National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for nanoscale chemical imaging

  1. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Wednesday, 28 January 2009 00:00 The heterogeneous catalysts used in most...

  2. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles...

  3. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergyApplications -Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of

  4. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergyApplications -Nanoscale Chemical Imaging

  5. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications The NREL windTeacherNanoscale Chemical Imaging of a

  6. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications The NREL windTeacherNanoscale Chemical Imaging of

  7. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergyApplications - EnergyNanoscale Chemical

  8. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergyApplications - EnergyNanoscaleNanoscale

  9. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of chemical processes. Watching Catalysts at Work Catalysts-substances that speed up chemical reactions without themselves being consumed-are essential to the production of...

  10. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergyApplications - EnergyNanoscale

  11. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications The NREL windTeacher Programs5fourSauerNanoscale

  12. Science Highlight July 2011 Better Batteries through Nanoscale 3D Chemical Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Science Highlight ­ July 2011 Better Batteries through Nanoscale 3D Chemical Imaging Concerns of imaging from 4 to 14 keV, a range suitable for spectroscopic imaging of many metals used in battery battery technology. Although Li-ion batteries, crucial in the boom of portable electronics, stand

  13. Microsoft Word - Dynamic Chemical Imaging at Nanoscale bh

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carried out using linear voltammetry at two consecutive sweep rates, V 1 and V 2 . Images were acquired at different x-ray photon energies and cell potentials, and chemical...

  14. Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage Lithium-Manganese Rich NMC Composite Cathodes with Cycling Friday, August 29, 2014 Renewable energy is critical for the...

  15. Nano-scale scratching in chemical-mechanical polishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eusner, Thor

    2008-01-01

    During the chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process, a critical step in the manufacture of ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) semiconductor devices, undesirable nano-scale scratches are formed on the surfaces being ...

  16. Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series X-ray Imaging at the Nanoscale Presented by Ian Mc-ray microscopy has blossomed into a popular and rich methodology, opening the door to new research-ray microscopy beamline at APS in 1997. Ian subsequently oversaw the development of the APS Sector 2 beamlines

  17. Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Presented by Anthony (Tony) van Buuren Ph.D. Nanoscale National Laboratory Abstract Securing this nation's energy future will require the development of new research on nanoporous materials is driven by their use in targets for high energy physics experiments

  18. Nanoscale Imaging of Photocurrent 2 and Efficiency in CdTe Solar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale Imaging of Photocurrent 2 and Efficiency in CdTe Solar Cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale Imaging of Photocurrent 2 and Efficiency in CdTe Solar...

  19. Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buratto, Steve

    Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells David A area of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is investigated using conductive probe atomic particle at its end. This is due to the formation of protons, at the carbon cloth side of the cell

  20. Direct imaging of nanoscale magnetic interactions in minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Direct imaging of nanoscale magnetic interactions in minerals Richard J. Harrison*, Rafal E. Dunin. Magnetite is the most strongly magnetic mineral in nature. Small particles of magnetite in single-domain (SD and pseudo-SD particles (1). In most igneous rocks, the grain size of primary magnetic minerals exceeds

  1. Self-Powered Wireless Nano-scale Sensor Networks within Chemical Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    Self-Powered Wireless Nano-scale Sensor Networks within Chemical Reactors Eisa Zarepour1 Mahbub, Australia #12;Abstract Because of their small size and unique nanomaterial properties, nano-scale sen- sor networks (NSNs) can be applied in many chemical applications to monitor and control the chemical process

  2. Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergyApplications -Nanoscale Chemical

  3. Nano-scale Sensor Networks for Chemical Eisa Zarepour1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    natural gas to liquid fuel. Given that reliable wireless communi- cation at nano-scale is at very early

  4. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopmentEnergyApplications -

  5. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications The NREL windTeacher

  6. Nanoscale Chemical and Structural Characterization of Transient Metallic Nanowires using Aberration-Corrected STEM-EELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -sur-Yvette, France ABSTRACT: Direct chemical and structural characterization of transient iron-nickel alloy nanowiresNanoscale Chemical and Structural Characterization of Transient Metallic Nanowires using Aberration-energy facets were observed. The hitherto unknown rich variety of structural and chemical behavior in alloyed

  7. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase formation and preferential growth of lithium metal nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacci, Robert L; Black, Jennifer M; Wisinger, Nina; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Unocic, Raymond R

    2015-01-01

    The performance characteristics of Li-ion batteries are intrinsically linked to evolving nanoscale interfacial electrochemical reactions. To probe the mechanisms of solid electrolyte interphase formation and Li electrodeposition from a standard battery electrolyte, we use in situ electrochemical scanning transmission electron microscopy for controlled potential sweep-hold electrochemical measurements with simultaneous BF and ADF STEM image acquisition. Through a combined quantitative electrochemical measurement and quantitative STEM imaging approach, based upon electron scattering theory, we show that chemically sensitive ADF STEM imaging can be used to estimate the density of evolving SEI constituents and distinguish contrast mechanisms of Li-bearing components in the liquid cell.

  8. Fourier Magnetic Imaging with Nanoscale Resolution and Compressed Sensing Speed-up using Electronic Spins in Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    1 Fourier Magnetic Imaging with Nanoscale Resolution and Compressed Sensing Speed-up using imaging.12 Here we introduce an alternative technique of Fourier magnetic imaging using NV Fourier transform to yield real-space images with nanoscale resolution, wide field-of-view (FOV

  9. Nanoscale Light Focusing and Imaging with Nano-Optical Devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meenashi Sundaram, Vijay

    2014-09-23

    Energy transport analysis of micro/nano optics as well as their optimization to achieve high-throughput deep nanoscale patterning and microscopy is the goal of this study. To understand the energy transport in nano-optical ...

  10. Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Wednesday, 27 September 2006 00:00 For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical...

  11. Colloid Science and Nanoscale Engineering Course (CHE 596-009) Orlin Velev, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, NCSU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    and suspension stability, detergency, separations and product formulation. Vast areas of application of colloidColloid Science and Nanoscale Engineering Course (CHE 596-009) Orlin Velev, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, NCSU Synopsis The Colloid Science and Nanoscale Engineering Course discusses

  12. 1/19/2015 Nanoscale NMR Advances | Chemical & Engineering News http://cen.acs.org.ezpprod1.hul.harvard.edu/articles/93/i2/NanoscaleNMRAdvances.html 1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    1/19/2015 Nanoscale NMR Advances | Chemical & Engineering News http://cen.acs.org.ezpprod1.hul nuclear species in a region measuring 50 µm2. Chemical & Engineering News ISSN 00092347 Copyright © 2015.harvard.edu/articles/93/i2/NanoscaleNMRAdvances.html 1/2 CASC&ENACS PublicationsACS Log In Serving The Chemical, Life

  13. Nanoscale chemical phase separation in FeTe0.55Se0.45 as seen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE PAGES Search Results Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: Nanoscale chemical phase separation in FeTe0.55Se0.45 as seen via scanning tunneling spectroscopy Prev Next Title:...

  14. Nondestructive volumetric 3-D chemical mapping of nickel-sulfur compounds at the nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris W. M.; Chu Y.; Nelson, G.J.; Kiss, A.M.; Izzo Jr, J.R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, M.; Wang, S.; Chiu W.K.S.

    2012-04-04

    Nano-structures of nickel (Ni) and nickel subsulfide (Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}) materials were studied and mapped in 3D with high-resolution x-ray nanotomography combined with full field XANES spectroscopy. This method for characterizing these phases in complex microstructures is an important new analytical imaging technique, applicable to a wide range of nanoscale and mesoscale electrochemical systems.

  15. Nanoscale Imaging of Lithium Ion Distribution During In Situ Operation of Battery Electrode and Electrolyte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Megan E; Gunceler, Deniz; Gao, Jie; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Schwarz, Kathleen A; Arias, Tomás A; Abruña, Héctor D; Muller, David A

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in the development of new battery materials is understanding their fundamental mechanisms of operation and degradation. Their microscopically inhomogeneous nature calls for characterization tools that provide operando and localized information from individual grains and particles. Here we describe an approach that images the nanoscale distribution of ions during electrochemical charging of a battery in a transmission electron microscope liquid flow cell. We use valence energy-loss spectroscopy to track both solvated and intercalated ions, with electronic structure fingerprints of the solvated ions identified using an ab initio non-linear response theory. Equipped with the new electrochemical cell holder, nanoscale spectroscopy and theory, we have been able to determine the lithiation state of a LiFePO4 electrode and surrounding aqueous electrolyte in real time with nanoscale resolution during electrochemical charge and discharge. We follow lithium transfer between electrode and electrolyte a...

  16. Nanoscale NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging of Multiple Nuclear Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    /v) for more than 1 hour. Using atomic layer deposition (ALD, Savannah Atomic Layer Deposition S200), a 3 nm.999% 12 C high-purity chemical vapor deposition (CVD) chip from Element 6 with an unpolished surface.999% 12 C high-purity chemical vapor deposition (CVD) chip from Element 6 with an unpolished surface

  17. Imaging exotic properties of nanoscale magnetic lattices | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHusseinSOLICWfATION/MODIFICATlONImagingLaboratory Imaging

  18. Chemical Imaging Initiative Delivering New Capabilities for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or with light-source capabilities to image materials of importance to the nation's energy and environmentalChemical Imaging Initiative Delivering New Capabilities for In Situ, Molecular-Scale Imaging A complete, precise and realistic view of chemical, materials and biochemical processes and an understanding

  19. Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Advancing Methods for Labeling, Staining, Imaging of Neurosciences University of California, San Diego Abstract A grand goal in neuroscience research will highlight development and application of new contrasting methods and imaging tools that have allowed us

  20. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Wednesday, 25 August 2010 00:00 Scientists have...

  1. Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Presented by Kannan M. Krishnan, Ph.D. Departments of Materials Science and Physics University of Washington Abstract There has been a renaissance in magnetism. Central to this work are innovations in chemical synthesis of nanoparticles, their size-dependent magnetic

  2. Nanoscale metals and semiconductors for the storage of solar energy in chemical bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manthiram, Karthish

    2015-01-01

    for the storage of solar energy in chemical bonds Byfor the storage of solar energy in chemical bonds Copyrightfor the storage of solar energy in chemical bonds By

  3. Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series S cience and Technology of Multifunctional Oxide Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory Abstract New paradigms in the research and development of novel multifunctional oxide and nanocarbon thin films are providing the bases for new physics

  4. Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the Materials Research Society. His research interests focus on the development of Z-contrast scanningFrontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Presented by Dr. Stephen J Pennycook, Ph.D. Materials and Adjoint Professor in the Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University. For the development

  5. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing...

  6. Methods for chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheidegger, Rachel Nora

    2013-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a relatively new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition technique that generates contrast dependent on tissue microenvironment, such as protein concentration and ...

  7. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has led to unprecedented study of dynamic processes. The ability to image the chemical reactions in living cells in real time, especially in parallel with fluorescence...

  8. Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    uses of chemical imaging, and the development of advanced reactivity concepts in combustion and catalysis including carbon management. These activities directly benefitted...

  9. Chemical vapor detection with a multispectral thermal imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chein-I

    Chemical vapor detection with a multispectral thermal imager Mark 1. G. Aithouse, MEMBER SPIE U.S. Army Chemical Research Development and Engineering Center SMCCR-DDT Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland algorithm 7. Conclusions 8. Acknowledgments 9. References 1. INTRODUCTION Detection of chemical vapor clouds

  10. Fron%ers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fron%ers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Visualizing Crystal Growth Department IBM T. J. Watson Research Center Abstract In situ transmission electron microscopy is a unique and exciting technique for visualizing and quantifying crystal growth. Physical and chemical vapour deposition

  11. Chemically-selective imaging of brain structures with CARS microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    Chemically-selective imaging of brain structures with CARS microscopy Conor L. Evans1§ , Xiaoyin Xu anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy to image brain structure and pathology ex vivo. Although. Definitive diagnosis still requires brain biopsy in a significant number of cases. CARS microscopy

  12. Nonlinear Chemical Imaging Microscopy: Near-Field Third Harmonic Generation Imaging of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    radiation in human red blood cells. We show that resonantly enhanced THG is a chemically specific bulk probeNonlinear Chemical Imaging Microscopy: Near-Field Third Harmonic Generation Imaging of Human Red experiments do not produce contrast that is truly surface specific. There is much current interest in the use

  13. Nanoscale chemical phase separation in FeTe0.55Se0.45 as seen via scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Xiaobo [Louisiana State University; Li, Guorong [Louisiana State University; Zhang, Jiandi [Louisiana State University; Karki, A B [Louisiana State University; Jin, Rongying [Louisiana State University; Sales, Brian C [ORNL; Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL; Plummer, E. W. [Louisiana State University

    2011-01-01

    Atomically resolved structural and electronic properties of FeTe{sub 1-x}Se{sub x} (x = 0 and 0.45) have been studied with scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS). In contrast to the extreme flatness of the Te-terminated FeTe surface, nanoscale chemical phase separation between Te and Se atoms is unambiguously revealed on the surface of FeTe{sub 0.55}Se{sub 0.45}. A statistical counting of the two kinds of atoms has the same ratio as that in the bulk. Remarkably, there is no electronic phase separation seen in the tunneling spectroscopy. This indicates that the optimally doped superconductor is chemically inhomogeneous but electronically homogeneous, in contrast to many correlated electron materials.

  14. Nanoscale Material Properties | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications The NREL windTeacherNanoscale Chemical Imaging

  15. Density and water content of nanoscale solid C-S-H formed in alkali-activated slag (AAS) paste and implications for chemical shrinkage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Jeffrey J., E-mail: jthomas39@slb.com [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Allen, Andrew J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Jennings, Hamlin M. [CSHub, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Alkali-activated slag (AAS) paste was analyzed using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The scattering response indicates that the microstructure consists of a uniform matrix of hydration product with a high surface area studded with unhydrated cores of slag particles. In contrast with portland cement paste, no surface fractal scattering regime was detected, and elevated temperature curing (at 60 Degree-Sign C) had no detectable effect on the microstructure at any length scale studied. The specific surface area of the AAS pastes is about 25% higher than that of a portland cement paste cured under the same conditions. The composition and mass density of the nanoscale solid C-S-H phase formed in the AAS paste was determined using a previously developed neutron scattering method, in conjunction with a hydration model. The result ((CaO){sub 0.99}-SiO{sub 2}-(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 0.06}-(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.97}, d = (2.73 {+-} 0.02) g/cm{sup 3}) is significantly lower in calcium and in water as compared to portland cement or pure tricalcium silicate paste. These values were used to calculate the chemical shrinkage that would result from complete hydration of the AAS paste. The result, (12.2 {+-} 1.5) cm{sup 3} of volumetric shrinkage per 100 g of unhydrated cement, is about twice the amount of chemical shrinkage exhibited by normal cement pastes.

  16. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Udo

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  17. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts onReal-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm

  18. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts onReal-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial BiofilmReal-Time

  19. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton DeliveryRadioactiveRare |Real-Time Chemical Imaging

  20. Nanoscale, multidimensional artificial magnet created

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications The NREL windTeacherNanoscale ChemicalNanoscale,

  1. Influence of the chemical surface structure on the nanoscale friction in plasma nitrided and post-oxidized ferrous alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freislebem, Márcia; Menezes, Caren M.; Cemin, Felipe; Costi, Fernanda B.; Ferreira, Patrícia A.; Aguzzoli, César; Baumvol, Israel J. R.; Alvarez, Fernando; Figueroa, Carlos A.

    2014-09-15

    Friction is a ubiquitous phenomenon in everyday activities spanning from vehicles where efficient brakes are mandatory up to mechanical devices where its minimum effects are pursued for energy efficiency issues. Recently, theoretical models succeed correlating the friction behavior with energy transference via phonons between sliding surfaces. Therefore, considering that the energy losses by friction are prompted through phonons, the chemical surface structure between sliding surfaces is very important to determine the friction phenomenon. In this work, we address the issue of friction between a conical diamond tip sliding on different functionalized flat steel surfaces by focusing the influence of the chemical bonds in the outermost layers on the sliding resistance. This geometry allows probing the coupling of the sharp tip with terminator species on the top and underneath material surface at in-depth friction measurements from 20 to 200?nm. Experimentally, the friction coefficient decreases when nitrogen atoms are substituted for oxygen in the iron network. This effect is interpreted as due to energy losses through phonons whilst lower vibrational frequency excitation modes imply lower friction coefficients and a more accurate adjustment is obtained when a theoretical model with longitudinal adsorbate vibration is used.

  2. Nanoscale femtosecond imaging of transient hot solid density plasmas with elemental and charge state sensitivity using resonant coherent diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluge, Thomas; Chung, H -K; Gutt, C; Huang, L G; Zacharias, M; Schramm, U; Cowan, T E

    2015-01-01

    Here we propose to exploit the low energy bandwidth, small wavelength and penetration power of ultrashort pulses from XFELs for resonant Small Angle Scattering (SAXS) on plasma structures in laser excited plasmas. Small angle scattering allows to detect nanoscale density fluctuations in forward scattering direction. Typically, the SAXS signal from laser excited plasmas is expected to be dominated by the free electron distribution. We propose that the ionic scattering signal becomes visible when the X-ray energy is in resonance with an electron transition between two bound states (Resonant coherent X-ray diffraction, RCXD). In this case the scattering cross-section dramatically increases so that the signal of X-ray scattering from ions silhouettes against the free electron scattering background which allows to measure the opacity and derived quantities with high spatial and temporal resolution, being fundamentally limited only by the X-ray wavelength and timing. Deriving quantities such as ion spatial distribu...

  3. Nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of thin films:sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy at buriedinterfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kweskin, S.J.

    2006-05-19

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy was used to characterize interfaces pertinent to current surface engineering applications, such as thin film polymers and novel catalysts. An array of advanced surface science techniques like scanning probe microscopy (SPM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), gas chromatography (GC) and electron microscopy were used to obtain experimental measurements complementary to SFG data elucidating polymer and catalyst surface composition, surface structure, and surface mechanical behavior. Experiments reported in this dissertation concentrate on three fundamental questions: (1) How does the interfacial molecular structure differ from that of the bulk in real world applications? (2) How do differences in chemical environment affect interface composition or conformation? (3) How do these changes correlate to properties such as mechanical or catalytic performance? The density, surface energy and bonding at a solid interface dramatically alter the polymer configuration, physics and mechanical properties such as surface glass transition, adhesion and hardness. The enhanced sensitivity of SFG at the buried interface is applied to three systems: a series of acrylates under compression, the compositions and segregation behavior of binary polymer polyolefin blends, and the changes in surface structure of a hydrogel as a function of hydration. In addition, a catalytically active thin film of polymer coated nanoparticles is investigated to evaluate the efficacy of SFG to provide in situ information for catalytic reactions involving small mass adsorption and/or product development. Through the use of SFG, in situ total internal reflection (TIR) was used to increase the sensitivity of SFG and provide the necessary specificity to investigate interfaces of thin polymer films and nanostructures previously considered unfeasible. The dynamic nature of thin film surfaces is examined and it is found that the non-equilibrium states contribute to practical applications of acrylates, blends and hydrogels. Lastly, nanoparticle surfaces and the catalytic activity and selectivity of platinum cube nanoparticles are correlated to the surface intermediates in a high pressure flow reactor.

  4. Chemical Imaging Infrastructure Research Team: Carina Lansing, Zoe Guillen, Kerstin Kleese-van Dam, Shaun O'Leary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Shaun O'Leary Purpose Support real-time analysis of single and multi-modal chemical imaging experiments

  5. X-ray photon-in/photon-out methods for chemical imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcus, Matthew A.

    2010-03-24

    Most interesting materials in nature are heterogeneous, so it is useful to have analytical techniques with spatial resolution sufficient to resolve these heterogeneities.This article presents the basics of X-ray photon-in/photon-out chemical imaging. This family of methods allows one to derive images reflectingthe chemical state of a given element in a complex sample, at micron or deep sub-micron scale. X-ray chemical imaging is relatively non-destructiveand element-selective, and requires minimal sample preparation. The article presents the basic concepts and some considerations of data takingand data analysis, along with some examples.

  6. Phase transition in bulk single crystals and thin films of VO2 by nanoscale infrared spectroscopy and imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Mengkun; Sternbach, Aaron J.; Wagner, Martin; Slusar, Tetiana V.; Kong, Tai; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Kittiwatanakul, Salinporn; Qazilbash, M. M.; McLeod, Alexander; Fei, Zhe; et al

    2015-06-29

    We have systematically studied a variety of vanadium dioxide (VO2) crystalline forms, including bulk single crystals and oriented thin films, using infrared (IR) near-field spectroscopic imaging techniques. By measuring the IR spectroscopic responses of electrons and phonons in VO2 with sub-grain-size spatial resolution (~20nm), we show that epitaxial strain in VO2 thin films not only triggers spontaneous local phase separations, but leads to intermediate electronic and lattice states that are intrinsically different from those found in bulk. Generalized rules of strain- and symmetry-dependent mesoscopic phase inhomogeneity are also discussed. Furthermore, these results set the stage for a comprehensive understanding ofmore »complex energy landscapes that may not be readily determined by macroscopic approaches.« less

  7. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of...

  8. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies. Studying Living Cells For...

  9. Z-STEM Imaging of Chemical Ordering in FePt Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Z-STEM Imaging of Chemical Ordering in FePt Magnetic Nanoparticles J.E. Wittig, M.S. Wellons and C.M. Lukehart, Vanderbilt University J. Bentley and L.F. Allard, Oak Ridge National...

  10. In Situ Chemical Imaging of Plant Cell Walls Using CARS/SRS Microscopy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Y.; Liu, Y. S.; Saar, B. G.; Xie, X. S.; Chen, F.; Dixon, R. A.; Himmel, M. E.; Ding S. Y.

    2009-06-01

    This poster demonstrates coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and stimulated Raman scattering of plant cell walls. It includes simultaneous chemical imaging of lignin and cellulose (corn stover) during acidic pretreatment.

  11. Nanoscale Pore Network and Pore Fluid Characterization from Neutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Pore Network and Pore Fluid Characterization from Neutron Scattering and Modeling Techniques Jul 22 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Gernot Rother, Chemical Sciences Division...

  12. Chemical Tools for Imaging Glycans in Living Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Small molecule ROS and RNS indicators Chemical reporter1–5 Small molecule fluorescent ROS/RNS sensors Figure 1–6sensors. Small molecule ROS and RNS indicators As discussed

  13. Design of angle-tolerant multivariate optical elements for chemical imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    Design of angle-tolerant multivariate optical elements for chemical imaging Olusola O. Soyemi in imaging applications. We report a method for the design of angle-insensitive MOEs based on modification of Bismarck Brown and Crystal Violet, was designed and its performance simulated. For angles of incidence

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for chemical sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Vincent Hok

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used for examining the human body. MRI contrast agents currently used in the clinic assist physicians in locating problematic areas, but other tools are needed to interrogate ...

  15. Simultaneous multislice spiral and EPI chemical shift imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abuhashem, Obaidah Anees

    2013-01-01

    The current prominent excitation methods of 3D slabs used for MR Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) include long dead times in each TR. This dead time is necessary for magnetization moments' longitudinal relaxation, and so a good ...

  16. Using Dynamic Quantum Clustering to Analyze Hierarchically Heterogeneous Samples on the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hume, Allison; /Princeton U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07

    Dynamic Quantum Clustering (DQC) is an unsupervised, high visual data mining technique. DQC was tested as an analysis method for X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) data from the Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) group. The TXM group images hierarchically heterogeneous materials with nanoscale resolution and large field of view. XANES data consists of energy spectra for each pixel of an image. It was determined that DQC successfully identifies structure in data of this type without prior knowledge of the components in the sample. Clusters and sub-clusters clearly reflected features of the spectra that identified chemical component, chemical environment, and density in the image. DQC can also be used in conjunction with the established data analysis technique, which does require knowledge of components present.

  17. Chemical imaging of biological materials by NanoSIMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, P K; Smith, J B; Hutcheon, I D; Shmakov, A; Rybitskaya, I; Curran, H

    2004-08-23

    The NanoSIMS 50 represents the state -of-the-art for in situ microanalysis for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), combining unprecedented spatial resolution (as good as 50 nm) with ultra-high sensitivity (MDL of 200 atoms). The NanoSIMS incorporates an array of detectors, enabling simultaneous collection of 5 elements or isotopes originating from the same sputtered volume of a sample. The primary ion beam (Cs{sup +} or O{sup -}) can be scanned across the sample to produce quantitative secondary ion images. This capability for multiple isotope imaging with high spatial resolution is unique to the NanoSIMS and provides a novel new approach to the study of the distribution of elements in biological materials. We have applied this technique extensively to mammalian cells and bacterial spores. Results from these studies and critical analytical issues such as sample preparation, instrument tuning, and data processing will be discussed.

  18. Advanced synchronous luminescence imaging for chemical and medical diagnostics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2006-09-05

    A diagnostic method and associated system includes the steps of exposing at least one sample location with excitation radiation through a single optical waveguide or a single optical waveguide bundle, wherein the sample emits emission radiation in response to the excitation radiation. The same single optical waveguide or the single optical waveguide bundle receives at least a portion of the emission radiation from the sample, thus providing co-registration of the excitation radiation and the emission radiation. The wavelength of the excitation radiation and emission radiation is synchronously scanned to produce a spectrum upon which an image can be formed. An increased emission signal is generated by the enhanced overlap of the excitation and emission focal volumes provided by co-registration of the excitation and emission signals thus increasing the sensitivity as well as decreasing the exposure time necessary to obtain an image.

  19. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton DeliveryRadioactiveRare |Real-Time Chemical

  20. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton DeliveryRadioactiveRare |Real-Time ChemicalReal-Time

  1. In vivo imaging of C. elegans ASH neurons: cellular response and adaptation to chemical repellents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schafer, William R.

    In vivo imaging of C. elegans ASH neurons: cellular response and adaptation to chemical repellents di Genetica e Biofisica--ABT, Napoli, Italy ASH sensory neurons are required in Caenorhabditis and nose touch. The ASH neurons are therefore hypothesized to be polymodal nociceptive neurons

  2. MASTER GUIDE Nanoscale Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellandréa, Emmanuel

    #12;1 MASTER GUIDE Nanoscale Engineering #12;2 #12;3 Word of welcome Welcome to Lyon and more engineering institutions and universities in Lyon: �cole Centrale de Lyon (ECL), Institut des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon (INSA de lyon), Université Claude Bernard Lyon1 (UCBL1), which are part of the "Université

  3. In vivo imaging of C. elegans ASH neurons: cellular response and adaptation to chemical repellents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schafer, William R.

