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Sample records for nanoscale materials cnm

  1. Materials synthesis at the CNM | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  3. Nanoscale Materials in Medicine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoparticle Technology for Drug Delivery. Gao, X., et al. 2002. Journal of Biomedical Optics 7: 532-537. Ferromagnetic materials become superparamagnetic below 20 nm Size...

  4. Nanoscale Synthesis and Functional Assembly Center for Nanophase Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Kai Xiao R&D Staff Nanoscale Synthesis and Functional Assembly Center for Nanophase Materials Oak materials; #12;3. Inorganic/organic nanoscale electronics. Fabrication 1D and 2D nanoscale electronic of Technology, China Chemistry B.A., 1998 Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Acad. of Sci., China Material

  5. Filter casting nanoscale porous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Joel Ryan; Nyce, Gregory Walker; Kuntz, Joshua David

    2012-07-24

    A method of producing nanoporous material includes the steps of providing a liquid, providing nanoparticles, producing a slurry of the liquid and the nanoparticles, removing the liquid from the slurry, and producing a monolith.

  6. Filter casting nanoscale porous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Joel Ryan; Nyce, Gregory Walker; Kuntz, Jushua David

    2013-12-10

    A method of producing nanoporous material includes the steps of providing a liquid, providing nanoparticles, producing a slurry of the liquid and the nanoparticles, removing the liquid from the slurry, and producing monolith.

  7. Novel materials, computational spectroscopy, and multiscale simulation in nanoscale photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardi, Marco, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells convert solar energy to electricity using combinations of semiconducting sunlight absorbers and metallic materials as electrical contacts. Novel nanoscale materials introduce new paradigms for ...

  8. DOE A9024 Final Report Functional and Nanoscale Materials Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: DOE A9024 Final Report Functional and Nanoscale Materials Systems: Frontier Programs of Science at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory Citation...

  9. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    the other hand, energy transfer by thermal radiation betweenit was shown that energy transfer by thermal radi- ationpyroelectric energy conversion and nanoscale thermal

  10. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    eld radiative heat transfer dominates radiation transferstudy Far field radiation Heat transfer coefficient, h r (W/nanoscale radiation to enhance radiative heat transfer. The

  11. A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Divan, Ralu; Rosenthal, Dan; Rose, Volker; Wai Hla, Saw; Liu, Yuzi

    2014-01-29

    At a very small, or "nano" scale, materials behave differently. The study of nanomaterials is much more than miniaturization - scientists are discovering how changes in size change a material's properties. From sunscreen to computer memory, the applications of nanoscale materials research are all around us. Researchers at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials are creating new materials, methods and technologies to address some of the world's greatest challenges in energy security, lightweight but durable materials, high-efficiency lighting, information storage, environmental stewardship and advanced medical devices.

  12. A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Divan, Ralu; Rosenthal, Dan; Rose, Volker; Wai Hla, Saw; Liu, Yuzi

    2014-09-15

    At a very small, or "nano" scale, materials behave differently. The study of nanomaterials is much more than miniaturization - scientists are discovering how changes in size change a material's properties. From sunscreen to computer memory, the applications of nanoscale materials research are all around us. Researchers at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials are creating new materials, methods and technologies to address some of the world's greatest challenges in energy security, lightweight but durable materials, high-efficiency lighting, information storage, environmental stewardship and advanced medical devices.

  13. CNM Scientific Contact List | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. Nanoscale Material Properties | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. Basics of Ion Scattering in Nanoscale Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitlow, Harry J.; Zhang, Yanwen

    2010-01-01

    Energetic ions interact with materials by collisions with the nuclei and electrons of the atoms that make up the material. In these collisions energy and momentum is transferred from the projectile particle which is a moving atom or ion, to the target particles (atomic nucleus or electron). Each collision leads to a slowing down of the moving projectile and also a deflection of the trajectory which gives rise to the term scattering which is often used synonymously to describe the energy transfer process. In this chapter, we introduce from an experimental viewpoint the underlying theory for interaction of ions for analysis and modification of nanometer scale materials. A more detailed theoretical overview of the topic can be found in the recent monographs by Sigmund. Detailed derivations of the formulae introduced will not be given here but can be found in standard texts that are indicated by references. The treatment here starts by considering an individual scattering event. The results are then used to consider the effects on the primary ion in the limit where a large number of collisions take place. Subsequently, the primary effects are considered in nanometer materials which approach the thin-medium limit where the primary particles encounter only limited number of scattering centers. Finally, the dissipation of the energy deposited by the primary projectiles in secondary processes such as cascades of displaced atoms and electrons will be considered in the thick and thin medium limits. This approach was chosen because it builds upon the standard concepts in ion-matter interactions that are well know and have been widely used in experimental measurements of the stopping force and applications such as Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), ion beam modification of materials etc.

  16. Modelling Heat Transport Across Nano-scale Material Interfaces for Next-generation Electronic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milgram, Paul

    ) thermal boundary resistance between two dissimilar semiconductor materials using a combinationModelling Heat Transport Across Nano-scale Material Interfaces for Next-generation Electronic) with customized thermal transport properties. The scattering of thermal energy carriers at fabricated interfaces

  17. Charge separation in nanoscale photovoltaic materials: recent insights from first-principles electronic structure theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    Charge separation in nanoscale photovoltaic materials: recent insights from first-scale photovoltaic materials; in particular recent theoretical/computational work based on first principles electron and hole in so-called excitonic photovoltaic cells. Emphasis is placed on theoretical results

  18. Plant virus directed fabrication of nanoscale materials and devices James N. Culver a,b,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Review Plant virus directed fabrication of nanoscale materials and devices James N. Culver a Accepted 2 March 2015 Available online 26 March 2015 Keywords: Nanotechnology Bio-materials Virus particles Virus assembly Virus-like particles a b s t r a c t Bottom-up self-assembly methods in which individual

  19. NANO-SCALE MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT FOR FUTURE MAGNETIC APPLICATIONSp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    evolution, it is clear that development of new materials and their understanding on a smaller and smaller in the development of new mag- netic materials for a variety of important appli- cations [2±5]. In recent yearsNANO-SCALE MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT FOR FUTURE MAGNETIC APPLICATIONSp M. E. McHENRY and D. E. LAUGHLIN

  20. MSE 157: Quantum Mechanics of Nanoscale Materials Course Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and lasers, to solar cells and batteries and other energy- related materials problems, to broad aspects will make use more advanced concepts like partial differential equations, linear algebra, etc

  1. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  2. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirth, Brian

    2015-04-08

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to particular, the interfacial structure of embedded nanoscale precipitates will be evaluated by electronic- and atomic-scale modeling methods, and the efficiency of the validated interfaces for trapping point defects will next be evaluated by atomic-scale modeling (e.g., determining the sink strength of the precipitates), addressing key questions related to the optimal interface characteristics to attract point defects and enhance their recombination. Kinetic models will also be developed to simulate microstructural evolution of the nanoscale features and irradiation produced defect clusters, and compared with observed microstructural changes.

  3. Structural phase transitions on the nanoscale: The crucial pattern in the phase-change materials Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeTe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Structural phase transitions on the nanoscale: The crucial pattern in the phase-change materials Ge and computer memory, but the structure of the amorphous phases and the nature of the phase transition of types A Ge and Sb and B Te , an "ABAB square." The rapid amorphous-to-crystalline phase change

  4. NANO AT HOME: An Experiment That You Can Try PLEASE NOTE: The Center for Nano-and Molecular Science and Technology (CNM) at The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    Science and Technology (CNM) at The University of Texas at Austin (UT-Austin) cannot guarantee better. CAUTION: Strong magnets can pinch flesh and also should never be swallowed. Small magnetic

  5. Probing nanoscale behavior of magnetic materials with soft x-ray spectromicroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    spin electronics or spintronics [3], where in addition tomagnetic materials for spintronics ap- plications, where the

  6. Electronic & magnetic materials and devices at the CNM | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with polarized X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    promising materials for spintronic applications due theirextremely attractive for spintronic applications, where acalled field of molecular spintronic [197] - [199]. Magnetic

  8. Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with polarized X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    R. Buhrman, in Concepts in Spintronics (ed. Maekawa, S. ) (promising materials for spintronic applications due theirextremely attractive for spintronic applications, where a

  9. New Ferroelectrics for Naval SONAR and Modeling of Nanoscale Ferroelectric Nonvolatile Memory Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rappe, Andrew M.

    devices. When such a material is deformed by underwater sound vibrations, it generates an electric field of structural, electrical and mechanical properties, making them vital materials for many technological in computer speed has made first- principles calculations a viable tool for understanding these complex

  10. Charge separation in nanoscale photovoltaic materials: recent insights from first-principles electronic structure theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    different types of materials that are inexpensive and have the potential for global-scale production. From optimal designs or even new basic concepts for the solar cell can be developed. One promising class of ``nanoPV'' is the excitonic solar cell where excitons are more strongly bound in the active material

  11. Biological scaffolds for the peptide-directed assembly of nanoscale materials and devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solis, Daniel J., 1978-

    2006-01-01

    The utilization of biological factors in the design, synthesis and fabrication of nano-scaled materials and devices presents novel, large scale solutions for the realization of future technologies. In particular, we have ...

  12. Nanoscale Materials in Medicine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by Auburn University Department of Chemical Engineering held on June 26, 2012

  13. Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Wednesday, 27 September 2006 00:00 For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical...

  14. Mesoscale Metallic Pyramids with Nanoscale Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odom, Teri W.

    Mesoscale Metallic Pyramids with Nanoscale Tips Joel Henzie, Eun-Soo Kwak, and Teri W. Odom generate free-standing mesoscale metallic pyramids composed of one or more materials and having nanoscale tips (radii of curvature of less than 2 nm). Mesoscale holes (100-300 nm) in a chromium film are used

  15. Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaniewski, Anna Monro

    2012-01-01

    4.2.1 Organic solar cellOrganic Solar Cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3.1 Organic solar cell materials . . . . .

  16. NANOSCALE STRUCTURALAND MAGNETIC CHARACTERIZATION USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    of novel nanoscale storage devices and sensors. However, for successful utilization, it is essential]. Such unique properties of magnetic thin films and nanostructures hold great promise for the development to the characterization of nanostructured magnetic materials. 2. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY METHODS In the transmission electron

  17. Final LDRD report : nanoscale mechanisms in advanced aging of materials during storage of spent %22high burnup%22 nuclear fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Blythe G.; Rajasekhara, Shreyas; Enos, David George; Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Weiner, Ruth F.

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of a three-year LDRD project focused on understanding microstructural evolution and related property changes in Zr-based nuclear cladding materials towards the development of high fidelity predictive simulations for long term dry storage. Experiments and modeling efforts have focused on the effects of hydride formation and accumulation of irradiation defects. Key results include: determination of the influence of composition and defect structures on hydride formation; measurement of the electrochemical property differences between hydride and parent material for understanding and predicting corrosion resistance; in situ environmental transmission electron microscope observation of hydride formation; development of a predictive simulation for mechanical property changes as a function of irradiation dose; novel test method development for microtensile testing of ionirradiated material to simulate the effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties; and successful demonstration of an Idaho National Labs-based sample preparation and shipping method for subsequent Sandia-based analysis of post-reactor cladding.

  18. Using Plasmon Peaks in Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy to Determine the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Nanoscale Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, James M.

    2013-05-09

    In this program, we developed new theoretical and experimental insights into understanding the relationships among fundamental universality and scaling phenomena, the solid-state physical and mechanical properties of materials, and the volume plasmon energy as measured by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Particular achievements in these areas are summarized as follows: (i) Using a previously proposed physical model based on the universal binding-energy relation (UBER), we established close phenomenological connections regarding the influence of the valence electrons in materials on the longitudinal plasma oscillations (plasmons) and various solid-state properties such as the optical constants (including absorption and dispersion), elastic constants, cohesive energy, etc. (ii) We found that carbon materials, e.g., diamond, graphite, diamond-like carbons, hydrogenated and amorphous carbon films, exhibit strong correlations in density vs. Ep (or maximum of the volume plasmon peak) and density vs. hardness, both from available experimental data and ab initio DFT calculations. This allowed us to derive a three-dimensional relationship between hardness and the plasmon energy, that can be used to determine experimentally both hardness and density of carbon materials based on measurements of the plasmon peak position. (iii) As major experimental accomplishments, we demonstrated the possibility of in-situ monitoring of changes in the physical properties of materials with conditions, e.g., temperature, and we also applied a new plasmon ratio-imaging technique to map multiple physical properties of materials, such as the elastic moduli, cohesive energy and bonding electron density, with a sub-nanometer lateral resolution. This presents new capability for understanding material behavior. (iv) Lastly, we demonstrated a new physical phenomenon - electron-beam trapping, or �¢����electron tweezers�¢��� - of a solid metal nanoparticle inside a liquid metal. This phenomenon is analogous to that of optical trapping of solid microparticles in solution known as "optical tweezers", which is currently being used to manipulate molecules and inorganic materials in a variety of nanotechnology applications.

  19. Nanoscale data storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Li

    2007-01-29

    The object of this article is to review the development of ultrahigh-density, nanoscale data storage, i.e., nanostorage. As a fundamentally new type of storage system, the recording mechanisms of nanostorage may be completely different to those of the traditional devices. Currently, two types of molecules are being studied for potential application in nanostorage. One is molecular electronic elements including molecular wires, rectifiers, switches, and transistors. The other approach employs nanostructured materials such as nanotubes, nanowires, and nanoparticles. The challenges for nanostorage are not only the materials, ultrahigh data-densities, fabrication-costs, device operating temperatures and large-scale integration, but also the development of the physical principles and models. There are already some breakthroughs obtained, but it is still unclear what kind of nanostorage systems can ultimately replace the current silicon based transistors. A promising candidate may be a molecular-nanostructure hybrid device with sub-5 nm dimensions.

  20. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA); Regan, Brian C. (Los Angeles, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA)

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  1. Quantitative Determination of Nanoscale Electronic Properties of Semiconductor Surfaces by Scanning Tunnelling Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    Quantitative Determination of Nanoscale Electronic Properties of Semiconductor Surfaces by Scanning semiconductor surfaces permits quantitative evaluation of nanoscale electronic properties of the surface. Band properties associated with particular point defects within the material. An overview of the methods employed

  2. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Garritt Tucker Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Atomistic Methods to Quantify Nanoscale Strain and Deformation Mechanisms in Nanostructured Materials Thursday, August...

  3. Atomistic Time-Domain Simulations of Light-Harvesting and Charge-Transfer Dynamics in Novel Nanoscale Materials for Solar Hydrogen Production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2012-03-22

    Funded by the DOE grant (i) we continued to study and analyze the atomistic detail of the electron transfer (ET) across the chromophore-TiO2 interface in Gratzel cell systems for solar hydrogen production. (ii) We extensively investigated the nature of photoexcited states and excited state dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots (QD) designed for photovoltaic applications. (iii) We continued a newly initiated research direction focusing on excited state properties and electron-phonon interactions in nanoscale carbon materials. Over the past year, the results of the DOE funded research were summarized in 3 review articles. 12 original manuscripts were written. The research results were reported in 28 invited talks at conferences and university seminars. 20 invitations were accepted for talks in the near future. 2 symposia at national and international meetings have being organized this year on topics closely related to the DOE funded project, and 2 more symposia have been planned for the near future. We summarized the insights into photoinduced dynamics of semiconductor QDs, obtained from our time-domain ab initio studies. QDs exhibit both molecular and bulk properties. Unlike either bulk or molecular materials, QD properties can be modified continuously by changing QD shape and size. However, the chemical and physical properties of molecular and bulk materials often contradict each other, which can lead to differing viewpoints about the behavior of QDs. For example, the molecular view suggests strong electron-hole and charge-phonon interactions, as well as slow energy relaxation due to mismatch between electronic energy gaps and phonon frequencies. In contrast, the bulk view advocates that the kinetic energy of quantum confinement is greater than electron-hole interactions, that charge-phonon coupling is weak, and that the relaxation through quasi-continuous bands is rapid. By synthesizing the bulk and molecular viewpoints, we clarified the controversies and provided a unified atomistic picture of the nature and dynamics of photoexcited states in semiconductor QDs. We also summarized our recent findings about the photoinduced electron dynamics at the chromophore-semiconductor interfaces from a time-domain ab initio perspective. The interface provides the foundation for a new, promising type of solar cell and presents a fundamentally important case study for several fields, including photo-, electro- and analytical chemistries, molecular electronics, and photography. Further, the interface offers a classic example of an interaction between an organic molecular species and an inorganic bulk material. Scientists employ different concepts and terminologies to describe molecular and solid states of matter, and these differences make it difficult to describe the interface with a single model. At the basic atomistic level of description, however, this challenge can be largely overcome. Recent advances in non-adiabatic molecular dynamics and time-domain density functional theory have created a unique opportunity for simulating the ultrafast, photoinduced processes on a computer very similar to the way that they occur in nature. These state-of-the-art theoretical tools offered a comprehensive picture of a variety of electron transfer processes that occur at the interface, including electron injection from the chromophore to the semiconductor, electron relaxation and delocalization inside the semiconductor, back-transfer of the electron to the chromophore and to the electrolyte, and regeneration of the neutral chromophore by the electrolyte. The ab initio time-domain modeling is particularly valuable for understanding these dynamic features of the ultrafast electron transfer processes, which cannot be represented by a simple rate description. We demonstrated using symmetry adapted cluster theory with configuration interaction (SAC-CI) that charging of small PbSe nanocrystals (NCs) greatly modifies their electronic states and optical excitations. Conduction and valence band transitions that are not available in neutral NCs dominate

  4. Design and optimization of a high-efficiency nanoscale 90 light-bending structure by mode selection and tailoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chau, Kenneth

    before and after the bend. In this paper, we design a nanoscale light-bending struc- ture capable of 90Design and optimization of a high-efficiency nanoscale 90° light-bending structure by mode of a nanoscale structure to enable 90° visible light-bending. The geometry and constituent materials

  5. MASTER GUIDE Nanoscale Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellandréa, Emmanuel

    #12;1 MASTER GUIDE Nanoscale Engineering #12;2 #12;3 Word of welcome Welcome to Lyon and more engineering institutions and universities in Lyon: �cole Centrale de Lyon (ECL), Institut des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon (INSA de lyon), Université Claude Bernard Lyon1 (UCBL1), which are part of the "Université

  6. Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Lithium-Ion Anodes Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Lithium-Ion Anodes 2012 DOE...

  7. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles...

  8. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Wednesday, 28 January 2009 00:00 The heterogeneous catalysts used in most...

  9. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Jianhua; Russell, Scott; Morishetti, Kiran; Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P.; Kent, Michael Stuart

    2011-02-01

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  10. Large-Scale Simulations of Advanced Materials and Nanoscale Devices J. Bernholc, M. Buongiorno Nardelli, W. Lu, V. Meunier, W.G. Schmidt, S. Wang, and Q. Zhao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    of the properties of complex materials. We describe two current applications: pyro- and piezoelectric properties to estimate their potential usefulness in various pyro- and piezoelectric device applications to be excellent piezoelectrics, with response values significantly greater than those of piezoelectric polymers

  11. Nanotribology and Nanoscale Friction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Yi [Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey; Qu, Zhihua [University of Central Florida, Orlando; Braiman, Yehuda [ORNL; Zhang, Zhenyu [ORNL; Barhen, Jacob [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Tribology is the science and technology of contacting solid surfaces in relative motion, including the study of lubricants, lubrication, friction, wear, and bearings. It is estimated that friction and wear cost the U.S. economy 6% of the gross national product (Persson, 2000). For example, 5% of the total energy generated in an automobile engine is lost to frictional resistance. The study of nanoscale friction has a technological impact in reducing energy loss in machines, in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and in the development of durable, low-friction surfaces and ultra-thin lubrication films.

  12. Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudget || DepartmentMapping the Nanoscale

  13. Microfluidics and Nanoscale Research Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microfluidics and Nanoscale Science Research Profile Our research group is engaged in a broad range of activities in the general area of microfluidics and nanoscale science. At a primary level, our interest that when compared to macroscale tech- nology, microfluidic systems engender a number of distinct advantages

  14. Nanoscale heat transfer - from computation to experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Tengfei

    2013-04-09

    Heat transfer can differ distinctly at the nanoscale from that at the macroscale. Recent advancement in

  15. Highly Reversible Open Framework Nanoscale Electrodes for Divalent Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Highly Reversible Open Framework Nanoscale Electrodes for Divalent Ion Batteries Richard Y. Wang into electrode materials has enabled the development of rechargeable batteries with high energy density. Reversible insertion of divalent ions such as magnesium would allow the creation of new battery chemistries

  16. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Rytov, S. M. , 1953. Theory of Electrical Fluctuation andRadiation Based on the theory of electrical ?uctuation and

  17. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    and the Olsen cycle can reach the Carnot ef?ciency between aCarnot ef?ciency is the maximum thermodynamic ef?- ciency which can be theoretically achieved by a power cycle

  18. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    small convective heat transfer rate between the py-observed that the net heat transfer rate between the platesmagnitude of average heat transfer rate Q in is about 1 W/cm

  19. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    actuation of microelectromechanical systems by the Casimirin a model microelectromechanical system”. Journal of Mi-

  20. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    actuation of microelectromechanical systems by the Casimireffect in a model microelectromechanical system”. Journal of

  1. Center for Nanoscale Materials | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonforsupernovae model (Journal Article)NationalAbout Research

  2. Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -Department of EnergyNEW1forEnergyatEnergy Nanomaterials

  3. Nanoscale Surface Topography to Guide Bone Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanoscale Surface Topography to Guide Bone Growth P R O J E C T L E A D E R : Jirun Sun (American T S Designed and fabricated devices with nanoscale surface topography. Controlled cell alignment by varying

  4. Carbon-bearing fluids at nanoscale interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, David [Ohio State University; Ok, Salim [Ohio State University, Columbus; Phan, A [Ohio State University, Columbus; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Striolo, Alberto [Oklahoma University; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The behaviour of fluids at mineral surfaces or in confined geometries (pores, fractures) typically differs from their bulk behaviour in many ways due to the effects of large internal surfaces and geometrical confinement. We summarize research performed on C-O-H fluids at nanoscale interfaces in materials of interest to the earth and material sciences (e.g., silica, alumina, zeolites, clays, rocks, etc.), emphasizing those techniques that assess microstructural modification and/or dynamical behaviour such as gravimetric analysis, small-angle (SANS) neutron scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations will be described that provide atomistic characterization of interfacial and confined fluid behaviour as well as aid in the interpretation of the neutron scattering results.

  5. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Helble, Joseph J. (Andover, MA); Moniz, Gary A. (Windham, NH); Morse, Theodore F. (Little Compton, RI)

    1997-02-04

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

  6. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Helble, Joseph J. (Andover, MA); Moniz, Gary A. (Windham, NH); Morse, Theodore F. (Little Compton, RI)

    1995-09-05

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

  7. Summary report for nanoscale magnetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, J.G.; Waddill, G.D.; Jankowski, A.F.; Tamura, E.; Sterne, P.A.; Pappas, D.P.; Tong, S.Y.

    1993-09-23

    We have probed the electronic, geometric, and magnetic nanoscale structure of ultrathin magnetic films, both monolayers and multilayers (Fe/Cu(001), FePt, FeCoPt, UFe{sub 2}, U-S). Techniques used included the MCD (magnetic circular dichroism)-variants of of x-ray absorption, core-level photoemission, and photoelectron diffraction. Progress has been made on nanoscale structure-property relations, in part of coupling of world-class experimentation and theoretical modeling. Feasibility of investigations of 5f magnetism using bulk uranium samples also has been demonstrated.

  8. Nanoscale, multidimensional artificial magnet created

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications The NREL windTeacherNanoscale ChemicalNanoscale,

  9. Nanoscale Charge Transport in Excitonic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Bommisetty, South Dakota State University

    2011-06-23

    Excitonic solar cells, including all-organic, hybrid organic-inorganic and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), offer strong potential for inexpensive and large-area solar energy conversion. Unlike traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, where all the charge generation and collection processes are well understood, these excitonic solar cells contain extremely disordered structures with complex interfaces which results in large variations in nanoscale electronic properties and has a strong influence on carrier generation, transport, dissociation and collection. Detailed understanding of these processes is important for fabrication of highly efficient solar cells. Efforts to improve efficiency are underway at a large number of research groups throughout the world focused on inorganic and organic semiconductors, photonics, photophysics, charge transport, nanoscience, ultrafast spectroscopy, photonics, semiconductor processing, device physics, device structures, interface structure etc. Rapid progress in this multidisciplinary area requires strong synergetic efforts among researchers from diverse backgrounds. Such effort can lead to novel methods for development of new materials with improved photon harvesting and interfacial treatments for improved carrier transport, process optimization to yield ordered nanoscale morphologies with well defined electronic structures.

  10. Nanoscale Electronic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jing, Xiaoye

    2010-01-01

    In practice, naturally-grown oxide layer on the surface ofThe naturally grown oxide layer is difficult to estimate dueNH 4 ) 2 S X removes oxide layer of III-V material through a

  11. Using Self-Assembly to Control Nanoscale Morphology in Semiconducting Polymers for Application in Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Amy Susan

    2015-01-01

    and Traditional Blend Casting: Nanoscale Structure andand Traditional Blend Casting: Nanoscale Structure andand Traditional Blend Casting: Nanoscale Structure and

  12. Nanoscale Twins Formed by Plastic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    -Ren Yang Phase Transformation Group 6/9/10 1PTM 2010 #12;Strengthening Mechanisms in Nano Bainitic Steels). 0 20 40 60 80 100 #12;Twinning in Steels · Twinning in steels can be achieved by several different methods: 1. Annealing Twins 2. Deformation Twins 3. Transformation Twins 6/9/10 PTM 2010 4 #12;Nanoscale

  13. Nanoscale Stress Measurements and Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Nanoscale Stress Measurements and Standards SEMICONDUCTORS Our objective is to develop accurate and lifetime, and address a critical measurement need in the MEMS industry, i.e., 90 % of MEMS customers and Customers · The semiconductor microelectronics industry is a $250B worldwide market with 9% cumulative

  14. Nanoscale mass conveyors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, Brian C. (Oakland, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

    2008-03-11

    A mass transport method and device for individually delivering chargeable atoms or molecules from source particles is disclosed. It comprises a channel; at least one source particle of chargeable material fixed to the surface of the channel at a position along its length; a means of heating the channel; and a means for applying an controllable electric field along the channel, whereby the device transports the atoms or molecules along the channel in response to applied electric field. In a preferred embodiment, the mass transport device will comprise a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT), although other one dimensional structures may also be used. The MWNT or other structure acts as a channel for individual or small collections of atoms due to the atomic smoothness of the material. Also preferred is a source particle of a metal such as indium. The particles move by dissociation into small units, in some cases, individual atoms. The particles are preferably less than 100 nm in size.

  15. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamza, A V

    2008-04-07

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The NSCL is delivering on its mission providing Laboratory programs with scientific solutions through the use of nanoscale synthesis and characterization. While this annual report summarizes 2007 activities, we have focused on nanoporous materials, advanced high strength, nanostructured metals, novel 3-dimensional lithography and characterization at the nanoscale for the past 3 years. In these three years we have synthesized the first monolithic nanoporous metal foams with less than 10% relative density; we have produced ultrasmooth nanocrystalline diamond inertial confinement fusion capsules; we have synthesized 3-dimensional graded density structures from full density to 5% relative density using nanolithography; and we have established ultrasmall angle x-ray scattering as a non-destructive tool to determine the structure on the sub 300nm scale. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and to train personnel for Lab programs. The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory. Andrew Detor from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sutapa Ghosal from the University of California, Irvine, Xiang Ying Wang from Shanghai Institute of Technology, and Arne Wittstock from University of Bremen joined the NSCL this year. The NSCL is pursuing four science and technology themes: nanoporous materials, advanced nanocrystalline materials, novel three-dimensional nanofabrication technologies, and nondestructive characterization at the mesoscale. The NSCL is also pursuing building new facilities for science and technology such as nanorobotics and atomic layer deposition.

  16. 60th Anniversary Issue: Physical Picoscale science and nanoscale engineering by electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    and development of X-ray-based technology is one of the most important inventions in human history, which has Zhong Lin Wang* School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta nanoscale technology related to materials science, biology, physics and chemistry. Keywords In situ electron

  17. Nanoscale, Electrified Liquid Jets for High-Resolution Printing of Charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, Division of Korea, and § Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 ABSTRACT Nearly all research in micro- and nanofabrication focuses on the formation of solid structures

  18. ORNL microscopy pencils patterns in polymers at the nanoscale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (865) 574-7308 ORNL microscopy pencils patterns in polymers at the nanoscale Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers used atomic force microscopy to draw nanoscale patterns in a...

