Sample records for nanoscale conducting channels

  1. Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buratto, Steve

    Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells David A area of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is investigated using conductive probe atomic particle at its end. This is due to the formation of protons, at the carbon cloth side of the cell

  2. Conductive Channel for Energy Transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apollonov, Victor V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Vavilov Str. 38, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    For many years the attempts to create conductive channels of big length were taken in order to study the upper atmosphere and to settle special tasks, related to energy transmission. There upon the program of creation of 'Impulsar' represents a great interest, as this program in a combination with high-voltage high repetition rate electrical source can be useful to solve the above mentioned problems (N. Tesla ideas for the days of high power lasers). The principle of conductive channel production can be shortly described as follows. The 'Impulsar' - laser jet engine vehicle - propulsion take place under the influence of powerful high repetition rate pulse-periodic laser radiation. In the experiments the CO{sub 2}-laser and solid state Nd:YAG laser systems had been used. Active impulse appears thanks to air breakdown (<30 km) or to the breakdown of ablated material on the board (>30 km), placed in the vicinity of the focusing mirror-acceptor of the breakdown waves. With each pulse of powerful laser the device rises up, leaving a bright and dense trace of products with high degree of ionization and metallization by conductive nano-particles due to ablation. Conductive dust plasma properties investigation in our experiments was produced by two very effective approaches: high power laser controlled ablation and by explosion of wire. Experimental and theoretical results of conductive canal modeling will be presented. The estimations show that with already experimentally demonstrated figures of specific thrust impulse the lower layers of the Ionosphere can be reached in several ten seconds that is enough to keep the high level of channel conductivity and stability with the help of high repetition rate high voltage generator. Some possible applications for new technology are highlighted.

  3. Electroosmosis in conducting nanofluidic channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Cunlu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical modeling of electroosmosis through conducting (ideally polarizable) nanochannels is reported. Based on the theory of induced charge electrokinetics, a novel nanofluidic system which possesses both adjustable ion selective characteristics and flexible flow control is proposed. Such nanofluidic devices operate only with very low gate control voltage applied on the conductive walls of nanochannels, and thus even can be energized by normal batteries. We believe that it is possible to use such metal-electrolyte configurations to overcome the difficulties met with conventional metal-isolator-electrolyte systems for nanofluidic applications.

  4. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a long time, it was thought that their chemical complexity would preclude their use in device applications. All changed in 2004 with the discovery that the interface between...

  5. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1A Month toA NewAA New RouteAA

  6. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1A Month toA NewAA New RouteAAA

  7. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1A Month toA NewAA New RouteAAAA

  8. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1A Month toA NewAA New

  9. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1A Month toA NewAA NewA New

  10. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1A Month toA NewAA NewA NewA New

  11. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced Charged-CurrentN N U A L R EAAAAAAA

  12. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced Charged-CurrentN N U A L R

  13. Free Energy Barrier for Electric Field Driven Polymer Entry into Nanoscale Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narges Nikoofard; Hossein Fazli

    2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Free energy barrier for entry of a charged polymer into a nanoscale channel by a driving electric field is studied theoretically and using molecular dynamics simulations. Dependence of the barrier height on the polymer length, the driving field strength, and the channel entrance geometry is investigated. Squeezing effect of the electric field on the polymer before its entry to the channel is taken into account. It is shown that lateral confinement of the polymer prior to its entry changes the polymer length dependence of the barrier height noticeably. Our theory and simulation results are in good agreement and reasonably describe related experimental data.

  14. Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder in a slit channel: Lubrication theory versus molecular dynamics analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmani, Amir M; Jupiterwala, Mehlam; Colosqui, Carlos E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plane Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder that is arbitrarily confined (i.e., symmetrically or asymmetrically confined) in a slit channel is studied via hydrodynamic lubrication theory and molecular dynamics simulations, considering cases where the cylinder remains static or undergoes thermal motion. Lubrication theory predictions for the drag force and volumetric flow rate are in close agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of flows having molecularly thin lubrication gaps, despite the presence of significant structural forces induced by the crystalline structure of the modeled solid. While the maximum drag force is observed in symmetric confinement, i.e., when the cylinder is equidistant from both channel walls, the drag decays significantly as the cylinder moves away from the channel centerline and approaches a wall. Hence, significant reductions in the mean drag force on the cylinder and hydraulic resistance of the channel can be observed when thermal motion induces random off-center displace...

  15. The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, J K; Herberg, J L; Wu, Y; Schwegler, E; Mehta, A

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

  16. Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder in a slit channel: Lubrication theory versus molecular dynamics analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir M. Rahmani; Yang Shao; Mehlam Jupiterwala; Carlos E. Colosqui

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Plane Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder that is arbitrarily confined (i.e., symmetrically or asymmetrically confined) in a slit channel is studied via hydrodynamic lubrication theory and molecular dynamics simulations, considering cases where the cylinder remains static or undergoes thermal motion. Lubrication theory predictions for the drag force and volumetric flow rate are in close agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of flows having molecularly thin lubrication gaps, despite the presence of significant structural forces induced by the crystalline structure of the modeled solid. While the maximum drag force is observed in symmetric confinement, i.e., when the cylinder is equidistant from both channel walls, the drag decays significantly as the cylinder moves away from the channel centerline and approaches a wall. Hence, significant reductions in the mean drag force on the cylinder and hydraulic resistance of the channel can be observed when thermal motion induces random off-center displacements. Analytical expressions and numerical results in this work provide useful insights into the hydrodynamics of colloidal solids and macromolecules in confinement.

  17. Conductance matrix of multiterminal semiconductor devices with edge channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilovskii, E. Yu., E-mail: danilovskii@mail.ioffe.ru; Bagraev, N. T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the conductance matrix of multiterminal semiconductor structures with edge channels is proposed. The method is based on the solution of a system of linear algebraic equations based on Kirchhoff equations, made up of potential differences U{sub ij} measured at stabilized currents I{sub kl}, where i, j, k, l are terminal numbers. The matrix obtained by solving the system of equations completely describes the structure under study, reflecting its configuration and homogeneity. This method can find wide application when using the known Landauer-Buttiker formalism to analyze carrier transport in the quantum Hall effect and quantum spin Hall effect modes. Within the proposed method, the contribution of the contact area resistances R{sub c} to the formation of conductance matrix elements is taken into account. The possibilities of practical application of the results obtained in developing analog cryptographic devices are considered.

  18. Proton-Conducting Films of Nanoscale Ribbons Formed by Exfoliation of the Layer Perovskite H2SrTa2O7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proton-Conducting Films of Nanoscale Ribbons Formed by Exfoliation of the Layer Perovskite H2SrTa2OTa2O7 were grown and characterized as solid-state proton conductors. The ribbons, made by exfoliation membranes made from layered materials such as exfoliated zirconium phosphate.12 Unfortunately, the proton

  19. Nanoscale size dependence parameters on lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamand, S.M., E-mail: soran.mamand@univsul.net [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Sulaimani, Sulaimanyah, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq); Omar, M.S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq)] [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq); Muhammad, A.J. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Kirkuk, Kirkuk (Iraq)] [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Kirkuk, Kirkuk (Iraq)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Temperature dependence of calculated lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A modified Callaway model is used to calculate lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A direct method is used to calculate phonon group velocity for these nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-Gruneisen parameter, surface roughness, and dislocations are successfully investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dislocation densities are decreases with the decrease of wires diameter. -- Abstract: A detailed calculation of lattice thermal conductivity of freestanding Wurtzite GaN nanowires with diameter ranging from 97 to 160 nm in the temperature range 2-300 K, was performed using a modified Callaway model. Both longitudinal and transverse modes are taken into account explicitly in the model. A method is used to calculate the Debye and phonon group velocities for different nanowire diameters from their related melting points. Effect of Gruneisen parameter, surface roughness, and dislocations as structure dependent parameters are successfully used to correlate the calculated values of lattice thermal conductivity to that of the experimentally measured curves. It was observed that Gruneisen parameter will decrease with decreasing nanowire diameters. Scattering of phonons is assumed to be by nanowire boundaries, imperfections, dislocations, electrons, and other phonons via both normal and Umklapp processes. Phonon confinement and size effects as well as the role of dislocation in limiting thermal conductivity are investigated. At high temperatures and for dislocation densities greater than 10{sup 14} m{sup -2} the lattice thermal conductivity would be limited by dislocation density, but for dislocation densities less than 10{sup 14} m{sup -2}, lattice thermal conductivity would be independent of that.

  20. Estimation of body composition in channel catfish utilizing relative weight and total body electrical conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Francisco

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESTIMATION OF BODY COMPOSITION IN CHANNEL CATFISH UTILIZING RELATIVE WEIGHT AND TOTAL BODY ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY A Thesis by FRANCISCO JARAMILLO, JR. Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences ESTIMATION OF BODY COMPOSITION IN CHANNEL CATFISH UTILIZING RELATIVE WEIGHT AND TOTAL BODY ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY A Thesis...

  1. Measurement of the electronic thermal conductance channels and heat capacity of graphene at low temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement of the electronic thermal conductance channels and heat capacity of graphene at low, Gwf , test the Wiedemann-Franz (wf) law, and infer the electronic heat capacity, with a minimum value of a Coulomb-interacting electron-hole plasma may result in deviations from the Fermi-liquid values of the Mott

  2. Effect of an organic molecular coating on control over the conductance of carbon nanotube channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobrinetskiy, I. I.; Emelianov, A. V.; Nevolin, V. K., E-mail: vkn@miee.ru; Romashkin, A. V. [National Research University “Moscow Institute of Electronic Technology” (MIET) (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the coating of carbon nanotubes with molecules with a constant dipole moment changes the conductance of the tubes due to a variation in the structure of energy levels that participate in charge transport. The I–V characteristics of the investigated structures exhibit significant dependence of the channel conductance on the gate potential. The observed memory effect of conductance level can be explained by the rearrangement of polar groups and molecules as a whole in an electric field. The higher the dipole moment per unit length and the weaker the intermolecular interaction, the faster the rearrangement process is.

  3. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA); Regan, Brian C. (Los Angeles, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA)

    2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  4. Engineering the (In, Al, Ga)N back-barrier to achieve high channel-conductivity for extremely scaled channel-thicknesses in N-polar GaN high-electron-mobility-transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jing, E-mail: jing@ece.ucsb.edu; Zheng, Xun; Guidry, Matthew; Denninghoff, Dan; Ahmadi, Elahe; Lal, Shalini; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); DenBaars, Steven P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Scaling down the channel-thickness (t{sub ch}) in GaN/(In, Al, Ga)N high-electron-mobility-transistors (HEMTs) is essential to eliminating short-channel effects in sub 100?nm gate length HEMTs. However, this scaling can degrade both charge density (n{sub s}) and mobility (?), thereby reducing channel-conductivity. In this study, the back-barrier design in N-polar GaN/(In, Al, Ga)N was engineered to achieve highly conductive-channels with t{sub ch}?channel-conductivity for structures with t{sub ch}???3-nm. For a HEMT with 3-nm-thick-channel, a sheet-resistance of 329 ?/? and a peak-transconductance of 718 mS/mm were demonstrated.

  5. Nanoscale In Situ Characterization of Li-ion Battery Electrochemistry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale In Situ Characterization of Li-ion Battery Electrochemistry via Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy A. L. Lipson, R. S. Ginder, and M. C. Hersam, Northwestern University...

  6. STEM characterization on silica nanowires with new mesopore structures by space-confined self-assembly within nano-scale channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Peng [University of Cincinnati; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL; Shi, Donglu [University of Cincinnati; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical channel diameters were found (below which space confinement takes effect, leading to more uniform and ordered mesopore structures) in the study of evaporation-induced coassembly of triblock-copolymer (P123) and silica molecular precursors (TEOS, tetraethyl orthosilicate) by employing channels in anodized aluminum oxide (AAO, 13 200 nm channel diameter) and in track-etched polycarbonate (EPC, 10 80 nm channel diameter) and for the first time we have observed a new mesopore structure (i.e., packed hollow spheres) in silica nanowires formed in AAO channels with diameters from 30 to 80 nm.

  7. Nuclear fission as resonance-mediated conductance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. F. Bertsch

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    For 75 years the theory of nuclear fission has been based on the existence of a collective coordinate associated with the nuclear shape, an assumption required by the Bohr-Wheeler formula as well as by the R-matrix theory of fission. We show that it is also possible to formulate the theory without the help of collective coordinates. In the new formulation, fission is facilitated by individual states in the barrier region rather than channels over the barrier. In a certain limit the theory reduces to a formula closely related to the formula for electronic conductance through resonant tunneling states. In contrast, conduction through channels gives rise to a staircase excitation function that is well-known in nanoscale electronics but has never been seen in nuclear fission.

  8. Probing Nanoscale Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Fluctuation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Fluctuation Dynamics using Correalted AFM and Confocal Ultramicroscopy. Probing Nanoscale Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Fluctuation...

  9. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahill, David G., E-mail: d-cahill@illinois.edu; Braun, Paul V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Chen, Gang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Clarke, David R. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Fan, Shanhui [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Goodson, Kenneth E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Keblinski, Pawel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); King, William P. [Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Mahan, Gerald D. [Department of Physics, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Majumdar, Arun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Maris, Humphrey J. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Phillpot, Simon R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainseville, Florida 32611 (United States); Pop, Eric [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Shi, Li [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, Autin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ?1?nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and thermal analysis using proximal probes has achieved spatial resolution of 10?nm, temperature precision of 50 mK, sensitivity to heat flows of 10 pW, and the capability for thermal analysis of sub-femtogram samples.

  10. Supersymmetry Across Nanoscale Heterojunction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Bagchi; A. Ganguly; A. Sinha

    2010-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that supersymmetric transformation could be applied across the heterojunction formed by joining of two mixed semiconductors. A general framework is described by specifying the structure of ladder operators at the junction for making quantitative estimation of physical quantities. For a particular heterojunction device, we show that an exponential grading inside a nanoscale doped layer is amenable to exact analytical treatment for a class of potentials distorted by the junctions through the solutions of transformed Morse-Type potentials.

  11. Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Lithium-Ion Anodes Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Lithium-Ion Anodes 2012 DOE...

  12. Nanoscale mass conveyors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, Brian C. (Oakland, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

    2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass transport method and device for individually delivering chargeable atoms or molecules from source particles is disclosed. It comprises a channel; at least one source particle of chargeable material fixed to the surface of the channel at a position along its length; a means of heating the channel; and a means for applying an controllable electric field along the channel, whereby the device transports the atoms or molecules along the channel in response to applied electric field. In a preferred embodiment, the mass transport device will comprise a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT), although other one dimensional structures may also be used. The MWNT or other structure acts as a channel for individual or small collections of atoms due to the atomic smoothness of the material. Also preferred is a source particle of a metal such as indium. The particles move by dissociation into small units, in some cases, individual atoms. The particles are preferably less than 100 nm in size.

  13. Microfluidics and Nanoscale Research Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microfluidics and Nanoscale Science Research Profile Our research group is engaged in a broad range of activities in the general area of microfluidics and nanoscale science. At a primary level, our interest that when compared to macroscale tech- nology, microfluidic systems engender a number of distinct advantages

  14. Nanotribology and Nanoscale Friction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Yi [Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey; Qu, Zhihua [University of Central Florida, Orlando; Braiman, Yehuda [ORNL; Zhang, Zhenyu [ORNL; Barhen, Jacob [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tribology is the science and technology of contacting solid surfaces in relative motion, including the study of lubricants, lubrication, friction, wear, and bearings. It is estimated that friction and wear cost the U.S. economy 6% of the gross national product (Persson, 2000). For example, 5% of the total energy generated in an automobile engine is lost to frictional resistance. The study of nanoscale friction has a technological impact in reducing energy loss in machines, in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and in the development of durable, low-friction surfaces and ultra-thin lubrication films.

  15. Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electronEnergy ManufacturingMapping the Nanoscale

  16. Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electronEnergy ManufacturingMapping the NanoscaleMapping

  17. Nanopatterned Electrically Conductive Films of Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mentzel, Tamar

    We present the first semiconductor nanocrystal films of nanoscale dimensions that are electrically conductive and crack-free. These films make it possible to study the electrical properties intrinsic to the nanocrystals ...

  18. Nanoscale heat transfer - from computation to experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Tengfei

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer can differ distinctly at the nanoscale from that at the macroscale. Recent advancement in

  19. Nanoscale data storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Li

    2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of this article is to review the development of ultrahigh-density, nanoscale data storage, i.e., nanostorage. As a fundamentally new type of storage system, the recording mechanisms of nanostorage may be completely different to those of the traditional devices. Currently, two types of molecules are being studied for potential application in nanostorage. One is molecular electronic elements including molecular wires, rectifiers, switches, and transistors. The other approach employs nanostructured materials such as nanotubes, nanowires, and nanoparticles. The challenges for nanostorage are not only the materials, ultrahigh data-densities, fabrication-costs, device operating temperatures and large-scale integration, but also the development of the physical principles and models. There are already some breakthroughs obtained, but it is still unclear what kind of nanostorage systems can ultimately replace the current silicon based transistors. A promising candidate may be a molecular-nanostructure hybrid device with sub-5 nm dimensions.

  20. Hierarchical Assembly and Compliance of Aligned Nanoscale Polymer Cylinders in Confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    beyond the confined channel volumes. This graphoepitaxial methodology can be exploited in hybrid hard/soft-organize at these length scales. For this reason, hybrid systems where soft matter self-organizes into a nanoscale template analysis of the capacity of this system to accommodate lithographic defects and observations of alignment

  1. NANOSCALE STRUCTURALAND MAGNETIC CHARACTERIZATION USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    of novel nanoscale storage devices and sensors. However, for successful utilization, it is essential]. Such unique properties of magnetic thin films and nanostructures hold great promise for the development to the characterization of nanostructured magnetic materials. 2. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY METHODS In the transmission electron

  2. Bridging conduction and radiation : investigating thermal transport in nanoscale gaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiloyan, Vazrik

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Near field radiation transfer between objects separated by small gaps is a widely studied field in heat transfer and has become more important than ever. Many technologies such as heat assisted magnetic recording, aerogels, ...

  3. Nanoscale heat conduction with applications in nanoelectronics and thermoelectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Ronggui, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the device or structure characteristic length scales are comparable to the mean free path and wavelength of energy carriers (electrons, photons, phonons, and molecules) or the time of interest is on the same order as ...

  4. Thermal Conductivity Spectroscopy Technique to Measure Phonon Mean Free Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, A. J.

    Size effects in heat conduction, which occur when phonon mean free paths (MFPs) are comparable to characteristic lengths, are being extensively explored in many nanoscale systems for energy applications. Knowledge of MFPs ...

  5. Experimental investigations of solid-solid thermal interface conductance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Kimberlee C. (Kimberlee Chiyoko)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding thermal interface conductance is important for nanoscale systems where interfaces can play a critical role in heat transport. In this thesis, pump and probe transient thermoreflectance methods are used to ...

  6. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the...

  7. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When...

  8. Nanoscale patterning of graphene through femtosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahin, R.; Akturk, S., E-mail: selcuk.akturk@itu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak 34469, Istanbul (Turkey); Simsek, E. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on nanometer-scale patterning of single layer graphene on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate through femtosecond laser ablation. The pulse fluence is adjusted around the single-pulse ablation threshold of graphene. It is shown that, even though both SiO{sub 2} and Si have more absorption in the linear regime compared to graphene, the substrate can be kept intact during the process. This is achieved by scanning the sample under laser illumination at speeds yielding a few numbers of overlapping pulses at a certain point, thereby effectively shielding the substrate. By adjusting laser fluence and translation speed, 400?nm wide ablation channels could be achieved over 100??m length. Raster scanning of the sample yields well-ordered periodic structures, provided that sufficient gap is left between channels. Nanoscale patterning of graphene without substrate damage is verified with Scanning Electron Microscope and Raman studies.

  9. Formation of Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous Solid Films of Methanol and Ethanol. Formation of Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous Solid Films of...

  10. Site-Specific Raman Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics of Nanoscale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Raman Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics of Nanoscale Interstitial Systems. Site-Specific Raman Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics of Nanoscale Interstitial Systems. Abstract:...

  11. ORNL microscopy pencils patterns in polymers at the nanoscale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (865) 574-7308 ORNL microscopy pencils patterns in polymers at the nanoscale Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers used atomic force microscopy to draw nanoscale patterns in a...

  12. Nanoscale Surface Topography to Guide Bone Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanoscale Surface Topography to Guide Bone Growth P R O J E C T L E A D E R : Jirun Sun (American T S Designed and fabricated devices with nanoscale surface topography. Controlled cell alignment by varying the height and aspect ratio of the surface features. R E F E R E N C E Exploring cellular contact guidance

  13. Oxygen Detection via Nanoscale Optical Indicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Ruby N.

    Oxygen Detection via Nanoscale Optical Indicators Ruby N. Ghosh Dept. of Physics Michigan State University East Lansing, MI, USA weekschr@msu.edu Abstract--Oxygen plays a ubiquitous role in terrestrial developed an optical technique for monitoring oxygen in both gas and liquid phases utilizing nanoscale metal

  14. Mesoscale Metallic Pyramids with Nanoscale Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odom, Teri W.

    Mesoscale Metallic Pyramids with Nanoscale Tips Joel Henzie, Eun-Soo Kwak, and Teri W. Odom generate free-standing mesoscale metallic pyramids composed of one or more materials and having nanoscale tips (radii of curvature of less than 2 nm). Mesoscale holes (100-300 nm) in a chromium film are used

  15. A robust, scanning quantum system for nanoscale sensing and imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Maletinsky; S. Hong; M. S. Grinolds; B. Hausmann; M. D. Lukin; R. -L. Walsworth; M. Loncar; A. Yacoby

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Controllable atomic-scale quantum systems hold great potential as sensitive tools for nanoscale imaging and metrology. Possible applications range from nanoscale electric and magnetic field sensing to single photon microscopy, quantum information processing, and bioimaging. At the heart of such schemes is the ability to scan and accurately position a robust sensor within a few nanometers of a sample of interest, while preserving the sensor's quantum coherence and readout fidelity. These combined requirements remain a challenge for all existing approaches that rely on direct grafting of individual solid state quantum systems or single molecules onto scanning-probe tips. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication and room temperature operation of a robust and isolated atomic-scale quantum sensor for scanning probe microscopy. Specifically, we employ a high-purity, single-crystalline diamond nanopillar probe containing a single Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) color center. We illustrate the versatility and performance of our scanning NV sensor by conducting quantitative nanoscale magnetic field imaging and near-field single-photon fluorescence quenching microscopy. In both cases, we obtain imaging resolution in the range of 20 nm and sensitivity unprecedented in scanning quantum probe microscopy.

  16. Concentration Polarization and Nonlinear Electrokinetic Flow near a Nanofluidic Channel Sung Jae Kim,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concentration Polarization and Nonlinear Electrokinetic Flow near a Nanofluidic Channel Sung Jae within nanofluidic channels, with critical dimensions of 10­100 nm, have drawn a lot of attention,3], nanofluidic channels can be an ideal, well-controlled experimental platform to study nanoscale molecular

  17. Free-Solution Oligonucleotide Separation in Nanoscale Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago, Juan G.

    Michael G. Kattah, Jonathan B. Steinman, and Paul J. Utz MedicinesImmunology and Rheumatology, Stanford) Chou, C. F.; Austin, R. H.; Bakajin, O.; Tegenfeldt, J. O.; Castelino, J. A.; Chan, S. S.; Cox, E. C

  18. Role of Penning ionization in the enhancement of streamer channel conductivity and Ar(1s{sub 5}) production in a He-Ar plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, Brian L. [UES, Inc., 4401 Dayton-Xenia Rd., Dayton, Ohio 45432 (United States); Huang, Shih K.; Speltz, Jared W.; Niekamp, Matthew A. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, Ohio 45435 (United States); Ganguly, Biswa N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, 1950 5th St. Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2013-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma jet devices that use a helium gas flow mixed with a small percentage of argon have been shown to operate with a larger discharge current and enhanced production of the Ar(1s{sub 5}) metastable state, particularly in the discharge afterglow. In this experiment, time-resolved quantitative measurements of He(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) and Ar(1s{sub 5}) metastable species were combined with current and spectrally resolved emission measurements to elucidate the role of Penning ionization in a helium plasma jet with a variable argon admixture. The plasma jet was enclosed in a glass chamber through which a flowing nitrogen background was maintained at 600 Torr. At 3%-5% Ar admixture, we observed a {approx}50% increase in the peak circuit current and streamer velocity relative to a pure helium plasma jet for the same applied voltage. The streamer initiation delay also decreased by {approx}20%. Penning ionization of ground-state argon was found to be the dominant quenching pathway for He(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) up to 2% Ar and was directly correlated with a sharp increase in both the circuit current and afterglow production of Ar(1s{sub 5}) for Ar admixtures up to 1%, but not necessarily with the streamer velocity, which increased more gradually with Ar concentration. Ar(1s{sub 5}) was produced in the afterglow through recombination of Ar{sup +} and dissociative recombination of Ar{sub 2}{sup +} as the local mean electron energy decreased in the plasma channel behind the streamer head. The discharge current and argon metastable enhancement are contingent on the rapid production of He(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) near the streamer head, >5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} in 30 ns under the conditions of this experiment.

  19. Proton channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Diat; G. Gebel

    2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of Nafion, the polymer electrolyte membrane used in some fuel cells, has been extensively debated over recent decades. Now, a newly proposed model reveals the nanoscale arrangement that could explain the excellent transport properties of the material.

  20. Nanoscale Strainability of Graphene by Laser Shock-Induced Three-Dimensional Shaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yong P.

    Nanoscale Strainability of Graphene by Laser Shock-Induced Three- Dimensional Shaping Ji Li,, Ting, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, United States ABSTRACT: Graphene has many promising physical properties. It has been discovered that local strain in a graphene sheet can alter its conducting properties

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Nanoscale Effects on Heterojunction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CoreShell Nanowires Nanoscale Effects on Heterojunction Electron Gases in GaNAlGaN CoreShell Nanowires Jeff Tsao participates in "Energy Efficiency and the Rebound Effect"...

  2. NANOSCALE OPTICAL COMPUTING USING RESONANCE ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebeck, Alvin R.

    OPTICAL COMPUTING USING RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER LOGIC A NEW NANOSCALE DEVICE BASED ON A SINGLE-MOLECULE OPTICAL PHENOMENON CALLED RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER. THIS DEVICE ENABLES A COMPLETE INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY, PROVIDING A POTENTIAL PATH TO MOLECULAR-SCALE COMPUTING

  3. Dopant Distribution, Oxygen Stoichiometry and Magnetism of Nanoscale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dopant Distribution, Oxygen Stoichiometry and Magnetism of Nanoscale Sn0.99Co0.01O. Dopant Distribution, Oxygen Stoichiometry and Magnetism of Nanoscale Sn0.99Co0.01O. Abstract: In...

  4. Parallel optical nanolithography using nanoscale bowtie aperture array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Parallel optical nanolithography using nanoscale bowtie aperture array Sreemanth M.V. Uppuluri of parallel optical nanolithography using nanoscale bowtie aperture array. These nanoscale bowtie aperture1805 photoresist. An interference-based optical alignment system was employed to position the bowtie

  5. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruckNanostructued Glass-Ceramic Waste FormsNanoscaleNanoscale

  6. Implications of Channelization and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    · Dams · Highways · Irrigation · Levees · Oilfield Canals · Channelization Reasons for Channelization

  7. Contacts Integration into functional nanoscale devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metlushko, Vitali

    from the very beginning of the design process. While the properties of nano-scale magnetic devices by magnetoresistive random- access memory (MRAM). The design challenges faced by CMOS and MRAM are very similar of this, the topographical influence of contacts on the overlying magnetic device must be taken account

  8. Nanoscale Thermal Transport andMicrorefrigeratorsonaChip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be cooled down by 20 C­30 C. Finally we will review some of the more exotic techniques hotter than the rest of the chip. Most of the conventional cooling techniques can be used to coolINVITED P A P E R Nanoscale Thermal Transport andMicrorefrigeratorsonaChip Devices for cooling high

  9. LAMELLAR MAGNETISM ASSOCIATED WITH NANOSCALE EXSOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    LAMELLAR MAGNETISM ASSOCIATED WITH NANOSCALE EXSOLUTION IN THE ILMENITE-HEMATITE SOLID SOLUTION-hematite (FeTiO3-Fe2O3) solid solution is one of the most important magnetic phases in nature. Unusual magnetic, magnetic ordering, and exsolution. This presentation describes how this interaction leads to the phenomenon

  10. Nanolithography Using High Transmission Nanoscale Bowtie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Nanolithography Using High Transmission Nanoscale Bowtie Apertures Liang Wang, Sreemanth M demonstrate that bowtie apertures can be used for contact lithography to achieve nanometer scale resolution. The bowtie apertures with a 30 nm gap size are fabricated in aluminum thin films coated on quartz substrates

  11. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Jianhua (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Russell, Scott (California State University, Stanislaus, Turlock, CA); Morishetti, Kiran (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  12. Trapping atoms using nanoscale quantum vacuum forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. E. Chang; K. Sinha; J. M. Taylor; H. J. Kimble

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum vacuum forces dictate the interaction between individual atoms and dielectric surfaces at nanoscale distances. For example, their large strengths typically overwhelm externally applied forces, which makes it challenging to controllably interface cold atoms with nearby nanophotonic systems. Here, we show that it is possible to tailor the vacuum forces themselves to provide strong trapping potentials. The trapping scheme takes advantage of the attractive ground state potential and adiabatic dressing with an excited state whose potential is engineered to be resonantly enhanced and repulsive. This procedure yields a strong metastable trap, with the fraction of excited state population scaling inversely with the quality factor of the resonance of the dielectric structure. We analyze realistic limitations to the trap lifetime and discuss possible applications that might emerge from the large trap depths and nanoscale confinement.