    Erratum In vivo imaging of C. elegans ASH neurons: cellular response and adaptation to chemical (arbitrary units) Intensity 10 mM copper 3 s 2 s 1 s 0 s -1 s 1.6 2.1 m)µ( YFP CFP Dendrite Soma ASH Time (s following panels. Scale bar, 200 mm. (B) Diagram of the animal's head with one of the two symmetrical ASH

  4. Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Lithium-Ion Anodes Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Lithium-Ion Anodes 2012 DOE...

  5. Nanotribology and Nanoscale Friction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Yi [Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey; Qu, Zhihua [University of Central Florida, Orlando; Braiman, Yehuda [ORNL; Zhang, Zhenyu [ORNL; Barhen, Jacob [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Tribology is the science and technology of contacting solid surfaces in relative motion, including the study of lubricants, lubrication, friction, wear, and bearings. It is estimated that friction and wear cost the U.S. economy 6% of the gross national product (Persson, 2000). For example, 5% of the total energy generated in an automobile engine is lost to frictional resistance. The study of nanoscale friction has a technological impact in reducing energy loss in machines, in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and in the development of durable, low-friction surfaces and ultra-thin lubrication films.

  6. Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudget || DepartmentMapping the Nanoscale

  7. Microfluidics and Nanoscale Research Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microfluidics and Nanoscale Science Research Profile Our research group is engaged in a broad range of activities in the general area of microfluidics and nanoscale science. At a primary level, our interest that when compared to macroscale tech- nology, microfluidic systems engender a number of distinct advantages

  8. Controlled nanoscale doping of semiconductors via molecular monolayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    -limiting and self-assembly processes where surface and chemical phenomena guide the synthesis and fabrication) the formation of self-assembled monolayers of dopant-containing molecules on the surface of crystalline SiARTICLES Controlled nanoscale doping of semiconductors via molecular monolayers JOHNNY C. HO1

  9. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA); Regan, Brian C. (Los Angeles, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA)

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  10. Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals as nanoscale emissive probes in light emitting diodes and cell biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Hao, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    This thesis employs colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) as nanoscale emissive probes to investigate the physics of light emitting diodes (LEDs), as well as to unveil properties of cells that conventional imaging ...

  11. Connecting the dots: Reinventing optics for nanoscale dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    contributions: N.J.H. wrote the paper. The author declares no conflict of interest. See companion article, an interesting analogy and scaling principle emerges. Just as radio-frequency antennas pro- vide sources survey of nanoscale optical components. (A) Gold nanostar SEM image, simulation geometry

  12. Nanoscale heat transfer - from computation to experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Tengfei

    2013-04-09

    Heat transfer can differ distinctly at the nanoscale from that at the macroscale. Recent advancement in

  13. Nanoscale Materials in Medicine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by Auburn University Department of Chemical Engineering held on June 26, 2012

  14. pH-weighted molecular imaging of gliomas using amine chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of gliomas using amine chemical exchange saturation transferenhancement mediated chemical exchange saturation transferZu Z, et al. On the origins of chemical exchange saturation

  15. Beyond control - The Uncertainties and Diverging Images of Swedish Chemicals Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haikola, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Stockholm: EPA. The Swedish Chemicals Agency. (2007). TheSCA. The Swedish Chemicals Agency. (2008). EkonomiskaSCA. The Swedish Chemicals Agency. (2008b). Produktval,

  16. Beyond control - The Uncertainties and Diverging Images of Swedish Chemicals Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haikola, Simon

    2015-01-01

    and European chemicals regulation. Journal of EuropeanSwedish chemicals regulation: An overview and analysis. Riskprinciple in chemical regulation: A constructive critique.

  17. Nanoscale data storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Li

    2007-01-29

    The object of this article is to review the development of ultrahigh-density, nanoscale data storage, i.e., nanostorage. As a fundamentally new type of storage system, the recording mechanisms of nanostorage may be completely different to those of the traditional devices. Currently, two types of molecules are being studied for potential application in nanostorage. One is molecular electronic elements including molecular wires, rectifiers, switches, and transistors. The other approach employs nanostructured materials such as nanotubes, nanowires, and nanoparticles. The challenges for nanostorage are not only the materials, ultrahigh data-densities, fabrication-costs, device operating temperatures and large-scale integration, but also the development of the physical principles and models. There are already some breakthroughs obtained, but it is still unclear what kind of nanostorage systems can ultimately replace the current silicon based transistors. A promising candidate may be a molecular-nanostructure hybrid device with sub-5 nm dimensions.

  18. Beyond control - The Uncertainties and Diverging Images of Swedish Chemicals Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haikola, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Chemicals Agency. (2011b). Bisfenol A, Report no. 2/11.Swedish Chemicals Agency. (2012). Bisfenol A i leksaker och

  19. Nanoscale Electronic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jing, Xiaoye

    2010-01-01

    Journal of Applied Electrochemistry, 2000. 30(5): p. 533-by template-assisted electrochemistry and chemical vaporSAD) patterns. For electrochemistry nanowire, ambipolar

  20. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    provides links to each partner's participating organizations. Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Center for Nanoscale Materials Energy Systems...

  1. Nanoscale Surface Topography to Guide Bone Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanoscale Surface Topography to Guide Bone Growth P R O J E C T L E A D E R : Jirun Sun (American T S Designed and fabricated devices with nanoscale surface topography. Controlled cell alignment by varying

  2. Chemical functionalization of AFM cantilevers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sunyoung, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been a powerful instrument that provides nanoscale imaging of surface features, mainly of rigid metal or ceramic surfaces that can be insulators as well as conductors. Since it has been ...

  3. Summary report for nanoscale magnetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, J.G.; Waddill, G.D.; Jankowski, A.F.; Tamura, E.; Sterne, P.A.; Pappas, D.P.; Tong, S.Y.

    1993-09-23

    We have probed the electronic, geometric, and magnetic nanoscale structure of ultrathin magnetic films, both monolayers and multilayers (Fe/Cu(001), FePt, FeCoPt, UFe{sub 2}, U-S). Techniques used included the MCD (magnetic circular dichroism)-variants of of x-ray absorption, core-level photoemission, and photoelectron diffraction. Progress has been made on nanoscale structure-property relations, in part of coupling of world-class experimentation and theoretical modeling. Feasibility of investigations of 5f magnetism using bulk uranium samples also has been demonstrated.

  4. ORNL microscopy directly images problematic lithium dendrites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    images of the nucleation and growth of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries. ORNL electron microscopy captured the first real-time nanoscale...

  5. Nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging C. L. Degena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo, Degiorgi

    tobacco mosaic virus particles sitting on a nanometer-thick layer of ad- sorbed hydrocarbons. This result, which represents a 100 million- fold improvement in volume resolution over conventional MRI considerable effort, attempts to push the spatial resolution of conventional MRI into the realm of high

  6. Using Self-Assembly to Control Nanoscale Morphology in Semiconducting Polymers for Application in Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Amy Susan

    2015-01-01

    and Traditional Blend Casting: Nanoscale Structure andand Traditional Blend Casting: Nanoscale Structure andand Traditional Blend Casting: Nanoscale Structure and

  7. Silicon-on-glass pore network micromodels with oxygen-sensing fluorophore films for chemical imaging and defined spatial structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Anheier, Norman C.

    2012-11-21

    Pore network microfluidic models were fabricated by a silicon-on-glass technique that provides the precision advantage of dry etched silicon while creating a structure that is transparent across all microfluidic channels and pores, and can be imaged from either side. A silicon layer is bonded to an underlying borosilicate glass substrate and thinned to the desired height of the microfluidic channels and pores. The silicon is then patterned and through-etched by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE), with the underlying glass serving as an etch stop. After bonding on a transparent glass cover plate, one obtains a micromodel in oxygen impermeable materials with water wet surfaces where the microfluidic channels are transparent and structural elements such as the pillars creating the pore network are opaque. The micromodel can be imaged from either side. The advantageous features of this approach in a chemical imaging application are demonstrated by incorporating a Pt porphyrin fluorophore in a PDMS film serving as the oxygen sensing layer and a bonding surface, or in a polystyrene film coated with a PDMS layer for bonding. The sensing of a dissolved oxygen gradient was demonstrated using fluorescence lifetime imaging, and it is shown that different matrix polymers lead to optimal use in different ranges dissolved oxygen concentration. Imaging with the opaque pillars in between the observation direction and the continuous fluorophore film yields images that retain spatial information in the sensor image.

  8. Nanoscale Twins Formed by Plastic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    -Ren Yang Phase Transformation Group 6/9/10 1PTM 2010 #12;Strengthening Mechanisms in Nano Bainitic Steels). 0 20 40 60 80 100 #12;Twinning in Steels · Twinning in steels can be achieved by several different methods: 1. Annealing Twins 2. Deformation Twins 3. Transformation Twins 6/9/10 PTM 2010 4 #12;Nanoscale

  9. NANOSCALE STRUCTURALAND MAGNETIC CHARACTERIZATION USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    of novel nanoscale storage devices and sensors. However, for successful utilization, it is essential]. Such unique properties of magnetic thin films and nanostructures hold great promise for the development to the characterization of nanostructured magnetic materials. 2. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY METHODS In the transmission electron

  10. Nanoscale Stress Measurements and Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Nanoscale Stress Measurements and Standards SEMICONDUCTORS Our objective is to develop accurate and lifetime, and address a critical measurement need in the MEMS industry, i.e., 90 % of MEMS customers and Customers · The semiconductor microelectronics industry is a $250B worldwide market with 9% cumulative

  11. Nanoscale In Situ Characterization of Li-ion Battery Electrochemistry Via Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipson, Albert L. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dept. of Chemistry; Ginder, Ryan S. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dept. of Chemistry; Hersam, Mark C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-12-15

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy imaging of battery electrodes, using the geometry shown in the figure, is a tool for in situ nanoscale mapping of surface topography and local ion current. Images of silicon and tin electrodes show that the combination of topography and ion current provides insight into the local electrochemical phenomena that govern the operation of lithium ion batteries.

  12. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane (Pleasanton, CA); Stolz, Christopher J. (Lathrop, CA); Wu, Zhouling (Pleasanton, CA); Huber, Robert (Discovery Bay, CA); Weinzapfel, Carolyn (Tracy, CA)

    2006-07-11

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  13. Dynamic Imaging of Au-nanoparticles via Scanning Electron Microscopy in a Graphene Wet Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wayne Yang; Yuning Zhang; Michael Hilke; Walter Reisner

    2015-06-10

    High resolution nanoscale imaging in liquid environments is crucial for studying molecular interactions in biological and chemical systems. In particular, electron microscopy is the gold-standard tool for nanoscale imaging, but its high-vacuum requirements make application to in-liquid samples extremely challenging. Here we present a new graphene based wet cell device where high resolution SEM (scanning electron microscope) and Energy Dispersive X-rays (EDX) analysis can be performed directly inside a liquid environment. Graphene is an ideal membrane material as its high transparancy, conductivity and mechanical strength can support the high vacuum and grounding requirements of a SEM while enabling maximal resolution and signal. In particular, we obtain high resolution (graphene wet cell and EDX analysis of nanoparticle composition in the liquid enviornment. Our obtained resolution surpasses current conventional silicon nitride devices imaged in both SEM and TEM under much higher electron doses.

  14. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    the other hand, energy transfer by thermal radiation betweenit was shown that energy transfer by thermal radi- ationpyroelectric energy conversion and nanoscale thermal

  15. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    eld radiative heat transfer dominates radiation transferstudy Far field radiation Heat transfer coefficient, h r (W/nanoscale radiation to enhance radiative heat transfer. The

  16. ORNL microscopy pencils patterns in polymers at the nanoscale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (865) 574-7308 ORNL microscopy pencils patterns in polymers at the nanoscale Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers used atomic force microscopy to draw nanoscale patterns in a...

  17. Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide Title Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication...

  18. Mesoscale Metallic Pyramids with Nanoscale Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odom, Teri W.

    Mesoscale Metallic Pyramids with Nanoscale Tips Joel Henzie, Eun-Soo Kwak, and Teri W. Odom generate free-standing mesoscale metallic pyramids composed of one or more materials and having nanoscale tips (radii of curvature of less than 2 nm). Mesoscale holes (100-300 nm) in a chromium film are used

  19. The Nanoscale Biophysics of Microscale Cell Adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tees, David F.J.

    The Nanoscale Biophysics of Microscale Cell Adhesion David F. J. Tees, Ph.D. Department of Physics://www.phy.ohiou.edu/~tees/current_research.html #12;Outline 1) Adhesion molecules and review of cell-scale phenomena 2) Force dependence of reaction Appendix 2--Bell model Appendix 3--Reliability theory #12;Cell Adhesion: Microscale to Nanoscale Cell 1

  20. Application of Thin-Film Amorphous Silicon to Chemical Imaging Tatsuo Yoshinobu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Werner

    silicon (a-Si) deposited on a glass substrate was employed as a semiconductor material for the chemical is determined by the thickness of the semiconductor layer as well as by the material parameters properties and the spatial resolution of the a-Si sensors were investigated. Nearly-Nernstian p

  1. Nanoscale engineering boosts performance of quantum dot light emitting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications The NREL windTeacherNanoscale Chemical

  2. Ultra-spatial synchrotron radiation for imaging molecular chemical structure: Applications in plant and animal studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical features and make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced synchrotron technique to the study of plant and animal tissues' inherent structure at a cellular or subcellular level. In this article, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of themore »newly developed, advanced synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to reveal molecular structural-chemical features of various plant and animal tissues.« less

  3. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

  4. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, David G.

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale ...

  5. NANOSCALE OPTICAL COMPUTING USING RESONANCE ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebeck, Alvin R.

    OPTICAL COMPUTING USING RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER LOGIC A NEW NANOSCALE DEVICE BASED ON A SINGLE-MOLECULE OPTICAL PHENOMENON CALLED RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER- molecule optical devices called chromo- phores. In isolation, a given chromophore absorbs photons

  6. Nanoscale Center Dedication | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to make them reality. That's what this facility will do - the future will be created right here. There are several very good reasons we have elected to locate our Nanoscale...

  7. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    OF CONTENTS Basic Energy Sciences Nanoscience/Nanotechnology Group Basic Energy Sciences Nanoscience/Nanotechnology Group Chair: Douglas H. Lowndes (ORNL) A. Paul#12;#12;Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions ABSTRACT This report

  8. Dynamics of sliding mechanisms in nanoscale friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yim, Shon W., 1973-

    2002-01-01

    Nanotribology is the study of friction and wear at the nanoscale, with relevance to such applications as micromechanical systems (MEMS) and thin, hard coatings. For these systems, classical laws of friction are inappropriate ...

  9. Nanoscale Mixing of Soft Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Sangwoo; Soto, Haidy E.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S. (UMM); (Texas)

    2013-03-07

    Assessing the state of mixing on the molecular scale in soft solids is challenging. Concentrated solutions of micelles formed by self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymers in squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}) adopt a body-centered cubic (bcc) lattice, with glassy PS cores. Utilizing small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and isotopic labeling ({sup 1}H and {sup 2}H (D) polystyrene blocks) in a contrast-matching solvent (a mixture of squalane and perdeuterated squalane), we demonstrate quantitatively the remarkable fact that a commercial mixer can create completely random mixtures of micelles with either normal, PS(H), or deuterium-labeled, PS(D), cores on a well-defined bcc lattice. The resulting SANS intensity is quantitatively modeled by the form factor of a single spherical core. These results demonstrate both the possibility of achieving complete nanoscale mixing in a soft solid and the use of SANS to quantify the randomness.

  10. Developing Next-Generation Multimodal Chemical Imaging Capability by Combining STEM/APT/STXM/HIM Research Team: Theva Thevuthasan, Arun Devaraj, Craig Szymanski, Birgit Schwenzer, Shuttha Shutthanandan, Zhijie Xu,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ion battery cathodes. Devaraj A et al. 2014 (to be submitted to Nat. Comm.) Chemical state STXM imagingDeveloping Next-Generation Multimodal Chemical Imaging Capability by Combining STEM ion battery cathodes. Performed directly coupled STXM- TEM-APT analysis of Li and Na ion battery

  11. The Art of Chemical Synthesis Controlled Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    inorganic materials at the nanoscale remains challenging, these nanostructures should be well controlledThe Art of Chemical Synthesis Controlled Synthesis of Nanomaterials Sample List of Nanomaterials Life-time: 8 weeks #12;Highlights Custom synthesis available Universal synthetic methodology

  12. Design Optimization of Radionuclide Nano-Scale Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenfeld, D.W.; Tulenko, J.S.; Wang, J.; Smith, B.

    2004-10-06

    Radioisotopes have been used for power sources in heart pacemakers and space applications dating back to the 50's. Two key properties of radioisotope power sources are high energy density and long half-life compared to chemical batteries. The tritium battery used in heart pacemakers exceeds 500 mW-hr, and is being evaluated by the University of Florida for feasibility as a MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) power source. Conversion of radioisotope sources into electrical power within the constraints of nano-scale dimensions requires cutting-edge technologies and novel approaches. Some advances evolving in the III-V and II-IV semiconductor families have led to a broader consideration of radioisotopes rather free of radiation damage limitations. Their properties can lead to novel battery configurations designed to convert externally located emissions from a highly radioactive environment. This paper presents results for the analytical computational assisted design and modeling of semiconductor prototype nano-scale radioisotope nuclear batteries from MCNP and EGS programs. The analysis evaluated proposed designs and was used to guide the selection of appropriate geometries, material properties, and specific activities to attain power requirements for the MEMS batteries. Plans utilizing high specific activity radioisotopes were assessed in the investigation of designs employing multiple conversion cells and graded junctions with varying band gap properties. Voltage increases sought by serial combination of VOC s are proposed to overcome some of the limitations of a low power density. The power density is directly dependent on the total active areas.

  13. Macro- to nanoscale wear prevention via molecular adsorption.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Seong H.; Asay, David B.; Dugger, Michael Thomas; Ohlhausen, James Anthony

    2007-04-01

    As the size of mechanical systems shrinks from macro- to nanoscales, surface phenomena such as adhesion, friction, and wear become increasingly significant. This paper demonstrates the use of alcohol adsorption as a means of continuously replenishing the lubricating layer on the working device surfaces and elucidates the tribochemical reaction products formed in the sliding contact region. Friction and wear of native silicon oxide were studied over a wide range of length scales from macro- to nanoscales using a ball-on-flat tribometer (millimeter scale), sidewall microelectromechanical system (MEMS) tribometer (micrometer scale), and atomic force microscopy (nanometer scale). In all cases, the alcohol vapor adsorption successfully lubricated and prevented wear. Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis of the sliding contact region revealed that high molecular weight oligomeric species were formed via tribochemical reactions of the adsorbed linear alcohol molecules. These tribochemical products seemed to enhance the lubrication and wear prevention. In the case of sidewall MEMS tests, the lifetime of the MEMS device was radically increased via vapor-phase lubrication with alcohol.

  14. Y-Shaped Polymer Brushes: Nanoscale Switchable Duangrut Julthongpiput, Yen-Hsi Lin, Jing Teng, Eugene R. Zubarev,* and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubarev, Eugene

    Y-Shaped Polymer Brushes: Nanoscale Switchable Surfaces Duangrut Julthongpiput, Yen-Hsi Lin, Jing incompatible polymer chains (arms) attached to a single focal point capable of chemical grafting dissimilar (hydrophobic and hydrophilic) polymer arms in such Y-shaped molecules lead to the formation

  15. Nanoscale Synthesis and Functional Assembly Center for Nanophase Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Kai Xiao R&D Staff Nanoscale Synthesis and Functional Assembly Center for Nanophase Materials Oak materials; #12;3. Inorganic/organic nanoscale electronics. Fabrication 1D and 2D nanoscale electronic of Technology, China Chemistry B.A., 1998 Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Acad. of Sci., China Material

  16. Nanoscale LEDs DOI: 10.1002/smll.200600628

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odom, Teri W.

    of macroscale organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for full-color dis- plays have created interestNanoscale LEDs DOI: 10.1002/smll.200600628 Addressable, Large-Area Nanoscale Organic Light in generating OLEDs at the nanoscale.[1,2] Reducing the size of an OLED can produce higher device densities per

  17. Nanoscale Calorimetry of Isolated Polyethylene Single Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Leslie H.

    Nanoscale Calorimetry of Isolated Polyethylene Single Crystals A. T. KWAN, M. YU. EFREMOV, E. A-film differential scanning calorimetry to investigate the melt- ing of isolated polyethylene single crystals of lamellar single crystals of polyethylene (PE). We obtain thickness, diffraction, and calorimetry data

  18. Nanoelectromechanical systems Electromechanical Transducers at the Nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekinci, Kamil

    Nanoelectromechanical systems Electromechanical Transducers at the Nanoscale: Actuation and Sensing;Electromechanical devices are rapidly being miniaturized, following the trend in commercial transistor electronics. Miniature electromechanical devices--now with dimensions in the deep sub-micrometer range--are envisioned

  19. Patterning Nanoscale Structures by Surface Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wei

    Patterning Nanoscale Structures by Surface Chemistry Wei Lu* and Dongchoul Kim Department combines spinodal decomposition, surface stress and surface chemistry. The simulation shows that the self-assembly process can be guided by tuning the surface chemistry of a substrate. An epilayer may evolve into various

  20. Contacts Integration into functional nanoscale devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metlushko, Vitali

    from the very beginning of the design process. While the properties of nano-scale magnetic devices by magnetoresistive random- access memory (MRAM). The design challenges faced by CMOS and MRAM are very similar of this, the topographical influence of contacts on the overlying magnetic device must be taken account

  1. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Jianhua; Russell, Scott; Morishetti, Kiran; Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P.; Kent, Michael Stuart

    2011-02-01

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  2. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  3. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, Bradley R. (Brentwood, CA); Talley, Chad E. (Brentwood, CA)

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  4. Novel materials, computational spectroscopy, and multiscale simulation in nanoscale photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardi, Marco, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells convert solar energy to electricity using combinations of semiconducting sunlight absorbers and metallic materials as electrical contacts. Novel nanoscale materials introduce new paradigms for ...

  5. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have...

  6. Nanoscale engineering boosts performance of quantum dot light...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum dot light emitting diodes Nanoscale engineering boosts performance of quantum dot light emitting diodes Quantum dots are nano-sized semiconductor particles whose emission...

  7. DOE A9024 Final Report Functional and Nanoscale Materials Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: DOE A9024 Final Report Functional and Nanoscale Materials Systems: Frontier Programs of Science at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory Citation...

  8. Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Calcium and Strontium Titanate Perovskites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, Sulata Kumari

    2013-01-01

    and A. Navrotsky, “Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Lead Titanate2007. A. Navrotsky, “Thermodynamics of Solid Electrolytesand Y. Fei, “The Thermodynamics of Ordered Perovskites on

  9. Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) User Facilities User Facilities Home User Facilities at a Glance All User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities X-Ray Light...

  10. Ideal Configuration For Nanoscale Solar Cells - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ideal Configuration For Nanoscale Solar Cells Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryThe standard design of excitonic...

  11. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  12. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeat Pumps Heat Pumpsfacility doe logo CH2M-WG logoImaging

  13. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower,PrincipalIdahoImaging Print The

  14. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower,PrincipalIdahoImaging Print

  15. The Effect of Pad-asperity Curvature on Material Removal Rate in Chemical-mechanical Polishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sanha

    In chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP), surface asperities of the polishing pad play a key role, for they transmit normal force and impart tangential motion to the hard, nano-scale abrasive particles in the slurry. It has ...

  16. Imaging and Nanoscale Characterization Group Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , Department of Physics & Astronomy, The University of Tennessee, USA. 2008 Session Chair, APS March meeting of Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China Solid State Physics M.S., 1991 Peking University, China Condensed Matter Physics Ph.D., 1997 Professional Experience 2002­present Research Scientist, Oak

  17. Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Bussian, James R. O'Dea, Horia Metiu, and Steven K. Buratto* California Nanosystems Institute (CNSI) and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UniVersity of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 at the electrodes and proton transport within the aqueous domains. A map of the electrochemically active regions

  18. Hyperspectral imaging of plasmonic nanostructures with nanoscale resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonsson, Fredrik

    plasmons; (250.5403) Plasmonics. References and Links 1. S. A. Maier, Plasmonics: Fundamentals Spectrometer (AVIRIS)," Remote Sens. Environ. 65, 227-248 (1998). 9. E. D. Palik, ed. Handbook of Optical and surface science due to their ability to concentrate and channel radiation in the visible and near

  19. Nanoscale Imaging of Lithium Ion Distribution During In Situ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (heterogeneous), energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), hydrogen and fuel cells, defects, charge transport, membrane, materials and chemistry by design,...

  20. Method to determine thermal profiles of nanoscale circuitry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K; Begtrup, Gavi E

    2013-04-30

    A platform that can measure the thermal profiles of devices with nanoscale resolution has been developed. The system measures the local temperature by using an array of nanoscale thermometers. This process can be observed in real time using a high resolution imagining technique such as electron microscopy. The platform can operate at extremely high temperatures.

  1. Challenges in computational nanoscale contact Roger A. Sauer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and we discussed my doctoral research on computational nanoscale contact me- chanics (Sauer, 2006). After for the future. Abstract This paper outlines the differences between nanoscale and macroscale contact it becomes necessary to integrate the fundamental physical phenomena (Israelachvili, 1991; Persson, 2000

  2. Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer: Interfacial Effects Dominate the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    conduction 2. Convective heat transfer 3. Thermal radiation 4. Conclusions 1.1 Thermal conductivity3/15/2012 1 Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer: Interfacial Effects Dominate the Heat Transfer 1 Xing/nanoscale heat transfer becomes critical. What is the dominant factor in micro/nanosclae heat transfer

  3. Nanoscale Charge Transport in Excitonic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Bommisetty, South Dakota State University

    2011-06-23

    Excitonic solar cells, including all-organic, hybrid organic-inorganic and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), offer strong potential for inexpensive and large-area solar energy conversion. Unlike traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, where all the charge generation and collection processes are well understood, these excitonic solar cells contain extremely disordered structures with complex interfaces which results in large variations in nanoscale electronic properties and has a strong influence on carrier generation, transport, dissociation and collection. Detailed understanding of these processes is important for fabrication of highly efficient solar cells. Efforts to improve efficiency are underway at a large number of research groups throughout the world focused on inorganic and organic semiconductors, photonics, photophysics, charge transport, nanoscience, ultrafast spectroscopy, photonics, semiconductor processing, device physics, device structures, interface structure etc. Rapid progress in this multidisciplinary area requires strong synergetic efforts among researchers from diverse backgrounds. Such effort can lead to novel methods for development of new materials with improved photon harvesting and interfacial treatments for improved carrier transport, process optimization to yield ordered nanoscale morphologies with well defined electronic structures.