  19. Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide Title Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication...

  20. The Nanoscale Biophysics of Microscale Cell Adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tees, David F.J.

    The Nanoscale Biophysics of Microscale Cell Adhesion David F. J. Tees, Ph.D. Department of Physics://www.phy.ohiou.edu/~tees/current_research.html #12;Outline 1) Adhesion molecules and review of cell-scale phenomena 2) Force dependence of reaction Appendix 2--Bell model Appendix 3--Reliability theory #12;Cell Adhesion: Microscale to Nanoscale Cell 1

  1. Assembly of biological building blocks for nano- and micro-fabrication of materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Chung-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Experimental studies were performed to fabricate various material structures using genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage. This virus template showed superior controls of material syntheses from nanoscale to microscale. ...

  2. Nanophotonics at CNM | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergy StorageNanophotonics

  3. Working at CNM | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricNCubictheThepresented in1: Model or WorkingWorking

  4. Development of Nanoscale Ceramics for Advanced Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miriam Leffler; Joseph Helble

    1999-09-30

    Bulk structures of unstabilized ZrO{sub 2-x}, with x in the range of 0 {<=} x {<=} 0.44, at ambient pressure have been found to exist in three different structures. (monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic.). At ambient temperature and elevated pressures above 3.5 GPa, unstabilized zirconia at these same compositions is found as a fourth phase, the orthorhombic phase. Work done in this project has demonstrated that nanoscale zirconia particles containing the orthorhombic phase in addition to amorphous material can be produced through solgel methods. Extensive characterization of this material including recent high temperature x-ray diffraction work has indicated that the structure of the synthesized zirconia appears to be linked to the oxygen vacancy population in the material, and that water appears to be a critical factor in determining the type of material formed during synthesis. These results suggest that surface energy alone is not the controlling factor in determining crystal phase.

  5. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

  6. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, David G.

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale ...

  7. NANOSCALE OPTICAL COMPUTING USING RESONANCE ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebeck, Alvin R.

    OPTICAL COMPUTING USING RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER LOGIC A NEW NANOSCALE DEVICE BASED ON A SINGLE-MOLECULE OPTICAL PHENOMENON CALLED RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER- molecule optical devices called chromo- phores. In isolation, a given chromophore absorbs photons

  8. Nanoscale Center Dedication | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to make them reality. That's what this facility will do - the future will be created right here. There are several very good reasons we have elected to locate our Nanoscale...

  9. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    OF CONTENTS Basic Energy Sciences Nanoscience/Nanotechnology Group Basic Energy Sciences Nanoscience/Nanotechnology Group Chair: Douglas H. Lowndes (ORNL) A. Paul#12;#12;Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions ABSTRACT This report

  10. Dynamics of sliding mechanisms in nanoscale friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yim, Shon W., 1973-

    2002-01-01

    Nanotribology is the study of friction and wear at the nanoscale, with relevance to such applications as micromechanical systems (MEMS) and thin, hard coatings. For these systems, classical laws of friction are inappropriate ...

  11. IT/Nano IFF Scientific Report 2007 Nanoscale Phase Transitions in Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IT/Nano · IFF Scientific Report 2007 158 I 159 Nanoscale Phase Transitions in Phase Change, and phase change (PC) materials are familiar to us as rewritable media (CD-RW, DVD- RW, DVD-RAM). Recently commercially available DVD-RW stor- age devices and DVD-RAM, are based on films of alloys of Ge, Sb, and Te

  12. Biologically Activated Noble Metal Alloys at the Nanoscale: For Lithium Ion Battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    Biologically Activated Noble Metal Alloys at the Nanoscale: For Lithium Ion Battery Anodes Yun Jung as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Using two clones, one for specificity (p8#9 virus) and one choice for lithium ion batteries, these noble metal/alloy nanowires serve as great model systems to study

  13. The Properties of Confined Water and Fluid Flow at the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwegler, E; Reed, J; Lau, E; Prendergast, D; Galli, G; Grossman, J C; Cicero, G

    2009-03-09

    This project has been focused on the development of accurate computational tools to study fluids in confined, nanoscale geometries, and the application of these techniques to probe the structural and electronic properties of water confined between hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates, including the presence of simple ions at the interfaces. In particular, we have used a series of ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations and quantum Monte Carlo calculations to build an understanding of how hydrogen bonding and solvation are modified at the nanoscale. The properties of confined water affect a wide range of scientific and technological problems - including protein folding, cell-membrane flow, materials properties in confined media and nanofluidic devices.

  14. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudgetMaterialMaterials Materials Access to

  15. Nanoscale Imaging of Lithium Ion Distribution During In Situ Operation of Battery Electrode and Electrolyte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Megan E; Gunceler, Deniz; Gao, Jie; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Schwarz, Kathleen A; Arias, Tomás A; Abruńa, Héctor D; Muller, David A

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in the development of new battery materials is understanding their fundamental mechanisms of operation and degradation. Their microscopically inhomogeneous nature calls for characterization tools that provide operando and localized information from individual grains and particles. Here we describe an approach that images the nanoscale distribution of ions during electrochemical charging of a battery in a transmission electron microscope liquid flow cell. We use valence energy-loss spectroscopy to track both solvated and intercalated ions, with electronic structure fingerprints of the solvated ions identified using an ab initio non-linear response theory. Equipped with the new electrochemical cell holder, nanoscale spectroscopy and theory, we have been able to determine the lithiation state of a LiFePO4 electrode and surrounding aqueous electrolyte in real time with nanoscale resolution during electrochemical charge and discharge. We follow lithium transfer between electrode and electrolyte a...

  16. Nanoscale Mixing of Soft Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Sangwoo; Soto, Haidy E.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S. (UMM); (Texas)

    2013-03-07

    Assessing the state of mixing on the molecular scale in soft solids is challenging. Concentrated solutions of micelles formed by self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymers in squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}) adopt a body-centered cubic (bcc) lattice, with glassy PS cores. Utilizing small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and isotopic labeling ({sup 1}H and {sup 2}H (D) polystyrene blocks) in a contrast-matching solvent (a mixture of squalane and perdeuterated squalane), we demonstrate quantitatively the remarkable fact that a commercial mixer can create completely random mixtures of micelles with either normal, PS(H), or deuterium-labeled, PS(D), cores on a well-defined bcc lattice. The resulting SANS intensity is quantitatively modeled by the form factor of a single spherical core. These results demonstrate both the possibility of achieving complete nanoscale mixing in a soft solid and the use of SANS to quantify the randomness.

  17. lame synthesis is one of the most versatile and promising technologies for large-scale production of nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    andenvironmental24 concern. Inorganic, nanostructured materials can be produced by doping a flame with inorganicLETTERS F lame synthesis is one of the most versatile and promising technologies for large-scale production of nanoscale materials1­3 . Pyrolysis has recently been shown to be a useful route

  18. Nano-scale Sensor Networks for Chemical Eisa Zarepour1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    natural gas to liquid fuel. Given that reliable wireless communi- cation at nano-scale is at very early

  19. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamza, A V; Lesuer, D R

    2006-01-03

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The initial emphasis of the NSCL has been on development of scientific solutions in support of target fabrication for the NIF laser and other stockpile stewardship experimental platforms. Particular emphasis has been placed on the design and development of innovative new materials and structures for use in these targets. Projects range from the development of new high strength nanocrystalline alloys to graded density materials to high Z nanoporous structures. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and train personnel for Lab programs such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Defense and Nuclear Technologies (DNT), and Nonproliferation, Arms control and International security (NAI). The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory.

  20. Polarization Engineering in Nano-Scale Waveguides Using Lossless Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, PoHan; Helmy, Amr S

    2016-01-01

    A device that achieves controllable rotation of the state of polarization by rotating the orientation of the eigenmodes of a waveguide by 45$^{\\circ}$ is introduced and analyzed. The device can be implemented using lossless materials on a nanoscale and helps circumvent the inherent polarization dependence of photonic devices realized within the silicon on insulator platform. We propose and evaluate two novel polarization rotator-based schemes to achieve polarization engineering functions: (1) A multi-purpose device, with dimensions on the order of a few wavelengths which can function as a polarization splitter or an arbitrary linear polarization state generator. (2) An energy efficient optical modulator that utilizes eigenmode rotation and epsilon near zero (ENZ) effects to achieve high extinction ratio, polarization insensitive amplitude modulation without the need to sweep the device geometry to match the TE and TM mode attributes. By using indium tin oxide (ITO) as an example for a tunable material, the pr...

  1. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergyApplications - EnergyNanoscaleNanoscale

  2. Nanoscale LEDs DOI: 10.1002/smll.200600628

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odom, Teri W.

    of macroscale organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for full-color dis- plays have created interestNanoscale LEDs DOI: 10.1002/smll.200600628 Addressable, Large-Area Nanoscale Organic Light in generating OLEDs at the nanoscale.[1,2] Reducing the size of an OLED can produce higher device densities per

  3. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudgetMaterial

  4. Design Optimization of Radionuclide Nano-Scale Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenfeld, D.W.; Tulenko, J.S.; Wang, J.; Smith, B.

    2004-10-06

    Radioisotopes have been used for power sources in heart pacemakers and space applications dating back to the 50's. Two key properties of radioisotope power sources are high energy density and long half-life compared to chemical batteries. The tritium battery used in heart pacemakers exceeds 500 mW-hr, and is being evaluated by the University of Florida for feasibility as a MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) power source. Conversion of radioisotope sources into electrical power within the constraints of nano-scale dimensions requires cutting-edge technologies and novel approaches. Some advances evolving in the III-V and II-IV semiconductor families have led to a broader consideration of radioisotopes rather free of radiation damage limitations. Their properties can lead to novel battery configurations designed to convert externally located emissions from a highly radioactive environment. This paper presents results for the analytical computational assisted design and modeling of semiconductor prototype nano-scale radioisotope nuclear batteries from MCNP and EGS programs. The analysis evaluated proposed designs and was used to guide the selection of appropriate geometries, material properties, and specific activities to attain power requirements for the MEMS batteries. Plans utilizing high specific activity radioisotopes were assessed in the investigation of designs employing multiple conversion cells and graded junctions with varying band gap properties. Voltage increases sought by serial combination of VOC s are proposed to overcome some of the limitations of a low power density. The power density is directly dependent on the total active areas.

  5. Nanoscale mapping of the W/Si(001) Schottky barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durcan, Chris A.; Balsano, Robert; LaBella, Vincent P., E-mail: vlabella@albany.edu [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    The W/Si(001) Schottky barrier was spatially mapped with nanoscale resolution using ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) and ballistic hole emission microscopy (BHEM) using n-type and p-type silicon substrates. The formation of an interfacial tungsten silicide is observed utilizing transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The BEEM and BHEM spectra are fit utilizing a linearization method based on the power law BEEM model using the Prietsch Ludeke fitting exponent. The aggregate of the Schottky barrier heights from n-type (0.71?eV) and p-type (0.47?eV) silicon agrees with the silicon band gap at 80?K. Spatially resolved maps of the Schottky barrier are generated from grids of 7225 spectra taken over a 1??m?×?1??m area and provide insight into its homogeneity. Histograms of the barrier heights have a Gaussian component consistent with an interface dipole model and show deviations that are localized in the spatial maps and are attributed to compositional fluctuations, nanoscale defects, and foreign materials.

  6. Controlling Magnetism at the Nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Jared

    2012-01-01

    systems and in rare-earth metal multilayer systems [7– 9].materials, rare-earths, transition metals, oxides, and/ormetals iron (as BCC a ferrite), cobalt, nickel, and some of the rare earth

  7. Nanoscale Calorimetry of Isolated Polyethylene Single Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Leslie H.

    Nanoscale Calorimetry of Isolated Polyethylene Single Crystals A. T. KWAN, M. YU. EFREMOV, E. A-film differential scanning calorimetry to investigate the melt- ing of isolated polyethylene single crystals of lamellar single crystals of polyethylene (PE). We obtain thickness, diffraction, and calorimetry data

  8. Nanoelectromechanical systems Electromechanical Transducers at the Nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekinci, Kamil

    Nanoelectromechanical systems Electromechanical Transducers at the Nanoscale: Actuation and Sensing;Electromechanical devices are rapidly being miniaturized, following the trend in commercial transistor electronics. Miniature electromechanical devices--now with dimensions in the deep sub-micrometer range--are envisioned

  9. Patterning Nanoscale Structures by Surface Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wei

    Patterning Nanoscale Structures by Surface Chemistry Wei Lu* and Dongchoul Kim Department combines spinodal decomposition, surface stress and surface chemistry. The simulation shows that the self-assembly process can be guided by tuning the surface chemistry of a substrate. An epilayer may evolve into various

  10. Contacts Integration into functional nanoscale devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metlushko, Vitali

    from the very beginning of the design process. While the properties of nano-scale magnetic devices by magnetoresistive random- access memory (MRAM). The design challenges faced by CMOS and MRAM are very similar of this, the topographical influence of contacts on the overlying magnetic device must be taken account

  11. Methods and devices for fabricating three-dimensional nanoscale structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.; Jeon, Seokwoo; Park, Jangung

    2010-04-27

    The present invention provides methods and devices for fabricating 3D structures and patterns of 3D structures on substrate surfaces, including symmetrical and asymmetrical patterns of 3D structures. Methods of the present invention provide a means of fabricating 3D structures having accurately selected physical dimensions, including lateral and vertical dimensions ranging from 10s of nanometers to 1000s of nanometers. In one aspect, methods are provided using a mask element comprising a conformable, elastomeric phase mask capable of establishing conformal contact with a radiation sensitive material undergoing photoprocessing. In another aspect, the temporal and/or spatial coherence of electromagnetic radiation using for photoprocessing is selected to fabricate complex structures having nanoscale features that do not extend entirely through the thickness of the structure fabricated.

  12. Method and system for nanoscale plasma processing of objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oehrlein, Gottlieb S. (Clarksville, MD); Hua, Xuefeng (Hyattsville, MD); Stolz, Christian (Baden-Wuerttemberg, DE)

    2008-12-30

    A plasma processing system includes a source of plasma, a substrate and a shutter positioned in close proximity to the substrate. The substrate/shutter relative disposition is changed for precise control of substrate/plasma interaction. This way, the substrate interacts only with a fully established, stable plasma for short times required for nanoscale processing of materials. The shutter includes an opening of a predetermined width, and preferably is patterned to form an array of slits with dimensions that are smaller than the Debye screening length. This enables control of the substrate/plasma interaction time while avoiding the ion bombardment of the substrate in an undesirable fashion. The relative disposition between the shutter and the substrate can be made either by moving the shutter or by moving the substrate.

  13. Atomic Calligraphy: The Direct Writing of Nanoscale Structures using MEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias Imboden; Han Han; Jackson Chang; Flavio Pardo; Cristian A. Bolle; Evan Lowell; David J. Bishop

    2013-04-04

    We present a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) based method for the resist free patterning of nano-structures. Using a focused ion beam (FIB) to customize larger MEMS machines, we fabricate apertures as small as 50 nm on plates that can be moved with nanometer precision over an area greater than 20x20 {\\mu}m^2. Depositing thermally evaporated gold atoms though the apertures while moving the plate results in the deposition of nanoscale metal patterns. Adding a shutter only microns above the aperture, enables high speed control of not only where but also when atoms are deposited. Using a shutter, different sized apertures can be selectively opened and closed for nano-structure fabrication with features ranging from nano- to micrometers in scale. The ability to evaporate materials with high precision, and thereby fabricate circuits and structures in situ, enables new kinds of experiments based on the interactions of a small number of atoms and eventually even single atoms.

  14. Nondestructive volumetric 3-D chemical mapping of nickel-sulfur compounds at the nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris W. M.; Chu Y.; Nelson, G.J.; Kiss, A.M.; Izzo Jr, J.R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, M.; Wang, S.; Chiu W.K.S.

    2012-04-04

    Nano-structures of nickel (Ni) and nickel subsulfide (Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}) materials were studied and mapped in 3D with high-resolution x-ray nanotomography combined with full field XANES spectroscopy. This method for characterizing these phases in complex microstructures is an important new analytical imaging technique, applicable to a wide range of nanoscale and mesoscale electrochemical systems.

  15. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  16. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, Bradley R. (Brentwood, CA); Talley, Chad E. (Brentwood, CA)

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  17. Characterization of Nanoscale Reinforced Polymer Composites as Active Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Sujay

    2012-02-14

    Bending moment E Electric field Em Elastic modulus Es Storage modulus w Tip displacement t Thickness t Thickness change L Length Z Impedance U0, V Voltage Conductivity C Capacitance C0 Capacitance of free space viii Df Loss factor tan... nanotube immersed in electrolyte ................... 6 1.5 Bending of the bucky paper under an applied field............................................. 7 1.6 Electrostrictive response of SWNTs...

  18. Dynamics of Excitons and Phonons in Disordered Nanoscale Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to a myriad of technological applications, ranging from sensing, imaging, solar energy harvesting, to future optoelectronic devices. In this talk I will overview several...

  19. Growth of and defect reduction in nanoscale materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, Kenneth J. (Berkeley, CA); Mickelson, William E. (San Francisco, CA); Zettl, Alex K. (Kensington, CA)

    2011-01-04

    Methods by which the growth of a nanostructure may be precisely controlled by an electrical current are described here. In one embodiment, an interior nanostructure is grown to a predetermined geometry inside another nanostructure, which serves as a reaction chamber. The growth is effected by a catalytic agent loaded with feedstock for the interior nanostructure. Another embodiment allows a preexisting marginal quality nanostructure to be zone refined into a higher-quality nanostructure by driving a catalytic agent down a controlled length of the nanostructure with an electric current. In both embodiments, the speed of nanostructure formation is adjustable, and the growth may be stopped and restarted at will. The catalytic agent may be doped or undoped to produce semiconductor effects, and the bead may be removed via acid etching.

  20. Imaging and Nanoscale Characterization Group Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , Department of Physics & Astronomy, The University of Tennessee, USA. 2008 Session Chair, APS March meeting of Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China Solid State Physics M.S., 1991 Peking University, China Condensed Matter Physics Ph.D., 1997 Professional Experience 2002­present Research Scientist, Oak

  1. Electrical and Optical Characterization of Nanoscale Materials for Electronics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chi-Yuan 1980-

    2012-10-05

    Due to a lack of fundamental knowledge about the role of molecular structures in molecular electronic devices, this research is focused on the development of instruments to understand the relation between device design and the electronic properties...

  2. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Nanoscale Measurements of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene Network Shaping of InherentInstitute (NTI):

  3. Center for Nanoscale Materials Brochure | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene Network Shaping ofStaff Highlight NinaMessage from

  4. Center for Nanoscale Materials Fact Sheet | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene Network Shaping ofStaff Highlight NinaMessage fromFact Sheet

  5. A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News BelowAsked toUSC-Aiken, SRNL SignDOE

  6. AUDIT REPORT Follow-up Audit of Nanoscale Materials Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s sconveyance of9, 2013ATVMEnergy's

  7. Scientists use world's fastest computer to simulate nanoscale material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| StanfordOffice ofTorus

  8. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have...

  9. Nanoscale engineering boosts performance of quantum dot light...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum dot light emitting diodes Nanoscale engineering boosts performance of quantum dot light emitting diodes Quantum dots are nano-sized semiconductor particles whose emission...

  10. Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Calcium and Strontium Titanate Perovskites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, Sulata Kumari

    2013-01-01

    and A. Navrotsky, “Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Lead Titanate2007. A. Navrotsky, “Thermodynamics of Solid Electrolytesand Y. Fei, “The Thermodynamics of Ordered Perovskites on

  11. Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) User Facilities User Facilities Home User Facilities at a Glance All User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities X-Ray Light...

  12. Ideal Configuration For Nanoscale Solar Cells - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ideal Configuration For Nanoscale Solar Cells Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryThe standard design of excitonic...

  13. Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage Lithium-Manganese Rich NMC Composite Cathodes with Cycling Friday, August 29, 2014 Renewable energy is critical for the...

  14. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  15. In situ characterization of nanoscale catalysts during anodic redox processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Renu National Institute of Standards and Technology; Crozier, Peter Arizona State University; Adams, James Arizona State University

    2013-09-19

    Controlling the structure and composition of the anode is critical to achieving high efficiency and good long-term performance. In addition to being a mixed electronic and ionic conductor, the ideal anode material should act as an efficient catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and dry hydrocarbons without de-activating through either sintering or coking. It is also important to develop novel anode materials that can operate at lower temperatures to reduce costs and minimized materials failure associated with high temperature cycling. We proposed to synthesize and characterize novel anode cermets materials based on ceria doped with Pr and/or Gd together with either a Ni or Cu metallic components. Ceria is a good oxidation catalyst and is an ionic conductor at room temperature. Doping it with trivalent rare earths such as Pr or Gd retards sintering and makes it a mixed ion conductor (ionic and electronic). We have developed a fundamental scientific understanding of the behavior of the cermet material under reaction conditions by following the catalytic oxidation process at the atomic scale using a powerful Environmental Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (ESTEM). The ESTEM allowed in situ monitoring of structural, chemical and morphological changes occurring at the cermet under conditions approximating that of typical fuel-cell operation. Density functional calculations were employed to determine the underlying mechanisms and reaction pathways during anode oxidation reactions. The dynamic behavior of nanoscale catalytic oxidation of hydrogen and methane were used to determine: ? Fundamental processes during anodic reactions in hydrogen and carbonaceous atmospheres ? Interfacial effects between metal particles and doped ceria ? Kinetics of redox reaction in the anode material

  16. Materials Science Volume 7, Number 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    Materials Science TM Volume 7, Number 4 Technologies for a changing world Nanomaterials for Energy Conversion and Storage Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries Surface-enhanced Solar Energy Convesion Changing the Landscape of Environmental and Energy Research Through Novel Nanoscale Materials #12

  17. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergyApplications - EnergyNanoscale Chemical

  18. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergyApplications - EnergyNanoscale

  19. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergyApplications -Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of

  20. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergyApplications -Nanoscale Chemical Imaging

  1. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications The NREL windTeacher Programs5fourSauerNanoscale

  2. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications The NREL windTeacherNanoscale Chemical Imaging of a

  3. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications The NREL windTeacherNanoscale Chemical Imaging of

  4. Method to determine thermal profiles of nanoscale circuitry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K; Begtrup, Gavi E

    2013-04-30

    A platform that can measure the thermal profiles of devices with nanoscale resolution has been developed. The system measures the local temperature by using an array of nanoscale thermometers. This process can be observed in real time using a high resolution imagining technique such as electron microscopy. The platform can operate at extremely high temperatures.

  5. Challenges in computational nanoscale contact Roger A. Sauer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and we discussed my doctoral research on computational nanoscale contact me- chanics (Sauer, 2006). After for the future. Abstract This paper outlines the differences between nanoscale and macroscale contact it becomes necessary to integrate the fundamental physical phenomena (Israelachvili, 1991; Persson, 2000

  6. Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer: Interfacial Effects Dominate the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    conduction 2. Convective heat transfer 3. Thermal radiation 4. Conclusions 1.1 Thermal conductivity3/15/2012 1 Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer: Interfacial Effects Dominate the Heat Transfer 1 Xing/nanoscale heat transfer becomes critical. What is the dominant factor in micro/nanosclae heat transfer

  7. Towards rational design of peptides for selective interaction with inorganic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krauland, Eric Mark

    2007-01-01

    Utilizing molecular recognition and self-assembly, material-specific biomolecules have shown great promise for engineering and ordering materials at the nanoscale. These molecules, inspired from natural biomineralization ...

  8. Control of friction at the nanoscale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barhen, Jacob; Braiman, Yehuda Y.; Protopopescu, Vladimir

    2010-04-06

    Methods and apparatus are described for control of friction at the nanoscale. A method of controlling frictional dynamics of a plurality of particles using non-Lipschitzian control includes determining an attribute of the plurality of particles; calculating an attribute deviation by subtracting the attribute of the plurality of particles from a target attribute; calculating a non-Lipschitzian feedback control term by raising the attribute deviation to a fractionary power .xi.=(2m+1)/(2n+1) where n=1, 2, 3 . . . and m=0, 1, 2, 3 . . . , with m strictly less than n and then multiplying by a control amplitude; and imposing the non-Lipschitzian feedback control term globally on each of the plurality of particles; imposing causes a subsequent magnitude of the attribute deviation to be reduced.

  9. Ultrashort-pulse laser generated nanoparticles of energetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welle, Eric J. (Niceville, NM); Tappan, Alexander S. (Albuquerque, NM); Palmer, Jeremy A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-08-03

    A process for generating nanoscale particles of energetic materials, such as explosive materials, using ultrashort-pulse laser irradiation. The use of ultrashort laser pulses in embodiments of this invention enables one to generate particles by laser ablation that retain the chemical identity of the starting material while avoiding ignition, deflagration, and detonation of the explosive material.

  10. Design and implementation of nanoscale fiber mechanical testing apparatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brayanov, Jordan, 1981-

    2004-01-01

    The rapid growth in the synthetic manufacturing industry demands higher resolution mechanical testing devices, capable of working with nanoscale fibers. A new device has been developed to perform single-axis tensile tests ...

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heat Transfer In Nanoscale Liquid Films 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bo Hung

    2010-07-14

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of nano-scale flows typically utilize fixed lattice crystal interactions between the fluid and stationary wall molecules. This approach cannot properly model thermal interactions at the wall-fluid interface...

  12. Nanoscale Light Focusing and Imaging with Nano-Optical Devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meenashi Sundaram, Vijay

    2014-09-23

    Energy transport analysis of micro/nano optics as well as their optimization to achieve high-throughput deep nanoscale patterning and microscopy is the goal of this study. To understand the energy transport in nano-optical ...

  13. Nanoscale surface modification studied by reflection anisotropy spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Paul David

    2009-11-26

    The development and control of nanoscale properties is a major goal in science and technology; for the development of such technologies it is important that there are experimental techniques which allow the monitoring ...

  14. Perspectives Nanotechnology and the public: Effectively communicating nanoscale science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crone, Wendy C.

    Perspectives Nanotechnology and the public: Effectively communicating nanoscale science August 2006 Key words: nanotechnology, communication, public knowledge, public understanding the public on concepts and applications associated with nanotechnology. The goal of our work

  15. Nanoscale structure and transport : from atoms to devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Matthew Hiram

    2005-01-01

    Nanoscale structures present both unique physics and unique theoretical challenges. Atomic-scale simulations can find novel nanostructures with desirable properties, but the search can be difficult if the wide range of ...

  16. Nano-scale scratching in chemical-mechanical polishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eusner, Thor

    2008-01-01

    During the chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process, a critical step in the manufacture of ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) semiconductor devices, undesirable nano-scale scratches are formed on the surfaces being ...

  17. Electronic structure and transport in molecular and nanoscale electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Xiaofeng

    2008-01-01

    Two approaches based on first-principles method are developed to qualitatively and quantitatively study electronic structure and phase-coherent transport in molecular and nanoscale electronics, where both quantum mechanical ...

  18. Programming Matter on Nanoscale | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Matter on Nanoscale November 21, 2013 at 3pm36-428 Oleg Gang Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory GangOleg01000 Abstract: In the last...

  19. Nanoscale Pore Network and Pore Fluid Characterization from Neutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Pore Network and Pore Fluid Characterization from Neutron Scattering and Modeling Techniques Jul 22 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Gernot Rother, Chemical Sciences Division...

  20. Nanoscale contact engineering for Si/Silicide nanowire devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Yung-Chen

    2012-01-01

    may open the way for spintronics to grow the magneticimpact the future of spintronics. 3.5. Reference Zutic, I. ;in nanoscale silicon spintronic devices. Here, we report the

  1. Stable Storage of Helium in Nanoscale Platelets at Semicoherent Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kashinath, Abishek

    He implanted into metals precipitates into nanoscale bubbles that may later grow into voids, degrading the properties of engineering alloys. Using multiscale modeling, we show that a different class of He precipitates may ...

