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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Wednesday, 29 August 2012 00:00 Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

2

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

3

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

4

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

5

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

6

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

7

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

8

Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

must traverse the aqueous domains of the PEM and reach the catalyst at the cathode area of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is investigated using conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). A platinum-coated AFM tip is used as a nanoscale cathode in an operating

Buratto, Steve

9

Benchmark density functional theory calculations for nanoscale conductance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benchmark density functional theory calculations for nanoscale conductance M. Strange,a I. S. The transmission functions are calculated using two different density functional theory methods, namely state density functional theory DFT . The resulting NEGF- DFT formalism provides a numerically efficient

Thygesen, Kristian

10

Electric-field-driven polymer entry into asymmetric nanoscale channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electric-field-driven entry process of flexible charged polymers such as single stranded DNA (ssDNA) into asymmetric nanoscale channels such as alpha-hemolysin protein channel is studied theoretically and using molecular dynamics simulations. Dependence of the height of the free-energy barrier on the polymer length, the strength of the applied electric field and the channel entrance geometry is investigated. It is shown that the squeezing effect of the driving field on the polymer and the lateral confinement of the polymer before its entry to the channel crucially affect the barrier height and its dependence on the system parameters. The attempt frequency of the polymer for passing the channel is also discussed. Our theoretical and simulation results support each other and describe related data sets of polymer translocation experiments through the alpha-hemolysin protein channel reasonably well.

Narges Nikoofard; Hossein Fazli

2012-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

11

Nanoscale Graphene Disk: A Natural Functionally Graded Material --The Thermal Conductivity of Nanoscale Graphene Disk by Molecular Dynamics Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this letter, we investigate numerically (by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics) and analytically the thermal conductivity of nanoscale graphene disks (NGDs), and discussed the possibility to realize FGM with only one material, NGDs. We found that the NGD has a graded thermal conductivity and can be used as FGM in a large temperature range. Moreover, we show the dependent of NGDs' thermal conductivity on radius and temperature. Our study may inspire experimentalists to develop NGD based FGMs and help heat removal of hot spots on chips by graphene.

Yang, Nuo; Ma, Dengke; Lu, Tingyu; Li, Baowen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Perspective Ion Channels: From Conductance to Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

membrane is an essen- tially insurmountable barrier for the flow of ions; therefore, ion transport is carried out by membrane-embedded specialized proteins in the form of transporters and ion channels a purely electrical concept to a structural dynamics view of ions in- teracting with a membrane protein

Bezanilla, Francisco

13

Network Flow Modeling Via Lattice-Boltzmann Based Channel Conductance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) computations of single phase, pore-to-pore conductance are compared to models in which such conductances are computed via standard pore body-channel-pore body series resistance (SR), with the conductance of each individual element (pore body, channel) based on geometric shape factor measurements. The LB computations, based upon actual channel geometry derived from X-ray computed tomographic imagery, reveal that the variation in conductance for channels having similar shape factor is much larger than is adequately captured by the geometric models. Fits to the dependence of median value of conductance versus shape factor from the LB-based computations show a power law dependence of higher power than that predicted by the geometric models. We introduce two network flow models based upon the LB conductance computations: one model is based upon LB computations for each pore-to-pore connection; the second is based upon a power law fit to the relationship between computed conductance and throat shape factor. Bulk absolute permeabilities for Fontainebleau sandstone images are computed using the SR-based network models and the two LB-based models. Both LB-based network models produce bulk absolute permeability values that fit published data more accurately than the SR-based models.

Sholokhova, Y.; Kim, D; Lindquist, W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Single ultrafast diffusive conduction based optoelectronic switch for multi-channel operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single ultrafast diffusive conduction based optoelectronic switch for multi-channel operation Fatih to multi-channel operation, including Green's function diffusive conduction solution and crosstalk conduction based optoelectronic switches that accommodate >100 optical channels (with 2,000mm-2 channel

Miller, David A. B.

15

Nanoscale sensing methodology via functional control of an ion channel-forming peptide, Gramicidin A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties of ion channels by engineering molecularexamples of the engineering of ion channel-based sensors forin re-engineering or synthetic modification of ion channels

Macrae, Michael X.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Horizontal cell gap junctions: single-channel conductance and modulation by dopamine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of 50-60 pS. The elementary conductance of channels...Dopamine pharmacology Electric Conductivity Intercellular...of 50-60 pS. The elementary conductance of channels...their num- ber or elementary conductance. METHODS...12). Electrode resistance measured in the bath...

D G McHahon; A G Knapp; J E Dowling

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Synthesis of nano-scale fast ion conducting cubic Li7La3Zr2O12  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A solution-based process was investigated for synthesizing cubic Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO), which is known to exhibit the unprecedented combination of fast ionic conductivity, and stability in air and against Li. Sol–gel chemistry was developed to prepare solid metal–oxide networks consisting of 10 nm cross-links that formed the cubic LLZO phase at 600?° C. Sol–gel LLZO powders were sintered into 96% dense pellets using an induction hot press that applied pressure while heating. After sintering, the average LLZO grain size was 260 nm, which is 13 times smaller compared to LLZO prepared using a solid-state technique. The total ionic conductivity was 0.4 mS cm?1 at 298 K, which is the same as solid-state synthesized LLZO. Interestingly, despite the same room temperature conductivity, the sol–gel LLZO total activation energy is 0.41 eV, which 1.6 times higher than that observed in solid-state LLZO (0.26 eV). We believe the nano-scale grain boundaries give rise to unique transport phenomena that are more sensitive to temperature when compared to the conventional solid-state LLZO.

Jeff Sakamoto; Ezhiylmurugan Rangasamy; Hyunjoung Kim; Yunsung Kim; Jeff Wolfenstine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 075308 (2012) Calculation of terahertz conductivity spectra in semiconductors with nanoscale modulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of charge localization in CdS nanocrystals attributed to the formation of clusters of nanocrystals.13 is the positive elementary charge, n is the density of conducting charge carriers (either due to doping

KuÂ?el, Petr

19

Nanoscale size dependence parameters on lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Temperature dependence of calculated lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A modified Callaway model is used to calculate lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A direct method is used to calculate phonon group velocity for these nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-Gruneisen parameter, surface roughness, and dislocations are successfully investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dislocation densities are decreases with the decrease of wires diameter. -- Abstract: A detailed calculation of lattice thermal conductivity of freestanding Wurtzite GaN nanowires with diameter ranging from 97 to 160 nm in the temperature range 2-300 K, was performed using a modified Callaway model. Both longitudinal and transverse modes are taken into account explicitly in the model. A method is used to calculate the Debye and phonon group velocities for different nanowire diameters from their related melting points. Effect of Gruneisen parameter, surface roughness, and dislocations as structure dependent parameters are successfully used to correlate the calculated values of lattice thermal conductivity to that of the experimentally measured curves. It was observed that Gruneisen parameter will decrease with decreasing nanowire diameters. Scattering of phonons is assumed to be by nanowire boundaries, imperfections, dislocations, electrons, and other phonons via both normal and Umklapp processes. Phonon confinement and size effects as well as the role of dislocation in limiting thermal conductivity are investigated. At high temperatures and for dislocation densities greater than 10{sup 14} m{sup -2} the lattice thermal conductivity would be limited by dislocation density, but for dislocation densities less than 10{sup 14} m{sup -2}, lattice thermal conductivity would be independent of that.

Mamand, S.M., E-mail: soran.mamand@univsul.net [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Sulaimani, Sulaimanyah, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq); Omar, M.S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq)] [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq); Muhammad, A.J. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Kirkuk, Kirkuk (Iraq)] [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Kirkuk, Kirkuk (Iraq)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Nanoscale structural evolution of electrically driven insulator to metal transition in vanadium dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural evolution of tensile strained vanadium dioxide thin films was examined across the electrically driven insulator-to-metal transition by nanoscale hard X-ray diffraction. A metallic filament with rutile (R) structure was found to be the dominant conduction pathway for an electrically driven transition, while the majority of the channel area remained in the monoclinic M1 phase. The filament dimensions were estimated using simultaneous electrical probing and nanoscale X-ray diffraction. Analysis revealed that the width of the conducting channel can be tuned externally using resistive loads in series, enabling the M1/R phase ratio in the phase coexistence regime to be tuned.

Freeman, Eugene, E-mail: exf181@psu.edu; Shukla, Nikhil; Datta, Suman [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Stone, Greg; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Gopalan, Venkatraman [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Paik, Hanjong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Moyer, Jarrett A. [Department of Physics and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Cai, Zhonghou; Wen, Haidan [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Schlom, Darrell G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Multi-channel conduction in redox-based resistive switch modelled using quantum point contact theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple analytic model for the electron transport through filamentary-type structures in Si-rich silica (SiO{sub x})-based resistive switches is proposed. The model is based on a mesoscopic description and is able to account for the linear and nonlinear components of conductance that arise from both fully and partially formed conductive channels spanning the dielectric film. Channels are represented by arrays of identical scatterers whose number and quantum transmission properties determine the current magnitude in the low and high resistance states. We show that the proposed model not only reproduces the experimental current-voltage (I-V) characteristics but also the normalized differential conductance (dln(I)/dln(V)-V) curves of devices under test.

Miranda, E., E-mail: enrique.miranda@uab.cat; Suñé, J. [Departament d'Enginyeria Electrònica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallés, Barcelona (Spain)] [Departament d'Enginyeria Electrònica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallés, Barcelona (Spain); Mehonic, A.; Kenyon, A. J. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)] [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

22

Contribution of calcium-conducting channels to the transport of zinc ions Alexandre Bouron 1,2,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Contribution of calcium-conducting channels to the transport of zinc ions Alexandre Bouron 1. The mechanisms controlling its transport through the plasma membrane are far from being completely understood in the cellular uptake of zinc. These ion channels are currently described as systems dedicated to the transport

23

Nanoscale relaxation oscillator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA); Regan, Brian C. (Los Angeles, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA)

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

Limits of applicability of the advection-dispersion model in aquifers containing connected high-conductivity channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-conductivity channels Gaisheng Liu and Chunmiao Zheng Department of Geological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA Steven M. Gorelick Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford.10. We evaluated how well an advection- dispersion model (ADM) could be used to represent solute plumes

Zheng, Chunmiao

25

A mesoscopic description of radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a formulation of the nanoscale radiative heat transfer (RHT) using concepts of mesoscopic physics. We introduce the analog of the Sharvin conductance using the quantum of thermal conductance. The formalism provides a convenient framework to analyse the physics of RHT at the nanoscale. Finally, we propose a RHT experiment in the regime of quantized conductance.

Svend-Age Biehs; Emmanuel Rousseau; Jean-Jacques Greffet

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

26

The Center for Nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) at Argonne for interdisciplinary nanoscience and nanotechnology researchers can apply to use CNM for both nonproprietary The Center's goal is to...

27

Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ?1?nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and thermal analysis using proximal probes has achieved spatial resolution of 10?nm, temperature precision of 50 mK, sensitivity to heat flows of 10 pW, and the capability for thermal analysis of sub-femtogram samples.

Cahill, David G., E-mail: d-cahill@illinois.edu; Braun, Paul V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Chen, Gang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Clarke, David R. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Fan, Shanhui [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Goodson, Kenneth E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Keblinski, Pawel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); King, William P. [Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Mahan, Gerald D. [Department of Physics, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Majumdar, Arun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Maris, Humphrey J. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Phillpot, Simon R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainseville, Florida 32611 (United States); Pop, Eric [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Shi, Li [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, Autin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with STXM-multicomponent organic electronic devices that have intrinsically nanoscale dimensions. Understanding where charge transport and recombination occur in these materials helps explain the efficient performance of polymer-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and will lead to a new avenue of research on organic electronic devices, supporting emerging technologies such as molecular computing and promoting increased efficiencies in existing organic technologies (organic LEDs and solar cells).

29

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with STXM-multicomponent organic electronic devices that have intrinsically nanoscale dimensions. Understanding where charge transport and recombination occur in these materials helps explain the efficient performance of polymer-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and will lead to a new avenue of research on organic electronic devices, supporting emerging technologies such as molecular computing and promoting increased efficiencies in existing organic technologies (organic LEDs and solar cells).

30

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with STXM-multicomponent organic electronic devices that have intrinsically nanoscale dimensions. Understanding where charge transport and recombination occur in these materials helps explain the efficient performance of polymer-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and will lead to a new avenue of research on organic electronic devices, supporting emerging technologies such as molecular computing and promoting increased efficiencies in existing organic technologies (organic LEDs and solar cells).

31

Nanoscale mass conveyors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mass transport method and device for individually delivering chargeable atoms or molecules from source particles is disclosed. It comprises a channel; at least one source particle of chargeable material fixed to the surface of the channel at a position along its length; a means of heating the channel; and a means for applying an controllable electric field along the channel, whereby the device transports the atoms or molecules along the channel in response to applied electric field. In a preferred embodiment, the mass transport device will comprise a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT), although other one dimensional structures may also be used. The MWNT or other structure acts as a channel for individual or small collections of atoms due to the atomic smoothness of the material. Also preferred is a source particle of a metal such as indium. The particles move by dissociation into small units, in some cases, individual atoms. The particles are preferably less than 100 nm in size.

Regan, Brian C. (Oakland, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

32

Microfluidics and Nanoscale Research Profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidics and Nanoscale Science Research Profile Our research group is engaged in a broad range of activities in the general area of microfluidics and nanoscale science. At a primary level, our interest that when compared to macroscale tech- nology, microfluidic systems engender a number of distinct advantages

33

Nanoscale friction and wear maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The nanoscale friction force follows a complex nonlinear...Studies have shown that the fundamental laws of friction, as...measurements using friction force microscopy: part I...J. N. 2007 Surface forces and nanorheology of molecularly...thin films. In Springer handbook of nanotechnology (ed...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Fabrication of nanoscale charge density wave systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanoscale charge density wave systems of quasi-one-dimensional o ? TaS 3 crystals were fabricated.Goldelectrodes 400 nm wide were made by standard lift-off technique on o ? TaS 3 nanocrystals prepared by deposition on silicon substrates. Interface resistance was higher than 100 G ? just after evaporation and were significantly reduced by electron-beam irradiation. The electrodes were tested down to 80 mK and were found quite durable for cryogenic measurement. The temperature dependence of the resistance of the nanocrystal was represented as the variable-range-hopping-type conduction with one dimension over the wide range of temperature from 4.2 to 100 K. This behavior was different from that of conventional bulk samples.

Katsuhiko Inagaki; Takeshi Toshima; Satoshi Tanda; Kazuhiko Yamaya; Shinya Uji

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Nano-Biotechnology: Structure and Dynamics of Nanoscale Biosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale biosystems are widely used in numerous medical applications. The approaches for structure and function of the nanomachines that are available in the cell (natural nanomachines) are discussed. Molecular simulation studies have been extensively used to study the dynamics of many nanomachines including ribosome. Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) serve as prototypes for biological channels such as Aquaporins (AQPs). Recently, extensive investigations have been performed on the transport of biological nanosystems through CNTs. The results are utilized as a guide in building a nanomachinary such as nanosyringe for a needle free drug delivery.

Manjasetty, Babu A; Ramaswamy, Y S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Nanoscale thermal transport and the thermal conductance of interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-8 2008 #12;Er-fiber laser system, UIUC Nov. 2007 #12;Solid-liquid interfaces: Two approaches · Transient-wide: ­ thermal interface materials ­ so-called "nanofluids" (suspensions in liquids) ­ polymer composites absorption depends on temperature of the nanotube · Assume heat capacity is comparable to graphite · Cooling

Braun, Paul

37

Nanoscale Heat Conduction across Metal-Dielectric Interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resistance between a metal and a dielectric material assumedresistance of a metallic film bounded by dielectric materials.resistance of a metallic film bounded by dielectric materials.

Ju, Y. Sungtaek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

ATTACHMENT CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SMALL-SCALE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS USING NANOSCALE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SMALL-SCALE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS USING NANOSCALE MATERIALS, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, RICHLAND,WASH[NGTON Proposed Adion: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to conduct indoor small-scale research and development projects and small-scale pilot projects using nanoscale materials. Nanoscale materials are engineered materials consisting of, or containing structures of between 1 and 100 nanometers (nm) that make use of properties unique to nanoscale forms of materials. Location of Action: The proposed action would occur on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site and in the vicinity ofPNNL facilities in the State of Washington. Description of the Proposed Action:

39

NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemical and Nanoscale Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Science Nanoscale Science Learn about our research staff including staff profiles, publications, and contact information. The primary goal of the Chemical and Nanoscale Science Group, within NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center, is to understand photoconversion processes in nanoscale, excitonic photoconversion systems, such as semiconductor quantum dots, molecular dyes, conjugated molecules and polymers, nanostructured oxides, and carbon nanotubes. Closely associated with this goal are efforts to gain an understanding of how to use chemistry and physical tools to control and maximize the photoconversion process. The innovative chemistry and physics that evolve from these fundamental studies are used on a number of applied projects, maximizing the benefits from these discoveries.

40

Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide....  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nanoscale Material Properties | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanotechnology Drives New Levels of Performance Nanotechnology Drives New Levels of Performance GE scientists are discovering new material properties at the nanoscale that drive...

42

Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Anodes Novel Lithium Ion Anode Structures: Overview of New DOE BATT Anode Projects Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible Anodes for...

43

Nanoscale patterning of graphene through femtosecond laser ablation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on nanometer-scale patterning of single layer graphene on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate through femtosecond laser ablation. The pulse fluence is adjusted around the single-pulse ablation threshold of graphene. It is shown that, even though both SiO{sub 2} and Si have more absorption in the linear regime compared to graphene, the substrate can be kept intact during the process. This is achieved by scanning the sample under laser illumination at speeds yielding a few numbers of overlapping pulses at a certain point, thereby effectively shielding the substrate. By adjusting laser fluence and translation speed, 400?nm wide ablation channels could be achieved over 100??m length. Raster scanning of the sample yields well-ordered periodic structures, provided that sufficient gap is left between channels. Nanoscale patterning of graphene without substrate damage is verified with Scanning Electron Microscope and Raman studies.

Sahin, R.; Akturk, S., E-mail: selcuk.akturk@itu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak 34469, Istanbul (Turkey); Simsek, E. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

44

Formation of Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous Solid Films of Methanol and Ethanol. Formation of Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous Solid Films of...

45

Symmetry-Driven Spontaneous Self-assembly of Nanoscale Ceria...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Symmetry-Driven Spontaneous Self-assembly of Nanoscale Ceria Building Blocks to Fractal Super-octahedra. Symmetry-Driven Spontaneous Self-assembly of Nanoscale Ceria Building...

46

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Nanoscale Heterostructu...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Lithium-Ion Anodes Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible Anodes for...

47

Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory Print Tuesday, 21 May 2013 00:00 Research at the Advanced...

48

Quantum effects in nanoscale Josephson junction circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum effects in nanoscale Josephson junction circuits SILVIA CORLEVI Doctoral Thesis Stockholm Josephson junction arrays with SQUID geometry. TRITA FYS 2006:31 ISSN 0280-316X ISRN KTH/FYS/­06:31­SE ISBN study on single-charge effects in nanoscale Josephson junctions and Cooper pair transistors (CPTs

Haviland, David

49

Oxygen Detection via Nanoscale Optical Indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen Detection via Nanoscale Optical Indicators Ruby N. Ghosh Dept. of Physics Michigan State University East Lansing, MI, USA weekschr@msu.edu Abstract--Oxygen plays a ubiquitous role in terrestrial developed an optical technique for monitoring oxygen in both gas and liquid phases utilizing nanoscale metal

Ghosh, Ruby N.

50

Evolutionary MOSFET Structure and Channel Design for Nanoscale CMOS Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11] International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors,10] International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors,21] International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors,

Ho, Byron

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials | Argonne...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials Share Topic Programs Materials science Nanoscience...

52

Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Calcium and Strontium Titanate Perovskites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energetics of Magnesium, Strontium, and Barium DopedNanoscale Calcium and Strontium Titanate Perovskites Sulata

Sahu, Sulata Kumari

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Pushing the boundaries of the thermal conductivity of materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pushing the boundaries of the thermal conductivity of materials David G. Cahill, C. Chiritescu, Y. · Advances in time-domain thermoreflectance. · Amorphous limit to the thermal conductivity of materials. #12;50 nm Interfaces are critical at the nanoscale · Low thermal conductivity in nanostructured

Braun, Paul

54

Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials An Office of Science User Facility U.S. Department of Energy Search CNM ... Search CNM Home About CNM Research Facilities People For Users Publications News & Highlights Events Jobs CNM Users Organization Contact Us Other DOE Nanoscale Science Research Centers Casimir force reduction Casimir Force Reduction through Nanostructuring By nanostructuring one of two interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, a new regime in the Casimir force was observed by researchers in the Center for Nanoscale Materials Nanofabrication & Devices Group working with collaborators at NIST, other national laboratories, and universities. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with <100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and,

55

Neural assembly models derived through nano-scale measurements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments of a three-year project focused on developing technical capabilities for measuring and modeling neuronal processes at the nanoscale. It was successfully demonstrated that nanoprobes could be engineered that were biocompatible, and could be biofunctionalized, that responded within the range of voltages typically associated with a neuronal action potential. Furthermore, the Xyce parallel circuit simulator was employed and models incorporated for simulating the ion channel and cable properties of neuronal membranes. The ultimate objective of the project had been to employ nanoprobes in vivo, with the nematode C elegans, and derive a simulation based on the resulting data. Techniques were developed allowing the nanoprobes to be injected into the nematode and the neuronal response recorded. To the authors's knowledge, this is the first occasion in which nanoparticles have been successfully employed as probes for recording neuronal response in an in vivo animal experimental protocol.

Fan, Hongyou; Branda, Catherine; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E.; Forsythe, James Chris

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Friction-Induced Fluid Heating in Nanoscale Helium Flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the mechanism of friction-induced fluid heating in nanoconfinements. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the temperature variations of liquid helium in nanoscale Poiseuille flows. It is found that the fluid heating is dominated by different sources of friction as the external driving force is changed. For small external force, the fluid heating is mainly caused by the internal viscous friction in the fluid. When the external force is large and causes fluid slip at the surfaces of channel walls, the friction at the fluid-solid interface dominates over the internal friction in the fluid and is the major contribution to fluid heating. An asymmetric temperature gradient in the fluid is developed in the case of nonidentical walls and the general temperature gradient may change sign as the dominant heating factor changes from internal to interfacial friction with increasing external force.

Li Zhigang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

57

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Wednesday, 28 January 2009 00:00 The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

58

Dopant Distribution, Oxygen Stoichiometry and Magnetism of Nanoscale...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dopant Distribution, Oxygen Stoichiometry and Magnetism of Nanoscale Sn0.99Co0.01O. Dopant Distribution, Oxygen Stoichiometry and Magnetism of Nanoscale Sn0.99Co0.01O. Abstract: In...

59

Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer Workshop (NOMAD 2011)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer Workshop Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer Workshop NOMAD 2011 September 12 - 13, 2011 High-Flux Isotope Reactor * Spallation Neutron Source * Oak Ridge National Laboratory About the Workshop Contact Information Important Dates Application Form Sample Description NOMAD at SNS filler About the Workshop The acronym NOMAD stands for Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer. It is a diffractometer located at the Spallation Neutron Source and is designed for the determination of pair distribution functions from a wide range of materials spanning from dense gases to long range ordered crystalline materials. It combines a large accessible Q range, large detector coverage with high intensity while maintaining good resolution. For a typical sample of the order of ~0.5cm3 good statistical accuracy can be achieved in minutes or even seconds of data acquisition time.

60

Nanoscale Center Dedication | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nanoscale Center Dedication Nanoscale Center Dedication Nanoscale Center Dedication May 6, 2005 - 12:44pm Addthis Remarks by Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Thank you, Bob [Rosner] for that introduction. And let me also thank you, along with [University of Chicago] President Randel, for the leadership you are showing here. Argonne has long been a world class institution. It will soar to new heights under your joint direction. I also want to acknowledge Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich. Thank you for being here. More than that, thank you for your strong backing of Argonne and its employees. Congresswoman Judy Biggert, who chairs the Science Subcommittee on Energy, is also a good friend to this lab, and we value her support as well. I took over as Secretary of Energy three months ago, and I have to say this

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Audit Report Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories DOE/IG-0788 February 2008 Department of Energy Washington, DC 2 0 5 8 5 February 28, 2008 MEMORANDUM FOR FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT: IhTFORMATION: Audit Report on "Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories" BACKGROUND The National Nanotechnology Initiative was established as a multi-agency research and development program in 200 1. As a part of the Initiative, the Department of Energy (Energy) is in the process of constructing Nanoscale Science Research Centers at six national laboratories. In addition to funding the construction and operation of these

62

Vortex Dynamics in NanoScale Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Into the Vortex: Dynamics in Nanoscale Materials Into the Vortex: Dynamics in Nanoscale Materials Micron and nanosized magnets are of great interest for their potential applications in new electronic devices, such as magnetic random access memories. As the size of magnets is reduced to a 1-micron scale and below, the boundaries (surfaces, perimeters, etc) of the objects begin to profoundly influence both the static and dynamic behavior of the materials. Researchers from Argonne's Materials Science Division (MSD), Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), and Advanced Photon Source (APS) have recently examined the dynamics of 3- to 7-micron-diameter NiFe alloy disks with a combination of theoretical calculations and a new time-resolved magnetic imaging technique using synchrotron-based x-ray photoemission electron

63

Nanoscale Center Dedication | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nanoscale Center Dedication Nanoscale Center Dedication Nanoscale Center Dedication May 6, 2005 - 12:44pm Addthis Remarks by Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Thank you, Bob [Rosner] for that introduction. And let me also thank you, along with [University of Chicago] President Randel, for the leadership you are showing here. Argonne has long been a world class institution. It will soar to new heights under your joint direction. I also want to acknowledge Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich. Thank you for being here. More than that, thank you for your strong backing of Argonne and its employees. Congresswoman Judy Biggert, who chairs the Science Subcommittee on Energy, is also a good friend to this lab, and we value her support as well. I took over as Secretary of Energy three months ago, and I have to say this

64

Nanoscale Tubules Formed by Exfoliation of Potassium Hexaniobate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consist of sheets that curl into nanoscale rolls, to relieve built-in strain between silicate and brucite

65

Nano-scale Sensor Networks for Chemical Eisa Zarepour1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nano-scale Sensor Networks for Chemical Catalysis Eisa Zarepour1 Mahbub Hassan1 Chun Tung Chou1- searchers are now investigating the viability of nano-scale sensor networks (NSNs), which are formed natural gas to liquid fuel. Given that reliable wireless communi- cation at nano-scale is at very early

New South Wales, University of

66

Nanoscale chemical imaging using synchrotron x-ray enhanced scanning tunneling microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combination of synchrotron radiation with scanning tunneling microscopy provides a promising new concept for chemical imaging of nanoscale structures. It employs detection of local x-ray absorption, which directly yields chemical, electronic, and magnetic sensitivity. The study of the tip current in the far field (800 nm tip/sample separation) shows that insulator-coated tips have to be considered in order to reduce the background from stray photoelectron. A picture of the different channels contributing to the x-ray enhanced STM process is proposed. If during electron tunneling the sample is illuminated with monochromatic x-rays, characteristic absorption will arise, and core electrons are excited, which might modulate the conventional tunnel current and facilitate chemical imaging at the nanoscale.

Rose, Volker; Freeland, John W. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

67

Ultralow thermal conductivity and the thermal d t f i t fconductance of interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are critical at the nanoscale · Low thermal conductivity in nanostructured materials ­ improved thermoelectric to the thermal conductivity of materials. · Ultralow thermal conductivity: beating the amorphous limitUltralow thermal conductivity and the thermal d t f i t fconductance of interfaces David G. Cahill

Braun, Paul

68

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - National Security - Nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Engineering Nanoscale Engineering * Members * Contact * Publications * Overview * Nanospheres * Gel for Radioactive Decontamination * Advanced Radionuclide Sensor * Removal/Decontamination of Metal Substrates * Advanced Water Purification National Security Home National Security - Nanoscale Engineering Nanoscale Engineering Physical chemist Carol Mertz mixes a polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating for synthesized polymer nanospheres as polymer chemist Martha Finck examines a different PEG formulation. The coated nanospheres can be injected into humans following exposure to chemical, biological, or radiological toxins. The nanospheres selectively pick up these toxins and then are drawn out through a magnetic filtration system outside the body. Researchers in Nanoscale Engineering seek to bridge the gap between

69

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

70

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

71

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

72

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

73

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

74

Nanoscale Molecular Transport by Synthetic DNA Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale Molecular Transport by Synthetic DNA Machines Jong-Shik Shin1 and Niles A. Pierce1,2 1 a processive bipedal DNA walker. Powered by externally controlled DNA fuel strands, the walker locomotes with a 5 nm stride by advancing the trailing foot to the lead at each step. On a periodic DNA track

Pierce, Niles A.

75

Nanoscale Thermal Transport andMicrorefrigeratorsonaChip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are promising candidates as thermal vias and thermal interface materials due to their inherently high thermal; superlattices; thermal boundary resistance; thermionics; thermotunneling; thermoelectrics I. INTRODUCTIONINVITED P A P E R Nanoscale Thermal Transport andMicrorefrigeratorsonaChip Devices for cooling high

76

Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the origin and physical effects of “dynamic structural disorder” (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale.

Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F. D. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nanoscale Calorimetry of Isolated Polyethylene Single Crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale Calorimetry of Isolated Polyethylene Single Crystals A. T. KWAN, M. YU. EFREMOV, E. A-film differential scanning calorimetry to investigate the melt- ing of isolated polyethylene single crystals of lamellar single crystals of polyethylene (PE). We obtain thickness, diffraction, and calorimetry data

Allen, Leslie H.

78

Nanoscale Spectroscopy and Nanotechnology 8 Scientific Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Nanoscale Spectroscopy and Nanotechnology 8 Scientific Program Gleacher Center Chicago, USA #12 Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago USA. (Invited, and Dept. of Medicine, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA. Fabrication and characterization of smart CNT

Kemner, Ken

79

LAMELLAR MAGNETISM ASSOCIATED WITH NANOSCALE EXSOLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LAMELLAR MAGNETISM ASSOCIATED WITH NANOSCALE EXSOLUTION IN THE ILMENITE-HEMATITE SOLID SOLUTION-hematite (FeTiO3-Fe2O3) solid solution is one of the most important magnetic phases in nature. Unusual magnetic, magnetic ordering, and exsolution. This presentation describes how this interaction leads to the phenomenon

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

80

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

Ren, Jianhua (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Russell, Scott (California State University, Stanislaus, Turlock, CA); Morishetti, Kiran (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

Hart, Bradley R. (Brentwood, CA); Talley, Chad E. (Brentwood, CA)

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

83

Electric potential distribution in nanoscale electroosmosis: from molecules to continuum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correlations in the electric double layer. 1. Counterionsand correlations in the electric double layer. 2 . SymmetricElectric potential distribution in nanoscale electroosmosis:

Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Chen, S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Center for Nanoscale Materials Brochure | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Acknowledgment Statements for Publications Fact Sheets & Other Documents Center for Nanoscale Materials Brochure Changing the World with Nanoscience CNM Brochure 2014.pdf...