  13. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, Bradley R. (Brentwood, CA); Talley, Chad E. (Brentwood, CA)

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  14. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  15. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruckNanostructued Glass-Ceramic Waste FormsNanoscale

  16. Nano-scale strengthening from grains, subgrains, and particles in Fe-based alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesuer, D. R.; Syn, C. K.; Sherby, O. D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    x ULTRAFINE GRAINED MATERIALS Nano-scale strengthening fromSpringerlink.com Abstract Nano-scale strengthening has beenless than 20 h), develop nano-scale subgrains [15]. These

  17. Nano-scale magnetic film formation by decompression of supercritical CO?/ferric acetylacetonate solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Dea, Silvia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GROWTH OF NANO-SCALE MAGNETIC FILMS USING CO 2 RESS EX-113 GROWTH OF NANO-SCALE MAGNETIC FILMS USING A SUPERCRIT-of EDX analysis on nano-scale ?lms. . . . . . . . . . . 109

  18. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  19. Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (EFRC) - Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary The objective of the DOE Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (NCGC) is to use new investigative tools, combined with experiments...

  20. Nanoscale Phase Separation, Cation Ordering, and Surface Oxygen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    been identified to be attributed to the oxygen deficiency near the particle surfaces. Characterization of the nanoscale phase separation and cation ordering in the pristine...

  1. Postdoctoral Research Associate Imaging and Nanoscale Characterization Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Qian Li Postdoctoral Research Associate Imaging and Nanoscale Characterization Group Center-ion battery and fuel cell materials. 2. Surface Charge and Polarization Dynamics of Ferroelectrics The surface

  2. Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities User Facilities Dev X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for...

  3. Nanoscale Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell Evolution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell Evolution of Gold-Platinum Nanoparticles and Their Electrocatalytic Effect Nanoscale Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell...

  4. Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage Lithium-Manganese Rich NMC Composite Cathodes with Cycling Friday, August 29, 2014 Renewable energy is critical for the...

  5. Nanoscale Phase Transitions under Extreme Conditions within an...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    under extreme conditions. Citation: Zhang J, M Lang, RC Ewing, R Devanathan, WJ Weber, and M Toulemonde.2010."Nanoscale Phase Transitions under Extreme Conditions within an...

  6. Nanoscale engineering boosts performance of quantum dot light...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum dot light emitting diodes Nanoscale engineering boosts performance of quantum dot light emitting diodes Quantum dots are nano-sized semiconductor particles whose emission...

  7. Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Calcium and Strontium Titanate Perovskites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, Sulata Kumari

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and A. Navrotsky, “Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Lead Titanate2007. A. Navrotsky, “Thermodynamics of Solid Electrolytesand Y. Fei, “The Thermodynamics of Ordered Perovskites on

  8. High-Efficiency, Self-Concentrating Nanoscale Solar Cell - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to Search High-Efficiency, Self-Concentrating Nanoscale Solar Cell Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact...

  9. Thermal and Non-thermal Physiochemical Processes in Nanoscale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanoscale films of ASW at low temperatures. To study the transport properties (viscosity, diffusivity), the amorphous films can be heated above their glass transition...

  10. Novel materials, computational spectroscopy, and multiscale simulation in nanoscale photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardi, Marco, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells convert solar energy to electricity using combinations of semiconducting sunlight absorbers and metallic materials as electrical contacts. Novel nanoscale materials introduce new paradigms for ...

  11. Electrically Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase Multiferroics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Q.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase2001). Chakhalian, J. et al. Magnetism at the interfacelocal nature of this magnetism. We find that the spontaneous

  12. Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    a Glance All User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) BER User...

  13. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have...

  14. Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with polarized X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stoehr and H.C. Siegmann, „Magnetism”, Springer (2006) [93]Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials withABSTRACT Nanoscale magnetism is of paramount scientific

  15. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; Han, Myung-Guen; Chen, Hanghui; Zhu, Yimei; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this work, we describe an oxide/ oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr??.?Ti?.?O?-LaNiO? where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly,more »in one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7-eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.« less

  16. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Matthew S. J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Malashevich, Andrei [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Disa, Ankit S. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Han, Myung-Guen [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Chen, Hanghui [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Walker, Frederick J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Ahn, Charles H. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States);

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this work, we describe an oxide/ oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr??.?Ti?.?O?-LaNiO? where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly, in one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7-eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.

  17. Measuring oxygen reduction/evolution reactions on the nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kumar, Amit [ORNL; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Ciucci, Francesco [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of fuel cells and metal-air batteries is significantly limited by the activation of oxygen reduction and evolution reactions (ORR/OER). Despite the well-recognized role of oxygen reaction kinetics on the viability of energy technologies, the governing mechanisms remain elusive and until now addressable only by macroscopic studies. This lack of nanoscale understanding precludes optimization of material architecture. Here we report direct measurements of oxygen reduction/evolution reactions and oxygen vacancy diffusion on oxygen-ion conductive solid surfaces with sub-10 nanometer resolution. In electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), the biased scanning probe microscopy tip acts as a moving, electrocatalytically active probe exploring local electrochemical activity. The probe concentrates an electric field in a nanometer-scale volume of material, and bias-induced, picometer-level surface displacements provide information on local electrochemical processes. Systematic mapping of oxygen activity on bare and Pt-functionalized yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) surfaces is demonstrated. This approach allows directly visualization of ORR/OER activation process at the triple-phase boundary, and can be extended to broad spectrum of oxygen-conductive and electrocatalytic materials.

  18. Conductive Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohnert, G.W.

    2002-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroluminescent devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and high-energy density batteries. These new polymers offer cost savings, weight reduction, ease of processing, and inherent rugged design compared to conventional semiconductor materials. The photovoltaic industry has grown more than 30% during the past three years. Lightweight, flexible solar modules are being used by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps for field power units. LEDs historically used for indicator lights are now being investigated for general lighting to replace fluorescent and incandescent lights. These so-called solid-state lights are becoming more prevalent across the country since they produce efficient lighting with little heat generation. Conductive polymers are being sought for battery development as well. Considerable weight savings over conventional cathode materials used in secondary storage batteries make portable devices easier to carry and electric cars more efficient and nimble. Secondary battery sales represent an $8 billion industry annually. The purpose of the project was to synthesize and characterize conductive polymers. TRACE Photonics Inc. has researched critical issues which affect conductivity. Much of their work has focused on production of substituted poly(phenylenevinylene) compounds. These compounds exhibit greater solubility over the parent polyphenylenevinylene, making them easier to process. Alkoxy substituted groups evaluated during this study included: methoxy, propoxy, and heptyloxy. Synthesis routes for production of alkoxy-substituted poly phenylenevinylene were developed. Considerable emphasis was placed on final product yield and purity.

  19. Exciton-Plasmon States in Nanoscale Materials: Breakdown of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Andrea

    Exciton-Plasmon States in Nanoscale Materials: Breakdown of the Tamm-Dancoff Approximation Myrta propagating only forward in time. However, we show that in nanoscale materials excitons and plasmons hybridize, creating exciton-plasmon states where the electron-hole pairs oscillate back and forth in time. Then

  20. Nanoscale replicas DOI: 10.1002/smll.200600507

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jie

    Nanoscale replicas DOI: 10.1002/smll.200600507 Supramolecular Nanomimetics: Replication of Micelles. Samulski, Edward T. Samulski, and Joseph M. DeSimone* Naturally occurring supramolecular objects-assembly"-driven approaches can be tremendously successful in controlling nanoscale shape in organic and inorganic materials

  1. Novel Nanoscale Materials Reduce Electricity Needed for Sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This project researches the use of nanoscale materials (a broadly defined set of substances that haveNovel Nanoscale Materials Reduce Electricity Needed for Sludge Dewatering Industrial process, requiring up to 6000 kilowatt hours/year per million gallons per day. Project Description

  2. www.rsc.org/nanoscale ISSN 2040-3364

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    morphology of the photoactive layer. The nanoscale interpenetrating networks composed of nanostructured donor organization and nanoscale morphology for high performance low bandgap polymer solar cells Volume 6 Number 8 21 performance low bandgap polymer solar cells Ming He,a Mengye Wang,ab Changjian Linb and Zhiqun Lin*a Rational

  3. Method to determine thermal profiles of nanoscale circuitry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K; Begtrup, Gavi E

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A platform that can measure the thermal profiles of devices with nanoscale resolution has been developed. The system measures the local temperature by using an array of nanoscale thermometers. This process can be observed in real time using a high resolution imagining technique such as electron microscopy. The platform can operate at extremely high temperatures.

  4. Nanopatterning using NSOM probes integrated with high transmission nanoscale bowtie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Nanopatterning using NSOM probes integrated with high transmission nanoscale bowtie aperture experimental demonstration of field enhancement using such ridge antenna apertures in a bowtie shape integrated with nanoscale bowtie aperture. Consistent lines with width of 59 nm and as small as 24 nm have

  5. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruckNanostructued Glass-Ceramic Waste FormsNanoscale Chemical

  6. Surface-Charge-Governed Ion Transport in Nanofluidic Channels Derek Stein, Maarten Kruithof, and Cees Dekker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekker, Cees

    Surface-Charge-Governed Ion Transport in Nanofluidic Channels Derek Stein, Maarten Kruithof the role of surface charge in governing conductance at low salt concentrations. Nanofluidic channels [Fig

  7. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  8. Nanoscale Charge Transport in Excitonic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Bommisetty, South Dakota State University

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Excitonic solar cells, including all-organic, hybrid organic-inorganic and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), offer strong potential for inexpensive and large-area solar energy conversion. Unlike traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, where all the charge generation and collection processes are well understood, these excitonic solar cells contain extremely disordered structures with complex interfaces which results in large variations in nanoscale electronic properties and has a strong influence on carrier generation, transport, dissociation and collection. Detailed understanding of these processes is important for fabrication of highly efficient solar cells. Efforts to improve efficiency are underway at a large number of research groups throughout the world focused on inorganic and organic semiconductors, photonics, photophysics, charge transport, nanoscience, ultrafast spectroscopy, photonics, semiconductor processing, device physics, device structures, interface structure etc. Rapid progress in this multidisciplinary area requires strong synergetic efforts among researchers from diverse backgrounds. Such effort can lead to novel methods for development of new materials with improved photon harvesting and interfacial treatments for improved carrier transport, process optimization to yield ordered nanoscale morphologies with well defined electronic structures.

  9. Jaszczak et al. 1 MICRO-AND NANO-SCALE GRAPHITE CONES AND TUBES FROM HACKMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaszczak, John A.

    of micro- and nano-scale RGS. The largest of the RGS are hollow scrolls, with the c-axis predominantly at the micro- and nano-scales. The nano-scale cones tend not to be hollow and may have a cone-helix structureJaszczak et al. 1 MICRO- AND NANO-SCALE GRAPHITE CONES AND TUBES FROM HACKMAN VALLEY, KOLA

  10. Channel Meander Migration in Large-Scale Physical Model Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Po Hung

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of large-scale laboratory experiments were conducted to study channel meander migration. Factors affecting the migration of banklines, including the ratio of curvature to channel width, bend angle, and the Froude ...

  11. Control of friction at the nanoscale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barhen, Jacob; Braiman, Yehuda Y.; Protopopescu, Vladimir

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for control of friction at the nanoscale. A method of controlling frictional dynamics of a plurality of particles using non-Lipschitzian control includes determining an attribute of the plurality of particles; calculating an attribute deviation by subtracting the attribute of the plurality of particles from a target attribute; calculating a non-Lipschitzian feedback control term by raising the attribute deviation to a fractionary power .xi.=(2m+1)/(2n+1) where n=1, 2, 3 . . . and m=0, 1, 2, 3 . . . , with m strictly less than n and then multiplying by a control amplitude; and imposing the non-Lipschitzian feedback control term globally on each of the plurality of particles; imposing causes a subsequent magnitude of the attribute deviation to be reduced.

  12. Carbon-bearing fluids at nanoscale interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, David [Ohio State University; Ok, Salim [Ohio State University, Columbus; Phan, A [Ohio State University, Columbus; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Striolo, Alberto [Oklahoma University; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behaviour of fluids at mineral surfaces or in confined geometries (pores, fractures) typically differs from their bulk behaviour in many ways due to the effects of large internal surfaces and geometrical confinement. We summarize research performed on C-O-H fluids at nanoscale interfaces in materials of interest to the earth and material sciences (e.g., silica, alumina, zeolites, clays, rocks, etc.), emphasizing those techniques that assess microstructural modification and/or dynamical behaviour such as gravimetric analysis, small-angle (SANS) neutron scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations will be described that provide atomistic characterization of interfacial and confined fluid behaviour as well as aid in the interpretation of the neutron scattering results.

  13. Discovery Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    and sonar to spot passing ships and submarines. And, for people living in poor, remote communitiesDiscovery Channel :: Bacteria Power: Future Energy? Page 1 September 10, 2003 EDT Bacteria Power: Energy Of The Future? AFP R. ferriducens: "Bacterial Battery" Sept. 9, 2003 -- U

  14. Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (EFRC) - Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager (Energy Sciences Area, LBNL) An organization chart of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 Research Teams: Thrust 1: Fractured Shale Ian Bourg, Thrust 1 Lead,...

  15. Nano-scale scratching in chemical-mechanical polishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eusner, Thor

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process, a critical step in the manufacture of ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) semiconductor devices, undesirable nano-scale scratches are formed on the surfaces being ...

  16. Secretarial Policy Statement on Nanoscale Safety - DOE Directives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    56.1, Secretarial Policy Statement on Nanoscale Safety by Bill McArthur Functional areas: Nano Technology, Safety The safety of its employees, the public, and the environment is...

  17. Nanoscale Pore Network and Pore Fluid Characterization from Neutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Pore Network and Pore Fluid Characterization from Neutron Scattering and Modeling Techniques Jul 22 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Gernot Rother, Chemical Sciences Division...

  18. Nanoscale surface topography reshapes neuronal growth in culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Nanoscale surface topography reshapes neuronal growth in culture Ghislain Bugnicourt1. Moreover, when confronted to a differential surface topography, neurons specify an axon preferentially onto neurites, elongate faster, and differentiate an axon earlier than those grown on flat silicon surfaces

  19. Center for Nanoscale Materials Director Petford-Long chats with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a larger version of the image, click on it. Petford-Long with Center for Nanoscale Materials colleagues (from left) Phil Rash, Ron Tollner, Marvin Kirshenbaum and George Norek...

  20. Shedding light on Nature's nanoscale control of solar energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    light on Nature's nanoscale control of solar energy July 30, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint Across billions of years of evolution, nature has retained a common light-absorbing hexameric...

  1. Electrical and Optical Characterization of Nanoscale Materials for Electronics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chi-Yuan 1980-

    2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    is aimed at demonstrating fabrication processes of nanoscale FETs of graphene and porphyrinoid composites based entirely on scanning probe lithography (SPL). A nanoshaving mechanism was used to define patterns on octadecanethiol self-assembled monolayers...

  2. Title of Document: NANOSCALE MANIPULATION, PROBING, AND ASSEMBLY USING MICROFLUIDIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Document: NANOSCALE MANIPULATION, PROBING, AND ASSEMBLY USING MICROFLUIDIC FLOW along the wire. Together, these experiments illustrate the versatility of microfluidics MICROFLUIDIC FLOW CONTROL By Chad Ropp Dissertation submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School

  3. Nanoscale structure and transport : from atoms to devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Matthew Hiram

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoscale structures present both unique physics and unique theoretical challenges. Atomic-scale simulations can find novel nanostructures with desirable properties, but the search can be difficult if the wide range of ...

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heat Transfer In Nanoscale Liquid Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bo Hung

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of nano-scale flows typically utilize fixed lattice crystal interactions between the fluid and stationary wall molecules. This approach cannot properly model thermal interactions at the wall-fluid interface...

  5. Electronic structure and transport in molecular and nanoscale electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Xiaofeng

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two approaches based on first-principles method are developed to qualitatively and quantitatively study electronic structure and phase-coherent transport in molecular and nanoscale electronics, where both quantum mechanical ...

  6. Perspectives Nanotechnology and the public: Effectively communicating nanoscale science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crone, Wendy C.

    Perspectives Nanotechnology and the public: Effectively communicating nanoscale science August 2006 Key words: nanotechnology, communication, public knowledge, public understanding the public on concepts and applications associated with nanotechnology. The goal of our work

  7. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

  8. New Dark Matter Detector using Nanoscale Explosives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Alejandro; Freese, Katherine; Kurdak, Cagliyan; Tarle, Gregory

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present nanoscale explosives as a novel type of dark matter detector and study the ignition properties. When a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle WIMP from the Galactic Halo elastically scatters off of a nucleus in the detector, the small amount of energy deposited can trigger an explosion. For specificity, this paper focuses on a type of two-component explosive known as a nanothermite, consisting of a metal and an oxide in close proximity. When the two components interact they undergo a rapid exothermic reaction --- an explosion. As a specific example, we consider metal nanoparticles of 5 nm radius embedded in an oxide. One cell contains more than a few million nanoparticles, and a large number of cells adds up to a total of 1 kg detector mass. A WIMP interacts with a metal nucleus of the nanoparticles, depositing enough energy to initiate a reaction at the interface between the two layers. When one nanoparticle explodes it initiates a chain reaction throughout the cell. A number of possible thermite mat...

  9. Spin Coherence at the Nanoscale: Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Arthur J. [Professor

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Breakthrough results were achieved during the reporting period in the areas of organic spintronics. (A) For the first time the giant magnetic resistance (GMR) was observed in spin valve with an organic spacer. Thus we demonstrated the ability of organic semiconductors to transport spin in GMR devices using rubrene as a prototype for organic semiconductors. (B) We discovered the electrical bistability and spin valve effect in a ferromagnet /organic semiconductor/ ferromagnet heterojunction. The mechanism of switching between conducting phases and its potential applications were suggested. (C) The ability of V(TCNE)x to inject spin into organic semiconductors such as rubrene was demonstrated for the first time. The mechanisms of spin injection and transport from and into organic magnets as well through organic semiconductors were elucidated. (D) In collaboration with the group of OSU Prof. Johnston-Halperin we reported the successful extraction of spin polarized current from a thin film of the organic-based room temperature ferrimagnetic semiconductor V[TCNE]x and its subsequent injection into a GaAs/AlGaAs light-emitting diode (LED). Thus all basic steps for fabrication of room temperature, light weight, flexible all organic spintronic devices were successfully performed. (E) A new synthesis/processing route for preparation of V(TCNE)x enabling control of interface and film thicknesses at the nanoscale was developed at OSU. Preliminary results show these films are higher quality and what is extremely important they are substantially more air stable than earlier prepared V(TCNE)x. In sum the breakthrough results we achieved in the past two years form the basis of a promising new technology, Multifunctional Flexible Organic-based Spintronics (MFOBS). MFOBS technology enables us fabrication of full function flexible spintronic devices that operate at room temperature.

  10. Contact-independent measurement of electrical Conductance of a Thin Film with a Nanoscale Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mentzel, Tamar

    Contact effects are a common impediment to electrical measurements throughout the fields of nanoelectronics, organic electronics, and the emerging field of graphene electronics. We demonstrate a novel method of measuring ...

  11. Nano-scale positioning, control and motion planning in hard disk drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boettcher, Uwe

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Nano-scale Positioning, Control andABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION Nano-scale Positioning, Controlmm) height (mm) mini micro nano pico femto Figure 2.8:

  12. Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    presence of nanoscale phase separation in the MBE grown alloy thin films can impact the metal-oxide interface structure. Due to nanoscale domain size of such phase separation it...

  13. 3/04/2008 Center for Nanoscale Systems, FAS, Harvard University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Nanoscale Systems, FAS, Harvard University 5 Filling Out Hazardous Waste Tags 1 of 2 ·Fill In Full Chemical This Blank #12;3/04/2008 Center for Nanoscale Systems, FAS, Harvard University 6 Filling Out Hazardous Waste3/04/2008 Center for Nanoscale Systems, FAS, Harvard University 1 Protocol For User Supplied

  14. A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Divan, Ralu; Rosenthal, Dan; Rose, Volker; Wai Hla, Saw; Liu, Yuzi

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At a very small, or "nano" scale, materials behave differently. The study of nanomaterials is much more than miniaturization - scientists are discovering how changes in size change a material's properties. From sunscreen to computer memory, the applications of nanoscale materials research are all around us. Researchers at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials are creating new materials, methods and technologies to address some of the world's greatest challenges in energy security, lightweight but durable materials, high-efficiency lighting, information storage, environmental stewardship and advanced medical devices.

  15. Water Transport in Hydrophilic Channels of Nafion (DMR 0819860)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    (RH) that open up the ion channels for optimal proton transport. Nafion, a polymer used for fuel cells Benziger, Princeton University Sr Fuel cells convert chemical energy to electrical energy by transporting protons through ion conducting channels in polymer membranes. Improving proton conduction will make fuel

  16. Implications of Channelization and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    patterns #12;3 Dynamic Hydrology of Hardwood Bottomlands Natural hydroperiod is characterized by stochastic · Irrigation · Levees · Oilfield Canals · Channelization Reasons for Channelization · Mainly for agricultural

  17. Construction of Channels (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Permission is required from the Natural Resources Commission is required for the construction or alteration of artificial channels or improved channels of natural watercourses that connect to any...

  18. Guiding Polymers to Perfection: Macroscopic Alignment of Nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    frequently with (3) a complete absence of defects. This methodology can be exploited in hybrid hard/soft matter systems for electronics, catalysis, and sensors. Fabrication of macroscopic domains of periodic nanoscale structures using self-organizing systems has garnered sig- nificant attention because

  19. Title of dissertation: NANOSCALE BEHAVIOR OF 90 IN FERROELECTRIC FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of dissertation: NANOSCALE BEHAVIOR OF 90 DOMAINS IN FERROELECTRIC FILMS Zhengkun Ma, Doctor of Philosophy, 2005 Dissertation directed by: Professor Alexander L. Roytburd Department Dissertation submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Maryland, College Park

  20. Nanoscale Thermotropic Phase Transitions Enhance Photothermal Microscopy Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the material undergoes a phase transition. Herein, we show that thermotropic phase transitions in 4-Cyano-41 Nanoscale Thermotropic Phase Transitions Enhance Photothermal Microscopy Signals A. Nicholas G-objects in various environments. It uses a photo-induced change in the refractive index of the environment. Taking

  1. Nanoscale Tubules Formed by Exfoliation of Potassium Hexaniobate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanoscale Tubules Formed by Exfoliation of Potassium Hexaniobate Geoffrey B. Saupe, Chad C. Waraksa. Revised Manuscript Received March 27, 2000 The exfoliation of acid-exchanged K4Nb6O17 with tetra formed early in the exfoliation process, which are found only as flat sheets. Tubules in colloidal

  2. Mediated Enzyme Electrodes with Combined Micro-and Nanoscale Supports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    Mediated Enzyme Electrodes with Combined Micro- and Nanoscale Supports Scott Calabrese Barton which is grown multiwall nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition combined with ohmic heating. Power systems based on ambient fuels will be feasible if the power device itself is capable

  3. Low Power Nanoscale Buffer Management for Network on Chip Routers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    Low Power Nanoscale Buffer Management for Network on Chip Routers Suman K. Mandal Texas A power dissipation. We present a novel dynamic power management technique for low power NoC router buffers using nano CMOS SRAMS. A feedback controller was designed for block level power management

  4. Analysis and specificities of adhesive forces between microscale and nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is the packaging of NEMS which require handling, positioning, assembling and joining strategies in the mesoscale of the mesoscale in comparison with nanoscale and microscale. Firstly, it is shown that the distributions are presented. Thirdly, the van der Waals forces are increased by local deformations on the mesoscale contrary

  5. Bioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    (IV) (UO2[s], uraninite) Anthropogenic · Release of mill tailings during uranium mining - MobilizationBioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale Zero-valent Iron Angela Athey Advisers: Dr. Reyes Undergraduate Student Fellowship Program April 15, 2011 #12;Main Sources of Uranium Natural · Leaching from

  6. Sandia National Laboratories conducts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home DistributionTransportation Safety HomeWaterNanoscaleProject

  7. Nanoscale sensing methodology via functional control of an ion channel-forming peptide, Gramicidin A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macrae, Michael X.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from a bridge rectifier using semiconductor diodes (middle);full-wave bridge rectifier based on semiconductor diodes andfull-wave bridge rectifier based on semiconductor diodes and

  8. Local heat transfer distribution in a triangular channel with smooth walls and staggered ejection holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Sung-Won

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient liquid crystal experiments have been conducted to determine the distribution of the local heat transfer coefficient in a triangular channel with smooth wails and ejection holes along one or two of the wails. The end of the test channel...

  9. Energy conversion device with support member having pore channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Routkevitch, Dmitri [Longmont, CO; Wind, Rikard A [Johnstown, CO

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy devices such as energy conversion devices and energy storage devices and methods for the manufacture of such devices. The devices include a support member having an array of pore channels having a small average pore channel diameter and having a pore channel length. Material layers that may include energy conversion materials and conductive materials are coaxially disposed within the pore channels to form material rods having a relatively small cross-section and a relatively long length. By varying the structure of the materials in the pore channels, various energy devices can be fabricated, such as photovoltaic (PV) devices, radiation detectors, capacitors, batteries and the like.

  10. Computation of radiative heat transport across a nanoscale vacuum gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budaev, Bair V., E-mail: bair@berkeley.edu; Bogy, David B., E-mail: dbogy@berkeley.edu [University of California, Etcheverry Hall, MC 1740, Berkeley, California 94720-1740 (United States)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation heat transport across a vacuum gap between two half-spaces is studied. By consistently applying only the fundamental laws of physics, we obtain an algebraic equation that connects the temperatures of the half-spaces and the heat flux between them. The heat transport coefficient generated by this equation for such structures matches available experimental data for nanoscale and larger gaps without appealing to any additional specific mechanisms of energy transfer.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Assemblies for Transparent Conducting Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, Matthew P [ORNL] [ORNL; Gerhardt, Rosario [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this chapter is to introduce readers to the fundamental and practical aspects of nanotube assemblies made into transparent conducting networks and discuss some practical aspects of their characterization. Transparent conducting coatings (TCC) are an essential part of electro-optical devices, from photovoltaics and light emitting devices to electromagnetic shielding and electrochromic widows. The market for organic materials (including nanomaterials and polymers) based TCCs is expected to show a growth rate of 56.9% to reach nearly 20.3billionin2015,whilethemarketfortraditionalinorganictransparentelectronicswillexperiencegrowthwithratesof6.7103 billion in 2015. Emerging flexible electronic applications have brought additional requirements of flexibility and low cost for TCC. However, the price of indium (the major component in indium tin oxide TCC) continues to increase. On the other hand, the price of nanomaterials has continued to decrease due to development of high volume, quality production processes. Additional benefits come from the low cost, nonvacuum deposition of nanomaterials based TCC, compared to traditional coatings requiring energy intensive vacuum deposition. Among the materials actively researched as alternative TCC are nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanotubes with high aspect ratio as well as their composites. The figure of merit (FOM) can be used to compare TCCs made from dissimilar materials and with different transmittance and conductivity values. In the first part of this manuscript, we will discuss the seven FOM parameters that have been proposed, including one specifically intended for flexible applications. The approach for how to measure TCE electrical properties, including frequency dependence, will also be discussed. We will relate the macroscale electrical characteristics of TCCs to the nanoscale parameters of conducting networks. The fundamental aspects of nanomaterial assemblies in conducting networks will also be addressed. We will review recent literature on TCCs composed of carbon nanotubes of different types in terms of the FOM.

  12. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamza, A V

    2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The NSCL is delivering on its mission providing Laboratory programs with scientific solutions through the use of nanoscale synthesis and characterization. While this annual report summarizes 2007 activities, we have focused on nanoporous materials, advanced high strength, nanostructured metals, novel 3-dimensional lithography and characterization at the nanoscale for the past 3 years. In these three years we have synthesized the first monolithic nanoporous metal foams with less than 10% relative density; we have produced ultrasmooth nanocrystalline diamond inertial confinement fusion capsules; we have synthesized 3-dimensional graded density structures from full density to 5% relative density using nanolithography; and we have established ultrasmall angle x-ray scattering as a non-destructive tool to determine the structure on the sub 300nm scale. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and to train personnel for Lab programs. The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory. Andrew Detor from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sutapa Ghosal from the University of California, Irvine, Xiang Ying Wang from Shanghai Institute of Technology, and Arne Wittstock from University of Bremen joined the NSCL this year. The NSCL is pursuing four science and technology themes: nanoporous materials, advanced nanocrystalline materials, novel three-dimensional nanofabrication technologies, and nondestructive characterization at the mesoscale. The NSCL is also pursuing building new facilities for science and technology such as nanorobotics and atomic layer deposition.