  2. Non-Equilibrium Nanoscale Self-Organization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aziz, Michael J

    2006-03-09

    Self-organized one- and two-dimensional arrays of nanoscale surface features ("ripples" and "dots") sometimes form spontaneously on initially flat surfaces eroded by a directed ion beam in a process called "sputter patterning". Experiments on this sputter patterning process with focused and unfocused ion beams, combined with theoretical advances, have been responsible for a number of scientific advances. Particularly noteworthy are (i) the discovery of propagative, rather than dissipative, behavior under some ion erosion conditions, permitting a pattern to be fabricated at a large length scale and propagated over large distances while maintaining, or even sharpening, the sharpest features; (ii) the first demonstration of guided self-organization of sputter patterns, along with the observation that defect density is minimized when the spacing between boundaries is near an integer times the natural spatial period; and (iii) the discovery of metastability of smooth surfaces, which contradicts the nearly universally accepted linear stability theory that predicts that any surface is linearly unstable to sinusoidal perturbations of some wave vector.

  3. New Dark Matter Detector using Nanoscale Explosives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Alejandro; Freese, Katherine; Kurdak, Cagliyan; Tarle, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    We present nanoscale explosives as a novel type of dark matter detector and study the ignition properties. When a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle WIMP from the Galactic Halo elastically scatters off of a nucleus in the detector, the small amount of energy deposited can trigger an explosion. For specificity, this paper focuses on a type of two-component explosive known as a nanothermite, consisting of a metal and an oxide in close proximity. When the two components interact they undergo a rapid exothermic reaction --- an explosion. As a specific example, we consider metal nanoparticles of 5 nm radius embedded in an oxide. One cell contains more than a few million nanoparticles, and a large number of cells adds up to a total of 1 kg detector mass. A WIMP interacts with a metal nucleus of the nanoparticles, depositing enough energy to initiate a reaction at the interface between the two layers. When one nanoparticle explodes it initiates a chain reaction throughout the cell. A number of possible thermite mat...

  4. Stripe-like nanoscale structural phase separation in superconducting BaPb1-xBixO3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Zhang, Y.; Parra, C.; Manoharan, H. C.; Beasley, M. R.; Geballe, T. H.; Kramer, M. J.; Fisher, I. R.

    2015-09-16

    The phase diagram of BaPb1-xBixO3 exhibits a superconducting “dome” in the proximity of a charge density wave phase. For the superconducting compositions, the material coexists as two structural polymorphs. Here we show, via high resolution transmission electron microscopy, that the structural dimorphism is accommodated in the form of partially disordered nanoscale stripes. Identification of the morphology of the nanoscale structural phase separation enables determination of the associated length scales, which we compare to the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length. Thus, we find that the maximum Tc occurs when the superconducting coherence length matches the width of the partially disordered stripes, implying amore »connection between the structural phase separation and the shape of the superconducting dome.« less

  5. Nanoscale Imaging of Photocurrent 2 and Efficiency in CdTe Solar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale Imaging of Photocurrent 2 and Efficiency in CdTe Solar Cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale Imaging of Photocurrent 2 and Efficiency in CdTe Solar...

  6. CNM End-of-Experiment Survey | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReports from the Cloud Modeling Working Group AnnNatural gas

  7. X-ray microscopy at CNM | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-RayX-Ray ScienceX-RayX-ray

  8. Plasmonic nanoantennas: enhancing light-matter interactions at the nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Shobhit K

    2015-01-01

    The research area of plasmonics promises devices with ultrasmall footprint operating at ultrafast speeds and with lower energy consumption compared to conventional electronics. These devices will operate with light and bridge the gap between microscale dielectric photonic systems and nanoscale electronics. Recent research advancements in nanotechnology and optics have led to the creation of a plethora of new plasmonic designs. Among the most promising are nanoscale antennas operating at optical frequencies, called nanoantennas. Plasmonic nanoantennas can provide enhanced and controllable light-matter interactions and strong coupling between far-field radiation and localized sources at the nanoscale. After a brief introduction of several plasmonic nanoantenna designs and their well-established radio-frequency antenna counterparts, we review several linear and nonlinear applications of different nanoantenna configurations. In particular, the possibility to tune the scattering response of linear nanoantennas and...

  9. Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Rodriguez, Brian J [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Karapetian, Edgar [ORNL; Mirman, B [Suffolk University, Boston; Eliseev, E. A. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine

    2007-01-01

    Functionality of biological and inorganic systems ranging from nonvolatile computer memories and microelectromechanical systems to electromotor proteins and cellular membranes is ultimately based on the intricate coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena. In the past decade, piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has been established as a powerful tool for nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Here, we give an overview of the fundamental image formation mechanism in PFM and summarize recent theoretical and technological advances. In particular, we show that the signal formation in PFM is complementary to that in the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques, and we discuss the implications. We also consider the prospect of extending PFM beyond ferroelectric characterization for quantitative probing of electromechanical behavior in molecular and biological systems and high-resolution probing of static and dynamic polarization switching processes in low-dimensional ferroelectric materials and heterostructures.

  10. Predictive modeling of synergistic effects in nanoscale ion track formation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-08-05

    Molecular dynamics techniques and the inelastic thermal spike model are used to study the coupled effects of inelastic energy loss due to 21 MeV Ni ion irradiation and pre-existing defects in SrTiO3. We determine the dependence on pre-existing defect concentration of nanoscale track formation occurring from the synergy between the inelastic energy loss and the pre-existing atomic defects. We show that the nanoscale ion tracks’ size can be controlled by the concentration of pre-existing disorder. This work identifies a major gap in fundamental understanding concerning the role played by defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron–lattice coupling.

  11. Ballistic transport and electrical spin signal enhancement in a nanoscale three-terminal spintronic device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    Ballistic transport and electrical spin signal enhancement in a nanoscale three-terminal spintronic dimensions is investigated and exploited in a nanoscale three-terminal, all-electrical spintronic-electrical spintronic switching device in which ballistic electron transport at nanoscale dimensions combined

  12. Reoccurring Patterns in Hierarchical Protein Materials and Music: The Power of Analogies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesa, Tristan

    Complex hierarchical structures composed of simple nanoscale building blocks form the basis of most biological materials. Here, we demonstrate how analogies between seemingly different fields enable the understanding of ...

  13. Debonding in bi-layer material systems under moisture effect : a multiscale approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Tak-bun, Denvid

    2012-01-01

    Bi-layer material systems are found in various engineering applications ranging from nano-scale components, such as thin films in circuit boards, to macro-scale structures such as adhesive bonding in aerospace and civil ...

  14. Vision for the University of Connecticut Technology Park Materials Discovery, Product Design & Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    · Additive Manufacturing and Nanoscale Processing · Fuel Cells, Sustainable Energy & Energy Management & Development and Advanced Manufacturing: Partnering with Industry to Accelerate Manufacturing Innovation for the Tech Park which will house the Connecticut Collaboratory for Materials & Manufacturing (C2M2

  15. Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy via Relaxation of Solid-State Spin Probes at the Nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. T. Hall; P. Kehayias; D. A. Simpson; A. Jarmola; A. Stacey; D. Budker; L. C. L. Hollenberg

    2015-03-03

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) describes a suite of techniques for characterising electronic systems, with applications in physics, materials science, chemistry, and biology. However, the requirement for large electron spin ensembles in conventional ESR techniques limits their spatial resolution. Here we present a method for measuring the ESR spectrum of nanoscale electronic environments by measuring the relaxation time ($T_1$) of an optically addressed single-spin probe as it is systematically tuned into resonance with the target electronic system. As a proof of concept we extract the spectral distribution for the P1 electronic spin bath in diamond using an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centres, and demonstrate excellent agreement with theoretical expectations. As the response of each NV spin in this experiment is dominated by a single P1 spin at a mean distance of 2.7\\,nm, the extension of this all-optical technique to the single NV case will enable nanoscale ESR spectroscopy of atomic and molecular spin systems.

  16. Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buratto, Steve

    Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells David A area of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is investigated using conductive probe atomic particle at its end. This is due to the formation of protons, at the carbon cloth side of the cell

  17. Analysis and specificities of adhesive forces between microscale and nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is the packaging of NEMS which require handling, positioning, assembling and joining strategies in the mesoscale of the mesoscale in comparison with nanoscale and microscale. Firstly, it is shown that the distributions are presented. Thirdly, the van der Waals forces are increased by local deformations on the mesoscale contrary

  18. Controlled nanoscale doping of semiconductors via molecular monolayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    -limiting and self-assembly processes where surface and chemical phenomena guide the synthesis and fabrication) the formation of self-assembled monolayers of dopant-containing molecules on the surface of crystalline SiARTICLES Controlled nanoscale doping of semiconductors via molecular monolayers JOHNNY C. HO1

  19. Kinetic Energy Is Important in the Nanoscale World Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    that a is the best trial function of the three because it gives the lowest total energy, the primary criterionKinetic Energy Is Important in the Nanoscale World Frank Rioux Department of Chemistry College phenomena found in textbooks are expressed in terms of potential-energy-only (PEO) models. Inclusion

  20. NANO-SCALE CALORIMETRY OF ISOLATED POLYETHYLENE SINGLE CRYSTALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Leslie H.

    #12;NANO-SCALE CALORIMETRY OF ISOLATED POLYETHYLENE SINGLE CRYSTALS BY ALEX TAN KWAN B.S., Stanford) device, the nanocalorimeter, it was possible to investigate the melting of isolated polyethylene (PE, a simple Ni-foil calorimeter, to measure the heat capacity of a thin polyethylene film to verify

  1. Comment on `Nanoscale water capillary bridges under deeply negative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balibar, Sébastien

    saturated vapor pressure Psat. Because of the cohesion forces between particles, the pressure can evenComment on `Nanoscale water capillary bridges under deeply negative pressure' [Chem. Phys. Lett micro- scope tip and a silicon wafer. They deduced the pressure of liquid water inside the capillary

  2. Direct imaging of nanoscale magnetic interactions in minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Direct imaging of nanoscale magnetic interactions in minerals Richard J. Harrison*, Rafal E. Dunin. Magnetite is the most strongly magnetic mineral in nature. Small particles of magnetite in single-domain (SD and pseudo-SD particles (1). In most igneous rocks, the grain size of primary magnetic minerals exceeds

  3. Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer: Interfacial Effects Dominate the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    -probe method Pump laser is externally modulated and heats the sample Probe beam detects the transient3/15/2012 1 Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer: Interfacial Effects Dominate the Heat Transfer 1 Xing nanotransistors. Nanotechnology has been described as a new industrial revolution M. Chu, et al. Annu. Rev. Mater

  4. APPLIED PHYSICS REVIEWS Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 20032012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    APPLIED PHYSICS REVIEWS Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003­2012 David G. Cahill,1,a) Paul V, California 94305, USA 5 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA 9 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA

  5. Connecting the dots: Reinventing optics for nanoscale dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    contributions: N.J.H. wrote the paper. The author declares no conflict of interest. See companion article, an interesting analogy and scaling principle emerges. Just as radio-frequency antennas pro- vide sources survey of nanoscale optical components. (A) Gold nanostar SEM image, simulation geometry

  6. Hybrid Solar Cells with Prescribed Nanoscale Morphologies Based onHyperbranched Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gur, Ilan; Fromer, Neil A.; Chen, Chih-Ping; Kanaras, AntoniosG.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-09-09

    In recent years, the search to develop large-area solar cells at low cost has led to research on photovoltaic (PV) systems based on nanocomposites containing conjugated polymers. These composite films can be synthesized and processed at lower costs and with greater versatility than the solid state inorganic semiconductors that comprise today's solar cells. However, the best nanocomposite solar cells are based on a complex architecture, consisting of a fine blend of interpenetrating and percolating donor and acceptor materials. Cell performance is strongly dependent on blend morphology, and solution-based fabrication techniques often result in uncontrolled and irreproducible blends, whose composite morphologies are difficult to characterize accurately. Here we incorporate 3-dimensional hyper-branched colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals in solution-processed hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells, yielding reproducible and controlled nanoscale morphology.

  7. Micro- and Nanoscale Heat Transfer in Femtosecond Laser Processing of Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuwen; Chen, J K

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser material processing has received significant attention due to a growing need for the fabrication of miniaturized devices at micro- and nanoscales. The traditional phenomenological laws, such as Fourier's law of heat conduction, are challenged in the microscale regime and a hyperbolic or dual phase lag model should be employed. During ultrafast laser interaction with metal, the electrons and lattices are not in equilibrium. Various two-temperature models that can be used to describe the nonequilibrium heat transfer are presented. A semi-classical two-step heating model to investigate thermal transport in metals caused by ultrashort laser heating is also presented. The main difference between the semiclassical and the phenomenological two-temperature models is that the former includes the effects of electron drifting, which could result in significantly different electron and lattice temperature response from the latter for higher-intensity and shorter-pulse laser heating. Under higher laser flu...

  8. Using Dynamic Quantum Clustering to Analyze Hierarchically Heterogeneous Samples on the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hume, Allison; /Princeton U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07

    Dynamic Quantum Clustering (DQC) is an unsupervised, high visual data mining technique. DQC was tested as an analysis method for X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) data from the Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) group. The TXM group images hierarchically heterogeneous materials with nanoscale resolution and large field of view. XANES data consists of energy spectra for each pixel of an image. It was determined that DQC successfully identifies structure in data of this type without prior knowledge of the components in the sample. Clusters and sub-clusters clearly reflected features of the spectra that identified chemical component, chemical environment, and density in the image. DQC can also be used in conjunction with the established data analysis technique, which does require knowledge of components present.

  9. Nanoscale Advances in Catalysis and Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yimin; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-05-12

    In this perspective, we present an overview of nanoscience applications in catalysis, energy conversion, and energy conservation technologies. We discuss how novel physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials can be applied and engineered to meet the advanced material requirements in the new generation of chemical and energy conversion devices. We highlight some of the latest advances in these nanotechnologies and provide an outlook at the major challenges for further developments.

  10. An atomistic methodology of energy release rate for graphene at nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhen; Lee, James D., E-mail: jdlee@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, the George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Wang, Xianqiao [College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2014-03-21

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms packed into a honeycomb architecture, serving as a fundamental building block for electric devices. Understanding the fracture mechanism of graphene under various conditions is crucial for tailoring the electrical and mechanical properties of graphene-based devices at atomic scale. Although most of the fracture mechanics concepts, such as stress intensity factors, are not applicable in molecular dynamics simulation, energy release rate still remains to be a feasible and crucial physical quantity to characterize the fracture mechanical property of materials at nanoscale. This work introduces an atomistic simulation methodology, based on the energy release rate, as a tool to unveil the fracture mechanism of graphene at nanoscale. This methodology can be easily extended to any atomistic material system. We have investigated both opening mode and mixed mode at different temperatures. Simulation results show that the critical energy release rate of graphene is independent of initial crack length at low temperature. Graphene with inclined pre-crack possesses higher fracture strength and fracture deformation but smaller critical energy release rate compared with the graphene with vertical pre-crack. Owing to its anisotropy, graphene with armchair chirality always has greater critical energy release rate than graphene with zigzag chirality. The increase of temperature leads to the reduction of fracture strength, fracture deformation, and the critical energy release rate of graphene. Also, higher temperature brings higher randomness of energy release rate of graphene under a variety of predefined crack lengths. The energy release rate is independent of the strain rate as long as the strain rate is small enough.

  11. 320 MRS BULLETIN VOLUME 38 APRIL 2013 www.mrs.org/bulletin 2013 Materials Research Society Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    on the recent development of conductive paper for energy devices, particularly for ultracapacitors and batteries fibers at the nanoscale will allow this renewable material to be applied to advanced energy storage

  12. Novel photonic phenomena in nanostructured material systems with applications and mid-range efficient insensitive wireless energy-transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karalis, Aristeidis, 1978-

    2008-01-01

    A set of novel mechanisms for the manipulation of light in the nanoscale is provided. In the class of all-dielectric material systems, techniques for the suppression of radiative loss from incomplete-photonic-bandgap ...

  13. Deterministic, Nanoscale Fabrication of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jr., R M; Shirk, M; Gilmer, G; Rubenchik, A

    2004-09-24

    Neither LLNL nor any other organization has the capability to perform deterministic fabrication of mm-sized objects with arbitrary, {micro}m-sized, 3-dimensional features with 20-nm-scale accuracy and smoothness. This is particularly true for materials such as high explosives and low-density aerogels. For deterministic fabrication of high energy-density physics (HEDP) targets, it will be necessary both to fabricate features in a wide variety of materials as well as to understand and simulate the fabrication process. We continue to investigate, both in experiment and in modeling, the ablation/surface-modification processes that occur with the use of laser pulses that are near the ablation threshold fluence. During the first two years, we studied ablation of metals, and we used sub-ps laser pulses, because pulses shorter than the electron-phonon relaxation time offered the most precise control of the energy that can be deposited into a metal surface. The use of sub-ps laser pulses also allowed a decoupling of the energy-deposition process from the ensuing movement/ablation of the atoms from the solid, which simplified the modeling. We investigated the ablation of material from copper, gold, and nickel substrates. We combined the power of the 1-D hydrocode ''HYADES'' with the state-of-the-art, 3-D molecular dynamics simulations ''MDCASK'' in our studies. For FY04, we have stretched ourselves to investigate laser ablation of carbon, including chemically-assisted processes. We undertook this research, because the energy deposition that is required to perform direct sublimation of carbon is much higher than that to stimulate the reaction 2C + O{sub 2} => 2CO. Thus, extremely fragile carbon aerogels might survive the chemically-assisted process more readily than ablation via direct laser sublimation. We had planned to start by studying vitreous carbon and move onto carbon aerogels. We were able to obtain flat, high-quality vitreous carbon, which was easy to work on, experimentally and relatively easy to model. We were provided with bulk samples of carbon aerogel by Dr. Joe Satcher, but the shop that would have prepared mounted samples for us was overwhelmed by programmatic assignments. We are pursuing aligned carbon nanotubes, provided to us by colleagues at NASA Ames Research Center, as an alternative to aerogels. Dr. Gilmer started modeling the laser/thermally accelerated reactions of carbon with H{sub 2}, rather than O{sub 2}, due to limited information on equation of state for CO. We have extended our molecular dynamics models of ablation to include carbon in the form of graphite, vitreous carbon, and aerogels. The computer code has features that allow control of temperature, absorption of shock waves, and for the ejection of material from the computational cell. We form vitreous carbon atomic configurations by melting graphite in a microcanonical cell at a temperature of about 5000K. Quenching the molten carbon at a controlled rate of cooling yields material with a structure close to that of the vitreous carbon produced in the laboratory. To represent the aerogel, we have a computer code that connects ''graphite'' rods to randomly placed points in the 3-D computational cell. Ablation simulations yield results for vitreous carbon similar to our previous results with copper, usually involving the transient melting of the material above the threshold energy density. However, some fracturing in the solid regions occurs in this case, but was never observed in copper. These simulations are continuing, together with studies of the reaction of hydrogen with vitreous graphite at high temperatures. These reactions are qualitatively similar to that of oxygen with the carbon atoms at the surface, and the simulations should provide insight into the applicability of the use of chemical reactions to shape the surfaces of aerogels.

  14. Nanoscale capillary wetting studied with dissipative particle dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Cupelli; B. Henrich; M. Moseler; M. Santer

    2006-02-19

    We demonstrate that Multi-Body Dissipative Particle Dynamics (MDPD) can be used as an efficient computational tool for the investigation of nanoscale capillary impregnation of confined geometries. As an essential prerequisite, a novel model for a solid-liquid interface in the framework of MDPD is introduced, with tunable wetting behaviour and thermal roughening to reduce artificial density- and temperature oscillations. Within this model, the impregnation dynamics of a water-like fluid into a nanoscale slit pore has been studied. Despite the coarse graining implied with the model fluid, a sufficient amount of non-equilibrium averaging can be achieved allowing for the extraction of useful information even from transient simulations, such as the dynamic apparent contact angle. Although it is found to determine the capillary driving completely, it cannot be intepreted as a simple function of the capillary number.

  15. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects ofmore »both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.« less

  16. Equilibrium insertion of nanoscale objects into phospholipid bilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Pogodin; Vladimir A. Baulin

    2011-08-30

    Certain membrane proteins, peptides, nanoparticles and nanotubes have rigid structure and fixed shape. They are often viewed as spheres and cylinders with certain surface properties. Single Chain Mean Field theory is used to model the equilibrium insertion of nanoscale spheres and rods into the phospholipid bilayer. The equilibrium structures and the resulting free energies of the nano-objects in the bilayer allow to distinguish different orientations in the bilayer and estimate the energy barrier of insertion.

  17. How do liquids confined at the nanoscale influence adhesion?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Yang; U. Tartaglino; B. N. J. Persson

    2006-12-06

    Liquids play an important role in adhesion and sliding friction. They behave as lubricants in human bodies especially in the joints. However, in many biological attachment systems they acts like adhesives, e.g. facilitating insects to move on ceilings or vertical walls. Here we use molecular dynamics to study how liquids confined at the nanoscale influence the adhesion between solid bodies with smooth and rough surfaces. We show that a monolayer of liquid may strongly affect the adhesion.

  18. Computation of radiative heat transport across a nanoscale vacuum gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budaev, Bair V. Bogy, David B.

    2014-02-10

    Radiation heat transport across a vacuum gap between two half-spaces is studied. By consistently applying only the fundamental laws of physics, we obtain an algebraic equation that connects the temperatures of the half-spaces and the heat flux between them. The heat transport coefficient generated by this equation for such structures matches available experimental data for nanoscale and larger gaps without appealing to any additional specific mechanisms of energy transfer.

  19. Hetero-twin formation during growth of nano-scale Al-TiN composites - experimental and DFT studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharyya, Dhriti [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Xiang - Yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoagland, Richard G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Genc, A [MSE, OSU; Fraser, H L [MSE, OSU

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that high stacking fault energy metals such as Al do not form either growth twins or mechanical twins easily. Although mechanical twins in nanocrystalline Al have been observed under certain conditions, growth twins have never been observed. In this work, the authors report for the first time, through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), that Al layers, when deposited on TiN layers, tend to grow in a twin relationship to both the TiN layer and the underlying Al layer. The TiN layers assume the orientation of the Al layers below. Calculations using density functional theory (DFT) show that nitrogen termination in the {l_brace}111{r_brace} growth plane of the TiN layers favors the growth of twin oriented Al layers over these TiN layers. This finding provides a way to create a twin-modulated structure in Al with the inclusion of intermediate nm-scale layer of an ionic solid such as TiN. Al metal is resistant to twinning, as it has a high stacking fault energy (SFE) of > 150 mJ/m. Although twins have been observed in nano-scale grains of Al, and predicted by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in conditions when the nanoscale grains are plastically deformed, no process or phenomenon has been reported yet in which the deposition of an intermediate layer of a different material phase causes the subsequent layer of Al to be deposited in the twin orientation. The authors show in this paper that it is possible to form Al layers in twin orientation to each other across polar TiN layers, if these are grown so that both the Al and TiN layers have a {l_brace}111{r_brace} surface as their growth front. Since the deposition of Al and TiN layers is used in the formation of diffusion barriers, and the mechanical properties of these nanoscale multilayers are also seen to be exceptional, it is important to investigate and understand their structure at the nanometer length scale, and thence to be able to control it. Moreover, these findings point out a method of introducing nano-scale twins in high SFE materials in general, and can potentially improve the properties of nano-layered materials.

  20. Nanoscale Dielectric Capacitors Composed of Graphene and Boron Nitride Layers: A First Principles Study of High-Capacitance at Nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Özçelik, V Ongun

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a nanoscale dielectric capacitor model consisting of two-dimensional, hexagonal h-BN layers placed between two commensurate and metallic graphene layers using self-consistent field density functional theory. The separation of equal amounts of electric charge of different sign in different graphene layers is achieved by applying electric field perpendicular to the layers. The stored charge, energy, and the electric potential difference generated between the metallic layers are calculated from the first-principles for the relaxed structures. Predicted high-capacitance values exhibit the characteristics of supercapacitors. The capacitive behavior of the present nanoscale model is compared with that of the classical Helmholtz model, which reveals crucial quantum size effects at small separations, which in turn recede as the separation between metallic planes increases.

  1. Optical Properties of Nanostructured Optical Materials Russell J. Gehr* and Robert W. Boyd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Robert W.

    Optical Properties of Nanostructured Optical Materials Russell J. Gehr* and Robert W. Boyd Manuscript Received April 24, 1996X The optical properties of nanoscale composite materials are often quite different from the properties of the constituent materials from which the composite is constructed

  2. Near Zero Friction from Nanoscale Lubricants | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Near Zero Friction from Nanoscale Lubricants Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy...

  3. Stripe-like nanoscale structural phase separation in superconducting BaPb1-xBixO3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Zhang, Y.; Parra, C.; Manoharan, H. C.; Beasley, M. R.; Geballe, T. H.; Kramer, M. J.; Fisher, I. R.

    2015-09-16

    The phase diagram of BaPb1-xBixO3 exhibits a superconducting “dome” in the proximity of a charge density wave phase. For the superconducting compositions, the material coexists as two structural polymorphs. Here we show, via high resolution transmission electron microscopy, that the structural dimorphism is accommodated in the form of partially disordered nanoscale stripes. Identification of the morphology of the nanoscale structural phase separation enables determination of the associated length scales, which we compare to the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length. Thus, we find that the maximum Tc occurs when the superconducting coherence length matches the width of the partially disordered stripes, implying a connection between the structural phase separation and the shape of the superconducting dome.

  4. Formation of hollow nanocrystals through the nanoscale kirkendall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Yadong; Rioux, Robert M.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Hughes, Steven; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2004-03-11

    We demonstrate that hollow nanocrystals can be synthesized through a mechanism analogous to the Kirkendall Effect, in which pores form due to the difference in diffusion rates between two components in a diffusion couple. Cobalt nanocrystals are chosen as a primary example to show that their reaction in solution with oxygen, sulfur or selenium leads to the formation of hollow nanocrystals of the resulting oxide and chalcogenides. This process provides a general route to the synthesis of hollow nanostructures of large numbers of compounds. A simple extension of this process yields platinum-cobalt oxide yolk-shell nanostructures which may serve as nanoscale reactors in catalytic applications.

  5. Nanoscale topographical replication of graphene architecture by artificial DNA nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Y.; Seo, S.; Park, J.; Park, T.; Ahn, J. R., E-mail: jrahn@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, J.; Dugasani, S. R. [Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, S. H. [College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, S. H., E-mail: sunghapark@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-09

    Despite many studies on how geometry can be used to control the electronic properties of graphene, certain limitations to fabrication of designed graphene nanostructures exist. Here, we demonstrate controlled topographical replication of graphene by artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nanostructures. Owing to the high degree of geometrical freedom of DNA nanostructures, we controlled the nanoscale topography of graphene. The topography of graphene replicated from DNA nanostructures showed enhanced thermal stability and revealed an interesting negative temperature coefficient of sheet resistivity when underlying DNA nanostructures were denatured at high temperatures.

  6. Analysis and Modeling of Parasitic Capacitances in Advanced Nanoscale Devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bekal, Prasanna

    2012-07-16

    Graphics Corporation, 2011. [7] ?Predictive Technology Model (PTM).? [Online]. http://ptm.asu.edu [8] H.-H. Tsai, C.-L. Yu, and C.-Y. Wu, ?A Bird's Beak Reduction Technique for LOCOS in VLSI Fabrication,? IEEE Electron Device Letters, vol. 7, no. 2, pp... AND MODELING OF PARASITIC CAPACITANCES IN ADVANCED NANOSCALE DEVICES A Thesis by PRASANNA BEKAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  7. Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergyApplications -Nanoscale Chemical

  8. Nanoscale thermal transport II (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switch for integration withLa1.9Ca1.1Cu2O6+δ madeNanoscale

  9. Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewing systemVacancyVacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire

  10. Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewing systemVacancyVacancy-Induced Nanoscale

  11. Nanoscale engineering boosts performance of quantum dot light emitting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications The NREL windTeacherNanoscale Chemical

  12. PHILOSOPHICAL MAGAZINE A, 2002, VOL. 82, NO. 16, 31193127 Dislocation dipoles in nanoscale lms with compositional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovid'ko Ilya A.