85

Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered Nanoscale Particulate Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety in Nanotechnology Research Occupational Medicinenanotechnology revolution promises dramatic advancements in science, technology, medicineMedicine Implications of Engineered Nanoscale Particulate Matter The emerging nanotechnology

Kelly, Richard J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Nanoscale contact engineering for Si/Silicide nanowire devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications of metal silicides …………………………………..……1-3 1.4.Professor Yu Huang, Chair Metal silicides have been used inSummary Nanoscale metal silicides have garnered significant

Lin, Yung-Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Novel materials, computational spectroscopy, and multiscale simulation in nanoscale photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells convert solar energy to electricity using combinations of semiconducting sunlight absorbers and metallic materials as electrical contacts. Novel nanoscale materials introduce new paradigms for ...

Bernardi, Marco, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Electrically Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase Multiferroics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase2001). Chakhalian, J. et al. Magnetism at the interfacelocal nature of this magnetism. We find that the spontaneous

He, Q.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

(SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities User Facilities Dev X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for...

90

Electron-beam-driven nanoscale metamaterial light sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show experimentally that beams of free electrons can induce light emission from nanoscale planar photonic metamaterials. Wavelengths of emitted light are determined by both the...

Adamo, Giorgio; Ou, Jun-Yu; MacDonald, Kevin; De Angelis, Francesco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Zheludev, Nikolay

91

Uncertainty Quantification for Nano-Scale Integrated Circuits...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Uncertainty Quantification for Nano-Scale Integrated Circuits and MEMS Design Event Sponsor: Mathematics and Computing Science Seminar Start Date: Jan 20 2015 - 10:30am Building...

92

Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nano-scale strengthening from grains, subgrains, and particles in Fe-based alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

x ULTRAFINE GRAINED MATERIALS Nano-scale strengthening fromSpringerlink.com Abstract Nano-scale strengthening has beenless than 20 h), develop nano-scale subgrains [15]. These

Lesuer, D. R.; Syn, C. K.; Sherby, O. D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Nano-scale magnetic film formation by decompression of supercritical CO?/ferric acetylacetonate solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROWTH OF NANO-SCALE MAGNETIC FILMS USING CO 2 RESS EX-113 GROWTH OF NANO-SCALE MAGNETIC FILMS USING A SUPERCRIT-of EDX analysis on nano-scale ?lms. . . . . . . . . . . 109

De Dea, Silvia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with polarized X-rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stoehr and H.C. Siegmann, „Magnetism”, Springer (2006) [93]Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials withABSTRACT Nanoscale magnetism is of paramount scientific

Fischer, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible Anodes for Lithium-ion Batteries Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible...

97

XEDS STEM Tomography For 3D Chemical CharacterizationOf Nanoscale...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XEDS STEM Tomography For 3D Chemical CharacterizationOf Nanoscale Particles. XEDS STEM Tomography For 3D Chemical CharacterizationOf Nanoscale Particles. Abstract: We present a...

98

Measuring oxygen reduction/evolution reactions on the nanoscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficiency of fuel cells and metal-air batteries is significantly limited by the activation of oxygen reduction and evolution reactions (ORR/OER). Despite the well-recognized role of oxygen reaction kinetics on the viability of energy technologies, the governing mechanisms remain elusive and until now addressable only by macroscopic studies. This lack of nanoscale understanding precludes optimization of material architecture. Here we report direct measurements of oxygen reduction/evolution reactions and oxygen vacancy diffusion on oxygen-ion conductive solid surfaces with sub-10 nanometer resolution. In electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), the biased scanning probe microscopy tip acts as a moving, electrocatalytically active probe exploring local electrochemical activity. The probe concentrates an electric field in a nanometer-scale volume of material, and bias-induced, picometer-level surface displacements provide information on local electrochemical processes. Systematic mapping of oxygen activity on bare and Pt-functionalized yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) surfaces is demonstrated. This approach allows directly visualization of ORR/OER activation process at the triple-phase boundary, and can be extended to broad spectrum of oxygen-conductive and electrocatalytic materials.

Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kumar, Amit [ORNL; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Ciucci, Francesco [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Nanoscale atomic waveguides with suspended carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an experimentally viable setup for the realization of one-dimensional ultracold atom gases in a nanoscale magnetic waveguide formed by single doubly-clamped suspended carbon nanotubes. We show that all common decoherence and atom loss mechanisms are small guaranteeing a stable operation of the trap. Since the extremely large current densities in carbon nanotubes are spatially homogeneous, our proposed architecture allows to overcome the problem of fragmentation of the atom cloud. Adding a second nanowire allows to create a double-well potential with a moderate tunneling barrier which is desired for tunneling and interference experiments with the advantage of tunneling distances being in the nanometer regime.

V. Peano; M. Thorwart; A. Kasper; R. Egger

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

100

Argonne CNM: Manipulation of Nanoscale Materials for Energy & Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manipulation of Nanoscale Materials for Energy & Information Transduction Manipulation of Nanoscale Materials for Energy & Information Transduction Nanoscale materials absorb, dissipate, and propagate energy very differently from bulk materials. These properties offer unusual opportunities to induce, optimize, and control the conversion and transfer of energy and information at the nanoscale. The CNM applies recent advances in materials, theory, and characterization to create novel nanoscale materials for the control and transfer of energy, charge, and/or spin between homogeneous and heterogeneous materials. Propagation, Localization, and Interaction of Spin, Charge, Photons, and Phonons Realizing the promise of nanoscience hinges on the ability to understand and ultimately control the propagation of, localization of, and interaction between the basic quanta of energy and information - spin, charge, photons, and phonons - at the nanoscale. Key factors include continued advances in generating homogeneous nanoscale building blocks, finding means to hierarchically assemble the building blocks, and advanced scanning probe or other techniques for precisely initiating and monitoring propagation of these quanta at the nanoscale.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Novel Nanoscale Materials Reduce Electricity Needed for Sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

removal from sludge using less energy. The addition of nanoscale materials will increase the volume that removes as much water from digested sludge as possible. Dewatering is necessary to reduce the sludge of benchscale work that showed nanoscale materials enhanced the performance of polymer additives currently

102

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Wednesday, 21 December 2005 00:00 Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

103

Conductive Polymers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electroluminescent devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and high-energy density batteries. These new polymers offer cost savings, weight reduction, ease of processing, and inherent rugged design compared to conventional semiconductor materials. The photovoltaic industry has grown more than 30% during the past three years. Lightweight, flexible solar modules are being used by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps for field power units. LEDs historically used for indicator lights are now being investigated for general lighting to replace fluorescent and incandescent lights. These so-called solid-state lights are becoming more prevalent across the country since they produce efficient lighting with little heat generation. Conductive polymers are being sought for battery development as well. Considerable weight savings over conventional cathode materials used in secondary storage batteries make portable devices easier to carry and electric cars more efficient and nimble. Secondary battery sales represent an $8 billion industry annually. The purpose of the project was to synthesize and characterize conductive polymers. TRACE Photonics Inc. has researched critical issues which affect conductivity. Much of their work has focused on production of substituted poly(phenylenevinylene) compounds. These compounds exhibit greater solubility over the parent polyphenylenevinylene, making them easier to process. Alkoxy substituted groups evaluated during this study included: methoxy, propoxy, and heptyloxy. Synthesis routes for production of alkoxy-substituted poly phenylenevinylene were developed. Considerable emphasis was placed on final product yield and purity.

Bohnert, G.W.

2002-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

104

Nanoscale Charge Transport in Excitonic Solar Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excitonic solar cells, including all-organic, hybrid organic-inorganic and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), offer strong potential for inexpensive and large-area solar energy conversion. Unlike traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, where all the charge generation and collection processes are well understood, these excitonic solar cells contain extremely disordered structures with complex interfaces which results in large variations in nanoscale electronic properties and has a strong influence on carrier generation, transport, dissociation and collection. Detailed understanding of these processes is important for fabrication of highly efficient solar cells. Efforts to improve efficiency are underway at a large number of research groups throughout the world focused on inorganic and organic semiconductors, photonics, photophysics, charge transport, nanoscience, ultrafast spectroscopy, photonics, semiconductor processing, device physics, device structures, interface structure etc. Rapid progress in this multidisciplinary area requires strong synergetic efforts among researchers from diverse backgrounds. Such effort can lead to novel methods for development of new materials with improved photon harvesting and interfacial treatments for improved carrier transport, process optimization to yield ordered nanoscale morphologies with well defined electronic structures.

Venkat Bommisetty, South Dakota State University

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

105

Heat conduction of single-walled carbon nanotube isotope-superlattice structures: A molecular dynamics study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-folding effect to thermal boundary resistance of lattice interface. The crossover mechanism is explained-dimensional materials. In our previous molecular dynamics study, isotope-effects on the thermal conduction were of heat conduction of SWNTs subjected to nanoscale intrinsic thermal resistances. Here, in order to reduce

Maruyama, Shigeo

106

Safety at the Center for Nanoscale Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

case of emergency or if you need help or assistance case of emergency or if you need help or assistance dial Argonne's Protective Force: 911 (from Argonne phones) or (630) 252-1911 (from cell phones) Safety at Work As a staff member or user at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), you need to be aware of safety regulations at Argonne National Laboratory. You are also required to have taken any safety, orientation, and training classes or courses specified by your User Work Authorization(s) and/or work planning and control documents prior to beginning your work. For safety and security reasons, it is necessary to know of all facility users present in the CNM (Buildings 440 and 441). Users are required to sign in and out in the visitors logbook located in Room A119. Some detailed emergency information is provided on the Argonne National

107

Carbon-bearing fluids at nanoscale interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behaviour of fluids at mineral surfaces or in confined geometries (pores, fractures) typically differs from their bulk behaviour in many ways due to the effects of large internal surfaces and geometrical confinement. We summarize research performed on C-O-H fluids at nanoscale interfaces in materials of interest to the earth and material sciences (e.g., silica, alumina, zeolites, clays, rocks, etc.), emphasizing those techniques that assess microstructural modification and/or dynamical behaviour such as gravimetric analysis, small-angle (SANS) neutron scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations will be described that provide atomistic characterization of interfacial and confined fluid behaviour as well as aid in the interpretation of the neutron scattering results.

Cole, David [Ohio State University; Ok, Salim [Ohio State University, Columbus; Phan, A [Ohio State University, Columbus; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Striolo, Alberto [Oklahoma University; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

109

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

110

Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory Print Tuesday, 21 May 2013 00:00 Research at the Advanced Light Source may lead to four-bit magnetic cells housed on nanoscale metal disks, instead of the two-bit magnetic domains of standard magnetic memories. In magnetic vortices, parallel electron spins point either clockwise or counterclockwise, while in their crowded centers the spins point either down or up. "From the scientist's point of view, magnetism is about controlling electron spin," says Peter Fischer of the Materials Sciences Division, who leads the work at beamline 6.1.2. Four orientations could provide multibits in a new kind of memory. The next step is to control the states independently and simultaneously.

111

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

112

Thermophysical properties study of micro/nanoscale materials.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Thermal transport in low-dimensional structure has attracted tremendous attentions because micro/nanoscale materials play crucial roles in advancing micro/nanoelectronics industry. The thermal properties are essential for… (more)

Feng, Xuhui

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Negative pressure characteristics of an evaporating meniscus at nanoscale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study aims at understanding the characteristics of negative liquid pressures at the nanoscale using molecular dynamics simulation. A nano-meniscus is formed by placing liquid argon on a platinum wall between two ...

Maroo, Shalabh C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Shedding light on Nature's nanoscale control of solar energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shedding light on Nature's nanoscale control of solar energy July 30, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint Across billions of years of evolution, nature has retained a common light-absorbing...

115

Electronic structure and transport in molecular and nanoscale electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two approaches based on first-principles method are developed to qualitatively and quantitatively study electronic structure and phase-coherent transport in molecular and nanoscale electronics, where both quantum mechanical ...

Qian, Xiaofeng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nano-scale scratching in chemical-mechanical polishing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process, a critical step in the manufacture of ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) semiconductor devices, undesirable nano-scale scratches are formed on the surfaces being ...

Eusner, Thor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Secretarial Policy Statement on Nanoscale Safety - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CURRENT DOE P 456.1, Secretarial Policy Statement on Nanoscale Safety by Bill McArthur Functional areas: Nano Technology, Safety The safety of its employees, the public, and the...

118

Perspectives Nanotechnology and the public: Effectively communicating nanoscale science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perspectives Nanotechnology and the public: Effectively communicating nanoscale science August 2006 Key words: nanotechnology, communication, public knowledge, public understanding the public on concepts and applications associated with nanotechnology. The goal of our work

Crone, Wendy C.

119

Design and implementation of nanoscale fiber mechanical testing apparatus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rapid growth in the synthetic manufacturing industry demands higher resolution mechanical testing devices, capable of working with nanoscale fibers. A new device has been developed to perform single-axis tensile tests ...

Brayanov, Jordan, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nanoscale structure and transport : from atoms to devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale structures present both unique physics and unique theoretical challenges. Atomic-scale simulations can find novel nanostructures with desirable properties, but the search can be difficult if the wide range of ...

Evans, Matthew Hiram

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

3D Tracking at the Nanoscale | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3D Tracking at the Nanoscale A new theory shows that reactivity at catalytic sites inside narrow pores is controlled by how molecules move at the pore openings. Like cars...

122

Tunable, Nanoscale Free-Electron Source of Photons and Plasmons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The passage of a free-electron beam through a nano-hole in a periodically layered metal/dielectric structure creates a new type of tuneable, nanoscale radiation source, analogous to...

Adamo, G; MacDonald, K F; Zheludev, N I; Fu, Y H; Wang, C -m; Tsai, D P; García de Abajo, F J

123

Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light Title Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Choi, Jong Hyun, Donald Lucas, and Catherine P. Koshland Journal Journal of Physics: Conference Series Volume 59 Start Page 54 Issue 1 Pagination 54-59 Abstract Laser interaction with nanoscale particles is distinct and different from laser-bulk material interaction, where a hot plasma is normally created. Here, we review our studies on 193 nm laser ablation of various nanoscale particles including NaCl, soot, polystyrene, and gold. The 20 ns laser beam with fluences up to 0.3 J/cm2 irradiates nanoparticles in a gas stream at laser repetition rates from 10 to 100 Hz. The particle size distributions before and after irradiation are measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and particle morphology is examined with electron microscopy. All the nanomaterials studied exhibit a similar disintegration pattern and similar particle formation characteristics. No broadband emission associated with particle heating or optical breakdown is observed. The nanoparticles formed after irradiation have a smaller mean diameter and an order of magnitude higher number concentration with a more spherical shape compared to the original particles. We use the photon-atom ratio (PAR) to interpret the laser-particle interaction energetics.

124

Contact-independent measurement of electrical Conductance of a Thin Film with a Nanoscale Sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contact effects are a common impediment to electrical measurements throughout the fields of nanoelectronics, organic electronics, and the emerging field of graphene electronics. We demonstrate a novel method of measuring ...

Mentzel, Tamar

125

Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The ability to make materials with nanoscale dimensions opens vast opportunities for creating custom materials with unique properties. The properties of materials on the nanoscale… (more)

Zaniewski, Anna Monro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Nano-scale positioning, control and motion planning in hard disk drives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Nano-scale Positioning, Control andABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION Nano-scale Positioning, Controlmm) height (mm) mini micro nano pico femto Figure 2.8:

Boettcher, Uwe

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Peering into the Interfaces of Nanoscale Polymeric Materials | Advanced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ironing Out the Details of the Earth's Core Ironing Out the Details of the Earth's Core Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Peering into the Interfaces of Nanoscale Polymeric Materials JANUARY 6, 2012 Bookmark and Share Schematic configuration of the marker XPCS experiments. The use of resonance enhanced X-ray scattering for XPCS enables one to intensify, by more than one order of magnitude, the probing electrical field in the regions of interest within single nanometer polymer films. The development of polymer nanostructures and nanoscale devices for a wide variety of applications could emerge from new information about the interplay between nanoscale interfaces in polymeric materials, thanks to

128

2-5 Interfacial & Nanoscale Science Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INSF Overview INSF Overview Interfacial & Nanoscale Science Facility The Interfacial & Nanoscale Science (I&NS) Facility is a world-class resource for scientific expertise and instrumentation related to the study of interfacial phenomena and nanoscience and technology. This section summarizes the capabilities that exist in the I&NS Facility, along with research programs associated with facility users. Activities in the I&NS Facility address national needs in environmental restoration, waste management, pollution preven- tion, energy, and national security through research that specializes in preparation, charac- terization, interactions, and reactivity of interfaces and nanoscale materials. The range of scientific expertise and instrumentation within the I&NS Facility provides a unique envi-

129

Argonne CNM Highlight: Graphene Research at the Center for Nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Graphene Research at the Center for Nanoscale Materials Graphene Research at the Center for Nanoscale Materials graphene research The 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics was recently awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov from the University of Manchester "for groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene." Graphene is an extraordinary material made up of hexagonally packed carbon atoms that are sp2 bonded. A sheet of graphene is only one atom thick making it nature's version of an ideal two-dimensional material. At the Center for Nanoscale Materials we are exploring state-of-the-art synthesis, characterization, processing, and novel applications of graphene. With the highest resolution microscopes we are able to characterize the structural, electronic, and chemical properties of

130

Argonne CNM Highlight: Block copolymer lithography approach to nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Block copolymer lithography approach to nanoscale self-assembly Block copolymer lithography approach to nanoscale self-assembly hybrid organic-organomemtalliic block copolymer thin film cast on a silicon nitride membrane substrate This image created by Seth Darling and Nathan Ramanathan was selected for the September 2009 cover of Materials Today. Block copolymer lithography represents a promising next-generation alternative to traditional top-down methodologies. The figure shows an optical micrograph of a hybrid organic-organometallic block copolymer thin film cast on a silicon nitride membrane substrate, which reveals thickness-induced coloring effects reminiscent of art glass. This polymer self-assembles into an ordered nanoscale cylindrical morphology, the orientation of which can be controlled with film thickness. Cylinders

131

ATP hydrolysis-driven gating in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Daniella Muallem Paola Vergani * * Author...cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), alone, is an ion channel...cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which resulted in abnormal...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

SURFACE ELASTICITY MODELS FOR STATIC AND DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF NANOSCALE BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURFACE ELASTICITY MODELS FOR STATIC AND DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF NANOSCALE BEAMS by Chang Liu B) THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (Vancouver) February 2010 © Chang Liu, 2010 #12;ii Abstract Nanoscale beam of nanoscale beams. The objective is to provide NEMS designers with an efficient set of tools that can predict

Phani, A. Srikantha

133

A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

At a very small, or "nano" scale, materials behave differently. The study of nanomaterials is much more than miniaturization - scientists are discovering how changes in size change a material's properties. From sunscreen to computer memory, the applications of nanoscale materials research are all around us. Researchers at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials are creating new materials, methods and technologies to address some of the world's greatest challenges in energy security, lightweight but durable materials, high-efficiency lighting, information storage, environmental stewardship and advanced medical devices.

Divan, Ralu; Rosenthal, Dan; Rose, Volker; Wai Hla, Saw; Liu, Yuzi

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging with a single diamond NV center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid-state quantum emitters, such as artificially engineered quantum dots or naturally occurring defects in solids, are being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to biomedical imaging. Recently, these same systems have also been studied from the perspective of nanoscale metrology. In this letter we study the near-field optical properties of a diamond nanocrystal hosting a single nitrogen vacancy center. We find that the nitrogen vacancy center is a sensitive probe of the surrounding electromagnetic mode structure. We exploit this sensitivity to demonstrate nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with a single nitrogen vacancy center by imaging the local density of states of an optical antenna.

Ryan Beams; Dallas Smith; Timothy W. Johnson; Sang-Hyun Oh; Lukas Novotny; Nick Vamivakas

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

135

Capacity of steganographic channels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An information-theoretic approach is used to determine the amount of information that may be safely transferred over a steganographic channel with a passive adversary. A steganographic channel, or stego-channel is a pair consisting of the channel transition ... Keywords: information spectrum, information theory, steganalysis, steganographic capacity, steganography, stego-channel

Jeremiah J. Harmsen; William A. Pearlman

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Ion Channel Engineering: Perspectives and Strategies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ion channels facilitate the passive movement of ions down an electrochemical gradient and across lipid bilayers in cells. This phenomenon is essential for life and underlies many critical homeostatic processes in cells. Ion channels are diverse and differ with respect to how they open and close (gating) and to their ionic conductance/selectivity (permeation). Fundamental understanding of ion channel structure–function mechanisms, their physiological roles, how their dysfunction leads to disease, their utility as biosensors, and development of novel molecules to modulate their activity are important and active research frontiers. In this review, we focus on ion channel engineering approaches that have been applied to investigate these aspects of ion channel function, with a major emphasis on voltage-gated ion channels.

Prakash Subramanyam; Henry M. Colecraft

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Why Area Might Reduce Power in Nanoscale CMOS Paul Beckett  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why Area Might Reduce Power in Nanoscale CMOS Paul Beckett School of Electrical and Computer Engineering RMIT University Melbourne, Australia 3000 Email: pbeckett@rmit.edu.au Seth Copen Goldstein School-- In this paper we explore the relationship between power and area. By exploiting parallelism (and thus using more

Goldstein, Seth Copen

138

Bioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(IV) (UO2[s], uraninite) Anthropogenic · Release of mill tailings during uranium mining - MobilizationBioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale Zero-valent Iron Angela Athey Advisers: Dr. Reyes Undergraduate Student Fellowship Program April 15, 2011 #12;Main Sources of Uranium Natural · Leaching from

Fay, Noah

139

Nanoscale Thermotropic Phase Transitions Enhance Photothermal Microscopy Signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the material undergoes a phase transition. Herein, we show that thermotropic phase transitions in 4-Cyano-41 Nanoscale Thermotropic Phase Transitions Enhance Photothermal Microscopy Signals A. Nicholas G-objects in various environments. It uses a photo-induced change in the refractive index of the environment. Taking

Boyer, Edmond

140

The attractions of magnetism for nanoscale data storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...remodelling of society by electricity and electronics owed...magnetism for nanoscale data storage 283 The irony...was made assuming one data bit every 40 nm on the...atom representing one data bit, a piece of material...are unimaginable! The big problem facing this idea...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NANO-SCALE CALORIMETRY OF ISOLATED POLYETHYLENE SINGLE CRYSTALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;NANO-SCALE CALORIMETRY OF ISOLATED POLYETHYLENE SINGLE CRYSTALS BY ALEX TAN KWAN B.S., Stanford) device, the nanocalorimeter, it was possible to investigate the melting of isolated polyethylene (PE, a simple Ni-foil calorimeter, to measure the heat capacity of a thin polyethylene film to verify

Allen, Leslie H.

142

Construction of Channels (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Permission is required from the Natural Resources Commission is required for the construction or alteration of artificial channels or improved channels of natural watercourses that connect to any...

143

Channel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Channel Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleChannel&oldid596209" Category: Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type...

144

Nanoscale sensing methodology via functional control of an ion channel-forming peptide, Gramicidin A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be useful as a platform for sensing chemical or biochemicalplatform. Furthermore, the capability to tailor the chemicalplatforms hold potential for various biosensing applications, including sensing of enzyme activity or chemical

Macrae, Michael X.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Nanoscale sensing methodology via functional control of an ion channel-forming peptide, Gramicidin A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

265 mg, 1.6 mmol) and tetrazole (560 mg, 8 mmol) were265 mg, 1.6 mmol) and tetrazole (560 mg, 8 mmol) were

Macrae, Michael X.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Calcium conductance of acetylcholine-induced endplate channels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... mV: all deviations are ±1 s.d. unless otherwise stated), and the input resistance of the fibres was increased (normal Ringer -350 kft; Ca2* solution 1.32 ... , and in others no detectable change.

P. D. BREGESTOVSKI; R. MILEDI; I. PARKER

1979-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

147

Student Affairs STUDENT CONDUCT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Affairs CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT 2014-15 #12;Contents Letter from the Dean of Students ....................................................................ii Binghamton University's Code of Student Conduct Preamble...................... 1 Section I: Rules of Student Conduct.............................................................. 1 Section II: Definitions

Suzuki, Masatsugu

148

Final Report: Thermal Conductance of Solid-Liquid Interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research supported by this grant has significantly advanced fundamental understanding of the thermal conductance of solid-liquid interfaces, and the thermal conductivity of nanofluids and nanoscale composite materials. • The thermal conductance of interfaces between carbon nanotubes and a surrounding matrix of organic molecules is exceptionally small and this small value of the interface conductance limits the enhancement in thermal conductivity that can be achieved by loading a fluid or a polymer with nanotubes. • The thermal conductance of interfaces between metal nanoparticles coated with hydrophilic surfactants and water is relatively high and surprisingly independent of the details of the chemical structure of the surfactant. • We extended our experimental methods to enable studies of planar interfaces between surfactant-coated metals and water where the chemical functionalization can be varied between strongly hydrophobic and strongly hydrophilic. The thermal conductance of hydrophobic interfaces establishes an upper-limit of 0.25 nm on the thickness of the vapor-layer that is often proposed to exist at hydrophobic interfaces. • Our high-precision measurements of fluid suspensions show that the thermal conductivity of fluids is not significantly enhanced by loading with a small volume fraction of spherical nanoparticles. These experimental results directly contradict some of the anomalous results in the recent literature and also rule-out proposed mechanisms for the enhanced thermal conductivity of nanofluids that are based on modification of the fluid thermal conductivity by the coupling of fluid motion and the Brownian motion of the nanoparticles.

Cahil, David, G.; Braun, Paul, V.

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

New Nanoscale Engineering Breakthrough Points to Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Patterning High-density Arrays of Nanospheres with Self Assembly Patterning High-density Arrays of Nanospheres with Self Assembly Cells Forming Blood Vessels Send Their Copper to the Edge A Molecular Cause for One Form of Deafness Water Theory is Watertight Nanowire Micronetworks from Carbon-Black Nanoparticles Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Nanoscale Engineering Breakthrough Points to Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles MARCH 7, 2007 Bookmark and Share Nenad Markovic and Vojislav Stamenkovic with the new three-chamber UHV system at Argonne. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have developed an advanced concept in nanoscale catalyst engineering - a

150

The Nanoscale-Ordered Materials Diffractometer at SNS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale-Ordered Materials Diffractometer Nanoscale-Ordered Materials Diffractometer Inside the NOMAD detector tank. Inside the NOMAD detector tank. NOMAD is a high-flux, medium-resolution diffractometer that uses a large bandwidth of neutron energies and extensive detector coverage to carry out structural determinations of local order in crystalline and amorphous materials. It enables studies of a large variety of samples ranging from liquids, solutions, glasses, polymers, and nanocrystalline materials to long-range-ordered crystals. The enhanced neutron flux at SNS, coupled with the advanced neutron optics and detector features of NOMAD, allows for unprecedented access to high-resolution pair distribution functions, small-contrast isotope substitution experiments, small sample sizes, and parametric studies.

151

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Nanoscale Measurements of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Measurements of Glass Transition Temperature and Nanoscale Measurements of Glass Transition Temperature and Temperature-Dependent Mechanical Properties in Polymers M.P. Nikiforov, S. Jesse, L.T. Germinario (CNMS user, Eastman Chemical Co.), and S.V. Kalinin Achievement We report a novel method for local measurements of glass transition temperatures and the temperature dependence of elastic and loss moduli of polymeric materials. The combination of Anasys Instruments' heated tip technology, ORNL-developed band excitation scanning probe microscopy, and a "freeze-in" thermal profile technique allows quantitative thermomechanical measurements at high spatial resolution on the order of ~100 nm. Here, we developed an experimental approach for local thermomechanical probing that reproducibly tracks changes in the mechanical properties of

152

Argonne CNM Highlight: Quasi-Crystalline Order at Nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quasi-Crystalline Order at Nanoscale Quasi-Crystalline Order at Nanoscale Polyimide Nanofilter TEM showing the two-dimensional dodecagonal quasi-crystalline structure self-assembled from 5-nm Au and 13.4-nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Nanoparticles have a strong tendency to form periodic structures. Mixing and matching of two different types of nanoparticles allows the formation of binary nanoparticle superlattices isostructural to ionic or intermetallic compounds. In addition to periodic superlattices, binary mixtures of nearly spherical nanoparticles could lead to the growth of quasi-crystals. CNM staff in the Nanobio Interfaces Group, together with colleagues from the University of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania, have found that two-dimensional dodecagonal quasi-crystals can be formed in mixtures

153

ST ATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS Nanoscale Science Research Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ST ST ATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS Nanoscale Science Research Center Class Waiver, W(C)-200S-001 The 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act, 15 U.S.c. §7501 et seq., (the "Nanotechnology Act"), signed into lawon December 3,2003, codifies programs and activities supported by the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) and provides for the establishment of a network of advanced technology user facilities and centers. An "advanced technology user facility" is defined as "a nanotechnology research development facility supported, in whole or in part, by Federal funds that is open to all United States researchers on a competitive, merit- reviewed basis." 15 U.S.c. § 7509(5). DOE has established five user facilities under the Nanotechnology Act, known as Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), which are funded by the

154

Coupled ionic and electronic heat transport at the nanoscale.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In modeling thermal transport in nanoscale systems, classical molecular dynamics (MD) explicitly represents phonon modes and scattering mechanisms, but electrons and their role in energy transport are missing. Furthermore, the assumption of local equilibrium between ions and electrons often fails at the nanoscale. We have coupled MD (implemented in the LAMMPS MD package) with a partial differential equation based representation of the electrons (implemented using finite elements). The coupling between the subsystems occurs via a local version of the two-temperature model. Key parameters of the model are calculated using the Time Dependent Density Functional Theory with either explicit or implicit energy flow. We will discuss application of this work in the context of the US DOE Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT).

Olmsted, David L.; Modine, Normand Arthur; Beck, M. J. (University of Kentucky); Jones, Reese E.; Hatcher, R. M. (Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories); Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Wagner, Gregory John

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Size and load dependence of nanoscale electric contact resistance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nanoscale electrical resistance between a platinum-coated atomic force microscope tip and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface is measured as a function of normal load and tip radius. These measurements are complemented by molecular dynamics simulations that relate load and radius to contact area. Simulation-predicted contact area and experimentally-measured resistance are used to calculate contact resistivity. The results show that the effect of load on resistance can be captured by the real contact area, while tip size, although in part captured by area, affects contact resistivity itself, potentially through interface distance. Our study provides new insight into the effect of load and geometry on nanoscale electric contact and, more significantly, highlights the role of atomic-scale contact features in determining contact resistance.