  13. Growth and control of microscale to nanoscale carbon nitride particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, H. Y.; Shi, Y. C.; Feng, P. X. [Physics Department, Dong Hua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931 (Puerto Rico) and Physics Department, Dong Hua University, Shanghai 200051 (China)

    2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscale to nanoscale carbon nitride (China) particles are prepared using plasma sputtering deposition techniques. The preferred orientation of nanoscale CN particle distributions is obtained. Particles are examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman scattering spectroscopy. SEM micrographs show that the CN particles are spherical with nearly the same diameters of 2.5 {mu}m prepared without setting bias voltage. The distribution of these particles is random. Setting bias voltage up to 5 kV, plasma sputtering deposition yields several dispersed ring patterns of particle distributions where many small groups of nanoscale particles are observed. Each group of these particles is in a sunflower type of distribution, in which the biggest (85 nm) particle at the center is surrounded by many small sizes (30 nm) of CN particles. Disk type of the particles with a diameter of 10 {mu}m is also observed at different deposition conditions. Typical carbon bands and CN band in the Raman spectra of the samples are identified. The intensity of the bands obviously varies at the different deposition conditions.

  14. The effects of acid contact time and rock surfaces on acid fracture conductivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melendez Castillo, Maria Georgina

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    likely to retain conductivity after closure. The hardness of the rock is the dominating factor to determine the conductivity response when no channeling is present. Among the rocks tested, Texas Cream chalk had the lowest hardness measurement before...

  15. A waveguide model of the return stroke channel with a "metamaterial" corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehtinen, Nikolai G.

    ) highly conducting thin core channel; (2) "metamaterial" corona, i.e., corona with an effective bulk, 2005], highly conducting thin core surrounded by a perfectly conducting cylindrical shell corona shieldA waveguide model of the return stroke channel with a "metamaterial" corona Nikolai G. Lehtinen1

  16. Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities User Facilities Dev X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for...

  17. Hybrid Solar Cells with Prescribed Nanoscale Morphologies Based on Hyperbranched Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan; Fromer, Neil A.; Chen, Chih-Ping; Kanaras, Antonios G.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of interpenetrating networks of conjugated polymer and TiO2Photodiodes from Interpenetrating Polymer Networks. Naturepolymer solar cells with nanoscale control of the interpenetrating network

  18. Hydrodynamics of vegetated channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    This paper highlights some recent trends in vegetation hydrodynamics, focusing on conditions within channels and spanning spatial scales from individual blades, to canopies or vegetation patches, to the channel reach. At ...

  19. Interactions Between Membrane Conductances Underlying Thalamocortical Slow-Wave Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Destexhe, Alain

    or oscillations can be explained by interactions between calcium- and voltage-dependent channels. At the networkInteractions Between Membrane Conductances Underlying Thalamocortical Slow-Wave Oscillations A: Oscillations and Bursts Emerging From the Interplay of Intrinsic Conductances in Single Neurons 1404 A

  20. ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO/MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendez-Torres, A.; Torres, R.; Lam, P.

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.

  1. ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, R.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Lam, P.

    2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.

  2. Thermal conductivity of configurable two-dimensional carbon nanotube architecture and strain modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhan, H. F.; Bell, J. M.; Gu, Y. T., E-mail: yuantong.gu@qut.edu.au [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George St., Brisbane, Queensland 4000 (Australia); Zhang, G. [Institute of High Performance Computing, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 1 Fusionopolis Way, Singapore 138632 (Singapore)

    2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We reported the thermal conductivity of the two-dimensional carbon nanotube (CNT)-based architecture, which can be constructed through welding of single-wall CNTs by electron beam. Using large-scale nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, the thermal conductivity is found to vary with different junction types due to their different phonon scatterings at the junction. The strong length and strain dependence of the thermal conductivity suggests an effective avenue to tune the thermal transport properties of the CNT-based architecture, benefiting the design of nanoscale thermal rectifiers or phonon engineering.

  3. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  4. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  5. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  6. Conductance valve and pressure-to-conductance transducer method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cummings, Eric B.; Brennan, James S.

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for interrupting or throttling undesired ionic transport through a fluid network is disclosed. The device acts as a fluid valve by reversibly generating a fixed "bubble" in the conducting solvent solution carried by the network. The device comprises a porous hydrophobic structure filling a portion of a connecting channel within the network and optionally incorporates flow restrictor elements at either end of the porous structure that function as pressure isolation barriers, and a fluid reservoir connected to the region of the channel containing the porous structure. Also included is a pressure pump connected to the fluid reservoir. The device operates by causing the pump to vary the hydraulic pressure to a quantity of solvent solution held within the reservoir and porous structure. At high pressures, most or all of the pores of the structure are filled with conducting liquid so the ionic conductance is high. At lower pressures, only a fraction of the pores are filled with liquid, so ionic conductivity is lower. Below a threshold pressure, the porous structure contains only vapor, so there is no liquid conduction path. The device therefore effectively throttles ionic transport through the porous structure and acts as a "conductance valve" or "pressure-to-conductance" transducer within the network.

  7. Mid Infrared Focal Plane Arrays With Nanoscale Quantum Dots and Superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna, Sanjay

    Mid Infrared Focal Plane Arrays With Nanoscale Quantum Dots and Superlattices S. Krishna Center- Molecular beam epitaxy, Nanoscale, Quantum Dots Superlattices, Antimonides, Mid-infrared photodetector. I. INTRODUCTION Presently, the state of the art photon detectors for the mid wave infrared (MWIR, 3-5 µm) and long

  8. Title of Document: INTERACTION OF INTENSE SHORT LASER PULSES WITH GASES OF NANOSCALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Document: INTERACTION OF INTENSE SHORT LASER PULSES WITH GASES OF NANOSCALE-cluster interaction. #12;INTERACTION OF INTENSE SHORT LASER PULSES WITH GASES OF NANOSCALE ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR., Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering We study the interaction of intense laser pulses with gases

  9. Electrochemical Nanoscale Templating: Laterally Self-Aligned Growth of Organic-Metal Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borguet, Eric

    attractive for a wide range of applications such as the fabrication of nanoscale devices, energy storage of nanostructures into 2D or 3D arrays is necessary for the further hierarchical development of devices. TemplatingElectrochemical Nanoscale Templating: Laterally Self-Aligned Growth of Organic-Metal Nanostructures

  10. Local Heating in Nanoscale Conductors Yu-Chang Chen, Michael Zwolak, and Massimiliano Di Ventra*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zwolak, Michael

    Local Heating in Nanoscale Conductors Yu-Chang Chen, Michael Zwolak, and Massimiliano Di Ventra Received October 2, 2003 ABSTRACT We report first-principles calculations of local heating in nanoscale heat dissipation, the single molecule heats less than the gold point contact. We also find that

  11. Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped Emmanuel Rousseau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped silicon the role of surface plasmons for nanoscale radiative heat transfer between doped silicon surfaces. We derive a new accurate and closed-form expression of the radiative near- field heat transfer. We also

  12. High transmission nanoscale bowtie-shaped aperture probe for near-field optical imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    High transmission nanoscale bowtie-shaped aperture probe for near-field optical imaging Liang Wang probe integrated with nanoscale bowtie aperture for enhanced optical transmission is demonstrated. The bowtie-shape aperture allows a propagating mode in the bowtie gap region, which enables simultaneous

  13. A mean field approach for computing solid-liquid surface tension for nanoscale interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    A mean field approach for computing solid-liquid surface tension for nanoscale interfaces Chi are largely determined by the solid-liquid surface tension. This is especially true for nanoscale systems with high surface area to volume ratios. While experimental techniques can only measure surface tension

  14. Nanoscale topographical replication of graphene architecture by artificial DNA nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Y.; Seo, S.; Park, J.; Park, T.; Ahn, J. R., E-mail: jrahn@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, J.; Dugasani, S. R. [Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, S. H. [College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, S. H., E-mail: sunghapark@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite many studies on how geometry can be used to control the electronic properties of graphene, certain limitations to fabrication of designed graphene nanostructures exist. Here, we demonstrate controlled topographical replication of graphene by artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nanostructures. Owing to the high degree of geometrical freedom of DNA nanostructures, we controlled the nanoscale topography of graphene. The topography of graphene replicated from DNA nanostructures showed enhanced thermal stability and revealed an interesting negative temperature coefficient of sheet resistivity when underlying DNA nanostructures were denatured at high temperatures.

  15. Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4VacancyVacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire

  16. Cermet fuel thermal conductivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvis, John Mark

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    particles of low conductivity dispersed in a metal matrix of high conductivity. A computer code was developed in order to compute the conductivity of cermet fuels as predicted by existing models and an additional model derived in this work... gas release from the fuel particle and contact resistance at the fuel-matrix interface. A description of the methodology used to construct the model is given in Chapter 3. Comparisons between the analytic predictions and the experimental data...

  17. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  18. Nanoscale mapping of the W/Si(001) Schottky barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durcan, Chris A.; Balsano, Robert; LaBella, Vincent P., E-mail: vlabella@albany.edu [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The W/Si(001) Schottky barrier was spatially mapped with nanoscale resolution using ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) and ballistic hole emission microscopy (BHEM) using n-type and p-type silicon substrates. The formation of an interfacial tungsten silicide is observed utilizing transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The BEEM and BHEM spectra are fit utilizing a linearization method based on the power law BEEM model using the Prietsch Ludeke fitting exponent. The aggregate of the Schottky barrier heights from n-type (0.71?eV) and p-type (0.47?eV) silicon agrees with the silicon band gap at 80?K. Spatially resolved maps of the Schottky barrier are generated from grids of 7225 spectra taken over a 1??m?×?1??m area and provide insight into its homogeneity. Histograms of the barrier heights have a Gaussian component consistent with an interface dipole model and show deviations that are localized in the spatial maps and are attributed to compositional fluctuations, nanoscale defects, and foreign materials.

  19. Design Optimization of Radionuclide Nano-Scale Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenfeld, D.W.; Tulenko, J.S.; Wang, J.; Smith, B.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioisotopes have been used for power sources in heart pacemakers and space applications dating back to the 50's. Two key properties of radioisotope power sources are high energy density and long half-life compared to chemical batteries. The tritium battery used in heart pacemakers exceeds 500 mW-hr, and is being evaluated by the University of Florida for feasibility as a MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) power source. Conversion of radioisotope sources into electrical power within the constraints of nano-scale dimensions requires cutting-edge technologies and novel approaches. Some advances evolving in the III-V and II-IV semiconductor families have led to a broader consideration of radioisotopes rather free of radiation damage limitations. Their properties can lead to novel battery configurations designed to convert externally located emissions from a highly radioactive environment. This paper presents results for the analytical computational assisted design and modeling of semiconductor prototype nano-scale radioisotope nuclear batteries from MCNP and EGS programs. The analysis evaluated proposed designs and was used to guide the selection of appropriate geometries, material properties, and specific activities to attain power requirements for the MEMS batteries. Plans utilizing high specific activity radioisotopes were assessed in the investigation of designs employing multiple conversion cells and graded junctions with varying band gap properties. Voltage increases sought by serial combination of VOC s are proposed to overcome some of the limitations of a low power density. The power density is directly dependent on the total active areas.

  20. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swain, Greg (East Lansing, MI); Fischer, Anne (Arlington, VA),; Bennett, Jason (Lansing, MI); Lowe, Michael (Holt, MI)

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  1. Quantum Channel Capacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graeme Smith

    2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum communication channel can be put to many uses: it can transmit classical information, private classical information, or quantum information. It can be used alone, with shared entanglement, or together with other channels. For each of these settings there is a capacity that quantifies a channel's potential for communication. In this short review, I summarize what is known about the various capacities of a quantum channel, including a discussion of the relevant additivity questions. I also give some indication of potentially interesting directions for future research.

  2. Prediction of Fast Fading Mobile Radio Channels in Wideband Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Liang

    Prediction of Fast Fading Mobile Radio Channels in Wideband Communication Systems Liang Dong on the performance of wireless communication systems, such that the prediction of the changing channel behaviors-frequency prediction scheme has superior performance over conducting the channel predic- tion on a single frequency. I

  3. Foundations for in vivo nano-scale measurement of memory processes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsythe, James Chris

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ongoing program of research and development is utilizing nanomaterials as a basis for observing and measuring neurophysiological processes. Work commencing in fiscal year 2007 will focus on expanding current capabilities to create nanoelectrode arrays that will allow nanoscale measurement of the activity of 10's to 100's of neurons. This development is a vital step in gaining scientific insights concerning network properties associated with neural representations and processes. Specifically, attention will be focused the representation of memory in the hippocampus, for which extensive research has been conducted using laboratory rats. This report summarizes background research providing a foundation for work planned for fiscal year 2007 and beyond. In particular, the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the hippocampus is described. Additionally, several programs of research are described that have addressed the relationship between neurophysiological processes and behavioral measures of memory performance. These studies provide insight into methodological and analytic approaches for studying the representation of memory processes in the hippocampus. The objective of this report is to document relevant literature in a reference document that will support future research in this area.

  4. Nanoscale transport of phonons: Dimensionality, subdiffusion, molecular damping, and interference effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walczak, Kamil; Yerkes, Kirk L. [Aerospace Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine heat transport carried by acoustic phonons in the systems composed of nanoscale chains of masses coupled to two thermal baths of different temperatures. Thermal conductance is obtained by using linearized Landauer-type formula for heat flux with phonon transmission probability calculated within atomistic Green's functions (AGF) method. AGF formalism is extended onto dissipative chains of masses with harmonic coupling beyond nearest-neighbor approximation, while atomistic description of heat reservoirs is also included into computational scheme. In particular, the phonon lifetimes and the phonon frequency shifts are discussed for harmonic lattices of different dimensions. Further, resonant structure of phonon transmission spectrum is analyzed with respect to reservoir-induced effects, molecular damping, and mass-to-mass harmonic coupling. Analysis of transmission zeros (antiresonances) and their accompanied Fano-shape resonances are discussed as a result of interference effects between different vibrational modes. Finally, we also predict subdiffusive transport regime for low-frequency ballistic phonons propagated along a linear chain of harmonically coupled masses.

  5. Conductivity fuel cell collector plate and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braun, James C. (Juno Beach, FL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method of manufacturing a PEM fuel cell collector plate is disclosed. During molding a highly conductive polymer composite is formed having a relatively high polymer concentration along its external surfaces. After molding the polymer rich layer is removed from the land areas by machining, grinding or similar process. This layer removal results in increased overall conductivity of the molded collector plate. The polymer rich surface remains in the collector plate channels, providing increased mechanical strength and other benefits to the channels. The improved method also permits greater mold cavity thickness providing a number of advantages during the molding process.

  6. Conduct of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Cancels DOE O 5480.19. Admin Chg 1, 6-25-13

  7. Electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

    1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

  8. Dissecting holographic conductivities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard A. Davison; Blaise Goutéraux

    2015-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The DC thermoelectric conductivities of holographic systems in which translational symmetry is broken can be efficiently computed in terms of the near-horizon data of the dual black hole. By calculating the frequency dependent conductivities to the first subleading order in the momentum relaxation rate, we give a physical explanation for these conductivities in the simplest such example, in the limit of slow momentum relaxation. Specifically, we decompose each conductivity into the sum of a coherent contribution due to momentum relaxation and an incoherent contribution, due to intrinsic current relaxation. This decomposition is different from those previously proposed, and is consistent with the known hydrodynamic properties in the translationally invariant limit. This is the first step towards constructing a consistent theory of charged hydrodynamics with slow momentum relaxation.

  9. Athermalized channeled spectropolarimeter enhancement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Julia Craven; Way, Brandyn Michael; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Hunt, Jeffery P.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Channeled spectropolarimetry can measure the complete polarization state of light as a function of wavelength. Typically, a channeled spectropolarimeter uses high order retarders made of uniaxial crystal to amplitude modulate the measured spectrum with the spectrally-dependent Stokes polarization information. A primary limitation of conventional channeled spectropolarimeters is related to the thermal variability of the retarders. Thermal variation often forces frequent system recalibration, particularly for field deployed systems. However, implementing thermally stable retarders, made of biaxial crystal, results in an athermal channeled spectropolarimeter that relieves the need for frequent recalibration. This report presents experimental results for an anthermalized channeled spectropolarimeter prototype produced using potassium titanyl phosphate. The results of this prototype are compared to the current thermal stabilization state of the art. Finally, the application of the technique to the thermal infrared is studied, and the athermalization concept is applied to an infrared imaging spectropolarimeter design.

  10. Novel approaches to tailor and tune light-matter interactions at the nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. M. Kort-Kamp

    2015-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we propose new, versatile schemes to control light-matter interactions at the nanoscale. In the first part of the thesis, we envisage a new class of plasmonic cloaks made of magneto-optical (MO) materials. We demonstrate that the application of a uniform magnetic field B in these cloaks may not only switch on and off the cloaking mechanism, but also mitigate the electromagnetic (EM) absorption. We also prove that the scattered field profile can be effectively controlled by changing B. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the study of light-matter interactions mediated by fluctuations of the vacuum EM field. Firstly, we demonstrate that the Purcell effect can be effectively suppressed for an excited atom near a cloaking device. Furthermore, the decay rate of a quantum emitter near a graphene-coated wall under the influence of an external magnetic field is studied. We show that the MO properties of graphene strongly affect the atomic lifetime and that B allows for an unprecedented control of the decay channels of the system. In addition, we discuss the dispersive interaction between an atom and suspended graphene in a magnetic field. For large atom-graphene separations and low temperatures we show that the interaction energy is a quantized function of B. Besides, we show that at room temperature, thermal effects must be taken into account even in the extreme near-field regime. Finally, the third part of the thesis deals with the study of near-field heat transfer. We analyze the energy transfered from a semi-infinite medium to a composite sphere made of metallic inclusions embedded in a dielectric host medium. We show that the heat transfer can be strongly enhanced at the percolation phase transition. We show that our results apply for different effective medium models and are robust against changes in the inclusions' shape and materials.

  11. Nanostructured polymer membranes for proton conduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Park, Moon Jeong

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers having an improved ability to entrain water are characterized, in some embodiments, by unusual humidity-induced phase transitions. The described polymers (e.g., hydrophilically functionalized block copolymers) have a disordered state and one or more ordered states (e.g., a lamellar state, a gyroid state, etc.). In one aspect, the polymers are capable of undergoing a disorder-to-order transition while the polymer is exposed to an increasing temperature at a constant relative humidity. In some aspects the polymer includes a plurality of portions, wherein a first portion forms proton-conductive channels within the membrane and wherein the channels have a width of less than about 6 nm. The described polymers are capable of entraining and preserving water at high temperature and low humidity. Surprisingly, in some embodiments, the polymers are capable of entraining greater amounts of water with the increase of temperature. The polymers can be used in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes in fuel cells.

  12. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamza, A V; Lesuer, D R

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The initial emphasis of the NSCL has been on development of scientific solutions in support of target fabrication for the NIF laser and other stockpile stewardship experimental platforms. Particular emphasis has been placed on the design and development of innovative new materials and structures for use in these targets. Projects range from the development of new high strength nanocrystalline alloys to graded density materials to high Z nanoporous structures. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and train personnel for Lab programs such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Defense and Nuclear Technologies (DNT), and Nonproliferation, Arms control and International security (NAI). The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory.

  13. Method and system for nanoscale plasma processing of objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oehrlein, Gottlieb S. (Clarksville, MD); Hua, Xuefeng (Hyattsville, MD); Stolz, Christian (Baden-Wuerttemberg, DE)

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma processing system includes a source of plasma, a substrate and a shutter positioned in close proximity to the substrate. The substrate/shutter relative disposition is changed for precise control of substrate/plasma interaction. This way, the substrate interacts only with a fully established, stable plasma for short times required for nanoscale processing of materials. The shutter includes an opening of a predetermined width, and preferably is patterned to form an array of slits with dimensions that are smaller than the Debye screening length. This enables control of the substrate/plasma interaction time while avoiding the ion bombardment of the substrate in an undesirable fashion. The relative disposition between the shutter and the substrate can be made either by moving the shutter or by moving the substrate.

  14. High-pressure lubricity at the meso- and nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Vanossi; A. Benassi; N. Varini; E. Tosatti

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The increase of sliding friction upon increasing load is a classic in the macroscopic world. Here we discuss the possibility that friction rise might sometimes turn into a drop when, at the mesoscale and nanoscale, a confined lubricant film separating crystalline sliders undergoes strong layering and solidification. Under pressure, transitions from N to N-1 layers may imply a change of lateral periodicity of the crystallized lubricant sufficient to alter the matching of crystal structures, influencing the ensuing friction jump. A pressure-induced friction drop may occur as the shear gradient maximum switches from the lubricant middle, marked by strong stick-slip with or without shear melting, to the crystalline slider-lubricant interface, characterized by smooth superlubric sliding. We present high pressure sliding simulations to display examples of frictional drops, suggesting their possible relevance to the local behavior in boundary lubrication.

  15. Nanoscale spatially resolved infrared spectra from single microdroplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Thomas; Kulik, Andrzej J; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Mason, Thomas O; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Dietler, Giovanni

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Droplet microfluidics has emerged as a powerful platform allowing a large number of individual reactions to be carried out in spatially distinct microcompartments. Due to their small size, however, the spectroscopic characterisation of species encapsulated in such systems remains challenging. In this paper, we demonstrate the acquisition of infrared spectra from single microdroplets containing aggregation-prone proteins. To this effect, droplets are generated in a microfluidic flow-focussing device and subsequently deposited in a square array onto a ZnSe prism using a micro stamp. After drying, the solutes present in the droplets are illuminated locally by an infrared laser through the prism, and their thermal expansion upon absorption of infrared radiation is measured with an atomic force microscopy tip, granting nanoscale resolution. Using this approach, we resolve structural differences in the amide bands of the spectra of monomeric and aggregated lysozyme from single microdroplets with picolitre volume.

  16. Nanoscale heterogeneity at the aqueous electrolyte-electrode interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David T. Limmer; Adam P. Willard

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we reveal emergent properties of hydrated electrode interfaces that while molecular in origin are integral to the behavior of the system across long times scales and large length scales. Specifically, we describe the impact of a disordered and slowly evolving adsorbed layer of water on the molecular structure and dynamics of the electrolyte solution adjacent to it. Generically, we find that densities and mobilities of both water and dissolved ions are spatially heterogeneous in the plane parallel to the electrode over nanosecond timescales. These and other recent results are analyzed in the context of available experimental literature from surface science and electrochemistry. We speculate on the implications of this emerging microscopic picture on the catalytic proficiency of hydrated electrodes, offering an new direction for study in heterogeneous catalysis at the nanoscale.

  17. ADVANCED HEAT EXCHANGERS USING TUNABLE NANOSCALE-MOLECULAR ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwang J. Kim; Thomas W. Bell; Srinivas Vemuri; Sailaja Govindaraju

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam condensation heat transfer on smooth horizontal tubes and enhanced tubes (TURBO-CDI and TURBO-CSL) along with nanoscale hydrophobic coated tubes was studied experimentally. Hydrophobic coatings have been created through self-assembled mono layers (SAMs) on copper alloy (99.9% Cu, 0.1% P) surfaces to enhance steam condensation through dropwise condensation. In general, a SAM system with a long-chain, hydrophobic group is nano-resistant, meaning that such a system forms a protective hydrophobic layer with negligible heat transfer resistance but a much stronger bond. When compared to complete filmwise condensation, the SAM coating on a plain tube increased the condensation heat transfer rate by a factor of 3 for copper alloy surfaces, under vacuum pressure (33.86 kPa) and by a factor of about 8 times when operated at atmospheric pressure (101 kPa). Lifetime of maintaining dropwise condensation is greatly dependent on the processing conditions.

  18. Low thermal conductivity skutterudites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleurial, J.P.; Caillat, T.; Borshchevsky, A.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental results on semiconductors with the skutterudite crystal structure show that these materials possess attractive transport properties and have a good potential for achieving ZT values substantially larger than for state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. Both n-type and p-type conductivity samples have been obtained, using several preparation techniques. Associated with a low hole effective mass, very high carrier mobilities, low electrical resistivities and moderate Seebeck coefficients are obtained in p-type skutterudites. For a comparable doping level, the carrier mobilities of n-type samples are about an order of magnitude lower than the values achieved on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients make n-type skutterudite promising candidates as well. Unfortunately, the thermal conductivities of the binary skutterudites compounds are too large, particularly at low temperatures, to be useful for thermoelectric applications. Several approaches to the reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity in skutterudites are being pursued: heavy doping, formation of solid solutions and alloys, study of novel ternary and filled skutterudite compounds. All those approaches have already resulted in skutterudite compositions with substantially lower thermal conductivity values in these materials. Recently, superior thermoelectric properties in the moderate to high temperature range were achieved for compositions combining alloying and filling of the skutterudite structure. Experimental results and mechanisms responsible for low thermal conductivity in skutterudites are discussed.

  19. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  20. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Single-chain Nanoparticles: Synthesis of Nano-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Single-chain Nanoparticles: Synthesis of Nano-scale Architectures:00 AM, IMS Room 20 Recent efforts by our lab to fold single polymer chains into nano

  1. Tunable Nanoscale Plasmon Antenna for Localization and Enhancement of Optical Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Tunable Nanoscale Plasmon Antenna for Localization and Enhancement of Optical Energy Douglas Howe....................................................................................................................... 4 Surface Plasmons used. The coupling of optical energy with the surface plasmons that occur on the surface of metals

  2. The development of nanoscale morphology in polymer:fullerene photovoltaic blends during solvent casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Travis, Adrian

    The development of nanoscale morphology in polymer:fullerene photovoltaic blends during solventsm00343c The power conversion efficiency in a conjugated polymer-functionalized fullerene bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic (OPV) device is dependent both on the electronic properties

  3. Nanoscale Graphene Oxide (nGO) as Artificial Receptors: Implications for Biomolecular Interactions and Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jiaxing

    . P. Dravid*, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, International Institute or signal transducer due to size inconsistencies and poor supramolecular response. We overcame these issues uniform lateral dimension of 20 nm. Due to its nanoscale architecture, its supramolecular response

  4. Development of novel high-performance six-axis magnetically levitated instruments for nanoscale applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verma, Shobhit

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents two novel 6-axis magnetic-levitation (maglev) stages that are capable of nanoscale positioning. These stages have very simple and compact structure that is advantageous to meet requirements in ...

  5. Nanoscale Triboelectric-Effect-Enabled Energy Conversion for Sustainably Powering Portable Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Nanoscale Triboelectric-Effect-Enabled Energy Conversion for Sustainably Powering Portable: Harvesting energy from our living environment is an effective approach for sustainable, maintenance-free, and green power source for wireless, portable, or implanted electronics. Mechanical energy scavenging based

  6. University of California, Santa Cruz, Applied Optics Grouphttp://photon.soe.ucsc.edu Nanoscale Optofluidics for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Herbie

    University of California, Santa Cruz, Applied Optics Grouphttp://photon.soe.ucsc.edu Nanoscale;University of California, Santa Cruz, Applied Optics Grouphttp://photon.soe.ucsc.edu Background Microfluidics Single molecule analysis Integrated optics Singleparticle Optofluidics Optofluidics: combination

  7. Atomic-Level Study of Ion-Induced Nanoscale Disordered Domains...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on SiC using ion-beam-induced order-disorder transformation. Citation: Gao F, and WJ Weber.2003."Atomic-Level Study of Ion-Induced Nanoscale Disordered Domains in Silicon...

  8. Nanoscale organic transistors that use sourcedrain electrodes supported by high resolution rubber stamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Nanoscale organic transistors that use sourceÕdrain electrodes supported by high resolution rubber resolution rubber stamps bilayers of two different types of the elastomer polydimethylsiloxane 3,4 by casting

  9. Toward Nanoscale Three-Dimensional Printing: Nanowalls Built of Electrospun Nanofibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ho-Young

    . This novel 3D printing scheme can be applied to the development of various 3D nanoscale objects including manufacturing for several decades.1 So- called 3D printing is reaching a stage where the desired products can

  10. Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals as nanoscale emissive probes in light emitting diodes and cell biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Hao, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis employs colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) as nanoscale emissive probes to investigate the physics of light emitting diodes (LEDs), as well as to unveil properties of cells that conventional imaging ...

  11. Development of nano-scale and biomimetic surfaces for biomedical applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, James Edward

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . Both sensors developed in this work take advantage of the unique optical properties associated with nanoscale metal particles, however they use different types of spectroscopies for optical detection of the presence of the disease associated abnormal...

  12. Advances in quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging by mode-synthesizing atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitry, P.; Bourillot, E.; Plassard, C.; Lacroute, Y.; Lesniewska, E. [ICB, UMR CNRS 6303 CNRS-University of Bourgogne, Dijon F-21078 (France); Tetard, L. [Nanoscience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826 (United States)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on advances toward quantitative non-destructive nanoscale subsurface investigation of a nanofabricated sample based on mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy with heterodyne detection, addressing the need to correlate the role of actuation frequencies of the probe f{sub p} and the sample f{sub s} with depth resolution for 3D tomography reconstruction. Here, by developing a simple model and validating the approach experimentally through the study of the nanofabricated calibration depth samples consisting of buried metallic patterns, we demonstrate avenues for quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging. Our findings enable the reconstruction of the sample depth profile and allow high fidelity resolution of the buried nanostructures. Non-destructive quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging offers great promise in the study of the structures and properties of complex systems at the nanoscale.