  4. Nanoscale magnetic field mapping with a single spin scanning probe magnetometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondin, L.; Tetienne, J.-P.; Spinicelli, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Jacques, V.; Dal Savio, C.; Karrai, K.; Dantelle, G.; Thiaville, A.; Rohart, S.

    2012-04-09

    We demonstrate quantitative magnetic field mapping with nanoscale resolution, by applying a lock-in technique on the electron spin resonance frequency of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect placed at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip. In addition, we report an all-optical magnetic imaging technique which is sensitive to large off-axis magnetic fields, thus extending the operation range of diamond-based magnetometry. Both techniques are illustrated by using a magnetic hard disk as a test sample. Owing to the non-perturbing and quantitative nature of the magnetic probe, this work should open up numerous perspectives in nanomagnetism and spintronics.

  5. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ping [Sandia National Laboratories; Zhou, Lin [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J. [Ames Laboratory; Smith, David J. [Arizona State University

    2014-02-04

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B?-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B??-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems.

  6. Investigation of the chemical interface in the soybean–aphid and rice–bacteria interactions using MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Klein, Adam T.; Yagnik, Gargey B.; Hohenstein, Jessica D.; Ji, Zhiyuan; Zi, Jiachen; Reichert, Malinda D.; MacIntosh, Gustavo C.; Yang, Bing; Peters, Reuben J.; Vela, Javier; et al

    2015-04-27

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is an emerging technology for high-resolution plant biology. It has been utilized to study plant–pest interactions, but limited to the surface interfaces. Here we expand the technology to explore the chemical interactions occurring inside the plant tissues. Two sample preparation methods, imprinting and fracturing, were developed and applied, for the first time, to visualize internal metabolites of leaves in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-MSI. This is also the first time nanoparticle-based ionization was implemented to ionize diterpenoid phytochemicals that were difficult to analyze with traditional organic matrices. The interactions between rice–bacterium and soybean–aphid were investigated asmore »two model systems to demonstrate the capability of high-resolution MSI based on MALDI. Localized molecular information on various plant- or pest-derived chemicals provided valuable insight for the molecular processes occurring during the plant–pest interactions. Basically, salicylic acid and isoflavone based resistance was visualized in the soybean–aphid system and antibiotic diterpenoids in rice–bacterium interactions.« less

  7. Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Technique: Microanalysis Insights into Atmospheric Chemistry of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-01-21

    Airborne fly ash from coal combustion may represent a source of bioavailable iron (Fe) in the open ocean. However, few studies have been made focusing on Fe speciation and distribution in coal fly ash. In this study, chemical imaging of fly ash has been performed using a dual-beam FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope) system for a better understanding of how simulated atmospheric processing modify the morphology, chemical compositions and element distributions of individual particles. A novel approach has been applied for cross-sectioning of fly ash specimen with a FIB in order to explore element distribution within the interior of individual particles. Our results indicate that simulated atmospheric processing causes disintegration of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in fly ash particles. Aluminosilicate-phase Fe in the inner core of fly ash particles is more easily mobilized compared with oxide-phase Fe present as surface aggregates on fly ash spheres. Fe release behavior depends strongly on Fe speciation in aerosol particles. The approach for preparation of cross-sectioned specimen described here opens new opportunities for particle microanalysis, particular with respect to inorganic refractive materials like fly ash and mineral dust.

  8. Carbon-bearing fluids at nanoscale interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, David [Ohio State University; Ok, Salim [Ohio State University, Columbus; Phan, A [Ohio State University, Columbus; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Striolo, Alberto [Oklahoma University; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The behaviour of fluids at mineral surfaces or in confined geometries (pores, fractures) typically differs from their bulk behaviour in many ways due to the effects of large internal surfaces and geometrical confinement. We summarize research performed on C-O-H fluids at nanoscale interfaces in materials of interest to the earth and material sciences (e.g., silica, alumina, zeolites, clays, rocks, etc.), emphasizing those techniques that assess microstructural modification and/or dynamical behaviour such as gravimetric analysis, small-angle (SANS) neutron scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations will be described that provide atomistic characterization of interfacial and confined fluid behaviour as well as aid in the interpretation of the neutron scattering results.

  9. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Helble, Joseph J. (Andover, MA); Moniz, Gary A. (Windham, NH); Morse, Theodore F. (Little Compton, RI)

    1997-02-04

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

  10. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Helble, Joseph J. (Andover, MA); Moniz, Gary A. (Windham, NH); Morse, Theodore F. (Little Compton, RI)

    1995-09-05

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

  11. Control of friction at the nanoscale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barhen, Jacob; Braiman, Yehuda Y.; Protopopescu, Vladimir

    2010-04-06

    Methods and apparatus are described for control of friction at the nanoscale. A method of controlling frictional dynamics of a plurality of particles using non-Lipschitzian control includes determining an attribute of the plurality of particles; calculating an attribute deviation by subtracting the attribute of the plurality of particles from a target attribute; calculating a non-Lipschitzian feedback control term by raising the attribute deviation to a fractionary power .xi.=(2m+1)/(2n+1) where n=1, 2, 3 . . . and m=0, 1, 2, 3 . . . , with m strictly less than n and then multiplying by a control amplitude; and imposing the non-Lipschitzian feedback control term globally on each of the plurality of particles; imposing causes a subsequent magnitude of the attribute deviation to be reduced.

  12. Phonon-energy-coupling enhancement: Strengthening the chemical bonds of the SiO2/Si system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhi

    Phonon-energy-coupling enhancement: Strengthening the chemical bonds of the SiO2/Si system Zhi Chena and Jun Guo Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for Nanoscale Science

  13. Design and implementation of nanoscale fiber mechanical testing apparatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brayanov, Jordan, 1981-

    2004-01-01

    The rapid growth in the synthetic manufacturing industry demands higher resolution mechanical testing devices, capable of working with nanoscale fibers. A new device has been developed to perform single-axis tensile tests ...

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heat Transfer In Nanoscale Liquid Films 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bo Hung

    2010-07-14

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of nano-scale flows typically utilize fixed lattice crystal interactions between the fluid and stationary wall molecules. This approach cannot properly model thermal interactions at the wall-fluid interface...

  15. Nanoscale surface modification studied by reflection anisotropy spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Paul David

    2009-11-26

    The development and control of nanoscale properties is a major goal in science and technology; for the development of such technologies it is important that there are experimental techniques which allow the monitoring ...

  16. Perspectives Nanotechnology and the public: Effectively communicating nanoscale science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crone, Wendy C.

    Perspectives Nanotechnology and the public: Effectively communicating nanoscale science August 2006 Key words: nanotechnology, communication, public knowledge, public understanding the public on concepts and applications associated with nanotechnology. The goal of our work

  17. Nanoscale structure and transport : from atoms to devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Matthew Hiram

    2005-01-01

    Nanoscale structures present both unique physics and unique theoretical challenges. Atomic-scale simulations can find novel nanostructures with desirable properties, but the search can be difficult if the wide range of ...

  18. Electronic structure and transport in molecular and nanoscale electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Xiaofeng

    2008-01-01

    Two approaches based on first-principles method are developed to qualitatively and quantitatively study electronic structure and phase-coherent transport in molecular and nanoscale electronics, where both quantum mechanical ...

  19. Programming Matter on Nanoscale | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Matter on Nanoscale November 21, 2013 at 3pm36-428 Oleg Gang Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory GangOleg01000 Abstract: In the last...

  20. Nanoscale contact engineering for Si/Silicide nanowire devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Yung-Chen

    2012-01-01

    may open the way for spintronics to grow the magneticimpact the future of spintronics. 3.5. Reference Zutic, I. ;in nanoscale silicon spintronic devices. Here, we report the

  1. Stable Storage of Helium in Nanoscale Platelets at Semicoherent Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kashinath, Abishek

    He implanted into metals precipitates into nanoscale bubbles that may later grow into voids, degrading the properties of engineering alloys. Using multiscale modeling, we show that a different class of He precipitates may ...

  2. In situ characterization of nanoscale catalysts during anodic redox processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Renu National Institute of Standards and Technology; Crozier, Peter Arizona State University; Adams, James Arizona State University

    2013-09-19

    Controlling the structure and composition of the anode is critical to achieving high efficiency and good long-term performance. In addition to being a mixed electronic and ionic conductor, the ideal anode material should act as an efficient catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and dry hydrocarbons without de-activating through either sintering or coking. It is also important to develop novel anode materials that can operate at lower temperatures to reduce costs and minimized materials failure associated with high temperature cycling. We proposed to synthesize and characterize novel anode cermets materials based on ceria doped with Pr and/or Gd together with either a Ni or Cu metallic components. Ceria is a good oxidation catalyst and is an ionic conductor at room temperature. Doping it with trivalent rare earths such as Pr or Gd retards sintering and makes it a mixed ion conductor (ionic and electronic). We have developed a fundamental scientific understanding of the behavior of the cermet material under reaction conditions by following the catalytic oxidation process at the atomic scale using a powerful Environmental Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (ESTEM). The ESTEM allowed in situ monitoring of structural, chemical and morphological changes occurring at the cermet under conditions approximating that of typical fuel-cell operation. Density functional calculations were employed to determine the underlying mechanisms and reaction pathways during anode oxidation reactions. The dynamic behavior of nanoscale catalytic oxidation of hydrogen and methane were used to determine: ? Fundamental processes during anodic reactions in hydrogen and carbonaceous atmospheres ? Interfacial effects between metal particles and doped ceria ? Kinetics of redox reaction in the anode material

  3. ITP Nanomanufacturing: Manufacturing of Surfaces with Nanoscale...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These molds and dies are then used to image these features onto surfaces via plastic injection molding, stamping, forging, die casting, or pressing. This approach will be...

  4. Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Rodriguez, Brian J [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Karapetian, Edgar [ORNL; Mirman, B [Suffolk University, Boston; Eliseev, E. A. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine

    2007-01-01

    Functionality of biological and inorganic systems ranging from nonvolatile computer memories and microelectromechanical systems to electromotor proteins and cellular membranes is ultimately based on the intricate coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena. In the past decade, piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has been established as a powerful tool for nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Here, we give an overview of the fundamental image formation mechanism in PFM and summarize recent theoretical and technological advances. In particular, we show that the signal formation in PFM is complementary to that in the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques, and we discuss the implications. We also consider the prospect of extending PFM beyond ferroelectric characterization for quantitative probing of electromechanical behavior in molecular and biological systems and high-resolution probing of static and dynamic polarization switching processes in low-dimensional ferroelectric materials and heterostructures.

  5. Non-Equilibrium Nanoscale Self-Organization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aziz, Michael J

    2006-03-09

    Self-organized one- and two-dimensional arrays of nanoscale surface features ("ripples" and "dots") sometimes form spontaneously on initially flat surfaces eroded by a directed ion beam in a process called "sputter patterning". Experiments on this sputter patterning process with focused and unfocused ion beams, combined with theoretical advances, have been responsible for a number of scientific advances. Particularly noteworthy are (i) the discovery of propagative, rather than dissipative, behavior under some ion erosion conditions, permitting a pattern to be fabricated at a large length scale and propagated over large distances while maintaining, or even sharpening, the sharpest features; (ii) the first demonstration of guided self-organization of sputter patterns, along with the observation that defect density is minimized when the spacing between boundaries is near an integer times the natural spatial period; and (iii) the discovery of metastability of smooth surfaces, which contradicts the nearly universally accepted linear stability theory that predicts that any surface is linearly unstable to sinusoidal perturbations of some wave vector.

  6. New Dark Matter Detector using Nanoscale Explosives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Alejandro; Freese, Katherine; Kurdak, Cagliyan; Tarle, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    We present nanoscale explosives as a novel type of dark matter detector and study the ignition properties. When a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle WIMP from the Galactic Halo elastically scatters off of a nucleus in the detector, the small amount of energy deposited can trigger an explosion. For specificity, this paper focuses on a type of two-component explosive known as a nanothermite, consisting of a metal and an oxide in close proximity. When the two components interact they undergo a rapid exothermic reaction --- an explosion. As a specific example, we consider metal nanoparticles of 5 nm radius embedded in an oxide. One cell contains more than a few million nanoparticles, and a large number of cells adds up to a total of 1 kg detector mass. A WIMP interacts with a metal nucleus of the nanoparticles, depositing enough energy to initiate a reaction at the interface between the two layers. When one nanoparticle explodes it initiates a chain reaction throughout the cell. A number of possible thermite mat...

  7. Photoelectron imaging and theoretical study on the structure and chemical binding of the mixed-ligand M(I) complexes, [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Zhengbo; Liu, Zhiling; Cong, Ran; Xie, Hua; Tang, Zichao, E-mail: zctang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: fanhj@dicp.ac.cn; Fan, Hongjun, E-mail: zctang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: fanhj@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2014-03-21

    We have reported a combined photoelectron imaging and theoretical study on gaseous mixed-ligand M(I) complexes of [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au). With the aid of Franck-Condon simulations, vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra yield accurate electron affinities of 3.269(6), 3.669(10), and 3.591(6) eV for [HCuSH], [HAgSH], and [HAuSH], respectively. And low-frequency modes are observed: 368(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HCuSH], 286(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HAgSH], and 327(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HAuSH], respectively. Extensive theoretical calculations are performed to aid in the spectral assignments and the calculated values agree well with the experimental observations. Although the S and H atoms have little discrepancy in electronegativity (2.20 for H and 2.54 for S), distinct bonding properties are demonstrated between H–M and M–S bond. It is revealed that there exists significant ionic bonding between M–S in [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au), while a gradual transition from ionic behavior between H–Cu in [HCuSH]{sup ?} to quite strong covalent bonding between H–Au in [HAuSH]{sup ?}, supported by a variety of chemical bonding analyses.

  8. Nanoscale Advances in Catalysis and Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yimin; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-05-12

    In this perspective, we present an overview of nanoscience applications in catalysis, energy conversion, and energy conservation technologies. We discuss how novel physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials can be applied and engineered to meet the advanced material requirements in the new generation of chemical and energy conversion devices. We highlight some of the latest advances in these nanotechnologies and provide an outlook at the major challenges for further developments.

  9. The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, J K; Herberg, J L; Wu, Y; Schwegler, E; Mehta, A

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

  10. Coupling EELS/EFTEM Imaging with Environmental Fluid Cell Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unocic, Raymond R; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Insight into dynamically evolving electrochemical reactions and mechanisms encountered in electrical energy storage (EES) and conversion technologies (batteries, fuel cells, and supercapacitors), materials science (corrosion and oxidation), and materials synthesis (electrodeposition) remains limited due to the present lack of in situ high-resolution characterization methodologies. Electrochemical fluid cell microscopy is an emerging in-situ method that allows for the direct, real-time imaging of electrochemical processes within a fluid environment. This technique is facilitated by the use of MEMS-based biasing microchip platforms that serve the purpose of sealing the highly volatile electrolyte between two electron transparent SiNx membranes and interfacing electrodes to an external potentiostat for controlled nanoscale electrochemislly experiments [!]. In order to elucidate both stmctural and chemical changes during such in situ electrochemical experiments, it is impmtant to first improve upon the spatial resolution by utilizing energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) (to minimize chromatic aben ation), then to detennine the chemical changes via electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). This presents a formidable challenge since the overall thickness through which electrons are scattered through the multiple layers of the cell can be on the order of hundreds of nanometers to microns, scattering through which has the deleterious effect of degrading image resolution and decreasing signal-to noise for spectroscopy [2].

  11. Quantitative Determination of Nanoscale Electronic Properties of Semiconductor Surfaces by Scanning Tunnelling Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    Quantitative Determination of Nanoscale Electronic Properties of Semiconductor Surfaces by Scanning semiconductor surfaces permits quantitative evaluation of nanoscale electronic properties of the surface. Band properties associated with particular point defects within the material. An overview of the methods employed

  12. CHINESE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS VOLUME 20, NUMBER 4 AUGUST 27, 2007 Photofragment Imaging of HNCO Decomposition at 210 nm: the Primary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Shilin

    CHINESE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS VOLUME 20, NUMBER 4 AUGUST 27, 2007 ARTICLE Photofragment of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Dalian 116023, China (Dated: Received on June 3, 2007

  13. Evidence for the temperature dependence of phase transformation behavior of silicon at nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangalampalli S. R. N., Kiran; Tran, Tuan; Smillie, Lachlan; Haberl, Bianca; Subianto, D.; Williams, James S.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2015-01-01

    This study uses the in-situ high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25 to 200 C) of the phase transformation behavior of crystalline silicon (dc-Si) at the nanoscale. Along with in-situ indentation and electrical data, ex-situ characterizations such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) have been used to reveal the dominant mode of deformation under the indenter. In contrast to the previous studies, the dominant mode of deformation under the nanoindenter at elevated temperatures is not the dc-Si to metallic phase ( -Sn) transformation. Instead, XTEM images from 150 C indents reveal that the dominant mode of deformation is twinning along {111} planes. While the in-situ high-temperature electrical measurements show an increase in the current due to metallic phase formation up to 125 C, it is absent 150 C, revealing that the formation of the metallic phase is negligible in this regime. Thus, this work provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale.

  14. Plasmonic nanoantennas: enhancing light-matter interactions at the nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Shobhit K

    2015-01-01

    The research area of plasmonics promises devices with ultrasmall footprint operating at ultrafast speeds and with lower energy consumption compared to conventional electronics. These devices will operate with light and bridge the gap between microscale dielectric photonic systems and nanoscale electronics. Recent research advancements in nanotechnology and optics have led to the creation of a plethora of new plasmonic designs. Among the most promising are nanoscale antennas operating at optical frequencies, called nanoantennas. Plasmonic nanoantennas can provide enhanced and controllable light-matter interactions and strong coupling between far-field radiation and localized sources at the nanoscale. After a brief introduction of several plasmonic nanoantenna designs and their well-established radio-frequency antenna counterparts, we review several linear and nonlinear applications of different nanoantenna configurations. In particular, the possibility to tune the scattering response of linear nanoantennas and...

  15. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili; Zhang, Weijing

    2013-11-01

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm{sup 2}) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells.

  16. Chemical leukoderma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Reilly, Kathryn E; Patel, Utpal; Chu, Julie; Patel, Rishi; Machler, Brian C

    2011-01-01

    the first report, to date, of chemical leukoderma that wasreview on biological, chemical and clinical aspects. Pigment4. Briganti S, et al. Chemical and instrumental approaches

  17. A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Divan, Ralu; Rosenthal, Dan; Rose, Volker; Wai Hla, Saw; Liu, Yuzi

    2014-01-29

    At a very small, or "nano" scale, materials behave differently. The study of nanomaterials is much more than miniaturization - scientists are discovering how changes in size change a material's properties. From sunscreen to computer memory, the applications of nanoscale materials research are all around us. Researchers at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials are creating new materials, methods and technologies to address some of the world's greatest challenges in energy security, lightweight but durable materials, high-efficiency lighting, information storage, environmental stewardship and advanced medical devices.

  18. A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Divan, Ralu; Rosenthal, Dan; Rose, Volker; Wai Hla, Saw; Liu, Yuzi

    2014-09-15

    At a very small, or "nano" scale, materials behave differently. The study of nanomaterials is much more than miniaturization - scientists are discovering how changes in size change a material's properties. From sunscreen to computer memory, the applications of nanoscale materials research are all around us. Researchers at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials are creating new materials, methods and technologies to address some of the world's greatest challenges in energy security, lightweight but durable materials, high-efficiency lighting, information storage, environmental stewardship and advanced medical devices.

  19. Predictive modeling of synergistic effects in nanoscale ion track formation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-08-05

    Molecular dynamics techniques and the inelastic thermal spike model are used to study the coupled effects of inelastic energy loss due to 21 MeV Ni ion irradiation and pre-existing defects in SrTiO3. We determine the dependence on pre-existing defect concentration of nanoscale track formation occurring from the synergy between the inelastic energy loss and the pre-existing atomic defects. We show that the nanoscale ion tracks’ size can be controlled by the concentration of pre-existing disorder. This work identifies a major gap in fundamental understanding concerning the role played by defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron–lattice coupling.

  20. Ballistic transport and electrical spin signal enhancement in a nanoscale three-terminal spintronic device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    Ballistic transport and electrical spin signal enhancement in a nanoscale three-terminal spintronic dimensions is investigated and exploited in a nanoscale three-terminal, all-electrical spintronic-electrical spintronic switching device in which ballistic electron transport at nanoscale dimensions combined

  1. Chemical Distribution and Bonding of Lithium in Intercalated Graphite: Identification with Optimized Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Feng; Graetz, Jason; Moreno, M. Sergio; Ma, Chao; Wu, Lijun; Volkov, Vyacheslav; Zhu, Yimei

    2011-01-01

    Direct mapping of the lithium spatial distribution and the chemical state provides critical information on structure-correlated lithium transport in electrode materials for lithium batteries. Nevertheless, probing lithium, the lightest solid element in the periodic table, poses an extreme challenge with traditional X-ray or electron scattering techniques due to its weak scattering power and vulnerability to radiation damage. Here, we report nanoscale maps of the lithium spatial distribution in electrochemically lithiated graphite using electron energy loss spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope under optimized experimental conditions. The electronic structure of the discharged graphite was obtained from the near-edge fine structure of the Li and C K-edges and ab initio calculations. A 2.7 eV chemical shift of the Li K-edge, along with changes in the density of states, reveals the ionic nature of the intercalated lithium with significant charge transfer to the graphene sheets. Direct mapping of lithium in graphite revealed nanoscale inhomogeneities (nonstoichiometric regions), which are correlated with local phase separation and structural disorder (i.e., lattice distortion and dislocations) as observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The surface solid?electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer was also imaged and determined to have a thickness of 10?50 nm, covering both edge and basal planes with LiF as its primary inorganic component. The Li K-edge spectroscopy and mapping, combined with electron microscopy-based structural analysis provide a comprehensive view of the structure-correlated lithium intercalation in graphite and of the formation of the SEI layer.

  2. Chemical Distribution and Bonding of Lithium in Intercalated Graphite: Identification with Optimized Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Y.; Wang, F.; Graetz, J.; Moreno, M.S.; Ma, C.; Wu, L.; Volkov, V.

    2011-02-01

    Direct mapping of the lithium spatial distribution and the chemical state provides critical information on structure-correlated lithium transport in electrode materials for lithium batteries. Nevertheless, probing lithium, the lightest solid element in the periodic table, poses an extreme challenge with traditional X-ray or electron scattering techniques due to its weak scattering power and vulnerability to radiation damage. Here, we report nanoscale maps of the lithium spatial distribution in electrochemically lithiated graphite using electron energy loss spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope under optimized experimental conditions. The electronic structure of the discharged graphite was obtained from the near-edge fine structure of the Li and C K-edges and ab initio calculations. A 2.7 eV chemical shift of the Li K-edge, along with changes in the density of states, reveals the ionic nature of the intercalated lithium with significant charge transfer to the graphene sheets. Direct mapping of lithium in graphite revealed nanoscale inhomogeneities (nonstoichiometric regions), which are correlated with local phase separation and structural disorder (i.e., lattice distortion and dislocations) as observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The surface solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer was also imaged and determined to have a thickness of 10-50 nm, covering both edge and basal planes with LiF as its primary inorganic component. The Li K-edge spectroscopy and mapping, combined with electron microscopy-based structural analysis provide a comprehensive view of the structure-correlated lithium intercalation in graphite and of the formation of the SEI layer.

  3. Nanoscale simulation of shale transport properties using the lattice Boltzmann method: permeability and diffusivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Li; Kang, Qinjun; Yao, Jun; Tao, Wenquan

    2014-01-01

    Porous structures of shales are reconstructed based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of shale samples from Sichuan Basin, China. Characterization analyzes of the nanoscale reconstructed shales are performed, including porosity, pore size distribution, specific surface area and pore connectivity. The multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) fluid flow model and single-relaxation-time (SRT) LBM diffusion model are adopted to simulate the fluid flow and Knudsen diffusion process within the reconstructed shales, respectively. Tortuosity, intrinsic permeability and effective Knudsen diffusivity are numerically predicted. The tortuosity is much higher than that commonly employed in Bruggeman equation. Correction of the intrinsic permeability by taking into consideration the contribution of Knudsen diffusion, which leads to the apparent permeability, is performed. The correction factor under different Knudsen number and pressure are estimated and compared with existing corrections re...

  4. Nanoscale magnetometry through quantum control of nitrogen-vacancy centres in rotationally diffusing nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maclaurin, D; Martin, A M; Hollenberg, L C L

    2012-01-01

    The confluence of quantum physics and biology is driving a new generation of quantum-based sensing and imaging technology capable of harnessing the power of quantum effects to provide tools to understand the fundamental processes of life. One of the most promising systems in this area is the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond - a natural spin qubit which remarkably has all the right attributes for nanoscale sensing in ambient biological conditions. Typically the nitrogen-vacancy qubits are fixed in tightly controlled/isolated experimental conditions. In this work quantum control principles of nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry are developed for a randomly diffusing diamond nanocrystal. We find that the accumulation of geometric phases, due to the rotation of the nanodiamond plays a crucial role in the application of a diffusing nanodiamond as a bio-label and magnetometer. Specifically, we show that a freely diffusing nanodiamond can offer real-time information about local magnetic fields and its own rotational beh...