    PHILOSOPHICAL MAGAZINE A, 2002, VOL. 82, NO. 16, 3119±3127 Dislocation dipoles in nanoscale ®lms and their dipole con®gurations in nanoscale ®lms with compositional inhomogeneities is suggested. Energy characterizes the energetically favourable generation of mis®t dislocation dipoles in ®lms with compositional

  13. Self-Powered Wireless Nano-scale Sensor Networks within Chemical Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    Self-Powered Wireless Nano-scale Sensor Networks within Chemical Reactors Eisa Zarepour1 Mahbub, Australia #12;Abstract Because of their small size and unique nanomaterial properties, nano-scale sen- sor networks (NSNs) can be applied in many chemical applications to monitor and control the chemical process

  14. Nanoscale Anisotropic Plastic Deformation in Single Crystal Aragonite C. Kearney,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanoscale Anisotropic Plastic Deformation in Single Crystal Aragonite C. Kearney,1 Z. Zhao,2 B. J; published 30 June 2006) The nanoscale anisotropic elastic-plastic behavior of single-crystal aragonite coaxial to the c axis exhibited load plateaus indicative of dislocation nucleation events. Plasticity

  15. Real-time observation of lithium fibers growth inside a nanoscale lithium-ion battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    Real-time observation of lithium fibers growth inside a nanoscale lithium-ion battery Hessam to observe the real-time nucleation and growth of the lithium fibers inside a nanoscale Li-ion battery. Our.1063/1.3643035] Lithium-ion batteries are of great interest due to their high energy density, however, various safety

  16. Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped Emmanuel Rousseau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped silicon the role of surface plasmons for nanoscale radiative heat transfer between doped silicon surfaces. We derive a new accurate and closed-form expression of the radiative near- field heat transfer. We also

  17. Electrochemical Nanoscale Templating: Laterally Self-Aligned Growth of Organic-Metal Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borguet, Eric

    attractive for a wide range of applications such as the fabrication of nanoscale devices, energy storage of nanostructures into 2D or 3D arrays is necessary for the further hierarchical development of devices. TemplatingElectrochemical Nanoscale Templating: Laterally Self-Aligned Growth of Organic-Metal Nanostructures

  18. A non-planar organic molecule with non-volatile electrical bistability for nano-scale data storage{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    A non-planar organic molecule with non-volatile electrical bistability for nano-scale data storage-planar organic molecule with electron donor and acceptor capabilities was synthesized for nano-scale data storage possesses good electrical bistability. Nano-scale recording dots with an average diameter of 2.5 nm were

  19. Polypeptide A9K at Nanoscale Carbon: Simulation Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitaly V. Chaban; Andre Arruda; Eudes Eterno Fileti

    2015-08-21

    An amphiphilic nature of the surfactant-like peptides is responsible for their propensity to aggregate at the nanoscale. These peptides can be readily used for a non-covalent functionalization of nanoparticles and macromolecules. This work reports an observation of supramolecular ensembles consisting of ultrashort carbon nanotubes (USCNTs), graphene (GR) and A9K polypeptide formed by lysine and arginine. Potential of mean force (PMF) is used as a major descriptor of the CNT-A9K and GR-A9K binding process, supplementing structural data. The phase space sampling is performed by multiple equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations with position restraints, where applicable. Binding in all cases was found to be thermodynamically favorable. Encapsulation in the (10,10) USCNT is particularly favorable. Curvature of external surface does not favor binding. Thus, binding of A9K at GR is stronger than its binding at the outer sidewall of USCNTs. Overall, the presented results favor non-covalent functionalization of nanoscale carbons that are considered interesting in the fields of biomaterials, biosensors, biomedical devices, and drug delivery.

  20. Macro- to nanoscale wear prevention via molecular adsorption.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Seong H.; Asay, David B.; Dugger, Michael Thomas; Ohlhausen, James Anthony

    2007-04-01

    As the size of mechanical systems shrinks from macro- to nanoscales, surface phenomena such as adhesion, friction, and wear become increasingly significant. This paper demonstrates the use of alcohol adsorption as a means of continuously replenishing the lubricating layer on the working device surfaces and elucidates the tribochemical reaction products formed in the sliding contact region. Friction and wear of native silicon oxide were studied over a wide range of length scales from macro- to nanoscales using a ball-on-flat tribometer (millimeter scale), sidewall microelectromechanical system (MEMS) tribometer (micrometer scale), and atomic force microscopy (nanometer scale). In all cases, the alcohol vapor adsorption successfully lubricated and prevented wear. Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis of the sliding contact region revealed that high molecular weight oligomeric species were formed via tribochemical reactions of the adsorbed linear alcohol molecules. These tribochemical products seemed to enhance the lubrication and wear prevention. In the case of sidewall MEMS tests, the lifetime of the MEMS device was radically increased via vapor-phase lubrication with alcohol.

  1. N C M NNebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience University of NebraskaLincoln

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    materials for energy applications such as electric motors for automobiles and wind turbines. Center, low-energy devices for technologies combining memory and logic functions. It is supported is the manipulation of material at the nanoscale to take advantage of these properties. The exploration

  2. High-pressure lubricity at the meso- and nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Vanossi; A. Benassi; N. Varini; E. Tosatti

    2013-01-11

    The increase of sliding friction upon increasing load is a classic in the macroscopic world. Here we discuss the possibility that friction rise might sometimes turn into a drop when, at the mesoscale and nanoscale, a confined lubricant film separating crystalline sliders undergoes strong layering and solidification. Under pressure, transitions from N to N-1 layers may imply a change of lateral periodicity of the crystallized lubricant sufficient to alter the matching of crystal structures, influencing the ensuing friction jump. A pressure-induced friction drop may occur as the shear gradient maximum switches from the lubricant middle, marked by strong stick-slip with or without shear melting, to the crystalline slider-lubricant interface, characterized by smooth superlubric sliding. We present high pressure sliding simulations to display examples of frictional drops, suggesting their possible relevance to the local behavior in boundary lubrication.

  3. Friction-Induced Fluid Heating in Nanoscale Helium Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhigang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-05-21

    We investigate the mechanism of friction-induced fluid heating in nanoconfinements. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the temperature variations of liquid helium in nanoscale Poiseuille flows. It is found that the fluid heating is dominated by different sources of friction as the external driving force is changed. For small external force, the fluid heating is mainly caused by the internal viscous friction in the fluid. When the external force is large and causes fluid slip at the surfaces of channel walls, the friction at the fluid-solid interface dominates over the internal friction in the fluid and is the major contribution to fluid heating. An asymmetric temperature gradient in the fluid is developed in the case of nonidentical walls and the general temperature gradient may change sign as the dominant heating factor changes from internal to interfacial friction with increasing external force.

  4. Universal contact-line dynamics at the nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Rivetti; Thomas Salez; Michael Benzaquen; Elie Raphaël; Oliver Bäumchen

    2015-07-31

    The relaxation dynamics of the contact angle between a viscous liquid and a smooth substrate is studied at the nanoscale. Through atomic force microscopy measurements of polystyrene nanostripes we monitor simultaneously the temporal evolution of the liquid-air interface as well as the position of the contact line. The initial configuration exhibits high curvature gradients and a non-equilibrium contact angle that drive liquid flow. Both these conditions are relaxed to achieve the final state, leading to three successive regimes along time: i) stationary-contact-line levelling; ii) receding-contact-line dewetting; iii) collapse of the two fronts. For the first regime, we reveal the existence of a self-similar evolution of the liquid interface, which is in excellent agreement with numerical calculations from a lubrication model. For different liquid viscosities and film thicknesses we provide evidence for a transition to dewetting featuring a universal critical contact angle and dimensionless time.

  5. Nano-Scale Hydroxyapatite: Synthesis, Two-Dimensional Transport Experiments, and Application for Uranium Remediation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kanel, S. R.; Clement, T. P.; Barnett, M. O.; Goltz, M. N.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic nano-scale hydroxyapatite (NHA) was prepared and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. The XRD data confirmed that the crystalline structure and chemical composition of NHA correspond to Ca 5 OH(PO 4 ) 3 . The SEM data confirmed the size of NHA to be less than 50?nm. A two-dimensional physical model packed with saturated porous media was used to study the transport characteristics of NHA under constant flow conditions. The data show that the transport patterns of NHA were almost identical to tracer transport patterns. This result indicates that the NHA material canmore »move with water like a tracer, and its movement was neither retarded nor influenced by any physicochemical interactions and/or density effects. We have also tested the reactivity of NHA with 1?mg/L hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) and found that complete removal of U(VI) is possible using 0.5?g/L NHA at pH?5 to 6. Our results demonstrate that NHA has the potential to be injected as a dilute slurry for in situ treatment of U(VI)-contaminated groundwater systems. « less

  6. Novel approaches to tailor and tune light-matter interactions at the nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kort-Kamp, W J M

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we propose new, versatile schemes to control light-matter interactions at the nanoscale. In the first part of the thesis, we envisage a new class of plasmonic cloaks made of magneto-optical (MO) materials. We demonstrate that the application of a uniform magnetic field B in these cloaks may not only switch on and off the cloaking mechanism, but also mitigate the electromagnetic (EM) absorption. We also prove that the scattered field profile can be effectively controlled by changing B. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the study of light-matter interactions mediated by fluctuations of the vacuum EM field. Firstly, we demonstrate that the Purcell effect can be effectively suppressed for an excited atom near a cloaking device. Furthermore, the decay rate of a quantum emitter near a graphene-coated wall under the influence of an external magnetic field is studied. We show that the MO properties of graphene strongly affect the atomic lifetime and that B allows for an unprecedented control ...

  7. Time dynamics of photothermal vs optoacoustic response in mid IR nanoscale biospectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tovee, Peter D; Kjoller, Kevin; Allsop, David; Weightman, Peter; Surman, Mark; Siggel-King, Michele R F; Wolski, Andy; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy, a well established tool for chemical analysis of diverse materials, has significant potential in biomedical applications. While the spatial resolution of traditional IR spectroscopy is limited by the wavelength of the IR light to the few micrometres, it has been shown that nanoscale chemical analysis can be obtained by detecting IR induced local heating photothermal response via Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) or local thermomechanical expansion using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). This paper explores the potential of a pulsed ps pulse duration high power free electron laser (FEL) light source for AFM-IR and SThM-IR spectroscopy employing standard AFM and SThM probes. The SThM-IR response was found to have a detrimental strong background signal due to the direct heating of the probe, whereas the AFM IR thermomechanical response allowed to eliminate such a problem for both top down and bottom up illuminations with the FEL IR source. The SThM IR characteristic response time was ap...

  8. Many of the key technological problems associated with alternative energies (e.g., thermoelectrics, ad-vanced batteries, hydrogen storage, etc.) may be traced back to the lack of suitable materials. Both the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilian, Kristopher A.

    , ad- vanced batteries, hydrogen storage, etc.) may be traced back to the lack of suitable materials Motor Company, where he was group leader for the Hydrogen Storage and Nanoscale Modeling Group. He

  9. TRADITIONAL METALLURGY, NANOTECHNOLOGIES AND STRUCTURAL MATERIALS: A SORBY AWARD LECTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louthan, M

    2007-07-17

    Traditional metallurgical processes are among the many ''old fashion'' practices that use nanoparticles to control the behavior of materials. Many of these practices were developed long before microscopy could resolve nanoscale features, yet the practitioners learned to manipulate and control microstructural elements that they could neither see nor identify. Furthermore, these early practitioners used that control to modify microstructures and develop desired material properties. Centuries old colored glass, ancient high strength steels and medieval organ pipes derived many of their desirable features through control of nanoparticles in their microstructures. Henry Sorby was among the first to recognize that the properties of rocks, minerals, metals and organic materials were controlled by microstructure. However, Mr. Sorby was accused of the folly of trying to study mountains with a microscope. Although he could not resolve nanoscale microstructural features, Mr. Sorby's observations revolutionized the study of materials. The importance of nanoscale microstructural elements should be emphasized, however, because the present foundation for structural materials was built by manipulating those features. That foundation currently supports several multibillion dollar industries but is not generally considered when the nanomaterials revolution is discussed. This lecture demonstrates that using nanotechnologies to control the behavior of metallic materials is almost as old as the practice of metallurgy and that many of the emergent nanomaterials technologists are walking along pathways previously paved by traditional metallurgists.

  10. Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals as nanoscale emissive probes in light emitting diodes and cell biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Hao, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    This thesis employs colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) as nanoscale emissive probes to investigate the physics of light emitting diodes (LEDs), as well as to unveil properties of cells that conventional imaging ...

  11. Templated self-assembly of Si-containing block copolymers for nanoscale device fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Caroline A.

    Block copolymers have been proposed for self-assembled nanolithography because they can spontaneously form well-ordered nanoscale periodic patterns of lines or dots in a rapid, low-cost process. By templating the selfassembly, ...

  12. Applications of a new theory extending continuum mechanics to the nanoscale 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Kaibin

    2005-11-01

    In this dissertation, we present the Slattery-Oh-Fu theory extending continuum mechanics to the nanoscale and its applications. We begin with an analysis of supercritical adsorption of argon, krypton, and methane on Graphon before we fully develop...

  13. Development of novel high-performance six-axis magnetically levitated instruments for nanoscale applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verma, Shobhit

    2005-11-01

    This dissertation presents two novel 6-axis magnetic-levitation (maglev) stages that are capable of nanoscale positioning. These stages have very simple and compact structure that is advantageous to meet requirements in the next...

  14. In-situ Observation of Switchable Nanoscale Topography for Y-Shaped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    In-situ Observation of Switchable Nanoscale Topography for Y-Shaped Binary Brushes in Fluids Yen network-like surface topography formed by coexisting stretched soluble PAA arms and collapsed insoluble PS

  15. Nanoscale Triboelectric-Effect-Enabled Energy Conversion for Sustainably Powering Portable Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Nanoscale Triboelectric-Effect-Enabled Energy Conversion for Sustainably Powering Portable: Harvesting energy from our living environment is an effective approach for sustainable, maintenance-free, and green power source for wireless, portable, or implanted electronics. Mechanical energy scavenging based

  16. Toward Nanoscale Three-Dimensional Printing: Nanowalls Built of Electrospun Nanofibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ho-Young

    . This novel 3D printing scheme can be applied to the development of various 3D nanoscale objects including manufacturing for several decades.1 So- called 3D printing is reaching a stage where the desired products can

  17. Ensemble Dependent Matrix Methodology for Probabilistic-Based Fault-tolerant Nanoscale Circuit Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, An-Yeu "Andy"

    Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Canada *Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taiwan Abstract tools development and to optimize nanoscale circuit and system design. In this paper, we show

  18. High-speed multiple-mode mass-sensing resolves dynamic nanoscale mass distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olcum, Selim

    Simultaneously measuring multiple eigenmode frequencies of nanomechanical resonators can determine the position and mass of surface-adsorbed proteins, and could ultimately reveal the mass tomography of nanoscale analytes. ...

  19. Generalizations of the Landau-Zener theory in the physics of nanoscale systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai

    2004-09-30

    Nanoscale systems have sizes intermediate between atomic and macroscopic ones. Therefore their treatment often requires a combination of methods from atomic and condensed matter physics. The conventional Landau-Zener theory, being a powerful tool...

  20. University of California, Santa Cruz, Applied Optics Grouphttp://photon.soe.ucsc.edu Nanoscale Optofluidics for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Herbie

    University of California, Santa Cruz, Applied Optics Grouphttp://photon.soe.ucsc.edu Nanoscale;University of California, Santa Cruz, Applied Optics Grouphttp://photon.soe.ucsc.edu Background Microfluidics Single molecule analysis Integrated optics Singleparticle Optofluidics Optofluidics: combination

  1. Label-free route to rapid, nanoscale characterization of cellular structure and dynamics through opaque media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Bipin

    We report a novel technique for label-free, rapid visualization of structure and dynamics of live cells with nanoscale sensitivity through traditionally opaque media. Specifically, by combining principles of near-infrared ...

  2. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than Fe into the structure of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) has been shown to greatly enhance the magnetic properties of the particles, tailoring them to different commercial uses. However, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is often carried out at high temperatures with toxic solvents resulting in high environmental and energy costs. Additionally, these ferrite nanoparticles are not intrinsically biocompatible, and to make them suitable for insertion into the human body is a rather intricate task. A relatively unexplored resource for magnetic nanomaterial production is subsurface Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, as these microorganisms are capable of producing large quantities of nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at ambient temperatures. Metal-reducing bacteria live in environments deficient in oxygen and conserve energy for growth through the oxidation of hydrogen or organic electron donors, coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals such as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. This can result in the formation of magnetite via the extracellular reduction of amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides causing the release of soluble Fe(II) and resulting in complete recrystallization of the amorphous mineral into a new phase. Some previous studies have reported altering the composition of biogenic magnetite produced by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for industrial and environmental applications. However, research into the commercial exploitation of bacteria to form magnetic minerals has focused primarily on magnetotactic bacteria which form magnetosomal magnetite internally using very different pathways to those bacteria forming magnetite outside the cell. Magnetotactic bacteria live at the sediment-water interface and use internal nanomagnets to guide them to their preferred environmental niche using the Earth's magnetic field. Since magnetotactic bacteria generally grow optimally under carefully controlled microaerobic conditions, the culturing processes for these organisms are challenging and result in low yields of nanomagnetite. Despite these limitations, magnetotactic bacteria have bee

  3. Novel approaches to tailor and tune light-matter interactions at the nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. M. Kort-Kamp

    2015-05-10

    In this thesis we propose new, versatile schemes to control light-matter interactions at the nanoscale. In the first part of the thesis, we envisage a new class of plasmonic cloaks made of magneto-optical (MO) materials. We demonstrate that the application of a uniform magnetic field B in these cloaks may not only switch on and off the cloaking mechanism, but also mitigate the electromagnetic (EM) absorption. We also prove that the scattered field profile can be effectively controlled by changing B. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the study of light-matter interactions mediated by fluctuations of the vacuum EM field. Firstly, we demonstrate that the Purcell effect can be effectively suppressed for an excited atom near a cloaking device. Furthermore, the decay rate of a quantum emitter near a graphene-coated wall under the influence of an external magnetic field is studied. We show that the MO properties of graphene strongly affect the atomic lifetime and that B allows for an unprecedented control of the decay channels of the system. In addition, we discuss the dispersive interaction between an atom and suspended graphene in a magnetic field. For large atom-graphene separations and low temperatures we show that the interaction energy is a quantized function of B. Besides, we show that at room temperature, thermal effects must be taken into account even in the extreme near-field regime. Finally, the third part of the thesis deals with the study of near-field heat transfer. We analyze the energy transfered from a semi-infinite medium to a composite sphere made of metallic inclusions embedded in a dielectric host medium. We show that the heat transfer can be strongly enhanced at the percolation phase transition. We show that our results apply for different effective medium models and are robust against changes in the inclusions' shape and materials.

  4. Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with polarized X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    R. Buhrman, in Concepts in Spintronics (ed. Maekawa, S. ) (new area of electronics, spintronics has emerged from theseof the future, e.g. in spintronics [124],[125]. Examples of

  5. Probing nanoscale behavior of magnetic materials with soft x-ray spectromicroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    seen as one of the ?rst spintronic effects. Very soon afterstructure and magnetism in spintronic-, complex oxide- and

  6. Charge Transport and Transfer at the Nanoscale Between Metals and Novel Conjugated Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    - terials that hold promise to create exible electronic displays, high speed transistors, and low-cost solar to explain the data well. The second part of this thesis focuses on the interaction between gold and platinum

  7. Atomistic Simulations of Bonding, Thermodynamics, and Surface Passivation in Nanoscale Solid Propellant Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Kristen

    2012-10-19

    decomposition analysis CMDB composite-modified double-base propellant CO carbon monoxide CO2 carbon dioxide Cp cyclopentadienyl, C5H5 Cp? pentamethyl-cyclopentadienyl, C5[CH3]5 DDT Deflagration-to-detonation transition EA Electron affinity EDA Energy...- istry WebBook.14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 4.1 Elemental assignments for the combined basis sets, BS-I and BS-II. GTH bases are those provided with the cp2k distribution. . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 5.1 Vertical...

  8. A scanning AC calorimetry technique for the analysis of nano-scale quantities of materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Massachusetts 02138, USA 2 Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, 1200

  9. Solid State Theory of Photovoltaic Materials: Nanoscale Grain Boundaries and Doping CIGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zunger, A

    2005-01-01

    We use modern first-principles electronic structure theory to investigate (1) why are grain boundaries in chalcopyrites passive; (2) can chalcopyrites be doped by transition metals, and; (3) can hot electrons and carrier multiplication be efficient in quantum-dot solar cells.

  10. Probing nanoscale behavior of magnetic materials with soft x-ray spectromicroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    seen as one of the ?rst spintronic effects. Very soon afterstructure and magnetism in spintronic-, complex oxide- andspin electronics or spintronics [3], where in addition to

  11. DOE A9024 Final Report Functional and Nanoscale Materials Systems: Frontier

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collidertransfer (Journal Article) |

  12. DOE A9024 Final Report Functional and Nanoscale Materials Systems: Frontier

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collidertransfer (Journal Article) |Programs of Science at the

  13. Mechanics and tribology of MEMS materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, Somuri V.; Dugger, Michael Thomas; Boyce, Brad Lee; Buchheit, Thomas Edward

    2004-04-01

    Micromachines have the potential to significantly impact future weapon component designs as well as other defense, industrial, and consumer product applications. For both electroplated (LIGA) and surface micromachined (SMM) structural elements, the influence of processing on structure, and the resultant effects on material properties are not well understood. The behavior of dynamic interfaces in present as-fabricated microsystem materials is inadequate for most applications and the fundamental relationships between processing conditions and tribological behavior in these systems are not clearly defined. We intend to develop a basic understanding of deformation, fracture, and surface interactions responsible for friction and wear of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) materials. This will enable needed design flexibility for these devices, as well as strengthen our understanding of material behavior at the nanoscale. The goal of this project is to develop new capabilities for sub-microscale mechanical and tribological measurements, and to exercise these capabilities to investigate material behavior at this size scale.

  14. Mesoscale Engineering of Nanocomposite Nonlinear Optical Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afonso, C.N.; Feldman, L.C.; Gonella, F.; Haglund, R.F.; Luepke, G.; Magruder, R.H.; Mazzoldi, P.; Osborne, D.H.; Solis, J.; Zuhr, R.A.

    1999-11-01

    Complex nonlinear optical materials comprising elemental, compound or alloy quantum dots embedded in appropriate dielectric or semiconducting hosts may be suitable for deployment in photonic devices. Ion implantation, ion exchange followed by ion implantation, and pulsed laser deposition have ail been used to synthesize these materials. However, the correlation between the parameters of energetic-beam synthesis and the nonlinear optical properties is still very rudimentary when one starts to ask what is happening at nanoscale dimensions. Systems integration of complex nonlinear optical materials requires that the mesoscale materials science be well understood within the context of device structures. We discuss the effects of beam energy and energy density on quantum-dot size and spatial distribution, thermal conductivity, quantum-dot composition, crystallinity and defects - and, in turn, on the third-order optical susceptibility of the composite material. Examples from recent work in our laboratories are used to illustrate these effects.

  15. Effects and Mechanisms of Mechanical Activation on Hydrogen Sorption/ Desorption of Nanoscale Lithium Nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, Leon, L.; Yang, Gary, Z.; Crosby, Kyle; Wwan, Xufei. Zhong, Yang; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Osborn, William; Hu, Jianzhi; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2012-04-26

    The objective of this project is to investigate and develop novel, mechanically activated, nanoscale Li3N-based and LiBH4-based materials that are able to store and release {approx}10 wt% hydrogen at temperatures near 100 C with a plateau hydrogen pressure of less than 10 bar. Four (4) material systems have been investigated in the course of this project in order to achieve the project objective. These 4 systems are (i) LiNH2+LiH, (ii) LiNH2+MgH2, (iii) LiBH4, and (iv) LiBH4+MgH2. The key findings we have obtained from these 4 systems are summarized below. *The thermodynamic driving forces for LiNH2+LiH and LiBH4 systems are not adequate to enable H2 release at temperatures < 100 C. *Hydrogen release in the solid state for all of the four systems is controlled by diffusion, and thus is a slow process. *LiNH2+MgH2 and LiBH4+MgH2 systems, although possessing proper thermodynamic driving forces to allow for H2 release at temperatures < 100 C, have sluggish reaction kinetics because of their diffusion-controlled rate-limiting steps. *Reducing particles to the nanometer length scale (< 50 nm) can improve the thermodynamic driving force to enable H2 release at near ambient temperature, while simultaneously enhancing the reaction kinetics as well as changing the diffusion-controlled rate-limiting step to gas desorption-controlled rate-limiting step. This phenomenon has been demonstrated with LiBH4 and offers the hope that further work along this direction will make one of the material systems, i.e., LiBH4, LiBH4+MgH2 and LiNH2+MgH2, possess the desired thermodynamic properties and rapid H2 uptake/release kinetics for on-board applications. Many of the findings and knowledge gained from this project have been published in archival refereed journal articles [1-15] and are accessible by general public. Thus, to avoid a bulky final report, the key findings and knowledge gained from this project will be succinctly summarized, particularly for those findings and knowledge available in the public domain. However, for those findings and knowledge that have not been published yet, more detailed information will be provided. The report will be divided into 4 major sections based on the material systems investigated.

  16. Mechanisms of budding of nanoscale particles through lipid bilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teresa Ruiz-Herrero; Enrique Velasco; Michael F. Hagan

    2012-02-21

    We examine the budding of a nanoscale particle through a lipid bilayer using molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations, and an elastic theory, with the aim of determining the extent to which equilibrium elasticity theory can describe the factors that control the mechanism and efficiency of budding. The particle is a smooth sphere which experiences attractive interactions to the lipid head groups. Depending on the parameters, we observe four classes of dynamical trajectories: particle adhesion to the membrane, stalled partially wrapped states, budding followed by scission, and membrane rupture. In most regions of parameter space we find that the elastic theory agrees nearly quantitatively with the simulated phase behavior as a function of adhesion strength, membrane bending rigidity, and particle radius. However, at parameter values near the transition between particle adhesion and budding, we observe long-lived partially wrapped states which are not captured by existing elastic theories. These states could constrain the accessible system parameters for those enveloped viruses or drug delivery vehicles which rely on exo- or endocytosis for membrane transport.

  17. Pressure Driven Flow of Polymer Solutions in Nanoscale Slit Pores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Millan; W. Jiang; M. Laradji; Y. Wang

    2006-10-16

    Polymer solutions subject to pressure driven flow and in nanoscale slit pores are systematically investigated using the dissipative particle dynamics approach. We investigated the effect of molecular weight, polymer concentration and flow rate on the profiles across the channel of the fluid and polymer velocities, polymers density, and the three components of the polymers radius of gyration. We found that the mean streaming fluid velocity decreases as the polymer molecular weight or/and polymer concentration is increased, and that the deviation of the velocity profile from the parabolic profile is accentuated with increase in polymer molecular weight or concentration. We also found that the distribution of polymers conformation is highly anisotropic and non-uniform across the channel. The polymer density profile is also found to be non-uniform, exhibiting a local minimum in the center-plane followed by two symmetric peaks. We found a migration of the polymer chains either from or towards the walls. For relatively long chains, as compared to the thickness of the slit, a migration towards the walls is observed. However, for relatively short chains, a migration away from the walls is observed.

  18. Nanoscale contact engineering for Si/Silicide nanowire devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Yung-Chen

    2012-01-01

    1-19 Figure 1-5. Growth technologies of silicide materials:Figure 1-5. Growth technologies of silicide materials:with current Si technology. 1.4.The growth and applications

  19. High-density thermoelectric power generation and nanoscale thermal metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Peter (Peter Matthew), 1978-

    2007-01-01

    Thermoelectric power generation has been around for over 50 years but has seen very little large scale implementation due to the inherently low efficiencies and powers available from known materials. Recent material advances ...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Li-ion Anode Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by University of Pittsburgh at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about nanoscale...

  1. Nanoscale Imaging of Lithium Ion Distribution During In Situ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (heterogeneous), energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), hydrogen and fuel cells, defects, charge transport, membrane, materials and chemistry by design,...