  13. Side-Channel Oscilloscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sumanta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Side-Channel Analysis used for codebreaking could be used constructively as a probing tool for internal gates in integrated circuits. This paper outlines basic methods and mathematics for that purpose

  14. Exchange-coupled nanoscale SmCo/NdFeB hybrid magnets Dapeng Wang a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, J. Ping

    t Nanoscale hybrid magnets containing SmCo5 and Nd2Fe14B hard magnetic phases have been produced via a novel magnetization and energy products compared to the single-phase SmCo5 counterpart. & 2012 Elsevier B.V. All-coupled fully dense nanoscale hybrid magnets of different hard magnetic phases ``in one pot''. The SmCo5/Nd2Fe14

  15. Distributed Precoding for MISO Interference Channels with Channel Mean Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulukus, Sennur

    Distributed Precoding for MISO Interference Channels with Channel Mean Feedback: Algorithms precoding algorithms for multiple-input single-output (MISO) interference channels, where each trans- mitter- antenna wireless interference channels [5]-[7]. For multiple- input single-output (MISO) interference

  16. Conduct of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Cancels DOE O 5480.19. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-25-13, cancels DOE O 422.1. Certified 12-3-14.

  17. Conduct of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Cancels DOE O 5480.19. Admin Chg 2, dated 12-3-14, cancels Admin Chg 1.

  18. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen (Tempe, AZ); Liu, Changle (Tempe, AZ)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN) succinnonitrile (CH.sub.2 CN).sub.2, and tetraglyme (CH.sub.3 --O--CH.sub.2 --CH.sub.2 --O--).sub.2 (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg.sup.+2 cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100.degree. C. conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone.

  19. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, C.A.; Liu, C.

    1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN), succinnonitrile (CH{sub 2}CN){sub 2}, and tetraglyme (CH{sub 3}--O--CH{sub 2}--CH{sub 2}--O--){sub 2} (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg{sup +2} cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100 C conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone. 2 figs.

  20. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Liu, Changle (Midland, MI); Xu, Kang (Montgomery Village, MD); Skotheim, Terje A. (Tucson, AZ)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to highly conductive alkali-metal ion non-crystalline electrolyte systems, and more particularly to novel and unique molten (liquid), rubbery, and solid electrolyte systems which are especially well suited for use with high current density electrolytic cells such as primary and secondary batteries.

  1. Nanoscale Electrical Conductivity and Surface Spectroscopic Studies of Indium-Tin Oxide Yish-Hann Liau and Norbert F. Scherer*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherer, Norbert F.

    such as flat panel displays, solar cells, and organic electroluminescence devices due to its unique combination

  2. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Susman, Sherman (Park Forest, IL); Volin, Kenneth J. (Fort Collins, CO)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A.sub.1+x D.sub.2-x/3 Si.sub.x P.sub.3-x O.sub.12-2x/3, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  3. Cermet fuel thermal conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvis, John Mark

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? ) is expressed by k ( + + ) (3 21) where llg? gap conductance (W/mz-'K) kg? ? conductivity of the gas mixture (W/m-'K) d = actual gap dimension (m) gt gz= temperature jump distances at the fuel and cladding surfaces (cm) The value of d in Equation 3. 21...- ?, )+ ( ") 3 (I- ?, ) - ( ? ) 3 1 yvM trMT b 1+ vF g?T a 1-v?a 1-vF (3. 31) and finally, 2aFBF T 2EMC3M 1 1-2va 1-va 1+vM a (3, 32) 21 Once the constants have been determined, Equation 3. 28 can be solved at the fuel particle outer radius to determine...

  4. Electrically conductive alternating copolymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldissi, M.; Jorgensen, B.S.

    1987-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers which are soluble in common organic solvents and are electrically conductive, but which also may be synthesized in such a manner that they become nonconductive. Negative ions from the electrolyte used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer are incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant. A further electrochemical step may be utilized to cause the polymer to be conductive. The monomer repeat unit is comprised of two rings, a pyrrole molecule joined to a thienyl group, or a furyl group, or a phenyl group. The individual groups of the polymers are arranged in an alternating manner. For example, the backbone arrangement of poly(furylpyrrole) is -furan-pyrrole-furan-pyrrole- furan-pyrrole. An alkyl group or phenyl group may be substituted for either or both of the hydrogen atoms of the pyrrole ring.

  5. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  6. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  7. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  8. High conductivity composite metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhou, R.; Smith, J.L.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical conductors and methods of producing them are disclosed, where the conductors possess both high strength and high conductivity. Conductors are comprised of carbon steel and a material chosen from a group consisting of copper, nickel, silver, and gold. Diffusion barriers are placed between these two materials. The components of a conductor are assembled and then the assembly is subjected to heat treating and mechanical deformation steps. 10 figs.

  9. High conductivity composite metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhou, Ruoyi (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, James L. (Los Alamos, NM); Embury, John David (Hamilton, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical conductors and methods of producing them, where the conductors possess both high strength and high conductivity. Conductors are comprised of carbon steel and a material chosen from a group consisting of copper, nickel, silver, and gold. Diffusion barriers are placed between these two materials. The components of a conductor are assembled and then the assembly is subjected to heat treating and mechanical deformation steps.

  10. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Becht, IV, Charles (Morristown, NJ)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  11. Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

  12. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface. 15 figs.

  13. TRANSPORT INVOLVING CONDUCTING FIBERS IN A NON-CONDUCTING MATRIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    to sev- eral applications including flexible thin-film transistors, PEM fuel cells, and direct energy, particularly Peltier devices, high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity are preferred

  14. Laboratory Experiments and Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Bed Leveler Used to Level the Bottom of Ship Channels after Dredging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Ephraim Udo

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to ascertain the impacts of bed leveling, following ship channel dredging operations, and to also investigate the hydrodynamic flow field around box bed levelers. Laboratory experiments were conducted with bed levelers...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Li-ion Anode Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by University of Pittsburgh at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about nanoscale...

  16. Effects of grazing incidence conditions on the x-ray diffuse scattering from self-assembled nanoscale islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidbauer, M.; Grigoriev, D.; Hanke, M.; Schaefer, P.; Wiebach, T.; Koehler, R. [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstrasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction from SiGe nanoscale islands grown on Si(001) substrate were investigated. Experiments and corresponding theoretical simulations based on the distorted-wave Born approximation were carried out. The strain field inside and in the vicinity of the SiGe islands was calculated in the framework of linear elasticity theory using the numerical finite element method. The diffuse intensity pattern in reciprocal space reveals a well-resolved fine structure with prominent maxima and a complicated fringe pattern. The distribution of diffuse intensity in reciprocal space strongly depends on the angle of incidence with respect to the sample surface. The results obtained substantiate the important role of basically five (grazing incidence small-angle x-ray) and nine (grazing incidence diffraction) scattering channels that have to be considered for a complete understanding of the scattering scenario. A refined island model concerning shape, size, and Ge composition was elaborated.

  17. Mechanisms of budding of nanoscale particles through lipid bilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teresa Ruiz-Herrero; Enrique Velasco; Michael F. Hagan

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the budding of a nanoscale particle through a lipid bilayer using molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations, and an elastic theory, with the aim of determining the extent to which equilibrium elasticity theory can describe the factors that control the mechanism and efficiency of budding. The particle is a smooth sphere which experiences attractive interactions to the lipid head groups. Depending on the parameters, we observe four classes of dynamical trajectories: particle adhesion to the membrane, stalled partially wrapped states, budding followed by scission, and membrane rupture. In most regions of parameter space we find that the elastic theory agrees nearly quantitatively with the simulated phase behavior as a function of adhesion strength, membrane bending rigidity, and particle radius. However, at parameter values near the transition between particle adhesion and budding, we observe long-lived partially wrapped states which are not captured by existing elastic theories. These states could constrain the accessible system parameters for those enveloped viruses or drug delivery vehicles which rely on exo- or endocytosis for membrane transport.

  18. Entanglement-Saving Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludovico Lami; Vittorio Giovannetti

    2015-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The set of Entanglement Saving (ES) quantum channels is introduced and characterized. These are completely positive, trace preserving transformations which when acting locally on a bipartite quantum system initially prepared into a maximally entangled configuration, preserve its entanglement even when applied an arbitrary number of times. In other words, a quantum channel $\\psi$ is said to be ES if its powers $\\psi^n$ are not entanglement-breaking for all integers $n$. We also characterize the properties of the Asymptotic Entanglement Saving (AES) maps. These form a proper subset of the ES channels that is constituted by those maps which, not only preserve entanglement for all finite $n$, but which also sustain an explicitly not null level of entanglement in the asymptotic limit~$n\\rightarrow \\infty$. Structure theorems are provided for ES and for AES maps which yield an almost complete characterization of the former and a full characterization of the latter.

  19. Observations of the Behavior and Distribution of Fish in Relation to the Columbia River Navigation Channel and Channel Maintenance Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, R. L.; Mueller, Robert P.; Weiland, Mark A.; Johnson, P. N.

    2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of 7 studies conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers between 1995 and 1998 which used hydroacoustic methods to study the behavior of migrating salmon in response to navigation channel maintenance activities in the lower Columbia River near river mile 45. Differences between daytime and nighttime behavior and fish densities were noted. Comparisons were made of fish distribution across the river (in the channel, channel margin or near shore) and fish depth upstream and downstream of dikes, dredges, and pile driving areas.

  20. Enhanced Thermal Conductivity Oxide Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin Solomon; Shripad Revankar; J. Kevin McCoy

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    the purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of increasing the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels by adding small fractions of a high conductivity solid phase.

  1. Lateral conduction infrared photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Carroll, Malcolm S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A photodetector for detecting infrared light in a wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m is disclosed. The photodetector has a mesa structure formed from semiconductor layers which include a type-II superlattice formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. Impurity doped regions are formed on sidewalls of the mesa structure to provide for a lateral conduction of photo-generated carriers which can provide an increased carrier mobility and a reduced surface recombination. An optional bias electrode can be used in the photodetector to control and vary a cut-off wavelength or a depletion width therein. The photodetector can be formed as a single-color or multi-color device, and can also be used to form a focal plane array which is compatible with conventional read-out integrated circuits.

  2. Channeling through Bent Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack, Stephanie; /Ottawa U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Bent crystals have demonstrated potential for use in beam collimation. A process called channeling is when accelerated particle beams are trapped by the nuclear potentials in the atomic planes within a crystal lattice. If the crystal is bent then the particles can follow the bending angle of the crystal. There are several different effects that are observed when particles travel through a bent crystal including dechanneling, volume capture, volume reflection and channeling. With a crystal placed at the edge of a particle beam, part of the fringe of the beam can be deflected away towards a detector or beam dump, thus helping collimate the beam. There is currently FORTRAN code by Igor Yazynin that has been used to model the passage of particles through a bent crystal. Using this code, the effects mentioned were explored for beam energy that would be seen at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at a range of crystal orientations with respect to the incoming beam. After propagating 5 meters in vacuum space past the crystal the channeled particles were observed to separate from most of the beam with some noise due to dechanneled particles. Progressively smaller bending radii, with corresponding shorter crystal lengths, were compared and it was seen that multiple scattering decreases with the length of the crystal therefore allowing for cleaner detection of the channeled particles. The input beam was then modified and only a portion of the beam sent through the crystal. With the majority of the beam not affected by the crystal, most particles were not deflected and after propagation the channeled particles were seen to be deflected approximately 5mm. After a portion of the beam travels through the crystal, the entire beam was then sent through a quadrupole magnet, which increased the separation of the channeled particles from the remainder of the beam to a distance of around 20mm. A different code, which was developed at SLAC, was used to create an angular profile plot which was compared to what was produced by Yazynin's code for a beam with no multiple scattering. The results were comparable, with volume reflection and channeling effects observed and the range of crystal orientations at which volume reflection is seen was about 1 mrad in both simulations.

  3. Characterization of particulate matter deposited in diesel particulate filters: Visual and analytical approach in macro-, micro- and nano-scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liati, Anthi; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Panayotis [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for I.C. Engines, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-scale analytical investigations of particulate matter (soot and ash) of two loaded diesel particulate filters (DPF) from (a) a truck (DPF1) and (b) a passenger car (DPF2) reveal the following: in DPF1 (without fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 130-270 {mu}m thick, homogeneous porous cake with pronounced orientation. Soot aggregates consist of 15-30 nm large individual particles exhibiting relatively mature internal nanostructures, however, far from being graphite. Ash aggregates largely accumulate at the outlet part of DPF1, while minor amounts are deposited directly on the channel walls all along the filter length. They consist of crystalline phases with individual particles of sizes down to the nanoscale range. Chemically, the ash consists mainly of Mg, S, Ca, Zn and P, elements encountered in lubricating oil additives. In the passenger car DPF2 (with fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 200-500 {mu}m thick, inhomogeneous porous cake consisting of several superposed layers corresponding to different soot generations. The largest part of the soot cake is composed of unburned, oriented soot aggregates left behind despite repeated regenerations, while a small part constitutes a loose layer with randomly oriented aggregates, which was deposited last and has not seen any regeneration. Fe-oxide particles of micro- to nano-scale sizes, originating from the fuel-borne additive, are often dispersed within the part of the soot cake composed of the unburned soot leftovers. The individual soot nanoparticles in DPF2 are approximately 15-40 nm large and generally less mature than in the truck DPF1. The presence of soot leftovers in DPF2 indicates that the addition of fuel-borne material does not fully compensate for the temperatures needed for complete soot removal. Ash in DPF2 is filling up more than half of the filter volume (at the downstream part) and is dominated by Fe-oxide aggregates, due to the Fe-based fuel-borne additive, but otherwise its chemical composition reflects compounds of lubricating oil additives. (author)

  4. In situ characterization of nanoscale catalysts during anodic redox processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Renu [National Institute of Standards and Technology] National Institute of Standards and Technology; Crozier, Peter [Arizona State University] Arizona State University; Adams, James [Arizona State University] Arizona State University

    2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlling the structure and composition of the anode is critical to achieving high efficiency and good long-term performance. In addition to being a mixed electronic and ionic conductor, the ideal anode material should act as an efficient catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and dry hydrocarbons without de-activating through either sintering or coking. It is also important to develop novel anode materials that can operate at lower temperatures to reduce costs and minimized materials failure associated with high temperature cycling. We proposed to synthesize and characterize novel anode cermets materials based on ceria doped with Pr and/or Gd together with either a Ni or Cu metallic components. Ceria is a good oxidation catalyst and is an ionic conductor at room temperature. Doping it with trivalent rare earths such as Pr or Gd retards sintering and makes it a mixed ion conductor (ionic and electronic). We have developed a fundamental scientific understanding of the behavior of the cermet material under reaction conditions by following the catalytic oxidation process at the atomic scale using a powerful Environmental Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (ESTEM). The ESTEM allowed in situ monitoring of structural, chemical and morphological changes occurring at the cermet under conditions approximating that of typical fuel-cell operation. Density functional calculations were employed to determine the underlying mechanisms and reaction pathways during anode oxidation reactions. The dynamic behavior of nanoscale catalytic oxidation of hydrogen and methane were used to determine: ? Fundamental processes during anodic reactions in hydrogen and carbonaceous atmospheres ? Interfacial effects between metal particles and doped ceria ? Kinetics of redox reaction in the anode material

  5. Wideband Fading Channels With Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borade, Shashi

    The Rayleigh flat fading channel at low SNR is considered. With full channel state information (CSI) at the transmitter and receiver, its capacity is shown to be essentially SNR log(1SNR) nats/symbol, as SNR goes to zero. ...

  6. Parallel nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A New Device for Combinatorial Analysis of Complex nano-Scale Material Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Parallel nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A New Device for Combinatorial Analysis of Complex nano-Scale Material Systems Patrick James McCluskey, and Joost J. Vlassak Division of Engineering is presented for the combinatorial analysis of complex nano-scale material systems. The parallel nano

  7. A non-planar organic molecule with non-volatile electrical bistability for nano-scale data storage{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    A non-planar organic molecule with non-volatile electrical bistability for nano-scale data storage-planar organic molecule with electron donor and acceptor capabilities was synthesized for nano-scale data storage the demand of expansive storage capacity in the future. Recently, organic materials have received much

  8. Nanoscale Imaging of Lithium Ion Distribution During In Situ Operation of Battery Electrode and Electrolyte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Megan E; Gunceler, Deniz; Gao, Jie; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Schwarz, Kathleen A; Arias, Tomás A; Abruña, Héctor D; Muller, David A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major challenge in the development of new battery materials is understanding their fundamental mechanisms of operation and degradation. Their microscopically inhomogeneous nature calls for characterization tools that provide operando and localized information from individual grains and particles. Here we describe an approach that images the nanoscale distribution of ions during electrochemical charging of a battery in a transmission electron microscope liquid flow cell. We use valence energy-loss spectroscopy to track both solvated and intercalated ions, with electronic structure fingerprints of the solvated ions identified using an ab initio non-linear response theory. Equipped with the new electrochemical cell holder, nanoscale spectroscopy and theory, we have been able to determine the lithiation state of a LiFePO4 electrode and surrounding aqueous electrolyte in real time with nanoscale resolution during electrochemical charge and discharge. We follow lithium transfer between electrode and electrolyte a...

  9. Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films Studied Using Atom Probe Tomography: Comparison Of Experiments And Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaraj, Arun; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Ramanan, Sathvik; Walvekar, Sarita K.; Bowden, Mark E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Tailored metal alloy thin film-oxide interfaces generated using molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) deposition of alloy thin films on a single crystalline oxide substrate can be used for detailed studies of irradiation damage response on the interface structure. However presence of nanoscale phase separation in the MBE grown alloy thin films can impact the metal-oxide interface structure. Due to nanoscale domain size of such phase separation it is very challenging to characterize by conventional techniques. Therefor laser assisted atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized to study the phase separation in epitaxial Cr0.61Mo0.39, Cr0.77Mo0.23, and Cr0.32V0.68 alloy thin films grown by MBE on MgO(001) single crystal substrates. Statistical analysis, namely frequency distribution analysis and Pearson coefficient analysis of experimental data was compared with similar analyses conducted on simulated APT datasets with known extent of phase separation. Thus the presence of phase separation in Cr-Mo films, even when phase separation was not clearly observed by x-ray diffraction, and the absence of phase separation in the Cr-V film were thus confirmed.

  10. Microsoft Word - Dynamic Chemical Imaging at Nanoscale bh

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to engineers striving to reduce the amount of inactive materials such as conductive additives and binders so as to increase the energy density of a system. In this study,...

  11. Atomistic Study of Transport Properties at the Nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haskins, Justin

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    water clusters and water thin films, both having characteristic size scales under 11 nm. The diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivity in the nanosized systems are all shown to be significantly different from bulk water systems, with diffusion...

  12. The Properties of Confined Water and Fluid Flow at the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwegler, E; Reed, J; Lau, E; Prendergast, D; Galli, G; Grossman, J C; Cicero, G

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has been focused on the development of accurate computational tools to study fluids in confined, nanoscale geometries, and the application of these techniques to probe the structural and electronic properties of water confined between hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates, including the presence of simple ions at the interfaces. In particular, we have used a series of ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations and quantum Monte Carlo calculations to build an understanding of how hydrogen bonding and solvation are modified at the nanoscale. The properties of confined water affect a wide range of scientific and technological problems - including protein folding, cell-membrane flow, materials properties in confined media and nanofluidic devices.

  13. VAX CAMAC channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, D.J.; Breidenbach, M.; Granieri, C.D.; Grund, J.E.; Patrick, J.F.; Weaver, L.J.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new generation CAMAC System has been developed for the Mark II Detector at SLAC's PEP storage ring. This flexible system can efficiently transfer data between a host computer and a very large set of CAMAC data acquisition and control modules. A bipolar microprocessor operates as a Channel interface by supervising the CAMAC system and minimizing the host computer's work. This programmable channel couples the host to a set of System Crates; each System Crate houses Branch Drivers that can directly control a set of crates or communicate over differential parallel highways to Branch Receivers for control of distant crates. A coherent software package integrates the high level programs, system driver level programs, and microcode control of the system.

  14. Dynamical coupled-channels study of meson production reactions from EBACatJLab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamano, Hiroyuki [Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC), Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the current status of a combined and simultaneous analysis of meson production reactions based on a dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) model, which is conducted at Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) of Jefferson Lab.

  15. Gas Code of Conduct (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Gas Code of Conduct sets forth the standard of conduct for transactions, direct or indirect, between gas companies and their affiliates. The purpose of these regulations is to promote...

  16. Thermal Conductivity of Coated Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Lei L [ORNL; Pan, Yun-Long [Smart Papers, Hamilton, OH 45013; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Peterson, Robert C. [Miami University, Oxford, OH

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we introduce a method for measuring the thermal conductivity of paper using a hot disk system. To the best of our knowledge, few publications are found discussing the thermal conductivity of a coated paper although it is important to various forms of today s digital printing where heat is used for imaging as well as for toner fusing. This motivates us to investigate the thermal conductivity of paper coating. Our investigation demonstrates that thermal conductivity is affected by the coat weight and the changes in the thermal conductivity affect ink gloss and density. As the coat weight increases, the thermal conductivity increases. Both the ink gloss and density decrease as the thermal conductivity increases. The ink gloss appears to be more sensitive to the changes in the thermal conductivity.

  17. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Seoul, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Cambridge, MA); Andersson, Anna M. (Uppsala, SE)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z(A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).s- ub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001conductivity at 27.degree. C. of at least about 10.sup.-8 S/cm. The compound can be a doped lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

  18. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Incheon, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Mountain View, CA); Andersson, Anna M. (Vasteras, SE)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001conductivity at 27.degree. C. of at least about 10.sup.-8 S/cm. The compound can be a doped lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

  19. Methods of conducting simultaneous exothermic and endothermic reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee (Marysville, OH); Roberts, Gary L. (West Richland, WA); Perry, Steven T. (Galloway, OH); Fitzgerald, Sean P. (Columbus, OH)

    2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated Combustion Reactors (ICRs) and methods of making ICRs are described in which combustion chambers (or channels) are in direct thermal contact to reaction chambers for an endothermic reaction. Superior results were achieved for combustion chambers which contained a gap for free flow through the chamber. Particular reactor designs are also described. Processes of conducting reactions in integrated combustion reactors are described and results presented. Some of these processes are characterized by unexpected and superior results.

  20. Intra-membrane molecular interactions of K%2B channel proteins : application to problems in biodefense and bioenergy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moczydlowski, Edward G.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion channel proteins regulate complex patterns of cellular electrical activity and ionic signaling. Certain K+ channels play an important role in immunological biodefense mechanisms of adaptive and innate immunity. Most ion channel proteins are oligomeric complexes with the conductive pore located at the central subunit interface. The long-term activity of many K+ channel proteins is dependent on the concentration of extracellular K+; however, the mechanism is unclear. Thus, this project focused on mechanisms underlying structural stability of tetrameric K+ channels. Using KcsA of Streptomyces lividans as a model K+ channel of known structure, the molecular basis of tetramer stability was investigated by: 1. Bioinformatic analysis of the tetramer interface. 2. Effect of two local anesthetics (lidocaine, tetracaine) on tetramer stability. 3. Molecular simulation of drug docking to the ion conduction pore. The results provide new insights regarding the structural stability of K+ channels and its possible role in cell physiology.

  1. Use of Plasmon Spectroscopy to Evaluate the Mechanical Properties of Materials at the Nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howe, James M.

    Use of Plasmon Spectroscopy to Evaluate the Mechanical Properties of Materials at the Nanoscale, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4745, USA Abstract: Relationships between volume plasmon of available data, correlations between the volume plasmon energy, Ep, Young's modulus, Ym, bulk modulus, Bm

  2. Advances in Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Enable Quantitative Tracking of Nanoscale Changes in Thickness and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutcher, John

    Advances in Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Enable Quantitative Tracking of Nanoscale Changes: To date, detailed studies of the thickness of coatings using surface plasmon resonance have been limited a significant improvement to surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) that allows this sensitive technique

  3. Real-time observation of lithium fibers growth inside a nanoscale lithium-ion battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    Real-time observation of lithium fibers growth inside a nanoscale lithium-ion battery Hessam.1063/1.3643035] Lithium-ion batteries are of great interest due to their high energy density, however, various safety properties, many applications are pos- sible.10,11 One is the electrolyte of the lithium-ion batteries, where

  4. Nanoscale Joule heating, Peltier cooling and current crowding at graphenemetal contacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, William P.

    Nanoscale Joule heating, Peltier cooling and current crowding at graphene­metal contacts Kyle L are the Joule and Peltier effects. The Joule effect9 occurs as charge carriers dissipate energy within the lattice, and is pro- portional to resistance and the square of the current. The Peltier effect17

  5. A Mossbauer spectroscopy study of nanoscale GeSn dispersions prepared by ball milling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boolchand, Punit

    A Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy study of nanoscale Ge­Sn dispersions prepared by ball milling P by 119 Sn Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy. The Mo¨ssbauer measurements in general reveal two sites for the Sn of the Sn was detected by Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy at Sn-poor concentrations (x # 0.10) when the milling vial

  6. High-Affinity DNA Base Analogs as Supramolecular, Nanoscale Promoters of Macroscopic Adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    High-Affinity DNA Base Analogs as Supramolecular, Nanoscale Promoters of Macroscopic Adhesion Cyrus and Engineering, § Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and Department of Materials Science and manufac- tured coatings and composites. Supramolecular interactions are often implicated in various

  7. Nanoscale Diffusion Studies of Lipid Membranes National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging & Spectroscopy User Facility, University of Florida Chemical Engineering We haveNanoscale Diffusion Studies of Lipid Membranes National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Advanced for the facility's future use. This will serve to enhance infrastructure for research and education at the Magnet

  8. Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels: Observations on deformation microstructure, nanoscale dimples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sow-Hsin

    Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels: Observations on deformation microstructure, nanoscale hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels has been a subject of significant research, one of the major challenges in tackling hydrogen embrittlement is that the mechanism of embrittlement is not fully resolved

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of the nano-scale room-temperature oxidation of aluminum single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    films that form on aluminum and aluminum alloys in air protect the surface against further oxidationMolecular dynamics simulations of the nano-scale room-temperature oxidation of aluminum single Abstract The oxidation of aluminum single crystals is studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations

  10. Last Revised: 04/03/2014 UNDERGRADUATE MINOR IN "NANOSCALE SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    . It is open to any UG student pursuing an Engineering or Arts & Sciences (Chemistry, Physics, BiologyLast Revised: 04/03/2014 UNDERGRADUATE MINOR IN "NANOSCALE SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING" SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE Available to any UG pursuing an Arts and Science or Engineering degree I

  11. Next Generation Optical Fiber for IR Applications: Novel Materials and NanoScale Textures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    Next Generation Optical Fiber for IR Applications: Novel Materials and NanoScale Textures Axel, Orlando, FL 32816, USA #12;Outline · Impact of fiber optics · What are next generation optical fibers achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication" Charles K. Kao Brief

  12. Science Highlight July 2011 Better Batteries through Nanoscale 3D Chemical Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Science Highlight ­ July 2011 Better Batteries through Nanoscale 3D Chemical Imaging Concerns battery technology. Although Li-ion batteries, crucial in the boom of portable electronics, stand energy density devices. Hence, monitoring changes in electrodes during battery operation (i.e., insertion

  13. Self-Powered Wireless Nano-scale Sensor Networks within Chemical Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    a reactor for a bottom-up control of the chemical synthesis with the ultimate goal of improvingSelf-Powered Wireless Nano-scale Sensor Networks within Chemical Reactors Eisa Zarepour1 Mahbub networks (NSNs) can be applied in many chemical applications to monitor and control the chemical process

  14. A pomegranate-inspired nanoscale design for large-volume-change lithium battery anodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    A pomegranate-inspired nanoscale design for large-volume-change lithium battery anodes Nian Liu1 lithium-ion batteries and in more recent Li­O2 and Li­S batteries as a replacement for the dendrite to the level of commercial lithium-ion batteries (3.7 mAh cm22 ). Particle fracture and loss of electrical

  15. Biologically Activated Noble Metal Alloys at the Nanoscale: For Lithium Ion Battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    Biologically Activated Noble Metal Alloys at the Nanoscale: For Lithium Ion Battery Anodes Yun Jung as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Using two clones, one for specificity (p8#9 virus) and one choice for lithium ion batteries, these noble metal/alloy nanowires serve as great model systems to study

  16. 60th Anniversary Issue: Physical Picoscale science and nanoscale engineering by electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    th Anniversary Issue: Physical Picoscale science and nanoscale engineering by electron microscopy Zhong Lin Wang* School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta.wang@mse.gatech.edu Abstract A future scanning/transmission electron microscope is proposed to be a comprehensive machine

  17. A robust scanning diamond sensor for nanoscale imaging with single nitrogen-vacancy centres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    A robust scanning diamond sensor for nanoscale imaging with single nitrogen-vacancy centres P-vacancy centre within a few nanometres of a sample, and then scan it across the sample surface, while preserving the centre's spin coherence and readout fidelity. However, existing scanning techniques, which use a single

  18. A scanning AC calorimetry technique for the analysis of nano-scale quantities of materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A scanning AC calorimetry technique for the analysis of nano-scale quantities of materials Kechao OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 83, 114901 (2012) A scanning AC calorimetry technique for the analysis of nano 2012) We present a scanning AC nanocalorimetry method that enables calorimetry measurements at heating

  19. Commensurability effects induced by a periodic array of nanoscale anti-dots in Nb superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metlushko, Vitali

    Commensurability effects induced by a periodic array of nanoscale anti-dots in Nb superconductor A. PACS: 74.25.Ha; 74.76.)w Keywords: Nanostructures; Anti-dots; Commensurability 1. Introduction atomic layers on periodical substrate [5], magnetic bubble arrays [6] and the magnetically induced Wigner

  20. Nanoscale high-temperature superconductivity P. Mohanty a,*, J.Y.T. Wei b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Raj

    of high-temperature superconducting nanoscale devices, including Y-junctions, four-probe wires and rings-Tc superconducting (HTS) cuprate structures are only a few nanometers in size [1]. Scan- ning tunneling microscopy on a typical HTS surface gives microscopic length scales of unit cells and do- mains, typically in the range

  1. A computational contact model for nanoscale rubber adhesion Roger A. Sauer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A computational contact model for nanoscale rubber adhesion Roger A. Sauer Institute for Continuum Mechanics, Leibniz Universit¨at Hannover, Germany published in Constitutive Models for Rubber VI, G mechanical contact model which is capable of describing and simulating rubber adhesion at the nanometer scale

  2. Micro-and nanoscale domain engineering in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    Micro- and nanoscale domain engineering in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate Vladimir Ya. Shur investigation of the domain evolution in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate during backswitched electric sources based on quasi-phase matching.11 Lithium niobate LiNbO3 (LN) and lithium tantalate LiTaO3 (LT

  3. Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature Anders Lervik transient non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations, heat-transfer through nanometer-scale interfaces processes. We show that the modeling of heat transfer across a nanodroplet/fluid interface requires

  4. Nanoscale Heat Transfer at Contact Between a Hot Tip and a Substrate Stphane Lefvre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Nanoscale Heat Transfer at Contact Between a Hot Tip and a Substrate Stéphane Lefèvre Laboratoire d three heat transfer modes with experimental data and modeling. We conclude that the three modes in "International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 49, 1-2 (2006) 251-258" DOI : 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2005

  5. Three-dimensional mapping of optical near field of a nanoscale bowtie antenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Three-dimensional mapping of optical near field of a nanoscale bowtie antenna Rui Guo*, Edward C. This paper describes an experimental three-dimensional optical near-field mapping of a bowtie nano. The experimental results also demonstrate the polarization dependence of the transmission through the bowtie

  6. The effects of stress concentrators on strength of materials at nanoscale: A molecular dynamics study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deymier, Pierre

    materials. There is evidence that when at least one spatial dimension is below a critical one the effects, suggests that such critical dimensions are in the nanometer range and, of course, depend on the materialThe effects of stress concentrators on strength of materials at nanoscale: A molecular dynamics

  7. Graphitic Phase of NaCl. Bulk Properties and Nanoscale Stability Alexander G. Kvashnin,,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tománek, David

    Graphitic Phase of NaCl. Bulk Properties and Nanoscale Stability Alexander G. Kvashnin,,,§ Pavel B approach to evaluate the stability and physical properties of the nanometer-thickness NaCl layered films and found that the rock salt films with a (111) surface become unstable with thickness below 1 nm

  8. From self-assembly to engines: Simulating the nanoscale D. C. Rapaport, Bar-Ilan University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    a small fraction of the most highly bonded forms. The second is the Stirling engine, an externalFrom self-assembly to engines: Simulating the nanoscale D. C. Rapaport, Bar-Ilan University Two combustion engine with a history dating back to the industrial revolution. The model considered here employs

  9. Nanoscale study of reactive transport in catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with precious and non-precious catalysts using lattice Boltzmann method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Li; Kang, Qinjun; Holby, Edward F; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution porous structures of catalyst layer (CL) with multicomponent in proton exchange membrane fuel cells are reconstructed using a reconstruction method called quartet structure generation set. Characterization analyses of nanoscale structures are implemented including pore size distribution, specific area and phase connectivity. Pore-scale simulation methods based on the lattice Boltzmann method are developed and used to predict the macroscopic transport properties including effective diffusivity and proton conductivity. Nonuniform distributions of ionomer in CL generates more tortuous pathway for reactant transport and greatly reduces the effective diffusivity. Tortuosity of CL is much higher than conventional Bruggeman equation adopted. Knudsen diffusion plays a significant role in oxygen diffusion and significantly reduces the effective diffusivity. Reactive transport inside the CL is also investigated. Although the reactive surface area of non-precious metal catalyst (NPMC) CL is much higher t...