Zhijiang Ye; Hyeongjoo Moon; Min Hwan Lee; Ashlie Martini

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Nanoscale Cluster Detection in Massive Atom Probe Tomography Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent technological advances in atom probe tomography (APT) have led to unprecedented data acquisition capabilities that routinely generate data sets containing hundreds of millions of atoms. Detecting nanoscale clusters of different atom types present in these enormous amounts of data and analyzing their spatial correlations with one another are fundamental to understanding the structural properties of the material from which the data is derived. Extant algorithms for nanoscale cluster detection do not scale to large data sets. Here, a scalable, CUDA-based implementation of an autocorrelation algorithm is presented. It isolates spatial correlations amongst atomic clusters present in massive APT data sets in linear time using a linear amount of storage. Correctness of the algorithm is demonstrated using large synthetically generated data with known spatial distributions. Benefits and limitations of using GPU-acceleration for autocorrelation-based APT data analyses are presented with supporting performance results on data sets with up to billions of atoms. To our knowledge, this is the first nanoscale cluster detection algorithm that scales to massive APT data sets and executes on commodity hardware.

Seal, Sudip K [ORNL] [ORNL; Yoginath, Srikanth B [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, Michael K [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Energy conversion device with support member having pore channels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Energy devices such as energy conversion devices and energy storage devices and methods for the manufacture of such devices. The devices include a support member having an array of pore channels having a small average pore channel diameter and having a pore channel length. Material layers that may include energy conversion materials and conductive materials are coaxially disposed within the pore channels to form material rods having a relatively small cross-section and a relatively long length. By varying the structure of the materials in the pore channels, various energy devices can be fabricated, such as photovoltaic (PV) devices, radiation detectors, capacitors, batteries and the like.

Routkevitch, Dmitri [Longmont, CO; Wind, Rikard A [Johnstown, CO

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

158

Nanoscale Gold for Enhanced Protein Electrochemistry, Ebolavirus Immunosensors, and In Vivo Distribution Measurements.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Different applications using gold at the nanoscale level are discussed in this dissertation. The first section includes relevant background into nanoparticles, specifically, monolayer protected gold… (more)

Huffman, Brian Joseph

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Atomic-Level Study of Ion-Induced Nanoscale Disordered Domains...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The simulations suggest that it is possible to design and fabricate nanoscale optoelectronic devices based on SiC using ion-beam-induced order-disorder transformation....

160

Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

(SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities User Facilities Dev X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

E-Print Network 3.0 - altered nanoscale topographies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bioelectric Scanning Probe Microscopies Summary: . Fumagalli, G. Gomila, et al. Nano Letters (2009) Topography Capacitance Dielectric constant 4. Nanoscale... to measure...

162

Tiny tool measures heat at the nanoscale > EMC2 News > The Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fellowship In This Section EMC2 News Archived News Stories Tiny tool measures heat at the nanoscale February 26th, 2014 Robinson Group Design of the spectrometer to...

163

Ion Channels as Devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ion channels are proteins with a hole down ... biological function. Channels are devices in the engineering sense of the word and engineering analysis helps understand their function. In particular ... The curren...

Bob Eisenberg

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hydraulic conductivity of shaly sands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of clays on the hydraulic conductivity of a sandstone are analyzed by considering a simple clay coating structure for the sand grains. In the model, silicate insulating nuclei are uniformly surrounded by charged clay particles. The total charge on the clays is compensated by a counterion density Q{sub v}. Assuming a capillary flow regime inside this granular model a Kozeny-Carman type equation has been derived, expressing its intrinsic permeability k in terms of a porosity-tortuosity factor {phi}{sup (m{minus}0.5)} and of the parameter Q{sub v}. The power-law derived expression shows that k decreases with the amount of clay, not only because a high Q{sub v} implies a narrowing of the pore channels, but also because it modifies the hydraulic tortuosity of the medium. This new equation has been statistically tested with extensive petrophysical laboratory data for different types of shaly sandstones.

Lima, O.A.L. de [PPPG/Federal Univ. of Bahia, Salvador Bahia (Brazil)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Code of Conduct  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Governance » Governance » Ethics, Accountability » Code of Conduct Code of Conduct Helping employees recognize and resolve the ethics and compliance issues that may arise in their daily work. Contact Code of Conduct (505) 667-7506 Code of Conduct LANL is committed to operating in accordance with the highest standards of ethics and compliance and with its core values of service to our nation, ethical conduct and personal accountability, excellence in our work, and mutual respect and teamwork. LANL must demonstrate to customers and the public that the Laboratory is accountable for its actions and that it conducts business in a trustworthy manner. What is LANL's Code of Conduct? Charlie McMillan 1:46 Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan introduces the code LANL's Code of Conduct is designed to help employees recognize and

166

JLF Conduct of Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) Conduct Of Operations The Conduct of Operations is a set of procedures and guidelines that are put in place to ensure operational safety and security...

167

Electrically conductive composite material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

168

CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (CO)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (CO) CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (CO) OBJECTIVE TA-55 SST Facility NNSA ORR Implementation Plan 1 1 CO.1 The formality and discipline of operations is adequate to conduct work safely and programs are inplace to maintain this formality and discipline. (Core Requirement 13) Criteria 1. Programmatic elements of conduct of operations are in place for TA-55 SST operations. 2. The TA-55 SST operations personnel adequately demonstrate the principles of conduct ofoperations requirements during the shift performance period. Approach Record Reviews: Review procedures and other facility documents to verify compliance with conduct of operations principles. Interviews: Interview a sampling of the TA-55 SST associated personnel to validate their understanding of the conduct of operations principles (e.g., procedure usage,

169

Formation of hollow nanocrystals through the nanoscale kirkendall effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate that hollow nanocrystals can be synthesized through a mechanism analogous to the Kirkendall Effect, in which pores form due to the difference in diffusion rates between two components in a diffusion couple. Cobalt nanocrystals are chosen as a primary example to show that their reaction in solution with oxygen, sulfur or selenium leads to the formation of hollow nanocrystals of the resulting oxide and chalcogenides. This process provides a general route to the synthesis of hollow nanostructures of large numbers of compounds. A simple extension of this process yields platinum-cobalt oxide yolk-shell nanostructures which may serve as nanoscale reactors in catalytic applications.

Yin, Yadong; Rioux, Robert M.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Hughes, Steven; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2004-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

170

Nanoscale topographical replication of graphene architecture by artificial DNA nanostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite many studies on how geometry can be used to control the electronic properties of graphene, certain limitations to fabrication of designed graphene nanostructures exist. Here, we demonstrate controlled topographical replication of graphene by artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nanostructures. Owing to the high degree of geometrical freedom of DNA nanostructures, we controlled the nanoscale topography of graphene. The topography of graphene replicated from DNA nanostructures showed enhanced thermal stability and revealed an interesting negative temperature coefficient of sheet resistivity when underlying DNA nanostructures were denatured at high temperatures.

Moon, Y.; Seo, S.; Park, J.; Park, T.; Ahn, J. R., E-mail: jrahn@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, J.; Dugasani, S. R. [Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, S. H. [College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, S. H., E-mail: sunghapark@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Kinetics of Analyte Capture on Nanoscale Sensors J. E. Solomon* and M. R. Pauly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Kinetics of Analyte Capture on Nanoscale Sensors J. E. Solomon* and M. R. Pauly *Condensed analyte capture efficiency is a crucial measure of the ultimate sensitivity of such devices years, the potential use of nanoscale electromechanical systems has been considered for high

Paul, Mark

172

Surface-Phonon Polariton Contribution to Nanoscale Radiative Heat Transfer. Emmanuel Rousseau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface-Phonon Polariton Contribution to Nanoscale Radiative Heat Transfer. Emmanuel Rousseau-sud Campus Polytechnique RD 128 91127 Palaiseau cedex, France Heat transfer between two plates of polar far-field value. In this article, we show that nanoscale heat transfer is dominated by the coupling

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

173

Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped Emmanuel Rousseau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped silicon the role of surface plasmons for nanoscale radiative heat transfer between doped silicon surfaces. We derive a new accurate and closed-form expression of the radiative near- field heat transfer. We also

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

174

Local Heating in Nanoscale Conductors Yu-Chang Chen, Michael Zwolak, and Massimiliano Di Ventra*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local Heating in Nanoscale Conductors Yu-Chang Chen, Michael Zwolak, and Massimiliano Di Ventra Received October 2, 2003 ABSTRACT We report first-principles calculations of local heating in nanoscale heat dissipation, the single molecule heats less than the gold point contact. We also find that

Zwolak, Michael

175

A mean field approach for computing solid-liquid surface tension for nanoscale interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mean field approach for computing solid-liquid surface tension for nanoscale interfaces Chi are largely determined by the solid-liquid surface tension. This is especially true for nanoscale systems with high surface area to volume ratios. While experimental techniques can only measure surface tension

Nielsen, Steven O.

176

Tunable Nanoscale Plasmon Antenna for Localization and Enhancement of Optical Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tunable Nanoscale Plasmon Antenna for Localization and Enhancement of Optical Energy Douglas Howe used. The coupling of optical energy with the surface plasmons that occur on the surface of metals the optical energy that couples with surface plasmons that exist on nanoscale metal structures. Gold

La Rosa, Andres H.

177

Nanoscale patterning of graphene through femtosecond laser ablation R. Sahin, E. Simsek, and S. Akturk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale patterning of graphene through femtosecond laser ablation R. Sahin, E. Simsek, and S.164.158.129 On: Mon, 10 Feb 2014 15:01:27 #12;Nanoscale patterning of graphene through femtosecond laser ablation 2014) We report on nanometer-scale patterning of single layer graphene on SiO2/Si substrate through

Simsek, Ergun

178

Coherent Control of Nanoscale Light Localization in Metamaterial: Creating and Positioning Isolated Subwavelength Energy Hot Spots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a subwavelength local- ization of optical energy. A desired nanoscale light hot spot can be engineered simplyCoherent Control of Nanoscale Light Localization in Metamaterial: Creating and Positioning Isolated Subwavelength Energy Hot Spots T. S. Kao,1 S. D. Jenkins,2 J. Ruostekoski,2 and N. I. Zheludev1,* 1

Zheludev, Nikolay

179

Nanoscale Science Research Centers | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nanoscale Science Research Centers Nanoscale Science Research Centers Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers Electron-Beam Microcharacterization Centers Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home User Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The five NSRCs are DOE's premier user centers for interdisciplinary research at the nanoscale, serving as the basis for a national program that encompasses new science, new tools, and new computing capabilities. Each center has particular expertise and capabilities in selected theme areas, such as synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials; catalysis; theory,

180

High conductance surge cable  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrical cable for connecting transient voltage surge suppressors to electrical power panels. A strip of electrically conductive foil defines a longitudinal axis, with a length of an electrical conductor electrically attached to the metallic foil along the longitudinal axis. The strip of electrically conductive foil and the length of an electrical conductor are covered by an insulating material. For impedance matching purposes, triangular sections can be removed from the ends of the electrically conductive foil at the time of installation. 6 figs.

Murray, M.M.; Wilfong, D.H.; Lomax, R.E.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High conductance surge cable  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrical cable for connecting transient voltage surge suppressers to ectrical power panels. A strip of electrically conductive foil defines a longitudinal axis, with a length of an electrical conductor electrically attached to the metallic foil along the longitudinal axis. The strip of electrically conductive foil and the length of an electrical conductor are covered by an insulating material. For impedance matching purposes, triangular sections can be removed from the ends of the electrically conductive foil at the time of installation.

Murray, Matthew M. (Espanola, NM); Wilfong, Dennis H. (Brooksville, FL); Lomax, Ralph E. (Santa Fe, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Research Conduct Policies  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Research Conduct Policies Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Materials Sciences & Engineering (MSE) Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences (CSGB)...

183

Nanoscale transport of phonons: Dimensionality, subdiffusion, molecular damping, and interference effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine heat transport carried by acoustic phonons in the systems composed of nanoscale chains of masses coupled to two thermal baths of different temperatures. Thermal conductance is obtained by using linearized Landauer-type formula for heat flux with phonon transmission probability calculated within atomistic Green's functions (AGF) method. AGF formalism is extended onto dissipative chains of masses with harmonic coupling beyond nearest-neighbor approximation, while atomistic description of heat reservoirs is also included into computational scheme. In particular, the phonon lifetimes and the phonon frequency shifts are discussed for harmonic lattices of different dimensions. Further, resonant structure of phonon transmission spectrum is analyzed with respect to reservoir-induced effects, molecular damping, and mass-to-mass harmonic coupling. Analysis of transmission zeros (antiresonances) and their accompanied Fano-shape resonances are discussed as a result of interference effects between different vibrational modes. Finally, we also predict subdiffusive transport regime for low-frequency ballistic phonons propagated along a linear chain of harmonically coupled masses.

Walczak, Kamil; Yerkes, Kirk L. [Aerospace Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

Quantum Channels with Memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a general model for quantum channels with memory, and show that it is sufficiently general to encompass all causal automata: any quantum process in which outputs up to some time t do not depend on inputs at times t' > t can be decomposed into a concatenated memory channel. We then examine and present different physical setups in which channels with memory may be operated for the transfer of (private) classical and quantum information. These include setups in which either the receiver or a malicious third party have control of the initializing memory. We introduce classical and quantum channel capacities for these settings, and give several examples to show that they may or may not coincide. Entropic upper bounds on the various channel capacities are given. For forgetful quantum channels, in which the effect of the initializing memory dies out as time increases, coding theorems are presented to show that these bounds may be saturated. Forgetful quantum channels are shown to be open and dense in the set of quantum memory channels.

Dennis Kretschmann; Reinhard F. Werner

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

185

Stochastic resonance for quantum channels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of stochastic resonance in nonlinear dynamics is applied to interpret the capacity of noisy quantum channels. The two-Pauli channel is used to illustrate the idea. The fidelity of the channel is also considered. Noise enhancement is found for the channel fidelity but not for the channel capacity.

Julian Juhi-Lian Ting

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Athermalized channeled spectropolarimeter enhancement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Channeled spectropolarimetry can measure the complete polarization state of light as a function of wavelength. Typically, a channeled spectropolarimeter uses high order retarders made of uniaxial crystal to amplitude modulate the measured spectrum with the spectrally-dependent Stokes polarization information. A primary limitation of conventional channeled spectropolarimeters is related to the thermal variability of the retarders. Thermal variation often forces frequent system recalibration, particularly for field deployed systems. However, implementing thermally stable retarders, made of biaxial crystal, results in an athermal channeled spectropolarimeter that relieves the need for frequent recalibration. This report presents experimental results for an anthermalized channeled spectropolarimeter prototype produced using potassium titanyl phosphate. The results of this prototype are compared to the current thermal stabilization state of the art. Finally, the application of the technique to the thermal infrared is studied, and the athermalization concept is applied to an infrared imaging spectropolarimeter design.

Jones, Julia Craven; Way, Brandyn Michael; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Hunt, Jeffery P.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Quantification of nanoscale density fluctuations using electron microscopy: Light-localization properties of biological cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a study of the nanoscale mass-density fluctuations of heterogeneous optical dielectric media, including nanomaterials and biological cells, by quantifying their nanoscale light-localization properties. Transmission electron microscope images of the media are used to construct corresponding effective disordered optical lattices. Light-localization properties are studied by the statistical analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the localized eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscale. We validated IPR analysis using nanomaterials as models of disordered systems fabricated from dielectric nanoparticles. As an example, we then applied such analysis to distinguish between cells with different degrees of aggressive malignancy.

Pradhan, Prabhakar; Damania, Dhwanil; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Dravid, Vinayak P. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Roy, Hemant K. [Department of Internal Medicine, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, Illinois 60201 (United States); Taflove, Allen [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

188

Electrically conductive material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically conductive material for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO.sub.2 formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns.

Singh, Jitendra P. (Bollingbrook, IL); Bosak, Andrea L. (Burnam, IL); McPheeters, Charles C. (Woodridge, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Woodridge, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Electrically conductive material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

190

Engineered Nano-scale Ceramic Supports for PEM Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Engineered Nano-scale Ceramic Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Eric L. Brosha, Anthony Burrell, Neil Henson, Jonathan Phillips, and Tommy Rockward Los Alamos National Laboratory Timothy Ward, Plamen Atanassov University of New Mexico Karren More Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fuel Cell Technologies Program Kick-off Meeting September 30 - October 1, 2009 Washington DC Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Fuel Cell Technologies Objectives  Develop a ceramic alternative to carbon material supports for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathode that exhibits an enhanced resistance to corrosion and Pt coalescence while preserving positive attributes of carbon such as

191

Los Alamos scientists detect and track single molecules with nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanotube "glowsticks" transform surface science tool kit Nanotube "glowsticks" transform surface science tool kit Los Alamos scientists detect and track single molecules with nanoscale carbon cylinders Researchers have now shown that semiconducting carbon nanotubes have the potential to detect and track single molecules in water. January 10, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

192

NERSC Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanocontrol of CO2 Nanocontrol of CO2 Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Goals * Collect experimental 2D-3D imaging data in order to investigate fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions; * Provide algorithms for better understanding of processes governing fluid-fluid and fluid-rock systems, related to geologic sequestration of CO2; * Develop image processing methods for analyzing experimental data and comparing it to simulations; * Detect/reconstruct material interfaces, quantify contact angles, derive contact angle distribution, etc. Impact * Unveil knowledge required for developing technology to store CO2 safely in deep surface rock formations, thus reducing amount of CO2 in atmosphere; More Personnel * CRD: Wes Bethel, Dani Ushizima, Gunther Weber (SciDAC-e award)

193

ADVANCED HEAT EXCHANGERS USING TUNABLE NANOSCALE-MOLECULAR ASSEMBLY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam condensation heat transfer on smooth horizontal tubes and enhanced tubes (TURBO-CDI and TURBO-CSL) along with nanoscale hydrophobic coated tubes was studied experimentally. Hydrophobic coatings have been created through self-assembled mono layers (SAMs) on copper alloy (99.9% Cu, 0.1% P) surfaces to enhance steam condensation through dropwise condensation. In general, a SAM system with a long-chain, hydrophobic group is nano-resistant, meaning that such a system forms a protective hydrophobic layer with negligible heat transfer resistance but a much stronger bond. When compared to complete filmwise condensation, the SAM coating on a plain tube increased the condensation heat transfer rate by a factor of 3 for copper alloy surfaces, under vacuum pressure (33.86 kPa) and by a factor of about 8 times when operated at atmospheric pressure (101 kPa). Lifetime of maintaining dropwise condensation is greatly dependent on the processing conditions.

Kwang J. Kim; Thomas W. Bell; Srinivas Vemuri; Sailaja Govindaraju

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Atomic Calligraphy: The Direct Writing of Nanoscale Structures using MEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) based method for the resist free patterning of nano-structures. Using a focused ion beam (FIB) to customize larger MEMS machines, we fabricate apertures as small as 50 nm on plates that can be moved with nanometer precision over an area greater than 20x20 {\\mu}m^2. Depositing thermally evaporated gold atoms though the apertures while moving the plate results in the deposition of nanoscale metal patterns. Adding a shutter only microns above the aperture, enables high speed control of not only where but also when atoms are deposited. Using a shutter, different sized apertures can be selectively opened and closed for nano-structure fabrication with features ranging from nano- to micrometers in scale. The ability to evaporate materials with high precision, and thereby fabricate circuits and structures in situ, enables new kinds of experiments based on the interactions of a small number of atoms and eventually even single atoms.

Matthias Imboden; Han Han; Jackson Chang; Flavio Pardo; Cristian A. Bolle; Evan Lowell; David J. Bishop

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

195

Conductivity fuel cell collector plate and method of fabrication  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method of manufacturing a PEM fuel cell collector plate is disclosed. During molding a highly conductive polymer composite is formed having a relatively high polymer concentration along its external surfaces. After molding the polymer rich layer is removed from the land areas by machining, grinding or similar process. This layer removal results in increased overall conductivity of the molded collector plate. The polymer rich surface remains in the collector plate channels, providing increased mechanical strength and other benefits to the channels. The improved method also permits greater mold cavity thickness providing a number of advantages during the molding process.

Braun, James C. (Juno Beach, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

THERMAL HEAT TRANSPORT AT THE NANO-SCALE LEVEL AND ITS APPLICATION TO NANO-MACHINING.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Nano-manufacturing is receiving significant attention in industry due to the ever-growing interest in nanotechnology in research institutions. It is hypothesized that single-step or direct-write nano-scale… (more)

Wong, Basil T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Applications of a new theory extending continuum mechanics to the nanoscale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this dissertation, we present the Slattery-Oh-Fu theory extending continuum mechanics to the nanoscale and its applications. We begin with an analysis of supercritical adsorption of argon, krypton, and methane on Graphon before we fully develop...

Fu, Kaibin

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Mechanics of Indentation into Micro- and Nanoscale Forests of Tubes, Rods, or Pillars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The force-depth behavior of indentation into fibrillar-structured surfaces such as those consisting of forests of micro- or nanoscale tubes or rods is a depth-dependent behavior governed by compression, bending, and buckling ...

Wang, Lifeng

199

Nanoscale Interplay of Strain and Doping in a High-Temperature Superconductor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The highest-temperature superconductors are electronically inhomogeneous at the nanoscale, suggesting the existence of a local variable that could be harnessed to enhance the superconducting pairing. Here we report the relationship between local doping ...

Ilija Zeljkovic; Jouko Nieminen; Dennis Huang; Tay-Rong Chang; Yang He; Horng-Tay Jeng; Zhijun Xu; Jinsheng Wen; Genda Gu; Hsin Lin; Robert S. Markiewicz; Arun Bansil; Jennifer E. Hoffman

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

Generalizations of the Landau-Zener theory in the physics of nanoscale systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale systems have sizes intermediate between atomic and macroscopic ones. Therefore their treatment often requires a combination of methods from atomic and condensed matter physics. The conventional Landau-Zener theory, being a powerful tool...

Sinitsyn, Nikolai

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Single-chain Nanoparticles: Synthesis of Nano-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Single-chain Nanoparticles: Synthesis of Nano-scale Architectures:00 AM, IMS Room 20 Recent efforts by our lab to fold single polymer chains into nano

Alpay, S. Pamir

202

Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films Studied Using Atom Probe Tomography: Comparison Of Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films...

203

CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY Revision 1 10/31/07 Approved by: DOE Records Management Division, IM-23 PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY 1. GENERAL. A records inventory is compiling a descriptive list of each record series or system, including the location of the records and any other pertinent data. A records inventory is not a list of each document or each folder. 2. DEFINE THE RECORDS INVENTORY GOAL(S). The goals of a records inventory should be to: a. Gather information for scheduling purposes; b. Prepare for conversion to other media or to identify the volume of classified and/or permanent records in your organization's custody; and c. Identify any existing shortcomings, deficiencies, or problems with

204

Nanoscale Electrical Conductivity and Surface Spectroscopic Studies of Indium-Tin Oxide Yish-Hann Liau and Norbert F. Scherer*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enabled the Electronic and optoelectronic devices impact many areas of society, from simple household and optoelectronic devices OCTOBER 2006 | VOLUME 9 | NUMBER 1018 #12;creation of a host of structures with modulated

Scherer, Norbert F.

205

Lithium ion conducting electrolytes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN), succinnonitrile (CH{sub 2}CN){sub 2}, and tetraglyme (CH{sub 3}--O--CH{sub 2}--CH{sub 2}--O--){sub 2} (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg{sup +2} cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100 C conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone. 2 figs.

Angell, C.A.; Liu, C.

1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

206

Conduct of Operations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Cancels DOE O 5480.19. Admin Chg 2, dated 12-3-14, cancels Admin Chg 1.

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

207

Li Conductivity in LixMPO4 ,,M Mn, Fe, Co, Ni... Olivine Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diffusivity may become quite relevant. In addition, the role of electrical vs. ionic conductivity is not clear and an estimate for Li diffusion constants, in the absence of electrical conductivity constraints, is made energy barriers to cross between the channels. Without electrical conductivity limitations the intrinsic

Ceder, Gerbrand

208

Capacitor-less memory cell fabricated on nano-scale strained Si on a relaxed SiGe layer-on-insulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated the combined effect of the strained Si channel and hole confinement on the memory margin enhancement for a capacitor-less memory cell fabricated on nano-scale strained Si on a relaxed SiGe layer-on-insulator (?-Si SGOI). The memory margin for the ?-Si SGOI capacitor-less memory cell was higher than that of the memory cell fabricated on an unstrained Si-on-insulator (SOI) and increased with increasing Ge concentration of the relaxed SiGe layer; i.e. the memory margin for the ?-Si SGOI capacitor-less memory cell (138.6 µA) at a 32 at% Ge concentration was 3.3 times higher than the SOI capacitor-less memory cell (43 µA).

Tae-Hyun Kim; Jea-Gun Park

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

At the request of the Secretary of Energy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed a Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories. The Special Review included onsite field reviews of work practices at the 8 of the 16 laboratories currently performing nanoscale activities. The eight selected DOE sites, which were reviewed during May-July 2008. This volume is a compilation of field reports of the eight selected DOE sites, which were reviewed during May-July 2008. The field reviews focused on collecting data by reviewing nanomaterial program documents, observing activities involving nanomaterials, conducting facility walkthroughs, and interviewing personnel. The data for each site was analyzed and subject to an internal HSS quality review board. Reports were validated with site representatives and revised as appropriate to ensure factual accuracy. Closeout meetings were conducted with DOE site managers and laboratory management to discuss results. The individual sites are responsible for evaluating and addressing weaknesses identified on the field reviews.

210

TRANSPORT INVOLVING CONDUCTING FIBERS IN A NON-CONDUCTING MATRIX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result is a material with high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity. Transport Models,2 , J. Rozen3 Introduction Thermal and electrical transport through a low-conductivity matrix containing conversion devices high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity are preferred for superior

Walker, D. Greg

211

Dendritic Ca2 -Activated K Conductances Regulate Electrical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dendritic Ca2 -Activated K Conductances Regulate Electrical Signal Propagation in an Invertebrate studies revealed that backpropagating Na spikes and synaptically evoked EPSPs caused Ca2 entry through low-voltage-activated Ca2 channels that are distrib- uted throughout the neurites. Voltage-clamp recordings from the soma

Wessel, Ralf

212

Low Temperature Proton Conductivity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and and MEAs at Freezing Temperatures Thomas A. Zawodzinski, Jr. Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, Ohio 2 Freezing Fuel Cells: Impact on MEAS Below 0 o C *Transport processes/motions slow down: questions re: lower conductivity,water mobility etc *Residual water will have various physical effects in different portions of the MEA questions re: durability of components 3 3 'States' of Water in Proton Conductors ? Freezing (bulk), bound freezable, bound non freezable water states claimed based on DSC * Freezing water more mobile, allegedly important for high conductivity Analysis common for porous systems Does the presence of these states matter? Why? 4 'State of Water' in PEMs At T < 0 o C *'Liquid-like' water freezes *'Non-freezing' fraction: water of solvation at pore

213

Oxygen ion conducting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Super ionic conductive glass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A.sub.1+x D.sub.2-x/3 Si.sub.x P.sub.3-x O.sub.12-2x/3, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

Susman, Sherman (Park Forest, IL); Volin, Kenneth J. (Fort Collins, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Conduction cooled tube supports  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Becht, IV, Charles (Morristown, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

SUGAMA,T.

2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

217

Nanoscale order in ZnSe:(Mg, O)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-assembling of 1O4Mg identical tetrahedral clusters resulting in the nanoscale order in ZnSe:(Mg, O) is presented. Co-doping transforms ZnSe into Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O{sub y}Se{sub 1?y} alloy of MgO, MgSe, ZnO and ZnSe. The decrease of a sum of the enthalpies of the constituent compounds and diminution of the strain energy are the causes of this phenomenon. The self-assembling conditions are obtained from the free energy minimum when magnesium and oxygen are in the dilute and ultra dilute limits, correspondingly. The occurrence of 1O4Mg clusters and completion of self-assembling when all oxygen atoms are in clusters are results of the continuous phase transitions. The self-assembling occurrence temperature does not depend on the oxygen content and it is a function of magnesium concentration. Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O{sub y}Se{sub 1?y} with all oxygen atoms in clusters can be obtained in temperature ranges from T = 206 °C (x = 0.001, y = 1×10{sup ?4}) to T = 456 °C (x = 0.01, y = 1×10{sup ?4}) and from T = 237 °C (x = 0.001, y = 1×10{sup ?6}) to T = 462 °C (x = 0.01, y = 1×10{sup ?6})

Elyukhin, Vyacheslav A. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Avenida Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, 07360 México (Mexico)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

218

Calibrated nanoscale dopant profiling using a scanning microwave microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scanning microwave microscope is used for calibrated capacitance spectroscopy and spatially resolved dopant profiling measurements. It consists of an atomic force microscope combined with a vector network analyzer operating between 1-20 GHz. On silicon semiconductor calibration samples with doping concentrations ranging from 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 3}, calibrated capacitance-voltage curves as well as derivative dC/dV curves were acquired. The change of the capacitance and the dC/dV signal is directly related to the dopant concentration allowing for quantitative dopant profiling. The method was tested on various samples with known dopant concentration and the resolution of dopant profiling determined to 20% while the absolute accuracy is within an order of magnitude. Using a modeling approach the dopant profiling calibration curves were analyzed with respect to varying tip diameter and oxide thickness allowing for improvements of the calibration accuracy. Bipolar samples were investigated and nano-scale defect structures and p-n junction interfaces imaged showing potential applications for the study of semiconductor device performance and failure analysis.

Huber, H. P.; Hochleitner, M.; Hinterdorfer, P. [University of Linz, Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Altenbergerstrasse 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Humer, I.; Smoliner, J. [Technical University of Vienna, Institute for Solid State Electronics, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Fenner, M.; Moertelmaier, M.; Rankl, C.; Tanbakuchi, H.; Kienberger, F. [Agilent Technologies, Inc., 5301 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara, California 95051 (United States); Imtiaz, A.; Wallis, T. M.; Kabos, P. [National Institute for Standards and Technology, Electromagnetic Division, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3337 (United States); Kopanski, J. J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Semiconductor Measurements Division, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8120 (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Li-ion Anode Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by University of Pittsburgh at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about nanoscale...

220

QKD Quantum Channel Authentication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several simple yet secure protocols to authenticate the quantum channel of various QKD schemes, by coupling the photon sender's knowledge of a shared secret and the QBER Bob observes, are presented. It is shown that Alice can encrypt certain portions of the information needed for the QKD protocols, using a sequence whose security is based on computational-complexity, without compromising all of the sequence's entropy. It is then shown that after a Man-in-the-Middle attack on the quantum and classical channels, there is still enough entropy left in the sequence for Bob to detect the presence of Eve by monitoring the QBER. Finally, it is shown that the principles presented can be implemented to authenticate the quantum channel associated with any type of QKD scheme, and they can also be used for Alice to authenticate Bob.

J. T. Kosloski

2006-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Chiral Conductivities of Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chiral conductivities of nanotubes are examined within the framework of the Boltzmann transport equation. Electron transport along a chiral trajectory is decomposed into current components along the tubule axis and its circumference. Within a constant relaxation time approximation, these components are derived from the expectation values of Fermi velocities by using the appropriate operators and the wave functions at the Fermi level obtained by first-principles calculations. As a typical example, the chiral current of a doped BC2N tubule is illustrated, and the strength of the induced magnetic field is discussed.