  5. Analysis and specificities of adhesive forces between microscale and nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is the packaging of NEMS which require handling, positioning, assembling and joining strategies in the mesoscale of the mesoscale in comparison with nanoscale and microscale. Firstly, it is shown that the distributions are presented. Thirdly, the van der Waals forces are increased by local deformations on the mesoscale contrary

  6. Kinetic Energy Is Important in the Nanoscale World Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    that a is the best trial function of the three because it gives the lowest total energy, the primary criterionKinetic Energy Is Important in the Nanoscale World Frank Rioux Department of Chemistry College phenomena found in textbooks are expressed in terms of potential-energy-only (PEO) models. Inclusion

  7. Highly Reversible Open Framework Nanoscale Electrodes for Divalent Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Highly Reversible Open Framework Nanoscale Electrodes for Divalent Ion Batteries Richard Y. Wang into electrode materials has enabled the development of rechargeable batteries with high energy density. Reversible insertion of divalent ions such as magnesium would allow the creation of new battery chemistries

  8. NANO-SCALE CALORIMETRY OF ISOLATED POLYETHYLENE SINGLE CRYSTALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Leslie H.

    #12;NANO-SCALE CALORIMETRY OF ISOLATED POLYETHYLENE SINGLE CRYSTALS BY ALEX TAN KWAN B.S., Stanford) device, the nanocalorimeter, it was possible to investigate the melting of isolated polyethylene (PE, a simple Ni-foil calorimeter, to measure the heat capacity of a thin polyethylene film to verify

  9. Comment on `Nanoscale water capillary bridges under deeply negative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balibar, Sébastien

    saturated vapor pressure Psat. Because of the cohesion forces between particles, the pressure can evenComment on `Nanoscale water capillary bridges under deeply negative pressure' [Chem. Phys. Lett micro- scope tip and a silicon wafer. They deduced the pressure of liquid water inside the capillary

  10. Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer: Interfacial Effects Dominate the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    -probe method Pump laser is externally modulated and heats the sample Probe beam detects the transient3/15/2012 1 Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer: Interfacial Effects Dominate the Heat Transfer 1 Xing nanotransistors. Nanotechnology has been described as a new industrial revolution M. Chu, et al. Annu. Rev. Mater

  11. APPLIED PHYSICS REVIEWS Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 20032012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    APPLIED PHYSICS REVIEWS Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003­2012 David G. Cahill,1,a) Paul V, California 94305, USA 5 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA 9 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA

  12. Nanoscale strain mapping in battery nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulvestad, A., E-mail: aulvesta@ucsd.edu; Kim, J. W.; Dietze, S. H.; Shpyrko, O. G. [Department of Physics, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0319 (United States); Cho, H. M.; Meng, Y. S. [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0448 (United States); Harder, R. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Fohtung, E. [Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Department of Physics, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 (United States)

    2014-02-17

    Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging is used to map the local three dimensional strain inhomogeneity and electron density distribution of two individual LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4??} cathode nanoparticles in both ex-situ and in-situ environments. Our reconstructed images revealed a maximum strain of 0.4%. We observed different variations in strain inhomogeneity due to multiple competing effects. The compressive/tensile component of the strain is connected to the local lithium content and, on the surface, interpreted in terms of a local Jahn-Teller distortion of Mn{sup 3+}. Finally, the measured strain distributions are discussed in terms of their impact on competing theoretical models of the lithiation process.

  13. GENERALIZED TOPOLOGIES: HYPERGRAPHS, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flamm, Christoph

    topological spaces have applications in various applied domains of computer science, including digital image types or chemical species. A chemical reaction is a transformation rule of the form xX s- ,xx xX s

  14. Super-Resolution Optical Imaging of Biomass Chemical-Spatial Structure: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-410

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-06-01

    The overall objective for this project is to characterize and develop new methods to visualize the chemical spatial structure of biomass at varying stages of the biomass degradation processes in situ during the process.

  15. Nanoscale capillary wetting studied with dissipative particle dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Cupelli; B. Henrich; M. Moseler; M. Santer

    2006-02-19

    We demonstrate that Multi-Body Dissipative Particle Dynamics (MDPD) can be used as an efficient computational tool for the investigation of nanoscale capillary impregnation of confined geometries. As an essential prerequisite, a novel model for a solid-liquid interface in the framework of MDPD is introduced, with tunable wetting behaviour and thermal roughening to reduce artificial density- and temperature oscillations. Within this model, the impregnation dynamics of a water-like fluid into a nanoscale slit pore has been studied. Despite the coarse graining implied with the model fluid, a sufficient amount of non-equilibrium averaging can be achieved allowing for the extraction of useful information even from transient simulations, such as the dynamic apparent contact angle. Although it is found to determine the capillary driving completely, it cannot be intepreted as a simple function of the capillary number.

  16. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects ofmore »both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.« less

  17. Equilibrium insertion of nanoscale objects into phospholipid bilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Pogodin; Vladimir A. Baulin

    2011-08-30

    Certain membrane proteins, peptides, nanoparticles and nanotubes have rigid structure and fixed shape. They are often viewed as spheres and cylinders with certain surface properties. Single Chain Mean Field theory is used to model the equilibrium insertion of nanoscale spheres and rods into the phospholipid bilayer. The equilibrium structures and the resulting free energies of the nano-objects in the bilayer allow to distinguish different orientations in the bilayer and estimate the energy barrier of insertion.

  18. How do liquids confined at the nanoscale influence adhesion?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Yang; U. Tartaglino; B. N. J. Persson

    2006-12-06

    Liquids play an important role in adhesion and sliding friction. They behave as lubricants in human bodies especially in the joints. However, in many biological attachment systems they acts like adhesives, e.g. facilitating insects to move on ceilings or vertical walls. Here we use molecular dynamics to study how liquids confined at the nanoscale influence the adhesion between solid bodies with smooth and rough surfaces. We show that a monolayer of liquid may strongly affect the adhesion.

  19. Computation of radiative heat transport across a nanoscale vacuum gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budaev, Bair V. Bogy, David B.

    2014-02-10

    Radiation heat transport across a vacuum gap between two half-spaces is studied. By consistently applying only the fundamental laws of physics, we obtain an algebraic equation that connects the temperatures of the half-spaces and the heat flux between them. The heat transport coefficient generated by this equation for such structures matches available experimental data for nanoscale and larger gaps without appealing to any additional specific mechanisms of energy transfer.

  20. Chemical Sciences Division | Advanced Materials |ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analysis, chemical imaging, neutron science, polymer science, and interfacial science. Theory is closely integrated with materials synthesis and characterization to gain new...

  1. Deterministic, Nanoscale Fabrication of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jr., R M; Shirk, M; Gilmer, G; Rubenchik, A

    2004-09-24

    Neither LLNL nor any other organization has the capability to perform deterministic fabrication of mm-sized objects with arbitrary, {micro}m-sized, 3-dimensional features with 20-nm-scale accuracy and smoothness. This is particularly true for materials such as high explosives and low-density aerogels. For deterministic fabrication of high energy-density physics (HEDP) targets, it will be necessary both to fabricate features in a wide variety of materials as well as to understand and simulate the fabrication process. We continue to investigate, both in experiment and in modeling, the ablation/surface-modification processes that occur with the use of laser pulses that are near the ablation threshold fluence. During the first two years, we studied ablation of metals, and we used sub-ps laser pulses, because pulses shorter than the electron-phonon relaxation time offered the most precise control of the energy that can be deposited into a metal surface. The use of sub-ps laser pulses also allowed a decoupling of the energy-deposition process from the ensuing movement/ablation of the atoms from the solid, which simplified the modeling. We investigated the ablation of material from copper, gold, and nickel substrates. We combined the power of the 1-D hydrocode ''HYADES'' with the state-of-the-art, 3-D molecular dynamics simulations ''MDCASK'' in our studies. For FY04, we have stretched ourselves to investigate laser ablation of carbon, including chemically-assisted processes. We undertook this research, because the energy deposition that is required to perform direct sublimation of carbon is much higher than that to stimulate the reaction 2C + O{sub 2} => 2CO. Thus, extremely fragile carbon aerogels might survive the chemically-assisted process more readily than ablation via direct laser sublimation. We had planned to start by studying vitreous carbon and move onto carbon aerogels. We were able to obtain flat, high-quality vitreous carbon, which was easy to work on, experimentally and relatively easy to model. We were provided with bulk samples of carbon aerogel by Dr. Joe Satcher, but the shop that would have prepared mounted samples for us was overwhelmed by programmatic assignments. We are pursuing aligned carbon nanotubes, provided to us by colleagues at NASA Ames Research Center, as an alternative to aerogels. Dr. Gilmer started modeling the laser/thermally accelerated reactions of carbon with H{sub 2}, rather than O{sub 2}, due to limited information on equation of state for CO. We have extended our molecular dynamics models of ablation to include carbon in the form of graphite, vitreous carbon, and aerogels. The computer code has features that allow control of temperature, absorption of shock waves, and for the ejection of material from the computational cell. We form vitreous carbon atomic configurations by melting graphite in a microcanonical cell at a temperature of about 5000K. Quenching the molten carbon at a controlled rate of cooling yields material with a structure close to that of the vitreous carbon produced in the laboratory. To represent the aerogel, we have a computer code that connects ''graphite'' rods to randomly placed points in the 3-D computational cell. Ablation simulations yield results for vitreous carbon similar to our previous results with copper, usually involving the transient melting of the material above the threshold energy density. However, some fracturing in the solid regions occurs in this case, but was never observed in copper. These simulations are continuing, together with studies of the reaction of hydrogen with vitreous graphite at high temperatures. These reactions are qualitatively similar to that of oxygen with the carbon atoms at the surface, and the simulations should provide insight into the applicability of the use of chemical reactions to shape the surfaces of aerogels.

  2. Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2009-09-09

    To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  3. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamza, A V

    2008-04-07

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The NSCL is delivering on its mission providing Laboratory programs with scientific solutions through the use of nanoscale synthesis and characterization. While this annual report summarizes 2007 activities, we have focused on nanoporous materials, advanced high strength, nanostructured metals, novel 3-dimensional lithography and characterization at the nanoscale for the past 3 years. In these three years we have synthesized the first monolithic nanoporous metal foams with less than 10% relative density; we have produced ultrasmooth nanocrystalline diamond inertial confinement fusion capsules; we have synthesized 3-dimensional graded density structures from full density to 5% relative density using nanolithography; and we have established ultrasmall angle x-ray scattering as a non-destructive tool to determine the structure on the sub 300nm scale. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and to train personnel for Lab programs. The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory. Andrew Detor from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sutapa Ghosal from the University of California, Irvine, Xiang Ying Wang from Shanghai Institute of Technology, and Arne Wittstock from University of Bremen joined the NSCL this year. The NSCL is pursuing four science and technology themes: nanoporous materials, advanced nanocrystalline materials, novel three-dimensional nanofabrication technologies, and nondestructive characterization at the mesoscale. The NSCL is also pursuing building new facilities for science and technology such as nanorobotics and atomic layer deposition.

  4. Time dynamics of photothermal vs optoacoustic response in mid IR nanoscale biospectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tovee, Peter D; Kjoller, Kevin; Allsop, David; Weightman, Peter; Surman, Mark; Siggel-King, Michele R F; Wolski, Andy; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy, a well established tool for chemical analysis of diverse materials, has significant potential in biomedical applications. While the spatial resolution of traditional IR spectroscopy is limited by the wavelength of the IR light to the few micrometres, it has been shown that nanoscale chemical analysis can be obtained by detecting IR induced local heating photothermal response via Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) or local thermomechanical expansion using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). This paper explores the potential of a pulsed ps pulse duration high power free electron laser (FEL) light source for AFM-IR and SThM-IR spectroscopy employing standard AFM and SThM probes. The SThM-IR response was found to have a detrimental strong background signal due to the direct heating of the probe, whereas the AFM IR thermomechanical response allowed to eliminate such a problem for both top down and bottom up illuminations with the FEL IR source. The SThM IR characteristic response time was ap...

  5. Nanoscale Dielectric Capacitors Composed of Graphene and Boron Nitride Layers: A First Principles Study of High-Capacitance at Nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Özçelik, V Ongun

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a nanoscale dielectric capacitor model consisting of two-dimensional, hexagonal h-BN layers placed between two commensurate and metallic graphene layers using self-consistent field density functional theory. The separation of equal amounts of electric charge of different sign in different graphene layers is achieved by applying electric field perpendicular to the layers. The stored charge, energy, and the electric potential difference generated between the metallic layers are calculated from the first-principles for the relaxed structures. Predicted high-capacitance values exhibit the characteristics of supercapacitors. The capacitive behavior of the present nanoscale model is compared with that of the classical Helmholtz model, which reveals crucial quantum size effects at small separations, which in turn recede as the separation between metallic planes increases.

  6. Detection and Characterization of Chemicals Present in Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datskos, Panos G.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2000-06-01

    The principal goal of this three-year project is to develop and demonstrate novel multiparameter micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) sensors that are robust and can be used to simultaneously detect the presence of target chemicals in a mixture, radiation emitted from radioactive materials, and the heat generated by the absorption of photons of specific wavelength by the target chemicals. A major emphasis of this program is to study and develop effective methods of modifying MEMS surfaces with nano-scale structural features and chemical selective phases to improve sensor performance.

  7. Near Zero Friction from Nanoscale Lubricants | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Near Zero Friction from Nanoscale Lubricants Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy...

  8. Simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast in scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rose, Volker; Preissner, Curt A; Hla, Saw-Wai; Wang, Kangkang; Rosenmann, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    A method and system for performing simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast analysis in a scanning, tunneling microscope. The method and system also includes nanofabricated coaxial multilayer tips with a nanoscale conducting apex and a programmable in-situ nanomanipulator to fabricate these tips and also to rotate tips controllably.

  9. Formation of hollow nanocrystals through the nanoscale kirkendall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Yadong; Rioux, Robert M.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Hughes, Steven; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2004-03-11

    We demonstrate that hollow nanocrystals can be synthesized through a mechanism analogous to the Kirkendall Effect, in which pores form due to the difference in diffusion rates between two components in a diffusion couple. Cobalt nanocrystals are chosen as a primary example to show that their reaction in solution with oxygen, sulfur or selenium leads to the formation of hollow nanocrystals of the resulting oxide and chalcogenides. This process provides a general route to the synthesis of hollow nanostructures of large numbers of compounds. A simple extension of this process yields platinum-cobalt oxide yolk-shell nanostructures which may serve as nanoscale reactors in catalytic applications.

  10. Nanoscale topographical replication of graphene architecture by artificial DNA nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Y.; Seo, S.; Park, J.; Park, T.; Ahn, J. R., E-mail: jrahn@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, J.; Dugasani, S. R. [Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, S. H. [College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, S. H., E-mail: sunghapark@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-09

    Despite many studies on how geometry can be used to control the electronic properties of graphene, certain limitations to fabrication of designed graphene nanostructures exist. Here, we demonstrate controlled topographical replication of graphene by artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nanostructures. Owing to the high degree of geometrical freedom of DNA nanostructures, we controlled the nanoscale topography of graphene. The topography of graphene replicated from DNA nanostructures showed enhanced thermal stability and revealed an interesting negative temperature coefficient of sheet resistivity when underlying DNA nanostructures were denatured at high temperatures.

  11. Analysis and Modeling of Parasitic Capacitances in Advanced Nanoscale Devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bekal, Prasanna

    2012-07-16

    Graphics Corporation, 2011. [7] ?Predictive Technology Model (PTM).? [Online]. http://ptm.asu.edu [8] H.-H. Tsai, C.-L. Yu, and C.-Y. Wu, ?A Bird's Beak Reduction Technique for LOCOS in VLSI Fabrication,? IEEE Electron Device Letters, vol. 7, no. 2, pp... AND MODELING OF PARASITIC CAPACITANCES IN ADVANCED NANOSCALE DEVICES A Thesis by PRASANNA BEKAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  12. Nanoscale thermal transport II (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switch for integration withLa1.9Ca1.1Cu2O6+δ madeNanoscale

  13. Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewing systemVacancyVacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire

  14. Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewing systemVacancyVacancy-Induced Nanoscale

  15. PHILOSOPHICAL MAGAZINE A, 2002, VOL. 82, NO. 16, 31193127 Dislocation dipoles in nanoscale lms with compositional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovid'ko Ilya A.

    PHILOSOPHICAL MAGAZINE A, 2002, VOL. 82, NO. 16, 3119±3127 Dislocation dipoles in nanoscale ®lms and their dipole con®gurations in nanoscale ®lms with compositional inhomogeneities is suggested. Energy characterizes the energetically favourable generation of mis®t dislocation dipoles in ®lms with compositional

  16. Nanoscale Anisotropic Plastic Deformation in Single Crystal Aragonite C. Kearney,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanoscale Anisotropic Plastic Deformation in Single Crystal Aragonite C. Kearney,1 Z. Zhao,2 B. J; published 30 June 2006) The nanoscale anisotropic elastic-plastic behavior of single-crystal aragonite coaxial to the c axis exhibited load plateaus indicative of dislocation nucleation events. Plasticity

  17. Real-time observation of lithium fibers growth inside a nanoscale lithium-ion battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    Real-time observation of lithium fibers growth inside a nanoscale lithium-ion battery Hessam to observe the real-time nucleation and growth of the lithium fibers inside a nanoscale Li-ion battery. Our.1063/1.3643035] Lithium-ion batteries are of great interest due to their high energy density, however, various safety

  18. Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped Emmanuel Rousseau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped silicon the role of surface plasmons for nanoscale radiative heat transfer between doped silicon surfaces. We derive a new accurate and closed-form expression of the radiative near- field heat transfer. We also

  19. Electrochemical Nanoscale Templating: Laterally Self-Aligned Growth of Organic-Metal Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borguet, Eric

    attractive for a wide range of applications such as the fabrication of nanoscale devices, energy storage of nanostructures into 2D or 3D arrays is necessary for the further hierarchical development of devices. TemplatingElectrochemical Nanoscale Templating: Laterally Self-Aligned Growth of Organic-Metal Nanostructures

  20. A non-planar organic molecule with non-volatile electrical bistability for nano-scale data storage{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    A non-planar organic molecule with non-volatile electrical bistability for nano-scale data storage-planar organic molecule with electron donor and acceptor capabilities was synthesized for nano-scale data storage possesses good electrical bistability. Nano-scale recording dots with an average diameter of 2.5 nm were

  1. Design and optimization of a high-efficiency nanoscale 90 light-bending structure by mode selection and tailoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chau, Kenneth

    before and after the bend. In this paper, we design a nanoscale light-bending struc- ture capable of 90Design and optimization of a high-efficiency nanoscale 90° light-bending structure by mode of a nanoscale structure to enable 90° visible light-bending. The geometry and constituent materials

  2. Nanoscale chemical and structural study of Co- based FEBID structures by STEM-EELS and HRTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordoba, Rosa; Fernandez-Pacheco, Rodrigo; Fernandez-Pacheco, Amalio; Gloter, Alexandre; Magen, Cesar; Stephan, Odile; Ricardo Ibarra, Manuel; De Teresa, Jose Maria

    2011-11-15

    , Manuel Ricardo Ibarra1,2,5 and José María De Teresa1,2,5* Abstract Nanolithography techniques in a scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam are very attractive tools for a number of synthetic processes, including the fabrication of ferromagnetic nano...

  3. Center for Nanoscale Chemical-Electrical-Mechanical Manufacturing Systems Targeted Self-healing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    (tricyclohexylphosphine)ben zylidene ruthenium(IV) dichloride) and urea- formaldehyde shelled microcapsules filled-based Grubbs' catalyst in a ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) reaction.1 The resulting product weight percentage in a sample by protecting it in wax microspheres. The production of these microspheres

  4. Biomaterials 26 (2005) 49384943 Growth of nano-scale hydroxyapatite using chemically treated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    2005-01-01

    do not produce. While the fabrication of vertically aligned TiO2 nanotubes on Ti substrate not been reported. Such an aligned TiO2 nanotube structure would be useful especially since it can be made of hydroxyapatite (bone-like calcium phosphate) in a simulated body fluid. It is shown that the presence of TiO2

  5. Nanoscale metals and semiconductors for the storage of solar energy in chemical bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manthiram, Karthish

    2015-01-01

    hydrogen evolution reaction overpotentials and adsorbate binding energies, such as zinc, gallium, palladium,

  6. Spatially resolved nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of ZDDP antiwear films on aluminumsilicon alloys under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pupa Gelsomina De Stasio

    temperatures and loads to form a sacrificial film at the contacting points in an engine. nanoindenta- tion techniques. A study of the initial stages of wear (10 min) to prolonged rubbing (60 min Aluminum­silicon alloys, with high silicon contents (>18%), are currently being investigated as cost effec

  7. Polypeptide A9K at Nanoscale Carbon: Simulation Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitaly V. Chaban; Andre Arruda; Eudes Eterno Fileti

    2015-08-21

    An amphiphilic nature of the surfactant-like peptides is responsible for their propensity to aggregate at the nanoscale. These peptides can be readily used for a non-covalent functionalization of nanoparticles and macromolecules. This work reports an observation of supramolecular ensembles consisting of ultrashort carbon nanotubes (USCNTs), graphene (GR) and A9K polypeptide formed by lysine and arginine. Potential of mean force (PMF) is used as a major descriptor of the CNT-A9K and GR-A9K binding process, supplementing structural data. The phase space sampling is performed by multiple equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations with position restraints, where applicable. Binding in all cases was found to be thermodynamically favorable. Encapsulation in the (10,10) USCNT is particularly favorable. Curvature of external surface does not favor binding. Thus, binding of A9K at GR is stronger than its binding at the outer sidewall of USCNTs. Overall, the presented results favor non-covalent functionalization of nanoscale carbons that are considered interesting in the fields of biomaterials, biosensors, biomedical devices, and drug delivery.

  8. Nanoscale mapping of the W/Si(001) Schottky barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durcan, Chris A.; Balsano, Robert; LaBella, Vincent P., E-mail: vlabella@albany.edu [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    The W/Si(001) Schottky barrier was spatially mapped with nanoscale resolution using ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) and ballistic hole emission microscopy (BHEM) using n-type and p-type silicon substrates. The formation of an interfacial tungsten silicide is observed utilizing transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The BEEM and BHEM spectra are fit utilizing a linearization method based on the power law BEEM model using the Prietsch Ludeke fitting exponent. The aggregate of the Schottky barrier heights from n-type (0.71?eV) and p-type (0.47?eV) silicon agrees with the silicon band gap at 80?K. Spatially resolved maps of the Schottky barrier are generated from grids of 7225 spectra taken over a 1??m?×?1??m area and provide insight into its homogeneity. Histograms of the barrier heights have a Gaussian component consistent with an interface dipole model and show deviations that are localized in the spatial maps and are attributed to compositional fluctuations, nanoscale defects, and foreign materials.

  9. Nano-Scale Hydroxyapatite: Synthesis, Two-Dimensional Transport Experiments, and Application for Uranium Remediation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kanel, S. R.; Clement, T. P.; Barnett, M. O.; Goltz, M. N.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic nano-scale hydroxyapatite (NHA) was prepared and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. The XRD data confirmed that the crystalline structure and chemical composition of NHA correspond to Ca 5 OH(PO 4 ) 3 . The SEM data confirmed the size of NHA to be less than 50?nm. A two-dimensional physical model packed with saturated porous media was used to study the transport characteristics of NHA under constant flow conditions. The data show that the transport patterns of NHA were almost identical to tracer transport patterns. This result indicates that the NHA material canmore »move with water like a tracer, and its movement was neither retarded nor influenced by any physicochemical interactions and/or density effects. We have also tested the reactivity of NHA with 1?mg/L hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) and found that complete removal of U(VI) is possible using 0.5?g/L NHA at pH?5 to 6. Our results demonstrate that NHA has the potential to be injected as a dilute slurry for in situ treatment of U(VI)-contaminated groundwater systems. « less

  10. Method and apparatus for remote sensing of molecular species at nanoscale utilizing a reverse photoacoustic effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Su, Ming (Oviedo, FL); Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Hedden, David (Lenoir City, TN)

    2010-02-23

    A method and apparatus for identifying a sample, involves illuminating the sample with light of varying wavelengths, transmitting an acoustic signal against the sample from one portion and receiving a resulting acoustic signal on another portion, detecting a change of phase in the acoustic signal corresponding to the light of varying wavelengths, and analyzing the change of phase in the acoustic signal for the varying wavelengths of illumination to identify the sample. The apparatus has a controlled source for illuminating the sample with light of varying wavelengths, a transmitter for transmitting an acoustic wave, a receiver for receiving the acoustic wave and converting the acoustic wave to an electronic signal, and an electronic circuit for detecting a change of phase in the acoustic wave corresponding to respective ones of the varying wavelengths and outputting the change of phase for the varying wavelengths to allow identification of the sample. The method and apparatus can be used to detect chemical composition or visual features. A transmission mode and a reflection mode of operation are disclosed. The method and apparatus can be applied at nanoscale to detect molecules in a biological sample.

  11. Nanoscale magnetometry through quantum control of nitrogen-vacancy centres in rotationally diffusing nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Maclaurin; L. T. Hall; A. M. Martin; L. C. L. Hollenberg

    2012-07-23

    The confluence of quantum physics and biology is driving a new generation of quantum-based sensing and imaging technology capable of harnessing the power of quantum effects to provide tools to understand the fundamental processes of life. One of the most promising systems in this area is the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond - a natural spin qubit which remarkably has all the right attributes for nanoscale sensing in ambient biological conditions. Typically the nitrogen-vacancy qubits are fixed in tightly controlled/isolated experimental conditions. In this work quantum control principles of nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry are developed for a randomly diffusing diamond nanocrystal. We find that the accumulation of geometric phases, due to the rotation of the nanodiamond plays a crucial role in the application of a diffusing nanodiamond as a bio-label and magnetometer. Specifically, we show that a freely diffusing nanodiamond can offer real-time information about local magnetic fields and its own rotational behaviour, beyond continuous optically detected magnetic resonance monitoring, in parallel with operation as a fluorescent biomarker.

  12. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Objective Chemical Engineers of chemicals. This lesson introduces students to one component of chemical engineering: food processing, and a chemical engineer 2. How chemical engineers are involved in food production 3. That chemical engineers need

  13. High-pressure lubricity at the meso- and nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Vanossi; A. Benassi; N. Varini; E. Tosatti

    2013-01-11

    The increase of sliding friction upon increasing load is a classic in the macroscopic world. Here we discuss the possibility that friction rise might sometimes turn into a drop when, at the mesoscale and nanoscale, a confined lubricant film separating crystalline sliders undergoes strong layering and solidification. Under pressure, transitions from N to N-1 layers may imply a change of lateral periodicity of the crystallized lubricant sufficient to alter the matching of crystal structures, influencing the ensuing friction jump. A pressure-induced friction drop may occur as the shear gradient maximum switches from the lubricant middle, marked by strong stick-slip with or without shear melting, to the crystalline slider-lubricant interface, characterized by smooth superlubric sliding. We present high pressure sliding simulations to display examples of frictional drops, suggesting their possible relevance to the local behavior in boundary lubrication.