  10. Channel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest,CEI JumpChandradeep Solar PvtChannel Jump to:

  11. Geometric pumping in autophoretic channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastien Michelin; Thomas D. Montenegro Johnson; Gabriele De Canio; Nicolas Lobato-Dauzier; Eric Lauga

    2015-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Many microfluidic devices use macroscopic pressure differentials to overcome viscous friction and generate flows in microchannels. In this work, we investigate how the chemical and geometric properties of the channel walls can drive a net flow by exploiting the autophoretic slip flows induced along active walls by local concentration gradients of a solute species. We show that chemical patterning of the wall is not required to generate and control a net flux within the channel, rather channel geometry alone is sufficient. Using numerical simulations, we determine how geometric characteristics of the wall influence channel flow rate, and confirm our results analytically in the asymptotic limit of lubrication theory.

  12. Geometric pumping in autophoretic channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelin, Sebastien; De Canio, Gabriele; Lobato-Dauzier, Nicolas; Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many microfluidic devices use macroscopic pressure differentials to overcome viscous friction and generate flows in microchannels. In this work, we investigate how the chemical and geometric properties of the channel walls can drive a net flow by exploiting the autophoretic slip flows induced along active walls by local concentration gradients of a solute species. We show that chemical patterning of the wall is not required to generate and control a net flux within the channel, rather channel geometry alone is sufficient. Using numerical simulations, we determine how geometric characteristics of the wall influence channel flow rate, and confirm our results analytically in the asymptotic limit of lubrication theory.

  13. Optical Conductivity with Holographic Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary T. Horowitz; Jorge E. Santos; David Tong

    2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We add a gravitational background lattice to the simplest holographic model of matter at finite density and calculate the optical conductivity. With the lattice, the zero frequency delta function found in previous calculations (resulting from translation invariance) is broadened and the DC conductivity is finite. The optical conductivity exhibits a Drude peak with a cross-over to power-law behavior at higher frequencies. Surprisingly, these results bear a strong resemblance to the properties of some of the cuprates.

  14. Mirrored serpentine flow channels for fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rock, Jeffrey Allan (Rochester, NY)

    2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A PEM fuel cell having serpentine flow field channels wherein the input/inlet legs of each channel border the input/inlet legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field, and the output/exit legs of each channel border the output/exit legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field. The serpentine fuel flow channels may be longer, and may contain more medial legs, than the serpentine oxidant flow channels.

  15. Appendix C Conducting Structured Walkthroughs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide describes how to conduct a structured walkthroughs during the lifecycle stages of software engineering projects, regardless of hardware platform.

  16. Enhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Xinxin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction AEnhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction byTopological Insulator

  17. Conductive polymer-based material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Koren, Amy B. (Lansing, MI); Dourado, Sunil K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Dulebohn, Joel I. (Lansing, MI); Hanchar, Robert J. (Charlotte, MI)

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are polymer-based coatings and materials comprising (i) a polymeric composition including a polymer having side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, at least two of the side chains being substituted with a heteroatom selected from oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof; and (ii) a plurality of metal species distributed within the polymer. At least a portion of the heteroatoms may form part of a chelation complex with some or all of the metal species. In many embodiments, the metal species are present in a sufficient concentration to provide a conductive material, e.g., as a conductive coating on a substrate. The conductive materials may be useful as the thin film conducting or semi-conducting layers in organic electronic devices such as organic electroluminescent devices and organic thin film transistors.

  18. Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of Laminated Woven Composites Reinforced with Aligned Nanoscale Fibers: Mechanisms at the Macro, Micro, and Nano Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wicks, Sunny S.

    Several hybrid architectures with aligned nanoscale fibers have been shown to provide inter- and intra-laminar reinforcement of fiber reinforced polymer composites. In one architecture, aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown ...

  19. Muon Cooling Channels Eberhard Keil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, Eberhard

    Muon Cooling Channels Eberhard Keil Katharinenstr. 17, DE-10711 Berlin, Germany Abstract Parameters of muon cooling channels are discussed that achieve cooling of a muon beam from initial to final emittances in all three degrees of freedom in a given length. Published theories of ionisation cooling yield

  20. Experimental thermal conductivity and contact conductance of graphite composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Marian Christine

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphite fiber organic matrix composites were reviewed ics. for potential heat sink applications in the electronics packaging determined the effective transverse and longitudinal thermal industry. This experimental investigation conductivity...

  1. Experimental thermal conductivity and contact conductance of graphite composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Marian Christine

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphite fiber organic matrix composites were reviewed ics. for potential heat sink applications in the electronics packaging determined the effective transverse and longitudinal thermal industry. This experimental investigation conductivity...

  2. A Super-Additivity Inequality for Channel Capacity of Classical-Quantum Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Jain

    2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show a super-additivity inequality for the channel capacity of classical-quantum (c - q) channels.

  3. Nanoscale displacement sensing based on nonlinear frequency mixing in quantum cascade lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mezzapesa, F P; De Risi, G; Brambilla, M; Dabbicco, M; Spagnolo, V; Scamarcio, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a sensor scheme for nanoscale target displacement that relies on a single Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) subject to optical feedback. The system combines the inherent sensitivity of QCLs to optical re-injection and their ultra-stability in the strong feedback regime where nonlinear frequency mixing phenomena are enhanced. An experimental proof of principle in the micrometer wavelength scale is provided. We perform real-time measurements of displacement with {\\lambda}/100 resolution by inserting a fast-shifting reference etalon in the external cavity. The resulting signal dynamics at the QCL terminals shows a stroboscopic-like effect that relates the sensor resolution with the reference etalon speed. Intrinsic limits to the measurement algorithm and to the reference speed are discussed, disclosing that nanoscale ranges are attainable.

  4. Stick-Slip Control in Nanoscale Boundary Lubrication by Surface Wettability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Chen; Adam S. Foster; Mikko J. Alava; Lasse Laurson

    2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of atomic scale surface-lubricant interactions on nanoscale boundary-lubricated friction, by considering two example surfaces - hydrophilic mica and hydrophobic graphene - confining thin layers of water in molecular dynamics simulations. We observe stick-slip dynamics for thin water films confined by mica sheets, involving periodic breaking-reforming transitions of atomic scale capillary water bridges formed around the potassium ions of mica. However, only smooth sliding without stick-slip events is observed for water confined by graphene, as well as for thicker water layers confined by mica. Thus, our results illustrate how atomic scale details affect the wettability of the confining surfaces, and consequently control the presence or absence of stick-slip dynamics in nanoscale friction.

  5. Nano-Scale Interpenetrating Phase Composites (IPC S) for Industrial and Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-year project was completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to explore the technical and economic feasibility of producing nano-scale Interpenetrating Phase Composite (IPC) components of a usable size for actual testing/implementation in a real applications such as high wear/corrosion resistant refractory shapes for industrial applications, lightweight vehicle braking system components, or lower cost/higher performance military body and vehicle armor. Nano-scale IPC s with improved mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties have previously been demonstrated at the lab scale, but have been limited in size. The work performed under this project was focused on investigating the ability to take the current traditional lab scale processes to a manufacturing scale through scaling of these processes or through the utilization of an alternative high-temperature process.

  6. Photo-induced conductance fluctuations in mesoscopic Ge/Si systems with quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepina, N. P.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Nikiforov, A. I. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Moers, J.; Gruetzmacher, D. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems, Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH 52425 Julich (Germany)

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the evolution of electron transport in strongly localized mesoscopic system with quantum dots under small photon flux. Exploring devices with narrow transport channels lead to the observation of giant fluctuations of the photoconductance, which is attributed to the strong dependence of hopping current on the filling of dots by holes. In our experiments, single-photon mode operation is indicated by the linear dependence of the frequency of photo-induced fluctuations on the light intensity and the step-like response of conductance on the pulse excitation. The effect of the light wavelength, measurement temperature, size of the conductive channel on the device efficiency are considered.

  7. Development of nano-scale and biomimetic surfaces for biomedical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, James Edward

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    -Chairs of Committee, Theresa Good Daniel z Committee Members, Gerard Cot? Rosana ira Head of Department, Kenneth Hall August 2005 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering iii ABSTRACT Development of Nano-scale and Biomimetic Surfaces... for Biomedical Applications. (August 2005) James Edward Henry, B.S.; M.S., University of Arkansas Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Theresa Good Dr. Daniel Shantz The work described in this dissertation details the development of a biomimetic...

  8. Nondestructive volumetric 3-D chemical mapping of nickel-sulfur compounds at the nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris W. M.; Chu Y.; Nelson, G.J.; Kiss, A.M.; Izzo Jr, J.R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, M.; Wang, S.; Chiu W.K.S.

    2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-structures of nickel (Ni) and nickel subsulfide (Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}) materials were studied and mapped in 3D with high-resolution x-ray nanotomography combined with full field XANES spectroscopy. This method for characterizing these phases in complex microstructures is an important new analytical imaging technique, applicable to a wide range of nanoscale and mesoscale electrochemical systems.

  9. CONDUCTANCE OF NANOSYSTEMS WITH INTERACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsak, Anton

    -beam lithography or small metallic grains,[1] semiconductor quantum dots,[2] or a single large molecule of an atomic-size bridge that forms in the break,[3] or even measure the conductance of a single hydrogen

  10. Continuous production of conducting polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaige, Terry A. (Terry Alden), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device to continuously produce polypyrrole was designed, manufactured, and tested. Polypyrrole is a conducting polymer which has potential artificial muscle applications. The objective of continuous production was to ...

  11. Plasma conductivity at finite coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babiker Hassanain; Martin Schvellinger

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    By taking into account the full order(\\alpha'^3) type IIB string theory corrections to the supergravity action, we compute the leading finite 't Hooft coupling order(\\lambda^{-3/2}) corrections to the conductivity of strongly-coupled SU(N) {\\cal {N}}=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma in the large N limit. We find that the conductivity is enhanced by the corrections, in agreement with the trend expected from previous perturbative weak-coupling computations.

  12. XEDS STEM Tomography For 3D Chemical Characterization Of Nanoscale Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genc, Arda; Kovarik, Libor; Gu, Meng; Cheng, Huikai; Plachinda, Pavel; Pullan, Lee; Freitag, Bert; Wang, Chong M.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a tomography technique which couples scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (XEDS) to resolve 3D distribution of elements in nanoscale materials. STEM imaging when combined with a symmetrically arranged XEDS detector design around the specimen overcomes many of the obstacles in 3D spectroscopic tomography of nanoscale materials and successfully elucidate the 3D chemical information in a large field of view of the TEM sample. We employed this technique to investigate 3D distribution of Nickel (Ni), Manganese (Mn) and Oxygen (O) in Li(NiMn)O2 battery cathode material. For this purpose, 2D elemental maps were acquired for a range of tilt angles and reconstructed to obtain 3D elemental distribution in an isolated Li(NiMnO2) nanoparticle. The results highlight the strength of this technique in 3D chemical analysis of nanoscale materials by successfully resolving Ni, Mn and O elemental distributions in 3D and discovering the new phenomenon of Ni surface segregation in this material. Furthermore, the comparison of simultaneously acquired HAADF STEM and XEDS STEM tomography results show that XEDS STEM tomography provides additional 3D chemical information of the material especially when there is low atomic number (Z) contrast in the material of interest.

  13. Nanoscale fabrication and modification of selected battery materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostecki, Robert; Song, Xiang Yun; Kinoshita, Kim; McLarnon, Frank

    2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon is an integral part of many battery electrodes. We explored the use of semiconductor-processing techniques that involve photolithography to pattern photoresists and subsequent pyrolysis to form carbon microstructures that function as microelectrodes. In this study, we describe the status of the fabrication of carbon microelectrodes obtained by pyrolysis of photoresist. Electrochemical nanometer-scale patterning of the surface of a conducting lithium manganese oxide (LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}) by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) was studied. We show that a localized surface chemical change can be confined to a depth which depends on the oxide-tip voltage difference and ambient humidity The ability to produce nanometer-size patterns of chemically modified oxide or nanometer-sized alterations of the oxide morphology is demonstrated and discussed with reference to possible mechanisms.

  14. Mixed Conduction in Rare-Earth Phosphates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Hannah Leung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conduction  in  Rare-­Earth  Phosphates   by   Hannah  Conduction  in  Rare-­?Earth  Phosphates   by   Hannah  conduction  in  rare  earth  phosphates.  Specifically,  

  15. Bargaining and the MISO Interference Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nokleby, Matthew; Swindlehurst, A. Lee

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the pareto boundary for the MISO interference channel,” IEEEinterference in the Gaussian MISO broadcast channel,” inOn maximizing the sum network MISO broadcast capacity,” in

  16. Broadcasting Gaussian Sources Over Gaussian Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Yang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Channel . . . . . . . . . . Power Loss for the Gaussianbroadcast channel, the power loss of separate coding is alsois to analyze the power loss for the Gaussian case. We

  17. Electrochemomechanical Energy Conversion in Nanofluidic Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong

    Electrochemomechanical Energy Conversion in Nanofluidic Channels Hirofumi Daiguji,*, Peidong Yang the height of a nanofluidic channel containing surface charge, a unipolar solution of counterions

  18. Atomic Scale Design and Three-Dimensional Simulation of Ionic Diffusive Nanofluidic Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jin Kyoung; We, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advance in nanotechnology has led to rapid advances in nanofluidics, which has been established as a reliable means for a wide variety of applications, including molecular separation, detection, crystallization and biosynthesis. Although atomic and molecular level consideration is a key ingredient in experimental design and fabrication of nanfluidic systems, atomic and molecular modeling of nanofluidics is rare and most simulations at nanoscale are restricted to one- or two-dimensions in the literature, to our best knowledge. The present work introduces atomic scale design and three-dimensional (3D) simulation of ionic diffusive nanofluidic systems. We propose a variational multiscale framework to represent the nanochannel in discrete atomic and/or molecular detail while describe the ionic solution by continuum. Apart from the major electrostatic and entropic effects, the non-electrostatic interactions between the channel and solution, and among solvent molecules are accounted in our modeling. We deriv...

  19. Lithium-cation conductivity and crystal structure of lithium diphosphate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voronin, V.I., E-mail: voronin@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics Urals Branch RAS, S.Kovalevskoy Street 18, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sherstobitova, E.A. [Institute of Metal Physics Urals Branch RAS, S.Kovalevskoy Street 18, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Blatov, V.A., E-mail: blatov@samsu.ru [Samara Center for Theoretical Materials Science (SCTMS), Samara State University, Ac.Pavlov Street 1, 443011 Samara (Russian Federation); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Shekhtman, G.Sh., E-mail: shekhtman@ihte.uran.ru [Institute of High Temperature Electrochemistry Urals Branch RAS, Akademicheskaya 20, 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrical conductivity of lithium diphosphate Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been measured and jump-like increasing of ionic conductivity at 913 K has been found. The crystal structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been refined using high temperature neutron diffraction at 300–1050 K. At 913 K low temperature triclinic form of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms into high temperature monoclinic one, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a=8.8261(4) Å, b=5.2028(4) Å, c=13.3119(2) Å, ?=104.372(6)°. The migration maps of Li{sup +} cations based on experimental data implemented into program package TOPOS have been explored. It was found that lithium cations in both low- and high temperature forms of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} migrate in three dimensions. Cross sections of the migrations channels extend as the temperature rises, but at the phase transition point have a sharp growth showing a strong “crystal structure – ion conductivity” correlation. -- Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} at 950 K. Red balls represent oxygen atoms; black lines show Li{sup +} ion migration channels in the layers perpendicular to [001] direction. Highlights: • Structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been refined using high temperature neutron diffraction. • At 913 K triclinic form of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms into high temperature monoclinic one. • The migration maps of Li{sup +} implemented into program package TOPOS have been explored. • Cross sections of the migrations channels at the phase transition have a sharp growth.

  20. Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella Oneidensis Strain MR-1 and Other Microorganisms . Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...

  1. Optical conductivity of curved graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Chaves; T. Frederico; O. Oliveira; W. de Paula; M. C. Santos

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the optical conductivity for an out-of-plane deformation in graphene using an approach based on solutions of the Dirac equation in curved space. Different examples of periodic deformations along one direction translates into an enhancement of the optical conductivity peaks in the region of the far and mid infrared frequencies for periodicities $\\sim100\\,$nm. The width and position of the peaks can be changed by dialling the parameters of the deformation profiles. The enhancement of the optical conductivity is due to intraband transitions and the translational invariance breaking in the geometrically deformed background. Furthemore, we derive an analytical solution of the Dirac equation in a curved space for a general deformation along one spatial direction. For this class of geometries, it is shown that curvature induces an extra phase in the electron wave function, which can also be explored to produce interference devices of the Aharonov-Bohm type.

  2. Fuel cell assembly unit for promoting fluid service and electrical conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Daniel O. (Glenville, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid service and/or electrical conductivity for a fuel cell assembly is promoted. Open-faced flow channel(s) are formed in a flow field plate face, and extend in the flow field plate face between entry and exit fluid manifolds. A resilient gas diffusion layer is located between the flow field plate face and a membrane electrode assembly, fluidly serviced with the open-faced flow channel(s). The resilient gas diffusion layer is restrained against entering the open-faced flow channel(s) under a compressive force applied to the fuel cell assembly. In particular, a first side of a support member abuts the flow field plate face, and a second side of the support member abuts the resilient gas diffusion layer. The support member is formed with a plurality of openings extending between the first and second sides of the support member. In addition, a clamping pressure is maintained for an interface between the resilient gas diffusion layer and a portion of the membrane electrode assembly. Preferably, the support member is spikeless and/or substantially flat. Further, the support member is formed with an electrical path for conducting current between the resilient gas diffusion layer and position(s) on the flow field plate face.

  3. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, C.A.; Xu, K.; Liu, C.

    1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors. 4 figs.

  4. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Kang (Tempe, AZ); Liu, Changle (Tulsa, OK)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors.

  5. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neet, T.E.; Spieker, D.A.

    1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A rigid, moldable polyurethane foam comprises about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  6. Conducting Your Own Energy Audit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Why should you or anyone be interested in conducting a time intensive energy audit. What equipment is needed? When should you get started? Who should do it? The answer to Why is that energy costs are cutting into a company’s profit every minute...

  7. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neet, Thomas E. (Grandview, MO); Spieker, David A. (Olathe, KS)

    1985-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A rigid, polyurethane foam comprises about 2-10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  8. Thin film ion conducting coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA); Haas, Terry (Sudbury, MA); Wong, Kwok-Keung (Watertown, MA); Seward, George (Arlington, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

  9. Conductance of interacting Aharonov-Bohm systems and A. Ramsak1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsak, Anton

    a generalization of the conduc- tance formula Eq. 1 to systems which explicitly exhibit time reversal asymmetry May 2003; published 15 July 2003 A simple formula for the zero-temperature linear response conductance of an interacting mesoscopic region, threaded by magnetic flux, and attached to noninteracting single-channel leads

  10. Drainage of a horizontal Boussinesq aquifer with a power law hydraulic conductivity profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selker, John

    ]. The Boussinesq equation is derived from Darcy's law and the Dupuit-Forchheimer assumption, and by neglecting] Solutions to the Boussinesq equation describing drainage into a fully penetrating channel have been used equation for k / zn , where k is the saturated hydraulic conductivity, z is the height above an impermeable

  11. Terahertz responsivity of field effect transistors versus their static channel conductivity and loading effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levelut, Claire

    . Teppe,1 and W. Knap1 1 Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5221 and TERALAB, Universite´ Montpellier2 for terahertz imaging. This article gives prospects for electrical simulation of these transistors field is rectified like in square law detectors and a constant (dc) source-to-drain voltage appears

  12. Influence of Conductive Heat-Losses on the Propagation of Premixed Flames in Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heil, Matthias

    combustion engine--small volumes with narrow entrances--cools by heat transfer to a temperature that may to simulate this condition [3­5]. An early theoretical investigation of this configuration, in absence of flow

  13. INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON Nanoscale Energy Conversion and Information Processing Devices, Nice 2006 S. Dilhaire, W. Claeys, S. Grauby, J.M. Rampnoux, Y. Ezzahri,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical delay Ti:Sa Laser Probe beam Pump beam AOMModulation Translation command unit Modulation filter WORKSHOP ON Nanoscale Energy Conversion and Information Processing Devices, Nice 2006 Metal Cap layer Super latticeLaser Nano Ultrasonics #12;INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON Nanoscale Energy Conversion and Information

  14. Nanoscale interplay of strain and doping in a high-temperature superconductor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zeljkovic, Ilija [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Boston College, Chestnut Hills, MA (United States); Gu, Genda [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nieminen, Jouko [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland); Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Huang, Dennis [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Chang, Tay-Rong [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan); He, Yang [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Jeng, Horng-Tay [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan); Academia Sinica, Taipei (Taiwan); Xu, Zhijun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wen, Jinsheng [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lin, Hsin [Academia Sinica, Taipei (Taiwan); Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Markiewicz, Robert S. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Bansil, Arun [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Hoffman, Jennifer E. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The highest temperature superconductors are electronically inhomogeneous at the nanoscale, suggesting the existence of a local variable which could be harnessed to enhance the superconducting pairing. Here we report the relationship between local doping and local strain in the cuprate superconductor Bi?Sr?CaCu?O??x. We use scanning tunneling microscopy to discover that the crucial oxygen dopants are periodically distributed, in correlation with local strain. Our picoscale investigation of the intra-unit-cell positions of all oxygen dopants provides essential structural input for a complete microscopic theory.

  15. Nanoscale magnetic field mapping with a single spin scanning probe magnetometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondin, L.; Tetienne, J.-P.; Spinicelli, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Jacques, V. [Laboratoire de Photonique Quantique et Moleculaire, Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan and CNRS UMR 8537, 94235 Cachan Cedex (France); Dal Savio, C.; Karrai, K. [Attocube systems AG, Koeniginstrasse 11A RGB, Munich 80539 (Germany); Dantelle, G. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Ecole Polytechnique and CNRS UMR 7643, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Thiaville, A.; Rohart, S. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud and CNRS UMR 8502, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate quantitative magnetic field mapping with nanoscale resolution, by applying a lock-in technique on the electron spin resonance frequency of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect placed at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip. In addition, we report an all-optical magnetic imaging technique which is sensitive to large off-axis magnetic fields, thus extending the operation range of diamond-based magnetometry. Both techniques are illustrated by using a magnetic hard disk as a test sample. Owing to the non-perturbing and quantitative nature of the magnetic probe, this work should open up numerous perspectives in nanomagnetism and spintronics.

  16. Nanoscale interplay of strain and doping in a high-temperature superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeljkovic, Ilija [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Boston College, Chestnut Hills, MA (United States); Gu, Genda [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nieminen, Jouko [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland); Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Huang, Dennis [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Chang, Tay-Rong [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan); He, Yang [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Jeng, Horng-Tay [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan); Academia Sinica, Taipei (Taiwan); Xu, Zhijun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wen, Jinsheng [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lin, Hsin [Academia Sinica, Taipei (Taiwan); Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Markiewicz, Robert S. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Bansil, Arun [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Hoffman, Jennifer E. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The highest temperature superconductors are electronically inhomogeneous at the nanoscale, suggesting the existence of a local variable which could be harnessed to enhance the superconducting pairing. Here we report the relationship between local doping and local strain in the cuprate superconductor Bi?Sr?CaCu?O??x. We use scanning tunneling microscopy to discover that the crucial oxygen dopants are periodically distributed, in correlation with local strain. Our picoscale investigation of the intra-unit-cell positions of all oxygen dopants provides essential structural input for a complete microscopic theory.

  17. Nanoscale structure in AgSbTe2 determined by diffuse elastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Budai, John D [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; Karapetrova, Evguenia A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffuse elastic neutron scattering measurements confirm that AgSbTe2 has a hierarchical structure, with defects on length scales from nanometers to microns. While scattering from mesoscale structure is consistent with previously-proposed structures in which Ag and Sb order on a NaCl lattice, more diffuse scattering from nanoscale structure suggests a structural rearrangement in which hexagonal layers form a combination of (ABC), (ABA), and (AAB) stacking sequences. The AgCrSe2 structure is the best-fitting model for the local atomic arrangements.

  18. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  19. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  20. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  1. Hydraulic Conductivity Measurements Barrow 2014

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich; Jil Geller

    Six individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, in May of 2013 as part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE). Each core was drilled from a different location at varying depths. A few days after drilling, the cores were stored in coolers packed with dry ice and flown to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. 3-dimensional images of the cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner at 120kV. Hydraulic conductivity samples were extracted from these cores at LBNL Richmond Field Station in Richmond, CA, in February 2014 by cutting 5 to 8 inch segments using a chop saw. Samples were packed individually and stored at freezing temperatures to minimize any changes in structure or loss of ice content prior to analysis. Hydraulic conductivity was determined through falling head tests using a permeameter [ELE International, Model #: K-770B]. After approximately 12 hours of thaw, initial falling head tests were performed. Two to four measurements were collected on each sample and collection stopped when the applied head load exceeded 25% change from the original load. Analyses were performed between 2 to 3 times for each sample. The final hydraulic conductivity calculations were computed using methodology of Das et al., 1985.

  2. New bounding techniques for channel codes over quasi-static fading channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Jingyu

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is intended to provide several new bounding techniques for channel codes over quasi-static fading channels (QSFC). This type of channel has drawn more and more attention recently with the demanding need for higher capacity and more...

  3. 6 Equalization of Channels with ISI Many practical channels are bandlimited and linearly distort the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    244 6 Equalization of Channels with ISI Many practical channels are bandlimited and linearly distort the transmit signal. In this case, the resulting ISI channel has to be equalized for reliable

  4. Interference Channel with State Information 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Lili

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    with State Information. (August 2012) Lili Zhang, B.S., University of Science and Technology of China; M.S., University of Science and Technology of China Chair of Advisory Committee: Shuguang Cui In this dissertation, we study the state-dependent two... Fig. 2.: The interference channel with state information non-causally known at both transmitters. channel is assumed to be memoryless, i.e., p(yn1 , yn2 |xn1 , xn2 , sn) = n? i=1 p(y1i, y2i|x1i, x2i, si), where i is the element index for each...