  2. Visualizing nanoscale 3D compositional fluctuation of lithium in advanced lithium-ion battery cathodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Devaraj, Arun; Gu, Meng; Colby, Robert J.; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Chong M.; Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Genc, Arda; Zhang, Jiguang; Belharouak, Ilias; et al

    2015-08-14

    The distribution and concentration of lithium in Li-ion battery cathodes at different stages of cycling is a pivotal factor in determining battery performance. Non-uniform distribution of the transition metal cations has been shown to affect cathode performance; however, the Li is notoriously challenging to characterize with typical high-spatial-resolution imaging techniques. Here, for the first time, laser–assisted atom probe tomography is applied to two advanced Li-ion battery oxide cathode materials—layered Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 and spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4—to unambiguously map the three dimensional (3D) distribution of Li at sub-nanometer spatial resolution and correlate it with the distribution of the transition metal cations (M) and themore »oxygen. The as-fabricated layered Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 is shown to have Li-rich Li2MO3 phase regions and Li-depleted Li(Ni0.5Mn0.5)O2 regions while in the cycled layered Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 an overall loss of Li and presence of Ni rich regions, Mn rich regions and Li rich regions are shown in addition to providing the first direct evidence for Li loss on cycling of layered LNMO cathodes. The spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode is shown to have a uniform distribution of all cations. These results were additionally validated by correlating with energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping of these nanoparticles in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Thus, we have opened the door for probing the nanoscale compositional fluctuations in crucial Li-ion battery cathode materials at an unprecedented spatial resolution of sub-nanometer scale in 3D which can provide critical information for understanding capacity decay mechanisms in these advanced cathode materials.« less

  3. Spin Coherence at the Nanoscale: Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Arthur J.

    2013-09-10

    Breakthrough results were achieved during the reporting period in the areas of organic spintronics. (A) For the first time the giant magnetic resistance (GMR) was observed in spin valve with an organic spacer. Thus we demonstrated the ability of organic semiconductors to transport spin in GMR devices using rubrene as a prototype for organic semiconductors. (B) We discovered the electrical bistability and spin valve effect in a ferromagnet /organic semiconductor/ ferromagnet heterojunction. The mechanism of switching between conducting phases and its potential applications were suggested. (C) The ability of V(TCNE)x to inject spin into organic semiconductors such as rubrene was demonstrated for the first time. The mechanisms of spin injection and transport from and into organic magnets as well through organic semiconductors were elucidated. (D) In collaboration with the group of OSU Prof. Johnston-Halperin we reported the successful extraction of spin polarized current from a thin film of the organic-based room temperature ferrimagnetic semiconductor V[TCNE]x and its subsequent injection into a GaAs/AlGaAs light-emitting diode (LED). Thus all basic steps for fabrication of room temperature, light weight, flexible all organic spintronic devices were successfully performed. (E) A new synthesis/processing route for preparation of V(TCNE)x enabling control of interface and film thicknesses at the nanoscale was developed at OSU. Preliminary results show these films are higher quality and what is extremely important they are substantially more air stable than earlier prepared V(TCNE)x. In sum the breakthrough results we achieved in the past two years form the basis of a promising new technology, Multifunctional Flexible Organic-based Spintronics (MFOBS). MFOBS technology enables us fabrication of full function flexible spintronic devices that operate at room temperature.

  4. 1/19/2015 Nanoscale NMR Advances | Chemical & Engineering News http://cen.acs.org.ezpprod1.hul.harvard.edu/articles/93/i2/NanoscaleNMRAdvances.html 1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    1/19/2015 Nanoscale NMR Advances | Chemical & Engineering News http://cen.acs.org.ezpprod1.hul nuclear species in a region measuring 50 µm2. Chemical & Engineering News ISSN 00092347 Copyright © 2015.harvard.edu/articles/93/i2/NanoscaleNMRAdvances.html 1/2 CASC&ENACS PublicationsACS Log In Serving The Chemical, Life

  5. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enable in-depth study of complex molecular systems, including liquid batteries, living cells, novel electronic materials, and stardust. SINS gives researchers the power of full...

  6. Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural vacancies are a source of numerous interesting structural, electronic, and optical properties, and materials scientists often rely them as an important building...

  7. CNEEC - TRG2: Nanoscale Control over Photons and Electrons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of synthetic approaches. In a cross cutting effort with TGR1 we develop computational methods to aid our search for materials with ideal electronic and optical properties. We...

  8. CNEEC - TRG1: Nanoscale Control of Thermodynamic Potentials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of pristine materials. We are also studying nanomaterials incorporated into nanoporous aerogels, where the nanometer size is controlled and stabilized by the aerogel scaffold...

  9. Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches (474th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gang, Oleg

    2012-01-18

    In the field of nanoscience, if you can control how nanoparticles self-assemble in particular structures — joining each other, for example, as molecules can form, atom-by-atom — you can design new materials that have unique properties that industry needs. Nature already uses the DNA genetic code to instruct the building of specific proteins and whole organisms in both plants and people. Taking a cue from nature, scientists at BNL devised a way of using strands of synthetic DNA attached to the surface of nanoparticles to instruct them to self-assemble into specific nanoscale structures, clusters, and three-dimensional organizations. Novel materials designed and fabricated this way promise use in photovoltaics, energy storage, catalysis, cell-targeted systems for more effective medical treatments, and biomolecular sensing for environmental monitoring and medical applications. To find out more about the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method and its applications, join Physicist Oleg Gang of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) as he gives the 474th Brookhaven Lecture, titled “Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches." Gang, who has led this work at the CFN, will explain the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method, and discuss its present and future applications in highly specific biosensors, optically active nano-materials, and new ways to fabricate complex architectures in a rational manner via self-assembly. Gang and his colleagues used the CFN and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) facilities to perform their groundbreaking research. At the CFN, the scientists used electron microscopes and optical methods to visualize the clusters that they fabricated. At the NSLS, they applied x-rays to study a particles-assembly process in solution, DNA’s natural environment. Gang earned a Ph.D. in soft matter physics from Bar-Ilan University in 2000, and he was a Rothschild Fellow at Harvard University from 1999 to 2002. After joining BNL as a Goldhaber Fellow in 2002, he became an assistant scientist at the CFN in 2004. He became the CFN’s leader for Soft and Biological Nanomaterials Theme Group in 2006, and earned the title of scientist in 2009. Gang has received numerous honors and recognitions, including the 2010 Gordon Battelle Prize for Scientific Discovery.

  10. Material Misfits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Issues submit Material Misfits How well nanocomposite materials align at their interfaces determines what properties they have, opening broad new avenues of materials-science...

  11. A comparative study of nano-scale coatings on gold electrodes for bioimpedance studies of breast cancer cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heflin, Randy

    with that of gold microelectrodes coated with gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, or electroplated gold to inA comparative study of nano-scale coatings on gold electrodes for bioimpedance studies of breast- troduce nano-scale roughness on the surface of the electrodes. For biological solutions, the electroplated

  12. Fourier Magnetic Imaging with Nanoscale Resolution and Compressed Sensing Speed-up using Electronic Spins in Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    1 Fourier Magnetic Imaging with Nanoscale Resolution and Compressed Sensing Speed-up using imaging.12 Here we introduce an alternative technique of Fourier magnetic imaging using NV Fourier transform to yield real-space images with nanoscale resolution, wide field-of-view (FOV

  13. Colloid Science and Nanoscale Engineering Course (CHE 596-009) Orlin Velev, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, NCSU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    and suspension stability, detergency, separations and product formulation. Vast areas of application of colloidColloid Science and Nanoscale Engineering Course (CHE 596-009) Orlin Velev, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, NCSU Synopsis The Colloid Science and Nanoscale Engineering Course discusses

  14. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Frank Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to â??real-worldâ?ť materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  15. Electron-beam patterning of polymer electrolyte films to make multiple nanoscale gates for nanowire transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Carrad; A. M. Burke; R. W. Lyttleton; H. J. Joyce; H. H. Tan; C. Jagadish; K. Storm; H. Linke; L. Samuelson; A. P. Micolich

    2014-04-08

    We report an electron-beam based method for the nanoscale patterning of the poly(ethylene oxide)/LiClO$_{4}$ polymer electrolyte. We use the patterned polymer electrolyte as a high capacitance gate dielectric in single nanowire transistors and obtain subthreshold swings comparable to conventional metal/oxide wrap-gated nanowire transistors. Patterning eliminates gate/contact overlap which reduces parasitic effects and enables multiple, independently controllable gates. The method's simplicity broadens the scope for using polymer electrolyte gating in studies of nanowires and other nanoscale devices.

  16. Bio-inspired routes for synthesizing efficient nanoscale platinum electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cha, Jennifer N.; Wang, Joseph

    2014-08-31

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to use fundamental advances in bionanotechnology to design powerful platinum nanocrystal electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. The new economically-viable, environmentally-friendly, bottom-up biochemical synthetic strategy will produce platinum nanocrystals with tailored size, shape and crystal orientation, hence leading to a maximum electrochemical reactivity. There are five specific aims to the proposed bio-inspired strategy for synthesizing efficient electrocatalytic platinum nanocrystals: (1) isolate peptides that both selectively bind particular crystal faces of platinum and promote the nucleation and growth of particular nanocrystal morphologies, (2) pattern nanoscale 2-dimensional arrays of platinum nucleating peptides from DNA scaffolds, (3) investigate the combined use of substrate patterned peptides and soluble peptides on nanocrystal morphology and growth (4) synthesize platinum crystals on planar and large-area carbon electrode supports, and (5) perform detailed characterization of the electrocatalytic behavior as a function of catalyst size, shape and morphology. Project Description and Impact: This bio-inspired collaborative research effort will address key challenges in designing powerful electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications by employing nucleic acid scaffolds in combination with peptides to perform specific, environmentally-friendly, simultaneous bottom-up biochemical synthesis and patterned assembly of highly uniform and efficient platinum nanocrystal catalysts. Bulk synthesis of nanoparticles usually produces a range of sizes, accessible catalytic sites, crystal morphologies, and orientations, all of which lead to inconsistent catalytic activities. In contrast, biological systems routinely demonstrate exquisite control over inorganic syntheses at neutral pH and ambient temperature and pressures. Because the orientation and arrangement of the templating biomolecules can be precisely controlled, the nanocrystals boast a defined shape, morphology, orientation and size and are synthesized at benign reaction conditions. Adapting the methods of biomineralization towards the synthesis of platinum nanocrystals will allow effective control at a molecular level of the synthesis of highly active metal electrocatalysts, with readily tailored properties, through tuning of the biochemical inputs. The proposed research will incorporate many facets of biomineralization by: (1) isolating peptides that selectively bind particular crystal faces of platinum (2) isolating peptides that promote the nucleation and growth of particular nanocrystal morphologies (3) using two-dimensional DNA scaffolds to control the spatial orientation and density of the platinum nucleating peptides, and (4) combining bio-templating and soluble peptides to control crystal nucleation, orientation, and morphology. The resulting platinum nanocrystals will be evaluated for their electrocatalytic behavior (on common carbon supports) to determine their optimal size, morphology and crystal structure. We expect that such rational biochemical design will lead to highly uniform and efficient platinum nanocrystal catalysts for fuel cell applications.

  17. From the Academy Novel polymers: Molecular to nanoscale order in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Chi

    materials. Advanced synthetic approaches, characterization of solution structures, study of the parameters Road, Yangpu, Shanghai 200433, People's Republic of China The assembly of polymer chains in solution interactions (hydrophobic, hydrogen-bonding, and electrostatic interactions), with the process being elegantly

  18. Characterization of Nanoscale Objects and Domains with Massive Cluster SIMS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Chao-Kai

    2014-07-31

    . These observations point out the necessity of accurate data interpretation when dealing with nano-scaled objects. The capability of nano-domain analysis was demonstrated with fuel cell cathode materials consisting of pyrolized catalyst/carbon black mixtures...

  19. Dispersions of Aramid Nanofibers: A New Piece of Nanoscale Toolset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thouless, Michael

    chemical and materials research. Polymeric nanofibers are typically produced by electrospinning,2 drawing,3 template synthesis,4 phase separation,5 and self-assembly.6 Electrospinning is probably the most widely

  20. DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701956 Geometric Considerations of Micro-to Nanoscale Elastomeric Post

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Christopher S.

    DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701956 Geometric Considerations of Micro- to Nanoscale Elastomeric Post Arrays cultured on this substrate deflect underlying posts as they contract. Trac- tion forces could be calculated from these post deflections using a simple force-displacement relationship for pure bend- ing

  1. Last Revised: 04/03/2014 UNDERGRADUATE MINOR IN "NANOSCALE SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    . It is open to any UG student pursuing an Engineering or Arts & Sciences (Chemistry, Physics, BiologyLast Revised: 04/03/2014 UNDERGRADUATE MINOR IN "NANOSCALE SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING" SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE Available to any UG pursuing an Arts and Science or Engineering degree I

  2. Graphene-enabled hybrid architectures for multiprocessors: bridging nanophotonics and nanoscale wireless communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Graphene-enabled hybrid architectures for multiprocessors: bridging nanophotonics and nanoscale components. In this paper, we do a first overview of the state-of-the-art in graphene and silicon network, and carrying light data flows. Keywords: Nanophotonics; Silicon-on-Insulator; Graphene

  3. Nanoscale Chemical and Structural Characterization of Transient Metallic Nanowires using Aberration-Corrected STEM-EELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -sur-Yvette, France ABSTRACT: Direct chemical and structural characterization of transient iron-nickel alloy nanowiresNanoscale Chemical and Structural Characterization of Transient Metallic Nanowires using Aberration-energy facets were observed. The hitherto unknown rich variety of structural and chemical behavior in alloyed

  4. Topography-Correlated Confocal Raman Microscopy with Cylindrical Vector Beams for Probing Nanoscale Structural Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Frank

    Topography-Correlated Confocal Raman Microscopy with Cylindrical Vector Beams for Probing Nanoscale, such as radially or azimuthally polarized doughnut beams, are combined with topography studies of pentacene thin in the mirror focus and kept within a nanometer distance from the surface to probe the topography using shear

  5. Science Highlight July 2011 Better Batteries through Nanoscale 3D Chemical Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Science Highlight ­ July 2011 Better Batteries through Nanoscale 3D Chemical Imaging Concerns of imaging from 4 to 14 keV, a range suitable for spectroscopic imaging of many metals used in battery battery technology. Although Li-ion batteries, crucial in the boom of portable electronics, stand

  6. Nanoscale In Situ Characterization of Li-ion Battery Electrochemistry Via Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipson, Albert L. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dept. of Chemistry; Ginder, Ryan S. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dept. of Chemistry; Hersam, Mark C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-12-15

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy imaging of battery electrodes, using the geometry shown in the figure, is a tool for in situ nanoscale mapping of surface topography and local ion current. Images of silicon and tin electrodes show that the combination of topography and ion current provides insight into the local electrochemical phenomena that govern the operation of lithium ion batteries.

  7. High speed nano-scale positioning using a piezoelectric tube actuator with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    ], nanofabrication systems [4, 5] and nano- manipulation devices [6]. In many applications, piezoelectric tubesHigh speed nano-scale positioning using a piezoelectric tube actuator with active shunt control S. Aphale, A.J. Fleming and S.O.R. Moheimani Abstract: Piezoelectric tube scanners are the actuators

  8. Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels: Observations on deformation microstructure, nanoscale dimples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sow-Hsin

    Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels: Observations on deformation microstructure, nanoscale hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels has been a subject of significant research, one of the major challenges in tackling hydrogen embrittlement is that the mechanism of embrittlement is not fully resolved

  9. A pomegranate-inspired nanoscale design for large-volume-change lithium battery anodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    A pomegranate-inspired nanoscale design for large-volume-change lithium battery anodes Nian Liu1 lithium-ion batteries and in more recent Li­O2 and Li­S batteries as a replacement for the dendrite to the level of commercial lithium-ion batteries (3.7 mAh cm22 ). Particle fracture and loss of electrical

  10. 4.4 Nanoscale: Mineral Weathering Boundary RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    4.4 Nanoscale: Mineral Weathering Boundary RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA SJ-scattered detector. Biotic weathering Mineral weathering caused by life, including bacteria, fungi, algae, plants of elements such as silica or iron. Etching of minerals Mineral dissolution is not an even produce; areas

  11. Graphene-enabled hybrid architectures for multiprocessors: bridging nanophotonics and nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Graphene-enabled hybrid architectures for multiprocessors: bridging nanophotonics and nanoscale components. In this paper, we do a first overview of the state-of-the-art in graphene and silicon network, and carrying light data flows. Keywords: Nanophotonics; Silicon-on-Insulator; Graphene

  12. Cite this: Nanoscale, 2015, 7, 4514 Received 9th December 2014,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    oxidation reaction (HOR) ­ in hydrogen fuel cells2 : Water splitting đOER; HERŢ: H2O ! 1 2 O2 ţ H2 đ1Ţ Water February 2015 DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07277d www.rsc.org/nanoscale Optimizing the oxygen evolution reaction. Experimental optimization of these catalysts has proceeded slowly. Quantum Mechanics (QM) calculations have

  13. A computational model for nanoscale adhesion between deformable solids and its application to gecko adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A computational model for nanoscale adhesion between deformable solids and its application to gecko adhesion Roger A. Sauer 1 Aachen Institute for Advanced Study in Computational Engineering Science (AICES), RWTH Aachen University, Templergaben 55, 52056 Aachen, Germany Published2 in the Journal of Adhesion

  14. High-Affinity DNA Base Analogs as Supramolecular, Nanoscale Promoters of Macroscopic Adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    High-Affinity DNA Base Analogs as Supramolecular, Nanoscale Promoters of Macroscopic Adhesion Cyrus Information ABSTRACT: Adhesion phenomena are essential to many biological processes and to synthetic adhesives adhesion mechanisms. Recently, supramolecular building blocks, such as synthetic DNA base- pair mimics

  15. ReseaRch at the University of Maryland Innovating Energy Storage at the Nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    ReseaRch at the University of Maryland Innovating Energy Storage at the Nanoscale Growing demands for energy, particularly renewable energy, require not only new sources but new methods of storage tests newly created nanostructures for their energy storage capacities. His work in micro

  16. Nanoscale Manipulation of Surfaces and Interfaces: Engineering Electrical Properties Through Nanofabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Gregory J.

    2013-05-31

    dimensionalities, like graphene and carbon nanotubes also need to be studied for potential use in nanoscale devices. Graphene has been found to be electronically tunable by doping, causing it to be able to function as a semiconductor or as a metallic conductor...

  17. Micro-and nanoscale domain engineering in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    Micro- and nanoscale domain engineering in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate Vladimir Ya. Shur investigation of the domain evolution in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate during backswitched electric sources based on quasi-phase matching.11 Lithium niobate LiNbO3 (LN) and lithium tantalate LiTaO3 (LT

  18. Biomaterials 26 (2005) 68366845 Tuning compliance of nanoscale polyelectrolyte multilayers to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    2005-01-01

    Biomaterials 26 (2005) 6836­6845 Tuning compliance of nanoscale polyelectrolyte multilayers cause smooth muscle cells to secrete bone minerals typically produced by ARTICLE IN PRESS www.elsevier.com/locate/biomaterials 0142-9612/$ - see front matter r 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials

  19. Dynamics of nanoscale jet formation and impingement on flat surfaces Sohail Murad and Ishwar K. Puria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Dynamics of nanoscale jet formation and impingement on flat surfaces Sohail Murad and Ishwar K on a flat surface. The simulations show that to produce jets in the 1 nm diameter range, the orifice surface the attractive forces of the surface to form a jet. In addition, for the nanojet to form a stable liquid film

  20. Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature Anders Lervik transient non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations, heat-transfer through nanometer-scale interfaces processes. We show that the modeling of heat transfer across a nanodroplet/fluid interface requires

  1. Nanoscale Heat Transfer at Contact Between a Hot Tip and a Substrate Stphane Lefvre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Nanoscale Heat Transfer at Contact Between a Hot Tip and a Substrate Stéphane Lefčvre Laboratoire d three heat transfer modes with experimental data and modeling. We conclude that the three modes in "International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 49, 1-2 (2006) 251-258" DOI : 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2005

  2. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Single-chain Nanoparticles: Synthesis of Nano-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Single-chain Nanoparticles: Synthesis of Nano-scale Architectures:00 AM, IMS Room 20 Recent efforts by our lab to fold single polymer chains into nano as a reliable method to measure the change in solution conformation of polymer chains when folded via intra

  3. Polysulfide Flow Batteries Enabled by Percolating Nanoscale Conductor Networks Frank Y. Fan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Polysulfide Flow Batteries Enabled by Percolating Nanoscale Conductor Networks Frank YKinley2 , W. Craig Carter1 , and Yet-Ming Chiang*1 Abstract A new approach to flow battery design shown poor capacity utilization and reversibility, and may thereby enable new flow battery designs

  4. Digital Alchemy for Materials Design and Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Anders, Greg; Karas, Andrew S; Dodd, Paul M; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-01-01

    Starting with the early alchemists, a holy grail of science has been to make desired materials by modifying the attributes of basic building blocks. Building blocks that show promise for assembling new complex materials can be synthesized at the nanoscale with attributes that would astonish the ancient alchemists in their versatility. However, this versatility means that making direct connection between building block attributes and bulk behavior is both necessary for rationally engineering materials, and difficult because building block attributes can be altered in many ways. Here we show how to exploit the malleability of the valence of colloidal nanoparticle "elements" to directly and quantitatively link building block attributes to bulk behavior through a statistical thermodynamic framework we term "digital alchemy". We use this framework to optimize building blocks for a given target structure, and to determine which building block attributes are most important to control for self assembly, through a set...

  5. Investigating Deformation and Failure Mechanisms in Nanoscale Multilayer Metallic Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zbib, Hussein M; Bahr, David F

    2014-10-22

    Over the history of materials science there are many examples of materials discoveries that have made superlative materials; the strongest, lightest, or toughest material is almost always a goal when we invent new materials. However, often these have been a result of enormous trial and error approaches. A new methodology, one in which researchers design, from the atoms up, new ultra-strong materials for use in energy applications, is taking hold within the science and engineering community. This project focused on one particular new classification of materials; nanolaminate metallic composites. These materials, where two metallic materials are intimately bonded and layered over and over to form sheets or coatings, have been shown over the past decade to reach strengths over 10 times that of their constituents. However, they are not yet widely used in part because while extremely strong (they don’t permanently bend), they are also not particularly tough (they break relatively easily when notched). Our program took a coupled approach to investigating new materials systems within the laminate field. We used computational materials science to explore ways to institute new deformation mechanisms that occurred when a tri-layer, rather than the more common bi-layer system was created. Our predictions suggested that copper-nickel or copper-niobium composites (two very common bi-layer systems) with layer thicknesses on the order of 20 nm and then layered 100’s of times, would be less tough than a copper-nickel-niobium metallic composite of similar thicknesses. In particular, a particular mode of permanent deformation, cross-slip, could be activated only in the tri-layer system; the crystal structure of the other bi-layers would prohibit this particular mode of deformation. We then experimentally validated this predication using a wide range of tools. We utilized a DOE user facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnology (CINT), to fabricate, for the first time, these tri-layer composites. CINT formed nanolaminate composites were tested in tension, with bulge testing, using nanoindentation, and using micro-compression testing to demonstrate that the tri-layer films were indeed tougher and hardened more during deformation (they got stronger as we deformed them) than equivalent bi-layers. The seven graduate students, 4 post-docs and research faculty, and the two faculty co-PI’s were able to create a collaborated computational prediction and experimental validation team to demonstrate the benefits of this class of materials to the community. The computational work crossed from atomistic to bulk simulations, and the experiments coupled form nm-scale to the mm scale; closely matching the simulations. The simulations provided viable mechanisms that explained the observed results, and new experimental results were used to push the boundaries of the simulation tools. Over the life of the 7 years of this program we proved that tri-layer nanolaminate metallic composite systems exceeded the mechanical performance of bi-layer systems if the right materials were chosen, and that the mechanism responsible for this was tied to the cross slip of dislocations. With 30 journal publications resulting from this work we have broadly disseminated this family of results to the scientific community.

  6. Exchange bias in nanoscale antidot arrays D. Tripathy,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeyeye, Adekunle

    Information Storage Materials Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National lithography tools for fab- ricating nanostructures with controlled dimensions and ge- ometry has stimulated miniaturization of devices and drastic increase in the areal density of magnetic record- ing media however, has

  7. Single photon emission and detection at the nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    semiconductor nanowires. Our single photon emitter is based on a single InAsP quantum dot embedded in a p the single quantum dot by electrical injection of electrons and holes. The optical quality of the quantum dot emission is shown to improve when surrounding the dot material by a small intrinsic section of InP. Finally

  8. Covetic Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Can re-melt, dilute, alloy... Fabrication of Covetic Materials - Nanocarbon Infusion 3 4 Technical Approach Unusual Characteristics of Covetic Materials ("covalent" &...

  9. News Releases | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured the first real-time nanoscale images of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries. The ORNL...

  10. Nanoscale chemical phase separation in FeTe0.55Se0.45 as seen via scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Xiaobo [Louisiana State University; Li, Guorong [Louisiana State University; Zhang, Jiandi [Louisiana State University; Karki, A B [Louisiana State University; Jin, Rongying [Louisiana State University; Sales, Brian C [ORNL; Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL; Plummer, E. W. [Louisiana State University

    2011-01-01

    Atomically resolved structural and electronic properties of FeTe{sub 1-x}Se{sub x} (x = 0 and 0.45) have been studied with scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS). In contrast to the extreme flatness of the Te-terminated FeTe surface, nanoscale chemical phase separation between Te and Se atoms is unambiguously revealed on the surface of FeTe{sub 0.55}Se{sub 0.45}. A statistical counting of the two kinds of atoms has the same ratio as that in the bulk. Remarkably, there is no electronic phase separation seen in the tunneling spectroscopy. This indicates that the optimally doped superconductor is chemically inhomogeneous but electronically homogeneous, in contrast to many correlated electron materials.

  11. Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of Laminated Woven Composites Reinforced with Aligned Nanoscale Fibers: Mechanisms at the Macro, Micro, and Nano Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wicks, Sunny S.

    Several hybrid architectures with aligned nanoscale fibers have been shown to provide inter- and intra-laminar reinforcement of fiber reinforced polymer composites. In one architecture, aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown ...

  12. Nanoscale chemical phase separation in FeTe0.55Se0.45 as seen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE PAGES Search Results Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: Nanoscale chemical phase separation in FeTe0.55Se0.45 as seen via scanning tunneling spectroscopy Prev Next Title:...

  13. Fault modeling, delay evaluation and path selection for delay test under process variation in nano-scale VLSI circuits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Xiang

    2006-04-12

    Delay test in nano-scale VLSI circuits becomes more difficult with shrinking technology feature sizes and rising clock frequencies. In this dissertation, we study three challenging issues in delay test: fault modeling, ...

  14. material protection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

  15. Critical Materials:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Extraction Separation Processes for Critical Materials in 30- 21 Stage Test Facility (Bruce Moyer) ......

  16. Materials Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternate Title(s):Materials Research Engineer; Metallurgical/Chemical Engineer; Product Development Manager;

  17. Giant Transverse Optical Forces in Nanoscale Slot Waveguides of Hyperbolic Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Yingran; Gao, Jie; Yang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that giant transverse optical forces can be generated in nanoscale slot waveguides of hyperbolic metamaterials, with more than two orders of magnitude stronger compared to the force created in conventional silicon slot waveguides, due to the nanoscale optical field enhancement and the extreme optical energy compression within the air slot region. Both numerical simulation and analytical treatment are carried out to study the dependence of the optical forces on the waveguide geometries and the metamaterial permittivity tensors, including the attractive optical forces for the symmetric modes and the repulsive optical forces for the anti-symmetric modes. The significantly enhanced transverse optical forces result from the strong optical mode coupling strength between two metamaterial waveguides, which can be explained with an explicit relation derived from the coupled mode theory. Moreover, the calculation on realistic metal-dielectric multilayer structures indicates that the predicted giant ...

  18. Stick-Slip Control in Nanoscale Boundary Lubrication by Surface Wettability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Chen; Adam S. Foster; Mikko J. Alava; Lasse Laurson

    2015-02-13

    We study the effect of atomic scale surface-lubricant interactions on nanoscale boundary-lubricated friction, by considering two example surfaces - hydrophilic mica and hydrophobic graphene - confining thin layers of water in molecular dynamics simulations. We observe stick-slip dynamics for thin water films confined by mica sheets, involving periodic breaking-reforming transitions of atomic scale capillary water bridges formed around the potassium ions of mica. However, only smooth sliding without stick-slip events is observed for water confined by graphene, as well as for thicker water layers confined by mica. Thus, our results illustrate how atomic scale details affect the wettability of the confining surfaces, and consequently control the presence or absence of stick-slip dynamics in nanoscale friction.

  19. Nano-Scale Interpenetrating Phase Composites (IPC S) for Industrial and Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Hu, Michael Z.

    2010-06-01

    A one-year project was completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to explore the technical and economic feasibility of producing nano-scale Interpenetrating Phase Composite (IPC) components of a usable size for actual testing/implementation in a real applications such as high wear/corrosion resistant refractory shapes for industrial applications, lightweight vehicle braking system components, or lower cost/higher performance military body and vehicle armor. Nano-scale IPC s with improved mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties have previously been demonstrated at the lab scale, but have been limited in size. The work performed under this project was focused on investigating the ability to take the current traditional lab scale processes to a manufacturing scale through scaling of these processes or through the utilization of an alternative high-temperature process.

