal the following: in DPF1 (without fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 130-270 {mu}m thick, homogeneous porous cake with pronounced orientation. Soot aggregates consist of 15-30 nm large individual particles exhibiting relatively mature internal nanostructures, however, far from being graphite. Ash aggregates largely accumulate at the outlet part of DPF1, while minor amounts are deposited directly on the channel walls all along the filter length. They consist of crystalline phases with individual particles of sizes down to the nanoscale range. Chemically, the ash consists mainly of Mg, S, Ca, Zn and P, elements encountered in lubricating oil additives. In the passenger car DPF2 (with fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 200-500 {mu}m thick, inhomogeneous porous cake consisting of several superposed layers corresponding to different soot generations. The largest part of the soot cake is composed of unburned, oriented soot aggregates left behind despite repeated regenerations, while a small part constitutes a loose layer with randomly oriented aggregates, which was deposited last and has not seen any regeneration. Fe-oxide particles of micro- to nano-scale sizes, originating from the fuel-borne additive, are often dispersed within the part of the soot cake composed of the unburned soot leftovers. The individual soot nanoparticles in DPF2 are approximately 15-40 nm large and generally less mature than in the truck DPF1. The presence of soot leftovers in DPF2 indicates that the addition of fuel-borne material does not fully compensate for the temperatures needed for complete soot removal. Ash in DPF2 is filling up more than half of the filter volume (at the downstream part) and is dominated by Fe-oxide aggregates, due to the Fe-based fuel-borne additive, but otherwise its chemical composition reflects compounds of lubricating oil additives. (author)

Liati, Anthi; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Panayotis [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for I.C. Engines, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Measurement of quasi-ballistic heat transport across nanoscale interfaces using ultrafast coherent soft x-ray beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mean free path, the thermal energy phonon carriers traveli.e. non-diffusive) thermal energy distribution [13, 14] (to the transport of thermal energy from a nanoscale heat

Siemens, M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Investigation of aspect ratio of hole drilling from micro to nanoscale via focused ion beam fine milling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Holes with different sizes from microscale to nanoscale were directly fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) milling in this paper. Maximum aspect ratio of the fabricated holes can be 5:1 for the hole with large size with ...

Fu, Yongqi

427

Learning at the nanoscale: research questions that the rapidly evolving interdisciplinarity of science poses for the learning sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent interdisciplinary discoveries in the sciences and engineering at the nanoscale, specifically in our ability to manipulate, molecules at atomic scales, suggests a need for the education community to reconsider the ways in which disciplinary-based ...

Sherry Hsi; Nora Sabelli; Joseph Krajcik; Robert Tinker; Kirsten Ellenbogen

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Materials Characterization | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization Nuclear Forensics Scanning Probes Related Research Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials Home | Science &...

429

Uncovering Secrets of the Strength of Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uncovering Secrets of the Strength of Materials Uncovering Secrets of the Strength of Materials The application of intense submicron-sized x-ray beams at the XOR/UNI beamlines 33-BM and 34-ID at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has made possible the discovery that deformed metals have large, variable internal stresses in opposing directions on very short (submicron or nanoscale) length scales. This result has profound implications for understanding the mechanical strength and behavior of metals. The presence of such counterbalanced stresses within microscopic volumes (or cells) in deformed materials was predicted more than two decades ago and has been inferred from numerous indirect experiments. Yet, direct proof of their existence has been elusive, as spatially-resolved measurements of the stress magnitudes and distributions critical for testing theories and

430

Nano-Scale Interpenetrating Phase Composites (IPC S) for Industrial and Vehicle Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-year project was completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to explore the technical and economic feasibility of producing nano-scale Interpenetrating Phase Composite (IPC) components of a usable size for actual testing/implementation in a real applications such as high wear/corrosion resistant refractory shapes for industrial applications, lightweight vehicle braking system components, or lower cost/higher performance military body and vehicle armor. Nano-scale IPC s with improved mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties have previously been demonstrated at the lab scale, but have been limited in size. The work performed under this project was focused on investigating the ability to take the current traditional lab scale processes to a manufacturing scale through scaling of these processes or through the utilization of an alternative high-temperature process.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Materials Science Materials Science1354608000000Materials ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access./No/Questions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Materials Science Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Data Sources Reference Organizations Journals Key Resources CINDAS Materials Property Databases video icon Thermophysical Properties of Matter Database (TPMD) Aerospace Structural Metals Database (ASMD) Damage Tolerant Design Handbook (DTDH) Microelectronics Packaging Materials Database (MPMD) Structural Alloys Handbook (SAH) Proquest Technology Collection Includes the Materials Science collection MRS Online Proceedings Library Papers presented at meetings of the Materials Research Society Data Sources