  5. Diagnosis of femtosecond plasma filament by channeling microwaves along the filament

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Ren, Yu; Qin, Jiang; Hao, Zuoqiang; Lin, Jingquan [School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)] [School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a simple, fast, and non-intrusive experimental method to obtain the basic parameters of femtosecond laser-generated plasma filament. The method is based on the channeling of microwaves along both a plasma filament and a well-defined conducting wire. By comparing the detected microwaves that propagate along the plasma filament and a copper wire with known conductivity and spatial dimension, the basic parameters of the plasma filament can be easily obtained. As a result of the possibility of channeling microwave radiation along the plasma filament, we were then able to obtain the plasma density distribution along the filament length.

  6. Quantum Capacities of Channels with small Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael M. Wolf; David Perez-Garcia

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the quantum capacity of noisy quantum channels which can be represented by coupling a system to an effectively small environment. A capacity formula is derived for all cases where both system and environment are two-dimensional--including all extremal qubit channels. Similarly, for channels acting on higher dimensional systems we show that the capacity can be determined if the channel arises from a sufficiently small coupling to a qubit environment. Extensions to instances of channels with larger environment are provided and it is shown that bounds on the capacity with unconstrained environment can be obtained from decompositions into channels with small environment.

  7. Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings for Flat Panel Displays and Photovoltaic Cells Technology available for licensing: New transparent conducting oxide (TCO)...

  8. EIGHT CHANNEL PROGRAMMABLE PULSE GENERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Master-8 EIGHT CHANNEL PROGRAMMABLE PULSE GENERATOR Operation Manual A.M.P.I. A.M.P.I. 123Uzlel St and the programming simple and easy to learn. Master-8 is an attractive unit and you will enjoy working with its eight -- Modes of operation 11 -- Setting the parameters 13 -- Triggering 14 -- Eight stored paradigms 14

  9. Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy via Relaxation of Solid-State Spin Probes at the Nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. T. Hall; P. Kehayias; D. A. Simpson; A. Jarmola; A. Stacey; D. Budker; L. C. L. Hollenberg

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) describes a suite of techniques for characterising electronic systems, with applications in physics, materials science, chemistry, and biology. However, the requirement for large electron spin ensembles in conventional ESR techniques limits their spatial resolution. Here we present a method for measuring the ESR spectrum of nanoscale electronic environments by measuring the relaxation time ($T_1$) of an optically addressed single-spin probe as it is systematically tuned into resonance with the target electronic system. As a proof of concept we extract the spectral distribution for the P1 electronic spin bath in diamond using an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centres, and demonstrate excellent agreement with theoretical expectations. As the response of each NV spin in this experiment is dominated by a single P1 spin at a mean distance of 2.7\\,nm, the extension of this all-optical technique to the single NV case will enable nanoscale ESR spectroscopy of atomic and molecular spin systems.

  10. Water-soluble conductive polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldissi, M.

    1988-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers which are soluble in water and are electrically conductive. The monomer repeat unit is a thiophene or pyrrole molecule having an alkyl group substituted for the hydrogen atom located in the beta position of the thiophene or pyrrole ring and having a surfactant molecule at the end of the alkyl chain. Polymers of this class having 8 or more carbon atoms in the alkyl chain exhibit liquid crystalline behavior, resulting in high electrical anisotropy. The monomer-to-monomer bonds are located between the carbon atoms which are adjacent to the sulfur or nitrogen atoms. The number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group may vary from 1 to 20 carbon atoms. The surfactant molecule consists of a sulfonate group, or a sulfate group, or a carboxylate group, and hydrogen or an alkali metal. Negative ions from a supporting electrolyte which may be used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer may be incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant to increase the conductivity.

  11. Water-soluble conductive polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldissi, Mahmoud (Sante Fe, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers which are soluble in water and are electrically conductive. The monomer repeat unit is a thiophene or pyrrole molecule having an alkyl group substituted for the hydrogen atom located in the beta position of the thiophene or pyrrole ring and having a surfactant molecule at the end of the alkyl chain. Polymers of this class having 8 or more carbon atoms in the alkyl chain exhibit liquid crystalline behavior, resulting in high electrical anisotropy. The monomer-to-monomer bonds are located between the carbon atoms which are adjacent to the sulfur or nitrogen atoms. The number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group may vary from 1 to 20 carbon atoms. The surfactant molecule consists of a sulfonate group, or a sulfate group, or a carboxylate group, and hydrogen or an alkali metal. Negative ions from a supporting electrolyte which may be used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer may be incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant to increase the conductivity.

  12. Advances in inherently conducting polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldissi, M.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of polyacetylene as the prototype material led to extensive research on its synythesis and characterization. The techniques that emerged as the most important and promising ones are those that dealt with molecular orientation and that resulted in conductivities almost as high as that of copper. The study of dozens of other materials followed. Interest in conducting polymers stems from their nonclassical optical and electronic properties as well as their potential technological applications. However, some of the factors currently limiting their use are the lack of long-term stability and the need to develop conventional low-cost techniques for easy processing. Therefore, research was extended toward solving these problems, and progress has been recently made in that direction. The synthesis of new materials such as stable and easily processable alkylthiophenes, water-soluble polymers, and multicomponent systems, including copolymers and composites, constitutes an important step forward in the area of synthetic metals. However, a full understanding of materials chemistry and properties requires more work in the years to come. Although, few small-scale applications have proven to be successful, long-term stability and applicability tests are needed before their commercial use becomes reality.

  13. Water-soluble conductive polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldissi, Mahmoud (Sante Fe, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers which are soluble in water and are electrically conductive. The monomer repeat unit is a thiophene or pyrrole molecule having an alkyl group substituted for the hydrogen atom located in the beta position of the thiophene or pyrrole ring and having a surfactant molecule at the end of the alkyl chain. Polymers of this class having 8 or more carbon atoms in the alkyl chain exhibit liquid crystalline behavior, resulting in high electrical anisotropy. The monomer-to-monomer bonds are located between the carbon atoms which are adjacent to the sulfur or nitrogen atoms. The number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group may vary from 1 to 20 carbon atoms. The surfactant molecule consists of a sulfonate group, or a sulfate group, or a carboxylate group, and hydrogen or an alkali metal. Negative ions from a supporting electrolyte which may be used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer may be incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant to increase the conductivity.

  14. High Yield Synthesis of Mesoscopic Conductive and Dispersible Carbon Nanostructures via Ultrasonication of Commercial Precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, Vikram K [ORNL] [ORNL; Quinlan, Ronald [ORNL] [ORNL; Agapov, Alexander L [ORNL] [ORNL; Kisliuk, Alexander [ORNL] [ORNL; Bhat, Gajanan [ORNL] [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to produce large quantities of graphenic materials displaying excellent conductivity, thermal resistance, and tunable properties for industrial applications has spurred interest in new techniques for exfoliating graphite. In this paper, sonication-assisted exfoliation of graphitic precursors in the presence of chloroform is shown to produce chemically and structurally unique exfoliated graphitic materials in high yields. These exfoliated graphites, referred to as mesographite and mesographene, respectively, exhibit unique properties which depend on the number of layers and exfoliation conditions. Structural characterization of mesographene reveals the presence of nanoscale two-dimensional graphene layers, and threedimensional carbon nanostructures sandwiched between layers, similar to those found in ball-milled and intercalated graphites. The conductivities of mesographite and mesographene are 2700 and 2000 S/m, respectively, indicating high conductivity despite flake damage. Optical absorption measurements of mesographite sonicated in various solvents showed significant changes in dispersion characteristics, and also indicated significant changes to mesoscopic colloidal behavior. A mechanism for functionalization and formation of capped carbon nanostructures is proposed by integrating the chemical and structural characterization in relation to the various carbon structures observed by electron microscopy. Composites based on common polymers were prepared by solution processing, and changes in thermal properties indicate improved dispersion of mesographite in polar polymers.

  15. Atomic Scale Design and Three-Dimensional Simulation of Ionic Diffusive Nanofluidic Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin Kyoung Park; Kelin Xia; Guo-Wei We

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advance in nanotechnology has led to rapid advances in nanofluidics, which has been established as a reliable means for a wide variety of applications, including molecular separation, detection, crystallization and biosynthesis. Although atomic and molecular level consideration is a key ingredient in experimental design and fabrication of nanfluidic systems, atomic and molecular modeling of nanofluidics is rare and most simulations at nanoscale are restricted to one- or two-dimensions in the literature, to our best knowledge. The present work introduces atomic scale design and three-dimensional (3D) simulation of ionic diffusive nanofluidic systems. We propose a variational multiscale framework to represent the nanochannel in discrete atomic and/or molecular detail while describe the ionic solution by continuum. Apart from the major electrostatic and entropic effects, the non-electrostatic interactions between the channel and solution, and among solvent molecules are accounted in our modeling. We derive generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations for nanofluidic systems. Mathematical algorithms, such as Dirichlet to Neumann mapping and the matched interface and boundary (MIB) methods are developed to rigorously solve the aforementioned equations to the second-order accuracy in 3D realistic settings. Three ionic diffusive nanofluidic systems, including a negatively charged nanochannel, a bipolar nanochannel and a double-well nanochannel are designed to investigate the impact of atomic charges to channel current, density distribution and electrostatic potential. Numerical findings, such as gating, ion depletion and inversion, are in good agreements with those from experimental measurements and numerical simulations in the literature.

  16. Feedback Capacity of the Compound Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrader, Brooke E.

    In this work, we find the capacity of a compound finite-state channel (FSC) with time-invariant deterministic feedback. We consider the use of fixed length block codes over the compound channel. Our achievability result ...

  17. Process tomography for unitary quantum channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutoski, Gus [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada)] [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Johnston, Nathaniel [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)] [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the number of measurements required for quantum process tomography under prior information, such as a promise that the unknown channel is unitary. We introduce the notion of an interactive observable and we show that any unitary channel acting on a d-level quantum system can be uniquely identified among all other channels (unitary or otherwise) with only O(d{sup 2}) interactive observables, as opposed to the O(d{sup 4}) required for tomography of arbitrary channels. This result generalizes to the problem of identifying channels with at most q Kraus operators, and slight improvements can be obtained if we wish to identify such a channel only among unital channels or among other channels with q Kraus operators. These results are proven via explicit construction of large subspaces of Hermitian matrices with various conditions on rank, eigenvalues, and partial trace. Our constructions are built upon various forms of totally nonsingular matrices.

  18. Channel incision in Rodeo Creek, Marin County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, Phoebe; Choy, Min

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Wetlands of Rodeo Creek in the Marin Headlands,channel. Cross Section 3 Rodeo Creek is 5 ft wide at Cross1.55 ft deep. Here, Rodeo Creek is a small channel running

  19. Statistical distributions of level widths and conductance peaks in irregularly shaped quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alhassid, Y.; Lewenkopf, C.H. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)] [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    1995-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical expressions for width and conductance peak distributions for quantum dots with multichannel leads in the Coulomb blockade regime are presented for both limits of conserved and broken time-reversal symmetry. The results are valid for any number of nonequivalent and correlated channels, and the distributions are expressed in terms of the channel correlation matrix {ital M} in each lead. The matrix {ital M} is also given in closed form. A chaotic billiard is used as a model to test numerically the theoretical predictions. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  20. REPORT ON 6TH U.S.-JAPAN JOINT SEMINAR ON NANOSCALE TRANSPORT PHENOMENA.SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    electricity (PV), solar fuel (biomass), and solar thermal, and thermoelectricity related issues for discussing and identifying outstanding science and technology issues in the area of nanoscale thermophysics from MIT, Fushinobu Kazuyoshi from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Shigeo Maruyama from Tokyo University

  1. Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal-Insulator Domain Walls in Vanadium Dioxide Nanobeams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal- Insulator Domain Walls localized alternating Peltier heating and cooling as well as Joule heating concentrated at the M-I domain the monoclinic phase identification. KEYWORDS: Vanadium dioxide, thermoreflectance microscopy, Peltier effect

  2. Optical spectrometer at the nanoscale using optical Yagi-Uda nanoantennas Jingjing Li, Alessandro Salandrino, and Nader Engheta*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jingjing

    Optical spectrometer at the nanoscale using optical Yagi-Uda nanoantennas Jingjing Li, Alessandro; published 5 May 2009 Here we present and analyze an optical spectrum analyzer at the nanometer scale that is able to distribute different frequency contents of the radiation of an optical dipole source

  3. Direct Measurement of the Nanoscale Mechanical Properties of NiTi Shape Memory Gordon A. Shaw1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crone, Wendy C.

    Direct Measurement of the Nanoscale Mechanical Properties of NiTi Shape Memory Alloy Gordon A. Shaw.S.A. ABSTRACT The mechanical properties of sputter-deposited NiTi shape memory alloy thin films ranging the findings, which suggest that the substrate tends block the shape memory effect as film thickness decreases

  4. lame synthesis is one of the most versatile and promising technologies for large-scale production of nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    andenvironmental24 concern. Inorganic, nanostructured materials can be produced by doping a flame with inorganicLETTERS F lame synthesis is one of the most versatile and promising technologies for large-scale production of nanoscale materials1­3 . Pyrolysis has recently been shown to be a useful route

  5. Single-polymer `flyfishing' effect for nanoscale motors and machines: an exact worm-like-chain model study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Weizhu

    Single-polymer `flyfishing' effect for nanoscale motors and machines: an exact worm University of Singapore, Singapore 119076 Single-polymer control effects are abundant in biological motors/machines for nanotechnology. Understanding motor-relevant polymer effects in a general

  6. Y-Shaped Polymer Brushes: Nanoscale Switchable Duangrut Julthongpiput, Yen-Hsi Lin, Jing Teng, Eugene R. Zubarev,* and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubarev, Eugene

    Y-Shaped Polymer Brushes: Nanoscale Switchable Surfaces Duangrut Julthongpiput, Yen-Hsi Lin, Jing incompatible polymer chains (arms) attached to a single focal point capable of chemical grafting dissimilar (hydrophobic and hydrophilic) polymer arms in such Y-shaped molecules lead to the formation

  7. Direct Evidence of Nanoscale Carrier Localization in InGaN/GaN Structures Grown on Si Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Direct Evidence of Nanoscale Carrier Localization in InGaN/GaN Structures Grown on Si Substrates: time-resolved photoluminescence, quantum dots, InGaN, Si substrate There exists a strong continuous expensive and are limited in size. Thus, heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on silicon substrates seems

  8. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 031117 (2012) Stochastically driven single-level quantum dot: A nanoscale finite-time thermodynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindenberg, Katja

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as a nanoscale finite-time thermodynamic machine. The dot is driven by an external stochastic force that switches that extracts heat from the cold reservoir via the work input of the stochastic driving. The efficiency coupling conditions, familiar features are recovered in appropriate limits: Carnot efficiency

  9. Highly conductive composites for fuel cell flow field plates and bipolar plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jang, Bor Z; Zhamu, Aruna; Song, Lulu

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate having flow channels on faces of the plate, comprising an electrically conductive polymer composite. The composite is composed of (A) at least 50% by weight of a conductive filler, comprising at least 5% by weight reinforcement fibers, expanded graphite platelets, graphitic nano-fibers, and/or carbon nano-tubes; (B) polymer matrix material at 1 to 49.9% by weight; and (C) a polymer binder at 0.1 to 10% by weight; wherein the sum of the conductive filler weight %, polymer matrix weight % and polymer binder weight % equals 100% and the bulk electrical conductivity of the flow field or bipolar plate is at least 100 S/cm. The invention also provides a continuous process for cost-effective mass production of the conductive composite-based flow field or bipolar plate.

  10. Multiple channel data acquisition system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawley, H. Bert (Ames, IA); Rosenberg, Eli I. (Ames, IA); Meyer, W. Thomas (Ames, IA); Gorbics, Mark S. (Ames, IA); Thomas, William D. (Boone, IA); McKay, Roy L. (Ames, IA); Homer, Jr., John F. (Ames, IA)

    1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple channel data acquisition system for the transfer of large amounts of data from a multiplicity of data channels has a plurality of modules which operate in parallel to convert analog signals to digital data and transfer that data to a communications host via a FASTBUS. Each module has a plurality of submodules which include a front end buffer (FEB) connected to input circuitry having an analog to digital converter with cache memory for each of a plurality of channels. The submodules are interfaced with the FASTBUS via a FASTBUS coupler which controls a module bus and a module memory. The system is triggered to effect rapid parallel data samplings which are stored to the cache memories. The cache memories are uploaded to the FEBs during which zero suppression occurs. The data in the FEBs is reformatted and compressed by a local processor during transfer to the module memory. The FASTBUS coupler is used by the communications host to upload the compressed and formatted data from the module memory. The local processor executes programs which are downloaded to the module memory through the FASTBUS coupler.

  11. Multiple channel data acquisition system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawley, H.B.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Meyer, W.T.; Gorbics, M.S.; Thomas, W.D.; McKay, R.L.; Homer, J.F. Jr.

    1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple channel data acquisition system for the transfer of large amounts of data from a multiplicity of data channels has a plurality of modules which operate in parallel to convert analog signals to digital data and transfer that data to a communications host via a FASTBUS. Each module has a plurality of submodules which include a front end buffer (FEB) connected to input circuitry having an analog to digital converter with cache memory for each of a plurality of channels. The submodules are interfaced with the FASTBUS via a FASTBUS coupler which controls a module bus and a module memory. The system is triggered to effect rapid parallel data samplings which are stored to the cache memories. The cache memories are uploaded to the FEBs during which zero suppression occurs. The data in the FEBs is reformatted and compressed by a local processor during transfer to the module memory. The FASTBUS coupler is used by the communications host to upload the compressed and formatted data from the module memory. The local processor executes programs which are downloaded to the module memory through the FASTBUS coupler. 25 figs.

  12. Experimental and numerical investigation of turbulent flow and heat (mass) transfer in a two-pass trapezoidal channel with turbulence promoters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Sung Hyuk

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments and numerical predictions were conducted to study heat (mass) transfer characteristics in a two-pass trapezoidal channel simulating the cooling passage of a gas turbine blade. Three different rib configurations were tested for the air...

  13. Analysis of Energy Efficiency in Fading Channels under QoS Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gursoy, Mustafa Cenk

    Analysis of Energy Efficiency in Fading Channels under QoS Constraints Deli Qiao, Mustafa Cenk, and energy requirements under QoS constraints are identified. The analysis is conducted for the case in which vanishes. Through the wideband slope analysis, the increased energy requirements at low but nonzero power

  14. Performance Limitations of Linear Systems over Additive White Noise Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yiqian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control over additive white noise channels . . . . . . . 1.3Additive white noise channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Angaussian systems over additive gaussian wireles fading

  15. Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Rodriguez, Brian J [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Karapetian, Edgar [ORNL; Mirman, B [Suffolk University, Boston; Eliseev, E. A. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Functionality of biological and inorganic systems ranging from nonvolatile computer memories and microelectromechanical systems to electromotor proteins and cellular membranes is ultimately based on the intricate coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena. In the past decade, piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has been established as a powerful tool for nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Here, we give an overview of the fundamental image formation mechanism in PFM and summarize recent theoretical and technological advances. In particular, we show that the signal formation in PFM is complementary to that in the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques, and we discuss the implications. We also consider the prospect of extending PFM beyond ferroelectric characterization for quantitative probing of electromechanical behavior in molecular and biological systems and high-resolution probing of static and dynamic polarization switching processes in low-dimensional ferroelectric materials and heterostructures.

  16. Nanoscale density fluctuations in swift heavy ion irradiated amorphous SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kluth, P.; Giulian, R.; Ridgway, M. C. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Pakarinen, O. H.; Djurabekova, F.; Nordlund, K. [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Byrne, A. P. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the observation of nanoscale density fluctuations in 2 {mu}m thick amorphous SiO{sub 2} layers irradiated with 185 MeV Au ions. At high fluences, in excess of approximately 5 x 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}, where the surface is completely covered by ion tracks, synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering measurements reveal the existence of a steady state of density fluctuations. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, this steady state is consistent with an ion track ''annihilation'' process, where high-density regions generated in the periphery of new tracks fill in low-density regions located at the center of existing tracks.

  17. Theoretical studies of Ir5Th and Ir5Ce nanoscale precipitates in Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Averill, Frank [ORNL] [ORNL; Cooper, Valentino R [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimentally, it is known that very small amounts of thorium and/or cerium added to iridium metal form a precipitate, Ir5Th / Ir5Ce, which improves the high temperature mechanical properties of the resulting alloys. We demonstrate that there are low-energy configurations for nano-scale precipitates of these phases in Ir, and that these coherent arrangements may assist in producing improved mechanical properties. One precipitate/matrix orientation gives a particularly low interfacial energy, and a low lattice misfit. Nanolayer precipitates with this orientation are found to be likely to form, with little driving force to coarsen. The predicted morphology of the precipitates and their orientation with the matrix phase provide a potential experiment that could be used to test these predictions.

  18. Universal 2D Soft Nano-Scale Mosaic Structure Theory for Polymers and Colloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia-lin Wu

    2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A basic concept in chain-particle cluster-motion, from frozen glassy state to melt state, is the 2D soft nano-scale mosaic structure formed by 8 orders of 2D interface excitation (IE) loop-flows, from small to large in inverse cascade and re-arrangement structure in cascade along local one direction. IE has additional repulsive energy and extra vacancy volume. IE results from that the instantaneous synchronal polarized electron charge coupling pair is able to parallel transport on the interface between two neighboring chain-particles with antiparallel delocalization. This structure accords with de Gennes' mosaic structure picture, from which we can directly deduce glass transition temperature, melt temperature, free volume fraction, critical entangled chain length, and activation energy to break solid lattice. This is also the in-herency maximum order-potential structure in random systems.

  19. An atomistic methodology of energy release rate for graphene at nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhen; Lee, James D., E-mail: jdlee@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, the George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Wang, Xianqiao [College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms packed into a honeycomb architecture, serving as a fundamental building block for electric devices. Understanding the fracture mechanism of graphene under various conditions is crucial for tailoring the electrical and mechanical properties of graphene-based devices at atomic scale. Although most of the fracture mechanics concepts, such as stress intensity factors, are not applicable in molecular dynamics simulation, energy release rate still remains to be a feasible and crucial physical quantity to characterize the fracture mechanical property of materials at nanoscale. This work introduces an atomistic simulation methodology, based on the energy release rate, as a tool to unveil the fracture mechanism of graphene at nanoscale. This methodology can be easily extended to any atomistic material system. We have investigated both opening mode and mixed mode at different temperatures. Simulation results show that the critical energy release rate of graphene is independent of initial crack length at low temperature. Graphene with inclined pre-crack possesses higher fracture strength and fracture deformation but smaller critical energy release rate compared with the graphene with vertical pre-crack. Owing to its anisotropy, graphene with armchair chirality always has greater critical energy release rate than graphene with zigzag chirality. The increase of temperature leads to the reduction of fracture strength, fracture deformation, and the critical energy release rate of graphene. Also, higher temperature brings higher randomness of energy release rate of graphene under a variety of predefined crack lengths. The energy release rate is independent of the strain rate as long as the strain rate is small enough.

  20. Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  1. Interfacial band alignment and structural properties of nanoscale TiO{sub 2} thin films for integration with epitaxial crystallographic oriented germanium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, N.; Zhu, Y.; Hudait, M. K., E-mail: mantu.hudait@vt.edu [Advanced Devices and Sustainable Energy Laboratory (ADSEL), Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Maurya, D.; Varghese, R.; Priya, S. [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the structural and band alignment properties of nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin films deposited on epitaxial crystallographic oriented Ge layers grown on (100), (110), and (111)A GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited at low temperature by physical vapor deposition were found to be amorphous in nature, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed a sharp heterointerface between the TiO{sub 2} thin film and the epitaxially grown Ge with no traceable interfacial layer. A comprehensive assessment on the effect of substrate orientation on the band alignment at the TiO{sub 2}/Ge heterointerface is presented by utilizing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. A band-gap of 3.33?±?0.02?eV was determined for the amorphous TiO{sub 2} thin film from the Tauc plot. Irrespective of the crystallographic orientation of the epitaxial Ge layer, a sufficient valence band-offset of greater than 2?eV was obtained at the TiO{sub 2}/Ge heterointerface while the corresponding conduction band-offsets for the aforementioned TiO{sub 2}/Ge system were found to be smaller than 1?eV. A comparative assessment on the effect of Ge substrate orientation revealed a valence band-offset relation of ?E{sub V}(100)?>??E{sub V}(111)?>??E{sub V}(110) and a conduction band-offset relation of ?E{sub C}(110) >??E{sub C}(111)?>??E{sub C}(100). These band-offset parameters are of critical importance and will provide key insight for the design and performance analysis of TiO{sub 2} for potential high-? dielectric integration and for future metal-insulator-semiconductor contact applications with next generation of Ge based metal-oxide field-effect transistors.

  2. Joint source channel coding for non-ergodic channels: the distortion signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) exponent perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattad, Kapil

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 F. Performance Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 1. SISO / SIMO / MISO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 2. The General MIMO Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 3. Block Fading SISO Channel / Parallel SISO Channels 86 4... the mutual information between U and V. The second part, channel coding, is to send the bit stream B reliably over the channel. This is possible if and only if the channel coding rate Rc (bits per channel use) is less than the capacity of the channel...

  3. Electronically conductive polymer composites and microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dyke, L.S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composites of electronically conductive polymers with insulating host materials are investigated. A template synthesis method was developed for the production of electronically conductive polymer microstructures. In template synthesis the pores of a porous host membrane act as templates for the polymerization of a conductive polymer. The template synthetic method can be used to form either solid microfibrils or hollow microtubules. The electrochemical properties of conductive polymers produced via the template synthesis method are superior to those of conventionally synthesized conductive polymers. Electronically conductive polymers are used to impart conductivity to non-conductive materials. Two different approaches are used. First, thin film composites of conductive polymers with fluoropolymers are made by the polymerization of conductive polymers onto fluoropolymer films. Modification of the fluoropolymer surface prior to conductive polymer polymerization is necessary to obtain good adhesion between the two materials. The difference in adhesion of the conductive polymer to the modified and unmodified fluoropolymer surfaces can be used to pattern the conductive polymer coating. Patterning of the conductive polymer coating can alternatively be done via UV laser ablation of the conductive polymer. The second method by which conductive polymers were used to impart conductivity to an insulating polymer was via the formation of a graft copolymer. In this approach, heterocyclic monomers grafted to an insulating polyphosphazene backbone were polymerized to yield semiconductive materials. Finally the measurement of electrolyte concentration in polypyrrole and the effects of hydroxide anion on the electrochemical and electrical properties of polypyrrole are described. It is shown that treatment of polypyrrole with hydroxide anion increases the potential window over which polypyrrole is a good electronic conductor.

  4. On the specifics of the electrical conductivity anomalies in PVC nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Vlasov; L. A. Apresyan

    2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A qualitative model describing the "anomalous" features of the conductivity of polymer nanocomposites, in particular, switching to the conducting state in relatively thick (tens of microns or more) of flexible PVC films is considered. In previously published experimental results, change of conductivity by 10 or more orders of magnitude occurred both in the absence of external influences (spontaneously), and under the influence of an applied electric field, as well as other initiating factors (such as uniaxial pressure) . In a model of hopping conduction mechanism it is shown, that switching in the conduction states under the action of external field significantly (by orders of magnitude) below threshold can be associated with a high-resistance state instability that results from the sequence of "shorting" (reversible soft breakdown) of narrow insulating gaps between regions with relatively high conductivity. Increasing the field strength in the remaining insulating gaps ultimately leads to the formation of a conducting channel between the external electrodes and switching conductivity of the composite film sample in a state of high conductivity. This cascade model is essentially based on the transition from the usual description of the charge tunneling through single independent insulating gap to take into account correlations between adjacent gaps. In the frame of developed model other "anomalies" such as exponential dependence of the resistance on the sample thickness, pressure, and other influences can be qualitative explained. An analogy of the model with a cascading breakdown of avalanche transistors is also considered.

  5. CONDUCTIVE POLYCARBONATE NANOCOMPOSITES with HYBRID NANOFILLERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    CONDUCTIVE POLYCARBONATE NANOCOMPOSITES with HYBRID NANOFILLERS Catherine Smith, Brooks Lively, Wei of polymers. Emerging technologies have demonstrated the crucial need for highly conductive polymer combination between polycarbonate (PC) and hybrid concentrations of CNT and GNP nanofillers was investigated

  6. Fuel cell assembly fluid flow plate having conductive fibers and rigidizing material therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, Michael M. (Fairfield, CT)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid flow plate is preferably formed with three initial sections, for instance, two layers of conductive (e.g., metal) fibers and a barrier material (e.g., metal foil) which is interposed between the two layers. For example, sintering of these three sections can provide electrical path(s) between outer faces of the two layers. Then, the sintered sections can be, for instance, placed in a mold for forming of flow channel(s) into one or more of the outer faces. Next, rigidizing material (e.g., resin) can be injected into the mold, for example, to fill and/or seal space(s) about a conductive matrix of the electrical path(s). Preferably, abrading of surface(s) of the outer face(s) serves to expose electrical contact(s) to the electrical path(s).