  20. Workshop on innovation in materials processing and manufacture: Exploratory concepts for energy applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, L.L.

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the workshop was to bring together industrial, academic, and DOE Laboratory personnel to discuss and identify potential areas for which creative, innovative, and/or multidisciplinary solutions could result in major payoffs for the nation`s energy economy, DOE, and industry. The topics emphasized in these discussions were: surfaces and interfacial processing technologies, biomolecular materials, powder/precursor technologies, magnetic materials, nanoscale materials, novel ceramics and composites, novel intermetallics and alloys, environmentally benign materials, and energy efficiency. The workshop had a 2-day format. One the first day, there was an introductory session that summarized future directions within DOE`s basic and materials technology programs, and the national studies on manufacturing and materials science and engineering. The balance of the workshop was devoted to brainstorming sessions by seven working groups. During the first working group session, the entire group was divided to discuss topics on: challenges for hostile environments, novel materials in transportation technologies, novel nanoscale materials, and opportunities in biomolecular materials. For the second session, the entire group (except for the working group on biomolecular materials) was reconfigured into new working groups on: alternative pathways to energy efficiency, environmentally benign materials and processes, and waste treatment and reduction: a basic sciences approach. This report contains separate reports from each of the seven working groups.

  1. Cite this: Nanoscale, 2015, 7, 3173 Received 23rd November 2014,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    -sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). On the basis of a TiO2 nanotube, Gao et al.19 prepared a CdS/CdSe co December 2014 DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06935h www.rsc.org/nanoscale Highly efficient quantum dot-sensitized TiO2. ZnSe, CdS and CdSe QDs were sequentially assembled on a nanocrystalline TiO2 film to prepare a Zn

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - CNM_CNMS_NatComm-Jan2014.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganisms toPalladium wavyfamily of new lithium A

  3. The material dependence of temperature measurement resolution in thermal scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiaowei; Hull, Robert [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2013-03-18

    Thermal scanning electron microscopy is a recently developed temperature mapping technique based on thermal diffuse scattering in electron backscatter diffraction in a scanning electron microscope. It provides nano-scale and non-contact temperature mapping capabilities. Due to the specific temperature sensitive mechanism inherent to this technique, the temperature resolution is highly material dependent. A thorough investigation of what material properties affect the temperature resolution is important for realizing the inherent temperature resolution limit for each material. In this paper, three material dependent parameters-the Debye-Waller B-factor temperature sensitivity, backscatter yield, and lattice constant-are shown to control the temperature resolution.

  4. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Database (TPMD) Aerospace Structural Metals Database (ASMD) Damage Tolerant Design Handbook (DTDH) Microelectronics Packaging Materials Database (MPMD) Structural Alloys...

  5. Comparing matched polymer:Fullerene solar cells made by solution-sequential processing and traditional blend casting: Nanoscale structure and device performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    and Traditional Blend Casting: Nanoscale Structure andby traditional blend casting (BC), where the components aresuch networks is the blend-casting (BC) method, wherein the

  6. Asperity contacts at the nanoscale: Comparison of Ru and Au

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortini, Andrea; Buldyrev, Sergey; Srolovitz, David [Department of Physics, Yeshiva University, 500 West 185th Street, New York, New York 10033 (United States); Mendelev, Mikhail I. [Materials and Engineering Physics, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2008-10-01

    We develop and validate an interatomic potential for ruthenium based on the embedded atom method framework with the Finnis/Sinclair representation. We confirm that the potential yields a stable hcp lattice with reasonable lattice and elastic constants and surface and stacking fault energies. We employ molecular dynamics simulations to bring two surfaces together, one flat and the other with a single asperity. We compare the process of asperity contact formation and breaking in Au and Ru, two materials currently in use in microelectromechanical system switches. While Au is very ductile at 150 and 300 K, Ru shows considerably less plasticity at 300 and 600 K (approximately the same homologous temperature). In Au, the asperity necks down to a single atom thick bridge at separation. While similar necking occurs in Ru at 600 K, it is much more limited than in Au. On the other hand, at 300 K, Ru breaks by a much more brittle process of fracture/decohesion with limited plastic deformation.

  7. Nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 for High Rate Li-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, A.; Horne, C.R.; Chang, O.; Zhang, W.; Kong, W.; Wang, E.; Chern, T.; Doeff, M. M.

    2009-08-04

    The electrochemical performances of nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 materials are described in this communication. The nanomaterials were synthesized by pyrolysis of an aerosol precursor. Both compositions required moderate heat-treatment to become electrochemically active. LiFePO4 nanoparticles were coated with a uniform, 2-4 nm thick carbon-coating using an organic precursor in the heat treatment step and showed high tap density of 1.24 g/cm3, in spite of 50-100 nm particle size and 2.9 wtpercent carbon content. Li4Ti5O12 nanoparticles were between 50-200 nm in size and showed tap density of 0.8 g/cm3. The nanomaterials were tested both in half cell configurations against Li-metal and also in LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12 full cells. Nano-LiFePO4 showed high discharge rate capability with values of 150 and 138 mAh/g at C/25 and 5C, respectively, after constant C/25 charges. Nano-Li4Ti5O12 also showed high charge capability with values of 148 and 138 mAh/g at C/25 and 5C, respectively, after constant C/25 discharges; the discharge (lithiation) capability was comparatively slower. LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12 full cells deliver charge/discharge capacity values of 150 and 122 mAh/g at C/5 and 5C, respectively.

  8. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  9. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  10. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  11. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  12. material recovery

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    dispose of dangerous nuclear and radiological material, and detect and control the proliferation of related WMD technology and expertise.

  13. Method and apparatus for determination of mechanical properties of functionally-graded materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Giannakopoulos, Antonios E. (Somerville, MA); Suresh, Subra (Wellesley, MA)

    1999-01-01

    Techniques for the determination of mechanical properties of homogenous or functionally-graded materials from indentation testing are presented. The technique is applicable to indentation on the nano-scale through the macro-scale including the geological scale. The technique involves creating a predictive load/depth relationship for a sample, providing an experimental load/depth relationship, comparing the experimental data to the predictive data, and determining a physical characteristic from the comparison.

  14. The DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials: Research briefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This publication is designed to inform present and potential customers and partners of the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials about significant advances resulting from Center-coordinated research. The format is an easy-to-read, not highly technical, concise presentation of the accomplishments. Selected accomplishments from each of the Center`s seven initial focused projects are presented. The seven projects are: (1) conventional and superplastic forming; (2) materials joining; (3) nanoscale materials for energy applications; (4) microstructural engineering with polymers; (5) tailored microstructures in hard magnets; (6) processing for surface hardness; and (7) mechanically reliable surface oxides for high-temperature corrosion resistance.

  15. Nanoscale interplay of strain and doping in a high-temperature superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeljkovic, Ilija; Gu, Genda; Nieminen, Jouko; Huang, Dennis; Chang, Tay-Rong; He, Yang; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Lin, Hsin; Markiewicz, Robert S.; Bansil, Arun; Hoffman, Jennifer E.

    2014-11-07

    The highest temperature superconductors are electronically inhomogeneous at the nanoscale, suggesting the existence of a local variable which could be harnessed to enhance the superconducting pairing. Here we report the relationship between local doping and local strain in the cuprate superconductor Bi?Sr?CaCu?O??x. We use scanning tunneling microscopy to discover that the crucial oxygen dopants are periodically distributed, in correlation with local strain. Our picoscale investigation of the intra-unit-cell positions of all oxygen dopants provides essential structural input for a complete microscopic theory.

  16. Nanoscale magnetic field mapping with a single spin scanning probe magnetometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondin, L.; Tetienne, J.-P.; Spinicelli, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Jacques, V.; Dal Savio, C.; Karrai, K.; Dantelle, G.; Thiaville, A.; Rohart, S.

    2012-04-09

    We demonstrate quantitative magnetic field mapping with nanoscale resolution, by applying a lock-in technique on the electron spin resonance frequency of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect placed at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip. In addition, we report an all-optical magnetic imaging technique which is sensitive to large off-axis magnetic fields, thus extending the operation range of diamond-based magnetometry. Both techniques are illustrated by using a magnetic hard disk as a test sample. Owing to the non-perturbing and quantitative nature of the magnetic probe, this work should open up numerous perspectives in nanomagnetism and spintronics.

  17. Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

    2009-01-06

    The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

  18. Nanoscale structure in AgSbTe2 determined by diffuse elastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Budai, John D [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; Karapetrova, Evguenia A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse elastic neutron scattering measurements confirm that AgSbTe2 has a hierarchical structure, with defects on length scales from nanometers to microns. While scattering from mesoscale structure is consistent with previously-proposed structures in which Ag and Sb order on a NaCl lattice, more diffuse scattering from nanoscale structure suggests a structural rearrangement in which hexagonal layers form a combination of (ABC), (ABA), and (AAB) stacking sequences. The AgCrSe2 structure is the best-fitting model for the local atomic arrangements.

  19. Nanoscale interplay of strain and doping in a high-temperature superconductor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zeljkovic, Ilija; Gu, Genda; Nieminen, Jouko; Huang, Dennis; Chang, Tay-Rong; He, Yang; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Lin, Hsin; et al

    2014-11-07

    The highest temperature superconductors are electronically inhomogeneous at the nanoscale, suggesting the existence of a local variable which could be harnessed to enhance the superconducting pairing. Here we report the relationship between local doping and local strain in the cuprate superconductor Bi?Sr?CaCu?O??x. We use scanning tunneling microscopy to discover that the crucial oxygen dopants are periodically distributed, in correlation with local strain. Our picoscale investigation of the intra-unit-cell positions of all oxygen dopants provides essential structural input for a complete microscopic theory.

  20. Free Energy Barrier for Electric Field Driven Polymer Entry into Nanoscale Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narges Nikoofard; Hossein Fazli

    2011-04-27

    Free energy barrier for entry of a charged polymer into a nanoscale channel by a driving electric field is studied theoretically and using molecular dynamics simulations. Dependence of the barrier height on the polymer length, the driving field strength, and the channel entrance geometry is investigated. Squeezing effect of the electric field on the polymer before its entry to the channel is taken into account. It is shown that lateral confinement of the polymer prior to its entry changes the polymer length dependence of the barrier height noticeably. Our theory and simulation results are in good agreement and reasonably describe related experimental data.

  1. Molding the flow of light on the nanoscale: from vortex nanogears to phase-operated plasmonic machinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svetlana V. Boriskina; Bjoern M. Reinhard

    2011-12-07

    Efficient delivery of light into nanoscale volumes by converting free photons into localized charge-density oscillations (surface plasmons) enables technological innovation in various fields from biosensing to photovoltaics and quantum computing. Conventional plasmonic nanostructures are designed as nanoscale analogs of radioantennas and waveguides. Here, we discuss an alternative approach for plasmonic nanocircuit engineering that is based on molding the optical powerflow through 'vortex nanogears' around a landscape of local phase singularities 'pinned' to plasmonic nanostructures. We show that coupling of several vortex nanogears into transmission-like structures results in dramatic optical effects, which can be explained by invoking a hydrodynamic analogy of the 'photon fluid'. The new concept of vortex nanogear transmissions (VNTs) provides new design principles for the development of complex multi-functional phase-operated photonics machinery and, therefore, generates unique opportunities for light generation, harvesting and processing on the nanoscale.

  2. Cermet materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-12-23

    A self-cleaning porous cermet material, filter and system utilizing the same may be used in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The porous cermet filter may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an alumina phase. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The porous filter may also be electrically conductive so that a current may be passed therethrough to heat the filter during use. Further, a heating element may be incorporated into the porous cermet filter during manufacture. This heating element can be coated with a ceramic material to electrically insulate the heating element. An external heating element may also be provided to heat the cermet filter during use.

  3. Composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Solihull, GB); Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  4. Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaniewski, Anna Monro

    2012-01-01

    literature . . . . . . 3.1.2 Photovoltaic cells based on CuConjugated polymer photovoltaic cells. Chem. Mater. , 16:for e?cient photovoltaic cells. Nature Nanotechnology, 6:

  5. Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaniewski, Anna Monro

    2012-01-01

    and Outlook Transparent top contact Rear contact Figure 3.10: Schematic of a solarsolar cells is a di?cult combination to fabricate. Summary and Future Outlooksolar cell surface to enable better light absorption. ?T = Summary and Future Outlook

  6. Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaniewski, Anna Monro

    2012-01-01

    v List of Tables vii 1 Introduction 1.1 Photovoltaicsand J. V. Manca. Prog. Photovoltaics Res. Appl. , 15:713,polymer blends. Prog. Photovoltaics Res. Appl. , 15:727,

  7. Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaniewski, Anna Monro

    2012-01-01

    solar cell e?ciency is calculated as: W ork E sun Given the total energy input of the sun, and equationEnergy balance equations were used to model the e?ciency of the solar

  8. Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaniewski, Anna Monro

    2012-01-01

    the many-layer-graphene/semiconductor interface by doping.opened, turning graphene into a semiconductor which could begraphene is sometimes referred to as a ’zero gap’ semiconductor. [

  9. Nanoscale patterning in application to materials and device structures Universitt Konstanz, Fach M 676, Konstanz, D-78457, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    of this electrode or by contacting single molecules using scanning probe microscopy SPM . Reliable contacts to SAMs using SPM are difficult to realize.10 Con- tacting pure SAMs suffers from strong interactions between the SPM-tip and the molecules and intermolecule interac- tions. Contacting single molecules, which

  10. Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaniewski, Anna Monro

    2012-01-01

    for conventionally produced multijunction cells, as variousfor nanorod based multijunction cells. Chapter 4 A one-stepGaInP/GaInAs/Ge multijunction solar cells. Applied Physics

  11. Charge-free low-temperature method of forming thin film-based nanoscale materials and structures on a substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffbauer, Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Mueller, Alex (Santa Fe, NM)

    2008-07-01

    A method of forming a nanostructure at low temperatures. A substrate that is reactive with one of atomic oxygen and nitrogen is provided. A flux of neutral atoms of at least one of nitrogen and oxygen is generated within a laser-sustained-discharge plasma source and a collimated beam of energetic neutral atoms and molecules is directed from the plasma source onto a surface of the substrate to form the nanostructure. The energetic neutral atoms and molecules in the plasma have an average kinetic energy in a range from about 1 eV to about 5 eV.

  12. Evidence for the temperature dependence of phase transformation behavior of silicon at nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangalampalli S. R. N., Kiran; Tran, Tuan; Smillie, Lachlan; Haberl, Bianca; Subianto, D.; Williams, James S.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2015-01-01

    This study uses the in-situ high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25 to 200 C) of the phase transformation behavior of crystalline silicon (dc-Si) at the nanoscale. Along with in-situ indentation and electrical data, ex-situ characterizations such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) have been used to reveal the dominant mode of deformation under the indenter. In contrast to the previous studies, the dominant mode of deformation under the nanoindenter at elevated temperatures is not the dc-Si to metallic phase ( -Sn) transformation. Instead, XTEM images from 150 C indents reveal that the dominant mode of deformation is twinning along {111} planes. While the in-situ high-temperature electrical measurements show an increase in the current due to metallic phase formation up to 125 C, it is absent 150 C, revealing that the formation of the metallic phase is negligible in this regime. Thus, this work provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale.

  13. Chaotic oscillation and random-number generation based on nanoscale optical-energy transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naruse, Makoto; Aono, Masashi; Hori, Hirokazu; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2014-01-01

    By using nanoscale energy-transfer dynamics and density matrix formalism, we demonstrate theoretically and numerically that chaotic oscillation and random-number generation occur in a nanoscale system. The physical system consists of a pair of quantum dots (QDs), with one QD smaller than the other, between which energy transfers via optical near-field interactions. When the system is pumped by continuous-wave radiation and incorporates a timing delay between two energy transfers within the system, it emits optical pulses. We refer to such QD pairs as nano-optical pulsers (NOPs). Irradiating an NOP with external periodic optical pulses causes the oscillating frequency of the NOP to synchronize with the external stimulus. We find that chaotic oscillation occurs in the NOP population when they are connected by an external time delay. Moreover, by evaluating the time-domain signals by statistical-test suites, we confirm that the signals are sufficiently random to qualify the system as a random-number generator (R...

  14. Chaotic oscillation and random-number generation based on nanoscale optical-energy transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makoto Naruse; Song-Ju Kim; Masashi Aono; Hirokazu Hori; Motoichi Ohtsu

    2014-12-19

    By using nanoscale energy-transfer dynamics and density matrix formalism, we demonstrate theoretically and numerically that chaotic oscillation and random-number generation occur in a nanoscale system. The physical system consists of a pair of quantum dots (QDs), with one QD smaller than the other, between which energy transfers via optical near-field interactions. When the system is pumped by continuous-wave radiation and incorporates a timing delay between two energy transfers within the system, it emits optical pulses. We refer to such QD pairs as nano-optical pulsers (NOPs). Irradiating an NOP with external periodic optical pulses causes the oscillating frequency of the NOP to synchronize with the external stimulus. We find that chaotic oscillation occurs in the NOP population when they are connected by an external time delay. Moreover, by evaluating the time-domain signals by statistical-test suites, we confirm that the signals are sufficiently random to qualify the system as a random-number generator (RNG). This study reveals that even relatively simple nanodevices that interact locally with each other through optical energy transfer at scales far below the wavelength of irradiating light can exhibit complex oscillatory dynamics. These findings are significant for applications such as ultrasmall RNGs.

  15. The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, J K; Herberg, J L; Wu, Y; Schwegler, E; Mehta, A

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

  16. Complex Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-04-17

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  17. Complex Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-05-23

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  18. material removal

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Nuclear Material Removal http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdnnm3remove

    Pag...

  19. Propulsion materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Edward J.; Sullivan, Rogelio A.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  20. Y-Shaped Polymer Brushes: Nanoscale Switchable Duangrut Julthongpiput, Yen-Hsi Lin, Jing Teng, Eugene R. Zubarev,* and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubarev, Eugene

    Y-Shaped Polymer Brushes: Nanoscale Switchable Surfaces Duangrut Julthongpiput, Yen-Hsi Lin, Jing incompatible polymer chains (arms) attached to a single focal point capable of chemical grafting dissimilar (hydrophobic and hydrophilic) polymer arms in such Y-shaped molecules lead to the formation

  1. Role of the nanoscale in catalytic CO oxidation by supported Au and Pt nanostructures Sergey N. Rashkeev,1,2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Role of the nanoscale in catalytic CO oxidation by supported Au and Pt nanostructures Sergey N found that the catalytic activity of Au increases sharply for supported nanoparticles smaller than 5 nm in catalytically active TiO2-supported Au nanoparticles. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.76.035438 PACS number s : 82.65. r I

  2. Probing nanoscale photo-oxidation in organic films using spatial hole burning near-field scanning optical microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probing nanoscale photo-oxidation in organic films using spatial hole burning near-field scanning from a stationary NSOM tip to induce photo-oxidation. The reduction in the fluorescence yield resulting photo-oxidation as a function of time, position, and environment free from the limits of far

  3. Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal-Insulator Domain Walls in Vanadium Dioxide Nanobeams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal- Insulator Domain Walls localized alternating Peltier heating and cooling as well as Joule heating concentrated at the M-I domain the monoclinic phase identification. KEYWORDS: Vanadium dioxide, thermoreflectance microscopy, Peltier effect

  4. Investigation of Tibetian Plateau Varnish: New Findings at the Nanoscale Using Focused Ion Beam and Transmission Electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    electron microscopy (HR-TEM) was used. Preparing HR-TEM samples with a dual-beam fo- cused ion beamInvestigation of Tibetian Plateau Varnish: New Findings at the Nanoscale Using Focused Ion Beam and Transmission Electron Microscopy Techniques KURT A. LANGWORTHY 1 , DAVID H. KRINSLEY 2 , AND RONALD I. DORN 3 1

  5. Optical spectrometer at the nanoscale using optical Yagi-Uda nanoantennas Jingjing Li, Alessandro Salandrino, and Nader Engheta*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jingjing

    Optical spectrometer at the nanoscale using optical Yagi-Uda nanoantennas Jingjing Li, Alessandro; published 5 May 2009 Here we present and analyze an optical spectrum analyzer at the nanometer scale that is able to distribute different frequency contents of the radiation of an optical dipole source

  6. REPORT ON 6TH U.S.-JAPAN JOINT SEMINAR ON NANOSCALE TRANSPORT PHENOMENA.SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    electricity (PV), solar fuel (biomass), and solar thermal, and thermoelectricity related issues for discussing and identifying outstanding science and technology issues in the area of nanoscale thermophysics from MIT, Fushinobu Kazuyoshi from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Shigeo Maruyama from Tokyo University

  7. Formulation and analysis of a three-dimensional finite element implementation for adhesive contact at the nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formulation and analysis of a three-dimensional finite element implementation for adhesive contact-dimensional finite element model for nanoscale contact problems with strong adhesion is presented. The contact the BF formulation but loses accuracy as the strength of adhesion increases. The model has applications

  8. Single-polymer `flyfishing' effect for nanoscale motors and machines: an exact worm-like-chain model study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Weizhu

    Single-polymer `flyfishing' effect for nanoscale motors and machines: an exact worm University of Singapore, Singapore 119076 Single-polymer control effects are abundant in biological motors/machines for nanotechnology. Understanding motor-relevant polymer effects in a general

  9. Hardfacing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID)

    2012-01-17

    A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

  10. News and Awards | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured the first real-time nanoscale images of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries. The ORNL...

  11. Materials compatibility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-04-01

    Objectives are to enable development and implementation of codes and standards for H{sub 2} containment components: (1) Evaluate data on mechanical properties of materials in H{sub 2} gas - Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials; (2) Generate new benchmark data on high-priority materials - Pressure vessel steels, stainless steels; and (3) Establish procedures for reliable materials testing - Sustained-load cracking, fatigue crack propagation. Summary of this presentation are: (1) Completed measurement of cracking thresholds (K{sub TH}) for Ni-Cr-Mo pressure vessel steels in high-pressure H{sub 2} gas - K{sub TH} measurements required in ASME Article KD-10 (2) Crack arrest test methods appear to yield non-conservative results compared to crack initiation test methods - (a) Proposal to insert crack initiation test methods in Article KD-10 will be presented to ASME Project Team on Hydrogen Tanks, and (b) Crack initiation methods require test apparatus designed for dynamic loading of specimens in H{sub 2} gas; and (3) Demonstrated ability to measure fatigue crack growth of pressure vessel steels in high-pressure H{sub 2} gas - (a) Fatigue crack growth data in H{sub 2} required in ASME Article KD-10, and (b) Test apparatus is one of few in U.S. or abroad for measuring fatigue crack growth in >100 MPa H{sub 2} gas.

  12. Nanoscale simulation of shale transport properties using the lattice Boltzmann method: permeability and diffusivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Li; Kang, Qinjun; Yao, Jun; Tao, Wenquan

    2014-01-01

    Porous structures of shales are reconstructed based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of shale samples from Sichuan Basin, China. Characterization analyzes of the nanoscale reconstructed shales are performed, including porosity, pore size distribution, specific surface area and pore connectivity. The multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) fluid flow model and single-relaxation-time (SRT) LBM diffusion model are adopted to simulate the fluid flow and Knudsen diffusion process within the reconstructed shales, respectively. Tortuosity, intrinsic permeability and effective Knudsen diffusivity are numerically predicted. The tortuosity is much higher than that commonly employed in Bruggeman equation. Correction of the intrinsic permeability by taking into consideration the contribution of Knudsen diffusion, which leads to the apparent permeability, is performed. The correction factor under different Knudsen number and pressure are estimated and compared with existing corrections re...

  13. Nano-scale electron bunching in laser-triggered ionization injection in plasma accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, X L; Li, F; Wan, Y; Wu, Y P; Hua, J F; Pai, C -H; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2015-01-01

    Ionization injection is attractive as a controllable injection scheme for generating high quality electron beams using plasma-based wakefield acceleration. Due to the phase dependent tunneling ionization rate and the trapping dynamics within a nonlinear wake, the discrete injection of electrons within the wake is nonlinearly mapped to discrete final phase space structure of the beam at the location where the electrons are trapped. This phenomenon is theoretically analyzed and examined by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations which show that three dimensional effects limit the wave number of the modulation to between $> 2k_0$ and about $5k_0$, where $k_0$ is the wavenumber of the injection laser. Such a nano-scale bunched beam can be diagnosed through coherent transition radiation upon its exit from the plasma and may find use in generating high-power ultraviolet radiation upon passage through a resonant undulator.

  14. Nanoscale magnetometry through quantum control of nitrogen-vacancy centres in rotationally diffusing nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maclaurin, D; Martin, A M; Hollenberg, L C L

    2012-01-01

    The confluence of quantum physics and biology is driving a new generation of quantum-based sensing and imaging technology capable of harnessing the power of quantum effects to provide tools to understand the fundamental processes of life. One of the most promising systems in this area is the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond - a natural spin qubit which remarkably has all the right attributes for nanoscale sensing in ambient biological conditions. Typically the nitrogen-vacancy qubits are fixed in tightly controlled/isolated experimental conditions. In this work quantum control principles of nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry are developed for a randomly diffusing diamond nanocrystal. We find that the accumulation of geometric phases, due to the rotation of the nanodiamond plays a crucial role in the application of a diffusing nanodiamond as a bio-label and magnetometer. Specifically, we show that a freely diffusing nanodiamond can offer real-time information about local magnetic fields and its own rotational beh...

  15. Digital Alchemy for Materials Design and Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greg van Anders; Daphne Klotsa; Andrew S. Karas; Paul M. Dodd; Sharon C. Glotzer

    2015-07-17

    Starting with the early alchemists, a holy grail of science has been to make desired materials by modifying the attributes of basic building blocks. Building blocks that show promise for assembling new complex materials can be synthesized at the nanoscale with attributes that would astonish the ancient alchemists in their versatility. However, this versatility means that making direct connection between building block attributes and bulk behavior is both necessary for rationally engineering materials, and difficult because building block attributes can be altered in many ways. Here we show how to exploit the malleability of the valence of colloidal nanoparticle "elements" to directly and quantitatively link building block attributes to bulk behavior through a statistical thermodynamic framework we term "digital alchemy". We use this framework to optimize building blocks for a given target structure, and to determine which building block attributes are most important to control for self assembly, through a set of novel thermodynamic response functions, moduli and susceptibilities. We thereby establish direct links between the attributes of colloidal building blocks and the bulk structures they form. Moreover, our results give concrete solutions to the more general conceptual challenge of optimizing emergent behaviors in nature, and can be applied to other types of matter. As examples, we apply digital alchemy to systems of truncated tetrahedra, rhombic dodecahedra, and isotropically interacting spheres that self assemble diamond, FCC, and icosahedral quasicrystal structures, respectively.

  16. Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2009-09-09

    To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  17. Chemistry and Materials Science progress report, first half FY 1992. Weapons-Supporting Research and Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This report contains sections on: Fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals; interfaces, adhesion, and bonding; energetic materials; plutonium research; synchrotron radiation-based materials science; atomistic approach to the interaction of surfaces with the environment: actinide studies; properties of carbon fibers; buried layer formation using ion implantation; active coherent control of chemical reaction dynamics; inorganic and organic aerogels; synthesis and characterization of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels; structural transformation and precursor phenomena in advanced materials; magnetic ultrathin films, surfaces, and overlayers; ductile-phase toughening of refractory-metal intermetallics; particle-solid interactions; electronic structure evolution of metal clusters; and nanoscale lithography induced chemically or physically by modified scanned probe microscopy.

  18. Institute for Integrated Research in Materials, Environments & Society (IIRMES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manley, Steven L.