  14. Friction-Induced Fluid Heating in Nanoscale Helium Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhigang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-05-21

    We investigate the mechanism of friction-induced fluid heating in nanoconfinements. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the temperature variations of liquid helium in nanoscale Poiseuille flows. It is found that the fluid heating is dominated by different sources of friction as the external driving force is changed. For small external force, the fluid heating is mainly caused by the internal viscous friction in the fluid. When the external force is large and causes fluid slip at the surfaces of channel walls, the friction at the fluid-solid interface dominates over the internal friction in the fluid and is the major contribution to fluid heating. An asymmetric temperature gradient in the fluid is developed in the case of nonidentical walls and the general temperature gradient may change sign as the dominant heating factor changes from internal to interfacial friction with increasing external force.

  15. Methods and devices for fabricating three-dimensional nanoscale structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.; Jeon, Seokwoo; Park, Jangung

    2010-04-27

    The present invention provides methods and devices for fabricating 3D structures and patterns of 3D structures on substrate surfaces, including symmetrical and asymmetrical patterns of 3D structures. Methods of the present invention provide a means of fabricating 3D structures having accurately selected physical dimensions, including lateral and vertical dimensions ranging from 10s of nanometers to 1000s of nanometers. In one aspect, methods are provided using a mask element comprising a conformable, elastomeric phase mask capable of establishing conformal contact with a radiation sensitive material undergoing photoprocessing. In another aspect, the temporal and/or spatial coherence of electromagnetic radiation using for photoprocessing is selected to fabricate complex structures having nanoscale features that do not extend entirely through the thickness of the structure fabricated.

  16. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamza, A V; Lesuer, D R

    2006-01-03

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The initial emphasis of the NSCL has been on development of scientific solutions in support of target fabrication for the NIF laser and other stockpile stewardship experimental platforms. Particular emphasis has been placed on the design and development of innovative new materials and structures for use in these targets. Projects range from the development of new high strength nanocrystalline alloys to graded density materials to high Z nanoporous structures. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and train personnel for Lab programs such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Defense and Nuclear Technologies (DNT), and Nonproliferation, Arms control and International security (NAI). The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory.

  17. Polarization Engineering in Nano-Scale Waveguides Using Lossless Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, PoHan; Helmy, Amr S

    2016-01-01

    A device that achieves controllable rotation of the state of polarization by rotating the orientation of the eigenmodes of a waveguide by 45$^{\\circ}$ is introduced and analyzed. The device can be implemented using lossless materials on a nanoscale and helps circumvent the inherent polarization dependence of photonic devices realized within the silicon on insulator platform. We propose and evaluate two novel polarization rotator-based schemes to achieve polarization engineering functions: (1) A multi-purpose device, with dimensions on the order of a few wavelengths which can function as a polarization splitter or an arbitrary linear polarization state generator. (2) An energy efficient optical modulator that utilizes eigenmode rotation and epsilon near zero (ENZ) effects to achieve high extinction ratio, polarization insensitive amplitude modulation without the need to sweep the device geometry to match the TE and TM mode attributes. By using indium tin oxide (ITO) as an example for a tunable material, the pr...

  18. Method and system for nanoscale plasma processing of objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oehrlein, Gottlieb S. (Clarksville, MD); Hua, Xuefeng (Hyattsville, MD); Stolz, Christian (Baden-Wuerttemberg, DE)

    2008-12-30

    A plasma processing system includes a source of plasma, a substrate and a shutter positioned in close proximity to the substrate. The substrate/shutter relative disposition is changed for precise control of substrate/plasma interaction. This way, the substrate interacts only with a fully established, stable plasma for short times required for nanoscale processing of materials. The shutter includes an opening of a predetermined width, and preferably is patterned to form an array of slits with dimensions that are smaller than the Debye screening length. This enables control of the substrate/plasma interaction time while avoiding the ion bombardment of the substrate in an undesirable fashion. The relative disposition between the shutter and the substrate can be made either by moving the shutter or by moving the substrate.

  19. Atomic Calligraphy: The Direct Writing of Nanoscale Structures using MEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias Imboden; Han Han; Jackson Chang; Flavio Pardo; Cristian A. Bolle; Evan Lowell; David J. Bishop

    2013-04-04

    We present a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) based method for the resist free patterning of nano-structures. Using a focused ion beam (FIB) to customize larger MEMS machines, we fabricate apertures as small as 50 nm on plates that can be moved with nanometer precision over an area greater than 20x20 {\\mu}m^2. Depositing thermally evaporated gold atoms though the apertures while moving the plate results in the deposition of nanoscale metal patterns. Adding a shutter only microns above the aperture, enables high speed control of not only where but also when atoms are deposited. Using a shutter, different sized apertures can be selectively opened and closed for nano-structure fabrication with features ranging from nano- to micrometers in scale. The ability to evaporate materials with high precision, and thereby fabricate circuits and structures in situ, enables new kinds of experiments based on the interactions of a small number of atoms and eventually even single atoms.

  20. Development of Nanoscale Ceramics for Advanced Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miriam Leffler; Joseph Helble

    1999-09-30

    Bulk structures of unstabilized ZrO{sub 2-x}, with x in the range of 0 {<=} x {<=} 0.44, at ambient pressure have been found to exist in three different structures. (monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic.). At ambient temperature and elevated pressures above 3.5 GPa, unstabilized zirconia at these same compositions is found as a fourth phase, the orthorhombic phase. Work done in this project has demonstrated that nanoscale zirconia particles containing the orthorhombic phase in addition to amorphous material can be produced through solgel methods. Extensive characterization of this material including recent high temperature x-ray diffraction work has indicated that the structure of the synthesized zirconia appears to be linked to the oxygen vacancy population in the material, and that water appears to be a critical factor in determining the type of material formed during synthesis. These results suggest that surface energy alone is not the controlling factor in determining crystal phase.

  1. Universal contact-line dynamics at the nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Rivetti; Thomas Salez; Michael Benzaquen; Elie Raphaël; Oliver Bäumchen

    2015-07-31

    The relaxation dynamics of the contact angle between a viscous liquid and a smooth substrate is studied at the nanoscale. Through atomic force microscopy measurements of polystyrene nanostripes we monitor simultaneously the temporal evolution of the liquid-air interface as well as the position of the contact line. The initial configuration exhibits high curvature gradients and a non-equilibrium contact angle that drive liquid flow. Both these conditions are relaxed to achieve the final state, leading to three successive regimes along time: i) stationary-contact-line levelling; ii) receding-contact-line dewetting; iii) collapse of the two fronts. For the first regime, we reveal the existence of a self-similar evolution of the liquid interface, which is in excellent agreement with numerical calculations from a lubrication model. For different liquid viscosities and film thicknesses we provide evidence for a transition to dewetting featuring a universal critical contact angle and dimensionless time.

  2. Spiral precipitation patterns in confined chemical gardens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florence Haudin; Julyan H. E. Cartwright; Fabian Brau; A. De Wit

    2014-12-15

    Chemical gardens are mineral aggregates that grow in three dimensions with plant-like forms and share properties with self-assembled structures like nano-scale tubes, brinicles or chimneys at hydrothermal vents. The analysis of their shapes remains a challenge, as their growth is influenced by osmosis, buoyancy and reaction-diffusion processes. Here we show that chemical gardens grown by injection of one reactant into the other in confined conditions feature a wealth of new patterns including spirals, flowers, and filaments. The confinement decreases the influence of buoyancy, reduces the spatial degrees of freedom and allows analysis of the patterns by tools classically used to analyze two-dimensional patterns. Injection moreover allows the study in controlled conditions of the effects of variable concentrations on the selected morphology. We illustrate these innovative aspects by characterizing quantitatively, with a simple geometrical model, a new class of self-similar logarithmic spirals observed in a large zone of the parameter space.

  3. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  4. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes on diamond-like carbon by the hot filament plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Byungyou

    , scanning probes, nanoscale electronic devices, hydrogen storage, chemical sensors, and composite., 1995). These properties make CNTs good candidates for many applications such as field emission devices on a nanostructured transition metal catalyst such as Co, Ni, or Fe. The growth mechanisms of CNTs are divided

  5. Templated self-assembly of Si-containing block copolymers for nanoscale device fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Caroline A.

    Block copolymers have been proposed for self-assembled nanolithography because they can spontaneously form well-ordered nanoscale periodic patterns of lines or dots in a rapid, low-cost process. By templating the selfassembly, ...

  6. Applications of a new theory extending continuum mechanics to the nanoscale 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Kaibin

    2005-11-01

    In this dissertation, we present the Slattery-Oh-Fu theory extending continuum mechanics to the nanoscale and its applications. We begin with an analysis of supercritical adsorption of argon, krypton, and methane on Graphon before we fully develop...

  7. Development of novel high-performance six-axis magnetically levitated instruments for nanoscale applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verma, Shobhit

    2005-11-01

    This dissertation presents two novel 6-axis magnetic-levitation (maglev) stages that are capable of nanoscale positioning. These stages have very simple and compact structure that is advantageous to meet requirements in the next...

  8. In-situ Observation of Switchable Nanoscale Topography for Y-Shaped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    In-situ Observation of Switchable Nanoscale Topography for Y-Shaped Binary Brushes in Fluids Yen network-like surface topography formed by coexisting stretched soluble PAA arms and collapsed insoluble PS

  9. Nanoscale Triboelectric-Effect-Enabled Energy Conversion for Sustainably Powering Portable Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Nanoscale Triboelectric-Effect-Enabled Energy Conversion for Sustainably Powering Portable: Harvesting energy from our living environment is an effective approach for sustainable, maintenance-free, and green power source for wireless, portable, or implanted electronics. Mechanical energy scavenging based

  10. Toward Nanoscale Three-Dimensional Printing: Nanowalls Built of Electrospun Nanofibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ho-Young

    . This novel 3D printing scheme can be applied to the development of various 3D nanoscale objects including manufacturing for several decades.1 So- called 3D printing is reaching a stage where the desired products can

  11. Ensemble Dependent Matrix Methodology for Probabilistic-Based Fault-tolerant Nanoscale Circuit Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, An-Yeu "Andy"

    Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Canada *Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taiwan Abstract tools development and to optimize nanoscale circuit and system design. In this paper, we show

  12. High-speed multiple-mode mass-sensing resolves dynamic nanoscale mass distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olcum, Selim

    Simultaneously measuring multiple eigenmode frequencies of nanomechanical resonators can determine the position and mass of surface-adsorbed proteins, and could ultimately reveal the mass tomography of nanoscale analytes. ...

  13. Modelling Heat Transport Across Nano-scale Material Interfaces for Next-generation Electronic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milgram, Paul

    ) thermal boundary resistance between two dissimilar semiconductor materials using a combinationModelling Heat Transport Across Nano-scale Material Interfaces for Next-generation Electronic) with customized thermal transport properties. The scattering of thermal energy carriers at fabricated interfaces

  14. Generalizations of the Landau-Zener theory in the physics of nanoscale systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai

    2004-09-30

    Nanoscale systems have sizes intermediate between atomic and macroscopic ones. Therefore their treatment often requires a combination of methods from atomic and condensed matter physics. The conventional Landau-Zener theory, being a powerful tool...

  15. University of California, Santa Cruz, Applied Optics Grouphttp://photon.soe.ucsc.edu Nanoscale Optofluidics for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Herbie

    University of California, Santa Cruz, Applied Optics Grouphttp://photon.soe.ucsc.edu Nanoscale;University of California, Santa Cruz, Applied Optics Grouphttp://photon.soe.ucsc.edu Background Microfluidics Single molecule analysis Integrated optics Singleparticle Optofluidics Optofluidics: combination

  16. Label-free route to rapid, nanoscale characterization of cellular structure and dynamics through opaque media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Bipin

    We report a novel technique for label-free, rapid visualization of structure and dynamics of live cells with nanoscale sensitivity through traditionally opaque media. Specifically, by combining principles of near-infrared ...

  17. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  18. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than Fe into the structure of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) has been shown to greatly enhance the magnetic properties of the particles, tailoring them to different commercial uses. However, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is often carried out at high temperatures with toxic solvents resulting in high environmental and energy costs. Additionally, these ferrite nanoparticles are not intrinsically biocompatible, and to make them suitable for insertion into the human body is a rather intricate task. A relatively unexplored resource for magnetic nanomaterial production is subsurface Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, as these microorganisms are capable of producing large quantities of nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at ambient temperatures. Metal-reducing bacteria live in environments deficient in oxygen and conserve energy for growth through the oxidation of hydrogen or organic electron donors, coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals such as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. This can result in the formation of magnetite via the extracellular reduction of amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides causing the release of soluble Fe(II) and resulting in complete recrystallization of the amorphous mineral into a new phase. Some previous studies have reported altering the composition of biogenic magnetite produced by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for industrial and environmental applications. However, research into the commercial exploitation of bacteria to form magnetic minerals has focused primarily on magnetotactic bacteria which form magnetosomal magnetite internally using very different pathways to those bacteria forming magnetite outside the cell. Magnetotactic bacteria live at the sediment-water interface and use internal nanomagnets to guide them to their preferred environmental niche using the Earth's magnetic field. Since magnetotactic bacteria generally grow optimally under carefully controlled microaerobic conditions, the culturing processes for these organisms are challenging and result in low yields of nanomagnetite. Despite these limitations, magnetotactic bacteria have bee

  19. Dynamics of Excitons and Phonons in Disordered Nanoscale Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to a myriad of technological applications, ranging from sensing, imaging, solar energy harvesting, to future optoelectronic devices. In this talk I will overview several...

  20. Computational insights of water droplet transport on graphene sheet with chemical density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao, E-mail: xqwang@uga.edu [College of Engineering and NanoSEC, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2014-05-21

    Surface gradient has been emerging as an intriguing technique for nanoscale particle manipulation and transportation. Owing to its outstanding and stable chemical properties, graphene with covalently bonded chemical groups represents extraordinary potential for the investigation of nanoscale transport in the area of physics and biology. Here, we employ molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the fundamental mechanism of utilizing a chemical density on a graphene sheet to control water droplet motions on it. Simulation results have demonstrated that the binding energy difference among distinct segment of graphene in terms of interaction between the covalently bonded oxygen atoms on graphene and the water molecules provides a fundamental driving force to transport the water droplet across the graphene sheet. Also, the velocity of the water droplet has showed a strong dependence on the relative concentration of oxygen atoms between successive segments. Furthermore, a multi-direction channel provides insights to guide the transportation of objects towards a targeted position, separating the mixtures with a system of specific chemical functionalization. Our findings shed illuminating lights on the surface gradient method and therefore provide a feasible way to control nanoscale motion on the surface and mimic the channelless microfluidics.

  1. Mechanisms of budding of nanoscale particles through lipid bilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teresa Ruiz-Herrero; Enrique Velasco; Michael F. Hagan

    2012-02-21

    We examine the budding of a nanoscale particle through a lipid bilayer using molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations, and an elastic theory, with the aim of determining the extent to which equilibrium elasticity theory can describe the factors that control the mechanism and efficiency of budding. The particle is a smooth sphere which experiences attractive interactions to the lipid head groups. Depending on the parameters, we observe four classes of dynamical trajectories: particle adhesion to the membrane, stalled partially wrapped states, budding followed by scission, and membrane rupture. In most regions of parameter space we find that the elastic theory agrees nearly quantitatively with the simulated phase behavior as a function of adhesion strength, membrane bending rigidity, and particle radius. However, at parameter values near the transition between particle adhesion and budding, we observe long-lived partially wrapped states which are not captured by existing elastic theories. These states could constrain the accessible system parameters for those enveloped viruses or drug delivery vehicles which rely on exo- or endocytosis for membrane transport.

  2. Pressure Driven Flow of Polymer Solutions in Nanoscale Slit Pores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Millan; W. Jiang; M. Laradji; Y. Wang

    2006-10-16

    Polymer solutions subject to pressure driven flow and in nanoscale slit pores are systematically investigated using the dissipative particle dynamics approach. We investigated the effect of molecular weight, polymer concentration and flow rate on the profiles across the channel of the fluid and polymer velocities, polymers density, and the three components of the polymers radius of gyration. We found that the mean streaming fluid velocity decreases as the polymer molecular weight or/and polymer concentration is increased, and that the deviation of the velocity profile from the parabolic profile is accentuated with increase in polymer molecular weight or concentration. We also found that the distribution of polymers conformation is highly anisotropic and non-uniform across the channel. The polymer density profile is also found to be non-uniform, exhibiting a local minimum in the center-plane followed by two symmetric peaks. We found a migration of the polymer chains either from or towards the walls. For relatively long chains, as compared to the thickness of the slit, a migration towards the walls is observed. However, for relatively short chains, a migration away from the walls is observed.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Li-ion Anode Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by University of Pittsburgh at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about nanoscale...

  4. Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures with polarized soft x-ray photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, P.

    2010-01-01

    with polarized soft X-ray photons Peter Fischer and Mi -polarized soft X-ray photons which provide a strong X-rayhigh intense soft X-ray photon pulses hold the promise of

  5. Correlative Nanoscale 3D Imaging of Structure and Composition in Extended Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    'Environnement Industriel et des Risques, Verneuil en Halatte, France, 4 Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Amiens, Universite, the improvement of three-dimensional (3D) resolution is accomplished by tightening constraints: reduced manageable

  6. Atomic-Resolution Imaging of the Nanoscale Origin of Toughness in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    of the toughness in rare-earth doped silicon carbide (RE-SiC) by examining the mechanistic nature in the crack wake. Silicon carbides are potential candidate materials for many ultrahigh-temperature structural increase in thermodynamic efficiency and re- duced fuel consumption; however, to date the use

  7. Towards three-dimensional and attosecond x-ray imaging at the nanoscale |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnologyTel:FebruaryEIA's Today8TopoTowards a Design

  8. Femtosecond Single-Shot Imaging of Nanoscale Ferromagnetic Order in Co/Pd

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |production at aSciTech Connect Fe Atomic DataFebruaryMultilayers

  9. Femtosecond Single-Shot Imaging of Nanoscale Ferromagnetic Order in Co/Pd

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |production at aSciTech Connect Fe Atomic

  10. Nanoscale Imaging of Lithium Ion Distribution During In Situ Operation of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switch for integration with CMOS logic.applications.Battery

  11. Nanoscale Imaging of Photocurrent 2 and Efficiency in CdTe Solar Cells.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switch for integration with CMOS

  12. Chemical Occurrences

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Classification of Chemical Occurrence Reports into the following four classes: Occurrences characterized by serious energy release, injury or exposure requiring medical treatment, or severe environmental damage, Occurrences characterized by minor injury or exposure, or reportable environmental release, Occurrences that were near misses including notable safety violations and Minor occurrences.

  13. Chemical Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesca Matteucci

    2007-04-05

    In this series of lectures we first describe the basic ingredients of galactic chemical evolution and discuss both analytical and numerical models. Then we compare model results for the Milky Way, Dwarf Irregulars, Quasars and the Intra-Cluster- Medium with abundances derived from emission lines. These comparisons allow us to put strong constraints on the stellar nucleosynthesis and the mechanisms of galaxy formation.

  14. Dispersions of Aramid Nanofibers: A New Piece of Nanoscale Toolset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thouless, Michael

    chemical and materials research. Polymeric nanofibers are typically produced by electrospinning,2 drawing,3 template synthesis,4 phase separation,5 and self-assembly.6 Electrospinning is probably the most widely

  15. Spin Coherence at the Nanoscale: Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Arthur J.

    2013-09-10

    Breakthrough results were achieved during the reporting period in the areas of organic spintronics. (A) For the first time the giant magnetic resistance (GMR) was observed in spin valve with an organic spacer. Thus we demonstrated the ability of organic semiconductors to transport spin in GMR devices using rubrene as a prototype for organic semiconductors. (B) We discovered the electrical bistability and spin valve effect in a ferromagnet /organic semiconductor/ ferromagnet heterojunction. The mechanism of switching between conducting phases and its potential applications were suggested. (C) The ability of V(TCNE)x to inject spin into organic semiconductors such as rubrene was demonstrated for the first time. The mechanisms of spin injection and transport from and into organic magnets as well through organic semiconductors were elucidated. (D) In collaboration with the group of OSU Prof. Johnston-Halperin we reported the successful extraction of spin polarized current from a thin film of the organic-based room temperature ferrimagnetic semiconductor V[TCNE]x and its subsequent injection into a GaAs/AlGaAs light-emitting diode (LED). Thus all basic steps for fabrication of room temperature, light weight, flexible all organic spintronic devices were successfully performed. (E) A new synthesis/processing route for preparation of V(TCNE)x enabling control of interface and film thicknesses at the nanoscale was developed at OSU. Preliminary results show these films are higher quality and what is extremely important they are substantially more air stable than earlier prepared V(TCNE)x. In sum the breakthrough results we achieved in the past two years form the basis of a promising new technology, Multifunctional Flexible Organic-based Spintronics (MFOBS). MFOBS technology enables us fabrication of full function flexible spintronic devices that operate at room temperature.

  16. Visualizing Electromagnetic Fields at the Nanoscale by Single Molecule Localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steuwe, Christian; Erdelyi, Miklos; Szekeres, G.; Csete, M.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Mahajan, Sumeet; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-04-27

    -enhanced spectroscopies, electrochemistry and surface-science. Acknowledgement: The authors would like to thank Sebastian van de Linde and Eric Rees for their contributions to super-resolution imaging. We acknowledge financial support from EPSRC grant EP/G060649...

  17. Nanopatterning using NSOM probes integrated with high transmission nanoscale bowtie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    . Aizenberg, J. A. Rogers, K. E. Paul, and G. M. Whitesides, "Imaging the irradiance distribution-field optical lithography," Appl. Phys. Lett. 75, 3560-3562 (1999). 3. S. Y. Chou, P. R. Krauss, and P. J

  18. Contact optical nanolithography using nanoscale C-shaped apertures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    . Rogers, K. E. Paul, and G. M. Whitesides, "Imaging the irradiance distribution in the optical near field," Appl. Phys. Lett. 75, 3560-3562 (1999). 3. S. Y. Chou, P. R. Krauss, and P. J. Renstrom , "Imprint

  19. Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    knock-on radiation damage in materials such as graphene. As a result, very large electron doses can correction has allowed this performance to be maintained at low beam energies (30-80 keV), which do not cause. Bio Ondrej Krivanek is a co-founder of Nion. Ondrej has worked as the director of Research at Gatan

  20. Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vortices with electric flux closure domains. Using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have enabled the determination of the three-dimensional structure an aberration- corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. We found that the precious metals do

  1. Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... Howard Padmore Division Deputy for Experimental Systems Advanced Light Source Abstract Free Electron to the quality of the electron beam; typically this beam is produced by a laser-driven photocathode, before acceleration to relativistic velocity in a linear accelerator. A lower emittance beam can be used to lase

  2. Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electric fields. He is the co-inventor of the Atom-Probe (with the late Erwin Müller) and has published

  3. A comparative study of nano-scale coatings on gold electrodes for bioimpedance studies of breast cancer cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heflin, Randy

    with that of gold microelectrodes coated with gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, or electroplated gold to inA comparative study of nano-scale coatings on gold electrodes for bioimpedance studies of breast- troduce nano-scale roughness on the surface of the electrodes. For biological solutions, the electroplated

  4. Electron-beam patterning of polymer electrolyte films to make multiple nanoscale gates for nanowire transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Carrad; A. M. Burke; R. W. Lyttleton; H. J. Joyce; H. H. Tan; C. Jagadish; K. Storm; H. Linke; L. Samuelson; A. P. Micolich

    2014-04-08

    We report an electron-beam based method for the nanoscale patterning of the poly(ethylene oxide)/LiClO$_{4}$ polymer electrolyte. We use the patterned polymer electrolyte as a high capacitance gate dielectric in single nanowire transistors and obtain subthreshold swings comparable to conventional metal/oxide wrap-gated nanowire transistors. Patterning eliminates gate/contact overlap which reduces parasitic effects and enables multiple, independently controllable gates. The method's simplicity broadens the scope for using polymer electrolyte gating in studies of nanowires and other nanoscale devices.

  5. The Properties of Confined Water and Fluid Flow at the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwegler, E; Reed, J; Lau, E; Prendergast, D; Galli, G; Grossman, J C; Cicero, G

    2009-03-09

    This project has been focused on the development of accurate computational tools to study fluids in confined, nanoscale geometries, and the application of these techniques to probe the structural and electronic properties of water confined between hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates, including the presence of simple ions at the interfaces. In particular, we have used a series of ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations and quantum Monte Carlo calculations to build an understanding of how hydrogen bonding and solvation are modified at the nanoscale. The properties of confined water affect a wide range of scientific and technological problems - including protein folding, cell-membrane flow, materials properties in confined media and nanofluidic devices.