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) channel corner seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spurrier, Francis R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corner seal for an MHD duct includes a compressible portion which contacts the duct walls and an insulating portion which contacts the electrodes, sidewall bars and insulators. The compressible portion may be a pneumatic or hydraulic gasket or an open-cell foam rubber. The insulating portion is segmented into a plurality of pieces of the same thickness as the electrodes, insulators and sidewall bars and aligned therewith, the pieces aligned with the insulator being of a different size from the pieces aligned with the electrodes and sidewall bars to create a stepped configuration along the corners of the MHD channel.

  8. Organic conductive films for semiconductor electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, A.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the present invention, improved electrodes overcoated with conductive polymer films and preselected catalysts are provided. The electrodes typically comprise an inorganic semiconductor over-coated with a charge conductive polymer film comprising a charge conductive polymer in or on which is a catalyst or charge-relaying agent.

  9. Engineering domain structures in nanoscale magnetic thin films via strain Jia-Mian Hu, T. N. Yang, L. Q. Chen, and C. W. Nan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Engineering domain structures in nanoscale magnetic thin films via strain Jia-Mian Hu, T. N. Yang://scitation.aip.org/termsconditions. Downloaded to ] IP: 146.186.211.66 On: Thu, 09 Jan 2014 19:48:21 #12;Engineering domain structures in nanoscale magnetic thin films via strain Jia-Mian Hu,1,a) T. N. Yang,2 L. Q. Chen,1,2 and C. W. Nan1,a) 1

  10. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)] [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids.

  11. Diminished Short Channel Effects in Nanoscale Double-Gate Silicon-on-Insulator MetalOxideSemiconductor Field-Effect-Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, M. Jagadesh

    ) and the back-gate oxide (tb) thickness is 2 nm. The doping in the p-type body and n+ source/drain regions­Oxide­Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistors due to Induced Back-Gate Step Potential M. Jagadesh KUMAR Ã and G. Venkateshwar surface potential profile at the back gate of an asymmetrical double gate (DG) silicon-on-insulator (SOI

  12. Determining conductivity and mobility values of individual components in multiphase composite Cu{sub 1.97}Ag{sub 0.03}Se

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, Tristan W.; Brown, David R.; Snyder, G. Jeffrey, E-mail: jsnyder@caltech.edu [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, MC 309-81, Pasadena, California 91106 (United States); Zeier, Wolfgang G. [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, MC 309-81, Pasadena, California 91106 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Seeley G. Mudd Bldg., 3620 McClintock Ave., Los Angeles, California 90089-1062 (United States); Melot, Brent C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Seeley G. Mudd Bldg., 3620 McClintock Ave., Los Angeles, California 90089-1062 (United States)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The intense interest in phase segregation in thermoelectrics as a means to reduce the lattice thermal conductivity and to modify the electronic properties from nanoscale size effects has not been met with a method for separately measuring the properties of each phase assuming a classical mixture. Here, we apply effective medium theory for measurements of the in-line and Hall resistivity of a multiphase composite, in this case Cu{sub 1.97}Ag{sub 0.03}Se. The behavior of these properties with magnetic field as analyzed by effective medium theory allows us to separate the conductivity and charge carrier mobility of each phase. This powerful technique can be used to determine the matrix properties in the presence of an unwanted impurity phase, to control each phase in an engineered composite, and to determine the maximum carrier concentration change by a given dopant, making it the first step toward a full optimization of a multiphase thermoelectric material and distinguishing nanoscale effects from those of a classical mixture.

  13. Private Interactive Communication Across an Adversarial Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Private Interactive Communication Across an Adversarial Channel Ran Gelles, Amit Sahai, and Akshay Wadia Department of Computer Science, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA {gelles, sahai

  14. Southern California Channel Islands Bibliography, through 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Channel/Santa Maria Basin/Elk Hills/San Joaquin Basin/Chicosiliceous composition/Elk Hills/San Joaquin Basin/Chico

  15. Southern California Channel Islands Bibliography, through 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    evaluation/offshore/Santa Maria/ Santa Barbara/Santa Maria Basin/Santa Barbara Channel/Los Angeles Basin/economic geology/energy sources/petroleum. #

  16. Anisotropic flow in striped superhydrophobic channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Jiajia; Schmid, Friederike; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of dissipative particle dynamics simulations and develop a semi-analytical theory and of an anisotropic flow in a parallel-plate channel with two superhydrophobic striped walls. Our approach is valid for any local slip at the gas sectors and an arbitrary distance between the plates, ranging from a thick to a thin channel. It allows us to optimize area fractions, slip lengths, channel thickness and texture orientation to maximize a transverse flow. Our results may be useful for extracting effective slip tensors from global measurements, such as the permeability of a channel, in experiments or simulations, and may also find applications in passive microfluidic mixing.

  17. Anisotropic flow in striped superhydrophobic channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiajia Zhou; Aleksey V. Belyaev; Friederike Schmid; Olga I. Vinogradova

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of dissipative particle dynamics simulations and develop a semi-analytical theory of an anisotropic flow in a parallel-plate channel with two superhydrophobic striped walls. Our approach is valid for any local slip at the gas sectors and an arbitrary distance between the plates, ranging from a thick to a thin channel. It allows us to optimize area fractions, slip lengths, channel thickness and texture orientation to maximize a transverse flow. Our results may be useful for extracting effective slip tensors from global measurements, such as the permeability of a channel, in experiments or simulations, and may also find applications in passive microfluidic mixing.

  18. Combined source-channel coding for a power and bandwidth constrained noisy channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Nouman Saeed

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes a framework for combined source-channel coding under power and bandwidth constrained noisy channel. The framework is then applied to progressive image coding transmission using constant envelope M-ary Phase Shift Key (MPSK...

  19. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Mi [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiao, Xiubin [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xi, Ning, E-mail: xin@egr.msu.edu [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, Weijing, E-mail: zhangwj3072@163.com [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm{sup 2}) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells.

  20. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Buttermilk Channel, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buttermilk Channel was one of seven waterways that was sampled and evaluated for dredging and sediment disposal. Sediment samples were collected and analyses were conducted on sediment core samples. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the channel included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. A composite sediment samples, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

  1. Joint channel estimation and decoding of root LDPC codes in block-fading channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andriyanova, Iryna

    Joint channel estimation and decoding of root LDPC codes in block-fading channels Iryna Andriyanova receivers for joint decoding and channel-state estimation for transmission on block-fading chan- nels of root-LDPC-coded signals. Root-LDPC codes are known to be most performant codes for block

  2. Holographic conductivity of zero temperature superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Konoplya; A. Zhidenko

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the recently found by G. Horowitz and M. Roberts (arXiv:0908.3677) numerical model of the ground state of holographic superconductors (at zero temperature), we calculate the conductivity for such models. The universal relation connecting conductivity with the reflection coefficient was used for finding the conductivity by the WKB approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the frequency and charge density is discussed. Numerical calculations confirm the general arguments of (arXiv:0908.3677) in favor of non-zero conductivity even at zero temperature. In addition to the Horowitz-Roberts solution we have found (probably infinite) set of extra solutions which are normalizable and reach the same correct RN-AdS asymptotic at spatial infinity. These extra solutions (which correspond to larger values of the grand canonical potential) lead to effective potentials that also vanish at the horizon and thus correspond to a non-zero conductivity at zero temperature.

  3. In-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis of capacity fade in nanoscale-LiCoO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patridge, Christopher J. [NRC/NRL Cooperative Research Associate, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Love, Corey T., E-mail: corey.love@nrl.navy.mil [Chemistry Division, Code 6113, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Swider-Lyons, Karen E. [Chemistry Division, Code 6113, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Twigg, Mark E. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Code 6812, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ramaker, David E. [Chemistry Division, Code 6189, U.S. Naval Research laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The local structure of nanoscale (?10–40 nm) LiCoO{sub 2} is monitored during electrochemical cycling utilizing in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The high surface area of the LiCoO{sub 2} nanoparticles not only enhances capacity fade, but also provides a large signal from the particle surface relative to the bulk. Changes in the nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} metal-oxide bond lengths, structural disorder, and chemical state are tracked during cycling by adapting the delta mu (??) technique in complement with comprehensive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) modeling. For the first time, we use a ?? EXAFS method, and by comparison of the difference EXAFS spectra, extrapolate significant coordination changes and reduction of cobalt species with cycling. This combined approach suggests Li–Co site exchange at the surface of the nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} as a likely factor in the capacity fade and irreversible losses in practical, microscale LiCoO{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: Electrochemical cycling of Li-ion batteries has strong impact on the structure and integrity of the cathode active material particularly near the surface/electrolyte interface. In developing a new method, we have used in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy during electrochemical cycling of nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} to track changes during charge and discharge and between subsequent cycles. Using difference spectra, several small changes in Co-O bond length, Co-O and Co-Co coordination, and site exchange between Co and Li sites can be tracked. These methods show promise as a new technique to better understand processes which lead to capacity fade and loss in Li-ion batteries. - Highlights: • A new method is developed to understand capacity fade in Li-ion battery cathodes. • Structural changes are tracked during Li intercalation/deintercalation of LiCoO{sub 2}. • Surface structural changes are emphasized using nanoscale-LiCoO{sub 2} and difference spectra. • Full multiple scattering calculations are used to support ?? analysis.

  4. Thermal conductivity and heat transfer in superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G.; Neagu, M.; Borca-Tasciuc, T.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the thermal conductivity and heat transfer processes in superlattice structures is critical for the development of thermoelectric materials and devices based on quantum structures. This work reports progress on the modeling of thermal conductivity of superlattice structures. Results from the models established based on the Boltzmann transport equation could explain existing experimental results on the thermal conductivity of semiconductor superlattices in both in plane and cross-plane directions. These results suggest the possibility of engineering the interfaces to further reduce thermal conductivity of superlattice structures.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: electronic conducting transition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electronic conducting transition metal oxides Joint Hire Increases Materials Science Collaboration for Sandia, UNM On September 16, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory,...

  6. Conducting polymer actuator enhancement through microstructuring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillai, Priam Vasudevan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroactive conducting polymers, such as polypyrrole, polyaniline, and polythiophenes are currently studied as novel biologically inspired actuators. The actuation mechanisms in these materials are based on the diffusion ...

  7. Fabrication and characterization of conducting polymer microwires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saez, Miguel Angel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flexible microwires fabricated from conducting polymers have a wide range of potential applications, including smart textiles that incorporate sensing, actuation, and data processing. The development of garments that ...

  8. Low temperature proton conducting oxide devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Payzant, Edward A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Speakman, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Greenblatt, Martha (Highland Park, NJ)

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for conducting protons at a temperature below 550.degree. C. includes a LAMOX ceramic body characterized by an alpha crystalline structure.

  9. Conducting polymer nanostructures for biological applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Electronically Conductive Polymer Nanostructures,” Acc.et al. , “Conjugated-Polymer Micro- and Milliactuators for3. Y. Berdichevsky, Y. -H. Lo, “Polymer Microvalve Based on

  10. Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industry Resource Type: Guidemanual Website: china.lbl.govsiteschina.lbl.govfilesLBNL-3991E.Industrial%20Energy Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting...

  11. EPA -- Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act and Section 309 of the Clean Air Act EPA -- Addressing Children's Health...

  12. Blind Channel Equalization and -Approximation Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Yinyu

    Blind Channel Equalization and #15;-Approximation Algorithms #3; Qingyu Li 1 , Er-Wei Bai 1 University of Iowa Iowa City, IA 52242 Abstract In this paper, we show that a blind equalizer can be obtained without using any sta- tistical information on the input by formulating the blind channel equalization

  13. Distributed Interference Pricing with MISO Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    Distributed Interference Pricing with MISO Channels Changxin Shi, Randall A. Berry, and Michael L an interference channel consisting of multi- input, single-output (MISO) wireless links. The objective generalized to a MISO network, as shown in Sec- tion II. Such an algorithm was previously presented in [3

  14. Optimization of Energy Harvesting MISO Communication Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    1 Optimization of Energy Harvesting MISO Communication Channels Rajeev Gangula, Student Member-to-point multiple-input single-output (MISO) communication system is con- sidered when both the transmitter (TX bound on the ergodic rate of MISO channel with beamforming and limited feedback. Feedback bit allocation

  15. Energy Harvesting Diamond Channel with Energy Cooperation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulukus, Sennur

    Energy Harvesting Diamond Channel with Energy Cooperation Berk Gurakan Sennur Ulukus Department@umd.edu Abstract--We consider the energy harvesting diamond channel, where the source and two relays harvest energy the option of wirelessly transferring some of its energy to the relays via energy cooperation. We find

  16. Extending additivity from symmetric to asymmetric channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motohisa Fukuda

    2005-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a lemma which allows one to extend results about the additivity of the minimal output entropy from highly symmetric channels to a much larger class. A similar result holds for the maximal output $p$-norm. Examples are given showing its use in a variety of situations. In particular, we prove the additivity and the multiplicativity for the shifted depolarising channel.

  17. Fourier transform channeled spectropolarimetry in the MWIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dereniak, Eustace L.

    Fourier transform channeled spectropolarimetry in the MWIR Michael W. Kudenov,1 Nathan A. Hagen, 1 Abstract: A complete Fourier Transform Spectropolarimeter in the MWIR is demonstrated. The channeled and links 1. P. Griffiths and J. D. Haseth, "Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry," (John Wiley & Sons

  18. Constrained capacity of MIMO Rayleigh fading channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wenyan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis channel capacity of a special type of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) Rayleigh fading channels is studied, where the transmitters are subject to a finite phase-shift keying (PSK) input alphabet. The constraint on the input...

  19. Conductive porous scaffolds as potential neural interface materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth L.; Cicotte, Kirsten N.; Buerger, Stephen P.; Reece, Gregory; Dirk, Shawn M.; Lin, Patrick P.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our overall intent is to develop improved prosthetic devices with the use of nerve interfaces through which transected nerves may grow, such that small groups of nerve fibers come into close contact with electrode sites, each of which is connected to electronics external to the interface. These interfaces must be physically structured to allow nerve fibers to grow through them, either by being porous or by including specific channels for the axons. They must be mechanically compatible with nerves such that they promote growth and do not harm the nervous system, and biocompatible to promote nerve fiber growth and to allow close integration with biological tissue. They must exhibit selective and structured conductivity to allow the connection of electrode sites with external circuitry, and electrical properties must be tuned to enable the transmission of neural signals. Finally, the interfaces must be capable of being physically connected to external circuitry, e.g. through attached wires. We have utilized electrospinning as a tool to create conductive, porous networks of non-woven biocompatible fibers in order to meet the materials requirements for the neural interface. The biocompatible fibers were based on the known biocompatible material poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) as well as a newer biomaterial developed in our laboratories, poly(butylene fumarate) (PBF). Both of the polymers cannot be electrospun using conventional electrospinning techniques due to their low glass transition temperatures, so in situ crosslinking methodologies were developed to facilitate micro- and nano-fiber formation during electrospinning. The conductivity of the electrospun fiber mats was controlled by controlling the loading with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Fabrication, electrical and materials characterization will be discussed along with initial in vivo experimental results.

  20. Conversion of lignin precursors to carbon fibers with nanoscale graphitic domains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Sabornie [ORNL; Jones, Eric B [ORNL; Clingenpeel, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; McKenna, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; McNutt, Nicholas W [ORNL; Keffer, David J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Johs, Alexander [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignin is one of the most abundant and inexpensive natural biopolymers. It can be efficiently converted to low cost carbon fiber, monolithic structures or powders that could be used directly in the production of anodes for lithium-ion batteries. In this work, we report processing parameters relevant for the conversion of lignin precursors into electrochemically active carbon fibers, the impact of lignin precursor modification on melt processing and the microstructure of the final carbon material. The conversion process encompasses melt spinning of the lignin precursor, oxidative stabilization and a low temperature carbonization step in a nitrogen/hydrogen atmosphere. To assess electrochemical performance, we determined resistivities of individual carbon fiber samples and characterized the microstructure by scanning electron microscopy and neutron diffraction. The chemical modification and subsequent thermomechanical processing methods reported here are effective for conversion into carbon fibers while preserving the macromolecular backbone structure of lignin. Modification of softwood lignin produced functionalities and rheological properties that more closely resemble hardwood lignin thereby enabling the melt processing of softwood lignin in oxidative atmospheres (air). Structural characterization of the carbonized fibers reveals nanoscale graphitic domains that are linked to enhanced electrochemical performance.

  1. Method and apparatus for remote sensing of molecular species at nanoscale utilizing a reverse photoacoustic effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Su, Ming (Oviedo, FL); Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Hedden, David (Lenoir City, TN)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for identifying a sample, involves illuminating the sample with light of varying wavelengths, transmitting an acoustic signal against the sample from one portion and receiving a resulting acoustic signal on another portion, detecting a change of phase in the acoustic signal corresponding to the light of varying wavelengths, and analyzing the change of phase in the acoustic signal for the varying wavelengths of illumination to identify the sample. The apparatus has a controlled source for illuminating the sample with light of varying wavelengths, a transmitter for transmitting an acoustic wave, a receiver for receiving the acoustic wave and converting the acoustic wave to an electronic signal, and an electronic circuit for detecting a change of phase in the acoustic wave corresponding to respective ones of the varying wavelengths and outputting the change of phase for the varying wavelengths to allow identification of the sample. The method and apparatus can be used to detect chemical composition or visual features. A transmission mode and a reflection mode of operation are disclosed. The method and apparatus can be applied at nanoscale to detect molecules in a biological sample.

  2. The Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer NOMAD at the Spallation Neutron Source SNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feygenson, Mikhail [ORNL; Carruth, John William [ORNL; Hoffmann, Ron [ORNL; Chipley, Kenneth King [ORNL; Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nanoscale Ordered Materials Diffractometer (NOMAD) is neutron time-of-flight diffractometer designed to determine pair dist ribution functions of a wide range of materials ranging from short range ordered liquids to long range ordered crystals. Due to a large neutron flux provided by the Spallation Neutron Source SNS and a large detector coverage neutron count-rates exceed comparable instruments by one to two orders of magnitude. This is achieved while maintaining a relatively high momentum transfer resolution of a $\\delta Q/Q \\sim 0.8\\%$ FWHM (typical), and an achievable $\\delta Q/Q$ of 0.24\\% FWHM (best). The real space resolution is related to the maximum momentum transfer; A maximum momentum transfer of 50\\AA$^{-1}$ can be achieved routinely and the maximum momentum transfer given by the detector configuration and the incident neutron spectrum is 125 \\AA$^{-1}$. High stability of the source and the detector allow small contrast isotope experiments to be performed. A detailed description of the instrument is given and the results of experiments with standard samples are discussed.

  3. Ab-initio friction forces on the nanoscale: A DFT study of fcc Cu(111)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Wolloch; Gregor Feldbauer; Peter Mohn; Josef Redinger; András Vernes

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    While there are a number of models that tackle the problem of calculating friction forces on the atomic level, providing a completely parameter-free approach remains a challenge. Here we present a quasi-static model to obtain an approximation to the nanofrictional response of dry, wearless systems based on quantum mechanical all-electron calculations. We propose a mechanism to allow dissipative sliding, which relies on atomic relaxations. We define two different ways of calculating the mean nanofriction force, both leading to an exponential friction-versus-load behavior for all sliding directions. Since our approach does not impose any limits on lengths and directions of the sliding paths, we investigate arbitrary sliding directions for an fcc Cu(111) interface and detect two periodic paths which form the upper and lower bound of nanofriction. For long aperiodic paths the friction force convergences to a value in between these limits. For low loads we retrieve the Derjaguin generalization of Amontons-Coulomb kinetic friction law which appears to be valid all the way down to the nanoscale. We observe a non-vanishing Derjaguin-offset even for atomically flat surfaces in dry contact.

  4. Arrays of nanoscale magnetic dots: Fabrication by x-ray interference lithography and characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyderman, L.J.; Solak, H.H.; David, C.; Atkinson, D.; Cowburn, R.P.; Nolting, F. [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Nanomagnetism Group, Department of Physics, University of Durham, Rochester Building, Science Laboratories, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray interference lithography (XIL) was employed in combination with electrodeposition to fabricate arrays of nanoscale nickel dots which are uniform over 40 {mu}m and have periods down to 71 nm. Using extreme-ultraviolet light, XIL has the potential to produce magnetic dot arrays over large areas with periods well below 50 nm, and down to a theoretical limit of 6.5 nm for a 13 nm x-ray wavelength. In the nickel dot arrays, we observed the effect of interdot magnetic stray field interactions. Measuring the hysteresis loops using the magneto-optical Kerr effect, a double switching via the vortex state was observed in the nickel dots with diameters down to 44 nm and large dot separations. As the dot separations are reduced to below around 50 nm a single switching, occurring by collective rotation of the magnetic spins, is favored due to interdot magnetic stray field interactions. This results in magnetic flux closure through several dots which could be visualized with micromagnetic simulations. Further evidence of the stray field interactions was seen in photoemission electron microscopy images, where bands of contrast corresponding to chains of coupled dots were observed.

  5. Proton conducting membrane for fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colombo, Daniel G.; Krumpelt, Michael; Myers, Deborah J.; Kopasz, John P.

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion conducting membrane comprising dendrimeric polymers covalently linked into a network structure. The dendrimeric polymers have acid functional terminal groups and may be covalently linked via linking compounds, cross-coupling reactions, or copolymerization reactions. The ion conducting membranes may be produced by various methods and used in fuel cells.

  6. Proton conducting membrane for fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colombo, Daniel G.; Krumpelt, Michael; Myers, Deborah J.; Kopasz, John P.

    2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion conducting membrane comprising dendrimeric polymers covalently linked into a network structure. The dendrimeric polymers have acid functional terminal groups and may be covalently linked via linking compounds, cross-coupling reactions, or copolymerization reactions. The ion conducting membranes may be produced by various methods and used in fuel cells.

  7. Flexible moldable conductive current-limiting materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shea, John Joseph (Pittsburgh, PA); Djordjevic, Miomir B. (Milwaukee, WI); Hanna, William Kingston (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A current limiting PTC device (10) has two electrodes (14) with a thin film of electric conducting polymer material (20) disposed between the electrodes, the polymer material (20) having superior flexibility and short circuit performance, where the polymer material contains short chain aliphatic diepoxide, conductive filler particles, curing agent, and, preferably, a minor amount of bisphenol A epoxy resin.

  8. NUMBER: 1530 TITLE: Code of Student Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . For the purposes of this Code, the term "University Official" is inclusive of "Faculty Member" as defined in IV 1530 1 NUMBER: 1530 TITLE: Code of Student Conduct APPROVED: August 27, 1970; Revised June 14, 2012 I. BASIS AND RATIONALE FOR A CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT Old Dominion University

  9. Selected factors influencing GCL hydraulic conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrov, R.J. [Trow Consulting Engineers Ltd., Brampton, Ontario (Canada); Rowe, R.K.; Quigley, R.M. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of confined swell and hydraulic conductivity tests were conducted on a needle-punched geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) with water as the hydrating medium and reference permeant. Increases in the static confining stress and the needle-punching both restricted GCL swell and contributed to lower bulk GCL void ratios and hence significantly lower hydraulic conductivity values. A well defined linear-log relationship is found between the bulk void ratio and hydraulic conductivity. The number of pore volumes of permeant flow and consequently the level of chemical equilibrium is shown to have a significant effect on the hydraulic conductivity. It is shown that there is a decrease in hydraulic conductivity for small amounts of permeant flow for all ethanol/water mixtures examined. At or near chemical equilibrium, low concentration mixtures (25 and 50% ethanol) continued to produce relative decreases in GCL hydraulic conductivity due to the increased viscosity of the permeant; however, highly concentrated mixtures (75 and 100% ethanol) produced relative increases in GCL hydraulic conductivity arising from double layer contraction. The implications are discussed.

  10. An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamil A. Khan

    2009-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal conductivity of the fuel in today's Light Water Reactors, Uranium dioxide, can be improved by incorporating a uniformly distributed heat conducting network of a higher conductivity material, Silicon Carbide. The higher thermal conductivity of SiC along with its other prominent reactor-grade properties makes it a potential material to address some of the related issues when used in UO2 [97% TD]. This ongoing research, in collaboration with the University of Florida, aims to investigate the feasibility and develop a formal methodology of producing the resultant composite oxide fuel. Calculations of effective thermal conductivity of the new fuel as a function of %SiC for certain percentages and as a function of temperature are presented as a preliminary approach. The effective thermal conductivities are obtained at different temperatures from 600K to 1600K. The corresponding polynomial equations for the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities are given based on the simulation results. Heat transfer mechanism in this fuel is explained using a finite volume approach and validated against existing empirical models. FLUENT 6.1.22 was used for thermal conductivity calculations and to estimate reduction in centerline temperatures achievable within such a fuel rod. Later, computer codes COMBINE-PC and VENTURE-PC were deployed to estimate the fuel enrichment required, to maintain the same burnup levels, corresponding to a volume percent addition of SiC.

  11. The Generalized Switched Accounting or Conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Generalized Switched Accounting or Conduction Isaac Zafrany1 1 Technical Support Avant modeling and simulation of PWM converters was extended to include conduction losses. The method covers losses due to the inductor's resistance and due to the voltage drops across the switch and the diode

  12. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elangovan, S. (South Jordan, UT); Nair, Balakrishnan G. (Sandy, UT); Small, Troy (Midvale, UT); Heck, Brian (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  13. The Organic Chemistry of Conducting Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolbert, Laren Malcolm [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the last several years, we have examined the fundamental principles of conduction in one-dimensional systems, i.e., molecular “wires”. It is, of course, widely recognized that such systems, as components of electronically conductive materials, function in a two- and three-dimensional milieu. Thus interchain hopping and grain-boundary resistivity are limiting conductivity factors in highly conductive materials, and overall conductivity is a function of through-chain and boundary hopping. We have given considerable attention to the basic principles underlying charge transport (the “rules of the game”) in two-dimensional systems by using model systems which allow direct observation of such processes, including the examination of tunneling and hopping as components of charge transfer. In related work, we have spent considerable effort on the chemistry of conjugated heteropolymers, most especially polythiophens, with the aim of using these most efficient of readily available electroactive polymers in photovoltaic devices.

  14. Hydraulic and slurry flows through a channel contraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Hydraulic and slurry flows through a channel contraction Onno Bokhove o, Twente #12;Hydraulic flow through channel contraction Outline · 1. Introduction · 2. Experiments · 3. Conclusions · References ISSF 2008 University of Twente Page 2 #12;Hydraulic flow through channel contraction

  15. Maximum likelihood sequence estimation for multipath fading channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pautler, Joseph James

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses receiver design for multipath fading channels. The channel model was chosen to closely resemble a typical land mobile fading channel. Three receivers will be compared in this work. The first will be the optimum receiver...

  16. Solution to time-energy costs of quantum channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chi-Hang Fred Fung; H. F. Chau; Chi-Kwong Li; Nung-Sing Sze

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a formula for the time-energy costs of general quantum channels proposed in [Phys. Rev. A 88, 012307 (2013)]. This formula allows us to numerically find the time-energy cost of any quantum channel using positive semidefinite programming. We also derive a lower bound to the time-energy cost for any channels and the exact the time-energy cost for a class of channels which includes the qudit depolarizing channels and projector channels as special cases.

  17. Steady-state estuarine modeling of the Brownsville ship channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maldonado, Roberto Jaime

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Channel 17. Resultant Tidal Velocities Brownsville Ship Channel 18. Summary of Inflow Data Brownsvi lie Ship Channel Modelinp 14Z 145 149 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Figure 1 Drowns vi 1 le Ship Channel and Contiguous Waters Sam pl i ng Stat i on Loca... ti ons San Martin Lake System . 3 Sampling Station Locations, Fishing Harbor Climatological Occurrence Physical Sampling Station Locations Brownsville Ship Channel 6 Salinity, Brownsville Ship Channel, May 1975 . 7 Temperature, Brownsville Ship...

  18. Analysis of Crystal Lattice Deformation by Ion Channeling. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystal Lattice Deformation by Ion Channeling. Analysis of Crystal Lattice Deformation by Ion Channeling. Abstract: A model of dislocations has been developed for the use in Monte...

  19. Tidal channel and marshplain development : Cooley Landing salt pond restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrity, Nick

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the rapidly eroding outboard mudflat channels. Introductionthis there is an extensive mudflat. PWA performed baselineerosion of the outboard mudflat channels. Since September

  20. Exploiting Heterogeneous Channel Coherence Intervals for Blind Interference Alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jafar, Syed Ali

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the degrees of freedom of MISO broadcast channels withtrend, are listed below. 1. MISO BC with no CSIT for onemultiple input single output (MISO) broadcast channel (BC)

  1. Thermal conductivity measurements of Summit polycrystalline silicon.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemens, Rebecca; Kuppers, Jaron D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A capability for measuring the thermal conductivity of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials using a steady state resistance technique was developed and used to measure the thermal conductivities of SUMMiT{trademark} V layers. Thermal conductivities were measured over two temperature ranges: 100K to 350K and 293K to 575K in order to generate two data sets. The steady state resistance technique uses surface micromachined bridge structures fabricated using the standard SUMMiT fabrication process. Electrical resistance and resistivity data are reported for poly1-poly2 laminate, poly2, poly3, and poly4 polysilicon structural layers in the SUMMiT process from 83K to 575K. Thermal conductivity measurements for these polysilicon layers demonstrate for the first time that the thermal conductivity is a function of the particular SUMMiT layer. Also, the poly2 layer has a different variation in thermal conductivity as the temperature is decreased than the poly1-poly2 laminate, poly3, and poly4 layers. As the temperature increases above room temperature, the difference in thermal conductivity between the layers decreases.