Yoshiyuki Miyamoto; Steven G. Louie; Marvin L. Cohen

1996-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

222

Laboratory Experiments and Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Bed Leveler Used to Level the Bottom of Ship Channels after Dredging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study was conducted to ascertain the impacts of bed leveling, following ship channel dredging operations, and to also investigate the hydrodynamic flow field around box bed levelers. Laboratory experiments were conducted with bed levelers...

Paul, Ephraim Udo

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hybrid Zero-capacity Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are only two known kinds of zero-capacity channels. The first kind produces entangled states that have positive partial transpose, and the second one - states that are cloneable. We consider the family of 'hybrid' quantum channels, which lies in the intersection of the above classes of channels and investigate its properties. It gives rise to the first explicit examples of the channels, which create bound entangled states that have the property of being cloneable to the arbitrary finite number of parties. Hybrid channels provide the first example of highly cloneable binding entanglement channels, for which known superactivation protocols must fail - superactivation is the effect where two channels each with zero quantum capacity having positive capacity when used together. We give two methods to construct a hybrid channel from any binding entanglement channel. We also find the low-dimensional counterparts of hybrid states - bipartite qubit states which are extendible and possess two-way key.

Sergii Strelchuk; Jonathan Oppenheim

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

224

Enhanced Thermal Conductivity Oxide Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

the purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of increasing the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels by adding small fractions of a high conductivity solid phase.

Alvin Solomon; Shripad Revankar; J. Kevin McCoy

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Simple Audio Conductivity Device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Simple Audio Conductivity Device ... To solve these problems, the authors have built a simple audio conductivity device that is very sensitive to current flow. ...

Gregory Berenato; David F. Maynard

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

FAS CENTER FOR NANOSCALE SYSTEMS 11 OXFORD STREET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_Research_Proposal.doc 1 7/29/2009 Proposal for Minor to Conduct Research or Work in a Laboratory (To be completed by CNS Faculty or Staff Sponsor) Persons under 18 years of age (minors) wishing to work or conduct research hazards in the laboratory. · Hazardous operations are defined and safe practices and protective equipment

227

In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxides and their tailored structures are at the heart of electrochemical energy storage technologies and advances in understanding and controlling the dynamic behaviors in the complex oxides, particularly at the interfaces, during electrochemical processes will catalyze creative design concepts for new materials with enhanced and better-understood properties. Such knowledge is not accessible without new analytical tools. New innovative experimental techniques are needed for understanding the chemistry and structure of the bulk and interfaces, more importantly how they change with electrochemical processes in situ. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used extensively to study electrode materials ex situ and is one of the most powerful tools to obtain structural, morphological, and compositional information at nanometer scale by combining imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy, e.g., EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (EELS). Determining the composition/structure evolution upon electrochemical cycling at the bulk and interfaces can be addressed by new electron microscopy technique with which one can observe, at the nanometer scale and in situ, the dynamic phenomena in the electrode materials. In electrochemical systems, for instance in a lithium ion battery (LIB), materials operate under conditions that are far from equilibrium, so that the materials studied ex situ may not capture the processes that occur in situ in a working battery. In situ electrochemical operation in the ultra-high vacuum column of a TEM has been pursued by two major strategies. In one strategy, a 'nano-battery' can be fabricated from an all-solid-state thin film battery using a focused ion beam (FIB). The electrolyte is either polymer based or ceramic based without any liquid component. As shown in Fig. 1a, the interfaces between the active electrode material/electrolyte can be clearly observed with TEM imaging, in contrast to the composite electrodes/electrolyte interfaces in conventional lithium ion batteries, depicted in Fig.1b, where quantitative interface characterization is extremely difficult if not impossible. A second strategy involves organic electrolyte, though this approach more closely resembles the actual operation conditions of a LIB, the extreme volatility In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry by Ying Shirley Meng, Thomas McGilvray, Ming-Che Yang, Danijel Gostovic, Feng Wang, Dongli Zeng, Yimei Zhu, and Jason Graetz of the organic electrolytes present significant challenges for designing an in situ cell that is suitable for the vacuum environment of the TEM. Significant progress has been made in the past few years on the development of in situ electron microscopy for probing nanoscale electrochemistry. In 2008, Brazier et al. reported the first cross-section observation of an all solid-state lithium ion nano-battery by TEM. In this study the FIB was used to make a 'nano-battery,' from an all solid-state battery prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In situ TEM observations were not possible at that time due to several key challenges such as the lack of a suitable biasing sample holder and vacuum transfer of sample. In 2010, Yamamoto et al. successfully observed changes of electric potential in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery in situ with electron holography (EH). The 2D potential distribution resulting from movement of lithium ions near the positive-electrode/electrolyte interface was quantified. More recently Huang et al. and Wang et al. reported the in situ observations of the electrochemical lithiation of a single SnO{sub 2} nanowire electrode in two different in situ setups. In their approach, a vacuum compatible ionic liquid is used as the electrolyte, eliminating the need for complicated membrane sealing to prevent the evaporation of carbonate based organic electrolyte into the TEM column. One main limitation of this approach is that EELS spectral imaging is not possible due to the high plasmon signal of the ionic li

Graetz J.; Meng, Y.S.; McGilvray, T.; Yang, M.-C.; Gostovic, D.; Wang, F.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, Y.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Channels on Mars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...able to carry with CHANNELS ON MARS 607 power and vigor hundreds of kilometers across...by Nat ional Aeronautical and Space Administration Grant N G R 0 5 - 0 0 2 - 3 0 5 . J...The catastrophic late Pleistocene Bonneville Flood in the Snake River Plains, Idaho...

229

Channeling through Bent Crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bent crystals have demonstrated potential for use in beam collimation. A process called channeling is when accelerated particle beams are trapped by the nuclear potentials in the atomic planes within a crystal lattice. If the crystal is bent then the particles can follow the bending angle of the crystal. There are several different effects that are observed when particles travel through a bent crystal including dechanneling, volume capture, volume reflection and channeling. With a crystal placed at the edge of a particle beam, part of the fringe of the beam can be deflected away towards a detector or beam dump, thus helping collimate the beam. There is currently FORTRAN code by Igor Yazynin that has been used to model the passage of particles through a bent crystal. Using this code, the effects mentioned were explored for beam energy that would be seen at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at a range of crystal orientations with respect to the incoming beam. After propagating 5 meters in vacuum space past the crystal the channeled particles were observed to separate from most of the beam with some noise due to dechanneled particles. Progressively smaller bending radii, with corresponding shorter crystal lengths, were compared and it was seen that multiple scattering decreases with the length of the crystal therefore allowing for cleaner detection of the channeled particles. The input beam was then modified and only a portion of the beam sent through the crystal. With the majority of the beam not affected by the crystal, most particles were not deflected and after propagation the channeled particles were seen to be deflected approximately 5mm. After a portion of the beam travels through the crystal, the entire beam was then sent through a quadrupole magnet, which increased the separation of the channeled particles from the remainder of the beam to a distance of around 20mm. A different code, which was developed at SLAC, was used to create an angular profile plot which was compared to what was produced by Yazynin's code for a beam with no multiple scattering. The results were comparable, with volume reflection and channeling effects observed and the range of crystal orientations at which volume reflection is seen was about 1 mrad in both simulations.

Mack, Stephanie; /Ottawa U. /SLAC

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

Characterization of particulate matter deposited in diesel particulate filters: Visual and analytical approach in macro-, micro- and nano-scales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-scale analytical investigations of particulate matter (soot and ash) of two loaded diesel particulate filters (DPF) from (a) a truck (DPF1) and (b) a passenger car (DPF2) reveal the following: in DPF1 (without fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 130-270 {mu}m thick, homogeneous porous cake with pronounced orientation. Soot aggregates consist of 15-30 nm large individual particles exhibiting relatively mature internal nanostructures, however, far from being graphite. Ash aggregates largely accumulate at the outlet part of DPF1, while minor amounts are deposited directly on the channel walls all along the filter length. They consist of crystalline phases with individual particles of sizes down to the nanoscale range. Chemically, the ash consists mainly of Mg, S, Ca, Zn and P, elements encountered in lubricating oil additives. In the passenger car DPF2 (with fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 200-500 {mu}m thick, inhomogeneous porous cake consisting of several superposed layers corresponding to different soot generations. The largest part of the soot cake is composed of unburned, oriented soot aggregates left behind despite repeated regenerations, while a small part constitutes a loose layer with randomly oriented aggregates, which was deposited last and has not seen any regeneration. Fe-oxide particles of micro- to nano-scale sizes, originating from the fuel-borne additive, are often dispersed within the part of the soot cake composed of the unburned soot leftovers. The individual soot nanoparticles in DPF2 are approximately 15-40 nm large and generally less mature than in the truck DPF1. The presence of soot leftovers in DPF2 indicates that the addition of fuel-borne material does not fully compensate for the temperatures needed for complete soot removal. Ash in DPF2 is filling up more than half of the filter volume (at the downstream part) and is dominated by Fe-oxide aggregates, due to the Fe-based fuel-borne additive, but otherwise its chemical composition reflects compounds of lubricating oil additives. (author)

Liati, Anthi; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Panayotis [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for I.C. Engines, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Lateral conduction infrared photodetector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photodetector for detecting infrared light in a wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m is disclosed. The photodetector has a mesa structure formed from semiconductor layers which include a type-II superlattice formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. Impurity doped regions are formed on sidewalls of the mesa structure to provide for a lateral conduction of photo-generated carriers which can provide an increased carrier mobility and a reduced surface recombination. An optional bias electrode can be used in the photodetector to control and vary a cut-off wavelength or a depletion width therein. The photodetector can be formed as a single-color or multi-color device, and can also be used to form a focal plane array which is compatible with conventional read-out integrated circuits.

Kim, Jin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Carroll, Malcolm S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings A Dissertation Presented to The Faculty of the School conductivity of the coatings. The minimum thermal conductivity occurs at a low rotation rate and is 0.8 W intrinsic thermal conductivity, good phase stability and greater resistance to sintering and CMAS attack

Wadley, Haydn

233

Recovery Act Provides Big Boost with a Nanoscale Focus | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Provides Big Boost with a Nanoscale Focus Provides Big Boost with a Nanoscale Focus Recovery Act Provides Big Boost with a Nanoscale Focus October 14, 2010 - 9:46am Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? The Center for Functional Nanomaterials is getting a new electron microscope that will be valuable for solar cell research -- one of 7 ARRA-funded additions at the Brookhaven National Laboratory facility. Editor's note: cross posted from the Brookhaven National Laboratory The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is receiving more than $5 million in new equipment and upgrades funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The new acquisitions will fill gaps in the current facility to meet the needs of

234

Seminar Announcement Nanoscale High Field Chemistry with the Atomic Force Microscope and Patterning January 15, 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SEMINAR SEMINAR ANNOUNCMENT Thursday, January 15, 2009 11:00am - 12:00 noon EMSL Boardroom Nanoscale High Field Chemistry With the Atomic Force Microscope and Patterning Marco Rolandi Assistant Professor Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 Facile and affordable processes for the fabrication of nanostructures are fundamental to future endeavors in nanoscale science and engineering. The atomic force microscope was designed primarily for imaging, and has evolved into a versatile tool for nanoscale surface modification. We have developed an AFM based scheme capable of direct writing of glassy carbon nanowires as fast as 1 cm/s. In brief, when a bias is applied across the tip-sample gap a molecular precursor undergoes high field reactions that result in the deposition of a cross- linked product on the surface. In order to gain a

235

Parallel nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A New Device for Combinatorial Analysis of Complex nano-Scale Material Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Parallel nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A New Device for Combinatorial Analysis of Complex nano-Scale Material Systems Patrick James McCluskey, and Joost J. Vlassak Division of Engineering is presented for the combinatorial analysis of complex nano-scale material systems. The parallel nano

236

Impact of Nano-scale Through-Silicon Vias on the Quality of Today and Future 3D IC Designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Nano-scale Through-Silicon Vias on the Quality of Today and Future 3D IC Designs Dae Hyun sub-micron dimensions in a few years. This downscaling of TSVs requires research on the impact of nano. In this paper, we investigate, for the first time, the impact of nano-scale TSVs on the area, wirelength, delay

Lim, Sung Kyu

237

Extremality conditions for generalized channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A generalized channel is a completely positive map that preserves trace on a given subspace. We find conditions under which a generalized channel with respect to a positively generated subspace J is an extreme point in the set of all such generalized channels. As a special case, this yields extremality conditions for quantum protocols. In particular, we obtain new extremality conditions for quantum 1-testers with 2 outcomes, which correspond to yes/no measurements on the set of quantum channels.

Anna Jencova

2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

238

Nanoscale imaging of the electronic and structural transitions in vanadium dioxide.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the electronic and structural changes at the nanoscale in vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) in the vicinity of its thermally driven phase transition. Both electronic and structural changes exhibit phase coexistence leading to percolation. In addition, we observe a dichotomy between the local electronic and structural transitions. Nanoscale x-ray diffraction reveals local, nonmonotonic switching of the lattice structure, a phenomenon that is not seen in the electronic insulator-to-metal transition mapped by near-field infrared microscopy.

Qazilbash, M. M.; Tripathi, A.; Schafgans, A. A.; Kim, B.-J.; Kim, H.-T.; Cai, Z.; Holt, M. V.; Maser, J. M.; Keilmann, F.; Shpyrko, O. G.; Basov, D. N. (X-Ray Science Division); ( CNM); (Univ. of California at San Diego); (Electronics and Telecommunications Research IInst.); (Univ. of Science and Technology); (Munich Centre for Advanced Photonics and Center for NanoScience)

2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

239

Electron-beam patterning of polymer electrolyte films to make multiple nanoscale gates for nanowire transistors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report an electron-beam based method for the nanoscale patterning of the poly(ethylene oxide)/LiClO$_{4}$ polymer electrolyte. We use the patterned polymer electrolyte as a high capacitance gate dielectric in single nanowire transistors and obtain subthreshold swings comparable to conventional metal/oxide wrap-gated nanowire transistors. Patterning eliminates gate/contact overlap which reduces parasitic effects and enables multiple, independently controllable gates. The method's simplicity broadens the scope for using polymer electrolyte gating in studies of nanowires and other nanoscale devices.

D. J. Carrad; A. M. Burke; R. W. Lyttleton; H. J. Joyce; H. H. Tan; C. Jagadish; K. Storm; H. Linke; L. Samuelson; A. P. Micolich

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Properties of Confined Water and Fluid Flow at the Nanoscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has been focused on the development of accurate computational tools to study fluids in confined, nanoscale geometries, and the application of these techniques to probe the structural and electronic properties of water confined between hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates, including the presence of simple ions at the interfaces. In particular, we have used a series of ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations and quantum Monte Carlo calculations to build an understanding of how hydrogen bonding and solvation are modified at the nanoscale. The properties of confined water affect a wide range of scientific and technological problems - including protein folding, cell-membrane flow, materials properties in confined media and nanofluidic devices.

Schwegler, E; Reed, J; Lau, E; Prendergast, D; Galli, G; Grossman, J C; Cicero, G

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Conductive lithium storage electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001conductivity at 27.degree. C. of at least about 10.sup.-8 S/cm. The compound can be a doped lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Incheon, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Mountain View, CA); Andersson, Anna M. (Vasteras, SE)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

242

Conductive lithium storage electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z(A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).s- ub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001conductivity at 27.degree. C. of at least about 10.sup.-8 S/cm. The compound can be a doped lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Seoul, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Cambridge, MA); Andersson, Anna M. (Uppsala, SE)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

243

SUR1: a unique ATP-binding cassette protein that functions as an ion channel regulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...protein that functions as an ion channel regulator Jussi Aittoniemi Constantina Fotinou...transporters in that they serve as ion channel regulators. They belong to the ABCC subfamily of...cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7) and the multidrug resistance-associated...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Research on Convective Heat Transfer and Mass Transfer of the Evaporator in Micro/Mini-Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the development of science and technology, various heating and cooling equipment have a development trend of micromation. Micro-fabrication processes make it possible to conduct research on condensation heat transfer in micro-channels. Based...

Su, J.; Li, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Heat transfer in channels with porous inserts during forced fluid flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

General analytic expressions are obtained to calculate heat transfer and temperature fields in a plane channel ... allowance for the effective thermal conductivity of the heat carrier and the distribution of heat

A. A. Plakseev; V. V. Kharitonov

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Nanoscale Imaging of Photocurrent and Efficiency in CdTe Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanoscale Imaging of Photocurrent and Efficiency in CdTe Solar Cells ... The local collection characteristics of grain interiors and grain boundaries in thin-film CdTe polycrystalline solar cells are investigated using scanning photocurrent microscopy. ... photovoltaics; CdTe; scanning photocurrent microscopy; solar cells; NSOM ...

Marina S. Leite; Maxim Abashin; Henri J. Lezec; Anthony Gianfrancesco; A. Alec Talin; Nikolai B. Zhitenev

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Quantification of Nanoscale Density Fluctuations in Biological Cells/Tissues: Inverse Participation Ratio (IPR) Analysis of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ratio (IPR) Analysis of Transmission Electron Microscopy Images and Implications for Early-Stage Cancer analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscales. First, the IPR analysis is validated in experiments with models of disordered systems fabricated

Pradhan, Prabhakar

248

Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature Anders Lervik transient non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations, heat-transfer through nanometer-scale interfaces processes. We show that the modeling of heat transfer across a nanodroplet/fluid interface requires

Kjelstrup, Signe

249

Nanoscale Heat Transfer at Contact Between a Hot Tip and a Substrate Stphane Lefvre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale Heat Transfer at Contact Between a Hot Tip and a Substrate Stéphane Lefèvre Laboratoire d three heat transfer modes with experimental data and modeling. We conclude that the three modes in "International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 49, 1-2 (2006) 251-258" DOI : 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2005

Boyer, Edmond

250

Radiation-induced melting in coherent X-ray diffractive imaging at the nanoscale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coherent X-ray diffraction techniques play an increasingly significant role in imaging nanoscale structures which range from metallic and semiconductor samples to biological objects. The conventional knowledge about radiation damage effects caused by ever higher brilliance X-ray sources has to be critically revised while studying nanostructured materials.

Ponomarenko, O.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

251

Cryogenic etching of nano-scale silicon trenches with resist masks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cryogenic silicon etching using SF"6-O"2 at the sub-50 nm scale has been developed for nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) and nano-photonics systems where high aspect ratio trenches are desired. It was found that the SF"6-O"2 chemistry at cryogenic ... Keywords: Electron beam lithography, Nano-imprint lithography, Nano-scale pattern transfer, Nanofabrication, Plasma etching

Y. Wu; D. L. Olynick; A. Goodyear; C. Peroz; S. Dhuey; X. Liang; S. Cabrini

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Nanoscience This course explores the frontiers of science on the nanoscale. Many developing 21st  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscience MSc/PgDip This course explores the frontiers of science on the nanoscale. Many and behaviours of systems in this submicrometrescale size domain. The multidisciplinary nature of nanoscience. The projects take place primarily in research labs associated with nanoscience located in the University

Strathclyde, University of

253

A Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Manufacturing ... There is a need to both quantify unit process emissions and the impacts of auxiliary equipment at the facility scale; (iii) There is a need for streamlined methodologies to assess upstream impacts of manufacturing chemicals, materials and equipment infrastructure. ...

Nikhil Krishnan; Sarah Boyd; Ajay Somani; Sebastien Raoux; Daniel Clark; David Dornfeld

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

254

Polymeric Nanoscale All-Solid State Battery Steven E. Bullock1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polymeric Nanoscale All-Solid State Battery Steven E. Bullock1 , and Peter Kofinas2 1 Department to an all solid- state polymer battery. Such a battery would have greater safety, without potential, the search for an all solid-state battery has continued. Research on polymeric materials for batteries has

Kofinas, Peter

255

Material Standards for EHS for Engineered Nanoscale Materials Material Standards for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;Material Standards for EHS for Engineered Nanoscale Materials Material Standards of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD Workshop Co-Chairs and Principle Report Editors Dianne L. Poster, John A. Small, Michael T. Postek National Institute of Standards and Technology Sponsored by U

Magee, Joseph W.

256

Nanoscale Manipulation of Surfaces and Interfaces: Engineering Electrical Properties Through Nanofabrication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimensionalities, like graphene and carbon nanotubes also need to be studied for potential use in nanoscale devices. Graphene has been found to be electronically tunable by doping, causing it to be able to function as a semiconductor or as a metallic conductor...

Smith, Gregory J.

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Nanoscale photon management in silicon solar cells Sangmoo Jeong, Shuang Wang, and Yi Cui  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits. For power generation, low-cost fossil fuel has, however, been pre- ferred to renewable energy and wind, can be accessed easily in most of the world. In particular, the solar energy deliveredNanoscale photon management in silicon solar cells Sangmoo Jeong, Shuang Wang, and Yi Cui Citation

Cui, Yi

258

Nanoscale Joule heating, Peltier cooling and current crowding at graphenemetal contacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale Joule heating, Peltier cooling and current crowding at graphene­metal contacts Kyle L are the Joule and Peltier effects. The Joule effect9 occurs as charge carriers dissipate energy within the lattice, and is pro- portional to resistance and the square of the current. The Peltier effect17

King, William P.

259

Science Highlight July 2011 Better Batteries through Nanoscale 3D Chemical Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to hierarchical structures found in energy materials such as battery electrodes, fuel cells, and catalytic systems Science Highlight ­ July 2011 Better Batteries through Nanoscale 3D Chemical Imaging Concerns battery technology. Although Li-ion batteries, crucial in the boom of portable electronics, stand

Wechsler, Risa H.

260

Selective removal of atoms as a new method for fabrication of nanoscale patterned media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The method of 'selective removal of atoms' is proposed for purposeful efficient modification of a solid atomic composition under exposure to an accelerated ion beam of a certain energy. Such modification can dramatically change the physical properties ... Keywords: ion irradiation, nanodevices, nanoscale structure, patterned media, selective removal of atoms

B. A. Gurovich; D. I. Dolgy; E. A. Kuleshova; E. Z. Meilikhov; A. G. Domantovsky; K. E. Prikhodko; K. I. Maslakov; B. A. Aronzon; V. V. Rylkov; A. Yu. Yakubovsky

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nanoscale Triboelectric-Effect-Enabled Energy Conversion for Sustainably Powering Portable Electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale Triboelectric-Effect-Enabled Energy Conversion for Sustainably Powering Portable , and 128 mW/cm3 , respectively, and an energy conversion efficiency as high as 10-39% has been demonstrated: Harvesting energy from our living environment is an effective approach for sustainable, maintenance

Wang, Zhong L.

262

Nanoscale tunable reduction of graphene oxide for graphene electronics , D. Wang2*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale tunable reduction of graphene oxide for graphene electronics Z. Wei1* , D. Wang2* , S contributed equally to this work. paul.sheehan@nrl.navy.mil elisa.riedo@physics.gatech.edu Graphene is now in graphene oxide (GO) has risen for producing large-scale flexible conductors and for its potential to open

263

Controlled formation of nanoscale wrinkling patterns on polymers using focused ion beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controlled formation of nanoscale wrinkling patterns on polymers using focused ion beam Myoung of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA b Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shillim, Kwanak, Seoul 151

Hutchinson, John W.

264

Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels: Observations on deformation microstructure, nanoscale dimples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels: Observations on deformation microstructure, nanoscale hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels has been a subject of significant research, one of the major challenges in tackling hydrogen embrittlement is that the mechanism of embrittlement is not fully resolved

Chen, Sow-Hsin

265

Molecular dynamics simulations of the nano-scale room-temperature oxidation of aluminum single crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular dynamics simulations of the nano-scale room-temperature oxidation of aluminum single Abstract The oxidation of aluminum single crystals is studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with dynamic charge transfer between atoms. The simulations are performed on three aluminum low-index surfaces

Southern California, University of

266

Novel Nanoscale Catalysts and Desulfurizers for Aviation Fuels Martin Duran* and Abdul-Majeed Azad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reforming catalysts for jet fuel", The Ohio Fuel Cell Symposium of the Ohio Fuel Cell Coalition, May 23Novel Nanoscale Catalysts and Desulfurizers for Aviation Fuels Martin Duran* and Abdul-Majeed Azad) to hydrogen through steam reforming poses a challenge since these fuels contain sulfur up to about 1000 ppm

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

267

Transport Simulation of a Nanoscale Silicon Rod Field-Effect C. Dwyer, R. Taylor, L. Vicci  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://ftp.cs.unc.edu/pub/packages/GRIP/publication_addenda /TSNSRFET. I. INTRODUCTION Recent advances in nanoscience enable new possibilities for nanoscale computer CMOS inverter in the shape of a 3D rod lattice. The junctions between rods are metallized DNA strands components of the fabrication technique starting with its transistors. The importance of low power digital

Dwyer, Chris

268

A robust scanning diamond sensor for nanoscale imaging with single nitrogen-vacancy centres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A robust scanning diamond sensor for nanoscale imaging with single nitrogen-vacancy centres P and A. Yacoby1 * The nitrogen-vacancy defect centre in diamond1­4 has potential applications processing9 and bioimaging10 . These applications rely on the ability to pos- ition a single nitrogen-vacancy

Walsworth, Ronald L.

269

Novel nanoscale architectures: coated nanotubes and other nanowires  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for rechargeable-battery applications (Sakamoto...secondary step of thermal treatment on such...in rechargeable battery components (Dominko...hydro- or solvo-thermal conditions (Lu...Goddard, W. A. 2000 Thermal conductivity of...for lithium-ion batteries. Mater. Res...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Fluctuation enhanced electrochemical reaction rates at the nanoscale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coupled to the electric circuit. We show...that render all elementary electrochemical reactions...electrodes an ohmic resistance is often introduced...coupled to the electric circuit. We show...that render all elementary electrochemical...Peroxide | Algorithms Electric Conductivity Electrochemical...

Vladimir García-Morales; Katharina Krischer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - National Security - Nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanospheres for Human Detoxification Nanospheres for Human Detoxification Argonne scientists are developing technology that uses magnetic nanospheres for human detoxification of blood-borne toxins (radiological, biological, and chemical). Originally developed for in-field use by military personnel, the work also will have application in the early diagnosis and treatment of certain medical conditions. For more details, view the fact sheet. Nanospheres for Human Detoxification Intravenously injected into victims of radiological, chemical or biological attack, biodegradable nanospheres circulate through the bloodstream, where surface proteins bind to the targeted toxins. They are removed from the bloodstream by a small dual-channel shunt, inserted into an arm or leg artery, that circulates the blood through an external magnetic separator. Strong magnets in the shunt immobilize the iron-based particles, and clean blood flows back into the bloodstream. (Image courtesy of the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute)

272

Nanoscale study of reactive transport in catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with precious and non-precious catalysts using lattice Boltzmann method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution porous structures of catalyst layer (CL) with multicomponent in proton exchange membrane fuel cells are reconstructed using a reconstruction method called quartet structure generation set. Characterization analyses of nanoscale structures are implemented including pore size distribution, specific area and phase connectivity. Pore-scale simulation methods based on the lattice Boltzmann method are developed and used to predict the macroscopic transport properties including effective diffusivity and proton conductivity. Nonuniform distributions of ionomer in CL generates more tortuous pathway for reactant transport and greatly reduces the effective diffusivity. Tortuosity of CL is much higher than conventional Bruggeman equation adopted. Knudsen diffusion plays a significant role in oxygen diffusion and significantly reduces the effective diffusivity. Reactive transport inside the CL is also investigated. Although the reactive surface area of non-precious metal catalyst (NPMC) CL is much higher t...

Chen, Li; Kang, Qinjun; Holby, Edward F; Tao, Wen-Quan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Ultra-sensitive thermal conductance measurement of one-dimensional nanostructures enhanced by differential bridge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal conductivity of one-dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires nanotubes and polymer chains is of significant interest for understanding nanoscale thermal transport phenomena as well as for practical applications in nanoelectronics energy conversion and thermal management. Various techniques have been developed during the past decade for measuring this fundamental quantity at the individual nanostructure level. However the sensitivity of these techniques is generally limited to 1 × 10?9 W/K which is inadequate for small diameter nanostructures that potentially possess thermal conductance ranging between 10?11 and 10?10 W/K. In this paper we demonstrate an experimental technique which is capable of measuring thermal conductance of ?10?11 W/K. The improved sensitivity is achieved by using an on-chip Wheatstone bridge circuit that overcomes several instrumentation issues. It provides a more effective method of characterizing the thermal properties of smaller and less conductive one-dimensional nanostructures. The best sensitivity experimentally achieved experienced a noise equivalent temperature below 0.5 mK and a minimum conductancemeasurement of 1 × 10?11 W/K. Measuring the temperature fluctuation of both the four-point and bridge measurements over a 4 h time period shows a reduction in measured temperature fluctuation from 100 mK to 0.6 mK. Measurement of a 15 nm Genanowire and background conductance signal with no wire present demonstrates the increased sensitivity of the bridge method over the traditional four-point I-V measurement. This ultra-sensitive measurement platform allows for thermal measurements of materials at new size scales and will improve our understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale structures.

Matthew C. Wingert; Zack C. Y. Chen; Shooshin Kwon; Jie Xiang; Renkun Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Heat conductivity in the beta-FPU lattice. Solitons and breathers as energy carriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper consists of two parts. The first part proposes a new methodological framework within which the heat conductivity in 1D lattices can be studied. The total process of heat conductivity is decomposed into two contributions where the first one is the equilibrium process at equal temperatures T of both lattice ends and the second -- non-equilibrium process with the temperature \\Delta T of one end and zero temperature of the other. The heat conductivity in the limit \\Delta T \\to 0 is reduced to the heat conductivity of harmonic lattice. A threshold temperature T_{thr} scales T_{thr}(N) \\sim N^{-3} with the lattice size N. Some unusual properties of heat conductivity can be exhibited on nanoscales at low temperatures. The thermodynamics of the \\beta-FPU lattice can be adequately approximated by the harmonic lattice. The second part testifies in the favor of the soliton and breather contribution to the heat conductivity in contrast to [N. Li, B. Li, S. Flach, PRL 105 (2010) 054102]. In the continuum limit the \\beta-FPU lattice is reduced to the modified Korteweg - de Vries equation with soliton and breather solutions. Numerical simulations demonstrate their high stability. New method for the visualization of moving solitons and breathers is suggested. An accurate expression for the dependence of the sound velocity on temperature is also obtained. Our results support the conjecture on the solitons and breathers contribution to the heat conductivity.

T. Yu. Astakhova; V. N. Likhachev; G. A. Vinogradov

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

275

ELECTRON TRANSPORT AT THE NANOSCALE Lecture Notes, preliminary version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the electronic conductance or resistance of a system as a scattering problem.1 A naive derivation is given in Sec. 1.2.2 Sec. 1.3 introduces some elementary folklore of scattering theory, the transfer matrix at time t is Qab(t) = qPab(t).5 Defining the electrical current as I(x, t) = qJ(x, t), Eq. 1.2 can

Nikolic, Branislav K.