  6. Bio-inspired routes for synthesizing efficient nanoscale platinum electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cha, Jennifer N.; Wang, Joseph

    2014-08-31

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to use fundamental advances in bionanotechnology to design powerful platinum nanocrystal electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. The new economically-viable, environmentally-friendly, bottom-up biochemical synthetic strategy will produce platinum nanocrystals with tailored size, shape and crystal orientation, hence leading to a maximum electrochemical reactivity. There are five specific aims to the proposed bio-inspired strategy for synthesizing efficient electrocatalytic platinum nanocrystals: (1) isolate peptides that both selectively bind particular crystal faces of platinum and promote the nucleation and growth of particular nanocrystal morphologies, (2) pattern nanoscale 2-dimensional arrays of platinum nucleating peptides from DNA scaffolds, (3) investigate the combined use of substrate patterned peptides and soluble peptides on nanocrystal morphology and growth (4) synthesize platinum crystals on planar and large-area carbon electrode supports, and (5) perform detailed characterization of the electrocatalytic behavior as a function of catalyst size, shape and morphology. Project Description and Impact: This bio-inspired collaborative research effort will address key challenges in designing powerful electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications by employing nucleic acid scaffolds in combination with peptides to perform specific, environmentally-friendly, simultaneous bottom-up biochemical synthesis and patterned assembly of highly uniform and efficient platinum nanocrystal catalysts. Bulk synthesis of nanoparticles usually produces a range of sizes, accessible catalytic sites, crystal morphologies, and orientations, all of which lead to inconsistent catalytic activities. In contrast, biological systems routinely demonstrate exquisite control over inorganic syntheses at neutral pH and ambient temperature and pressures. Because the orientation and arrangement of the templating biomolecules can be precisely controlled, the nanocrystals boast a defined shape, morphology, orientation and size and are synthesized at benign reaction conditions. Adapting the methods of biomineralization towards the synthesis of platinum nanocrystals will allow effective control at a molecular level of the synthesis of highly active metal electrocatalysts, with readily tailored properties, through tuning of the biochemical inputs. The proposed research will incorporate many facets of biomineralization by: (1) isolating peptides that selectively bind particular crystal faces of platinum (2) isolating peptides that promote the nucleation and growth of particular nanocrystal morphologies (3) using two-dimensional DNA scaffolds to control the spatial orientation and density of the platinum nucleating peptides, and (4) combining bio-templating and soluble peptides to control crystal nucleation, orientation, and morphology. The resulting platinum nanocrystals will be evaluated for their electrocatalytic behavior (on common carbon supports) to determine their optimal size, morphology and crystal structure. We expect that such rational biochemical design will lead to highly uniform and efficient platinum nanocrystal catalysts for fuel cell applications.

  7. Chemical Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecoveryplanning CareerNationalCNMSTHEmaterials |Chemical

  8. 2009NatureAmerica,Inc.Allrightsreserved. Nanoscale live-cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    microscopy (SPM) is one approach to this problem and both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning. Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM)3 is another form of SPM, which allows imaging of the cell other SPM techniques. This is because when the probe encounters a vertical structure, it inevitably

  9. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erwin, David N. (San Antonio, TX); Kiel, Johnathan L. (San Antonio, TX); Batishko, Charles R. (West Richland, WA); Stahl, Kurt A. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  10. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

    1990-08-14

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

  11. Visualizing nanoscale 3D compositional fluctuation of lithium in advanced lithium-ion battery cathodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Devaraj, Arun; Gu, Meng; Colby, Robert J.; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Chong M.; Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Genc, Arda; Zhang, Jiguang; Belharouak, Ilias; et al

    2015-08-14

    The distribution and concentration of lithium in Li-ion battery cathodes at different stages of cycling is a pivotal factor in determining battery performance. Non-uniform distribution of the transition metal cations has been shown to affect cathode performance; however, the Li is notoriously challenging to characterize with typical high-spatial-resolution imaging techniques. Here, for the first time, laser–assisted atom probe tomography is applied to two advanced Li-ion battery oxide cathode materials—layered Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 and spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4—to unambiguously map the three dimensional (3D) distribution of Li at sub-nanometer spatial resolution and correlate it with the distribution of the transition metal cations (M) and themore »oxygen. The as-fabricated layered Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 is shown to have Li-rich Li2MO3 phase regions and Li-depleted Li(Ni0.5Mn0.5)O2 regions while in the cycled layered Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 an overall loss of Li and presence of Ni rich regions, Mn rich regions and Li rich regions are shown in addition to providing the first direct evidence for Li loss on cycling of layered LNMO cathodes. The spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode is shown to have a uniform distribution of all cations. These results were additionally validated by correlating with energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping of these nanoparticles in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Thus, we have opened the door for probing the nanoscale compositional fluctuations in crucial Li-ion battery cathode materials at an unprecedented spatial resolution of sub-nanometer scale in 3D which can provide critical information for understanding capacity decay mechanisms in these advanced cathode materials.« less

  12. Atomic-scale imaging and the effect of yttrium on the fracture toughness of silicon carbide ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Atomic-scale imaging and the effect of yttrium on the fracture toughness of silicon carbide boundary pro- motes transgranular fracture by raising the modulus of the nanoscale intergranular grain; Silicon carbide; Yttrium dopants; Fracture toughness 1. Introduction Rare-earth (RE) additives

  13. DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701956 Geometric Considerations of Micro-to Nanoscale Elastomeric Post

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Christopher S.

    DOI: 10.1002/adma.200701956 Geometric Considerations of Micro- to Nanoscale Elastomeric Post Arrays cultured on this substrate deflect underlying posts as they contract. Trac- tion forces could be calculated from these post deflections using a simple force-displacement relationship for pure bend- ing

  14. 60th Anniversary Issue: Physical Picoscale science and nanoscale engineering by electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    and development of X-ray-based technology is one of the most important inventions in human history, which has Zhong Lin Wang* School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta nanoscale technology related to materials science, biology, physics and chemistry. Keywords In situ electron

  15. Last Revised: 04/03/2014 UNDERGRADUATE MINOR IN "NANOSCALE SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    . It is open to any UG student pursuing an Engineering or Arts & Sciences (Chemistry, Physics, BiologyLast Revised: 04/03/2014 UNDERGRADUATE MINOR IN "NANOSCALE SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING" SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE Available to any UG pursuing an Arts and Science or Engineering degree I

  16. Graphene-enabled hybrid architectures for multiprocessors: bridging nanophotonics and nanoscale wireless communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Graphene-enabled hybrid architectures for multiprocessors: bridging nanophotonics and nanoscale components. In this paper, we do a first overview of the state-of-the-art in graphene and silicon network, and carrying light data flows. Keywords: Nanophotonics; Silicon-on-Insulator; Graphene

  17. Nanoscale, Electrified Liquid Jets for High-Resolution Printing of Charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, Division of Korea, and § Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 ABSTRACT Nearly all research in micro- and nanofabrication focuses on the formation of solid structures

  18. Charge separation in nanoscale photovoltaic materials: recent insights from first-principles electronic structure theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    Charge separation in nanoscale photovoltaic materials: recent insights from first-scale photovoltaic materials; in particular recent theoretical/computational work based on first principles electron and hole in so-called excitonic photovoltaic cells. Emphasis is placed on theoretical results

  19. Topography-Correlated Confocal Raman Microscopy with Cylindrical Vector Beams for Probing Nanoscale Structural Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Frank

    Topography-Correlated Confocal Raman Microscopy with Cylindrical Vector Beams for Probing Nanoscale, such as radially or azimuthally polarized doughnut beams, are combined with topography studies of pentacene thin in the mirror focus and kept within a nanometer distance from the surface to probe the topography using shear

  20. IT/Nano IFF Scientific Report 2007 Nanoscale Phase Transitions in Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IT/Nano · IFF Scientific Report 2007 158 I 159 Nanoscale Phase Transitions in Phase Change, and phase change (PC) materials are familiar to us as rewritable media (CD-RW, DVD- RW, DVD-RAM). Recently commercially available DVD-RW stor- age devices and DVD-RAM, are based on films of alloys of Ge, Sb, and Te

  1. High speed nano-scale positioning using a piezoelectric tube actuator with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    ], nanofabrication systems [4, 5] and nano- manipulation devices [6]. In many applications, piezoelectric tubesHigh speed nano-scale positioning using a piezoelectric tube actuator with active shunt control S. Aphale, A.J. Fleming and S.O.R. Moheimani Abstract: Piezoelectric tube scanners are the actuators

  2. Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels: Observations on deformation microstructure, nanoscale dimples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sow-Hsin

    Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels: Observations on deformation microstructure, nanoscale hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels has been a subject of significant research, one of the major challenges in tackling hydrogen embrittlement is that the mechanism of embrittlement is not fully resolved

  3. A pomegranate-inspired nanoscale design for large-volume-change lithium battery anodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    A pomegranate-inspired nanoscale design for large-volume-change lithium battery anodes Nian Liu1 lithium-ion batteries and in more recent Li­O2 and Li­S batteries as a replacement for the dendrite to the level of commercial lithium-ion batteries (3.7 mAh cm22 ). Particle fracture and loss of electrical

  4. Biologically Activated Noble Metal Alloys at the Nanoscale: For Lithium Ion Battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    Biologically Activated Noble Metal Alloys at the Nanoscale: For Lithium Ion Battery Anodes Yun Jung as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Using two clones, one for specificity (p8#9 virus) and one choice for lithium ion batteries, these noble metal/alloy nanowires serve as great model systems to study

  5. Plant virus directed fabrication of nanoscale materials and devices James N. Culver a,b,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Review Plant virus directed fabrication of nanoscale materials and devices James N. Culver a Accepted 2 March 2015 Available online 26 March 2015 Keywords: Nanotechnology Bio-materials Virus particles Virus assembly Virus-like particles a b s t r a c t Bottom-up self-assembly methods in which individual

  6. 4.4 Nanoscale: Mineral Weathering Boundary RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    4.4 Nanoscale: Mineral Weathering Boundary RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA SJ-scattered detector. Biotic weathering Mineral weathering caused by life, including bacteria, fungi, algae, plants of elements such as silica or iron. Etching of minerals Mineral dissolution is not an even produce; areas

  7. Graphene-enabled hybrid architectures for multiprocessors: bridging nanophotonics and nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Graphene-enabled hybrid architectures for multiprocessors: bridging nanophotonics and nanoscale components. In this paper, we do a first overview of the state-of-the-art in graphene and silicon network, and carrying light data flows. Keywords: Nanophotonics; Silicon-on-Insulator; Graphene

  8. Cite this: Nanoscale, 2015, 7, 4514 Received 9th December 2014,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    oxidation reaction (HOR) ­ in hydrogen fuel cells2 : Water splitting ðOER; HERÞ: H2O ! 1 2 O2 þ H2 ð1Þ Water February 2015 DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07277d www.rsc.org/nanoscale Optimizing the oxygen evolution reaction. Experimental optimization of these catalysts has proceeded slowly. Quantum Mechanics (QM) calculations have

  9. A computational model for nanoscale adhesion between deformable solids and its application to gecko adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A computational model for nanoscale adhesion between deformable solids and its application to gecko adhesion Roger A. Sauer 1 Aachen Institute for Advanced Study in Computational Engineering Science (AICES), RWTH Aachen University, Templergaben 55, 52056 Aachen, Germany Published2 in the Journal of Adhesion

  10. High-Affinity DNA Base Analogs as Supramolecular, Nanoscale Promoters of Macroscopic Adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    High-Affinity DNA Base Analogs as Supramolecular, Nanoscale Promoters of Macroscopic Adhesion Cyrus Information ABSTRACT: Adhesion phenomena are essential to many biological processes and to synthetic adhesives adhesion mechanisms. Recently, supramolecular building blocks, such as synthetic DNA base- pair mimics

  11. ReseaRch at the University of Maryland Innovating Energy Storage at the Nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    ReseaRch at the University of Maryland Innovating Energy Storage at the Nanoscale Growing demands for energy, particularly renewable energy, require not only new sources but new methods of storage tests newly created nanostructures for their energy storage capacities. His work in micro

  12. Nanoscale Manipulation of Surfaces and Interfaces: Engineering Electrical Properties Through Nanofabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Gregory J.

    2013-05-31

    dimensionalities, like graphene and carbon nanotubes also need to be studied for potential use in nanoscale devices. Graphene has been found to be electronically tunable by doping, causing it to be able to function as a semiconductor or as a metallic conductor...

  13. Micro-and nanoscale domain engineering in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    Micro- and nanoscale domain engineering in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate Vladimir Ya. Shur investigation of the domain evolution in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate during backswitched electric sources based on quasi-phase matching.11 Lithium niobate LiNbO3 (LN) and lithium tantalate LiTaO3 (LT

  14. Biomaterials 26 (2005) 68366845 Tuning compliance of nanoscale polyelectrolyte multilayers to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    2005-01-01

    Biomaterials 26 (2005) 6836­6845 Tuning compliance of nanoscale polyelectrolyte multilayers cause smooth muscle cells to secrete bone minerals typically produced by ARTICLE IN PRESS www.elsevier.com/locate/biomaterials 0142-9612/$ - see front matter r 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials

  15. Dynamics of nanoscale jet formation and impingement on flat surfaces Sohail Murad and Ishwar K. Puria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Dynamics of nanoscale jet formation and impingement on flat surfaces Sohail Murad and Ishwar K on a flat surface. The simulations show that to produce jets in the 1 nm diameter range, the orifice surface the attractive forces of the surface to form a jet. In addition, for the nanojet to form a stable liquid film

  16. Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature Anders Lervik transient non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations, heat-transfer through nanometer-scale interfaces processes. We show that the modeling of heat transfer across a nanodroplet/fluid interface requires

  17. Nanoscale Heat Transfer at Contact Between a Hot Tip and a Substrate Stphane Lefvre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Nanoscale Heat Transfer at Contact Between a Hot Tip and a Substrate Stéphane Lefèvre Laboratoire d three heat transfer modes with experimental data and modeling. We conclude that the three modes in "International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 49, 1-2 (2006) 251-258" DOI : 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2005

  18. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Single-chain Nanoparticles: Synthesis of Nano-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Single-chain Nanoparticles: Synthesis of Nano-scale Architectures:00 AM, IMS Room 20 Recent efforts by our lab to fold single polymer chains into nano as a reliable method to measure the change in solution conformation of polymer chains when folded via intra

  19. Polysulfide Flow Batteries Enabled by Percolating Nanoscale Conductor Networks Frank Y. Fan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Polysulfide Flow Batteries Enabled by Percolating Nanoscale Conductor Networks Frank YKinley2 , W. Craig Carter1 , and Yet-Ming Chiang*1 Abstract A new approach to flow battery design shown poor capacity utilization and reversibility, and may thereby enable new flow battery designs

  20. Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meetings Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators" is scarcely older than for one or two dozen people grew to include nearly a hundred. Chemical accelerators is a name sug- gested by one of us for devices that produce beams of chemically interesting species at relative kinetic

  1. Microbial Cell Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Sullivan, Claretta; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is finding increasing application in a variety of fields including microbiology. Until the emergence of AFM, techniques for ivnestigating processes in single microbes were limited. From a biologist's perspective, the fact that AFM can be used to generate high-resolution images in buffers or media is its most appealing feature as live-cell imaging can be pursued. Imaging living cells by AFM allows dynamic biological events to be studied, at the nanoscale, in real time. Few areas of biological research have as much to gain as microbiology from the application of AFM. Whereas the scale of microbes places them near the limit of resolution for light microscopy. AFM is well suited for the study of structures on the order of a micron or less. Although electron microscopy techniques have been the standard for high-resolution imaging of microbes, AFM is quickly gaining favor for several reasons. First, fixatives that impair biological activity are not required. Second, AFM is capable of detecting forces in the pN range, and precise control of the force applied to the cantilever can be maintained. This combination facilitates the evaluation of physical characteristics of microbes. Third, rather than yielding the composite, statistical average of cell populations, as is the case with many biochemical assays, the behavior of single cells can be monitored. Despite the potential of AFM in microbiology, there are several limitations that must be considered. For example, the time required to record an image allows for the study of gross events such as cell division or membrane degradation from an antibiotic but precludes the evaluation of biological reactions and events that happen in just fractions of a second. Additionally, the AFM is a topographical tool and is restricted to imaging surfaces. Therefore, it cannot be used to look inside cells as with opticla and transmission electron microscopes. other practical considerations are the limitation on the maximum scan size (roughly 100 x 100 {mu}m) and the restricted movement of the cantilever in the Z (or height) direction. In most commercial AFMs, the Z range is restricted to roughly 10 {mu}m such that the height of cells to be imaged must be seriously considered. Nevertheless, AFM can provide structural-functional information at nanometer resolution and do so in physiologically relevant environments. Further, instrumentation for scanning probe microscopy continues to advance. Systems for high-speed imaging are becoming available, and techniques for looking inside the cells are being demonstrated. The ability to combine AFM with other imaging modalities is likely to have an even greater impact on microbiological studies. AFM studies of intact microbial cells started to appear in the literature in the 1990s. For example, AFM studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae examined buddings cars after cell division and detailed changes related to cell growth processes. Also, the first AFM studies of bacterial biofilms appeared. In the late 1990s, AFM studies of intact fungal spores described clear changes in spore surfaces upon germination, and studies of individual bacterial cells were also described. These early bacterial imaging studies examined changes in bacterial morphology due to antimicrobial peptides exposure and bacterial adhesion properties. The majority of these early studies were carried out on dried samples and took advantage of the resolving power of AFM. The lack of cell mounting procedures presented an impediment for cell imaging studies. Subsequently, several approaches to mounting microbial cells have been developed, and these techniques are described later. Also highlighted are general considerations for microbial imaging and a description of some of the various applications of AFM to microbiology.

  2. 2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lagrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan

    2014-07-21

    A new instrument developed by LLNL scientists and engineers, the Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (MM-DTEM), captures billionth-of-a-meter-scale images with frame rates more than 100,000 times faster than those of conventional techniques. The work was done in collaboration with a Pleasanton-based company, Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions (IDES) Inc. Using this revolutionary imaging technique, a range of fundamental and technologically important material and biological processes can be captured in action, in complete billionth-of-a-meter detail, for the first time. The primary application of MM-DTEM is the direct observation of fast processes, including microstructural changes, phase transformations and chemical reactions, that shape real-world performance of nanostructured materials and potentially biological entities. The instrument could prove especially valuable in the direct observation of macromolecular interactions, such as protein-protein binding and host-pathogen interactions. While an earlier version of the technology, Single Shot-DTEM, could capture a single snapshot of a rapid process, MM-DTEM captures a multiframe movie that reveals complex sequences of events in detail. It is the only existing technology that can capture multiple electron microscopy images in the span of a single microsecond.

  3. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  4. Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of Laminated Woven Composites Reinforced with Aligned Nanoscale Fibers: Mechanisms at the Macro, Micro, and Nano Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wicks, Sunny S.

    Several hybrid architectures with aligned nanoscale fibers have been shown to provide inter- and intra-laminar reinforcement of fiber reinforced polymer composites. In one architecture, aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown ...

  5. Fault modeling, delay evaluation and path selection for delay test under process variation in nano-scale VLSI circuits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Xiang

    2006-04-12

    Delay test in nano-scale VLSI circuits becomes more difficult with shrinking technology feature sizes and rising clock frequencies. In this dissertation, we study three challenging issues in delay test: fault modeling, ...

  6. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes 2013-2014 1. Chemical engineering students must complete not included in the required chemical engineering curriculum. All technical electives are subject to approval be in chemical engineering. 2. Chemical engineering students must complete a minimum of 18 credits in the Social

  7. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging using parallel transmission at 7T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagoski, Borjan Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), also known as phase-encoded (PE) chemical shift imaging (CSI), suffers from both low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the brain metabolites, as well as inflexible ...

  8. Laser induced chemical reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orel, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    the simplest prototype chemical reaction, and since it is soLASER ENHANCEMENT OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS A. B. C. D. E.Laser Inhibition of Chemical Reaction Effect of Isotopic

  9. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Chung-cheng (Irvine, CA); Sui, Guodong (Los Angeles, CA); Elizarov, Arkadij (Valley Village, CA); Kolb, Hartmuth C. (Playa del Rey, CA); Huang, Jiang (San Jose, CA); Heath, James R. (South Pasadena, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Los Angeles, CA); Quake, Stephen R. (Stanford, CA); Tseng, Hsian-rong (Los Angeles, CA); Wyatt, Paul (Tipperary, IE); Daridon, Antoine (Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH)

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  10. Sandia Energy - Chemical Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Dynamics Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Chemical Dynamics Chemical DynamicsAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:45:37+00:00...

  11. Giant Transverse Optical Forces in Nanoscale Slot Waveguides of Hyperbolic Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Yingran; Gao, Jie; Yang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that giant transverse optical forces can be generated in nanoscale slot waveguides of hyperbolic metamaterials, with more than two orders of magnitude stronger compared to the force created in conventional silicon slot waveguides, due to the nanoscale optical field enhancement and the extreme optical energy compression within the air slot region. Both numerical simulation and analytical treatment are carried out to study the dependence of the optical forces on the waveguide geometries and the metamaterial permittivity tensors, including the attractive optical forces for the symmetric modes and the repulsive optical forces for the anti-symmetric modes. The significantly enhanced transverse optical forces result from the strong optical mode coupling strength between two metamaterial waveguides, which can be explained with an explicit relation derived from the coupled mode theory. Moreover, the calculation on realistic metal-dielectric multilayer structures indicates that the predicted giant ...

  12. Stick-Slip Control in Nanoscale Boundary Lubrication by Surface Wettability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Chen; Adam S. Foster; Mikko J. Alava; Lasse Laurson

    2015-02-13

    We study the effect of atomic scale surface-lubricant interactions on nanoscale boundary-lubricated friction, by considering two example surfaces - hydrophilic mica and hydrophobic graphene - confining thin layers of water in molecular dynamics simulations. We observe stick-slip dynamics for thin water films confined by mica sheets, involving periodic breaking-reforming transitions of atomic scale capillary water bridges formed around the potassium ions of mica. However, only smooth sliding without stick-slip events is observed for water confined by graphene, as well as for thicker water layers confined by mica. Thus, our results illustrate how atomic scale details affect the wettability of the confining surfaces, and consequently control the presence or absence of stick-slip dynamics in nanoscale friction.

  13. Nano-Scale Interpenetrating Phase Composites (IPC S) for Industrial and Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Hu, Michael Z.

    2010-06-01

    A one-year project was completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to explore the technical and economic feasibility of producing nano-scale Interpenetrating Phase Composite (IPC) components of a usable size for actual testing/implementation in a real applications such as high wear/corrosion resistant refractory shapes for industrial applications, lightweight vehicle braking system components, or lower cost/higher performance military body and vehicle armor. Nano-scale IPC s with improved mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties have previously been demonstrated at the lab scale, but have been limited in size. The work performed under this project was focused on investigating the ability to take the current traditional lab scale processes to a manufacturing scale through scaling of these processes or through the utilization of an alternative high-temperature process.

  14. Implications and mitigation of model mismatch and covariance contamination for hyperspectral chemical agent detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Sidi

    Most chemical gas detection algorithms for long-wave infrared hyperspectral images assume a gas with a perfectly known spectral signature. In practice, the chemical signature is either imperfectly measured and/or exhibits ...

  15. ITP Chemicals: Chemical Industry of the Future: New Biocatalysts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemical Industry of the Future: New Biocatalysts: Essential Tools for a Sustainable 21st Century Chemical Industry ITP Chemicals: Chemical Industry of the Future: New...

  16. Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes ICEHT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...

  17. Cite this: Nanoscale, 2015, 7, 3173 Received 23rd November 2014,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    -sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). On the basis of a TiO2 nanotube, Gao et al.19 prepared a CdS/CdSe co December 2014 DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06935h www.rsc.org/nanoscale Highly efficient quantum dot-sensitized TiO2. ZnSe, CdS and CdSe QDs were sequentially assembled on a nanocrystalline TiO2 film to prepare a Zn

  18. Correlation between magnetic spin structure and the three-dimensional geometry in chemically synthesized nanoscale magnetite rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    yielding an intermediate magnetic state between the vortex state and the tube state is found closure vortex states but in rings with thickness variations, an effective stray field occurs. Using. The interaction between exchange coupled rings leads to antiparallel vortex states and extended onion states

  19. Molecular level control of nanoscale composition and morphology: Toward photocatalytic nanocomposites for solar-to-chemical energy conversion of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruberu, Thanthrige P.

    2013-05-15

    Understanding the factors influencing nanocrystal formation is a challenge yet to be realized. In comparison to the large number of studies on nanocrystal synthesis and their applications, the number of studies on the effect of the precursor chemistry on nanocrystal composition and shape remains low. Although photochemical fabrication of metalsemiconductor nano-heterostructures is reported in literature, control over the free particle formation and the site of metal deposition have not been achieved. Moreover, utilization of metal- semiconductor nano-heterostructures in photocatalytic reactions other than water splitting is hardly explored. In this thesis, we studied the effect of chalcogenide precursor reactivity on the composition, morphology and the axial anisotropy of cadmiumchalcogenide nanocrystals. We also investigated the influence of the irradiation wavelength in synthesizing metal-semiconductor nano-heterostructures. Finally, we showed that metal semiconductor nano-heterostructures can be used as a photocatalyst for alcohol dehydrogenation reactions. We explored the pathways for the formation of Pt and Pd nanoparticles on CdS and CdS{sub 0.4}Se{sub 0.6} nanorods. This study revealed that the wavelength of irradiation is critical to control free-standing vs. bound metal (Pt and Pd) nanoparticles to semiconductor. Additionally, we observed that metal photodeposition occurs on specific segments of axially anisotropic, compositionally graded CdS0.4Se0.6 nanorods due to the band-gap differential between their nano-domains. We used semiconductor-metal heterostructures for sunlightdriven dehydrogenation and hydrogenolysis of benzyl alcohol. Heterostructure composition dictates activity (turnovers) and product distribution. A few metal (Pt, Pd) islands on the semiconductor surface significantly enhance activity and selectivity and also greatly stabilize the semiconductor against photoinduced etching and degradation.

  20. Nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of thin films: sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy at buried interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kweskin, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Halverson, D.E. Surface and Interface Analysis 1998 , 26,Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces II; Feast, W. J. ; Munro, H.Hobbins, N.D. Surf. Interface. Anal. 1980 , 2, 5. Briggs, D.

  1. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  2. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Renee H. Spires Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Project Manager July 29, 2009 Tank Waste Corporate Board 2 Objective Provide an overview of the ECC process...

  3. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  4. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li

    2013-05-10

    Chemistry occurring in the liquid and liquid surface is important in many applications. Chemical imaging of liquids using vacuum based analytical techniques is challenging due to the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface sensitive techniques such as electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Due to its small size, low cost, and flexibility in design, liquid cells based on microfluidics have been increasingly used in studying and imaging complex phenomena involving liquids. This paper presents a review of microfluidic cells that were developed to adapt to electron microscopes and various spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis and imaging of liquids. The following topics will be covered including cell designs, fabrication techniques, unique technical features for vacuum compatible cells, and imaging with electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Challenges are summarized and recommendations for future development priority are proposed.

  5. Final Technical Report for DE-FG02-06ER15835: Chemical Imaging with 100nm Spatial Resolution: Combining High Resolution Flurosecence Microscopy and Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buratto, Steven K.

    2013-09-03

    We have combined, in a single instrument, high spatial resolution optical microscopy with the chemical specificity and conformational selectivity of ion mobility mass spectrometry. We discuss the design and construction of this apparatus as well as our efforts in applying this technique to thin films of molecular semiconductor materials.