    Microscope. This instrument is ideal for nano-scale metrology. It fea tures multimode SPM includes contact tunneling microscope. SPM can measure atoms, molecules, and other nano-scale topographic, magnetic

  19. Proton-Conducting Films of Nanoscale Ribbons Formed by Exfoliation of the Layer Perovskite H2SrTa2O7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proton-Conducting Films of Nanoscale Ribbons Formed by Exfoliation of the Layer Perovskite H2SrTa2OVised Manuscript ReceiVed NoVember 6, 2007 Thin films of nanoscale ribbons derived from the layer perovskite H2Sr cell parameters (3.98 ( 0.05 Ĺ) to H2SrTa2O7 (3.87 ( 0.02 Ĺ) and the defect perovskite SrTa2O6 (3

  20. Casting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaudhry, Anil R. (Xenia, OH); Dzugan, Robert (Cincinnati, OH); Harrington, Richard M. (Cincinnati, OH); Neece, Faurice D. (Lyndurst, OH); Singh, Nipendra P. (Pepper Pike, OH)

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  1. Construction material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Antink, Allison L. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2008-07-22

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  2. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us HanfordReference Materials Reference

  3. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us HanfordReference Materials

  4. Atomistic modeling of nanowires, small-scale fatigue damage in cast magnesium, and materials for MEMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, Martin L.; Talmage, Mellisa J.; McDowell, David L., 1956- (,-Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); West, Neil (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Gullett, Philip Michael (Mississippi State University , MS); Miller, David C. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Spark, Kevin (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Diao, Jiankuai (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Horstemeyer, Mark F. (Mississippi State University , MS); Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Gall, K

    2006-10-01

    Lightweight and miniaturized weapon systems are driving the use of new materials in design such as microscale materials and ultra low-density metallic materials. Reliable design of future weapon components and systems demands a thorough understanding of the deformation modes in these materials that comprise the components and a robust methodology to predict their performance during service or storage. Traditional continuum models of material deformation and failure are not easily extended to these new materials unless microstructural characteristics are included in the formulation. For example, in LIGA Ni and Al-Si thin films, the physical size is on the order of microns, a scale approaching key microstructural features. For a new potential structural material, cast Mg offers a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, but the microstructural heterogeneity at various scales requires a structure-property continuum model. Processes occurring at the nanoscale and microscale develop certain structures that drive material behavior. The objective of the work presented in this report was to understand material characteristics in relation to mechanical properties at the nanoscale and microscale in these promising new material systems. Research was conducted primarily at the University of Colorado at Boulder to employ tightly coupled experimentation and simulation to study damage at various material size scales under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. Experimental characterization of nano/micro damage will be accomplished by novel techniques such as in-situ environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), 1 MeV transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). New simulations to support experimental efforts will include modified embedded atom method (MEAM) atomistic simulations at the nanoscale and single crystal micromechanical finite element simulations. This report summarizes the major research and development accomplishments for the LDRD project titled 'Atomistic Modeling of Nanowires, Small-scale Fatigue Damage in Cast Magnesium, and Materials for MEMS'. This project supported a strategic partnership between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Colorado at Boulder by providing funding for the lead author, Ken Gall, and his students, while he was a member of the University of Colorado faculty.

  5. Nanoscale Phase Separation, Cation Ordering, and Surface Oxygen Chemistry in Pristine Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 for Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Meng; Genc, Arda; Belharouak, Ilias; Wang, Dapeng; Amine, Khalil; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Zhang, Jiguang; Browning, Nigel D.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.

    2013-05-14

    Li-rich layered material Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 possesses high voltage and high specific capacity, which makes it an attractive candidate for the transportation industry and sustainable energy storage systems. The rechargeable capacity of the Li-ion battery is linked largely to the structural stability of the cathode materials during the charge-discharge cycles. However, the structure and cation distribution in pristine (un-cycled) Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 have not yet been fully characterized. Using a combination of aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy, X-ray dispersive energy spectroscopy (XEDS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and complementary multislice image simulation, we have probed the crystal structure, cation/anion distribution, and electronic structure of Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 nanoparticle. We discovered that the electronic structure and valence state of transition metal ions show significant variations, which have been identified to be attributed to the oxygen deficiency near the particle surfaces. Characterization of the nanoscale phase separation and cation ordering in the pristine material are critical for understanding the capacity and voltage fading of this material for battery application.

  6. Molding the flow of light on the nanoscale: from vortex nanogears to phase-operated plasmonic machinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boriskina, Svetlana V; 10.1039/C1NR11406A

    2011-01-01

    Efficient delivery of light into nanoscale volumes by converting free photons into localized charge-density oscillations (surface plasmons) enables technological innovation in various fields from biosensing to photovoltaics and quantum computing. Conventional plasmonic nanostructures are designed as nanoscale analogs of radioantennas and waveguides. Here, we discuss an alternative approach for plasmonic nanocircuit engineering that is based on molding the optical powerflow through 'vortex nanogears' around a landscape of local phase singularities 'pinned' to plasmonic nanostructures. We show that coupling of several vortex nanogears into transmission-like structures results in dramatic optical effects, which can be explained by invoking a hydrodynamic analogy of the 'photon fluid'. The new concept of vortex nanogear transmissions (VNTs) provides new design principles for the development of complex multi-functional phase-operated photonics machinery and, therefore, generates unique opportunities for light gene...

  7. Photovoltaic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These tools were combined with others to study the effect of defects on the performance of crystalline silicon and

  8. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili; Zhang, Weijing

    2013-11-01

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm{sup 2}) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells.

  9. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Science & Engineering The development of new high-performance materials for energy Use of Advanced Characterization Techniques for Materials Development in Energy and Transportation and composition of materials at higher spatial resolution, with greater efficiency, and on real materials

  10. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  11. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals, accidentally spilled, or released. In addition to laboratory chemicals, hazardous materials may include common not involve highly toxic or noxious hazardous materials, a fire, or an injury requiring medical attention

  12. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up, or there is a small spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  13. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  14. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit is not available? Call 561

  15. Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder in a slit channel: Lubrication theory versus molecular dynamics analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir M. Rahmani; Yang Shao; Mehlam Jupiterwala; Carlos E. Colosqui

    2015-04-13

    Plane Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder that is arbitrarily confined (i.e., symmetrically or asymmetrically confined) in a slit channel is studied via hydrodynamic lubrication theory and molecular dynamics simulations, considering cases where the cylinder remains static or undergoes thermal motion. Lubrication theory predictions for the drag force and volumetric flow rate are in close agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of flows having molecularly thin lubrication gaps, despite the presence of significant structural forces induced by the crystalline structure of the modeled solid. While the maximum drag force is observed in symmetric confinement, i.e., when the cylinder is equidistant from both channel walls, the drag decays significantly as the cylinder moves away from the channel centerline and approaches a wall. Hence, significant reductions in the mean drag force on the cylinder and hydraulic resistance of the channel can be observed when thermal motion induces random off-center displacements. Analytical expressions and numerical results in this work provide useful insights into the hydrodynamics of colloidal solids and macromolecules in confinement.

  16. Nanoscale magnetometry through quantum control of nitrogen-vacancy centres in rotationally diffusing nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Maclaurin; L. T. Hall; A. M. Martin; L. C. L. Hollenberg

    2012-07-23

    The confluence of quantum physics and biology is driving a new generation of quantum-based sensing and imaging technology capable of harnessing the power of quantum effects to provide tools to understand the fundamental processes of life. One of the most promising systems in this area is the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond - a natural spin qubit which remarkably has all the right attributes for nanoscale sensing in ambient biological conditions. Typically the nitrogen-vacancy qubits are fixed in tightly controlled/isolated experimental conditions. In this work quantum control principles of nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry are developed for a randomly diffusing diamond nanocrystal. We find that the accumulation of geometric phases, due to the rotation of the nanodiamond plays a crucial role in the application of a diffusing nanodiamond as a bio-label and magnetometer. Specifically, we show that a freely diffusing nanodiamond can offer real-time information about local magnetic fields and its own rotational behaviour, beyond continuous optically detected magnetic resonance monitoring, in parallel with operation as a fluorescent biomarker.

  17. Nanoscale transport of phonons: Dimensionality, subdiffusion, molecular damping, and interference effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walczak, Kamil; Yerkes, Kirk L.

    2014-05-07

    We examine heat transport carried by acoustic phonons in the systems composed of nanoscale chains of masses coupled to two thermal baths of different temperatures. Thermal conductance is obtained by using linearized Landauer-type formula for heat flux with phonon transmission probability calculated within atomistic Green's functions (AGF) method. AGF formalism is extended onto dissipative chains of masses with harmonic coupling beyond nearest-neighbor approximation, while atomistic description of heat reservoirs is also included into computational scheme. In particular, the phonon lifetimes and the phonon frequency shifts are discussed for harmonic lattices of different dimensions. Further, resonant structure of phonon transmission spectrum is analyzed with respect to reservoir-induced effects, molecular damping, and mass-to-mass harmonic coupling. Analysis of transmission zeros (antiresonances) and their accompanied Fano-shape resonances are discussed as a result of interference effects between different vibrational modes. Finally, we also predict subdiffusive transport regime for low-frequency ballistic phonons propagated along a linear chain of harmonically coupled masses.

  18. Method and apparatus for remote sensing of molecular species at nanoscale utilizing a reverse photoacoustic effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Su, Ming (Oviedo, FL); Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Hedden, David (Lenoir City, TN)

    2010-02-23

    A method and apparatus for identifying a sample, involves illuminating the sample with light of varying wavelengths, transmitting an acoustic signal against the sample from one portion and receiving a resulting acoustic signal on another portion, detecting a change of phase in the acoustic signal corresponding to the light of varying wavelengths, and analyzing the change of phase in the acoustic signal for the varying wavelengths of illumination to identify the sample. The apparatus has a controlled source for illuminating the sample with light of varying wavelengths, a transmitter for transmitting an acoustic wave, a receiver for receiving the acoustic wave and converting the acoustic wave to an electronic signal, and an electronic circuit for detecting a change of phase in the acoustic wave corresponding to respective ones of the varying wavelengths and outputting the change of phase for the varying wavelengths to allow identification of the sample. The method and apparatus can be used to detect chemical composition or visual features. A transmission mode and a reflection mode of operation are disclosed. The method and apparatus can be applied at nanoscale to detect molecules in a biological sample.

  19. Theory of signal and noise in double-gated nanoscale electronic pH sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Go, Jonghyun; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2012-08-01

    The maximum sensitivity of classical nanowire (NW)-based pH sensors is defined by the Nernst limit of 59 mV/pH. For typical noise levels in ultra-small single-gated nanowire sensors, the signal-to-noise ratio is often not sufficient to resolve pH changes necessary for a broad range of applications. Recently, a new class of double-gated devices was demonstrated to offer apparent 'super-Nernstian' response (>59 mV/pH) by amplifying the original pH signal through innovative biasing schemes. However, the pH-sensitivity of these nanoscale devices as a function of biasing configurations, number of electrodes, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) remains poorly understood. Even the basic question such as 'Do double-gated sensors actually resolve smaller changes in pH compared to conventional single-gated sensors in the presence of various sources of noise?' remains unanswered. In this article, we provide a comprehensive numerical and analytical theory of signal and noise of double-gated pH sensors to conclude that, while the theoretical lower limit of pH-resolution does not improve for double-gated sensors, this new class of sensors does improve the (instrument-limited) pH resolution.

  20. Development of nano-scale and biomimetic surfaces for biomedical applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, James Edward

    2006-10-30

    The work described in this dissertation details the development of a biomimetic materials for use in sensors and therapeutics, based on new advances in material science. The sensors developed herein target neurodegenerative diseases. Two...

  1. Effect of nano-scale twinning on the fracture, fatigue and wear properties of copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Aparna, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Grain refinement in materials has been one of the most common strategies for improving the strength of materials. However this comes at the price of reduced ductility, fracture toughness and stable fatigue crack propagation ...

  2. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  3. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  4. Hybrid Solar Cells with Prescribed Nanoscale Morphologies Based on Hyperbranched Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan; Fromer, Neil A.; Chen, Chih-Ping; Kanaras, Antonios G.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-01-01

    solar cells.. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the Director, Office of Energy Research, Office of Science, Division of Materials

  5. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coker, Victoria S.

    2009-01-01

    materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis

  6. Materials Science & Tech Division | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applied materials science and technology. One key component of the division is a strong Basic Energy Sciences (BES) portfolio that pushes the frontiers of materials theory,...

  7. Nanoscale photon management in silicon solar cells Sangmoo Jeong, Shuang Wang, and Yi Cui

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    for Materials and Energy Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park: Science & Technology of Materials, Interfaces, and Processing Related Articles Status and prospects of Al2 of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Stanford Institute

  8. Advanced Materials Manufacturing | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Manufacturing New materials drive the development of innovative products. Building upon a rich history in materials science, ORNL is discovering and developing...

  9. Materials Project: A Materials Genome Approach

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ceder, Gerbrand [MIT; Persson, Kristin [LBNL

    Technological innovation - faster computers, more efficient solar cells, more compact energy storage - is often enabled by materials advances. Yet, it takes an average of 18 years to move new materials discoveries from lab to market. This is largely because materials designers operate with very little information and must painstakingly tweak new materials in the lab. Computational materials science is now powerful enough that it can predict many properties of materials before those materials are ever synthesized in the lab. By scaling materials computations over supercomputing clusters, this project has computed some properties of over 80,000 materials and screened 25,000 of these for Li-ion batteries. The computations predicted several new battery materials which were made and tested in the lab and are now being patented. By computing properties of all known materials, the Materials Project aims to remove guesswork from materials design in a variety of applications. Experimental research can be targeted to the most promising compounds from computational data sets. Researchers will be able to data-mine scientific trends in materials properties. By providing materials researchers with the information they need to design better, the Materials Project aims to accelerate innovation in materials research.[copied from http://materialsproject.org/about] You will be asked to register to be granted free, full access.

  10. Early Career. Harnessing nanotechnology for fusion plasma-material interface research in an in-situ particle-surface interaction facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allain, Jean Paul

    2014-08-08

    This project consisted of fundamental and applied research of advanced in-situ particle-beam interactions with surfaces/interfaces to discover novel materials able to tolerate intense conditions at the plasma-material interface (PMI) in future fusion burning plasma devices. The project established a novel facility that is capable of not only characterizing new fusion nanomaterials but, more importantly probing and manipulating materials at the nanoscale while performing subsequent single-effect in-situ testing of their performance under simulated environments in fusion PMI.

  11. Size of nanoobjects in oil and gas species and materials with positron annihilation spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grafutin, V I; Elnikova, L V

    2012-01-01

    The analytical method to determine geometry and size of nano-scale defects in oil and gas species and materials is proposed. The modeling is carried out with the parameters of the positron spectra in the angular distribution method of positron annihilation spectroscopy, and is based on the 'free electron' approximation. From the annihilation decay kinetics, it is possible to express the trapping velocity of parapositronium in pores via intensities of the positronium components and to define the concentration and radii of pores in a porous layer. As the result, size and the concentration of micro-porous cylindrical nano-objects in the silicon samples are estimated.

  12. Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specific Binding ORNL discovery holds potential for separations, sensors, batteries, biotech and more Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials Advanced Materials |...

  13. Nanoscale topographic pattern formation on Kr{sup +}-bombarded germanium surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkinson, Joy C.; Madi, Charbel S.; Aziz, Michael J. [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    The nanoscale pattern formation of Ge surfaces uniformly irradiated by Kr{sup +} ions was studied in a low-contamination environment at ion energies of 250 and 500 eV and at angles of 0 Degree-Sign through 80 Degree-Sign . The authors present a phase diagram of domains of pattern formation occurring as these two control parameters are varied. The results are insensitive to ion energy over the range covered by the experiments. Flat surfaces are stable from normal incidence up to an incidence angle of {theta} = 55 Degree-Sign from normal. At higher angles, the surface is linearly unstable to the formation of parallel-mode ripples, in which the wave vector is parallel to the projection of the ion beam on the surface. For {theta} {>=} 75 Degree-Sign the authors observe perpendicular-mode ripples, in which the wave vector is perpendicular to the ion beam. This behavior is qualitatively similar to those of Madi et al. for Ar{sup +}-irradiated Si but is inconsistent with those of Ziberi et al. for Kr{sup +}-irradiated Ge. The existence of a window of stability is qualitatively inconsistent with a theory based on sputter erosion [R. M. Bradley and J. M. Harper, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 6, 2390 (1988)] and qualitatively consistent with a model of ion impact-induced mass redistribution [G. Carter and V. Vishnyakov, Phys. Rev. B 54, 17647 (1996)] as well as a crater function theory incorporating both effects [S. A. Norris et al., Nat. Commun. 2, 276 (2011)]. The critical transition angle between stable and rippled surfaces occurs 10 Degree-Sign -15 Degree-Sign above the value of 45 Degree-Sign predicted by the mass redistribution model.

  14. Nanostructured material for advanced energy storage : magnesium battery cathode development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigmund, Wolfgang M.; Woan, Karran V.; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2010-11-01

    Magnesium batteries are alternatives to the use of lithium ion and nickel metal hydride secondary batteries due to magnesium's abundance, safety of operation, and lower toxicity of disposal. The divalency of the magnesium ion and its chemistry poses some difficulties for its general and industrial use. This work developed a continuous and fibrous nanoscale network of the cathode material through the use of electrospinning with the goal of enhancing performance and reactivity of the battery. The system was characterized and preliminary tests were performed on the constructed battery cells. We were successful in building and testing a series of electrochemical systems that demonstrated good cyclability maintaining 60-70% of discharge capacity after more than 50 charge-discharge cycles.

  15. Composite material dosimeters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a composite material containing a mix of dosimeter material powder and a polymer powder wherein the polymer is transparent to the photon emission of the dosimeter material powder. By mixing dosimeter material powder with polymer powder, less dosimeter material is needed compared to a monolithic dosimeter material chip. Interrogation is done with excitation by visible light.

  16. Method for forming materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolle, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2009-10-06

    A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

  17. Nanoscale Surface and Interface Mechanics of Elastic-Plastic Media with Smooth, Patterned, and Rough Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Xi

    2011-01-01

    the elastic and plastic properties of the softer material Eof the elastic and plastic properties of the soft surfaceon the elastic and plastic properties of the soft surface (

  18. Nanoscale Building Blocks and DNA "Glue" Help Shape 3D Architectures...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    nanoparticles opens up opportunities to design unique materials that could benefit high-density energy storage devices and catalysis, among other applications. Summary The...

  19. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase formation and preferential growth of lithium metal nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacci, Robert L; Black, Jennifer M; Wisinger, Nina; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Unocic, Raymond R

    2015-01-01

    The performance characteristics of Li-ion batteries are intrinsically linked to evolving nanoscale interfacial electrochemical reactions. To probe the mechanisms of solid electrolyte interphase formation and Li electrodeposition from a standard battery electrolyte, we use in situ electrochemical scanning transmission electron microscopy for controlled potential sweep-hold electrochemical measurements with simultaneous BF and ADF STEM image acquisition. Through a combined quantitative electrochemical measurement and quantitative STEM imaging approach, based upon electron scattering theory, we show that chemically sensitive ADF STEM imaging can be used to estimate the density of evolving SEI constituents and distinguish contrast mechanisms of Li-bearing components in the liquid cell.

  20. Wave Propagation in Multiferroic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Scott Macklin

    2013-01-01

    Waves in Magnetoelectric Materials . . . Need forApplication of Multiferroic Materials to Receive AntennaMaterials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  1. Transporting particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  2. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Richard W. (Hinsdale, IL); Nieman, G. William (Evanston, IL); Weertman, Julia R. (Evanston, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material.

  3. Rough interfaces, accurate predictions: The necessity of capillary modes in a minimal model of nanoscale hydrophobic solvation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suriyanarayanan Vaikuntanathan; Grant M Rotskoff; Alexander Hudson; Phillip Geissler

    2015-10-26

    Modern theories of the hydrophobic effect highlight its dependence on length scale, emphasizing in particular the importance of interfaces that emerge in the vicinity of sizable hydrophobes. We recently showed that a faithful treatment of such nanoscale interfaces requires careful attention to the statistics of capillary waves, with significant quantitative implications for the calculation of solvation thermodynamics. Here we show that a coarse-grained lattice model in the spirit of those pioneered by Chandler and coworkers, when informed by this understanding, can capture a broad range of hydrophobic behaviors with striking accuracy. Specifically, we calculate probability distributions for microscopic density fluctuations that agree very well with results of atomistic simulations, even many standard deviations from the mean, and even for probe volumes in highly heterogeneous environments. This accuracy is achieved without adjustment of free parameters, as the model is fully specified by well-known properties of liquid water. As illustrative examples of its utility, we characterize the free energy profile for a solute crossing the air-water interface, and compute the thermodynamic cost of evacuating the space between extended nanoscale surfaces. Together, these calculations suggest that a highly reduced model for aqueous solvation can serve as the basis for efficient multiscale modeling of spatial organization driven by hydrophobic and interfacial forces.

  4. Thermodynamically Tuned Nanophase Materials for reversible Hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping Liu; John J. Vajo

    2010-02-28

    This program was devoted to significantly extending the limits of hydrogen storage technology for practical transportation applications. To meet the hydrogen capacity goals set forth by the DOE, solid-state materials consisting of light elements were developed. Many light element compounds are known that have high capacities. However, most of these materials are thermodynamically too stable, and they release and store hydrogen much too slowly for practical use. In this project we developed new light element chemical systems that have high hydrogen capacities while also having suitable thermodynamic properties. In addition, we developed methods for increasing the rates of hydrogen exchange in these new materials. The program has significantly advanced (1) the application of combined hydride systems for tuning thermodynamic properties and (2) the use of nanoengineering for improving hydrogen exchange. For example, we found that our strategy for thermodynamic tuning allows both entropy and enthalpy to be favorably adjusted. In addition, we demonstrated that using porous supports as scaffolds to confine hydride materials to nanoscale dimensions could improve rates of hydrogen exchange by > 50x. Although a hydrogen storage material meeting the requirements for commercial development was not achieved, this program has provided foundation and direction for future efforts. More broadly, nanoconfinment using scaffolds has application in other energy storage technologies including batteries and supercapacitors. The overall goal of this program was to develop a safe and cost-effective nanostructured light-element hydride material that overcomes the thermodynamic and kinetic barriers to hydrogen reaction and diffusion in current materials and thereby achieve > 6 weight percent hydrogen capacity at temperatures and equilibrium pressures consistent with DOE target values.

  5. Nanostructured magnetic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetism and Magnetic Materials Conference, Atlanta, GA (Nanostructured Magnetic Materials by Keith T. Chan Doctor ofinduced by a Si-based material occurs at a Si/Ni interface

  6. Department of Materials Science &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Developing Leaders of Innovation Department of Materials Science & Engineering #12;At the University of Virginia, students in materials science, engineering physics and engineering science choose to tackle compelling issues in materials science and engineering or engineering science

  7. Sandia Energy - Materials Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Chemistry Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Clean FuelsPower Materials Chemistry Materials ChemistryAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:42:21+00:00...

  8. Nanoscale influences on bioactivity : ultrastructure and nanomechanics of model bioactive hydroxyapatite based biomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandiver, Jennifer M. (Jennifer McKeehan)

    2006-01-01

    There is a significant need for improved synthetic materials as orthopedic implants to replace human bone lost and damaged due to disease or injury. Certain ceramics, such as hydroxyapatite (HA), have the special property ...

  9. Electrochemical lithiation and delithiation for control of magnetic properties of nanoscale transition metal oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivakumar, Vikram

    2008-01-01

    Transition metal oxides comprise a fascinating class of materials displaying a variety of magnetic and electronic properties, ranging from half-metallic ferromagnets like CrO2, ferrimagnetic semiconductors like Fey's, and ...

  10. Reducing deformation anisotropy to achieve ultrahigh strength and ductility in Mg at the nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Liang

    In mechanical deformation of crystalline materials, the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS; ?[subscript CRSS]) is the stress required to initiate movement of dislocations on a specific plane. In plastically anisotropic ...

  11. Optical characterization of thermal transport from the nanoscale to the macroscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

    2008-01-01

    The thermal properties of thin films and material interfaces play an important role in many technologies such as microelectronics and solid-state energy conversion. This thesis examines the characterization of thermal ...

  12. Nanoscale quantification of stress and strain in III-V semiconducting nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Eric James, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    III-V semiconducting nanostructures present a promising platform for the realization of advanced optoelectronic devices due to their superior intrinsic materials properties including direct band gap energies that span the ...

  13. Exploring electron and phonon transport at the nanoscale for thermoelectric energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnich, Austin Jerome

    2011-01-01

    Thermoelectric materials are capable of solid-state direct heat to electricity energy conversion and are ideal for waste heat recovery applications due to their simplicity, reliability, and lack of environmentally harmful ...

  14. Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transporting Hazardous Materials The procedures given below apply to all materials that are considered to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Consult your...

  15. Institute for Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Education Center About Us Conferences and Workshops Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop Quantum and Dirac Materials for Energy...

  16. Materials Physics and Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPA Materials Physics and Applications We develop new technologies that solve pressing national energy and security challenges by exploring and exploiting materials and their...

  17. Ultrafast pump-probe force microscopy with nanoscale resolution Junghoon Jahng, Jordan Brocious, Dmitry A. Fishman, Steven Yampolsky, Derek Nowak, Fei Huang, Vartkess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potma, Eric Olaf

    Ultrafast pump-probe force microscopy with nanoscale resolution Junghoon Jahng, Jordan Brocious and reconfigurable setup for all-terahertz time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 053107 (2012); 10.1063/1.4717732 Femtosecond time-resolved optical pump-probe spectroscopy at kilohertz

  18. Colloidal metal particles as probes of nanoscale thermal transport in fluids Orla M. Wilson, Xiaoyuan Hu, David G. Cahill,* and Paul V. Braun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Colloidal metal particles as probes of nanoscale thermal transport in fluids Orla M. WilsonPd nanoparticles as probes of thermal transport in fluids and determine approximate values for the thermal conductance G of the particle/fluid interfaces. Subpicosecond 770 nm optical pulses from a Ti:sapphire mode

  19. FA12 Nanoscale Devices & Systems MS Exam Solution 1. For small semiconductor quantum dot structures, the single-electron charging energy can

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    FA12 Nanoscale Devices & Systems MS Exam Solution 1. For small semiconductor quantum dot structures, the single-electron charging energy can become comparable to the quantum confinement energies in the dot effective mass 0 * 5.0 mmp , where m0 is the free electron mass. An infinite potential energy barrier

  20. Interrogation of Nanoscale Silicon Dioxide/Water Interfaces via Hyper-Rayleigh Scattering Fredrick W. Vance, Buford I. Lemon, Jessica A. Ekhoff, and Joseph T. Hupp*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    colloidal suspensions) display finite, measurable signals. HRS is not constrained by the orientational, size Nanoscale forms of these interfaces, both films and colloidal dispersions, have attracted particular In many cases the stability, energetics, and/or efficacy of these interfaces depend crucially upon

  1. Tunable Fresnel lens using nanoscale polymer-dispersed liquid crystals Hongwen Ren, Yun-Hsing Fan, and Shin-Tson Wua)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Tunable Fresnel lens using nanoscale polymer-dispersed liquid crystals Hongwen Ren, Yun-Hsing Fan May 2003; accepted 27 June 2003 An electrically tunable Fresnel zone plate lens is demonstrated using by voltage. The major advantages of such a Fresnel lens are simple fabrication, large aperture size

  2. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

  3. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Science & Engineering In this presentation the role of materials in power generation sector is about 20%, opportunities for materials-based technologies to improve energy efficiency (e Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). He is also the Director of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory

  4. Tritium breeding materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Johnson, C.E.; Abdou, M.

    1984-03-01

    Tritium breeding materials are essential to the operation of D-T fusion facilities. Both of the present options - solid ceramic breeding materials and liquid metal materials are reviewed with emphasis not only on their attractive features but also on critical materials issues which must be resolved.

  5. CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

  6. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  7. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Ramsey, David R. (Bothel, WA); Stampfer, Joseph F. (Santa Fe, NM); Macdonald, John M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  8. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, R.W.; Nieman, G.W.; Weertman, J.R.

    1994-06-14

    A method is disclosed for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material. 19 figs.

  9. Modeling and simulation of electronic structure, material interface and random doping in nano-electronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Duan [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Wei Guowei [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)], E-mail: wei@math.msu.edu

    2010-06-20

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic devices, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. Modeling and simulation of this class of problems have emerged as an important topic in applied and computational mathematics. This work presents mathematical models and computational algorithms for the simulation of nano-scale MOSFETs. We introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential of the nano-electronic device. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions in an equal footing at nano-scale. By optimization of the energy functional, we derive consistently coupled Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations. Additionally, layered structures are crucial to the electrostatic and transport properties of nano-transistors. A material interface model is proposed for more accurate description of the electrostatics governed by the Poisson equation. Finally, a new individual dopant model that utilizes the Dirac delta function is proposed to understand the random doping effect in nano-electronic devices. Two mathematical algorithms, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method and the Dirichlet-to-Neumann mapping (DNM) technique, are introduced to improve the computational efficiency of nano-device simulations. Electronic structures are computed via subband decomposition and the transport properties, such as the I-V curves and electron density, are evaluated via the non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) formalism. Two distinct device configurations, a double-gate MOSFET and a four-gate MOSFET, are considered in our three-dimensional numerical simulations. For these devices, the current fluctuation and voltage threshold lowering effect induced by the discrete dopant model are explored. Numerical convergence and model well-posedness are also investigated in the present work.