432

Programmable Immobilized PCR in Nanoscale: Bridging Nanoelectrodes with Single dsDNA Molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a method for controlled connection of gold electrodes with single dsDNA molecules (locally on a chip) by utilizing PCR. Single-stranded thiol-modified oligonucleotides are directed and immobilized to nanoscale electrodes by means of dielectrophoretic trapping, and extended in a PCR procedure finally forming a complete dsDNA bridging the gap between the electrodes. The technique opens up opportunities for detection and sensing applications, and for molecular electronics.

Linko, Veikko; Shen, Boxuan; Niskanen, Einari; Hytnen, Vesa P; Toppari, J Jussi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Engineered nano-scale ceramic supports for PEM fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Catalyst support durability is currently a technical barrier for commercialization of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, especially for transportation applications. Degradation and corrosion of the conventional carbon supports leads to losses in active catalyst surface area and, consequently, reduced performance. As a result, the major aim of this work is to develop support materials that interact strongly with Pt, yet sustain bulk-like catalytic activities with very highly dispersed particles. This latter aspect is key to attaining the 2015 DOE technical targets for platinum group metal (PGM) loadings (0.20 mg/cm{sup 2}). The benefits of the use of carbon-supported catalysts to drastically reduce Pt loadings from the early, conventional Pt-black technology are well known. The supported platinum catalyzed membrane approach widely used today for fabrication of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) was developed shortly thereafter these early reports. Of direct relevance to this present work, are the investigations into Pt particle growth in PEM fuel cells, and subsequent follow-on work showing evidence of Pt particles suspended free of the support within the catalyst layer. Further, durability work has demonstrated the detrimental effects of potential cycling on carbon corrosion and the link between electrochemical surface area and particle growth. To avoid the issues with carbon degradation altogether, it has been proposed by numerous fuel cell research groups to replace carbon supports with conductive materials that are ceramic in nature. Intrinsically, these many conductive oxides, carbides, and nitrides possess the prerequisite electronic conductivity required, and offer corrosion resistance in PEMFC environments; however, most reports indicate that obtaining sufficient surface area remains a significant barrier to obtaining desirable fuel ceU performance. Ceramic materials that exhibit high electrical conductivity and necessary stability under fuel cell conditions must also exhibit high surface area as a necessary adjunct to obtaining high Pt dispersions and Pt utilization targets. Our goal in this work is to identify new synthesis approaches together with materials that will lead to ceramic supports with high surface areas and high Pt dispersions. Several strong candidates for use as PEMFC catalyst supports include: transition metal nitrides and substoichiometric titanium oxides, which hither to now have been prepared by other researcher groups with relatively low surface areas (ca. 1-50 m{sup 2}/g typical). To achieve our goals of engineering high surface area, conductive ceramic support for utilization in PEMFCs, a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team with experience synthesizing and investigating these materials has been assembled. This team is headed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and includes Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of New Mexico. This report describes our fiscal year 2010 technical progress related to applying advanced synthetiC methods towards the development of new ceramic supports for Pt catalysts for PEM fuel cells.

Brosha, Eric L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blackmore, Karen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burrell, Anthony K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henson, Neil J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Atomistic modeling of nanoscale patterning of L1{sub 2} order induced by ion irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical predictions indicate that ordered alloys can spontaneously develop a steady-state nanoscale microstructure when irradiated with energetic particles. This behavior derives from a dynamical competition between disordering in cascades and thermally activated reordering, which leads to self-organization of the chemical order parameter. We test this possibility by combining molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. We first generate realistic distributions of disordered zones for Ni{sub 3}Al irradiated with 70 keV He and 1 MeV Kr ions using MD and then input this data into KMC to obtain predictions of steady state microstructures as a function of the irradiation flux. Nanoscale patterning is observed for Kr ion irradiations but not for He ion irradiations. We illustrate, moreover, using image simulations of these KMC microstructures, that high-resolution transmission electron microscopy can be employed to identify nanoscale patterning. Finally, we indicate how this method could be used to synthesize functional thin films, with potential for magnetic applications.