  6. Frontiers in Chemical Physics and Analysis Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scanning tunneling microscopy images and spectra, we show that oxygen vacancies act as trapping centresFrontiers in Chemical Physics and Analysis Seminar Series Influence of Wet Electron States

  7. Comparing matched polymer:Fullerene solar cells made by solution-sequential processing and traditional blend casting: Nanoscale structure and device performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    and Traditional Blend Casting: Nanoscale Structure andby traditional blend casting (BC), where the components aresuch networks is the blend-casting (BC) method, wherein the

  8. Chemical Management Contacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Contacts for additional information on Chemical Management and brief description on Energy Facility Contractors Group

  9. PINS chemical identification software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caffrey, Augustine J.; Krebs, Kennth M.

    2004-09-14

    An apparatus and method for identifying a chemical compound. A neutron source delivers neutrons into the chemical compound. The nuclei of chemical elements constituting the chemical compound emit gamma rays upon interaction with the neutrons. The gamma rays are characteristic of the chemical elements constituting the chemical compound. A spectrum of the gamma rays is generated having a detection count and an energy scale. The energy scale is calibrated by comparing peaks in the spectrum to energies of pre-selected chemical elements in the spectrum. A least-squares fit completes the calibration. The chemical elements constituting the chemical compound can be readily determined, which then allows for identification of the chemical compound.

  10. Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Colliex, C. [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France

    2012-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

  11. Image alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  12. Nanoscale interplay of strain and doping in a high-temperature superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeljkovic, Ilija; Gu, Genda; Nieminen, Jouko; Huang, Dennis; Chang, Tay-Rong; He, Yang; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Lin, Hsin; Markiewicz, Robert S.; Bansil, Arun; Hoffman, Jennifer E.

    2014-11-07

    The highest temperature superconductors are electronically inhomogeneous at the nanoscale, suggesting the existence of a local variable which could be harnessed to enhance the superconducting pairing. Here we report the relationship between local doping and local strain in the cuprate superconductor Bi?Sr?CaCu?O??x. We use scanning tunneling microscopy to discover that the crucial oxygen dopants are periodically distributed, in correlation with local strain. Our picoscale investigation of the intra-unit-cell positions of all oxygen dopants provides essential structural input for a complete microscopic theory.

  13. Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

    2009-01-06

    The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

  14. Nanoscale structure in AgSbTe2 determined by diffuse elastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Budai, John D [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; Karapetrova, Evguenia A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse elastic neutron scattering measurements confirm that AgSbTe2 has a hierarchical structure, with defects on length scales from nanometers to microns. While scattering from mesoscale structure is consistent with previously-proposed structures in which Ag and Sb order on a NaCl lattice, more diffuse scattering from nanoscale structure suggests a structural rearrangement in which hexagonal layers form a combination of (ABC), (ABA), and (AAB) stacking sequences. The AgCrSe2 structure is the best-fitting model for the local atomic arrangements.

  15. Nanoscale interplay of strain and doping in a high-temperature superconductor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zeljkovic, Ilija; Gu, Genda; Nieminen, Jouko; Huang, Dennis; Chang, Tay-Rong; He, Yang; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Lin, Hsin; et al

    2014-11-07

    The highest temperature superconductors are electronically inhomogeneous at the nanoscale, suggesting the existence of a local variable which could be harnessed to enhance the superconducting pairing. Here we report the relationship between local doping and local strain in the cuprate superconductor Bi?Sr?CaCu?O??x. We use scanning tunneling microscopy to discover that the crucial oxygen dopants are periodically distributed, in correlation with local strain. Our picoscale investigation of the intra-unit-cell positions of all oxygen dopants provides essential structural input for a complete microscopic theory.

  16. Free Energy Barrier for Electric Field Driven Polymer Entry into Nanoscale Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narges Nikoofard; Hossein Fazli

    2011-04-27

    Free energy barrier for entry of a charged polymer into a nanoscale channel by a driving electric field is studied theoretically and using molecular dynamics simulations. Dependence of the barrier height on the polymer length, the driving field strength, and the channel entrance geometry is investigated. Squeezing effect of the electric field on the polymer before its entry to the channel is taken into account. It is shown that lateral confinement of the polymer prior to its entry changes the polymer length dependence of the barrier height noticeably. Our theory and simulation results are in good agreement and reasonably describe related experimental data.

  17. Molding the flow of light on the nanoscale: from vortex nanogears to phase-operated plasmonic machinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svetlana V. Boriskina; Bjoern M. Reinhard

    2011-12-07

    Efficient delivery of light into nanoscale volumes by converting free photons into localized charge-density oscillations (surface plasmons) enables technological innovation in various fields from biosensing to photovoltaics and quantum computing. Conventional plasmonic nanostructures are designed as nanoscale analogs of radioantennas and waveguides. Here, we discuss an alternative approach for plasmonic nanocircuit engineering that is based on molding the optical powerflow through 'vortex nanogears' around a landscape of local phase singularities 'pinned' to plasmonic nanostructures. We show that coupling of several vortex nanogears into transmission-like structures results in dramatic optical effects, which can be explained by invoking a hydrodynamic analogy of the 'photon fluid'. The new concept of vortex nanogear transmissions (VNTs) provides new design principles for the development of complex multi-functional phase-operated photonics machinery and, therefore, generates unique opportunities for light generation, harvesting and processing on the nanoscale.

  18. Chemical Industry Bandwidth Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-01

    The Chemical Bandwidth Study provides a snapshot of potentially recoverable energy losses during chemical manufacturing. The advantage of this study is the use of "exergy" analysis as a tool for pinpointing inefficiencies.

  19. Chemicals Industry Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1996-12-01

    Chemical industry leaders articulated a long-term vision for the industry, its markets, and its technology in the groundbreaking 1996 document Technology Vision 2020 - The U.S. Chemical Industry. (PDF 310 KB).

  20. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  1. Chemical Sciences Division - CSD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CSD Chemical Sciences Division CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links Research Areas Research Highlights Organization Contacts Publications Awards Employment...

  2. MECS 2006- Chemicals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Chemicals Sector (NAICS 325) with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  3. Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Servatius, Brigitte

    Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . . Realization 2d Zeolites Finite Zeolites The Layer . . . Holes University (Brigitte Servatius -- WPI) #12;Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . . Realization 2d Zeolites. Chemical Zeolites · crystalline solid · units: Si + 4O Si O O O O · two covalent bonds per oxygen #12

  4. Department of Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Developing Leaders of Innovation Department of Chemical Engineering #12;At the University of Virginia, we educate students in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering, giving them.Va. Department of Chemical Engineering benefit from a modern academic curriculum and state

  5. Equilibrium Chemical Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tatsuo Shibata; Shin-ichi Sasa

    1997-10-30

    An equilibrium reversible cycle with a certain engine to transduce the energy of any chemical reaction into mechanical energy is proposed. The efficiency for chemical energy transduction is also defined so as to be compared with Carnot efficiency. Relevance to the study of protein motors is discussed. KEYWORDS: Chemical thermodynamics, Engine, Efficiency, Molecular machine.

  6. HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY PHD PROGRAM 2013-2014 Student Handbook #12;Program Contacts at the beginning of each semester. Laboratory Rotations Students in the Chemical Biology Program are expected an interest in having Chemical Biology Program Students in their labs. Students may rotate in the labs

  7. Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy via Relaxation of Solid-State Spin Probes at the Nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. T. Hall; P. Kehayias; D. A. Simpson; A. Jarmola; A. Stacey; D. Budker; L. C. L. Hollenberg

    2015-03-03

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) describes a suite of techniques for characterising electronic systems, with applications in physics, materials science, chemistry, and biology. However, the requirement for large electron spin ensembles in conventional ESR techniques limits their spatial resolution. Here we present a method for measuring the ESR spectrum of nanoscale electronic environments by measuring the relaxation time ($T_1$) of an optically addressed single-spin probe as it is systematically tuned into resonance with the target electronic system. As a proof of concept we extract the spectral distribution for the P1 electronic spin bath in diamond using an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centres, and demonstrate excellent agreement with theoretical expectations. As the response of each NV spin in this experiment is dominated by a single P1 spin at a mean distance of 2.7\\,nm, the extension of this all-optical technique to the single NV case will enable nanoscale ESR spectroscopy of atomic and molecular spin systems.

  8. Chaotic oscillation and random-number generation based on nanoscale optical-energy transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naruse, Makoto; Aono, Masashi; Hori, Hirokazu; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2014-01-01

    By using nanoscale energy-transfer dynamics and density matrix formalism, we demonstrate theoretically and numerically that chaotic oscillation and random-number generation occur in a nanoscale system. The physical system consists of a pair of quantum dots (QDs), with one QD smaller than the other, between which energy transfers via optical near-field interactions. When the system is pumped by continuous-wave radiation and incorporates a timing delay between two energy transfers within the system, it emits optical pulses. We refer to such QD pairs as nano-optical pulsers (NOPs). Irradiating an NOP with external periodic optical pulses causes the oscillating frequency of the NOP to synchronize with the external stimulus. We find that chaotic oscillation occurs in the NOP population when they are connected by an external time delay. Moreover, by evaluating the time-domain signals by statistical-test suites, we confirm that the signals are sufficiently random to qualify the system as a random-number generator (R...

  9. Chaotic oscillation and random-number generation based on nanoscale optical-energy transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makoto Naruse; Song-Ju Kim; Masashi Aono; Hirokazu Hori; Motoichi Ohtsu

    2014-12-19

    By using nanoscale energy-transfer dynamics and density matrix formalism, we demonstrate theoretically and numerically that chaotic oscillation and random-number generation occur in a nanoscale system. The physical system consists of a pair of quantum dots (QDs), with one QD smaller than the other, between which energy transfers via optical near-field interactions. When the system is pumped by continuous-wave radiation and incorporates a timing delay between two energy transfers within the system, it emits optical pulses. We refer to such QD pairs as nano-optical pulsers (NOPs). Irradiating an NOP with external periodic optical pulses causes the oscillating frequency of the NOP to synchronize with the external stimulus. We find that chaotic oscillation occurs in the NOP population when they are connected by an external time delay. Moreover, by evaluating the time-domain signals by statistical-test suites, we confirm that the signals are sufficiently random to qualify the system as a random-number generator (RNG). This study reveals that even relatively simple nanodevices that interact locally with each other through optical energy transfer at scales far below the wavelength of irradiating light can exhibit complex oscillatory dynamics. These findings are significant for applications such as ultrasmall RNGs.

  10. Nanoscale selective area growth of thick, dense, uniform, In-rich, InGaN nanostructure arrays on GaN/sapphire template

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaram, S.; El Gmili, Y.; Bonanno, P. L. [CNRS, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech - CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Puybaret, R.; Li, X.; Voss, P. L.; Ougazzaden, A. [Georgia Institute of Technology, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech - CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Pantzas, K.; Patriarche, G. [CNRS, UPR LPN, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Orsal, G.; Salvestrini, J. P., E-mail: salvestr@metz.supelec.fr [Université de Lorraine, Supélec, LMOPS, EA4423, 57070 Metz (France); Troadec, D. [Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, CNRS, UMR 8520 IEMN, 59000 Lille (France); Cai, Z.-H. [Advanced Photon Source, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-10-28

    Uniform, dense, single-phase, 150?nm thick indium gallium nitride (InGaN) nanostructure (nanorods and nanostripes) arrays have been obtained on gallium nitride templates, by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and nanoscale selective area growth on silicon dioxide patterned masks. The 150?nm thick InGaN nanorods have a perfect hexagonal pyramid shape with relatively homogenous indium concentration up to 22%, which is almost twice as high as in planar InGaN grown in the same condition, and luminesce at 535?nm. InGaN nanostripes feature c-axis oriented InGaN in the core which is covered by InGaN grown along semi-polar facets with higher In content. Transmission electron microscope and sub micron beam X-rays diffraction investigations confirm that both InGaN nanostructures are mostly defect free and monocrystalline. The ability to grow defect-free thick InGaN nanostructures with reduced polarization and high indium incorporation offers a solution to develop high efficiency InGaN-based solar cells.

  11. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    V. , Ed. , Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. J. Chem.£d. Amer/can Chemical Society. Easlon. PA. 18042. Vol. Lof Laboratory Safety. the Chemical Rubber Company Cleveland.

  12. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiu, Anne; Sturmfels, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    strongly-connected chemical reaction, and the compu- tationcredited. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks Referencesto persistence analysis in chemical reaction networks. In:

  13. Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering June 2015 #12;Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 POLICY..........................................................................................2 2.1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE OFFICER

  14. Role of the nanoscale in catalytic CO oxidation by supported Au and Pt nanostructures Sergey N. Rashkeev,1,2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Role of the nanoscale in catalytic CO oxidation by supported Au and Pt nanostructures Sergey N found that the catalytic activity of Au increases sharply for supported nanoparticles smaller than 5 nm in catalytically active TiO2-supported Au nanoparticles. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.76.035438 PACS number s : 82.65. r I

  15. Probing nanoscale photo-oxidation in organic films using spatial hole burning near-field scanning optical microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probing nanoscale photo-oxidation in organic films using spatial hole burning near-field scanning from a stationary NSOM tip to induce photo-oxidation. The reduction in the fluorescence yield resulting photo-oxidation as a function of time, position, and environment free from the limits of far

  16. Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal-Insulator Domain Walls in Vanadium Dioxide Nanobeams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal- Insulator Domain Walls localized alternating Peltier heating and cooling as well as Joule heating concentrated at the M-I domain the monoclinic phase identification. KEYWORDS: Vanadium dioxide, thermoreflectance microscopy, Peltier effect

  17. Investigation of Tibetian Plateau Varnish: New Findings at the Nanoscale Using Focused Ion Beam and Transmission Electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    electron microscopy (HR-TEM) was used. Preparing HR-TEM samples with a dual-beam fo- cused ion beamInvestigation of Tibetian Plateau Varnish: New Findings at the Nanoscale Using Focused Ion Beam and Transmission Electron Microscopy Techniques KURT A. LANGWORTHY 1 , DAVID H. KRINSLEY 2 , AND RONALD I. DORN 3 1

  18. Optical spectrometer at the nanoscale using optical Yagi-Uda nanoantennas Jingjing Li, Alessandro Salandrino, and Nader Engheta*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jingjing

    Optical spectrometer at the nanoscale using optical Yagi-Uda nanoantennas Jingjing Li, Alessandro; published 5 May 2009 Here we present and analyze an optical spectrum analyzer at the nanometer scale that is able to distribute different frequency contents of the radiation of an optical dipole source

  19. REPORT ON 6TH U.S.-JAPAN JOINT SEMINAR ON NANOSCALE TRANSPORT PHENOMENA.SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    electricity (PV), solar fuel (biomass), and solar thermal, and thermoelectricity related issues for discussing and identifying outstanding science and technology issues in the area of nanoscale thermophysics from MIT, Fushinobu Kazuyoshi from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Shigeo Maruyama from Tokyo University

  20. lame synthesis is one of the most versatile and promising technologies for large-scale production of nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    andenvironmental24 concern. Inorganic, nanostructured materials can be produced by doping a flame with inorganicLETTERS F lame synthesis is one of the most versatile and promising technologies for large-scale production of nanoscale materials1­3 . Pyrolysis has recently been shown to be a useful route

  1. Formulation and analysis of a three-dimensional finite element implementation for adhesive contact at the nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formulation and analysis of a three-dimensional finite element implementation for adhesive contact-dimensional finite element model for nanoscale contact problems with strong adhesion is presented. The contact the BF formulation but loses accuracy as the strength of adhesion increases. The model has applications

  2. Single-polymer `flyfishing' effect for nanoscale motors and machines: an exact worm-like-chain model study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Weizhu

    Single-polymer `flyfishing' effect for nanoscale motors and machines: an exact worm University of Singapore, Singapore 119076 Single-polymer control effects are abundant in biological motors/machines for nanotechnology. Understanding motor-relevant polymer effects in a general

  3. Imaging and measuring the biophysical properties of Fc gamma receptors on single macrophages using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Mi; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 ; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Nanoscale cellular ultra-structures of macrophages were observed. •The binding affinities of Fc?Rs were measured directly on macrophages. •The nanoscale distributions of Fc?Rs were mapped on macrophages. -- Abstract: Fc gamma receptors (Fc?R), widely expressed on effector cells (e.g., NK cells, macrophages), play an important role in clinical cancer immunotherapy. The binding of Fc?Rs to the Fc portions of antibodies that are attached to the target cells can activate the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) killing mechanism which leads to the lysis of target cells. In this work, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to observe the cellular ultra-structures and measure the biophysical properties (affinity and distribution) of Fc?Rs on single macrophages in aqueous environments. AFM imaging was used to obtain the topographies of macrophages, revealing the nanoscale cellular fine structures. For molecular interaction recognition, antibody molecules were attached onto AFM tips via a heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) crosslinker. With AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy, the binding affinities of Fc?Rs were quantitatively measured on single macrophages. Adhesion force mapping method was used to localize the Fc?Rs, revealing the nanoscale distribution of Fc?Rs on local areas of macrophages. The experimental results can improve our understanding of Fc?Rs on macrophages; the established approach will facilitate further research on physiological activities involved in antibody-based immunotherapy.

  4. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  5. Chemical Cleaning Program Review

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Chemical Cleaning Program Review Neil Davis Deputy Program Manager Waste Removal & Tank Closure July 29, 2009 SRR-STI-2009-00464 2 Contents Regulatory drivers Process overview...

  6. Apparatus for chemical synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-05-10

    A method and apparatus for forming a chemical hydride is described and which includes a pseudo-plasma-electrolysis reactor which is operable to receive a solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further includes a cathode and a movable anode, and wherein the anode is moved into and out of fluidic, ohmic electrical contact with the solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further, when energized produces an oxygen plasma which facilitates the formation of a chemical hydride in the solution.

  7. Nano-scale electron bunching in laser-triggered ionization injection in plasma accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, X L; Li, F; Wan, Y; Wu, Y P; Hua, J F; Pai, C -H; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2015-01-01

    Ionization injection is attractive as a controllable injection scheme for generating high quality electron beams using plasma-based wakefield acceleration. Due to the phase dependent tunneling ionization rate and the trapping dynamics within a nonlinear wake, the discrete injection of electrons within the wake is nonlinearly mapped to discrete final phase space structure of the beam at the location where the electrons are trapped. This phenomenon is theoretically analyzed and examined by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations which show that three dimensional effects limit the wave number of the modulation to between $> 2k_0$ and about $5k_0$, where $k_0$ is the wavenumber of the injection laser. Such a nano-scale bunched beam can be diagnosed through coherent transition radiation upon its exit from the plasma and may find use in generating high-power ultraviolet radiation upon passage through a resonant undulator.

  8. Hybrid Solar Cells with Prescribed Nanoscale Morphologies Based onHyperbranched Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gur, Ilan; Fromer, Neil A.; Chen, Chih-Ping; Kanaras, AntoniosG.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-09-09

    In recent years, the search to develop large-area solar cells at low cost has led to research on photovoltaic (PV) systems based on nanocomposites containing conjugated polymers. These composite films can be synthesized and processed at lower costs and with greater versatility than the solid state inorganic semiconductors that comprise today's solar cells. However, the best nanocomposite solar cells are based on a complex architecture, consisting of a fine blend of interpenetrating and percolating donor and acceptor materials. Cell performance is strongly dependent on blend morphology, and solution-based fabrication techniques often result in uncontrolled and irreproducible blends, whose composite morphologies are difficult to characterize accurately. Here we incorporate 3-dimensional hyper-branched colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals in solution-processed hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells, yielding reproducible and controlled nanoscale morphology.

  9. Micro- and Nanoscale Heat Transfer in Femtosecond Laser Processing of Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuwen; Chen, J K

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser material processing has received significant attention due to a growing need for the fabrication of miniaturized devices at micro- and nanoscales. The traditional phenomenological laws, such as Fourier's law of heat conduction, are challenged in the microscale regime and a hyperbolic or dual phase lag model should be employed. During ultrafast laser interaction with metal, the electrons and lattices are not in equilibrium. Various two-temperature models that can be used to describe the nonequilibrium heat transfer are presented. A semi-classical two-step heating model to investigate thermal transport in metals caused by ultrashort laser heating is also presented. The main difference between the semiclassical and the phenomenological two-temperature models is that the former includes the effects of electron drifting, which could result in significantly different electron and lattice temperature response from the latter for higher-intensity and shorter-pulse laser heating. Under higher laser flu...

  10. An atomistic methodology of energy release rate for graphene at nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhen; Lee, James D., E-mail: jdlee@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, the George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Wang, Xianqiao [College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2014-03-21

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms packed into a honeycomb architecture, serving as a fundamental building block for electric devices. Understanding the fracture mechanism of graphene under various conditions is crucial for tailoring the electrical and mechanical properties of graphene-based devices at atomic scale. Although most of the fracture mechanics concepts, such as stress intensity factors, are not applicable in molecular dynamics simulation, energy release rate still remains to be a feasible and crucial physical quantity to characterize the fracture mechanical property of materials at nanoscale. This work introduces an atomistic simulation methodology, based on the energy release rate, as a tool to unveil the fracture mechanism of graphene at nanoscale. This methodology can be easily extended to any atomistic material system. We have investigated both opening mode and mixed mode at different temperatures. Simulation results show that the critical energy release rate of graphene is independent of initial crack length at low temperature. Graphene with inclined pre-crack possesses higher fracture strength and fracture deformation but smaller critical energy release rate compared with the graphene with vertical pre-crack. Owing to its anisotropy, graphene with armchair chirality always has greater critical energy release rate than graphene with zigzag chirality. The increase of temperature leads to the reduction of fracture strength, fracture deformation, and the critical energy release rate of graphene. Also, higher temperature brings higher randomness of energy release rate of graphene under a variety of predefined crack lengths. The energy release rate is independent of the strain rate as long as the strain rate is small enough.

  11. Imaging of semiconductors using a flying laser spot scanning system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Thomas William

    1982-01-01

    in silicon p-n junctions was a direct result of this research. Verification of the experimental findings include analysis using other characterization techniques such as X-ray topo- graphy, electrical testing and preferential chemical etching... Image (I. R. Radiation) . . 22 Flying Spot Scanner Photo Image (Visible Radiation) . 23 15 Photo Image Showing Crystal Defects 24 16 Sirtl Etch Photomicrograph of Lattice Crystal Defects 25 17 Photo Image Showing Laser Induced Lifetime Changes 26...

  12. Synthesis of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-12-01

    Since the industrial revolution, detection and monitoring of toxic matter, chemical wastes, and air pollutants has become an important environmental issue. Thus, it leads to the development of chemical sensors for various environmental applications. The recent disastrous oil spills over the near-surface of ocean due to the offshore drilling emphasize the use of chemical sensors for prevention and monitoring of the processes that might lead to these mishaps.1, 2 Chemical sensors operated on a simple principle that the sensing platform undergoes a detectable change when exposed to the target substance to be sensed. Among all the types of chemical sensors, solid state gas sensors have attracted a great deal of attention due to their advantages such as high sensitivity, greater selectivity, portability, high stability and low cost.3, 4 Especially, semiconducting metal oxides such as SnO2, TiO2, and WO3 have been widely used as the active sensing platforms in solid state gas sensors.5 For the enhanced properties of solid state gas sensors, finding new sensing materials or development of existing materials will be needed. Thus, nanostructured materials such as nanotubes,6-8 nanowires,9-11 nanorods,12-15 nanobelts,16, 17 and nano-scale thin films18-23 have been synthesized and studied for chemical sensing applications.

  13. Nanodiamond Landmarks for Subcellular Multimodal Optical and Electron Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zurbuchen, Mark A; Kohan, Sirus A; Leung, Belinda; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need for biolabels that can be used in both optical and electron microscopies, are non-cytotoxic, and do not photobleach. Such biolabels could enable targeted nanoscale imaging of sub-cellular structures, and help to establish correlations between conjugation-delivered biomolecules and function. Here we demonstrate a subcellular multi-modal imaging methodology that enables localization of inert particulate probes, consisting of nanodiamonds having fluorescent nitrogen-vacancy centers. These are functionalized to target specific structures, and are observable by both optical and electron microscopies. Nanodiamonds targeted to the nuclear pore complex are rapidly localized in electron-microscopy diffraction mode to enable "zooming-in" to regions of interest for detailed structural investigations. Optical microscopies reveal nanodiamonds for in-vitro tracking or uptake-confirmation. The approach is general, works down to the single nanodiamond level, and can leverage the unique capabilities of...

  14. Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Simonson, Robert J. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2010-09-21

    A non-planar, tortuous path chemical preconcentrator has a high internal surface area having a heatable sorptive coating that can be used to selectively collect and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a sorptive support structure having a tortuous flow path. The tortuosity provides repeated twists, turns, and bends to the flow, thereby increasing the interfacial contact between sample fluid stream and the sorptive material. The tortuous path also provides more opportunities for desorption and readsorption of volatile species. Further, the thermal efficiency of the tortuous path chemical preconcentrator is comparable or superior to the prior non-planar chemical preconcentrator. Finally, the tortuosity can be varied in different directions to optimize flow rates during the adsorption and desorption phases of operation of the preconcentrator.

  15. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  16. PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    1 PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering Bylaws Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering College of Engineering and Architecture Approved by Voiland School facultyD Chemical Engineering, MS Chemical Engineering B. Discipline: Edgar, et al.1 provide a succinct description

  17. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging and characterization of strain in silicon-on-insulator nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Gang; Moutanabbir, Oussama; Reiche, Manfred; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian

    2014-12-06

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CDI) has emerged in the last decade as a promising high resolution lens-less imaging approach for the characterization of various samples. It has made significant technical progress through developments in source, algorithm and imaging methodologies thus enabling important scientific breakthroughs in a broad range of disciplines. In this report, we will introduce the principles of forward scattering CDI and Bragg geometry CDI (BCDI), with an emphasis on the latter. BCDI exploits the ultra-high sensitivity of the diffraction pattern to the distortions of crystalline lattice. Its ability of imaging strain on the nanometer scale in three dimensions is highly novel. We will present the latest progress on the application of BCDI in investigating the strain relaxation behavior in nanoscale patterned strained silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) materials, aiming to understand and engineer strain for the design and implementation of new generation semiconductor devices.