276

Majorization-preserving quantum channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this report, we give a characterization to those quantum channels that preserve majorization relationship between quantum states. Some remarks are presented as well.

Lin Zhang

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

277

Mirrored serpentine flow channels for fuel cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PEM fuel cell having serpentine flow field channels wherein the input/inlet legs of each channel border the input/inlet legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field, and the output/exit legs of each channel border the output/exit legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field. The serpentine fuel flow channels may be longer, and may contain more medial legs, than the serpentine oxidant flow channels.

Rock, Jeffrey Allan (Rochester, NY)

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

Optical Conductivity with Holographic Lattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We add a gravitational background lattice to the simplest holographic model of matter at finite density and calculate the optical conductivity. With the lattice, the zero frequency delta function found in previous calculations (resulting from translation invariance) is broadened and the DC conductivity is finite. The optical conductivity exhibits a Drude peak with a cross-over to power-law behavior at higher frequencies. Surprisingly, these results bear a strong resemblance to the properties of some of the cuprates.

Gary T. Horowitz; Jorge E. Santos; David Tong

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

279

Negative particle planar and axial channeling and channeling collimation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While information exists on high energy negative particle channeling there has been little study of the challenges of negative particle bending and channeling collimation. Partly this is because negative dechanneling lengths are relatively much shorter. Electrons are not particularly useful for investigating negative particle channeling effects because their material interactions are dominated by channeling radiation. Another important factor is that the current central challenge in channeling collimation is the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) where both beams are positive. On the other hand in the future the collimation question might reemerge for electon-positron or muon colliders. Dechanneling lengths increase at higher energies so that part of the negative particle experimental challenge diminishes. In the article different approaches to determining negative dechanneling lengths are reviewed. The more complicated case for axial channeling is also discussed. Muon channeling as a tool to investigate dechanneling is also discussed. While it is now possible to study muon channeling it will probably not illuminate the study of negative dechanneling.

Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Conductivity of a Warm Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theory for obtaining the conductivity of a uniform plasma as a function of frequency and temperature is presented and compared with a number of recent treatments.

Lyman Mower

1959-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Appendix C Conducting Structured Walkthroughs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This guide describes how to conduct a structured walkthroughs during the lifecycle stages of software engineering projects, regardless of hardware platform.

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

BPA Hotline & Codes of Conduct  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hotline & Codes of Conduct Pages default Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects &...

283

Optical Modulation of Molecular Conductance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optical Modulation of Molecular Conductance Authors: Battacharyya, S., Kibel, A., Kodis, G., Liddell, P. A., Gervaldo, M., Gust, D., and Lindsay, S. Title: Optical Modulation of...

284

Publications from Research Conducted at GP-SANS | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Publications from Research Conducted at GP-SANS Publications from Research Conducted at GP-SANS 2013 Publications Anovitz L. M., Cole D. R., Rother G., Allard L. F., Jackson A. J., Littrell K. C., "Diagenetic changes in macro- to nano-scale porosity in the St. Peter sandstone: an (ultra) small angle neutron scattering and backscattered electron imaging analysis", Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 102, 280-305 (2013). Black S. B., Chang Y., Bae C., Hickner M. A., "FTIR characterization of water-polymer interactions in superacid polymers", Journal of Physical Chemistry B 117, 16266-16274 (2013). Boukhalfa S., He L., Melnichenko Y. B., Yushin G., "Small-angle neutron scattering for in situ probing of ion adsorption inside micropores", Angewandte Chemie International Edition 52, 4618-4622 (2013).

285

On a novel rate theory for transport in narrow ion channels and its application to the study of flux optimization via geometric effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On a novel rate theory for transport in narrow ion channels and its application to the study passage time to describe single-ion conduction in narrow, effectively one-dimensional membrane channels. DOI: 10.1063/1.3077205 I. INTRODUCTION Ion channels are membrane proteins which enable se- lected ions

Reingruber, Jürgen

286

A flexible, highly stable electrochemical scanning probe microscope for nanoscale studies at the solid-liquid interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

low-noise measurements in ambient, in situ, and electrochemical environments. II. DESIGNA flexible, highly stable electrochemical scanning probe microscope for nanoscale studies at the solid-liquid interface, specifically in electrolyte environments. Quantification of system noise limits

Gimzewski, James

287

Coherent control of nanoscale light localization: creating and positioning isolated sub-wavelength energy hot-spots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new paradigm was suggested for achieving prescribed light localization with nanoscale accuracy. Well isolated energy hot-spots as small as ?/10 can be created and positioned at...

Kao, Tsung Sheng; Jenkins, Stewart; Ruostekoski, Janne; Zheludev, Nikolay

288

Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Flows in Expanding Channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an experimental realization of the classical Jeffery-Hamel flows inside a wedge-shaped channel. We compare the measured velocity fields with the predictions of Jeffery-Hamel theory. A detailed experimental study of bifurcation diagrams for the solutions reveals the absolute stability of the pure outflow solution and an interesting hysteretic structure for bifurcations. We also observe a multiple vortex flow regime predicted earlier numerically and analytically. Experimental studies of the stability of the flow to perturbations at the channel exit are also conducted.

Vorobieff, Peter; Putkaradze, Vakhtang

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

289

Test Procedure Conducted Energy Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Procedure for Conducted Energy Weapons Version 1.1 2010/07/31 #12;Contents Page 0.0 Disclaimer A TASER M26 13 Appendix B TASER X26 23 #12;1 Test Procedure for Conducted Energy Weapons 0.0 Disclaimer Energy Weapons ("CEWs") in a controlled and repeatable manner across jurisdictions. The consistent

Adler, Andy

290

STANDARD LAN -1 Fiber Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STANDARD LAN - 1 Fiber Channel Gruppo Reti TLC nome.cognome@polito.it http://www.telematica.polito.it/ #12;STANDARD LAN - 2 Fibre Channel · Born to interconnect mainframes and servers to storage systems: fibERs, but not only... · Interoperability with SCSI, Internet Protocol (IP), ... · Standard ANSI X3

Mellia, Marco

291

Engineered nano-scale ceramic supports for PEM fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalyst support durability is currently a technical barrier for commercialization of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, especially for transportation applications. Degradation and corrosion of the conventional carbon supports leads to losses in active catalyst surface area and, consequently, reduced performance. As a result, the major aim of this work is to develop support materials that interact strongly with Pt, yet sustain bulk-like catalytic activities with very highly dispersed particles. This latter aspect is key to attaining the 2015 DOE technical targets for platinum group metal (PGM) loadings (0.20 mg/cm{sup 2}). The benefits of the use of carbon-supported catalysts to drastically reduce Pt loadings from the early, conventional Pt-black technology are well known. The supported platinum catalyzed membrane approach widely used today for fabrication of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) was developed shortly thereafter these early reports. Of direct relevance to this present work, are the investigations into Pt particle growth in PEM fuel cells, and subsequent follow-on work showing evidence of Pt particles suspended free of the support within the catalyst layer. Further, durability work has demonstrated the detrimental effects of potential cycling on carbon corrosion and the link between electrochemical surface area and particle growth. To avoid the issues with carbon degradation altogether, it has been proposed by numerous fuel cell research groups to replace carbon supports with conductive materials that are ceramic in nature. Intrinsically, these many conductive oxides, carbides, and nitrides possess the prerequisite electronic conductivity required, and offer corrosion resistance in PEMFC environments; however, most reports indicate that obtaining sufficient surface area remains a significant barrier to obtaining desirable fuel ceU performance. Ceramic materials that exhibit high electrical conductivity and necessary stability under fuel cell conditions must also exhibit high surface area as a necessary adjunct to obtaining high Pt dispersions and Pt utilization targets. Our goal in this work is to identify new synthesis approaches together with materials that will lead to ceramic supports with high surface areas and high Pt dispersions. Several strong candidates for use as PEMFC catalyst supports include: transition metal nitrides and substoichiometric titanium oxides, which hither to now have been prepared by other researcher groups with relatively low surface areas (ca. 1-50 m{sup 2}/g typical). To achieve our goals of engineering high surface area, conductive ceramic support for utilization in PEMFCs, a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team with experience synthesizing and investigating these materials has been assembled. This team is headed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and includes Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of New Mexico. This report describes our fiscal year 2010 technical progress related to applying advanced synthetiC methods towards the development of new ceramic supports for Pt catalysts for PEM fuel cells.

Brosha, Eric L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blackmore, Karen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burrell, Anthony K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henson, Neil J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

SAFL Channel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SAFL Channel SAFL Channel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name SAFL Channel Overseeing Organization University of Minnesota Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 84.0 Beam(m) 2.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 6.1 Length of Effective Tow(m) 76.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Length(m) 6.6 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking No Wavemaking Description Programmable control of wave making is currently in development and will be available in fall of 2009. Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Channel is sufficiently adaptable to allow simulation of beach

293

On extreme Bosonic linear channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The set of all channels with fixed input and output is convex. We first give a convenient formulation of necessary and sufficient condition for a channel to be extreme point of this set in terms of complementary channel, a notion of big importance in quantum information theory. This formulation is based on the general approach to extremality of completely positive maps in an operator algebra due to Arveson. We then apply this formulation to prove the main result of this note: under certain nondegeneracy conditions, purity of the environment is necessary and sufficient for extremality of Bosonic linear (quasi-free) channel. It follows that Gaussian channel between finite-mode Bosonic systems is extreme if and only if it has minimal noise.

A. S. Holevo

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Argonne CNM News: Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar Energy Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar Energy Scanning tunneling microscopy tips A schematic of the Rhodobacter sphaerodes hexameric core, featuring the "special pair" (P) of degenerate bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules, and the active (a) and inactive (b) arms of BChl and bacteriopheophytin (BPh) molecules. The transient absorption (ΔA) spectra acquired following selective excitation of P are shown. Nature's process for storing solar energy occurs in light-absorbing protein complexes called photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs). Across billions of years of evolution, Nature has retained a common light-absorbing hexameric cofactor core for carrying out the very first chemical reaction of photosynthesis, the light-induced electron transfer across approximately 3

295

Field-induced gap and quantized charge pumping in a nanoscale helical wire  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose several physical phenomena based on nanoscale helical wires. Applying a static electric field transverse to the helical wire induces a metal to insulator transition, with the band gap determined by the applied voltage. A similar idea can be applied to “geometrically” construct one-dimensional systems with arbitrary external potential. With a quadrupolar electrode configuration, the electric field could rotate in the transverse plane, leading to a quantized dc charge current proportional to the frequency of the rotation. Such a device could be used as a standard for the high-precession measurement of the electric current. The inverse effect implies that passing an electric current through a helical wire in the presence of a transverse static electric field can lead to a mechanical rotation of the helix. This effect can be used to construct nanoscale electromechanical motors. Finally, our methodology also enables ways of controlling and measuring the electronic properties of helical biological molecules such as the DNA.

Xiao-Liang Qi and Shou-Cheng Zhang

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Experimental thermal conductivity and contact conductance of graphite composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphite fiber organic matrix composites were reviewed ics. for potential heat sink applications in the electronics packaging determined the effective transverse and longitudinal thermal industry. This experimental investigation conductivity...

Jackson, Marian Christine

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nanoscale retention-loss dynamics of polycrystalline PbTiO{sub 3} nanotubes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observed the nanoscale retention dynamics of polycrystalline PbTiO{sub 3} nanotubes using piezoresponse force microscopy. We found that the retention loss of the nanodot domains on the nanotubes showed the stretched exponential relaxation behaviors with stretched exponential factor n being less than 1 (0.523 and 0.692), which are similar to the thin films. In addition, the nanodot domains showed a diverse relaxation time constant {tau} due to different remnant polarization of each dot domains.

Choi, H.; Kim, Y.; Hong, S.; Sung, T.-H.; Shin, H.; No, K. (Materials Science Division); (Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology); (Hanyang Univ.); (Kookmin Univ.)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Dynamic Conductance of Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamic conductance of carbon nanotubes was investigated using the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism within the context of a tight-binding model. Specifically, we have studied the ac response of tubes of different helicities, both with and without defects, and an electronic heterojunction. Because of the induced displacement currents, the dynamic conductance of the nanotubes differs significantly from the dc conductance displaying both capacitive and inductive responses. The important role of photon-assisted transport through nanotubes is revealed and its implications for experiments discussed.

Christopher Roland; Marco Buongiorno Nardelli; Jian Wang; Hong Guo

2000-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

299

Field-amplified sample stacking and focusing in nanofluidic channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanofluidic technology is gaining popularity for bioanalytical applications due to advances in both nanofabrication and design. One major obstacle in the widespread adoption of such technology for bioanalytical systems is efficient detection of samples due to the inherently low analyte concentrations present in such systems. This problem is exacerbated by the push for electronic detection, which requires an even higher sensor-local sample concentration than optical detection. This paper explores one of the most common preconcentration techniques, field-amplified sample stacking, in nanofluidic systems in efforts to alleviate this obstacle. Holding the ratio of background electrolyte concentrations constant, the parameters of channel height, strength of electric field, and concentration are varied. Although in micron scale systems, these parameters have little or no effect on the final concentration enhancement achieved, nanofluidic experiments show strong dependencies on each of these parameters. Further, nanofluidic systems demonstrate an increased concentration enhancement over what is predicted and realized in microscale counterparts. Accordingly, a depth-averaged theoretical model is developed that explains these observations and furthermore predicts a novel focusing mechanism that can explain the increased concentration enhancement achieved. Specifically, when the electric double layer is sufficient in size relative to the channel height, negatively charged analyte ions are repelled from negatively charged walls, and thus prefer to inhabit the centerline of the channels. The resulting induced pressure gradients formed due to the high and low electrical conductivity fluids in the channel force the ions to move at a slower velocity in the low-conductivity region, and a faster velocity in the high-conductivity region, leading to focusing. A simple single-channel model is capable of predicting key experimental observations, while a model that incorporates the details of the fluid inlet and outlet ports allows for more detailed comparisons between model and experiment.

Sustarich, Jess M.; Pennathur, Sumita [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Storey, Brian D. [Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, Needham, Massachusetts 02492 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials A method of producing a proton conducting material. Available for thumbnail of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Chemical evaluations of John F. Baldwin Ship Channel sediment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 1989, the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conducted sampling, geological characterization, and chemical evaluation studies on sediment from a proposed ship channel in San Francisco Bay, California. This channel extends from the San Francisco Bar, through San Pablo Bay, into Carquinez Strait, and on to Sacramento. The 1989 study area included a 28-mile-long portion of the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel that extended from West Richmond to and including Carquinez Strait. The objective of our study was to determine physical characteristics and chemical contaminant levels in sediment to the proposed project depth of {minus}45 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) (plus 2 ft of overdepth). Sediment core samples were collected at 47 locations throughout the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel using a vibratory hammer core sampler. Ten of these locations were from West Richmond, 29 from San Pablo Bay, and 8 from Carquinez Strait. The geological properties of sediment core samples were described, the sediment from the cores was composited into 72 separate samples based on those descriptions, and chemical analyses were conducted of 13 metals, 16 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), 18 pesticides, 7 PCBs, 3 butyltins, and 4 conventional sediment chaacteristics. These data were then compared with sediment values from Oakland and Richmond harbors, reference values from Point Reyes fine- and coarse-grained sediments, and from typical shale sediment. 22 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs.

Word, J.Q.; Kohn, N.P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Open-Channel Flows Over Bridge-Decks Under Various Flooding Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This study simulates limited scaled experimental data conducted elsewhere for bridge flooding in open channel simulation, Computational fluid dynamics, Flooding flows, Turbulence modeling, VOF modeling. 1. IntroductionComputational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Open-Channel Flows Over Bridge-Decks Under Various

Kostic, Milivoje M.

303

Ion Channels in Small Cells and Subcellular Structures Can Be Studied with a Smart Patch-Clamp System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion Channels in Small Cells and Subcellular Structures Can Be Studied with a Smart Patch have developed a scanning patch-clamp technique that facilitates single-channel recording from small patch-clamp technique combines scanning ion conductance microscopy and patch-clamp recording through

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

304

Growth of metallic nanowires by chemical etching and the use of microfluidics channels to produce quantum point contacts.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A self-terminated electrochemical method was used to fabricate microscopic-scale contacts between two Au electrodes in a microfluidic channel. The conductance of contacts varies in a… (more)

Soltani, Fatemeh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Quantized ionic conductance in nanopores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ionic transport in nanopores is a fundamentally and technologically important problem in view of its ubiquitous occurrence in biological processes and its impact on DNA sequencing applications. Using microscopic calculations, we show that ion transport may exhibit strong non-liDearities as a function of the pore radius reminiscent of the conductance quantization steps as a function of the transverse cross section of quantum point contacts. In the present case, however, conductance steps originate from the break up of the hydration layers that form around ions in aqueous solution. Once in the pore, the water molecules form wavelike structures due to multiple scattering at the surface of the pore walls and interference with the radial waves around the ion. We discuss these effects as well as the conditions under which the step-like features in the ionic conductance should be experimentally observable.

Zwolak, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lagerqvist, Johan [UCSD; Di Ventra, Massimilliano [UCSD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Optical conductivity of curved graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the optical conductivity for an out-of-plane deformation in graphene using an approach based on solutions of the Dirac equation in curved space. Different examples of periodic deformations along one direction translates into an enhancement of the optical conductivity peaks in the region of the far and mid infrared frequencies for periodicities $\\sim100\\,$nm. The width and position of the peaks can be changed by dialling the parameters of the deformation profiles. The enhancement of the optical conductivity is due to intraband transitions and the translational invariance breaking in the geometrically deformed background. Furthemore, we derive an analytical solution of the Dirac equation in a curved space for a general deformation along one spatial direction. For this class of geometries, it is shown that curvature induces an extra phase in the electron wave function, which can also be explored to produce interference devices of the Aharonov-Bohm type.

A. J. Chaves; T. Frederico; O. Oliveira; W. de Paula; M. C. Santos

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Lithium-cation conductivity and crystal structure of lithium diphosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrical conductivity of lithium diphosphate Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been measured and jump-like increasing of ionic conductivity at 913 K has been found. The crystal structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been refined using high temperature neutron diffraction at 300–1050 K. At 913 K low temperature triclinic form of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms into high temperature monoclinic one, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a=8.8261(4) Å, b=5.2028(4) Å, c=13.3119(2) Å, ?=104.372(6)°. The migration maps of Li{sup +} cations based on experimental data implemented into program package TOPOS have been explored. It was found that lithium cations in both low- and high temperature forms of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} migrate in three dimensions. Cross sections of the migrations channels extend as the temperature rises, but at the phase transition point have a sharp growth showing a strong “crystal structure – ion conductivity” correlation. -- Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} at 950 K. Red balls represent oxygen atoms; black lines show Li{sup +} ion migration channels in the layers perpendicular to [001] direction. Highlights: • Structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been refined using high temperature neutron diffraction. • At 913 K triclinic form of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms into high temperature monoclinic one. • The migration maps of Li{sup +} implemented into program package TOPOS have been explored. • Cross sections of the migrations channels at the phase transition have a sharp growth.

Voronin, V.I., E-mail: voronin@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics Urals Branch RAS, S.Kovalevskoy Street 18, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sherstobitova, E.A. [Institute of Metal Physics Urals Branch RAS, S.Kovalevskoy Street 18, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Blatov, V.A., E-mail: blatov@samsu.ru [Samara Center for Theoretical Materials Science (SCTMS), Samara State University, Ac.Pavlov Street 1, 443011 Samara (Russian Federation); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Shekhtman, G.Sh., E-mail: shekhtman@ihte.uran.ru [Institute of High Temperature Electrochemistry Urals Branch RAS, Akademicheskaya 20, 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella Oneidensis Strain MR-1 and Other Microorganisms . Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...

309

Lithographically Patterned Channels Spatially Segregate Kinesin Motor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

* Departments of Bioengineering and Electrical Engineering and Materials Research Institute, The Pennsyl and transporting material at nanoscale dimensions, there is considerable interest in harnessing motor proteins), cumulative forces on the order of nN per µm2 are theoretically possible. The size, efficiency, and potential

Hancock, William O.

310

Memory effects in quantum channel discrimination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider quantum-memory assisted protocols for discriminating quantum channels. We show that for optimal discrimination of memory channels, memory assisted protocols are needed. This leads to a new notion of distance for channels with memory. For optimal discrimination and estimation of sets of unitary channels memory-assisted protocols are not required.

Giulio Chiribella; Giacomo M. D'Ariano; Paolo Perinotti

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

311

Entanglement Cost of Quantum Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The entanglement cost of a quantum channel is the minimal rate at which entanglement (between sender and receiver) is needed in order to simulate many copies of a quantum channel in the presence of free classical communication. In this paper we show how to express this quantity as a regularized optimization of the entanglement formation over states that can be generated between sender and receiver. Our formula is the channel analog of a well-known formula for the entanglement cost of quantum states in terms of the entanglement of formation; and shares a similar relation to the recently shattered hope for additivity. The entanglement cost of a quantum channel can be seen as the analog of the quantum reverse Shannon theorem in the case where free classical communication is allowed. The techniques used in the proof of our result are then also inspired by a recent proof of the quantum reverse Shannon theorem and feature the one-shot formalism for quantum information theory, the post-selection technique for quantum channels as well as von Neumann's minimax theorem. We discuss two applications of our result. First, we are able to link the security in the noisy-storage model to a problem of sending quantum rather than classical information through the adversary's storage device. This not only improves the range of parameters where security can be shown, but also allows us to prove security for storage devices for which no results were known before. Second, our result has consequences for the study of the strong converse quantum capacity. Here, we show that any coding scheme that sends quantum information through a quantum channel at a rate larger than the entanglement cost of the channel has an exponentially small fidelity.

Mario Berta; Fernando Brandao; Matthias Christandl; Stephanie Wehner

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

312

Conducting Your Own Energy Audit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why should you or anyone be interested in conducting a time intensive energy audit. What equipment is needed? When should you get started? Who should do it? The answer to Why is that energy costs are cutting into a company’s profit every minute...

Phillips, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Conducting Polymer Devices for Bioelectronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

signals recording. Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) represent a step beyond conducting polymer a far superior signal-to-noise- ratio (SNR) compared to electrodes. The high SNR of the OECT recordings and contamination. The use of an organic electrochemical transistor for detection of lactate by integration

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

314

ETHICAL CONDUCT IN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ETHICAL CONDUCT IN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH: A Handbook for Biomedical Graduate Studies Students and Research Fellows Third Edition BIOMEDICAL GRADUATE STUDIES PROGRAM UNIVERSITY of PENNSYLVANIA #12 that a trainee in biomedical research should be taught to maintain the highest standards of scientific integrity

Plotkin, Joshua B.

315

Estimation of body composition in channel catfish utilizing relative weight and total body electrical conductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Fish, and Parks; South Dakota State University; Tennessee Valley Authority; Texas Parks and Wildlife Department; and Department of Recreation, Fish and Game of Quebec. Last and most importantly, I would like to thank Jesus Christ for always being..., Fish, and Parks; South Dakota State University; Tennessee Valley Authority; Texas Parks and Wildlife Department; and Department of Recreation, Fish and Game of Quebec. Last and most importantly, I would like to thank Jesus Christ for always being...

Jaramillo, Francisco

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

A NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF A SHOCK-TUBE-DRIVEN CONDUCTIVITY CHANNEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, attention has been refocused on mag- netohydrodynamics (MHD) in an effort to produce a facility the existing hypersonic shock tun- nel on campus with an MHD accelerator. Initial *GraduateStudent, Member AIAA. A sketch of a typical reflected shock tunnel and wave diagram is shown in Figure 1. The wave diagram

Texas at Arlington, University of

317

Measurement of the electronic thermal conductance channels and heat capacity of graphene at low temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

opto-electronics, plasmonics, and ultra-sensitive bolometry. Here we present measurements of bipolar con- ductance over a temperature range of 300 mK to 100 K, using three different sample configurations of 10-20 J/K at 300 mK, which is 9 times smaller than the previous record[15]. For higher temperatures

318

Heat conduction in systems with Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser phase space structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study heat conduction in a billiard channel formed by two sinusoidal walls and the diffusion of particles in the corresponding channel of infinite length; the latter system has an infinite horizon, i.e., a particle can travel an arbitrary distance without colliding with the rippled walls. For small ripple amplitudes, the dynamics of the heat carriers is regular and analytical results for the temperature profile and heat flux are obtained using an effective potential. The study also proposes a formula for the temperature profile that is valid for any ripple amplitude. When the dynamics is regular, ballistic conductance and ballistic diffusion are present. The Poincar\\'e plots of the associated dynamical system (the infinitely long channel) exhibit the generic transition to chaos as ripple amplitude is increased.When no Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) curves are present to forbid the connection of all chaotic regions, the mean square displacement grows asymptotically with time t as tln(t).

I. F. Herrera-González; H. I. Pérez-Aguilar; A. Mendoza-Suárez; E. S Tututi

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

319

Direct Nanoscale Observations of CO2 Sequestration during Brucite [Mg(OH)2] Dissolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct Nanoscale Observations of CO2 Sequestration during Brucite [Mg(OH)2] Dissolution ... The dissolution and carbonation of brucite on (001) cleavage surfaces was investigated in a series of in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments at varying pH (2–12), temperature (23–40 °C), aqueous NaHCO3 concentration (10–5–1 M), and PCO2 (0–1 atm). ... Simultaneously with dissolution of brucite, the growth of a Mg–carbonate phase (probably dypingite) was directly observed. ...

J. Hövelmann; C. V. Putnis; E. Ruiz-Agudo; H. Austrheim

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

320

Nuclear waste management using alpha particle physical phenomena by nanoscale investigations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is investigated from the aspect of its nanoscale behaviour. Four materials are selected as the nuclear waste container. Using the irradiation-induced amorphisation, some characteristics are examined. The Displacement Per Atom (dpa) is affected by the ion dose using the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter 2008 (SRIM 2008) code system, which is a computer package of molecular dynamic simulations. The dpa is changed completely and kinetic energy is transferred to the target by the nuclear collision. The length of the material is a function of the ion collisions. It is concluded that a thickness of 204 nm is the optimised length of a waste drum by crystalline silicotitanate.

Taeho Woo; Taewoo Kim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nickel Ferrite Aerogels with Monodisperse Nanoscale Building Blocks—The Importance of Processing Temperature and Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nickel Ferrite Aerogels with Monodisperse Nanoscale Building Blocks—The Importance of Processing Temperature and Atmosphere ... Using two-step (air/argon) thermal processing, sol?gel-derived nickel?iron oxide aerogels are transformed into monodisperse, networked nanocrystalline magnetic oxides of NiFe2O4 with particle diameters that can be ripened with increasing temperature under argon to 4.6, 6.4, and 8.8 nm. ... nickel ferrites; magnetic nanomaterials; nanoarchitectures; aerogels; sol?gel chemistry; single magnetic domains; thermal processing ...

Katherine A. Pettigrew; Jeffrey W. Long; Everett E. Carpenter; Colin C. Baker; Justin C. Lytle; Christopher N. Chervin; Michael S. Logan; Rhonda M. Stroud; Debra R. Rolison

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

322

Course: ECE 597EN/697EN Energy Transport and Conversion at the Nanoscale Instructor: Zlatan Aksamija (zlatana@engin.umass.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Course: ECE 597EN/697EN Energy Transport and Conversion at the Nanoscale Instructor: Zlatan simulation. Suggested Textbook: Nanoscale Energy Transport and Conversion by Gang Chen (Oxford University. Energy Conversion and Coupled Transport Processes 9. Special Topics I: Thermoelectric and Photovoltaic

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

323

Drainage of a horizontal Boussinesq aquifer with a power law hydraulic conductivity profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drainage of a horizontal Boussinesq aquifer with a power law hydraulic conductivity profile David E] Solutions to the Boussinesq equation describing drainage into a fully penetrating channel have been used natural soils exhibit this characteristic. We derive a new set of analytical solutions to the Boussinesq

Selker, John

324

Randomization theorems for quantum channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The classical randomization criterion is an important result of statistical decision theory. Recently, a quantum analogue has been proposed, giving equivalent conditions for two sets of quantum states, ensuring existence of a quantum channel mapping one set close to the other, in $L_1$-distance. In the present paper, we extend these concepts in several ways. First, sets of states are replaced by channels and randomization is performed by either post- or pre-composition with another channel. The $L_1$-distance is replaced by the diamond norm. Secondly, the maps are not required to be completely positive, but positivity is given by an admissible family of convex cones. It is shown that the randomization theorems, generalizing both quantum and classical randomization criteria, can be proved in the framework of base section norms, including the diamond norm and its dual. The theory of such norms is developed in the Appendix.

Anna Jencova

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Conduct of operations implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This implementation plan describes the process and provides information and schedules that are necessary to implement and comply with the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, {open_quotes}Conduct of Operations{close_quotes} (CoOp). This plan applies to all Pinellas Plant operations and personnel. Generally, this Plan discusses how DOE Order 5480.19 will be implemented at the Pinellas Plant.

Anderson, C.K.; Hall, R.L.

1991-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

326

Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

327

Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Chaotic oscillation and random-number generation based on nanoscale optical-energy transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By using nanoscale energy-transfer dynamics and density matrix formalism, we demonstrate theoretically and numerically that chaotic oscillation and random-number generation occur in a nanoscale system. The physical system consists of a pair of quantum dots (QDs), with one QD smaller than the other, between which energy transfers via optical near-field interactions. When the system is pumped by continuous-wave radiation and incorporates a timing delay between two energy transfers within the system, it emits optical pulses. We refer to such QD pairs as nano-optical pulsers (NOPs). Irradiating an NOP with external periodic optical pulses causes the oscillating frequency of the NOP to synchronize with the external stimulus. We find that chaotic oscillation occurs in the NOP population when they are connected by an external time delay. Moreover, by evaluating the time-domain signals by statistical-test suites, we confirm that the signals are sufficiently random to qualify the system as a random-number generator (RNG). This study reveals that even relatively simple nanodevices that interact locally with each other through optical energy transfer at scales far below the wavelength of irradiating light can exhibit complex oscillatory dynamics. These findings are significant for applications such as ultrasmall RNGs.

Makoto Naruse; Song-Ju Kim; Masashi Aono; Hirokazu Hori; Motoichi Ohtsu

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

329

Ion transport through cell membrane channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss various models of ion transport through cell membrane channels. Recent experimental data shows that sizes of ion channels are compared to those of ions and that only few ions may be simultaneously in any single channel. Theoretical description of ion transport in such channels should therefore take into account interactions between ions and between ions and channel proteins. This is not satisfied by macroscopic continuum models based on Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. More realistic descriptions of ion transport are offered by microscopic Brownian and molecular dynamics. One should also take into account a dynamical character of the channel structure. This is not yet addressed in the literature

Jan Gomulkiewicz; Jacek Miekisz; Stanislaw Miekisz

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

330

Generic theory for channel sinuosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...development of incised meanders in the Central Colorado Plateau . Geol Soc Am Bull 102 ( 2 ): 233 – 242 . 11 Finnegan...05 58.4°N, 114.75°W Yampa Colorado 0.2 (8) 1.40* 0.10 40.5°N, 107.5°W...ZZQQhy407. 7. Hicks FE (1996) Hydraulic flood routing with minimal channel data: Peace...