Ye Jia [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8250 (United States); Li Youhong [Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Engineered Material Arresting Systems, Zodiac Aerospace, Logan Township, New Jersey 08085 (United States); Averback, Robert; Zuo Jianmin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Bellon, Pascal [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - CNMS User Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Measurements of Glass Transition Temperature and Nanoscale Measurements of Glass Transition Temperature and Temperature-Dependent Mechanical Properties in Polymers M.P. Nikiforov, S. Jesse, L.T. Germinario (CNMS user, Eastman Chemical Co.), and S.V. Kalinin Achievement We report a novel method for local measurements of glass transition temperatures and the temperature dependence of elastic and loss moduli of polymeric materials. The combination of Anasys Instruments' heated tip technology, ORNL-developed band excitation scanning probe microscopy, and a "freeze-in" thermal profile technique allows quantitative thermomechanical measurements at high spatial resolution on the order of ~100 nm. Here, we developed an experimental approach for local thermomechanical probing that reproducibly tracks changes in the mechanical properties of

436

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - CNMS Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transient-Mediated fate determination in a transcriptional circuit of HIV Transient-Mediated fate determination in a transcriptional circuit of HIV Leor S. Weinberger (University of California, San Diego), Roy D. Dar (University of Tennessee), and Michael L. Simpson (Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Achievement One of the greatest challenges in the characterization of complex nanoscale systems is gaining a mechanistic understanding of underlying processes that cannot be directly imaged. Recent research at the CNMS1 explored a novel technique of discovering the details of these interactions through the measurement of the structure of stochastic fluctuations that occur in neighboring nanoscale system components that can be directly imaged. In this work [Nature Genetics, 40(4), 466-470 (2008)], in collaboration with a

437

Reactor Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The reactor materials crosscut effort will enable the development of innovative and revolutionary materials and provide broad-based, modern materials science that will benefit all four DOE-NE...

438

Optimization of density functional tight-binding and classical reactive molecular dynamics for high-throughput simulations of carbon materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon materials and nanostructures (fullerenes, nanotubes) are promising building blocks of nanotechnology. Potential applications include optical and electronic devices, sensors, and nano-scale machines. The multiscale character of processes related ... Keywords: ACM proceedings, BLAS, Cray XT5, LAPACK, advanced materials, density-functional tight binding, high-throughput, linear algebra, material science, molecular dynamics, multiscale-modeling, quantum chemistry, scientific libraries, scientific-computing

Jacek Jakowski; Bilel Hadri; Steven J. Stuart; Predrag Krstic; Stephan Irle; Dulma Nugawela; Sophya Garashchuk

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Materials - Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Assessment The staff of the Energy Systems Division has a long history of technical and economic analysis of the production and recycling of materials for transportation...

440

Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Materials Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Thermoelectric Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermoelectric materials can generate electricity or provide cooling by converting thermal gradients to electricity or electricity to thermal gradients. More efficient thermoelectric materials would make feasible the widespread use of thermoelectric converters in mundane applications. This report summarizes the state-of-the-art of thermoelectric materials including currently available materials and applications, new developments, and future prospects.

2000-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

442

Atomistic Study of Transport Properties at the Nanoscale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A first approach to engineering problems in nanosized systems requires a thorough understanding of how physical properties change as size decreases from the macroscale. One important class of properties that can be severely affected by such a downward size shift are transport properties - classical mass, momentum and energy transport. Using atomistic simulation techniques, primarily molecular dynamics, and statistical expressions for diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivity formulated in terms of atomistic properties, three case studies of transport in important, nanosized systems are investigated, including confined water systems, silicon-germanium nanos- tructures, and carbon nanostructures. In the first study of confined water systems, diffusion and viscosity are of primary interest, as recent experimental studies have shown notably increased rates of diffusion through nano-confined carbon nanotube structures. In this work, a full treatment of the transport properties is provided in both water clusters and water thin films, both having characteristic size scales under 11 nm. The diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivity in the nanosized systems are all shown to be significantly different from bulk water systems, with diffusion and thermal transport increasing and viscosity decreasing. For silicon-germanium nanostructures, the thermal transport properties are exclusively considered, with the problem of interest concerning the control of thermal transport through a strict control on the nanostructure. Quantum dot superlattices are shown to be effective structures for controlling the thermal transport properties, the available range of thermal conductivity using these structures being 0.1-160 W/mK. The final study concerns graphene nanostructures, which in terms of thermal transport have some of the highest thermal conductivities of any available materials. Control of thermal transport properties is again of primary importance, with various physical aspects - defects, shape, and size - being probed in graphene, graphene nano ribbons, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes to determine their influence on transport; overall, these structures yield a large range of thermal transport, 10-2500 W/mK.