  10. Analysis of ballistic transport in nanoscale devices by using an accelerated finite element contact block reduction approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, H.; Li, G., E-mail: gli@clemson.edu [College of Engineering and Science, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0921 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    An accelerated Finite Element Contact Block Reduction (FECBR) approach is presented for computational analysis of ballistic transport in nanoscale electronic devices with arbitrary geometry and unstructured mesh. Finite element formulation is developed for the theoretical CBR/Poisson model. The FECBR approach is accelerated through eigen-pair reduction, lead mode space projection, and component mode synthesis techniques. The accelerated FECBR is applied to perform quantum mechanical ballistic transport analysis of a DG-MOSFET with taper-shaped extensions and a DG-MOSFET with Si/SiO{sub 2} interface roughness. The computed electrical transport properties of the devices obtained from the accelerated FECBR approach and associated computational cost as a function of system degrees of freedom are compared with those obtained from the original CBR and direct inversion methods. The performance of the accelerated FECBR in both its accuracy and efficiency is demonstrated.

  11. DNA and RNA sequencing by nanoscale reading through programmable electrophoresis and nanoelectrode-gated tunneling and dielectric detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James W.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2005-06-14

    An apparatus and method for performing nucleic acid (DNA and/or RNA) sequencing on a single molecule. The genetic sequence information is obtained by probing through a DNA or RNA molecule base by base at nanometer scale as though looking through a strip of movie film. This DNA sequencing nanotechnology has the theoretical capability of performing DNA sequencing at a maximal rate of about 1,000,000 bases per second. This enhanced performance is made possible by a series of innovations including: novel applications of a fine-tuned nanometer gap for passage of a single DNA or RNA molecule; thin layer microfluidics for sample loading and delivery; and programmable electric fields for precise control of DNA or RNA movement. Detection methods include nanoelectrode-gated tunneling current measurements, dielectric molecular characterization, and atomic force microscopy/electrostatic force microscopy (AFM/EFM) probing for nanoscale reading of the nucleic acid sequences.

  12. Effect of geometrical constraint condition on the formation of nanoscale twins in the Ni-based metallic glass composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.H.; Kim, B.S.; Kim, D.H.; Ott, R.T.; Sansoz, F.; Eckert, J.

    2014-04-25

    We investigated the effect of geometrically constrained stress-strain conditions on the formation of nanotwins in alpha-brass phase reinforced Ni59Zr20Ti16Si2Sn3 metallic glass (MG) matrix deformed under macroscopic uniaxial compression. The specific geometrically constrained conditions in the samples lead to a deviation from a simple uniaxial state to a multi-axial stress state, for which nanocrystallization in the MG matrix together with nanoscale twinning of the brass reinforcement is observed in localized regions during plastic flow. The nanocrystals in the MG matrix and the appearance of the twinned structure in the reinforcements indicate that the strain energy is highly confined and the local stress reaches a very high level upon yielding. Both the effective distribution of reinforcements on the strain enhancement of composite and the effects of the complicated stress states on the development of nanotwins in the second-phase brass particles are discussed.

  13. Thermal stability of sputter-deposited 330 austenitic stainless-steel thin films with nanoscale growth twins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X.; Misra, A.; Wang, H.; Swadener, J.G.; Lima, A.L.; Hundley, M.F.; Hoagland, R.G.

    2005-12-05

    We have explored the thermal stability of nanoscale growth twins in sputter-deposited 330 stainless-steel (SS) films by vacuum annealing up to 500 deg. C. In spite of an average twin spacing of only 4 nm in the as-deposited films, no detectable variation in the twin spacing or orientation of twin interfaces was observed after annealing. An increase in the average columnar grain size was observed after annealing. The hardness of 330 SS films increases after annealing, from 7 GPa for as-deposited films to around 8 GPa for annealed films, while the electrical resistivity decreases slightly after annealing. The changes in mechanical and electrical properties after annealing are interpreted in terms of the corresponding changes in the residual stress and microstructure of the films.

  14. Nanoscale femtosecond imaging of transient hot solid density plasmas with elemental and charge state sensitivity using resonant coherent diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluge, Thomas; Chung, H -K; Gutt, C; Huang, L G; Zacharias, M; Schramm, U; Cowan, T E

    2015-01-01

    Here we propose to exploit the low energy bandwidth, small wavelength and penetration power of ultrashort pulses from XFELs for resonant Small Angle Scattering (SAXS) on plasma structures in laser excited plasmas. Small angle scattering allows to detect nanoscale density fluctuations in forward scattering direction. Typically, the SAXS signal from laser excited plasmas is expected to be dominated by the free electron distribution. We propose that the ionic scattering signal becomes visible when the X-ray energy is in resonance with an electron transition between two bound states (Resonant coherent X-ray diffraction, RCXD). In this case the scattering cross-section dramatically increases so that the signal of X-ray scattering from ions silhouettes against the free electron scattering background which allows to measure the opacity and derived quantities with high spatial and temporal resolution, being fundamentally limited only by the X-ray wavelength and timing. Deriving quantities such as ion spatial distribu...

  15. Aluminum nanoscale order in amorphous Al92Sm8 measured by fluctuation electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    of Illinois--Urbana Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 S. V. Khareb Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois--Urbana Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 Received 15 December 2004,3 Devitrification of Al92Sm8 amorphized by de- formation does not proceed by primary Al crystallization.3 When

  16. Condensed matter physics IFF Scientific Report 2008 Nanoscale phase transitions in phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pulse is applied, and the state can be determined by monitoring the optical or electrical properties storage and memory materials [1] can be seen in Fig. 1. GeTe was the first system to show (1986) real-ray and neutron scattering experiments. Several calcula- tions have been performed in recent years, but the unit

  17. Trends and Challenges of SRAM Reliability in the Nano-scale Era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    problems [3]. The most critical reliability failure mechanisms for transistors are related to oxide layer (PMOS) transistor negative oxide field produce interface traps at silicon-oxide layers (Si-SiO2) inter across the gate oxide layer degrades the oxide material and results in the formation of conducting path

  18. THE INSTITUTE FOR SOLID STATE PHYSICS 2013 Division of Nanoscale Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    , superconductors, magnetic materials and their hybrid structures. - Study of local electronic states and transportAs/AlGaAs Srr C Srr C rr/rr Srr C Thermpower of two-dimensional electron system (2DES) at a Ga, a Corbino- type electrode geometry, and a microwave heating technique are employed. The radial diffusion

  19. Atomic-Resolution Imaging of the Nanoscale Origin of Toughness in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    of the toughness in rare-earth doped silicon carbide (RE-SiC) by examining the mechanistic nature in the crack wake. Silicon carbides are potential candidate materials for many ultrahigh-temperature structural increase in thermodynamic efficiency and re- duced fuel consumption; however, to date the use

  20. Engineered Nano-scale Ceramic Supports for PEM Fuel Cells. Tech Team Meeting Presentaion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L.; Elbaz Alon, Lior; Henson, Neil J.; Rockward, Tommy; Roy, Aaron; Serov, Alexey; Ward, Timothy

    2012-08-13

    Catalyst support durability is currently a technical barrier for commercialization of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, especially for transportation applications. Degradation and corrosion of the conventional carbon supports leads to losses in active catalyst surface area and, consequently, reduced performance. As a result, the goal of this work is to develop support materials that interact strongly with Pt, yet sustain bulk-like catalytic activities with very highly dispersed particles. Ceramic materials that are prepared using conventional solid-state methods have large grain sizes and low surface areas that can only be minimally ameliorated through grinding and ball milling. Other synthesis routes to produce ceramic materials must be investigated and utilized in order to obtain desired surface areas. In this work, several different synthesis methods are being utilized to prepare electronically conductive ceramic boride, nitride, and oxide materials with high surface areas and have the potential for use as PEMFC catalyst supports. Polymer-assisted deposition (PAD) and aerosol-through plasma (A-T-P) torch are among several methods used to obtain ceramic materials with surface areas that are equal to, or exceed Vulcan XC-72R supports. Cubic Mo-based ceramic phases have been prepared with average XRD-determined crystallite sizes as low as 1.6 nm (from full profile, XRD fitting) and a BET surface area exceeding 200 m{sup 2}/g. Additionally, black, sub-stoichiometric TiO{sub 2-x}, have been prepared with an average crystallite size in the 4 nm range and surface areas exceeding 250 m{sup 2}/gr. Pt disposition using an incipient wetness approach produced materials with activity for hydrogen redox reactions and ORR. Cyclic voltammetry data will be shown for a variety of potential Pt/ceramic catalysts. Initial experiments indicate enhanced Pt metal-support interactions as well. Plane wave periodic density functional calculations (VASP) are being used to predict the thermodynamic and activation barriers for fundamental electrode processes occurring at platinum surfaces supported on thin films of the ceramic support materials. The results of this work will be used in order to optimize support properties.

  1. Center for Fundamental and Applied Research in Nanostructured and Lightweight Materials. Final Technical Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, Michael; Rogers, Tony; King, Julia; Keith, Jason; Cornilsen, Bahne; Allen, Jeffrey; Gilbert, Ryan; Holles, Joseph

    2010-09-28

    The core projects for this DOE-sponsored Center at Michigan Tech have focused on several of the materials problems identified by the NAS. These include: new electrode materials, enhanced PEM materials, lighter and more effective bipolar plates, and improvement of the carbon used as a current carrier. This project involved fundamental and applied research in the development and testing of lightweight and nanostructured materials to be used in fuel cell applications and for chemical synthesis. The advent of new classes of materials engineered at the nanometer level can produce materials that are lightweight and have unique physical and chemical properties. The grant was used to obtain and improve the equipment infrastructure to support this research and also served to fund seven research projects. These included: 1. Development of lightweight, thermally conductive bipolar plates for improved thermal management in fuel cells; 2. Exploration of pseudomorphic nanoscale overlayer bimetallic catalysts for fuel cells; 3. Development of hybrid inorganic/organic polymer nanocomposites with improved ionic and electronic properties; 4. Development of oriented polymeric materials for membrane applications; 5. Preparation of a graphitic carbon foam current collectors; 6. The development of lightweight carbon electrodes using graphitic carbon foams for battery and fuel cell applications; and 7. Movement of water in fuel cell electrodes.

  2. Joining of dissimilar materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Michael C; Lau, Grace Y; Jacobson, Craig P

    2012-10-16

    A method of joining dissimilar materials having different ductility, involves two principal steps: Decoration of the more ductile material's surface with particles of a less ductile material to produce a composite; and, sinter-bonding the composite produced to a joining member of a less ductile material. The joining method is suitable for joining dissimilar materials that are chemically inert towards each other (e.g., metal and ceramic), while resulting in a strong bond with a sharp interface between the two materials. The joining materials may differ greatly in form or particle size. The method is applicable to various types of materials including ceramic, metal, glass, glass-ceramic, polymer, cermet, semiconductor, etc., and the materials can be in various geometrical forms, such as powders, fibers, or bulk bodies (foil, wire, plate, etc.). Composites and devices with a decorated/sintered interface are also provided.

  3. Nondestructive material characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive material characterization, such as identification of material flaws or defects, material thickness or uniformity and material properties such as acoustic velocity. The apparatus comprises a pulsed laser used to excite a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer, which sends acoustic waves through an acoustic coupling medium to the test material. The acoustic wave is absorbed and thereafter reflected by the test material, whereupon it impinges on the PZ transducer. The PZ transducer converts the acoustic wave to electrical impulses, which are conveyed to a monitor.

  4. EC Transmission Line Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Tim S

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify materials acceptable for use in the US ITER Project Office (USIPO)-supplied components for the ITER Electron cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH&CD) transmission lines (TL), PBS-52. The source of material property information for design analysis shall be either the applicable structural code or the ITER Material Properties Handbook. In the case of conflict, the ITER Material Properties Handbook shall take precedence. Materials selection, and use, shall follow the guidelines established in the Materials Assessment Report (MAR). Materials exposed to vacuum shall conform to the ITER Vacuum Handbook. [Ref. 2] Commercial materials shall conform to the applicable standard (e.g., ASTM, JIS, DIN) for the definition of their grade, physical, chemical and electrical properties and related testing. All materials for which a suitable certification from the supplier is not available shall be tested to determine the relevant properties, as part of the procurement. A complete traceability of all the materials including welding materials shall be provided. Halogenated materials (example: insulating materials) shall be forbidden in areas served by the detritiation systems. Exceptions must be approved by the Tritium System and Safety Section Responsible Officers.

  5. Interfacial electron and phonon scattering processes in high-powered nanoscale applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2011-10-01

    The overarching goal of this Truman LDRD project was to explore mechanisms of thermal transport at interfaces of nanomaterials, specifically linking the thermal conductivity and thermal boundary conductance to the structures and geometries of interfaces and boundaries. Deposition, fabrication, and post possessing procedures of nanocomposites and devices can give rise to interatomic mixing around interfaces of materials leading to stresses and imperfections that could affect heat transfer. An understanding of the physics of energy carrier scattering processes and their response to interfacial disorder will elucidate the potentials of applying these novel materials to next-generation high powered nanodevices and energy conversion applications. An additional goal of this project was to use the knowledge gained from linking interfacial structure to thermal transport in order to develop avenues to control, or 'tune' the thermal transport in nanosystems.

  6. Earth-Abundant Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE funds research into Earth-abundant materials for thin-film solar applications in response to the issue of materials scarcity surrounding other photovoltaic (PV) technologies. The sections below...

  7. Factors of material consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva Díaz, Pamela Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Historic consumption trends for materials have been studied by many researchers, and, in order to identify the main drivers of consumption, special attention has been given to material intensity, which is the consumption ...

  8. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Forensics team in the Polymers and Coatings Group, MST-7. He graduated from the University of Toledo, aerogels, carbon fiber composites, damaged materials, and low density materials examining defects

  9. CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INL National Technology Roadmap for Critical Materials 4 4-3 4.3.3 McCall, Scott LLNL Additive Manufacturing of Permanent Magnets 2 2-1 2.1.2 Turchi, Patrice LLNL Materials...

  10. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  11. Nanocomposites as thermoelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Thermoelectric materials have attractive applications in electric power generation and solid-state cooling. The performance of a thermoelectric device depends on the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) of the material, ...

  12. Karankawa linguistic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Anthony P.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper I present the available materials on the diverse dialectal forms of the extinct Karankawa language of coastal Texas in the form of an English-Karankawa vocabulary, together with the attested sentence and text material, a transcription...

  13. Radioactive Materials Product Stewardship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radioactive Materials Product Stewardship ABackground Report for the National Dialogue...................................................................................................26 Low Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Regulations on Radioactive Materials Product Stewardship Prepared by the: Product Stewardship Institute University

  14. Geopolymer Sealing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop and characterize field-applicable geopolymer temporary sealing materials in the laboratory and to transfer this developed material technology to geothermal drilling service companies as collaborators for field validation tests.

  15. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program Peer Review Technical Track: Nanostructures and Quantum Dots Project Name: Center for Nanoscale Energy Related Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas L. Schulz; Philip R. Boudjouk

    2009-03-09

    Some major accomplishments of the program are: (1) First crystal structures of Si{sub 6}H{sub 12}-related molecules; (2) PECVD of both a-Si and alloys (i.e., SiN and SiO{sub x}) using Si{sub 6}H{sub 12}; (3) Establishment of a system that couples a printing methodology with laser annealing; and (4) Developed schematics and electrical models for power-point tracking system and filed invention disclosure.

  16. Nanotechnol Rev 1 (2012): 515 2012 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin Boston. DOI 10.1515/ntrev-2011-0001 Probing nanoscale behavior of magnetic materials with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fadley, Charles

    2012-01-01

    of electrolysis, which laid foundation for technological inventions such as AC power systems by Nikola Tesla. John

  17. Tuning the Optical Properties of Nanoscale Materials on Surfaces Through Controlled Exchange Reactions on Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots and Patterning of Gold and QD Nanoparticle Arrays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pravitasari, Arika

    2013-11-11

    This work focused on the integration of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and Au nanoparticles (NPs) as building blocks for the development of quantum dot and plasmonic based optical and sensing devices. The manipulation of nanomaterials ...

  18. VHTR Materials Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-07-30

    The PowerPoint presentation was given at the DOE-NE Materials Crosscut Coordination Meeting, Tuesday, 30 July 2013.

  19. HIGH PERFORMANCE MACROMOLECULAR MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gregory Forest. Department of Mathematics. Institute for Advanced Materials, Nanoscience & Technology. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

  20. Instructions and Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following are 2012 Program Peer Review Meeting instructions, materials and resource links for presenters and reviewers.

  1. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Science & Engineering New paradigms in the R&D of novel multifunctional oxide and nanocarbon thin films are providing the bases for new physics, new materials science and chemistry Laboratory (ANL) during the past fifteen years. Also, the applications of these materials for a new

  2. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smolik, Galen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  3. Esselen Linguistic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaul, David L.; Turner, Katherine; Collins, James D.

    1984-01-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to make a complete list of materials known on the Esselen language available in a single place. The existing lexical material has been organized into a lexicon which is followed by phrasal and sentence materials...

  4. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Materials Science & Engineering The University of Utah 2014-15 Undergraduate Handbook #12;STUDYING FOR A MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING DEGREE Materials Science and Engineering inter-twines numerous disciplines, including chemistry, physics and engineering. It is the one discipline within the College of Engineering

  5. Development and Integration of Single-Asperity Nanotribology Experiments & Nanoscale Interface Finite Element Modeling for Prediction and Control of Friction and Damage in Micro- and Nano-mechnical Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.W. Carpick; M.E. Plesha

    2007-03-03

    This report describes the accomplishments of the DOE BES grant entitled "Development and Integration of Single-Asperity Nanotribology Experiments & Nanoscale Interface Finite Element Modeling for Prediction and Control of Friction and Damage in Micro- and Nano-mechnical Systems". Key results are: the determination of nanoscale frictional properties of MEMS surfaces, self-assembled monolayers, and novel carbon-based films, as well as the development of models to describe this behavior.

  6. Tailored Porous Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARTON,THOMAS J.; BULL,LUCY M.; KLEMPERER,WALTER G.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCENANEY,BRIAN; MISONO,MAKOTO; MONSON,PETER A.; PEZ,GUIDO; SCHERER,GEORGE W.; VARTULI,JAMES C.; YAGHI,OMAR M.

    1999-11-09

    Tailoring of porous materials involves not only chemical synthetic techniques for tailoring microscopic properties such as pore size, pore shape, pore connectivity, and pore surface reactivity, but also materials processing techniques for tailoring the meso- and the macroscopic properties of bulk materials in the form of fibers, thin films and monoliths. These issues are addressed in the context of five specific classes of porous materials: oxide molecular sieves, porous coordination solids, porous carbons, sol-gel derived oxides, and porous heteropolyanion salts. Reviews of these specific areas are preceded by a presentation of background material and review of current theoretical approaches to adsorption phenomena. A concluding section outlines current research needs and opportunities.

  7. Spin and orbital moments of nanoscale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} epitaxial thin film on MgO/GaAs(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, W. Q.; Xu, Y. B. E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Wong, P. K. J.; Maltby, N. J.; Li, S. P.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, R. E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Du, J.; You, B.; Wu, J.; Bencok, P.

    2014-04-07

    Nanoscale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} epitaxial thin film has been synthesized on MgO/GaAs(100) spintronic heterostructure, and studied with X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. We have observed a total magnetic moment (m{sub l+s}) of (3.32?±?0.1)?{sub B}/f.u., retaining 83% of the bulk value. Unquenched orbital moment (m{sub l}) of (0.47?±?0.05)?{sub B}/f.u. has been confirmed by carefully applying the sum rule. The results offer direct experimental evidence of the bulk-like total magnetic moment and a large orbital moment in the nanoscale fully epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MgO/GaAs(100) heterostructure, which is significant for spintronics applications.

  8. 2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lagrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan

    2014-07-21

    A new instrument developed by LLNL scientists and engineers, the Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (MM-DTEM), captures billionth-of-a-meter-scale images with frame rates more than 100,000 times faster than those of conventional techniques. The work was done in collaboration with a Pleasanton-based company, Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions (IDES) Inc. Using this revolutionary imaging technique, a range of fundamental and technologically important material and biological processes can be captured in action, in complete billionth-of-a-meter detail, for the first time. The primary application of MM-DTEM is the direct observation of fast processes, including microstructural changes, phase transformations and chemical reactions, that shape real-world performance of nanostructured materials and potentially biological entities. The instrument could prove especially valuable in the direct observation of macromolecular interactions, such as protein-protein binding and host-pathogen interactions. While an earlier version of the technology, Single Shot-DTEM, could capture a single snapshot of a rapid process, MM-DTEM captures a multiframe movie that reveals complex sequences of events in detail. It is the only existing technology that can capture multiple electron microscopy images in the span of a single microsecond.

  9. Tuning the Optical Properties of Mesoporous TiO2 Films by Nanoscale Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Wang, Liang; Swensen, James S.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Silverman, Gary; Korotkov, Roman; Gaspar, Daniel J.

    2012-07-03

    Introducing mesoscale pores into spincoated titanium dioxide films, prepared by spincoating different sol-gel precursor solutions on silicon substrates and subsequent annealing at 350 C, 400 C or 450 C, respectively, affects several optical properties of the material. The change in refractive index observed for different mesoporous anatase films directly correlates with changes in pore size, but is also in a more complex manner influenced by the film thickness and the density of pores within the films. Additionally, the band gap of the films is blueshifted by the stress the introduction of pores exerts on the inorganic matrix. The differently sized pores were templated by Pluronic{reg_sign} block copolymers in the solgel solutions and tuned by employing different annealing temperatures for the film preparation. This study focused on elucidating the effect different templating materials (F127 and P123) have on the pore size of the final mesoporous titania film, and on understanding the relation of varying polymer concentration (taking P123 as an example) in the sol-gel solution to the pore concentration and size in the resultant titania film. Titania thin film samples or corresponding titanium dioxide powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, ellipsometery, UV/Vis spectrometry and other techniques to understand the interplay between mesoporosity and optical properties.

  10. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction...

  11. Nanoscale Laser-Induced Spallation in SiO2 Films Containing Gold Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudryashov, S.I.; Allen, S.D.; Papernov, S.; Schmid, A.W.

    2006-02-16

    A phenomenological theory of ultraviolet pulsed-laser-induced spallation is proposed to interpret crater formation in SiO2 thin films containing absorbing 18.5-nm gold particles. The theory considers a spherical thermoacoustic stress wave propagating from a thermal source produced by laser-energy absorption inside the particle and surrounding ionized volume. Calculations show that the tensile stress associated with such an acoustic wave may exceed the local strength of the material and cause fracture and spallation of the top film portion. The theory provides an explanation of the experimentally observed complex (two-cone) shape of craters formed in the film with particle-lodging depth exceeding 110 nm. Theoretical estimates for the threshold stress amplitude and peak temperature in the thermal source are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  12. Zero Energy Peak and Triplet Correlations in Nanoscale SFF Spin-Valves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Alidoust; Klaus Halterman; Oriol T. Valls

    2015-06-17

    Using a self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes approach, we theoretically study the proximity-induced density of states (DOS) in clean SFF spin-valves with noncollinear exchange fields. Our results clearly demonstrate a direct correlation between the presence of a zero energy peak (ZEP) in the DOS spectrum and the persistence of spin-1 triplet pair correlations. By systematically varying the geometrical and material parameters governing the spin-valve, we point out to experimentally optimal system configurations where the ZEPs are most pronounced, and which can be effectively probed via scanning tunneling microscopy. We complement these findings in the ballistic regime by employing the Usadel formalism in the full proximity limit to investigate their diffusive SFF counterparts. We determine the optimal normalized ferromagnetic layer thicknesses which result in the largest ZEPs. Our results can serve as guidelines in designing samples for future experiments.

  13. LDRD final report on nano-scale engineering of smart membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Jamison, G.M.; Assink, R.A. [and others

    1997-09-01

    A new approach to the fabrication of porous, amorphous inorganic membranes using organic pore templates was investigated. The pore templates were a new family of hybrid organic-inorganic monomers. As background for membrane work, the monomers were polymerized by sol-gel techniques to make crosslinked polymers. Molecular modeling was used to create computer simulations of the materials and provide insight into their composites, were then converted into porous silicas using low temperature oxygen plasma techniques. A select few of the monomers were copolymerized with silica monomers to form non-porous thin films on mesoporous substrates. The films were converted into porous silica thin films with thermal oxidations and the resulting membranes were tested for gas selectivities and flux.

  14. Nano-Scale Fission Product Phases in an Irradiated U-7Mo Alloy Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Keiser, Jr.; Brandon Miller; James Madden; Jan-Fong Jue; Jian Gan

    2014-09-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel is a very difficult material to characterize. Due to the large radiation fields associated with these materials, they are hard to handle and typically have to be contained in large hot cells. Even the equipment used for performing characterization is housed in hot cells or shielded glove boxes. The result is not only a limitation in the techniques that can be employed for characterization, but also a limitation in the size of features that can be resolved The most standard characterization techniques include light optical metallography (WM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). These techniques are applied to samples that are typically prepared using grinding and polishing approaches that will always generate some mechanical damage on the sample surface. As a result, when performing SEM analysis, for example, the analysis is limited by the quality of the sample surface that can be prepared. However, a new approach for characterizing irradiated nuclear fuel has recently been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. It allows for a dramatic improvement in the quality of characterization that can be performed when using an instrument like an SEM. This new approach uses a dual-beam scanning microscope, where one of the beams isa focused ion beam (FIB), which can be used to generate specimens of irradiated fuel (-10µm x 10µm) for microstructural characterization, and the other beam is the electron beam of an SEM. One significant benefit of this approach is that the specimen surface being characterized has received much less damage (and smearing) than is caused by the more traditional approaches, which enables the imaging of nanometer­ sized microstructural features in the SEM. The process details are for an irradiated low-enriched uranium (LEU) U-Mo alloy fuel Another type of irradiated fuel that has been characterized using this technique is a mixed oxide fuel.

  15. Deformation Mechanisms in Nanocrystalline Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, Farghalli A.; Yang, Heather

    2010-01-01

    2010 METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A 47. F.A.12. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A VOLUME 41A,of Slip: Progress in Materials Science, Pergamon Press,

  16. Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.

    2006-01-01

    Smart Structures and Materials, 3989:531- 538. Biggerstaff,2002. “Electroviscoelastic Materials As Active Dampers”,Smart Structures and Materials, 4695:345-350. Biggerstaff,

  17. Sandia Energy - Wavelength Conversion Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wavelength Conversion Materials Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Overview Wavelength Conversion Materials Wavelength Conversion MaterialsAlyssa...

  18. ANS materials databook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchbanks, M.F.

    1995-08-01

    Technical development in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project is dynamic, and a continuously updated information source is necessary to provide readily usable materials data to the designer, analyst, and materials engineer. The Advanced Neutron Source Materials Databook (AMBK) is being developed as a part of the Advanced Neutron Source Materials Information System (AMIS). Its purpose is to provide urgently needed data on a quick-turnaround support basis for those design applications whose schedules demand immediate estimates of material properties. In addition to the need for quick materials information, there is a need for consistent application of data throughout the ANS Program, especially where only limited data exist. The AMBK is being developed to fill this need as well. It is the forerunner to the Advanced Neutron Source Materials Handbook (AMHB). The AMHB, as reviewed and approved by the ANS review process, will serve as a common authoritative source of materials data in support of the ANS Project. It will furnish documented evidence of the materials data used in the design and construction of the ANS system and will serve as a quality record during any review process whose objective is to establish the safety level of the ANS complex. The information in the AMBK and AMHB is also provided in electronic form in a dial-up computer database known as the ANS Materials Database (AMDB). A single consensus source of materials information prepared and used by all national program participants has several advantages. Overlapping requirements and data needs of various sub-projects and subcontractors can be met by a single document which is continuously revised. Preliminary and final safety analysis reports, stress analysis reports, equipment specifications, materials service reports, and many other project-related documents can be substantially reduced in size and scope by appropriate reference to a single data source.

  19. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  20. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.