Eli D. Lazarus; José Antonio Constantine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Wednesday, 27 January 2010 00:00 Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

332

Theory of the ion-channel laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A relativistic electron beam propagating through a plasma in the ion-focussed regime exhibits an electromagnetic instability with peak growth rate near a resonant frequency {omega}{approximately}2 {gamma}{sup 2} {omega}{beta}, where {gamma} is the Lorentz factor and {omega}{beta} is the betatron frequency. The physical basis for this instability is that an ensemble of relativistic simple harmonic oscillators, weakly driven by an electromagnetic wave, will lose energy to the wave through axial bunching. This bunching'' corresponds to the development of an rf component in the beam current, and a coherent centroid oscillation. The subject of this thesis is the theory of a laser capitalizing on this electromagnetic instability. A historical perspective is offered. The basic features of relativistic electron beam propagation in the ion-focussed regime are reviewed. The ion-channel laser (ICL) instability is explored theoretically through an eikonal formalism, analgous to the KMR'' formalism for the free-electron laser (FEL). The dispersion relation is derived, and the dependence of growth rate on three key parameters is explored. Finite temperature effects are assessed. From this work it is found that the typical gain length for amplification is longer than the Rayleigh length and we go on to consider three mechanisms which will tend to guide waveguide. First, we consider the effect of the ion channel as a dielectric waveguide. We consider next the use of a conducting waveguide, appropriate for a microwave amplifier. Finally, we examine a form of optical guiding'' analgous to that found in the FEL. The eikonal formalism is used to model numerically the instability through and beyond saturation. Results are compared with the numerical simulation of the full equations of motion, and with the analytic scalings. The analytical requirement on detuning spread is confirmed.

Whittum, D.H.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Semiconductors and Ceramics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

semiconductors and ceramics with desired thermalthermal conductivity of several polycrystalline semiconductors and ceramics,Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Semiconductors and Ceramics

Wang, Zhaojie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene Fibers and Sheets Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene Fibers and Sheets Massachusetts Institute of...

335

A computational investigation of the phase behavior and capillary sublimation of water confined between nanoscale hydrophobic plates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A computational investigation of the phase behavior and capillary sublimation of water confined behavior and capillary sublimation of water confined between nanoscale hydrophobic plates Andrew L 11210, USA 3 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712, USA 4

Ferguson, Andrew

336

Direct Measurement of Ion Beam Induced, Nanoscale Roughening of GaN Bentao Cui and P. I. Cohen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Measurement of Ion Beam Induced, Nanoscale Roughening of GaN Bentao Cui and P. I. Cohen of a surface roughening term due to curvature-dependent sputtering or asymmetric attachment of vacancies change using atomic force microscopy, we show a method to measure the ion-roughening coefficient. Using

Cohen, Philip I.

337

Probing nanoscale photo-oxidation in organic films using spatial hole burning near-field scanning optical microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probing nanoscale photo-oxidation in organic films using spatial hole burning near-field scanning from a stationary NSOM tip to induce photo-oxidation. The reduction in the fluorescence yield resulting photo-oxidation as a function of time, position, and environment free from the limits of far

Buratto, Steve

338

Ammonia synthesis by N2 and steam electrolysis in molten hydroxide suspensions of nanoscale Fe2O3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hydroxide suspensions of nanoscale Fe2O3 10.1126/science.1254234...hydroxide suspension of nano-Fe2O3. At 200°C in an electrolyte with...loaded into carbon black as an anode, again at a low rate; note that tin...which consumed water at the anode and air at the cathode at 0...

Stuart Licht; Baochen Cui; Baohui Wang; Fang-Fang Li; Jason Lau; Shuzhi Liu

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

339

Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal-Insulator Domain Walls in Vanadium Dioxide Nanobeams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal- Insulator Domain Walls localized alternating Peltier heating and cooling as well as Joule heating concentrated at the M-I domain the monoclinic phase identification. KEYWORDS: Vanadium dioxide, thermoreflectance microscopy, Peltier effect

Wu, Junqiao

340

Intrinsic vacancy induced nanoscale wire structure in heteroepitaxial Ga2Se3/Si(001) Taisuke Ohta,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intrinsic vacancy induced nanoscale wire structure in heteroepitaxial Ga2Se3/Si(001) Taisuke Ohta,1-blende structure of -Ga2Se3, which contains ordered 110 arrays of Ga vacancies. These ordered vacancy lines structural vacancies of semiconducting chalcogenides lead to numerous interesting structural, electronic

Olmstead, Marjorie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Extremal Channels for a genaral Quantum system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum channels can be mathematically represented as completely positive trace-preserving maps that act on a density matrix. A general quantum channel can be written as a convex sum of `extremal' channels. We show that for an $N$-level system, the extremal channel can be characterized in terms of $N^2$-$N$ real parameters coupled with rotations. We give a representation for $N$= 2, 3, 4.

Kuldeep Dixit; E. C. G. Sudarshan

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

342

Planning and Conducting Readiness Reviews  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3006-2010 3006-2010 ________________________ Superseding DOE-STD-3006-2000 June 2000 DOE STANDARD PLANNING AND CONDUCTING READINESS REVIEWS U.S. Department of Energy AREA OPER Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-3006-YR i CONTENTS FOREWORD................................................................................................................................. 1

343

Minimax discrimination of two Pauli channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the problem of optimally discriminating two Pauli channels in the minimax strategy, maximizing the smallest of the probabilities of correct identification of the channel. We find the optimal input state at the channel and show the conditions under which using entanglement strictly enhances distinguishability. We finally compare the minimax strategy with the Bayesian one.

D'Ariano, G. Mauro; Sacchi, Massimiliano F.; Kahn, Jonas [QUIT Group of the INFM, Unita di Pavia and Dipartimento di Fisica 'A. Volta', Universita di Pavia, via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Departement de Mathematiques, Universite Paris-Sud 11, Batiment 425 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Ion channels and apoptosis in cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Issue Ion channels, transporters and cancer compiled and edited by Mustafa B. A...Albrecht Schwab Ion channels and apoptosis in cancer Carl D. Bortner John A. Cidlowski e-mail...Issue Ion channels, transporters and cancer . Humans maintain a constant cell number...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Coding theorems for hybrid channels. II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work continues investigation of the capacities of measurement (quantum-classical) channels in the most general setting, initiated in~\\cite{HCT}. The proof of coding theorems is given for the classical capacity and entanglement-assisted classical capacity of the measurement channel with arbitrary output alphabet, without assuming that the channel is given by a bounded operator-valued density.

A. A. Kuznetsova; A. S. Holevo

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

346

FREEPORT HARBOR, TEXAS CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Gulf of Mexico; a main channel 45 feet deep and 400 feet wide; a Brazos Harbor channel 36 feet deep-loaded to traverse the waterway. The current channel depth requires that large crude carriers remain offshore and transfer their cargo into smaller crude tankers for the remainder of the voyage. This lightering operation

US Army Corps of Engineers

347

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE REVIEW/DISCUSSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE REVISION REVIEW/DISCUSSION Student Conduct Code Revision Workgroup #12;Agenda Introductions/Purpose History of the Student Conduct Code Revision Workgroup Highlights of the Draft Revision Introduction: Principles Promoting Student Responsibility Jurisdiction Conduct in Violation of Community

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

348

Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors | Advanced Photon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Unlikely Route to Ferroelectricity An Unlikely Route to Ferroelectricity How to Make a Splash Pressure-Tuning the Quantum Phase Transition in a Model 2-D Magnet Reappearing Superconductivity Surprises Scientists Manipulating Genes with Hidden TALENs Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors MAY 18, 2012 Bookmark and Share This collage shows the ring-shaped, isotropic x-ray diffraction pattern and electron microscope cross-section of the three-dimensional amorphous or quasi-ordered biophotonic nanostructure in spongy medullary feather barbs responsible for the vivid turquoise plumage of the Plum-throated Cotinga

349

Nanoscale compositional banding in binary thin films produced by ion-assisted deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the ion-assisted deposition of a binary material, the ion beam can induce the formation of nanoscale ripples on the surface of the growing thin film and compositional banding within its bulk. We demonstrate that this remains true even if the curvature dependence of the sputter yields and ballistic mass redistribution are negligible, and the two atomic species are completely miscible. The concentration of the species with the lower of the two sputter yields is higher at the crests of the ripples than at their troughs. Depending on the angles of incidence of the two atomic species, the incident flux of atoms with the higher sputter yield can either stabilize or destabilize the initially flat surface of the thin film.

Mark Bradley, R. [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

350

Using Dynamic Quantum Clustering to Analyze Hierarchically Heterogeneous Samples on the Nanoscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic Quantum Clustering (DQC) is an unsupervised, high visual data mining technique. DQC was tested as an analysis method for X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) data from the Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) group. The TXM group images hierarchically heterogeneous materials with nanoscale resolution and large field of view. XANES data consists of energy spectra for each pixel of an image. It was determined that DQC successfully identifies structure in data of this type without prior knowledge of the components in the sample. Clusters and sub-clusters clearly reflected features of the spectra that identified chemical component, chemical environment, and density in the image. DQC can also be used in conjunction with the established data analysis technique, which does require knowledge of components present.

Hume, Allison; /Princeton U. /SLAC

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

351

Fabrication and performance of nanoscale ultra-smooth programmeddefects for EUV Lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed processes for producing ultra-smooth nanoscale programmed substrate defects that have applications in areas such as thin film growth, EUV lithography, and defect inspection. Particle, line, pit, and scratch defects on the substrates between 40 and 140 nm wide 50 to 90 nm high have been successfully produced using e-beam lithograpy and plasma etching in both Silicon and Hydrosilsequioxane films. These programmed defect substrates have several advantages over those produced previously using gold nanoparticles or polystyrene latex spheres--most notably, the ability to precisely locate features and produce recessed as well as bump type features in ultra-smooth films. These programmed defects were used to develop techniques for film defect mitigation and results are discussed.

Olynick, D.L.; Salmassi, F.; Liddle, J.A.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; Spiller, E.; Baker, S.L.; Robinson, J.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Distribution of nanoscale nuclei in the amorphous dome of a phase change random access memory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nanoscale crystal nuclei in an amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} bit in a phase change memory device were evaluated by fluctuation transmission electron microscopy. The quench time in the device (?10 ns) afforded more and larger nuclei in the melt-quenched state than in the as-deposited state. However, nuclei were even more numerous and larger in a test structure with a longer quench time (?100 ns), verifying the prediction of nucleation theory that slower cooling produces more nuclei. It also demonstrates that the thermal design of devices will strongly influence the population of nuclei, and thus the speed and data retention characteristics.

Lee, Bong-Sub, E-mail: bongsub@gmail.com; Darmawikarta, Kristof; Abelson, John R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Coordinated Sciences Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Raoux, Simone; Shih, Yen-Hao; Zhu, Yu [IBM/Macronix PCRAM Joint Project, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Bishop, Stephen G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Coordinated Sciences Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Coordinated Sciences Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

353

The SFM/ToF-SIMS combination for advanced chemically-resolved analysis at the nanoscale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The combination of Time-of-flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) allows the 3D-compositional analysis of samples or devices. Typically, the topographical data obtained by SFM is used to determine the initial sample topography and the absolute depth of the ToF-SIMS analysis. Here ToF-SIMS and SFM data sets obtained on 2 prototypical samples are explored to go beyond conventional 3D-compositional analysis. SFM topographical and material contrast maps are combined with ToF-SIMS retrospective analysis to detect features that would have escaped a conventional ToF-SIMS data analysis. In addition, SFM data is used to extrapolate the chemical information beyond the spatial resolution of ToF-SIMS, allowing the mapping of the chemical composition at the nanoscale.

Laetitia Bernard; Jakob Heier; Wolfgang Paul; Hans J. Hug

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Highly conductive composites for fuel cell flow field plates and bipolar plates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate having flow channels on faces of the plate, comprising an electrically conductive polymer composite. The composite is composed of (A) at least 50% by weight of a conductive filler, comprising at least 5% by weight reinforcement fibers, expanded graphite platelets, graphitic nano-fibers, and/or carbon nano-tubes; (B) polymer matrix material at 1 to 49.9% by weight; and (C) a polymer binder at 0.1 to 10% by weight; wherein the sum of the conductive filler weight %, polymer matrix weight % and polymer binder weight % equals 100% and the bulk electrical conductivity of the flow field or bipolar plate is at least 100 S/cm. The invention also provides a continuous process for cost-effective mass production of the conductive composite-based flow field or bipolar plate.

Jang, Bor Z; Zhamu, Aruna; Song, Lulu

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

Nano-scale optical and electrical probes of materials and processes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the investigations and milestones of the Nano-Scale Optical and Electrical Probes of Materials and Processes Junior/Senior LDRD. The goal of this LDRD was to improve our understanding of radiative and non-radiative mechanisms at the nanometer scale with the aim of increasing LED and solar cell efficiencies. These non-radiative mechanisms were investigated using a unique combination of optical and scanning-probe microscopy methods for surface, materials, and device evaluation. For this research we utilized our new near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) system to aid in understanding of defect-related emission issues for GaN-based materials. We observed micrometer-scale variations in photoluminescence (PL) intensity for GaN films grown on Cantilever Epitaxy pattern substrates, with lower PL intensity observed in regions with higher dislocation densities. By adding electrical probes to the NSOM system, the photocurrent and surface morphology could be measured concurrently. Using this capability we observed reduced emission in InGaN MQW LEDs near hillock-shaped material defects. In spatially- and spectrally-resolved PL studies, the emission intensity and measured wavelength varied across the wafer, suggesting the possibility of indium segregation within the InGaN quantum wells. Blue-shifting of the InGaN MQW wavelength due to thinning of quantum wells was also observed on top of large-scale ({micro}m) defect structures in GaN. As a direct result of this program, we have expanded the awareness of our new NSOM/multifunctional SPM capability at Sandia and formed several collaborations within Sandia and with NINE Universities. Possible future investigations with these new collaborators might include GaN-based compound semiconductors for green LEDs, nanoscale materials science, and nanostructures, novel application of polymers for OLEDs, and phase imprint lithography for large area 3D nanostructures.

Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

An atomistic methodology of energy release rate for graphene at nanoscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms packed into a honeycomb architecture, serving as a fundamental building block for electric devices. Understanding the fracture mechanism of graphene under various conditions is crucial for tailoring the electrical and mechanical properties of graphene-based devices at atomic scale. Although most of the fracture mechanics concepts, such as stress intensity factors, are not applicable in molecular dynamics simulation, energy release rate still remains to be a feasible and crucial physical quantity to characterize the fracture mechanical property of materials at nanoscale. This work introduces an atomistic simulation methodology, based on the energy release rate, as a tool to unveil the fracture mechanism of graphene at nanoscale. This methodology can be easily extended to any atomistic material system. We have investigated both opening mode and mixed mode at different temperatures. Simulation results show that the critical energy release rate of graphene is independent of initial crack length at low temperature. Graphene with inclined pre-crack possesses higher fracture strength and fracture deformation but smaller critical energy release rate compared with the graphene with vertical pre-crack. Owing to its anisotropy, graphene with armchair chirality always has greater critical energy release rate than graphene with zigzag chirality. The increase of temperature leads to the reduction of fracture strength, fracture deformation, and the critical energy release rate of graphene. Also, higher temperature brings higher randomness of energy release rate of graphene under a variety of predefined crack lengths. The energy release rate is independent of the strain rate as long as the strain rate is small enough.

Zhang, Zhen; Lee, James D., E-mail: jdlee@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, the George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Wang, Xianqiao [College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

357

Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

358

Conductivity of Underdoped YBa2Cu3O7-?: Evidence for Incoherent Pair Correlations in the Pseudogap Regime  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A two-channel scenario for the conductivity of underdoped YBa 2Cu 3O 7-? is proposed. One is the single-particle excitations channel, which dominates in the optimally doped material, whose resistivity is linear as a function of temperature. The other one gives a contribution which merges the 3D Aslamazov-Larkin fluctuation conductivity at low temperature and obeys a power law at high temperature, depending on two superconductive parameters ( Tc and the zero temperature coherence length ?c0) and an energy scale ?*. This allows one to address the nature of the pseudogap in favor of incoherent pairing.

B. Leridon, A. Défossez, J. Dumont, J. Lesueur, and J. P. Contour

2001-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

Nonequilibrium dynamics of a two-channel Kondo system due to a quantum quench  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent experiments by Potok et al. have demonstrated a remarkable tunability between a single-channel Fermi-liquid fixed point and a two-channel non-Fermi-liquid fixed point. Motivated by this we study the nonequilibrium dynamics due to a sudden quench of the parameters of a Hamiltonian from a single-channel to a two-channel anisotropic Kondo system. We find a distinct difference between the long-time behavior of local quantities related to the impurity spin as compared to that of bulk quantities related to the total (conduction electrons plus impurity) spin of the system. In particular, the local impurity spin and the local spin susceptibility are found to equilibrate but in a very slow power-law fashion which is peculiar to the non-Fermi-liquid properties of the Hamiltonian. In contrast, we find a lack of equilibration in the two-particle expectation values related to the total spin of the system.

Zurab Ratiani and Aditi Mitra

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

360

Single channel recordings of K+ currents in squid axons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... channels are illustrated on the single channel level, and some more detailed features of the elementary current contribution are indicated.

Franco Conti; Erwin Neher

1980-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Experimental study of heat flows in the walls of a high-enthalpy mhd channel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports results of experimental studies of local heat flows in the walls of an MHD channel during different regimes of its operation. Special attention was given to aspects of the reliability of measurement of heat flow to B-walls. Tests were conducted on a unit consisting of a Faraday MHD channel with sectional electrodes operating in the accelerator regime. A basic diagram of the unit is shown. Tests were conducted with the primary nozzle and power was supplied along zones 160 and 280 mm long. The data obtained were analyzed using the electrogasdynamic flow pattern established for each regime from numerical solution of a system of quasiunidimensional magnetogasdynamic equations. Results are presented of measurement and analysis of gasdynamic and electrodynamic characteristics of flow in the MHD channel.

Alferov, V.I.; Rudakova, A.P.; Shcherbakov, G.I.; Sukhobokov, A.D.; Vitskoskaya, O.N.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A simple Markov model of sodium channels with a dynamic threshold  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristics of action potential generation are important to understanding brain functioning and, thus, must be understood and modeled. It is still an open question what model can describe concurrently the phenomena of sharp spike shape, the spike ... Keywords: Conductance-based neurons, Divisive effect, Dynamic patch-clamp, Sodium channels, Spike shape, Spike threshold

A. V. Chizhov; E. Yu. Smirnova; K. Kh. Kim; A. V. Zaitsev

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Activation of Ca-dependent K channels by carbamoylcholine in rat lacrimal glands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Carbachol pharmacology Electric Conductivity Ion Channels...the pipette-cell resistance R, = r1C was calculated...compensation for series resistance was applied during...present slightly larger elementary current amplitudes...the cell membrane resistance was larger than 2 GM...

A Trautmann; A Marty

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Three-dimensional analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in single- and two-layered micro-channel heat sinks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A three-dimensional numerical analysis of laminar fluid flow and conjugate heat transfer has been conducted for single- and two-layered micro-channel heat sinks. The validity of the numerical model ... power, the...

M. L.-J. Levac; H. M. Soliman; S. J. Ormiston

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Data-dependent Write Channel Model for Magnetic Recording  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Bit-Patterned Media (BPM) channel in [1]. Here, we focus on the write channel and characterize model considered and its relevance with the BPM write channel. We then characterize the information with probability 1. Relevance with the BPM write channel The channel model in (1) depicts a BPM write channel

Wang, Deli

366

Studying the semiconductor-metal phase transition in nanoscale vanadium dioxide, doped with ions of 3d-elements on a silicon surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanoscale vanadium dioxide doped with chromium and iron is obtained via molecular layering method on the surface of a single-crystal silicon. The qualitative and quantitative composition of the samples is dete...

D. V. Nazarov; O. M. Osmolowskaya…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Wrinkle-Based Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Nano-Scale Thin Pt Film Deposited on Polymeric Substrate: Verification and Uncertainty Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nano-scale thin films are extensively utilized in semiconductor, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), and nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) [1–3]. As feature sizes of the devices decrease, the critical d...

H-J. Choi; J-H. Kim; H-J. Lee; S-A. Song; H-J. Lee; J-H. Han…

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Reduced Thermal Conductivity of Compacted Silicon Nanowires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal-Barrier-Coating Applications,” Journa of American Ceramicthermal conductivity materials are typically found among ceramicsThermal Conductivity of Porous Materials: Application to Thick Barrier Coatings,” Journal of the European Ceramic

Yuen, Taylor S.

369

Analysis of IFR driver fuel hot channel factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal-hydraulic uncertainty factors for Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) driver fuels have been determined based primarily on the database obtained from the predecessor fuels used in the IFR prototype, Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The uncertainty factors were applied to the channel factors (HCFs) analyses to obtain separate overall HCFs for fuel and cladding for steady-state analyses. A ``semistatistical horizontal method`` was used in the HCFs analyses. The uncertainty factor of the fuel thermal conductivity dominates the effects considered in the HCFs analysis; the uncertainty in fuel thermal conductivity will be reduced as more data are obtained to expand the currently limited database for the IFR ternary metal fuel (U-20Pu-10Zr). A set of uncertainty factors to be used for transient analyses has also been derived.

Ku, J.Y.; Chang, L.K.; Mohr, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Fabrication of glass microspheres with conducting surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making hollow glass microspheres with conducting surfaces by adding a conducting vapor to a region of the glass fabrication furnace. As droplets or particles of glass forming material pass through multiple zones of different temperature in a glass fabrication furnace, and are transformed into hollow glass microspheres, the microspheres pass through a region of conducting vapor, forming a conducting coating on the surface of the microspheres.

Elsholz, William E. (Acampo, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

372

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

373

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

374

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

375

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

376

MODEL STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR MEDIATORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODEL STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR MEDIATORS AMERICAN ARBITRATION ASSOCIATION (ADOPTED SEPTEMBER 8 AUGUST 22, 2005) SEPTEMBER 2005 #12;1 The Model Standards of Conduct for Mediators 2005 The Model Standards of Conduct for Mediators was prepared in 1994 by the American Arbitration Association

377

Organic conductive films for semiconductor electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

According to the present invention, improved electrodes overcoated with conductive polymer films and preselected catalysts are provided. The electrodes typically comprise an inorganic semiconductor over-coated with a charge conductive polymer film comprising a charge conductive polymer in or on which is a catalyst or charge-relaying agent.

Frank, A.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The workshop on conductive polymers: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports are made by groups on: polyacetylene, polyphenylene, polyaniline, and related systems; molecular, crystallographic, and defect structures in conducting polymers; heterocyclic polymers; synthesis of new and improved conducting polymers; future applications possibilities for conducting polymers; and challenges for improved understanding of properties. (DLC)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Experimental Verification of Overlimiting Current by Surface Conduction and Electro-osmotic Flow in Microchannels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Possible mechanisms of overlimiting current in unsupported electrolytes, exceeding diffusion limitation, have been intensely studied for their fundamental significance and applications to desalination, separations, sensing, and energy storage. In bulk membrane systems, the primary physical mechanism is electro-convection, driven by electro-osmotic instability on the membrane surface. It has recently been predicted that confinement by charged surfaces in microchannels or porous media favors two new mechanisms, electro-osmotic flow (EOF) and surface conduction (SC), driven by large electric fields in the depleted region acting on the electric double layers on the sidewalls. Here, we provide the first direct evidence for the transition from SC to EOF above a critical channel height, using in situ particle tracking and current-voltage measurements in a micro/nanofluidic device. The dependence of the over-limiting conductance on channel depth (d) is consistent with theoretical predictions, scaling as d^-1 for SC a...

Nam, Sungmin; Heo, Joonseong; Lim, Geunbae; Bazant, Martin Z; Sung, Gunyong; Kim, Sung Jae

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Electrohydrodynamic Stability of Poorly Conducting Parallel Plasma Flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aerospace automobile structural and biomedical engineering applications require strong and smart materials to minimize the weight and vibrations and maximize the strength to achieve an efficient dynamic response and economic advantages. These materials are usually synthesized using poorly conducting plasma in the presence of a strong electric field. This strong applied electric field produces instabilities known as Electrohydrodynamic instability in a poorly conducting parallel flow of plasma. These instabilities produce impurities in the manufacture of strong smart materials. Therefore to manufacture these materials free from impurities there is a need to know whether this external constraint of electric field either suppress or augments these electrohydrodynamic instabilities. This can be achieved by investigating Electrohydrodynamic stability in the presence of an external constraint of strong electric field. The study of this instability is the main objective of this paper. In this paper stability of poorly conducting parallel plasma in a rectangular channel is studied in the presence of strong electric field subject to linear stability analysis. The basic flow is a function of electric potential and we found that this potential difference also drives the flow in addition to plasma pressure gradient. The condition for the onset of stability is determined in terms of Electric Reynolds Number using both moment and energy methods combined with Galerkin technique. If the motion is unstable an upperbound for the amplification factor is given. From this analysis we conclude that a proper choice of Electric Reynolds number controls instability of a parallel poorly conducting plasma. This result is useful in the manufacture of strong and smart materials free from impurities.

N. Shubha

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Applying Alpha-Channeling to Mirror Machines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ?-channeling effect entails the use of radio-frequency waves to expel and cool high-energetic ?- particles born in a fusion reactor; the device reactivity can then be increased even further by redirecting the extracted energy to fuel ions. Originally proposed for tokamaks, this technique has also been shown to benefi t open-ended fusion devices. Here, the fundamental theory and practical aspects of ?- channeling in mirror machines are reviewed, including the influence of magnetic field inhomogeneity and the effect of a finite wave region on the ?-channeling mechanism. For practical implementation of the ? -channeling effect in mirror geometry, suitable contained weakly-damped modes are identifi ed. In addition, the parameter space of candidate waves for implementing the ? -channeling effect can be signi cantly extended through the introduction of a suitable minority ion species that has the catalytic effect of moderating the transfer of power from the ?-channeling wave to the fuel ions.

A.I. Zhmoginov and N.J. Fisch

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

382

MHL Free Surface Channel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHL Free Surface Channel MHL Free Surface Channel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL Free Surface Channel Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Beam(m) 1.0 Depth(m) 0.6 Cost(per day) $2000 (+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 2 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Custom Data Acquisition System using National Instruments hardware; system compatible with Planing Hull and Floating Beam Dynamometers Custom Data Acquisition System using National Instruments hardware; system compatible with Planing Hull and Floating Beam Dynamometers

383

Directed Assembly of Bi Metallic Nanoparticles by Pulsed Laser Induced Dewetting: a Unique Nanoscale Time and Length Scale Regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulsed laser induced dewetting (PLiD) was used to assemble patterned, nanoscale metallic thin film features into bi metallic nanoparticles. The liquid-phase flow is related to a conventional droplet impact test and in appropriate dimensions have inertial and viscoinertial flow characteristics. The final size, morphology, composition, and inter-diffusion of the nanoparticles is governed by the interplay of capillary, inertial and viscous forces and an appropriate dimensional regime defined by competing Rayleigh-Plateau and spinodal instabilities.

Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Rack, P. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Wu, Yeuyeng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Perfect light trapping in nanoscale thickness semiconductor films with resonant back reflector and spectrum-splitting structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The optical absorption of nanoscale thickness semiconductor films on top of light-trapping structures based on optical interference effects combined with spectrum-splitting structures is theoretically investigated. Nearly perfect absorption over a broad spectrum range can be achieved in $solar absorption and low carrier thermalization loss can be achieved when the light-trapping structures with wedge-shaped spacer layer or semiconductor films are combined with spectrum-splitting structures.

Liu, Jiang-Tao; Yang, Wen; Li, Jun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Suppression of bulk conductivity in InAs/GaSb broken gap composite quantum wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two-dimensional topological insulator state in InAs/GaSb quantum wells manifests itself by topologically protected helical edge channel transport relying on an insulating bulk. This work investigates a way of suppressing bulk conductivity by using gallium source materials of different degrees of impurity concentrations. While highest-purity gallium is accompanied by clear conduction through the sample bulk, intentional impurity incorporation leads to a bulk resistance over 1 M?, independent of applied magnetic fields. In addition, ultra high electron mobilities for GaAs/AlGaAs structures fabricated in a molecular beam epitaxy system used for the growth of Sb-based samples are reported.

Charpentier, Christophe; Fält, Stefan; Reichl, Christian; Nichele, Fabrizio; Nath Pal, Atindra; Pietsch, Patrick; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus; Wegscheider, Werner [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)] [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

386

V-184: Google Chrome Flash Plug-in Lets Remote Users Conduct Clickjacking  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Google Chrome Flash Plug-in Lets Remote Users Conduct 4: Google Chrome Flash Plug-in Lets Remote Users Conduct Clickjacking Attacks V-184: Google Chrome Flash Plug-in Lets Remote Users Conduct Clickjacking Attacks June 24, 2013 - 12:56am Addthis PROBLEM: Google Chrome Flash Plug-in Lets Remote Users Conduct Clickjacking Attacks PLATFORM: Google Chrome prior to 27.0.1453.116 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Google Chrome. REFERENCE LINKS: Stable Channel Update SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028694 CVE-2013-2866 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A remote user can create specially crafted Flash content that, when loaded by the target user, will display the Flash settings in a transparent manner, which may allow the remote user to cause the target user to modify their Flash settings. This may allow the remote user to obtain potentially

387

Tradeoffs of Source Coding, Channel Coding and Spreading in Frequency Selective Rayleigh Fading Channels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the tradeoffs of source coding, channel coding and spreading in CDMA systems. We consider a system consisting of an image source coder, a convolutional channel coder, an interleaver, an...

1]Qinghua Zhao; Pamela Cosman…

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Programmable quantum channels and measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some partial results for two strictly related problems. The first problem consists in finding the optimal joint unitary transformation on system and ancilla which is the most efficient in programming any desired channel on the system by changing the state of the ancilla. In this respect we present a solution for dimension two for both system and ancilla. The second problem consists in finding the optimal universal programmable detector, namely a device that can be tuned to perform any desired measurement on a given quantum system, by changing the state of an ancilla. With a finite dimension for the ancilla only approximate universal programmability is possible, with minimal dimension increasing function versus the precision of the approximation. We show that one can achieve a dimension growing polynomially versus the precision, and even linearly in specific cases.

Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano; Paolo Perinotti

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

389

Chapter 22 - Heterogeneous Catalytic Reduction for Water Purification: Nanoscale Effects on Catalytic Activity, Selectivity, and Sustainability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reductive catalysis is a promising water treatment technology that employs heterogeneous metal catalysts (e.g., Pd nanoparticles on a support) to convert dihydrogen to adsorbed atomic hydrogen in order to promote reactions with functional groups in various contaminants. Reductive catalysis has several potential advantages, including high selectivity for a given target, fast rates under mild conditions, and low production of harmful by-products. The technology has been applied mostly for remediation of groundwater contaminated with halogenated hydrocarbons and for treatment of nitrate, but recent studies have expanded the range of target contaminants to include perchlorate and N-nitrosamines. Palladium-based catalysts hold tremendous promise for their ability to selectively destroy several drinking water contaminants, and some compounds that exhibit slow reaction kinetics with Pd alone are rapidly degraded when a second, promoter metal is added to the catalyst. However, there is a lack of information about the long-term sustainability of these catalytic treatment processes, which is a major consideration in their possible adoption for remediation applications. Recent research has focused on the nanoscale characterization of these heterogeneous catalysts in order to develop an improved understanding of their mechanisms of deactivation and the pathways for regeneration. Two examples of studies from the authors’ laboratories, involving (i) hydrodehalogenation of iodinated X-ray contrast media with Ni or Pd catalysts and (ii) selective reduction of nitrate with a regenerable Pd-In/alumina catalyst, are discussed in this chapter.

Timothy J. Strathmann; Charles J. Werth; John R. Shapley

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Conversion of lignin precursors to carbon fibers with nanoscale graphitic domains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is one of the most abundant and inexpensive natural biopolymers. It can be efficiently converted to low cost carbon fiber, monolithic structures or powders that could be used directly in the production of anodes for lithium-ion batteries. In this work, we report processing parameters relevant for the conversion of lignin precursors into electrochemically active carbon fibers, the impact of lignin precursor modification on melt processing and the microstructure of the final carbon material. The conversion process encompasses melt spinning of the lignin precursor, oxidative stabilization and a low temperature carbonization step in a nitrogen/hydrogen atmosphere. To assess electrochemical performance, we determined resistivities of individual carbon fiber samples and characterized the microstructure by scanning electron microscopy and neutron diffraction. The chemical modification and subsequent thermomechanical processing methods reported here are effective for conversion into carbon fibers while preserving the macromolecular backbone structure of lignin. Modification of softwood lignin produced functionalities and rheological properties that more closely resemble hardwood lignin thereby enabling the melt processing of softwood lignin in oxidative atmospheres (air). Structural characterization of the carbonized fibers reveals nanoscale graphitic domains that are linked to enhanced electrochemical performance.

Chatterjee, Sabornie [ORNL; Jones, Eric B [ORNL; Clingenpeel, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; McKenna, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; McNutt, Nicholas W [ORNL; Keffer, David J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Johs, Alexander [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Ab-initio friction forces on the nanoscale: A DFT study of fcc Cu(111)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While there are a number of models that tackle the problem of calculating friction forces on the atomic level, providing a completely parameter-free approach remains a challenge. Here we present a quasi-static model to obtain an approximation to the nanofrictional response of dry, wearless systems based on quantum mechanical all-electron calculations. We propose a mechanism to allow dissipative sliding, which relies on atomic relaxations. We define two different ways of calculating the mean nanofriction force, both leading to an exponential friction-versus-load behavior for all sliding directions. Since our approach does not impose any limits on lengths and directions of the sliding paths, we investigate arbitrary sliding directions for an fcc Cu(111) interface and detect two periodic paths which form the upper and lower bound of nanofriction. For long aperiodic paths the friction force convergences to a value in between these limits. For low loads we retrieve the Derjaguin generalization of Amontons-Coulomb kinetic friction law which appears to be valid all the way down to the nanoscale. We observe a non-vanishing Derjaguin-offset even for atomically flat surfaces in dry contact.

Michael Wolloch; Gregor Feldbauer; Peter Mohn; Josef Redinger; András Vernes

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

392

Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials A method of producing a proton conducting material. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials A method of producing a proton conducting material, comprising adding a pyrophosphate salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved pyrophosphate salt; adding an inorganic acid salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved inorganic acid salt; adding the dissolved inorganic acid salt to the dissolved pyrophosphate salt to produce a mixture; substantially evaporating the solvent from the mixture to produce a precipitate; and calcining the precipitate at a temperature of from about 400.degree. C. to about

393

Definition: Hydraulic Conductivity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conductivity Conductivity Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Hydraulic Conductivity Hydraulic conductivity is a physical property which measures the ability of the material to transmit fluid through pore spaces and fractures in the presence of an applied hydraulic gradient. Darcy's Law defines the hydraulic conductivity as the ratio of the average velocity of a fluid through a cross-sectional area (Darcy's velocity) to the applied hydraulic gradient.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Hydraulic conductivity, symbolically represented as, is a property of vascular plants, soil or rock, that describes the ease with which a fluid (usually water) can move through pore spaces or fractures. It depends on the intrinsic permeability of the material and on the degree of

394

Bunch Coalescing in a Helical Channel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-luminosity Muon Collider requires bunch recombination for optimal luminosity. In this paper, we take advantage of the large slip factor attainable in a helical transport channel (HTC) to coalesce bunches of muons into a single one over a shorter distance than can be achieved over a straight channel.

Neuffer, D.V.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Ca2+ Channels and Ryanodine Receptors in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ca2+ Channels and Ryanodine Receptors in Heart Cells Vasudev Bailey Calcium Signals Ca2+ signalling between single L-type Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in heart cells Shi-Qiang Wang, Long-Sheng Song and ryanodine receptors #12;Local calcium release Ca (a.u.) 20 µm Background Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release

Yue, David

396

Energy Harvesting Diamond Channel with Energy Cooperation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Harvesting Diamond Channel with Energy Cooperation Berk Gurakan Sennur Ulukus Department@umd.edu Abstract--We consider the energy harvesting diamond channel, where the source and two relays harvest energy the option of wirelessly transferring some of its energy to the relays via energy cooperation. We find

Ulukus, Sennur

397

Channel Coding Diversity with Mismatched Decoding Metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Channel Coding Diversity with Mismatched Decoding Metrics Trung Thanh Nguyen, Student Member diversity with general decoding metrics in terms of the gener- alized mutual information (GMI). We show of weather-induced fading scenarios where the quality of a single (either FSO or RF) channel could

Lampe, Lutz

398

Sabine-Neches Waterway Channel Improvement Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and 500 to 800 feet wide, from the Gulf of Mexico; a channel 40 feet deep and 400 feet wide to Beaumont of navigation on the waterway. The current channel was completed in 1960. At that time, crude oil tankers are now used routinely for crude oil imports to both Beaumont and Port Arthur. In addition to larger

US Army Corps of Engineers

399

FREEPORT HARBOR, TEXAS CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Gulf of Mexico; a main channel 45 feet deep and 400 feet wide; a Brazos Harbor channel 36 feet deep requires that large crude carriers remain offshore and transfer their cargo into smaller crude tankers for the remainder of the voyage. This lightering operation takes place in the Gulf of Mexico where the two ships

US Army Corps of Engineers

400

Elementary Processes Underlying Alpha Channeling in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alpha channeling in tokamaks is speculative, but also extraordinarily attractive. Waves that can accomplish this effect have been identified. Key aspects of the theory now enjoy experimental confirmation. This paper will review the elementary processes of wave-particle interactions in plasma that underlie the alpha channeling effect

NM.J. Fisch

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Transport involving conducting fibers in a non-conducting matrix R. A. Hansela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result is a material with high electrical conduc- tivity and low thermal conductivity. If we consider, conducting fibers, thin-film devices 1. Introduction Thermal and electrical transport through a low to predict conductance of the combined system. However, if the two materials are similar in conductivity

Walker, D. Greg

402

Carderock Circulating Water Channel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Circulating Water Channel Circulating Water Channel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock Circulating Water Channel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 18.3 Beam(m) 6.7 Depth(m) 2.7 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The Circulating Water Channel is a vertical plane, open to the atmosphere test section with a free surface in a closed recirculating water circuit, variable speed, rectangular cross-sectional shape facility. There are 10 large viewing windows on either side of the test section at different elevations and 9 in the bottom; movable bridge spans the test section for ease and versatility in mounting models, rigging bridge is capable of taking towing loads at any one of numerous points up to 35,584 N

403

Conducted Electrical Weapon Deployed Probe Wounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deployment of probes is a common method of use for some handheld conducted electrical weapons (CEWs). Probe deployment allows for greater...

Donald M. Dawes M.D.; Jeffrey D. Ho M.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Low temperature proton conducting oxide devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for conducting protons at a temperature below 550.degree. C. includes a LAMOX ceramic body characterized by an alpha crystalline structure.

Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Payzant, Edward A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Speakman, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Greenblatt, Martha (Highland Park, NJ)

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

405

EPA -- Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act and Section 309 of the Clean Air Act EPA -- Addressing Children's Health...

406

Conductivity measurement on thick insulating plaque samples.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The conductivity is one of the main properties of HVDC cable insulation materials and needs to be evaluated carefully. Since measurement on cables is… (more)

Huldén, Pierre

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

OPTIMAL INSULATION DISTRIBUTION OVER A CONDUCTING BODY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles OPTIMAL INSULATION DISTRIBUTION OVER A CONDUCTING BODY...conducted. Over the rest a given amount of insulation is assumed to be spread. Its pointwise...surroundings. Observe that thickening of the insulation at one point involves thinning elsewhere......

MICHAEL BETWICH

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE (Approved June 16, 2006)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 8 STUDENT CONDUCT CODE (Approved June 16, 2006) 8.010. Purpose 8.020. Definitions 8 of the conduct of all students" and "to enforce obedience to the rules." Although the grant of authority is broadly stated, it is well recognized that students are citizens. Students have legal rights, and deserve

Gering, Jon C.

409

Multi-channel blind system identification for central hemodynamic monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-channel Blind System Identification (MBSI) is a technique for estimating both an unknown input and unknown channel dynamics from simultaneous output measurements at different channels through which the input signal ...

Zhang, Yi, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

Elangovan, S. (South Jordan, UT); Nair, Balakrishnan G. (Sandy, UT); Small, Troy (Midvale, UT); Heck, Brian (Salt Lake City, UT)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

411

The Organic Chemistry of Conducting Polymers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the last several years, we have examined the fundamental principles of conduction in one-dimensional systems, i.e., molecular “wires”. It is, of course, widely recognized that such systems, as components of electronically conductive materials, function in a two- and three-dimensional milieu. Thus interchain hopping and grain-boundary resistivity are limiting conductivity factors in highly conductive materials, and overall conductivity is a function of through-chain and boundary hopping. We have given considerable attention to the basic principles underlying charge transport (the “rules of the game”) in two-dimensional systems by using model systems which allow direct observation of such processes, including the examination of tunneling and hopping as components of charge transfer. In related work, we have spent considerable effort on the chemistry of conjugated heteropolymers, most especially polythiophens, with the aim of using these most efficient of readily available electroactive polymers in photovoltaic devices.

Tolbert, Laren Malcolm [Georgia Institute of Technology

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Observing proton motion on the nanoscale in polymeric electrolyte membranes with quasielastic neutron scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The mechanism of proton conductivity in high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells (HT-PEFCs) has been investigated with macroscopic conductivity measurements and on a microscopic scale with quasielastic neutron scattering techniques. Polybenzimidazole membranes, which are used in HT-PEFCs, are doped with phosphoric acid (PA) to achieve the desired proton conductivity. Neutron spin echo experiments showed that the polymer matrix is very rigid incoherent scattering experiments, but incoherent scattering revealed rather fast diffusion processes, compatible with macroscopic conductivity measurements. The measured diffusion is faster than anticipated from the conductivity of a phosphoric acid doped PBI membrane, but slower than that expected for pure phosphoric acid. Over larger distances the fractal polymer membrane network slows down the locally fast diffusion to the macroscopic values. With elastic fixed window scans on a backscattering spectrometer an activation energy of 7.6 kJ/mol is obtained at typical conditions in an HT-PEFC.

O. Holderer; O. Ivanova; B. Hopfenmüller; M. Zamponi; W. Maier; A. Majerus; W. Lehnert; M. Monkenbusch; R. Zorn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than Fe into the structure of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) has been shown to greatly enhance the magnetic properties of the particles, tailoring them to different commercial uses. However, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is often carried out at high temperatures with toxic solvents resulting in high environmental and energy costs. Additionally, these ferrite nanoparticles are not intrinsically biocompatible, and to make them suitable for insertion into the human body is a rather intricate task. A relatively unexplored resource for magnetic nanomaterial production is subsurface Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, as these microorganisms are capable of producing large quantities of nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at ambient temperatures. Metal-reducing bacteria live in environments deficient in oxygen and conserve energy for growth through the oxidation of hydrogen or organic electron donors, coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals such as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. This can result in the formation of magnetite via the extracellular reduction of amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides causing the release of soluble Fe(II) and resulting in complete recrystallization of the amorphous mineral into a new phase. Some previous studies have reported altering the composition of biogenic magnetite produced by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for industrial and environmental applications. However, research into the commercial exploitation of bacteria to form magnetic minerals has focused primarily on magnetotactic bacteria which form magnetosomal magnetite internally using very different pathways to those bacteria forming magnetite outside the cell. Magnetotactic bacteria live at the sediment-water interface and use internal nanomagnets to guide them to their preferred environmental niche using the Earth's magnetic field. Since magnetotactic bacteria generally grow optimally under carefully controlled microaerobic conditions, the culturing processes for these organisms are challenging and result in low yields of nanomagnetite. Despite these limitations, magnetotactic bacteria have bee

Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

414

Solution to time-energy costs of quantum channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive a formula for the time-energy costs of general quantum channels proposed in [Phys. Rev. A 88, 012307 (2013)]. This formula allows us to numerically find the time-energy cost of any quantum channel using positive semidefinite programming. We also derive a lower bound to the time-energy cost for any channels and the exact the time-energy cost for a class of channels which includes the qudit depolarizing channels and projector channels as special cases.

Chi-Hang Fred Fung; H. F. Chau; Chi-Kwong Li; Nung-Sing Sze

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

415

Nanoscale topographic pattern formation on Kr{sup +}-bombarded germanium surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nanoscale pattern formation of Ge surfaces uniformly irradiated by Kr{sup +} ions was studied in a low-contamination environment at ion energies of 250 and 500 eV and at angles of 0 Degree-Sign through 80 Degree-Sign . The authors present a phase diagram of domains of pattern formation occurring as these two control parameters are varied. The results are insensitive to ion energy over the range covered by the experiments. Flat surfaces are stable from normal incidence up to an incidence angle of {theta} = 55 Degree-Sign from normal. At higher angles, the surface is linearly unstable to the formation of parallel-mode ripples, in which the wave vector is parallel to the projection of the ion beam on the surface. For {theta} {>=} 75 Degree-Sign the authors observe perpendicular-mode ripples, in which the wave vector is perpendicular to the ion beam. This behavior is qualitatively similar to those of Madi et al. for Ar{sup +}-irradiated Si but is inconsistent with those of Ziberi et al. for Kr{sup +}-irradiated Ge. The existence of a window of stability is qualitatively inconsistent with a theory based on sputter erosion [R. M. Bradley and J. M. Harper, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 6, 2390 (1988)] and qualitatively consistent with a model of ion impact-induced mass redistribution [G. Carter and V. Vishnyakov, Phys. Rev. B 54, 17647 (1996)] as well as a crater function theory incorporating both effects [S. A. Norris et al., Nat. Commun. 2, 276 (2011)]. The critical transition angle between stable and rippled surfaces occurs 10 Degree-Sign -15 Degree-Sign above the value of 45 Degree-Sign predicted by the mass redistribution model.

Perkinson, Joy C.; Madi, Charbel S.; Aziz, Michael J. [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Excess lithium storage and charge compensation in nanoscale Li4+xTi5O12  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lithium titanate spinel (Li4Ti5O12; LTO) is a promising candidate for anodes in lithium-ion batteries due to its excellent cyclability and safety performance, and has been known as a 'zero-strain' material that allows reversible lithium insertion–deinsertion with little change in the lattice parameters. For a better understanding of lithium reaction mechanisms in this material, it has been of great interest to identify where lithium is inserted and how it migrates during charge and discharge, which is often difficult with x-ray and electron scattering techniques due to the low scattering power of lithium. In this study, we employed atomic-resolution annular bright-field imaging to directly image the lithium on interstitial sites in nanoscale LTO, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy to measure local lithium occupancy and electronic structure at different states of charge. During lithiation, charge compensation occurs primarily at O sites, rather than at Ti sites, and no significant change was found in the projected density of states (Ti 3d) until the voltage was lowered to ~50 mV or below. The Li K-edge spectra were simulated via ab initio calculations, providing a direct correlation between the near-edge fine structure and the local lithium coordination. During the initial states of discharge, lithium ions on 8a sites migrate to 16c sites (above 740 mV). Further lithiation causes the partial re-occupation of 8a sites, initially in the near-surface region at ~600 mV, and then in the bulk at lower voltages (~50 mV). We attribute the enhanced capacity in nanostructured LTO to extra storage of lithium in the near-surface region, primarily at {111} facets.

Feng Wang; Lijun Wu; Chao Ma; Dong Su; Yimei Zhu; Jason Graetz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Multi-channel polarized thermal emitter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-channel polarized thermal emitter (PTE) is presented. The multi-channel PTE can emit polarized thermal radiation without using a polarizer at normal emergence. The multi-channel PTE consists of two layers of metallic gratings on a monolithic and homogeneous metallic plate. It can be fabricated by a low-cost soft lithography technique called two-polymer microtransfer molding. The spectral positions of the mid-infrared (MIR) radiation peaks can be tuned by changing the periodicity of the gratings and the spectral separation between peaks are tuned by changing the mutual angle between the orientations of the two gratings.

Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Constant, Kristen P

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

418

Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

C. Y. Yoshikawa, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov, D.V. Neuffer, K. Yonehara

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

Neuffer, D.V.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Johnson, R.P.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Derbenev, Y.S.; Morozov, V.S.; /Jefferson Lab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Step 7: Determine Loan Marketing Channels | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Financing Step 7: Determine Loan Marketing Channels Step 7: Determine Loan Marketing Channels Integrating financing into the overall energy efficiency marketing campaign is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Proton Conductivity Studies on Biopolymer Electrolytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolyte membranes consisting of methyl cellulose (MC) and different wt.% of ammonium nitrate (NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}) were prepared by solution cast technique. Impedance spectroscopy was carried out to study electrical characteristics of bulk materials. The ionic conductivity of the prepared samples was calculated using the bulk resistance (R{sub b}) obtained from impedance spectroscopy plot. The highest ionic conductivity obtained was 1.17x10{sup -4} Scm{sup -1} for the sample with composition ratio of MC(50): NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}(50). To enhance the ionic conductivity, propylene carbonate (PC) and ethylene carbonate (EC) plasticizers were introduced. It was found that the ionic conductivity of polymer electrolyte membranes increased with the increase in plasticizers concentration. The ionic conductivities of solid polymer electrolytes based on MC-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-PC was enhanced up to 4.91x10{sup -3} Scm{sup -1} while for the MC-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-EC system, the highest conductivity was 1.74x10{sup -2} Scm{sup -1}. The addition of more plasticizer however decreases in mechanical stability of the membranes.

Harun, N. I.; Sabri, N. S.; Rosli, N. H. A.; Taib, M. F. M.; Saaid, S. I. Y.; Kudin, T. I. T. [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Ali, A. M. M.; Yahya, M. Z. A. [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

Faussurier, G., E-mail: gerald.faussurier@cea.fr; Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Electrical conductivity of shock compressed xenon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results on measurements of electrical conductivity of shock compressed gaseous and liquid xenon are discussed. Thermodynamical parameters of xenon are calculated in frames of plasma chemical model. To estimate electrical conductivity modified Ziman theory is used. A reasonable agreement between experimental and theoretical data on equation of state and transport properties is shown in a wide range of parameters from gas to liquid densities pressures 10–140 GPa and temperatures >5000 K. New experimental data on measurements of equation of state and conductivity of xenon under multiple shock compression are presented.

Victor B. Mintsev; Vladimir Ya. Ternovoi; Victor K. Gryaznov; Alexei A. Pyalling; Vladimir E. Fortov; Igor L. Iosilevskii

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Electrical conductivity of warm dense tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The electrical conductivity of warm dense tungsten plasma has been investigated successfully by a linear mixture rule considering various interactions of electrons with electrons, atoms, and ions. The plasma composition is calculated by the nonideal Saha equation. The interesting regime for tungsten plasma spans from weakly coupled and nondegenerate regime to strongly coupled and partial degenerate state. The electrical conductivity calculated is in reasonable agreement with the exploding wire experiments and other theoretical models. The present result demonstrates that the theoretical model is valid for the electrical conductivity of tungsten plasma in the warm dense matter regime.

Zhijian Fu; Lijun Jia; Xiaowei Sun; Qifeng Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Femtosecond Single-Shot Imaging of Nanoscale Ferromagnetic Order in Co/Pd Multilayers using Resonant X-ray Holography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first single-shot images of ferromagnetic, nanoscale spin order taken with femtosecond x-ray pulses. X-ray-induced electron and spin dynamics can be outrun with pulses shorter than 80 fs in the investigated fluence regime, and no permanent aftereffects in the samples are observed below a fluence of 25 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Employing resonant spatially-muliplexed x-ray holography results in a low imaging threshold of 5 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Our results open new ways to combine ultrafast laser spectroscopy with sequential snapshot imaging on a single sample, generating a movie of excited state dynamics.

Wang, Tianhan; Zhu, Diling; Benny Wu,; Graves, Catherine; Schaffert, Stefan; Rander, Torbjorn; Muller, leonard; Vodungbo, Boris; Baumier, Cedric; Bernstein, David P.; Brauer, Bjorn; Cros, Vincent; Jong, Sanne de; Delaunay, Renaud; Fognini, Andreas; Kukreja, Roopali; Lee, Sooheyong; Lopez-Flores, Victor; Mohanty, Jyoti; Pfau, Bastian; Popescu, 5 Horia

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

End station for nanoscale magnetic materials study: Combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and soft X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have constructed an end station for nanoscale magnetic materials study at the soft X-ray beamline HiSOR BL-14 at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center. An ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was installed for an in situ characterization of nanoscale magnetic materials in combination with soft X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopy experiment. The STM was connected to the XMCD experimental station via damper bellows to isolate it from environmental vibrations, thus achieving efficient spatial resolution for observing Si(111) surface at atomic resolution. We performed an in situ experiment with STM and XMCD spectroscopy on Co nanoclusters on an Au(111) surface and explored its practical application to investigate magnetic properties for well-characterized nanoscale magnetic materials.

Ueno, Tetsuro; Sawada, Masahiro; Namatame, Hirofumi [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, 2-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Kishimizu, Yusuke; Kimura, Akio [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Taniguchi, Masaki [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, 2-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Method and apparatus for casting conductive and semi-conductive materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus is disclosed for casting conductive and semi-conductive materials. The apparatus includes a plurality of conductive members arranged to define a container-like area having a desired cross-sectional shape. A portion or all of the conductive or semi-conductive material which is to be cast is introduced into the container-like area. A means is provided for inducing the flow of an electrical current in each of the conductive members, which currents act collectively to induce a current flow in the material. The induced current flow through the conductive members is in a direction substantially opposite to the induced current flow in the material so that the material is repelled from the conductive members during the casting process.

Ciszek, T.F.

1984-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

428

Characterization of macro-length conducting polymers and the development of a conducting polymer rotary motor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting polymers are a subset of materials within the electroactive polymer class that exhibit active mechanical deformations. These deformations induce stresses and strains that allow for conducting polymers to be used ...

Schmid, Bryan D. (Bryan David), 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Scripps Channel 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scripps Channel 1 Scripps Channel 1 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Scripps Channel 1 Overseeing Organization University of California, San Diego (Scripps) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 44.5 Beam(m) 2.4 Depth(m) 2.4 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Strategically placed windows, longest being 5.5m, allow optical access from side Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2 Length of Effective Tow(m) 7.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Function Generator or user provided Wave Direction Uni-Directional

430

Scripps Channel 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Channel 2 Channel 2 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Scripps Channel 2 Overseeing Organization University of California, San Diego (Scripps) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 33.0 Beam(m) 0.5 Depth(m) 0.5 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features All side walls and 11m of the tank bottom are glass to provide optical access. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 0.7 Length of Effective Tow(m) 20.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Function Generator or user provided Wave Direction Uni-Directional

431

Weak multiplicativity for random quantum channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is known that random quantum channels exhibit significant violations of multiplicativity of maximum output p-norms for any p>1. In this work, we show that a weaker variant of multiplicativity nevertheless holds for these channels. For any constant p>1, given a random quantum channel N (i.e. a channel whose Stinespring representation corresponds to a random subspace S), we show that with high probability the maximum output p-norm of n copies of N decays exponentially with n. The proof is based on relaxing the maximum output infinity-norm of N to the operator norm of the partial transpose of the projector onto S, then calculating upper bounds on this quantity using ideas from random matrix theory.

Montanaro, Ashley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Optimal unitary dilation for bosonic Gaussian channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general quantum channel can be represented in terms of a unitary interaction between the information-carrying system and a noisy environment. In this paper the minimal number of quantum Gaussian environmental modes required to provide a unitary dilation of a multimode bosonic Gaussian channel is analyzed for both pure and mixed environments. We compute this quantity in the case of pure environment corresponding to the Stinespring representation and give an improved estimate in the case of mixed environment. The computations rely, on one hand, on the properties of the generalized Choi-Jamiolkowski state and, on the other hand, on an explicit construction of the minimal dilation for arbitrary bosonic Gaussian channel. These results introduce a new quantity reflecting ''noisiness'' of bosonic Gaussian channels and can be applied to address some issues concerning transmission of information in continuous variables systems.

Caruso, Filippo [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Eisert, Jens [Dahlem Center for Complex Quantum Systems, Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Giovannetti, Vittorio [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Holevo, Alexander S. [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Gubkina 8, RU-119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Longitudinal profile of channels cut by springs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a simple theory for the longitudinal profile of channels incised by groundwater flow. The aquifer surrounding the stream is represented in two dimensions through Darcy's law and the Dupuit approximation. The ...

Devauchelle, O.

434

Channelized voice over digital subscriber line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this article is to present a promising voice over digital subscriber line (VoDSL) solution: an alternative method that uses physical layer transportation to provide channelized VoDSL (CVoDSL). This article ...

Habib, A.; Saiedian, Hossein

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Message passing with queues and channels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an embodiment, a send thread receives an identifier that identifies a destination node and a pointer to data. The send thread creates a first send request in response to the receipt of the identifier and the data pointer. The send thread selects a selected channel from among a plurality of channels. The selected channel comprises a selected hand-off queue and an identification of a selected message unit. Each of the channels identifies a different message unit. The selected hand-off queue is randomly accessible. If the selected hand-off queue contains an available entry, the send thread adds the first send request to the selected hand-off queue. If the selected hand-off queue does not contain an available entry, the send thread removes a second send request from the selected hand-off queue and sends the second send request to the selected message unit.

Dozsa, Gabor J; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ratterman, Joseph D; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Wisniewski, Robert W

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

436

Flag flutter in inviscid channel flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using nonlinear vortex-sheet simulations, we determine the region in parameter space in which a straight flag in a channel-bounded inviscid flow is unstable to flapping motions. We find that for heavier flags, greater confinement increases the size of the region of instability. For lighter flags, confinement has little influence. We then compute the stability boundaries analytically for an infinite flag, and find similar results. For the finite flag we also consider the effect of channel walls on the large-amplitude periodic flapping dynamics. We find that multiple flapping states are possible but rare at a given set of parameters, when periodic flapping occurs. As the channel walls approach the flag, its flapping amplitude decreases roughly in proportion to the near-wall distance, for both symmetric and asymmetric channels. Meanwhile, its dominant flapping frequency and mean number of deflection extrema (or "wavenumber") increase in a nearly stepwise fashion. That is, they remain nearly unchanged over a wide...

Alben, Silas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Genetic Engineering and Cardiac Ion Channels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years there have been significant advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of the electrical activity of the heart with the cloning of many ion channel sub-units [1] and descriptions of t...

Andrew A. Grace; Richard C. Saumarez…

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Multi-channel coded-aperture photography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the multi-channel coded-aperture photography, a modified camera system that can extract an all-focus image of the scene along with a depth estimate over the scene. The modification consists of inserting ...

Baek, Jongmin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Time varying channels : characterization, estimation, and detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

overall, then the Doppler’s effect of smearing the symbol into note the effect on normalized Doppler of increasing theis the ICI, a direct effect of the Doppler induced channel

Ricklin, Nathan D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Investigation of the effect of gel residue on hydraulic fracture conductivity using dynamic fracture conductivity test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECT OF GEL RESIDUE ON HYDRAULIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY USING DYNAMIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY TEST A Thesis by FIVMAN MARPAUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECT OF GEL RESIDUE ON HYDRAULIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY USING DYNAMIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY TEST A...

Marpaung, Fivman

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Investigation of channel width-dependent threshold voltage variation in a-InGaZnO thin-film transistors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Letter investigates abnormal channel width-dependent threshold voltage variation in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. Unlike drain-induced source barrier lowering effect, threshold voltage increases with increasing drain voltage. Furthermore, the wider the channel, the larger the threshold voltage observed. Because of the surrounding oxide and other thermal insulating material and the low thermal conductivity of the IGZO layer, the self-heating effect will be pronounced in wider channel devices and those with a larger operating drain bias. To further clarify the physical mechanism, fast IV measurement is utilized to demonstrate the self-heating induced anomalous channel width-dependent threshold voltage variation.

Liu, Kuan-Hsien; Chou, Wu-Ching [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Chang, E-mail: tcchang@mail.phys.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Siou; Hung, Yi-Syuan; Sze, Simon M. [Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Hung, Pei-Hua; Chu, Ann-Kuo [Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Tien-Yu [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Bo-Liang [Advanced Display Technology Research Center, AU Optronics, No. 1, Li-Hsin Rd. 2, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30078, Taiwan (China)

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Standards of Student Conduct: A Guide to the University of Rochester Conduct  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standards of Student Conduct: A Guide to the University of Rochester Conduct Process and Policies 2012-2013 Center for Student Conflict Management #12;2 STANDARDS OF STUDENT CONDUCT A Guide Student Handbook, the Residential Community Standards material, the Resident Network Acceptable Use Policy

Portman, Douglas

443

Digitally Assisted Multi-Channel Receivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-channel charge sampling receivers with sinc filter banks together with a complete system calibration and synchronization algorithm for the receiver. A unified model has been defined for the receiver containing all first order mismatches, offsets... and imperfections and a technique based on least mean squares algorithm is employed to track these errors. The performance of this technique under noisy channel conditions has been verified. The sinc filter bank is compared with the conventional analog filter...

Pentakota, Krishna Anand Santosh Spikanth

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

444

Quantum capacity of channel with thermal noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum capacity of thermal noise channel is studied. The extremal input state is obtained at the postulation that the coherent information is convex or concave at its vicinity. When the input energy tends to infinitive, it is verified by perturbation theory that the coherent information reaches its maximum at the product of identical thermal state input. The quantum capacity is obtained for lower noise channel and it is equal the one shot capacity.