Haskins, Justin

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Vorbeck Materials Corp. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc. Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 333 likes Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc., based in Belmont, California, uses Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopes (DTEM) to enable imaging of nanoscale objects, such as proteins, thin films and nanoparticles at unprecedented time scales and frame rates. By utilizing a laser-driven electron source, DTEMs are able to produce short bursts of electrons that can form an image with nanometer resolution in as little as 10 nanoseconds. This enables observation of dynamics in material systems that play an important role in a wide range of energy technologies, including battery electrodes, petroleum catalysts, solar cell materials, and organisms for bio fuel growth. Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions uses technology

444

Argonne licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies By Joseph Bernstein * By Jared Sagoff * March 4, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint LEMONT, Ill. - The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory announced today that the laboratory has granted AKHAN Technologies exclusive diamond semiconductor application licensing rights to breakthrough low-temperature diamond deposition technology developed by Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM). The Argonne-developed technology allows for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond on a variety of wafer substrate materials at temperatures as low as 400 degrees Celsius. The combination of the Argonne's low-temperature diamond technology with AKHAN's Miraj Diamond(tm) process represents the state of the art in diamond semiconductor

445

Magnetocaloric Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic Materials for Energy Applications IV: Magnetocaloric Materials ... due to cost-effectiveness as well as superior magneto-thermal characteristics. ... metals and p-block elements can be explored in a time- and energy-saving manner.

446

Nanoscale magnetic field mapping with a single spin scanning probe magnetometer  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate quantitative magnetic field mapping with nanoscale resolution, by applying a lock-in technique on the electron spin resonance frequency of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect placed at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip. In addition, we report an all-optical magnetic imaging technique which is sensitive to large off-axis magnetic fields, thus extending the operation range of diamond-based magnetometry. Both techniques are illustrated by using a magnetic hard disk as a test sample. Owing to the non-perturbing and quantitative nature of the magnetic probe, this work should open up numerous perspectives in nanomagnetism and spintronics.

Rondin, L.; Tetienne, J.-P.; Spinicelli, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Jacques, V. [Laboratoire de Photonique Quantique et Moleculaire, Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan and CNRS UMR 8537, 94235 Cachan Cedex (France); Dal Savio, C.; Karrai, K. [Attocube systems AG, Koeniginstrasse 11A RGB, Munich 80539 (Germany); Dantelle, G. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Ecole Polytechnique and CNRS UMR 7643, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Thiaville, A.; Rohart, S. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud and CNRS UMR 8502, 91405 Orsay (France)

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

447

Quasipassive positioning platform for nanoscale management of in-plane motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As leading edge technology pursues a common trend of working on smaller and smaller scales, there is increasing demand on the motion management at the nanometer range. In this letter, we report a two-axis quasipassive positioning device capable of four degrees of freedom in-plane motion. The concept comprises of a platform suspended by tensile stressed flexure elements on either side. By selectively trimming the stress elements, the equilibrium position can be biased to one side or another, enabling nanoscale movement between the suspended platform and the base. Focused ion beam experiment demonstrates that such platform enables positioning accuracy on the order of tens of nanometers.

Li Biao; Zhu Yu; Sharon, Andre [Fraunhofer Center for Manufacturing Innovation, 15 St. Mary's Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States); College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany-SUNY, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Fraunhofer Center for Manufacturing Innovation, 15 St. Mary's Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States)

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

448

Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

449

Free Energy Barrier for Electric Field Driven Polymer Entry into Nanoscale Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free energy barrier for entry of a charged polymer into a nanoscale channel by a driving electric field is studied theoretically and using molecular dynamics simulations. Dependence of the barrier height on the polymer length, the driving field strength, and the channel entrance geometry is investigated. Squeezing effect of the electric field on the polymer before its entry to the channel is taken into account. It is shown that lateral confinement of the polymer prior to its entry changes the polymer length dependence of the barrier height noticeably. Our theory and simulation results are in good agreement and reasonably describe related experimental data.