  2. Multi-channel polarized thermal emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Constant, Kristen P

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-channel polarized thermal emitter (PTE) is presented. The multi-channel PTE can emit polarized thermal radiation without using a polarizer at normal emergence. The multi-channel PTE consists of two layers of metallic gratings on a monolithic and homogeneous metallic plate. It can be fabricated by a low-cost soft lithography technique called two-polymer microtransfer molding. The spectral positions of the mid-infrared (MIR) radiation peaks can be tuned by changing the periodicity of the gratings and the spectral separation between peaks are tuned by changing the mutual angle between the orientations of the two gratings.

  3. Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuffer, D.V.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Johnson, R.P.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Derbenev, Y.S.; Morozov, V.S.; /Jefferson Lab

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

  4. Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Y. Yoshikawa, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov, D.V. Neuffer, K. Yonehara

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

  5. Coupled-channel scattering on a torus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Peng [JLAB; Dudek, Jozef Jon [Old Dominion U., JLAB; Edwards, Robert G. [JLAB; Szczepaniak, Adam Pawel [Indiana U.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the Hamiltonian formalism approach, a generalized Luscher's formula for two particle scattering in both the elastic and coupled-channel cases in moving frames is derived from a relativistic Lippmann-Schwinger equation. Some strategies for extracting scattering amplitudes for a coupled-channel system from the discrete finite-volume spectrum are discussed and illustrated with a toy model of two-channel resonant scattering. This formalism will, in the near future, be used to extract information about hadron scattering from lattice QCD computations.

  6. TWO-CHANNEL DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results are reported for test beam acceleration and deflection in a two-channel, cm-scale, rectangular dielectric-lined wakefield accelerator structure energized by a 14-MeV drive beam. The dominant waveguide mode of the structure is at {approx}30 GHz, and the structure is configured to exhibit a high transformer ratio ({approx}12:1). Accelerated bunches in the narrow secondary channel of the structure are continuously energized via Cherenkov radiation that is emitted by a drive bunch moving in the wider primary channel. Observed energy gains and losses, transverse deflections, and changes in the test bunch charge distribution compare favorably with predictions of theory.

  7. On complementary channels and the additivity problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Holevo

    2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore complementarity between output and environment of a quantum channel (or, more generally, CP map), making an observation that the output purity characteristics for complementary CP maps coincide. Hence, validity of the mutiplicativity/additivity conjecture for a class of CP maps implies its validity for complementary maps. The class of CP maps complementary to entanglement-breaking ones is described and is shown to contain diagonal CP maps as a proper subclass, resulting in new class of CP maps (channels) for which the multiplicativity/additivity holds. Covariant and Gaussian channels are discussed briefly in this context.

  8. Channels and jokers in continuous systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butkovskii, O. Ya., E-mail: olegb@vlsu.ru; Logunov, M. Yu. [Vladimir State University (Russian Federation)

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Roessler system is used as an example to demonstrate that the reconstruction of a model nonlinear dynamical system from an observed time series reveals phase-space regions called channels and jokers [3]. The proposed method for finding such regions is shown to be robust to noise and inaccuracy (redundancy) of the models used in the reconstruction procedure. The evolution of local Lyapunov exponents of attractors is examined for the model systems, and its relation to channels and jokers is exposed. It is shown that channels and jokers can be used in predictive modeling. The quality of such models is analyzed by invoking the concept of degree of predictability.

  9. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than Fe into the structure of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) has been shown to greatly enhance the magnetic properties of the particles, tailoring them to different commercial uses. However, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is often carried out at high temperatures with toxic solvents resulting in high environmental and energy costs. Additionally, these ferrite nanoparticles are not intrinsically biocompatible, and to make them suitable for insertion into the human body is a rather intricate task. A relatively unexplored resource for magnetic nanomaterial production is subsurface Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, as these microorganisms are capable of producing large quantities of nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at ambient temperatures. Metal-reducing bacteria live in environments deficient in oxygen and conserve energy for growth through the oxidation of hydrogen or organic electron donors, coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals such as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. This can result in the formation of magnetite via the extracellular reduction of amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides causing the release of soluble Fe(II) and resulting in complete recrystallization of the amorphous mineral into a new phase. Some previous studies have reported altering the composition of biogenic magnetite produced by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for industrial and environmental applications. However, research into the commercial exploitation of bacteria to form magnetic minerals has focused primarily on magnetotactic bacteria which form magnetosomal magnetite internally using very different pathways to those bacteria forming magnetite outside the cell. Magnetotactic bacteria live at the sediment-water interface and use internal nanomagnets to guide them to their preferred environmental niche using the Earth's magnetic field. Since magnetotactic bacteria generally grow optimally under carefully controlled microaerobic conditions, the culturing processes for these organisms are challenging and result in low yields of nanomagnetite. Despite these limitations, magnetotactic bacteria have bee

  10. Development and Evaluation of Nanoscale Sorbents for Mercury Capture from Warm Fuel Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raja A. Jadhav

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several different types of nanocrystalline metal oxide sorbents were synthesized and evaluated for capture of mercury (Hg) from coal-gasifier warm fuel gas. Detailed experimental studies were carried out to understand the fundamental mechanism of interaction between mercury and nanocrystalline sorbents over a range of fuel gas conditions. The metal oxide sorbents evaluated in this work included those prepared by GTI's subcontractor NanoScale Materials, Inc. (NanoScale) as well as those prepared in-house. These sorbents were evaluated for mercury capture in GTI's Mercury Sorbent Testing System. Initial experiments were focused on sorbent evaluation for mercury capture in N{sub 2} stream over the temperature range 423-533 K. These exploratory studies demonstrated that NanoActive Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} along with its supported form was the most active of the sorbent evaluated. The capture of Hg decreased with temperature, which suggested that physical adsorption was the dominant mechanism of Hg capture. Desorption studies on spent sorbents indicated that a major portion of Hg was attached to the sorbent by strong bonds, which suggested that Hg was oxidized by the O atoms of the metal oxides, thus forming a strong Hg-O bond with the oxide. Initial screening studies also indicated that sulfided form of CuO/alumina was the most active for Hg capture, therefore was selected for detailed evaluation in simulated fuel gas (SFG). It was found that such supported CuO sorbents had high Hg-sorption capacity in the presence of H{sub 2}, provided the gas also contained H{sub 2}S. Exposure of supported CuO sorbent to H{sub 2}S results in the formation of CuS, which is an active sorbent for Hg capture. Sulfur atom in CuS forms a bond with Hg that results into its capture. Although thermodynamically CuS is predicted to form unreactive Cu{sub 2}S form when exposed to H{sub 2}, it is hypothesized that Cu atoms in such supported sorbents are in ''dispersed'' form, with two Cu atoms separated by a distance longer than required to form a Cu{sub 2}S molecule. Thus CuS remains in the stable reactive form as long as H{sub 2}S is present in the gas phase. It was also found that the captured Hg on such supported sorbents could be easily released when the spent sorbent is exposed to a H2-containing stream that is free of Hg and H{sub 2}S. Based on this mechanism, a novel regenerative process has been proposed to remove Hg from fuel gas at high temperature. Limited multicyclic studies carried out on the supported Cu sorbents showed their potential to capture Hg from SFG in a regenerative manner. This study has demonstrated that supported nanocrystalline Cu-based sorbents have potential to capture mercury from coal syngas over multiple absorption/regeneration cycles. Further studies are recommended to evaluate their potential to remove arsenic and selenium from coal fuel gas.

  11. Increased thermal conductivity monolithic zeolite structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James (Knoxville, TN); Klett, Lynn (Knoxville, TN); Kaufman, Jonathan (Leonardtown, MD)

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolith comprises a zeolite, a thermally conductive carbon, and a binder. The zeolite is included in the form of beads, pellets, powders and mixtures thereof. The thermally conductive carbon can be carbon nano-fibers, diamond or graphite which provide thermal conductivities in excess of about 100 W/mK to more than 1,000 W/mK. A method of preparing a zeolite monolith includes the steps of mixing a zeolite dispersion in an aqueous colloidal silica binder with a dispersion of carbon nano-fibers in water followed by dehydration and curing of the binder is given.

  12. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faussurier, G., E-mail: gerald.faussurier@cea.fr; Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  13. Thermal conductivity of bulk nanostructured lead telluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hori, Takuma [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Chen, Gang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Shiomi, Junichiro, E-mail: shiomi@photon.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal conductivity of lead telluride with embedded nanoinclusions was studied using Monte Carlo simulations with intrinsic phonon transport properties obtained from first-principles-based lattice dynamics. The nanoinclusion/matrix interfaces were set to completely reflect phonons to model the maximum interface-phonon-scattering scenario. The simulations with the geometrical cross section and volume fraction of the nanoinclusions matched to those of the experiment show that the experiment has already reached the theoretical limit of thermal conductivity. The frequency-dependent analysis further identifies that the thermal conductivity reduction is dominantly attributed to scattering of low frequency phonons and demonstrates mutual adaptability of nanostructuring and local disordering.

  14. Characterization of macro-length conducting polymers and the development of a conducting polymer rotary motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Bryan D. (Bryan David), 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conducting polymers are a subset of materials within the electroactive polymer class that exhibit active mechanical deformations. These deformations induce stresses and strains that allow for conducting polymers to be used ...

  15. Effects of imperfect insulating coatings on the flow partitioning between parallel channels in self-cooled liquid metal blankets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaizer, A.A.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully developed liquid-metal flow in a system of three straight rectangular ducts is investigated. The ducts are electrically coupled by common conducting walls covered with an imperfect insulating layer. A numerical model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow in the system is described. Since no additional assumptions, such as in the core-flow solution, have been made, this model can be used for the analysis of MHD flow in parallel ducts with nearly perfect insulating coating. Any orientation of the applied uniform magnetic field is possible. Electrical conductivities of the dividing and exterior walls, and of the insulating layers in individual channels can be varied independently, as well as characteristics of insulating imperfections in each channel. A restriction of equal pressure gradients in all ducts is imposed, and the flow partitioning between parallel channels is examined. Results of the numerical simulation of the influence of insulation imperfections on flow distribution and velocity profiles are presented. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

  17. M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) Steady Conduction Heat Transfer 1 Steady Heat Conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    of the material. In the limiting case where x0, the equation above reduces to the differential form: W dx dT k is the only energy interaction; the energy balance for the wall can be expressed: dt dE QQ wall outin). Thermal Conductivity Thermal conductivity k [W/mK] is a measure of a material's ability to conduct heat

  18. Modeling tensorial conductivity of particle suspension networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler Olsen; Ken Kamrin

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant microstructural anisotropy is known to develop during shearing flow of attractive particle suspensions. These suspensions, and their capacity to form conductive networks, play a key role in flow-battery technology, among other applications. Herein, we present and test an analytical model for the tensorial conductivity of attractive particle suspensions. The model utilizes the mean fabric of the network to characterize the structure, and the relationship to the conductivity is inspired by a lattice argument. We test the accuracy of our model against a large number of computer-generated suspension networks, based on multiple in-house generation protocols, giving rise to particle networks that emulate the physical system. The model is shown to adequately capture the tensorial conductivity, both in terms of its invariants and its mean directionality.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of conducting polymer actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandesteeg, Nathan A. (Nathan Alan)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conducting polymers are known to mechanically respond to electrochemical stimuli and have been utilized as linear actuators. To date, the most successful mechanism for actuation is ionic ingress and egress, though mechanisms ...

  20. LE JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE LA CONDUCTION LECTRIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    LE JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE ET LE RADIUM LA CONDUCTION ÉLECTRIQUE DES HYDROCARBURES LIQUIDES EN COUCHES hydrocarbures liquides en couches minces, signalé dans un précédent mémoire. Les expériences, faites dans des

  1. Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

  2. November 15, 2012 Conducting and managing documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaji, Hajime

    1 November 15, 2012 Conducting and managing documents #12;2 Agenda 1. Basics of copyright 2. Necessary information for citing materials 3. Citation Manager #12;1.Basics of copyright 3 #12;Definitions

  3. Large displacement fast conducting polymer actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Angela Y. (Angela Ying-Ju), 1982-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conducting polymers are a promising class of electroactive materials that undergo volumetric changes under applied potentials, which make them particularly useful for many actuation applications. Polypyrrole , is one of ...

  4. Electrical conductivity of segregated network polymer nanocomposites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yeon Seok

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    . The composites made using the emulsion with higher modulus show lower percolation threshold and higher conductivity. Higher modulus causes tighter packing of carbon black between the polymer particles. When the drying temperature was increased to 80°C...

  5. Conducting polymer nanostructures for biological applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis and characterization of conducting copolymer nanofibrils of pyrrolepolypyrrole synthesis was 0.1 M pyrrole monomer dissolved insynthesis Polypyrrole was electropolymerized from a solution of 0.1 M pyrrole (

  6. Development and characterization of conducting polymer actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillai, Priam Vasudevan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conducting polymers such as polypyrrole, polythiophene and polyaniline are currently studied as novel biologically inspired actuators. The actuation mechanism of these materials depends upon the motion of ions in and out ...

  7. California: Conducting Polymer Binder Boosts Storage Capacity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 10:17am Addthis Working with Nextval, Inc., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a Conducting Polymer Binder for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries. With a...

  8. Message passing with queues and channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dozsa, Gabor J; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ratterman, Joseph D; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Wisniewski, Robert W

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In an embodiment, a send thread receives an identifier that identifies a destination node and a pointer to data. The send thread creates a first send request in response to the receipt of the identifier and the data pointer. The send thread selects a selected channel from among a plurality of channels. The selected channel comprises a selected hand-off queue and an identification of a selected message unit. Each of the channels identifies a different message unit. The selected hand-off queue is randomly accessible. If the selected hand-off queue contains an available entry, the send thread adds the first send request to the selected hand-off queue. If the selected hand-off queue does not contain an available entry, the send thread removes a second send request from the selected hand-off queue and sends the second send request to the selected message unit.

  9. Channel modelling and relay for powerline communications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Bo

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis discusses the channel modelling and relay techniques in powerline communications (PLC) which is considered as a promising technology for the Smart Grid communications, Internet access and home area network ...

  10. Active Brownian motion in a narrow channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue Ao; Pulak Kumar Ghosh; Yunyun Li; Gerhard Schmid; Peter Hänggi; Fabio Marchesoni

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent advances in rectification control of artificial microswimmers, also known as Janus particles, diffusing along narrow, periodically corrugated channels. The swimmer self-propulsion mechanism is modeled so as to incorporate a nonzero torque (propulsion chirality). We first summarize the effects of chirality on the autonomous current of microswimmers freely diffusing in channels of different geometries. In particular, left-right and upside-down asymmetric channels are shown to exhibit different transport properties. We then report new results on the dependence of the diffusivity of chiral microswimmers on the channel geometry and their own self-propulsion mechanism. The self-propulsion torque turns out to play a key role as a transport control parameter.

  11. Two-way quantum communication channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childs, A M; Lo, H K; Childs, Andrew M.; Leung, Debbie W.; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider communication between two parties using a bipartite quantum operation, which constitutes the most general quantum mechanical model of two-party communication. We primarily focus on the simultaneous forward and backward communication of classical messages. For the case in which the two parties share unlimited prior entanglement, we give inner and outer bounds on the achievable rate region that generalize classical results due to Shannon. In particular, using a protocol of Bennett, Harrow, Leung, and Smolin, we give a one-shot expression in terms of the Holevo information for the entanglement-assisted one-way capacity of a two-way quantum channel. As applications, we rederive two known additivity results for one-way channel capacities: the entanglement-assisted capacity of a general one-way channel, and the unassisted capacity of an entanglement-breaking one-way channel.

  12. Kelp Forests of the Santa Barbara Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Kelp Forests of the Santa Barbara Channel Revised Fourth Edition Kelp Forests of the Santa Barbara Research Program Santa Barbara Coastal Long Term Ecological Research Program #12;Kelp Forests of the Santa

  13. Optimal Distributed Beamforming for MISO Interference Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Jiaming

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the problem of quantifying the Pareto optimal boundary of the achievable rate region is considered over multiple-input single-output(MISO)interference channels, where the problem boils down to solving a sequence of convex feasibility...

  14. Distributed computation on unreliable radio channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newport, Calvin (Calvin Charles)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important topic in wireless networking is the development of reliable algorithms for environments suffering from adversarial interference. This term captures any type of channel disruption outside the control of the ...

  15. Time varying channels : characterization, estimation, and detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricklin, Nathan D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    overall, then the Doppler’s effect of smearing the symbol into note the effect on normalized Doppler of increasing theis the ICI, a direct effect of the Doppler induced channel

  16. Electrokinetic Energy Conversion Efficiency in Nanofluidic Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekker, Cees

    Electrokinetic Energy Conversion Efficiency in Nanofluidic Channels Frank H. J. van der Heyden- and nanofluidic devices2-5 whose geometries and material properties can be engineered. High energy

  17. Transverse flow in thin superhydrophobic channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feuillebois, Francois

    We provide some general theoretical results to guide the optimization of transverse hydrodynamic phenomena in superhydrophobic channels. Our focus is on the canonical micro- and nanofluidic geometry of a parallel-plate ...

  18. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from South Brother Island Channel, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrows, E.S.; Gardiner, W.W.; Antrim, L.D.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S. [Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim, Washington (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    South Brother Island Channel was one of seven waterways that the US Army Crops of Engineers-New York District requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal. Tests and analyses were conducted on South Brother Island Channel sediment core samples and evaluations were performed. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from South Brother Island Channel included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples collected from Souther Brother Island Channel were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. a composite sediment sample, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl congers, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate water, prepared from the suspended-particle phase of South Brother Island Channel sediment, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

  19. Finite Heat conduction in 2D Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Yang; Yang Kongqing

    2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a 2D hamonic lattices model with missing bond defects, when the capacity ratio of defects is enough large, the temperature gradient can be formed and the finite heat conduction is found in the model. The defects in the 2D harmonic lattices impede the energy carriers free propagation, by another words, the mean free paths of the energy carrier are relatively short. The microscopic dynamics leads to the finite conduction in the model.

  20. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber. The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target in the process chamber to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  1. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, Timothy A; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target (110) doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber (100). The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target (110) to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  2. High quality transparent conducting oxide thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, Timothy A. (Conifer, CO); Duenow, Joel N. (Golden, CO); Barnes, Teresa (Evergreen, CO); Coutts, Timothy J. (Golden, CO)

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A transparent conducting oxide (TCO) film comprising: a TCO layer, and dopants selected from the elements consisting of Vanadium, Molybdenum, Tantalum, Niobium, Antimony, Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium, wherein the elements are n-type dopants; and wherein the transparent conducting oxide is characterized by an improved electron mobility of about 42 cm.sup.2/V-sec while simultaneously maintaining a high carrier density of .about.4.4e.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3.

  3. Conductive polymeric compositions for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, Charles A. (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Wu (Tempe, AZ)

    2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel chain polymers comprising weakly basic anionic moieties chemically bound into a polyether backbone at controllable anionic separations are presented. Preferred polymers comprise orthoborate anions capped with dibasic acid residues, preferably oxalato or malonato acid residues. The conductivity of these polymers is found to be high relative to that of most conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes. The conductivity at high temperatures and wide electrochemical window make these materials especially suitable as electrolytes for rechargeable lithium batteries.

  4. Femtosecond Single-Shot Imaging of Nanoscale Ferromagnetic Order in Co/Pd Multilayers using Resonant X-ray Holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Tianhan; Zhu, Diling; Benny Wu,; Graves, Catherine; Schaffert, Stefan; Rander, Torbjorn; Muller, leonard; Vodungbo, Boris; Baumier, Cedric; Bernstein, David P.; Brauer, Bjorn; Cros, Vincent; Jong, Sanne de; Delaunay, Renaud; Fognini, Andreas; Kukreja, Roopali; Lee, Sooheyong; Lopez-Flores, Victor; Mohanty, Jyoti; Pfau, Bastian; Popescu, 5 Horia

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first single-shot images of ferromagnetic, nanoscale spin order taken with femtosecond x-ray pulses. X-ray-induced electron and spin dynamics can be outrun with pulses shorter than 80 fs in the investigated fluence regime, and no permanent aftereffects in the samples are observed below a fluence of 25 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Employing resonant spatially-muliplexed x-ray holography results in a low imaging threshold of 5 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Our results open new ways to combine ultrafast laser spectroscopy with sequential snapshot imaging on a single sample, generating a movie of excited state dynamics.

  5. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase formation and preferential growth of lithium metal nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacci, Robert L [ORNL; Black, Jennifer M [ORNL; Wisinger, Nina [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance characteristics of Li-ion batteries are intrinsically linked to evolving nanoscale interfacial electrochemical reactions. To probe the mechanisms of solid electrolyte interphase formation and Li electrodeposition from a standard battery electrolyte, we use in situ electrochemical scanning transmission electron microscopy for controlled potential sweep-hold electrochemical measurements with simultaneous BF and ADF STEM image acquisition. Through a combined quantitative electrochemical measurement and quantitative STEM imaging approach, based upon electron scattering theory, we show that chemically sensitive ADF STEM imaging can be used to estimate the density of evolving SEI constituents and distinguish contrast mechanisms of Li-bearing components in the liquid cell.

  6. Long-term superelastic cycling at nano-scale in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy micropillars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    San Juan, J., E-mail: jose.sanjuan@ehu.es; Gómez-Cortés, J. F. [Dpto. Física Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Univ. del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)] [Dpto. Física Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Univ. del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); López, G. A.; Nó, M. L. [Dpto. Física Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Univ. del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)] [Dpto. Física Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Univ. del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Jiao, C. [FEI, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands)] [FEI, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Superelastic behavior at nano-scale has been studied along cycling in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy micropillars. Arrays of square micropillars were produced by focused ion beam milling, on slides of [001] oriented Cu-Al-Ni single crystals. Superelastic behavior of micropillars, due to the stress-induced martensitic transformation, has been studied by nano-compression tests during thousand cycles, and its evolution has been followed along cycling. Each pillar has undergone more than thousand cycles without any detrimental evolution. Moreover, we demonstrate that after thousand cycles they exhibit a perfectly reproducible and completely recoverable superelastic behavior.

  7. Oscillating spin-orbit interaction as a source of spin-polarized wave packets in two-terminal nanoscale devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viktor Szaszko-Bogar; Peter Foldi; F. M. Peeters

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ballistic transport through nanoscale devices with time-dependent Rashba-type spin-orbit interaction (SOI) can lead to spin-polarized wave packets that appear even for completely unpolarized input. The SOI that oscillates in a finite domain generates density and spin polarization fluctuations that leave the region as propagating waves. Particularly, spin polarization has space and time dependence even in regions without SOI. Our results are based on an analytic solution of the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation. The relevant Floquet quasi-energies that are obtained appear in the energy spectrum of both the transmitted and reflected waves.

  8. Digitally Assisted Multi-Channel Receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pentakota, Krishna Anand Santosh Spikanth

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    -channel charge sampling receivers with sinc filter banks together with a complete system calibration and synchronization algorithm for the receiver. A unified model has been defined for the receiver containing all first order mismatches, offsets... and imperfections and a technique based on least mean squares algorithm is employed to track these errors. The performance of this technique under noisy channel conditions has been verified. The sinc filter bank is compared with the conventional analog filter...

  9. Black Conductive Titanium Oxide High-Capacity Materials for Battery Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, W.

    2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Stoichiometric titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) is one of the most widely studied transitionmetal oxides because of its many potential applications in photoelectrochemical systems, such as dye-sensitized TiO{sub 2} electrodes for photovoltaic solar cells, and water-splitting catalysts for hydrogen generation, and in environmental purification for creating or degrading specific compounds. However, TiO{sub 2} has a wide bandgap and high electrical resistivity, which limits its use as an electrode. A set of non-stoichiometric titanium oxides called the Magneli phases, having a general formula of Ti{sub n}O{sub 2n-1} with n between 4 and 10, exhibits lower bandgaps and resistivities, with the highest electrical conductivities reported for Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}. These phases have been formulated under different conditions, but in all reported cases the resulting oxides have minimum grain sizes on the order of micrometers, regardless of the size of the starting titanium compounds. In this method, nanoparticles of TiO{sub 2} or hydrogen titanates are first coated with carbon using either wet or dry chemistry methods. During this process the size and shape of the nanoparticles are 'locked in.' Subsequently the carbon-coated nanoparticles are heated. This results in the transformation of the original TiO{sub 2} or hydrogen titanates to Magneli phases without coarsening, so that the original size and shape of the nanoparticles are maintained to a precise degree. People who work on batteries, fuel cells, ultracapacitors, electrosynthesis cells, electro-chemical devices, and soil remediation have applications that could benefit from using nanoscale Magneli phases of titanium oxide. Application of these electrode materials may not be limited to substitution for TiO{sub 2} electrodes. Combining the robustness and photosensitivity of TiO{sub 2} with higher electrical conductivity may result in a general electrode material.

  10. Hybrid Filtration Membranes incorporating Nanoporous Silica within a Nanoscale Alumina Fibre Scaffold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Veronica Mei Tiing; Clyne, Trevor William

    2015-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterisation Experimental permeation studies were conducted with the set-up shown schematically in Fig.1. The membranes were supported in a polycarbonate filter holder, using previously-developed procedures [8]. A cross-flow condition was generated with a... increased. This is difficult to avoid, since, in the absence of a conductive coating, the fibres have a strong tendency to become charged in the SEM. In order to study individual fibres in detail, transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies were...

  11. MISO Broadcast Channel with Delayed and Evolving CSIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    MISO Broadcast Channel with Delayed and Evolving CSIT Jinyuan Chen and Petros Elia Mobile--The work considers the two-user MISO broadcast channel with a gradual and delayed accumulation of channel-input single-output broadcast channel (MISO BC) with an M-transmit antenna (M 2) transmitter communicating

  12. FLUID: Improving Throughputs in Enterprise Wireless LANs through Flexible Channelization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    the usefulness of flexible channels in the context of 802.11-based networks. Current 802.11 hardware can provideFLUID: Improving Throughputs in Enterprise Wireless LANs through Flexible Channelization Shravan for designing 802.11 wireless LANs (WLANs) using flexible channelization -- the choice of an appropriate channel

  13. Ion Channels as Promising Therapeutic Targets for Melanoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    20 Ion Channels as Promising Therapeutic Targets for Melanoma Aurélie Chantôme1, Marie Potier. During the last decade, the number of ion- channel types expressed in various cancers, including melanoma;Breakthroughs in Melanoma Research430 class of channels, water channels or aquaporins (AQP), allow water

  14. A Reliable method for Blind Channel Identification using Burst Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphaeli, Dan

    1 A Reliable method for Blind Channel Identification using Burst Data Dan Raphaeli, Senior Member Output (MISO) FIR channels with nonminimum phase. The approach is based on mini- mizing a cost function of identification success when consider- ing statistical channels, its ability to obtain reliable channel estimates

  15. Clustering of cyclic-nucleotide-gated channels in olfactory cilia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, Donald A.

    Clustering of cyclic-nucleotide-gated channels in olfactory cilia Richard J. Flannery* , Donald A channel clusters in olfactory cilia Key words: olfaction, receptor neuron, cyclic-nucleotide-gated channel of olfactory signal transduction, including a high density of cyclic-nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels. CNG

  16. Multiple description source coding for mobile radio channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pegnyemb, Telesphore Bertrand

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The topic of this thesis is the transmission of a memoryless source over a slow fading channel. It should be noted that when a channel is specified as a slow fading channel, it does not specify whether the channel is flat or frequency selective...

  17. A Search for Channel Deformation in Irradiated Vanadium Tensile Specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, David S.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature tensile specimen of V-4Cr-4Ti which had be irradiated in the 17J test at 425°C to 3.7 dpa was mechanically polished, deformed to 3.9% strain at room temperature, and examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy in order to look for evidence of channel deformation. It was found that uniform deformation can occur without channel deformation, but evidence for channeling was found with channels appearing most prominently after the onset of necking. The channeling occurs on wavy planes with large variations in localized deformation from channel to channel.

  18. Poly(ethylene glycol)-based open-channel blockers for the acetylcholine receptor : mechanistic and structure-function studies at the single-channel level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Wan-Chen, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion channels are essential mediators in nervous signaling pathways. Because hyperactivation of ion channels can lead to pathological disorders such as congenital myasthenic syndromes and neurodegeneration, channel inhibitors ...

  19. Liquid Propane Injection Technology Conductive to Today's North...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Conductive to Today's North American Specification Liquid Propane Injection Technology Conductive to Today's North American Specification Liquid propane injection...

  20. Addressing the Recalcitrance of Cellulose Degradation through Cellulase Discovery, Nano-scale Elucidation of Molecular Mechanisms, and Kinetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Larry P., Bergstrom, Gary; Corgie, Stephane; Craighead, Harold; Gibson, Donna; Wilson, David

    2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project was designed to play a vital role in the development of low cost sugars from cellulosic biomass and contributing to the national effort to displace fossil fuel usage in the USA transportation sector. The goal was to expand the portfolio of cell wall degrading enzymes through innovative research at the nano-scale level, prospecting for novel cellulases and building a kinetic framework for the development of more effective enzymatic conversion processes. More precisely, the goal was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms for some cellulases that are very familiar to members of our research team and to investigate what we hope are novel cellulases or new enzyme combinations from the world of plant pathogenic fungi and bacteria. Hydrolytic activities of various cellulases and cellulase cocktails were monitored at the nanoscale of cellulose fibrils and the microscale of pretreated cellulose particles, and we integrated this insight into a heterogeneous reaction framework. The over-riding approach for this research program was the application of innovative and cutting edge optical and high-throughput screening and analysis techniques for observing how cellulases hydrolyze real substrates.