Xiao-yu Chen

2006-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

445

Thermal Conductivity in Nanocrystalline Ceria Thin Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline ceria films grown by unbalanced magnetron sputtering is determined as a function of temperature using laser-based modulated thermoreflectance. The films exhibit significantly reduced conductivity compared with stoichiometric bulk CeO2. A variety of microstructure imaging techniques including X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron analysis, and electron energy loss spectroscopy indicate that the thermal conductivity is influenced by grain boundaries, dislocations, and oxygen vacancies. The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity is analyzed using an analytical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The conclusion of this study is that oxygen vacancies pose a smaller impediment to thermal transport when they segregate along grain boundaries.

Marat Khafizov; In-Wook Park; Aleksandr Chernatynskiy; Lingfeng He; Jianliang Lin; John J. Moore; David Swank; Thomas Lillo; Simon R. Phillpot; Anter El-Azab; David H. Hurley

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Synthesis and characterization of conducting polymer actuators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting polymers are known to mechanically respond to electrochemical stimuli and have been utilized as linear actuators. To date, the most successful mechanism for actuation is ionic ingress and egress, though mechanisms ...

Vandesteeg, Nathan A. (Nathan Alan)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Large displacement fast conducting polymer actuators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting polymers are a promising class of electroactive materials that undergo volumetric changes under applied potentials, which make them particularly useful for many actuation applications. Polypyrrole , is one of ...

Chen, Angela Y. (Angela Ying-Ju), 1982-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Environmental Assessment for Conducting Astrophysics and Other...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Other Basic Science Experiments at the WIPP Site A-14 The existing WIPP Conduct of Operations process implements the long-term stewardship process that will govern all...

449

Modeling tensorial conductivity of particle suspension networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Significant microstructural anisotropy is known to develop during shearing flow of attractive particle suspensions. These suspensions, and their capacity to form conductive networks, play a key role in flow-battery technology, among other applications. Herein, we present and test an analytical model for the tensorial conductivity of attractive particle suspensions. The model utilizes the mean fabric of the network to characterize the structure, and the relationship to the conductivity is inspired by a lattice argument. We test the accuracy of our model against a large number of computer-generated suspension networks, based on multiple in-house generation protocols, giving rise to particle networks that emulate the physical system. The model is shown to adequately capture the tensorial conductivity, both in terms of its invariants and its mean directionality.

Tyler Olsen; Ken Kamrin

2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

450

Electronic Structure Calculations on Helical Conducting Polymers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electronic Structure Calculations on Helical Conducting Polymers ... Therefore, we select the B3LYP/6-31G* methodology to calculate the oligomers. ... Table 3 shows several calculated parameters. ...

Juan D. Ripoll; Andrei Serna; Doris Guerra; Albeiro Restrepo

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electrical conductivity of nondegenerate, fully ionized plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Within a virial expansion of the electrical conductivity of a fully ionized plasma, which takes into account many-particle effects, different limiting cases are considered. An appropriate interpolation formula is compared with experimental values.

G. Röpke and R. Redmer

1989-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Application of Conducting Polymers in Chemical Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents recent achievements in the field of analytical application of conducting polymers, most of which were published in the last five years. Based on 171 references mainly to original papers in...

Marek Trojanowicz

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Fracture Conductivity of the Eagle Ford Shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conductivity is influenced by several variables including fracture surface roughness, fracture closure stress, proppant size, and proppant concentration. The proppant concentration within a fracture can significantly affect the magnitude of fracture...

Guzek, James J

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

454

Thermal conductance of metal-metal interfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal conductance of interfaces between Al and Cu is measured in the temperature range 78conductance of the as-deposited Al-Cu interface is 4GWm?2K?1 at room temperature, an order-of-magnitude larger than the phonon-mediated thermal conductance of typical metal-dielectric interfaces. The magnitude and the linear temperature dependence of the conductance are described well by a diffuse-mismatch model for electron transport at interfaces.

Bryan C. Gundrum; David G. Cahill; Robert S. Averback

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

455

Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber. The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target in the process chamber to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

Gessert, Timothy A.; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

456

Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target (110) doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber (100). The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target (110) to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

Gessert, Timothy A; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

457

Horticultural marketing in Kenya: conduct and performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HORTICULTURAL MARKETING IN KENYA: CONDUCT AND PERFORMANCE A Thesis by DICKSON TEYIE MUTOKA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of tne requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981... Major Subject: Agricultural Economics HORTICULTURAL MARKETING IN KEl&A: CONDUCT AND PERFGRl4lMNCE A Thesis by DICKSOM TEYIE NUTGKA Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) ~n (Member) (Head of Departmen ABSTRACT...

Mutoka, Dickson Teyie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

458

Electrical Conductivity of a Dense Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ac electrical conductivity of a dense plasma is studied by use of reflectivity measurements on the rear surface of a laser-irradiated planar target. The results show general agreement with theory in which a minimum collision mean free path is assumed, yielding correspondingly a minimum conductivity. However, the results also suggest that the minimum mean free path is greater than the interatomic radius.

A. Ng, D. Parfeniuk, P. Celliers, L. DaSilva, R. M. More, and Y. T. Lee

1986-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

459

Thermal Conductance of Thin Silicon Nanowires  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal conductance of individual single crystalline silicon nanowires with diameters less than 30 nm has been measured from 20 to 100 K. The observed thermal conductance shows unusual linear temperature dependence at low temperatures, as opposed to the T3 dependence predicted by the conventional phonon transport model. In contrast to previous models, the present study suggests that phonon-boundary scattering is highly frequency dependent, and ranges from nearly ballistic to completely diffusive, which can explain the unexpected linear temperature dependence.

Renkun Chen, Allon I. Hochbaum, Padraig Murphy, Joel Moore, Peidong Yang, and Arun Majumdar

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

460

Conduction of Electricity in Highly Insulating Liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigations have been made on the natural conductivity, and on the conductivity induced by gamma-rays in isooctane and liquid oxygen. The characteristics of the two types of conductivity are so very different that it may be concluded that the natural conductivity is not due to stray radiation or to cosmic rays. The curves for the natural conductivity are such that the current increases much faster than the field. Evidence is presented supporting Plumley's theory that the observed conductivity is due to dissociation of the liquids by the field, and against the view that it has a thermionic origin at the cathode, or the view that it is due to radiation. The prediction that the logarithm of the current should be a linear function of the square root of the field is verified. The much larger currents induced by gamma-rays rise at first rapidly and then more slowly in a manner indicating a slow approach toward saturation. The results fit Jaffé's formula satisfactorily.

Chia-Shan Pao

1943-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Cation Defects and Conductivity in Transparent Oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High quality doped zinc oxide and mixed transition metal spinel oxide films have been deposited by means of sputter deposition from metal and metal oxide targets, and by spin casting from aqueous or alcoholic precursor solutions. Deposition conditions and post-deposition processing are found to alter cation oxidation states and their distributions in both oxide materials resulting in marked changes to both optical transmission and electrical response. For ZnO, partial reduction of the neat or doped material by hydrogen treatment of the heated film or by electrochemical processing renders the oxide n-type conducting. Continued reduction was found to diminish conductivity. In contrast, oxidation of the infrared transparent p-type spinel conductors typified by NiCo2O4 was found to increase conductivity. The disparate behavior of these two materials is caused in part by the sign of the charge carrier and by the existence of two different charge transport mechanisms that are identified as free carrier conduction and polaron hopping. While much work has been reported concerning structure/property relationships in the free carrier conducting oxides, there is a significantly smaller body of information on transparent polaron conductors. In this paper, we identify key parameters that promote conductivity in mixed metal spinel oxides and compare their behavior with that of the free carrier TCO’s.

Exarhos, Gregory J.; Windisch, Charles F.; Ferris, Kim F.; Owings, Robert R.

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

462

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 144305 (2013) Two-channel model for nonequilibrium thermal transport in pump-probe experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

150 nm of the Al/Si0.99Ge0.01 interface. The extra thermal resistance in this region is a result. INTRODUCTION The magnitude of a material's thermal conductivity and spe- cific heat is determinedPHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 144305 (2013) Two-channel model for nonequilibrium thermal transport in pump

Cahill, David G.

463

Cu oxide nanowire array grown on Si-based SiO{sub 2} nanoscale islands via nanochannels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cu oxide nanowire array on Si-based SiO{sub 2} nanoscale islands was fabricated via nanochannels of Si-based porous anodic alumina (PAA) template at room temperature under a pulse voltage in a conventional solution for copper electrodeposition. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the main composite of the oxide nanowire is Cu{sub 2}O. The nanowires had a preferential growth direction (1 1 1) and connected with the nanoscale SiO{sub 2} islands, which was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Such Si-based nanostructure is useful in the nanoelectrics application. The growth mechanism of Cu oxide nanowires in Si-based PAA template was discussed. The formation of Cu{sub 2}O is due to the alkalinity of the anodized solution. However, the oscillations of the potential and current during the experiment trend to bring on a small amount of copper and CuO in the nanowires.

Mei, Y.F. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China) and Department of Physics, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)]. E-mail: meiyongfeng@nju.org.cn; Siu, G.G. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Yang, Y. [Department of Physics, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Fu, Ricky K.Y. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Hung, T.F. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wu, X.L. [Department of Physics, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

464

Photo-electric Conduction in Selenium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variation with light intensity of the photo-current in selenium.—A selenium cell is described which gives a photo-current of 10 ma. for a difference of potential of 100 volts and an illumination of 100 foot-candles. The sensitiveness ratio between the currents under light and dark conditions is 100. The characteristics of the cell are very constant. The experimental results establish the existence of a linear relation between the square of the photo-current and the light intensity. It is pointed out that this result substantiates the conclusion that the photo-conduction in selenium is due to a photo-electric liberation of electrons rather than to an allotropic change from an insulating to a conducting form of selenium.Effect of temperature on the photo-conductivity of selenium.—Under dark conditions the current through a cell immersed in liquid air dropped in 15 sec. to 35 percent of its value at room temperature, and in 10 min. to 0.000046 percent. When the same cell was illuminated with 100 foot-candles and immersed in liquid air, the current increased for 8 min. to about 1.8 times its value at room temperature and then decreased until after 3 hours its value was 82 percent of its value at room temperature. It is concluded that the mechanism of the current conduction under dark conditions is entirely different from that of the photo-conduction.

R. J. Piersol

1927-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Poly(ethylene glycol)-based open-channel blockers for the acetylcholine receptor : mechanistic and structure-function studies at the single-channel level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion channels are essential mediators in nervous signaling pathways. Because hyperactivation of ion channels can lead to pathological disorders such as congenital myasthenic syndromes and neurodegeneration, channel inhibitors ...

Lin, Wan-Chen, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Joint source channel coding for non-ergodic channels: the distortion signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) exponent perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 II DISTORTION SNR EXPONENT FOR THE AWGN CHANNEL 10 A. Introduction and Problem Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 B. Informed Transmitter Upper Bound . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 C. Prior Work... mean square error, a simple joint source channel coding scheme that involves just transmitting the source over the channel with appropriate power scaling is optimal [1,2]. Some advantages and disadvantages of joint source channel coding are discussed...

Bhattad, Kapil

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

467

Quantum conductance of zigzag graphene oxide nanoribbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic properties of zigzag graphene oxide nanoribbons (ZGOR) are presented. The results show interesting behaviors which are considerably different from the properties of the perfect graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). The theoretical methods include a Huckel-tight binding approach, a Green's function methodology, and the Landauer formalism. The presence of oxygen on the edge results in band bending, a noticeable change in density of states and thus the conductance. Consequently, the occupation in the valence bands increase for the next neighboring carbon atom in the unit cell. Conductance drops in both the conduction and valence band regions are due to the reduction of allowed k modes resulting from band bending. The asymmetry of the energy band structure of the ZGOR is due to the energy differences of the atoms. The inclusion of a foreign atom's orbital energies changes the dispersion relation of the eigenvalues in energy space. These novel characteristics are important and valuable in the study of quantum transport of GNRs.

Kan, Zhe; Nelson, Christopher; Khatun, Mahfuza, E-mail: mkhatun@bsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Center for Computational Nanoscience, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana 47306 (United States)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

468

Casimir energy for surfaces with constant conductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the vacuum energy of the electromagnetic field in systems characterized by a constant conductivity using the zeta-regularization approach. The interaction in two cases is investigated: two infinitely thin parallel sheets and an infinitely thin spherical shell. We found that the Casimir energy for the planar system is always attractive and it has the same characteristic distance dependence as the interaction for two perfect semi-infinite metals. The Casimir energy for the spherical shell depends on the inverse radius of the sphere, but it maybe negative or positive depending on the value of the conductivity. If the conductivity is less than a certain critical value, the interaction is attractive, otherwise the Casimir force is repulsive regardless of the spherical shell radius.

Nail Khusnutdinov; D. Drosdoff; Lilia M. Woods

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

469

Liquid Propane Injection Technology Conductive to Today's North...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technology Conductive to Today's North American Specification Liquid Propane Injection Technology Conductive to Today's North American Specification Liquid propane injection...

470

Coupled-channel continuum eigenchannel basis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this paper is to calculate bound, resonant and scattering states in the coupled-channel formalism without relying on the boundary conditions at large distances. The coupled-channel solution is expanded in eigenchannel bases i.e. in eigenfunctions of diagonal Hamiltonians. Each eigenchannel basis may include discrete and discretized continuum (real or complex energy) single particle states. The coupled-channel solutions are computed through diagonalization in these bases. The method is applied to a few two-channels problems. The exact bound spectrum of the Poeschl-Teller potential is well described by using a basis of real energy continuum states. For deuteron described by Reid potential, the experimental energy and the S and D contents of the wave function are reproduced in the asymptotic limit of the cutoff energy. For the Noro-Taylor potential resonant state energy is well reproduced by using the complex energy Berggren basis. It is found that the expansion of the coupled-channel wave function in these eigenchannel bases require less computational efforts than the use of any other basis. The solutions are stable and converge as the cutoff energy increases.

R. M. Id Betan

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

471

Anion Exchange Membranes - Transport/Conductivity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fundamental understanding Fundamental understanding * Driving membranes towards applications Anion Exchange Membranes - Transport/Conductivity High Priority * A need for a standard/available AEM (similar to Nafion in PEMs) * Define standard experimental conditions and protocols * A need for much more fundamental studies in transport mechanisms and mechanical properties * A need to develop much more new AEMs with alternative chemistries (new cation and backbone chemistries) Fundamental Studies * TRANSPORT * Conductivity (pure OH - hard to measure) * Water content, λ * Diffusion coefficients, NMR * Drag coefficients * Transference * Solubility * Fundamental transport mechanisms for anion and water transport * Computational Modeling * MORPHOLOGY/CHEMISTRY * Vibrational Spectroscopy: FTIR, Raman

472

Scaling of the conductance in gold nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new form of gold nanobridges has been recently observed in ultrahigh-vacuum experiments, where gold atoms rearrange to build helical nanotubes, akin in some respects to carbon nanotubes. The good reproducibility of these wires and their unexpected stability allow for conductance measurements and make them promising candidates for future applications. We present here a study of the transport properties of these nanotubes in order to understand the role of chirality and of the different orbitals in quantum transport observables. The conductance per atomic row shows a light decreasing trend as the diameter grows, which is also shown through an analytical formula based on a one-orbital model.

Miriam del Valle; Carlos Tejedor; Gianaurelio Cuniberti

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

473

Electronic conduction through single crystals of polyethylene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May, 1966 Major Subjects Physics ELECTRONIC CONDUCTION THROUGH SINGLE CRYSTRLS OF POLYETHYLENE k Thesis By Gerald Maurice Samson Approved as to style and content by: naen of the Committee ad of the D artment ber ber c- The autho. u... talc o Polyot! ylone . -y, i'oo Gerald !':cur"' co Samson Directed by: Zr. Joe S. The predominant conduction mechani m through single cryo' mls op polyethylene is shown to be Schott!cy ( hernal) oui "sion . or tompora- o tu. es - bove 0 C. . "or...

Samson, Gerald Maurice

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

The hydraulic conductivity of chopped sorghum forage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ZL Kn H, Hg Hs ? H4 Hs ? H 6 Ln Hn+ & Q = flow rate L = layer thickness H = hydrostatic head Figure 3. Constnnt hend permenmeter for n mnterini mnde up of lngers of verging conductiviifes. 10 K is the hydraulic conductivity of a layer... will henceforth be called simply the hydraulic conductivity, K) was calculated using the equation. Q~XL A H7-Hi (Eq. 6) where H7-Hi is the head difference between the first and seventh pressure taps. Darcy's law, which is valid only for laminar flow...

Custer, Micheal Hugh

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

475

Conduct of Operations and Quality Assurance Compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to present and detail the deliverables for the Tiger Team Action Plan, Finding MF-11, and milestones in the FY92 Performance Appraisal for Conduct of Operations from Sandia National Laboratories to DOE. The ``Proposal for Reporting Conduct of Operations & Quality Assurance Compliance to DOE`` describes what the deliverables shall be. Five major steps that result in the development of line practices are covered in this document. These line practices specify what Sandia will do to comply with the above DOE management orders. The five steps include: hazard classification; programmatic risk classification; management grouping; compliance plan; and corporate reporting.

Andrews, N.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Conduct of Operations and Quality Assurance Compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to present and detail the deliverables for the Tiger Team Action Plan, Finding MF-11, and milestones in the FY92 Performance Appraisal for Conduct of Operations from Sandia National Laboratories to DOE. The Proposal for Reporting Conduct of Operations Quality Assurance Compliance to DOE'' describes what the deliverables shall be. Five major steps that result in the development of line practices are covered in this document. These line practices specify what Sandia will do to comply with the above DOE management orders. The five steps include: hazard classification; programmatic risk classification; management grouping; compliance plan; and corporate reporting.

Andrews, N.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Electrical conductivity of dense metal plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The composition of dense metal plasmas is calculated considering higher ionization stages of the atoms. A system of coupled mass action laws is solved self-consistently taking into account medium corrections which lead to pressure ionization at high densities. The electrical conductivity is calculated within linear response theory. The interactions between the various species are treated on T matrix level. The numerical results for the electrical conductivity are in reasonable agreement with new experimental data for nonideal Al and Cu plasmas. Comparison with other theories is performed.

Ronald Redmer

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Some Remarks on Lattice Thermal Conductivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of lattice thermal conductivity (in an insulator) has been outstanding for many years. Debye and Peierls made fundamental contributions in relating finite thermal conductivity to anharmonic interactions between the normal modes of lattice vibration; detailed analysis and calculation however remains today a difficult problem. This paper presents a rather crude and elementary discussion of the problem for “classical” temperatures (T??) which yields a semiquantitative result in agreement with other workers. We are also able to make a rather direct estimate of the probable magnitude of the contribution to the thermal resistivity which arises from the quartic term in the lattice potential.

D. K. C. MacDonald

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Measurements of static electrical conductivity of a dense plasma in a magnetic field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New experimental setup for generation of a non-ideal plasma, placed in a magnetic field of up to 25 T, is presented. The plasma generation technique is based on gas compression and heating behind the front of a shock wave with the use of an explosively driven linear generator. The magnetic field is produced by a discharge of a capacitor through a solenoid reeled on the generator channel. DC electrical conductivity of the plasma is determined by two and four contact techniques. Possibilities of magnetized dense plasma generation are discussed.

N S Shilkin; D S Yuriev; S V Dudin; V B Mintsev; V E Fortov

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Structural phase transitions on the nanoscale: The crucial pattern in the phase-change materials Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeTe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural phase transitions on the nanoscale: The crucial pattern in the phase-change materials Ge; published 4 December 2007 Phase-change materials are of immense importance for optical recording-increasing demands on the density, speed, and stability of memory. Phase-change PC materials already play impor- tant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale conducting channels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Peter Agre and Aquaporin Water Channels  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Peter Agre and Aquaporin Water Channels Peter Agre and Aquaporin Water Channels Resources with Additional Information Peter Agre Courtesy of Johns Hopkins University 'Peter Agre, MD received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2003 for his work with aquaporins, a family of water channel proteins found throughout nature and responsible for numerous physiological processes in humans.'1 'Dr. Agre received his BA in chemistry from Augsburg College in 1970, and his MD from Johns Hopkins in 1974. Following an Internal Medicine Residency at Case Western Reserve University Hospitals of Cleveland and a Hematology-Oncology Fellowship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dr. Agre returned to Johns Hopkins as a postdoctoral fellow in cell biology. Dr. Agre joined the faculty in 1984 and has spent most of his professional life at Hopkins' School of Medicine, leaving in 2005 to go to become Vice Chancellor for Science and Technology at Duke University Medical Center.'2

482

Renormalizing Chiral Nuclear Forces: Triplet Channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the subleading contact interactions, or counterterms, of the triplet channels of nucleon-nucleon scattering in the framework of chiral effective field theory, with S and P waves as the examples. The triplet channels are special in that it allows the singular attraction of one-pion exchange to modify Weinberg's original power counting (WPC) scheme. With renormalization group invariance as the constraint, our power counting for the triplet channels can be summarized as a modified version of naive dimensional analysis that, when compared with WPC, the subleading counterterms are enhanced as much as the leading one. More specifically, this means that WPC needs no modification in {sup 3}S{sub 1}-{sup 3}D{sub 1} and {sup 3}P{sub 1} whereas a two-order enhancement is necessary in both {sup 3}P{sub 0} and {sup 3}P{sub 2} - {sup 3}F{sub 2}.

Bingwei Long, Chieh-Jen Yang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Thermal Conductivity and Noise Attenuation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.3.4 Corrosion-resistant and high-temperature filters 9 1.3.5 Acoustic Applications 9 2. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY 2.1 THERMAL RESISTANCE 2.1.1 Thermal Conductors in Series 12 2.1.2 Thermal conductors in parallel 13 2 difference RTH Thermal resistance of conductor sb Stefan's constant T4 Temperature difference K* Total

Cambridge, University of

484

Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

"To provide requirements and guidelines for Departmental Elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), to use in developing directives, plans, and/or procedures relating to the conduct of operations at DOE facilities. The implementation of these requirements and guidelines should result in improved quality and uniformity of operations. Change 2, 10-23-2001. Canceled by DOE O 422.1.

1990-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

485

Thermal conductivity of low density carbon aerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon aerogels with densities ranging from 0.182 to 0.052 g/cm3, pore sizes ranging from 88 to 227 nm, and particle diameters ranging from 20 to 13 nm were prepared. Thermal conductivity measurements by laser fl...

Junzong Feng; Jian Feng; Changrui Zhang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

High-Frequency Conductivity of Degenerate Semiconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of high-frequency conductivity of a degenerate semiconductor is investigated by a kinetic description. The finite duration of encounters is taken into account in a self-consistent fashion which properly includes collective effects. This treatment is an extension for quantum plasmas of the Dawson-Oberman method given for classical plasmas.

Amiram Ron and Narkis Tzoar

1963-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Faculty and Staff Commute Report Conducted by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty and Staff Commute Report July 2008 Conducted by #12;Executive Summary The price of gasoline at Austin is $91.35 per month. With no relief in sight to rising gasoline prices, employees are increasingly to accommodate future vehicles, such as installing charging stations on campus for plug in cars. #12;Faculty

Yang, Zong-Liang

488

Review article Influence of electric conductivity management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review article Influence of electric conductivity management on greenhouse tomato yield and fruit quality Martine DORAISa,b*, Athanasios P. PAPADOPOULOSa, André GOSSELINb a Greenhouse and Processing Crops Horticulture, Université Laval, Sainte-Foy, QC, G1K 7P4, Canada (Received 3 August 2000; revised 6 February

Boyer, Edmond

489

IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operating experience. #12;ELTRON RESEARCH INC. Syngas Production Rate ­ 60 mL/min cm2 @ 900°C Equivalent O2IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND SEPARATION Presented by Tony Sammells for Hydrogen Production ­ Compositions ­ Feedstocks ­ Performance ­ Key Technical Hurdles · Membranes

490

Heat conductivity of a pion gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We evaluate the heat conductivity of a dilute pion gas employing the Uehling-Uehlenbeck equation and experimental phase-shifts parameterized by means of the SU(2) Inverse Amplitude Method. Our results are consistent with previous evaluations. For comparison we also give results for an (unphysical) hard sphere gas.

Antonio Dobado Gonzalez; Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Juan M. Torres Rincon

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

491

How Kondo-holes create intense nanoscale heavy-fermion hybridization disorder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the electronic structure at Kondo-holes created by substi- tuting spinless thorium atoms for magnetic uranium of the matrix element Vhðh2� for the quantum conversion of a conduction electron into an f-electron and vice

Davis, James C.

492

Sampling artifacts from conductive silicone tubing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sampling artifacts from conductive silicone tubing Sampling artifacts from conductive silicone tubing Title Sampling artifacts from conductive silicone tubing Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Timko, Michael T., Zhenhong Yu, Jesse Kroll, John T. Jayne, Douglas R. Worsnop, Richard C. Miake-Lye, Timothy B. Onasch, David Liscinsky, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Hugo Destaillats, Amara L. Holder, Jared D. Smith, and Kevin R. Wilson Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 43 Issue 9 Pagination 855-865 Date Published 06/03/2009 Abstract We report evidence that carbon impregnated conductive silicone tubing used in aerosol sampling systems can introduce two types of experimental artifacts: (1) silicon tubing dynamically absorbs carbon dioxide gas, requiring greater than 5 minutes to reach equilibrium and (2) silicone tubing emits organic contaminants containing siloxane that are adsorbed onto particles traveling through it and onto downstream quartz fiber filters. The consequence can be substantial for engine exhaust measurements as both artifacts directly impact calculations of particulate mass-based emission indices. The emission of contaminants from the silicone tubing can result in overestimation of organic particle mass concentrations based on real-time aerosol mass spectrometry and the off-line thermal analysis of quartz filters. The adsorption of siloxane contaminants can affect the surface properties of aerosol particles; we observed a marked reduction in the water-affinity of soot particles passed through conductive silicone tubing. These combined observations suggest that the silicone tubing artifacts may have wide consequence for the aerosol community and the tubing should, therefore, be used with caution. Contamination associated with the use of silicone tubing was observed at ambient temperature and, in some cases, was enhanced by mild heating (<70°C) or pre-exposure to a solvent (methanol). Further evaluation is warranted to quantify systematically how the contamination responds to variations in system temperature, physicochemical particle properties, exposure to solvent, sample contact time, tubing age, and sample flow rates.

493

Pollution control: A Houston Ship Channel issue.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. B Ibid. , p. 161. 17 following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The immediate effect on the Houston Ship Channel was a reduction in its normal maritime activity as shipping was diverted to East and West coast ports. This diversion was only... since 1951, but the study did express "some concern" with the Houston Ship Channel which it zeported was " . . . showing effects of water discharges". 5 Another point of view was expressed by Dr. Walter A. Quebedeaux. In 195/4 Dr. Quebedeaux became...

Williams, Edward Barney

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

494

Conduct of Operations Criteria, Review, & Approach Documents | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conduct of Operations Criteria, Review, & Approach Documents Conduct of Operations Criteria, Review, & Approach Documents Conduct of Operations Criteria, Review, & Approach Documents Documents Available for Download CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project

495

Appendix A: Committee on Student Conduct Hearing Procedures Committee on Student Conduct Hearing Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix A: Committee on Student Conduct Hearing Procedures Committee on Student Conduct Hearing Procedures A. Introduction B. Parties to the Complaint C. Committee and Panels D. Cases of Physical. For the purpose of these procedures, the parties are identified as the University presenter and the accused

Amin, S. Massoud

496

M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) Steady Conduction Heat Transfer 1 Steady Heat Conduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resistance of the wall. The heat transfer across the fluid/solid interface is based on Newton's law M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) Steady Conduction Heat Transfer 1 Steady Heat Conduction In thermodynamics, we considered the amount of heat transfer as a system

Bahrami, Majid

497

Effects of contact resistance on electrical conductivity measurements of SiC-based materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combination 2/4-probe method was used to measure electrical resistances across a pure, monolithic CVD-SiC disc sample with contact resistance at the SiC/metallic electrode interfaces. By comparison of the almost simultaneous 2/4-probe measurements, the specific contact resistance (Rc) and its temperature dependence were determined for two types (sputtered gold and porous nickel) electrodes from room temperature (RT) to ?973 K. The Rc-values behaved similarly for each type of metallic electrode: Rc > ?1000 ? cm2 at RT, decreasing continuously to ?1–10 ? cm2 at 973 K. The temperature dependence of the inverse Rc indicated thermally activated electrical conduction across the SiC/metallic interface with an apparent activation energy of ?0.3 eV. For the flow channel insert application in a fusion reactor blanket, contact resistance potentially could reduce the transverse electrical conductivity by about 50%.

Youngblood, Gerald E.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Henager, Charles H.

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

498

Nanoscale Imaging of Airborne Particles Mike Bogan Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diagnostics with an X-ray Laser? Lessons from the First Diagnostics with an X-ray Laser? Lessons from the First Nanoscale Imaging of Airborne Particles Mike Bogan Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA What does airborne particulate matter look like? How do we develop quantitative descriptors for particles of complex morphology? These challenges were highlighted in the NIST workshop report "Aerosol Metrology Needs for Climate Science" (Dec, 2011). Sure, we can capture aerosol particles on surfaces - removing them from their airborne state - and probe them with high resolution optical and chemical imaging tools, but what information do we lose about the airborne particles? How can we follow dynamics? In this talk we will explore these very basic questions and their importance to combustion

499

Thermalization properties at mK temperatures of a nanoscale optomechanical resonator with acoustic-bandgap shield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical measurements of a nanoscale silicon optomechanical crystal cavity with a mechanical resonance frequency of 3.6GHz are performed at sub-kelvin temperatures. We infer optical-absorption-induced heating and damping of the mechanical resonator from measurements of phonon occupancy and motional sideband asymmetry. At the lowest probe power and lowest fridge temperature (10mK), the localized mechanical resonance is found to couple at a rate of 400Hz (Q=9x10^6) to a thermal bath of temperature 270mK. These measurements indicate that silicon optomechanical crystals cooled to millikelvin temperatures should be suitable for a variety of experiments involving coherent coupling between photons and phonons at the single quanta level.

Sean M. Meenehan; Justin D. Cohen; Simon Groeblacher; Jeff T. Hill; Amir H. Safavi-Naeini; Markus Aspelmeyer; Oskar Painter

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

500

Delay of Light in an Optical Bottle Resonator with Nanoscale Radius Variation: Dispersionless, Broadband, and Low Loss  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown theoretically that an optical bottle resonator with a nanoscale radius variation can perform a multinanosecond long dispersionless delay of light in a nanometer-order bandwidth with minimal losses. Experimentally, a 3 mm long resonator with a 2.8 nm deep semiparabolic radius variation is fabricated from a 19???m radius silica fiber with a subangstrom precision. In excellent agreement with theory, the resonator exhibits the impedance-matched 2.58 ns (3 bytes) delay of 100 ps pulses with 0.44??dB/ns intrinsic loss. This is a miniature slow light delay line with the record large delay time, record small transmission loss, dispersion, and effective speed of light.

M. Sumetsky

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z