Narges Nikoofard; Hossein Fazli

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

450

Materials Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Science. Summary: Key metrologies/systems: In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, linear and non-linear spectroscopies ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

451

Training Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Training Materials. NIST Handbook 44 Self-Study Course. ... Chapter 3 Organization and Format of NIST Handbook 44 DOC. ...

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

452

Material matting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the widespread use of measured real-world materials, intuitive tools for editing measured reflectance datasets are still lacking. We present a solution inspired by natural image matting and texture synthesis to the material matting problem, ... Keywords: appearance models, material separation, matting, spatially-varying BRDFs, texture synthesis

Daniel Lepage; Jason Lawrence

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Materializing energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated and informed by perspectives on sustainability and design, this paper draws on a diverse body of scholarly works related to energy and materiality to articulate a perspective on energy-as-materiality and propose a design approach of ... Keywords: design, design theory, energy, materiality, sustainability

James Pierce; Eric Paulos

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Workshop on innovation in materials processing and manufacture: Exploratory concepts for energy applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the workshop was to bring together industrial, academic, and DOE Laboratory personnel to discuss and identify potential areas for which creative, innovative, and/or multidisciplinary solutions could result in major payoffs for the nation`s energy economy, DOE, and industry. The topics emphasized in these discussions were: surfaces and interfacial processing technologies, biomolecular materials, powder/precursor technologies, magnetic materials, nanoscale materials, novel ceramics and composites, novel intermetallics and alloys, environmentally benign materials, and energy efficiency. The workshop had a 2-day format. One the first day, there was an introductory session that summarized future directions within DOE`s basic and materials technology programs, and the national studies on manufacturing and materials science and engineering. The balance of the workshop was devoted to brainstorming sessions by seven working groups. During the first working group session, the entire group was divided to discuss topics on: challenges for hostile environments, novel materials in transportation technologies, novel nanoscale materials, and opportunities in biomolecular materials. For the second session, the entire group (except for the working group on biomolecular materials) was reconfigured into new working groups on: alternative pathways to energy efficiency, environmentally benign materials and processes, and waste treatment and reduction: a basic sciences approach. This report contains separate reports from each of the seven working groups.

Horton, L.L. [comp.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Metrological characterization of X-ray diffraction methods for determination of crystallite size in nano-scale materials  

SciTech Connect

Crystallite size values were determined by X-ray diffraction methods for 210 TiO{sub 2} (anatase) nanocrystalline powders with crystallite size from 3 nm to 35 nm. Each X-ray diffraction pattern was processed using different free and commercial software. The crystallite size calculations were performed using Scherrer equation and Warren-Averbach method. Statistical treatment and comparative assessment of the obtained results were performed for the purpose of an ascertainment of statistical significance of the obtained differences. The average absolute divergence between results obtained with using Scherrer equation does not exceed 0.36 nm for the crystallites smaller than 10 nm, 0.54 nm for the range 10-15 nm and 2.4 nm for the range > 15 nm. We have also found that increasing the analysis time improves statistics, however does not affect the calculated crystallite sizes. The values of crystallite size determined from X-ray data were in good agreement with those obtained by imaging in a transmission electron microscope.

Uvarov, V. [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Faculty of Natural Science, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Unit for Nanoscopic Characterization, E. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel)], E-mail: vladimiru@savion.huji.ac.il; Popov, I. [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Faculty of Natural Science, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Unit for Nanoscopic Characterization, E. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a PEDOT:PSS coated indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and LiF/Althe e?ciency. Indium tin oxide (ITO) is a transparentIn the control device, indium tin oxide(ITO) is used as the

Zaniewski, Anna Monro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectroscopy of single CdSe nanocrystallites. Accts. Chem.of individual CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals on siliconmicroscopy study of single Au-CdSe hybrid nanodumbbells:

Zaniewski, Anna Monro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Charge-free low-temperature method of forming thin film-based nanoscale materials and structures on a substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming a nanostructure at low temperatures. A substrate that is reactive with one of atomic oxygen and nitrogen is provided. A flux of neutral atoms of at least one of nitrogen and oxygen is generated within a laser-sustained-discharge plasma source and a collimated beam of energetic neutral atoms and molecules is directed from the plasma source onto a surface of the substrate to form the nanostructure. The energetic neutral atoms and molecules in the plasma have an average kinetic energy in a range from about 1 eV to about 5 eV.

Hoffbauer, Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Mueller, Alex (Santa Fe, NM)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Materials Education Community  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Resource Center Home. Materials Education. Materials Education. Established Materials Technologies. Magnesium Superalloys. Emerging Materials...

460

Emerging Materials Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Resource Center Home. Materials Education. Materials Education. Established Materials Technologies. Magnesium Superalloys. Emerging Materials...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Established Materials Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Resource Center Home. Materials Education. Materials Education. Established Materials Technologies. Magnesium Superalloys. Emerging Materials...

462

The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

Holt, J K; Herberg, J L; Wu, Y; Schwegler, E; Mehta, A

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Minor Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Materials used in glass manufacture...Table 1 Materials used in glass manufacture Material Purpose Antimony oxide (Sb 2 O 3 ) Decolorizing and fining agent Aplite (K, Na, Ca, Mg, alumina silicate) Source of alumina Aragonite (CaCO 3 ) Source of calcium oxide Arsenic oxide (As 2 O 3 ) Fining and decolorizing agent Barite/barytes (BaSO 4 )...

464

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

467

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Express Licensing Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And Membrane Express Licensing Analysis Of Macromolecule, Liggands And Macromolecule-Lingand Complexes Express Licensing Carbon Microtubes Express Licensing Chemical Synthesis Of Chiral Conducting Polymers Express Licensing Forming Adherent Coatings Using Plasma Processing Express Licensing Hydrogen Scavengers Express Licensing Laser Welding Of Fused Quartz Express Licensing Multiple Feed Powder Splitter Negotiable Licensing Boron-10 Neutron Detectors for Helium-3 Replacement Negotiable Licensing Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Negotiable Licensing Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) Express Licensing Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials

469

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Materials Negotiable Licensing Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Negotiable Licensing A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current...

470

Magnetic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 27, 2009 ... Extreme magnetic fields (>2 tesla), especially when combined with temperature, are being shown to revolutionize materials processing and...

471

materials processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the Stainless Steel Elaborated by the Duplex Procedure (Electric Furnace- VOD Installation) [pp. ... Materials Processing on a Solar Furnace Satellite [pp.

472

Materials Studio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 14, 2008 ... G. Fitzgerald; G. Goldbeck-Wood; P. Kung; M. Petersen; L. Subramanian; J. Wescott, " Materials Modeling from Quantum Mechanics to The...

473

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors III ... response of oxide ceramics for nuclear applications through experiment, theory, and...

474

Argonne User Facility Agreements | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Master proprietary agreement sample (pdf) Master proprietary agreement sample (pdf) Master non-proprietary agreement sample (pdf) Differences between non-proprietary and proprietary Opens in a new window Argonne's National User Facilities Advanced Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) Advanced Photon Source (APS) Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS) Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) Argonne User Facility Agreements About User Agreements If you are not an Argonne National Laboratory employee, a user agreement signed by your home institution is a prerequisite for experimental work at any of Argonne's user facilities. The Department of Energy recently formulated master agreements that cover liability, intellectual property, and financial issues (access templates from the links in the left

475

User Facility Training | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

See Also: See Also: Argonne WBT Argonne eJHQ ACIS Training APS Beamline Shielding Argonne National Laboratory User Facility Training Core Courses: These courses require your badge number and APS web password. If you have forgotten your web password, please click here. A temporary password will be sent to your e-mail address on record. Course Name APS 101 Advanced Photon Source User Orientation (2 year retraining) CNM 101 Center for Nanoscale Materials User Orientation (2 year retraining) ESH 100U Argonne National Laboratory User Facility Orientation (2 year retraining) ESH 223 Cybersecurity Annual Education and Awareness (1 year retraining) ESH 738 GERT: General Employee Radiation Training (2 year retraining) Additional Courses Available Remotely: These courses require your badge number and APS web password. If you have forgotten your web password, please click here. A temporary password will be sent to your e-mail address on record.

476

Method and apparatus for determination of mechanical properties of functionally-graded materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Techniques for the determination of mechanical properties of homogenous or functionally-graded materials from indentation testing are presented. The technique is applicable to indentation on the nano-scale through the macro-scale including the geological scale. The technique involves creating a predictive load/depth relationship for a sample, providing an experimental load/depth relationship, comparing the experimental data to the predictive data, and determining a physical characteristic from the comparison.

Giannakopoulos, Antonios E. (Somerville, MA); Suresh, Subra (Wellesley, MA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Nano Changes Have Macro Importance for a Key Electronics Material |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Squeezing an Old Material Could Yield "Instant-On" Memory Squeezing an Old Material Could Yield "Instant-On" Memory A Metal That Becomes Transparent under Pressure Under Pressure, Atoms Make Unlikely Alloys Slowing Down Near the Glass Transition New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Nano Changes Have Macro Importance for a Key Electronics Material APRIL 23, 2009 Bookmark and Share Original image courtesy of http://www.freefoto.com By combining the results from several powerful techniques for studying materials structure at the nanoscale, including work at the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory,

478

Analyzing the distribution of threshold voltage degradation in nanoscale transistors by using reaction-diffusion and percolation theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continued scaling of transistors into the nanoscale regime has led to large device-to-device variation in transistor characteristics. These variations reflect differences in substrate doping, channel length, interface and/or oxide defects, etc. among ... Keywords: Exponential distribution, Interface defect statistics, Markov Chain Monte-Carlo, Reaction-diffusion model, Skew-normal distribution, Threshold voltage degradation

Ahmad Ehteshamul Islam; Muhammad Ashraful Alam

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Effect of pressure on the phase behavior and structure of water confined between nanoscale hydrophobic and hydrophilic plates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1 GPa, the system crystallizes into a bilayer ice. A P-d phase diagram showing the vapor, liquid, and bilayer ice phases is proposed. When water is confined by hydrophilic hydroxylated silica platesEffect of pressure on the phase behavior and structure of water confined between nanoscale

480

Materials Science Advanced Materials News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Contributes to Discovery of Novel Quantum Spin-Liquid Release Date ... Novel Filter Material Could Cut Natural Gas Refining Costs Release Date: 03 ...

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale materials cnm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Materials Science Advanced Materials Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to Discovery of Novel Quantum Spin-Liquid. illustration of metal organic framework Novel Filter Material Could Cut Natural Gas Refining Costs. ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

482

The DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials: Research briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication is designed to inform present and potential customers and partners of the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials about significant advances resulting from Center-coordinated research. The format is an easy-to-read, not highly technical, concise presentation of the accomplishments. Selected accomplishments from each of the Center`s seven initial focused projects are presented. The seven projects are: (1) conventional and superplastic forming; (2) materials joining; (3) nanoscale materials for energy applications; (4) microstructural engineering with polymers; (5) tailored microstructures in hard magnets; (6) processing for surface hardness; and (7) mechanically reliable surface oxides for high-temperature corrosion resistance.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Materials - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Coatings & Lubricants * Coatings & Lubricants * Nanofluids * Deformation Joining * Recycling * Catalysts * Assessment * Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Materials ring on liner reciprocating tester Tribology Lab: Ring-on-liner reciprocating tester. Argonne National Laboratory plays an important role in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts to develop advanced materials for transportation. The materials are developed with DOE support from the EERE Office of Vehicle Technology and Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies in collaboration with worldwide industrial partners. Examples

484

Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures with polarized soft x-ray photons  

SciTech Connect

Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures and their fast dynamics is scientifically interesting and technologically of highest relevance. The combination of circularly polarized soft X-ray photons which provide a strong X-ray magnetic circular dichroism effect at characteristic X-ray absorption edges, with a high resolution soft X-ray microscope utilizing Fresnel zone plate optics allows to study in a unique way the stochastical behavior in the magnetization reversal process of thin films and the ultrafast dynamics of magnetic vortices and domain walls in confined ferromagnetic structures. Future sources of fsec short and high intense soft X-ray photon pulses hold the promise of magnetic imaging down to fundamental magnetic length and time scales.

Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.

2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

485

Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors | Advanced Photon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Unlikely Route to Ferroelectricity An Unlikely Route to Ferroelectricity How to Make a Splash Pressure-Tuning the Quantum Phase Transition in a Model 2-D Magnet Reappearing Superconductivity Surprises Scientists Manipulating Genes with Hidden TALENs Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors MAY 18, 2012 Bookmark and Share This collage shows the ring-shaped, isotropic x-ray diffraction pattern and electron microscope cross-section of the three-dimensional amorphous or quasi-ordered biophotonic nanostructure in spongy medullary feather barbs responsible for the vivid turquoise plumage of the Plum-throated Cotinga

486

Universal 2D Soft Nano-Scale Mosaic Structure Theory for Polymers and Colloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A basic concept in chain-particle cluster-motion, from frozen glassy state to melt state, is the 2D soft nano-scale mosaic structure formed by 8 orders of 2D interface excitation (IE) loop-flows, from small to large in inverse cascade and re-arrangement structure in cascade along local one direction. IE has additional repulsive energy and extra vacancy volume. IE results from that the instantaneous synchronal polarized electron charge coupling pair is able to parallel transport on the interface between two neighboring chain-particles with antiparallel delocalization. This structure accords with de Gennes' mosaic structure picture, from which we can directly deduce glass transition temperature, melt temperature, free volume fraction, critical entangled chain length, and activation energy to break solid lattice. This is also the in-herency maximum order-potential structure in random systems.

Jia-lin Wu

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

487

Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

488

thermoelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been proven that the maximum cooling temperature of a thermoelectric material can be increased by using either pulsed operation or graded Seebeck profiles. In this paper, we show that the maximum cooling temperature can be further increased by the pulsed operation of optimal inhomogeneous thermoelectric materials. A random sampling method is used to obtain the optimal electrical conductivity profile of inhomogeneous materials, which can achieve a much higher cooling temperature than the best uniform materials under the steady-state condition. Numerical simulations of pulsed operation are then carried out in the time domain. In the limit of low thermoelectric figure-of-merit ZT, the finite-difference time-domain simulations are verified by an analytical solution for homogeneous material. This numerical method is applied to high ZT BiTe materials and simulations show that the effective figure-of-merit can be improved by 153 % when both optimal graded electrical conductivity profiles and pulsed operation are used. 1.

Q Zhou; Z Bian; A Shakouri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Research Areas - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanostructured Thin Films Nanostructured Thin Films Theme: The Nanostructured Thin Films program is focused on the synthesis, characterization, and modeling of dimensionally constrained materials systems in which a nano-scale trait of the material (e.g. grain size, film thickness, interfacial boundary, etc.) fundamentally determines its structure-property relationships. The work performed in this program falls primarily into two areas: (1) studies of thin-film growth phenomena and film properties, with emphasis on diamond and multicomponent oxides; and (2) first principles quantum-mechanical calculations that model thin film growth processes and electronic structure. Frequently, the experimental and theoretical efforts are coordinated on common scientific issues in a particular material system. Current research is devoted to (a) growth

490

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials July 20, 2011 - 3:58pm Addthis Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects the mechanical properties of copper. By using a specialized in situ mechanical testing device in a transmission electron microscope at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, the team could examine — with nanoscale resolution — the localized nature of this deformation. | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects

491

Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials July 20, 2011 - 3:58pm Addthis Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects the mechanical properties of copper. By using a specialized in situ mechanical testing device in a transmission electron microscope at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, the team could examine — with nanoscale resolution — the localized nature of this deformation. | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects

493

Surfaces and Interfaces in Nanostructured Materials II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nano-Structured Metals and Oxides. N-Implantation ... Nano-Scale Coatings for Surface Modification of Carbon Structures...........................................89. P.P. Joshi...

494

Orlando H. Auciello - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and application to devices (ferroelectric memories, nanoscale CMOS devices, photovoltaic energy generation storage devices, high-frequency devices, piezoelectric thin films for...

495

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POLICIES User Access Policy - Version 1.1 General Policies and Procedures for User Access to the DOE Nanoscale Science Research Centers Peer Review and Advisory Bodies Evaluation...

496

Hardfacing material  

SciTech Connect

A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

4