  18. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging and characterization of strain in silicon-on-insulator nanostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiong, Gang; Moutanabbir, Oussama; Reiche, Manfred; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian

    2014-12-06

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CDI) has emerged in the last decade as a promising high resolution lens-less imaging approach for the characterization of various samples. It has made significant technical progress through developments in source, algorithm and imaging methodologies thus enabling important scientific breakthroughs in a broad range of disciplines. In this report, we will introduce the principles of forward scattering CDI and Bragg geometry CDI (BCDI), with an emphasis on the latter. BCDI exploits the ultra-high sensitivity of the diffraction pattern to the distortions of crystalline lattice. Its ability of imaging strain on the nanometer scale in three dimensionsmore »is highly novel. We will present the latest progress on the application of BCDI in investigating the strain relaxation behavior in nanoscale patterned strained silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) materials, aiming to understand and engineer strain for the design and implementation of new generation semiconductor devices.« less

  19. Mechanical-chemical coupling and self-organization in mudstones.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.

    2010-06-01

    Shales and other mudstones are the most abundant rock types in sedimentary basins, yet have received comparatively little attention. Common as hydrocarbon seals, these are increasingly being targeted as unconventional gas reservoirs, caprocks for CO{sub 2} sequestration, and storage repositories for waste. The small pore and grain size, large specific surface areas, and clay mineral structures lend themselves to rapid reaction rates accompanying changes in stress, pressure, temperature and chemical conditions. Under far from equilibrium conditions, mudrocks display a variety of spatio-temporal self-organized phenomena arising from the nonlinear coupling of mechanics with chemistry. Beginning with a detailed examination of nano-scale pore network structures in mudstones, we discuss the dynamics behind such self-organized phenomena as pressure solitons, chemically-induced flow self focusing and permeability transients, localized compaction, time dependent well-bore failure, and oscillatory osmotic fluxes as they occur in clay-bearing sediments. Examples are draw from experiments, numerical simulation, and the field. These phenomena bear on the ability of these rocks to serve as containment barriers.

  20. Proton-Conducting Films of Nanoscale Ribbons Formed by Exfoliation of the Layer Perovskite H2SrTa2O7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proton-Conducting Films of Nanoscale Ribbons Formed by Exfoliation of the Layer Perovskite H2SrTa2OVised Manuscript ReceiVed NoVember 6, 2007 Thin films of nanoscale ribbons derived from the layer perovskite H2Sr cell parameters (3.98 ( 0.05 Å) to H2SrTa2O7 (3.87 ( 0.02 Å) and the defect perovskite SrTa2O6 (3

  1. Chemical process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  2. A Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Nikhil; Boyd, Sarah; Somani, Ajay; Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01

    Aspects in Semiconductor Manufacturing. Proceed- ings of thefrom semiconductor manufacturing processes. EHS AssessmentM. Energy in chemical manufacturing processes: Gate-to-gate

  3. Imaging Scatterometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal

    2015-01-01

    We present an optical metrology system for characterization of topography of micro/nano-structures on a surface or embedded in a semi-transparent material. Based on the principles of scatterometry, where the intensity of scattered light is used as a 'fingerprint' to reconstruct a surface, this new imaging scatterometer can easily find areas of interest on the cm scale and measure multiple segments simultaneously. The imaging scatterometer measures structural features, such as height, width, and sidewall angle of a grating locally on few um2 areas with nm resolution. We demonstrate two imaging scatterometers, one built into an optical microscope and one in a split configuration. The two scatterometers are targeted characterization of mm2 and cm2 areas, respectively, and both setups are validated using nano-textured samples.

  4. Molding the flow of light on the nanoscale: from vortex nanogears to phase-operated plasmonic machinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boriskina, Svetlana V; 10.1039/C1NR11406A

    2011-01-01

    Efficient delivery of light into nanoscale volumes by converting free photons into localized charge-density oscillations (surface plasmons) enables technological innovation in various fields from biosensing to photovoltaics and quantum computing. Conventional plasmonic nanostructures are designed as nanoscale analogs of radioantennas and waveguides. Here, we discuss an alternative approach for plasmonic nanocircuit engineering that is based on molding the optical powerflow through 'vortex nanogears' around a landscape of local phase singularities 'pinned' to plasmonic nanostructures. We show that coupling of several vortex nanogears into transmission-like structures results in dramatic optical effects, which can be explained by invoking a hydrodynamic analogy of the 'photon fluid'. The new concept of vortex nanogear transmissions (VNTs) provides new design principles for the development of complex multi-functional phase-operated photonics machinery and, therefore, generates unique opportunities for light gene...

  5. Stripe-like nanoscale structural phase separation in superconducting BaPb1-xBixO3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Zhang, Y.; Parra, C.; Manoharan, H. C.; Beasley, M. R.; Geballe, T. H.; Kramer, M. J.; Fisher, I. R.

    2015-09-16

    The phase diagram of BaPb1-xBixO3 exhibits a superconducting “dome” in the proximity of a charge density wave phase. For the superconducting compositions, the material coexists as two structural polymorphs. Here we show, via high resolution transmission electron microscopy, that the structural dimorphism is accommodated in the form of partially disordered nanoscale stripes. Identification of the morphology of the nanoscale structural phase separation enables determination of the associated length scales, which we compare to the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length. Thus, we find that the maximum Tc occurs when the superconducting coherence length matches the width of the partially disordered stripes, implying amore »connection between the structural phase separation and the shape of the superconducting dome.« less

  6. ITP Chemicals: Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A Powerful Tool for Identifying Process Inefficiencies in the U.S. Chemical Industry, Industrial Technologies Program, DRAFT Summary...

  7. Neutron Imaging at ORNL: Challenges and Opportunities | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron Imaging at ORNL: Challenges and Opportunities Jul 15 2015 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM Hassina Bilheux, Chemical and Engineering Materials Division Celebrating the Achievements of...

  8. Safety Issues Chemical Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Issues · Chemical Storage ·Store in compatible containers that are in good condition to store separately. #12;Safety Issues · Flammable liquid storage -Store bulk quantities in flammable storage cabinets -UL approved Flammable Storage Refrigerators are required for cold storage · Provide

  9. Fuzzy Chemical Abstract Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syropoulos, Apostolos

    2009-01-01

    Fuzzy set theory opens new vistas in computability theory and here I show this by defining a new computational metaphor--the fuzzy chemical metaphor. This metaphor is an extension of the chemical metaphor. In particular, I introduce the idea of a state of a system as a solution of fuzzy molecules, that is molecules that are not just different but rather similar, that react according to a set of fuzzy reaction rules. These notions become precise by introducing fuzzy labeled transition systems. Solutions of fuzzy molecules and fuzzy reaction rules are used to define the general notion of a fuzzy chemical abstract machine, which is a {\\em realization} of the fuzzy chemical metaphor. Based on the idea that these machines can be used to describe the operational semantics of process calculi and algebras that include fuzziness as a fundamental property, I present a toy calculus that is a fuzzy equivalent of the $\\pi$-calculus.

  10. Chemical Processing White Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    hydrogen from hydrocarbon mixtures, and propylene from propane, and if scaled up, could cut the cost fibers as a platform," says Sankar Nair, a professor in the School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

  11. 219-S chemical compatibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOODWIN, L.D.

    1999-08-31

    This document consists of tables of the materials that make up the ''wetted'' parts of the 219-S waste handling facility and a combination of manufacturer lists of chemicals that are not recommended.

  12. Chemical Hygiene Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Chemical Hygiene Plan Michigan State University Environmental Health and Safety Engineering 2014 #12;ii Michigan State University Chemical Hygiene Plan Table of Contents 1.0 SCOPE.................................................................................................... 1 1.4 HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL DEFINITIONS

  13. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    IUPAC) or the Chemical Abstracts Service (CA,S} -'lee ofTerms CAS Number Chemical Abstract Service registry number,is indicated. CAS Number: Chemical Abstract Service registry

  14. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Program of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Program of Study Research Facilities Financial Aid Applying Correspondence The Department of Chemical Engineering and Biological Engineering has well-established programs at both area of chemical engineering and include both fundamental and applied topics. The Department has

  15. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiu, Anne; Sturmfels, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    source are credited. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networksalgorithms for minimal siphons in Petri nets based on placewe characterize the minimal siphons of a chemical reaction

  16. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  17. Magnetic fields, spots and weather in chemically peculiar stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Kochukhov

    2007-11-30

    New observational techniques and sophisticated modelling methods has led to dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of the interplay between the surface magnetism, atomic diffusion and atmospheric dynamics in chemically peculiar stars. Magnetic Doppler images, constructed using spectropolarimetric observations of Ap stars in all four Stokes parameters, reveal the presence of small-scale field topologies. Abundance Doppler mapping has been perfected to the level where distributions of many different chemical elements can be deduced self-consistently for one star. The inferred chemical spot structures are diverse and do not always trace underlying magnetic field geometry. Moreover, horizontal chemical inhomogeneities are discovered in non-magnetic CP stars and evolving chemical spots are observed for the first time in the bright mercury-manganese star alpha And. These results show that in addition to magnetic fields, another important non-magnetic structure formation mechanism acts in CP stars.

  18. Nuclear Imaging | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Jefferson Lab's Radiation Detector and Imaging Group Members of Jefferson Lab's Radiation Detector & Medical Imaging Group design and build unique imaging devices based on...

  19. Chemical Organization Theory as a Theoretical Base for Chemical Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittrich, Peter

    Chemical Organization Theory as a Theoretical Base for Chemical Computing NAOKI MATSUMARU, FLORIAN-07743 Jena, Germany http://www.minet.uni-jena.de/csb/ Submitted 14 November 2005 In chemical computing- gramming chemical systems a theoretical method to cope with that emergent behavior is desired

  20. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    ) Principles of probability and statistics, random variables and random functions. Application to chemical) CHE 442 Chemical Reactor Analysis (3, Fa) Basic concepts of chemical kinetics and chemical reactor to Separation Pro- cesses (3, Sp) Use of equilibrium phase relations and principles of material and energy

  1. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Introduction to Separation Processes (3, Sp) Use of equilibrium phase relations and principles of material by petition only. 405 Applications of Probability and Statistics for Chemical Engineers (3, Fa) Principles Chemical Reactor Analysis (3, Fa) Basic concepts of chemical kinetics and chemical reactor design

  2. Chemical Engineering Is Chemical Engineering right for me?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Chemical Engineering Is Chemical Engineering right for me? If you are interested in the uses and processes surrounding the engineering of new and raw materials, a degree in Chemical Engineering may be well suited to you. The Chemical Engineering degree programme will focus on the development of products

  3. Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder in a slit channel: Lubrication theory versus molecular dynamics analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir M. Rahmani; Yang Shao; Mehlam Jupiterwala; Carlos E. Colosqui

    2015-04-13

    Plane Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder that is arbitrarily confined (i.e., symmetrically or asymmetrically confined) in a slit channel is studied via hydrodynamic lubrication theory and molecular dynamics simulations, considering cases where the cylinder remains static or undergoes thermal motion. Lubrication theory predictions for the drag force and volumetric flow rate are in close agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of flows having molecularly thin lubrication gaps, despite the presence of significant structural forces induced by the crystalline structure of the modeled solid. While the maximum drag force is observed in symmetric confinement, i.e., when the cylinder is equidistant from both channel walls, the drag decays significantly as the cylinder moves away from the channel centerline and approaches a wall. Hence, significant reductions in the mean drag force on the cylinder and hydraulic resistance of the channel can be observed when thermal motion induces random off-center displacements. Analytical expressions and numerical results in this work provide useful insights into the hydrodynamics of colloidal solids and macromolecules in confinement.

  4. Nanoscale transport of phonons: Dimensionality, subdiffusion, molecular damping, and interference effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walczak, Kamil; Yerkes, Kirk L.

    2014-05-07

    We examine heat transport carried by acoustic phonons in the systems composed of nanoscale chains of masses coupled to two thermal baths of different temperatures. Thermal conductance is obtained by using linearized Landauer-type formula for heat flux with phonon transmission probability calculated within atomistic Green's functions (AGF) method. AGF formalism is extended onto dissipative chains of masses with harmonic coupling beyond nearest-neighbor approximation, while atomistic description of heat reservoirs is also included into computational scheme. In particular, the phonon lifetimes and the phonon frequency shifts are discussed for harmonic lattices of different dimensions. Further, resonant structure of phonon transmission spectrum is analyzed with respect to reservoir-induced effects, molecular damping, and mass-to-mass harmonic coupling. Analysis of transmission zeros (antiresonances) and their accompanied Fano-shape resonances are discussed as a result of interference effects between different vibrational modes. Finally, we also predict subdiffusive transport regime for low-frequency ballistic phonons propagated along a linear chain of harmonically coupled masses.

  5. Novel approaches to tailor and tune light-matter interactions at the nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kort-Kamp, W J M

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we propose new, versatile schemes to control light-matter interactions at the nanoscale. In the first part of the thesis, we envisage a new class of plasmonic cloaks made of magneto-optical (MO) materials. We demonstrate that the application of a uniform magnetic field B in these cloaks may not only switch on and off the cloaking mechanism, but also mitigate the electromagnetic (EM) absorption. We also prove that the scattered field profile can be effectively controlled by changing B. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the study of light-matter interactions mediated by fluctuations of the vacuum EM field. Firstly, we demonstrate that the Purcell effect can be effectively suppressed for an excited atom near a cloaking device. Furthermore, the decay rate of a quantum emitter near a graphene-coated wall under the influence of an external magnetic field is studied. We show that the MO properties of graphene strongly affect the atomic lifetime and that B allows for an unprecedented control ...

  6. Theory of signal and noise in double-gated nanoscale electronic pH sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Go, Jonghyun; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2012-08-01

    The maximum sensitivity of classical nanowire (NW)-based pH sensors is defined by the Nernst limit of 59 mV/pH. For typical noise levels in ultra-small single-gated nanowire sensors, the signal-to-noise ratio is often not sufficient to resolve pH changes necessary for a broad range of applications. Recently, a new class of double-gated devices was demonstrated to offer apparent 'super-Nernstian' response (>59 mV/pH) by amplifying the original pH signal through innovative biasing schemes. However, the pH-sensitivity of these nanoscale devices as a function of biasing configurations, number of electrodes, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) remains poorly understood. Even the basic question such as 'Do double-gated sensors actually resolve smaller changes in pH compared to conventional single-gated sensors in the presence of various sources of noise?' remains unanswered. In this article, we provide a comprehensive numerical and analytical theory of signal and noise of double-gated pH sensors to conclude that, while the theoretical lower limit of pH-resolution does not improve for double-gated sensors, this new class of sensors does improve the (instrument-limited) pH resolution.

  7. Modular strategies for PET imaging agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, , J.M.

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, modular and simplified chemical and biological strategies have been developed for the synthesis and implementation of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers. New developments in bioconjugation and synthetic methodologies, in combination with advances in macromolecular delivery systems and gene-expression imaging, reflect a need to reduce radiosynthesis burden in order to accelerate imaging agent development. These new approaches, which are often mindful of existing infrastructure and available resources, are anticipated to provide a more approachable entry point for researchers interested in using PET to translate in vitro research to in vivo imaging.

  8. Imaging bolometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wurden, Glen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

  9. Imaging bolometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wurden, G.A.

    1999-01-19

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

  10. 11 August 2000 Z .Chemical Physics Letters 326 2000 110

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    11 August 2000 Z .Chemical Physics Letters 326 2000 1­10 www.elsevier.nlrlocatercplett Imaging-2025, USA Received 20 April 2000; in final form 7 June 2000 The memory of Kent R. Wilson, one of whose many-frequency plane. We illustrate this for the rovibronic coherence of molecular iodine in the gas phase. q 2000

  11. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, S.P.

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser is disclosed for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 {micro}m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (ca. 200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments. 4 figs.

  12. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 .mu.m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (.about.200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments.

  13. Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Chemical Engineering and Materials Science COLLEGE of ENGINEERING DepartmentofChemicalEngineering-credit EDGE Engineering Entrepreneur Certificate Program is a great addition to a chemical engineering t engineering.wayne.edu/che #12;What is chemical engineering? Imagine saving the lives of pediatric patients

  14. Digital Compressive Quantitation and Hyperspectral Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-07-25

    the distance between the two transfer lenses is 2f (the location of the mirror in the ..... Panel (d) of Fig. 2 compares 11 prepared mixtures of hexanes and 1-hexene, with .... chemical image of plant tissue.15 However, the latter study obtained ...

  15. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will...

  16. Local Optical Spectroscopies for Subnanometer Spatial Resolution Chemical Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20

    The evanescently coupled photon scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) have special requirements in terms of stability and optical access. We have made substantial improvements to the stability, resolution, and noise floor of our custom-built visible-photon STM, and will translate these advances to our infrared instrument. Double vibration isolation of the STM base with a damping system achieved increased rigidity, giving high tunneling junction stability for long-duration and high-power illumination. Light frequency modulation with an optical chopper and phase-sensitive detection now enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the tunneling junction during irradiation.

  17. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy measurements. Future applications of the SR-FTIR-based microfluidics approach may help explain why some bacteria maintain biofilms in given...

  18. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chronic bacterial infections and beneficial processes such as those enabling biofuel production by microbes. A cartoon of the open-channel microfluidic platform used with SR-FTIR...

  19. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2RateCaseElementsOxideTransformations

  20. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on

  1. Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission,TextitSciTechin Complex Interfacial Systems. Final

  2. Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission,TextitSciTechin Complex Interfacial Systems. Finalin

  3. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton DeliveryRadioactiveRare | NationalEnvironment

  4. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton DeliveryRadioactiveRare |

  5. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-24

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  6. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  7. Novel approaches to tailor and tune light-matter interactions at the nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. M. Kort-Kamp

    2015-05-10

    In this thesis we propose new, versatile schemes to control light-matter interactions at the nanoscale. In the first part of the thesis, we envisage a new class of plasmonic cloaks made of magneto-optical (MO) materials. We demonstrate that the application of a uniform magnetic field B in these cloaks may not only switch on and off the cloaking mechanism, but also mitigate the electromagnetic (EM) absorption. We also prove that the scattered field profile can be effectively controlled by changing B. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the study of light-matter interactions mediated by fluctuations of the vacuum EM field. Firstly, we demonstrate that the Purcell effect can be effectively suppressed for an excited atom near a cloaking device. Furthermore, the decay rate of a quantum emitter near a graphene-coated wall under the influence of an external magnetic field is studied. We show that the MO properties of graphene strongly affect the atomic lifetime and that B allows for an unprecedented control of the decay channels of the system. In addition, we discuss the dispersive interaction between an atom and suspended graphene in a magnetic field. For large atom-graphene separations and low temperatures we show that the interaction energy is a quantized function of B. Besides, we show that at room temperature, thermal effects must be taken into account even in the extreme near-field regime. Finally, the third part of the thesis deals with the study of near-field heat transfer. We analyze the energy transfered from a semi-infinite medium to a composite sphere made of metallic inclusions embedded in a dielectric host medium. We show that the heat transfer can be strongly enhanced at the percolation phase transition. We show that our results apply for different effective medium models and are robust against changes in the inclusions' shape and materials.

  8. Nanoscale topographic pattern formation on Kr{sup +}-bombarded germanium surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkinson, Joy C.; Madi, Charbel S.; Aziz, Michael J. [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    The nanoscale pattern formation of Ge surfaces uniformly irradiated by Kr{sup +} ions was studied in a low-contamination environment at ion energies of 250 and 500 eV and at angles of 0 Degree-Sign through 80 Degree-Sign . The authors present a phase diagram of domains of pattern formation occurring as these two control parameters are varied. The results are insensitive to ion energy over the range covered by the experiments. Flat surfaces are stable from normal incidence up to an incidence angle of {theta} = 55 Degree-Sign from normal. At higher angles, the surface is linearly unstable to the formation of parallel-mode ripples, in which the wave vector is parallel to the projection of the ion beam on the surface. For {theta} {>=} 75 Degree-Sign the authors observe perpendicular-mode ripples, in which the wave vector is perpendicular to the ion beam. This behavior is qualitatively similar to those of Madi et al. for Ar{sup +}-irradiated Si but is inconsistent with those of Ziberi et al. for Kr{sup +}-irradiated Ge. The existence of a window of stability is qualitatively inconsistent with a theory based on sputter erosion [R. M. Bradley and J. M. Harper, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 6, 2390 (1988)] and qualitatively consistent with a model of ion impact-induced mass redistribution [G. Carter and V. Vishnyakov, Phys. Rev. B 54, 17647 (1996)] as well as a crater function theory incorporating both effects [S. A. Norris et al., Nat. Commun. 2, 276 (2011)]. The critical transition angle between stable and rippled surfaces occurs 10 Degree-Sign -15 Degree-Sign above the value of 45 Degree-Sign predicted by the mass redistribution model.

  9. RSNA 2002: Image Fusion Image Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelizzari, Charles A.

    RSNA 2002: Image Fusion Image Fusion: Introduction to the Technology Charles A. Pelizzari, Ph.D. Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology The University of Chicago #12;RSNA 2002: Image Fusion "Fusion and limitations) ·Where do we need to go? (future directions) #12;RSNA 2002: Image Fusion Terminology

  10. Image Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower,PrincipalIdaho NationalA pIlyaImage

  11. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-05-25

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  12. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  13. Optical gradient force nano-imaging and -spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Honghua U

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale forces play an important role in different scanning probe microscopies, most notably atomic force microscopy (AFM). In contrast, in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) a light-induced coupled local optical polarization between tip and sample is typically detected by scattering to the far field. Measurements of the optical gradient force associated with that optical near-field excitation would offer a novel optical scanning probe modality. Here we provide a generalized theory of optical gradient force nano-imaging and -spectroscopy. We quantify magnitude and distance dependence of the optical gradient force and its spectral response. We show that the optical gradient force is dispersive for single particle electronic and vibrational resonances, distinct from recent claims of its experimental observation. In contrast, the force can be absorptive for collective resonances. We provide a guidance for its measurements and distinction from competing processes such as thermal expansion.

  14. Subdiffraction-limited quantum imaging within a living cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael A. Taylor; Jiri Janousek; Vincent Daria; Joachim Knittel; Boris Hage; Hans-A. Bachor; Warwick P. Bowen

    2014-02-05

    We report both sub-diffraction-limited quantum metrology and quantum enhanced spatial resolution for the first time in a biological context. Nanoparticles are tracked with quantum correlated light as they diffuse through an extended region of a living cell in a quantum enhanced photonic force microscope. This allows spatial structure within the cell to be mapped at length scales down to 10 nm. Control experiments in water show a 14% resolution enhancement compared to experiments with coherent light. Our results confirm the longstanding prediction that quantum correlated light can enhance spatial resolution at the nanoscale and in biology. Combined with state-of-the-art quantum light sources, this technique provides a path towards an order of magnitude improvement in resolution over similar classical imaging techniques.

  15. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Graduation Checklist Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Graduation Checklist Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering College of Engineering For Students Graduating in Calendar Year 2014 (Co-op students graduating in Calendar Year 2015

  16. Appendix H. Chemicals Appendix H. Chemicals H-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation materials), asbestos

  17. Appendix B: Chemicals Appendix B: Chemicals B-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation

  18. Appendix G. Chemicals Appendix G. Chemicals G-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation materials), asbestos

  19. Hetero-twin formation during growth of nano-scale Al-TiN composites - experimental and DFT studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharyya, Dhriti [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Xiang - Yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoagland, Richard G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Genc, A [MSE, OSU; Fraser, H L [MSE, OSU

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that high stacking fault energy metals such as Al do not form either growth twins or mechanical twins easily. Although mechanical twins in nanocrystalline Al have been observed under certain conditions, growth twins have never been observed. In this work, the authors report for the first time, through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), that Al layers, when deposited on TiN layers, tend to grow in a twin relationship to both the TiN layer and the underlying Al layer. The TiN layers assume the orientation of the Al layers below. Calculations using density functional theory (DFT) show that nitrogen termination in the {l_brace}111{r_brace} growth plane of the TiN layers favors the growth of twin oriented Al layers over these TiN layers. This finding provides a way to create a twin-modulated structure in Al with the inclusion of intermediate nm-scale layer of an ionic solid such as TiN. Al metal is resistant to twinning, as it has a high stacking fault energy (SFE) of > 150 mJ/m. Although twins have been observed in nano-scale grains of Al, and predicted by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in conditions when the nanoscale grains are plastically deformed, no process or phenomenon has been reported yet in which the deposition of an intermediate layer of a different material phase causes the subsequent layer of Al to be deposited in the twin orientation. The authors show in this paper that it is possible to form Al layers in twin orientation to each other across polar TiN layers, if these are grown so that both the Al and TiN layers have a {l_brace}111{r_brace} surface as their growth front. Since the deposition of Al and TiN layers is used in the formation of diffusion barriers, and the mechanical properties of these nanoscale multilayers are also seen to be exceptional, it is important to investigate and understand their structure at the nanometer length scale, and thence to be able to control it. Moreover, these findings point out a method of introducing nano-scale twins in high SFE materials in general, and can potentially improve the properties of nano-layered materials.

  20. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirth, Brian

    2015-04-08

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to particular, the interfacial structure of embedded nanoscale precipitates will be evaluated by electronic- and atomic-scale modeling methods, and the efficiency of the validated interfaces for trapping point defects will next be evaluated by atomic-scale modeling (e.g., determining the sink strength of the precipitates), addressing key questions related to the optimal interface characteristics to attract point defects and enhance their recombination. Kinetic models will also be developed to simulate microstructural evolution of the nanoscale features and irradiation produced defect clusters, and compared with observed microstructural changes.

  1. Fabrication of Rare Earth-Doped Transparent Glass Ceramic Optical Fibers by Modified Chemical Vapor Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanc, Wilfried; Nguyen, Luan; Bhaktha, S N B; Sebbah, Patrick; Pal, Bishnu P; Dussardier, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Rare earth (RE) doped silica-based optical fibers with transparent glass ceramic (TGC) core was fabricated through the well-known modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process without going through the commonly used stage of post-ceramming. The main characteristics of the RE-doped oxyde nanoparticles namely, their density and mean diameter in the fibers are dictated by the concentration of alkaline earth element used as phase separating agent. Magnesium and erbium co-doped fibers were fabricated. Optical transmission in term of loss due to scattering as well as some spectroscopic characteristics of the erbium ions was studied. For low Mg content, nano-scale particles could be grown with and relatively low scattering losses were obtained, whereas large Mg-content causes the growth of larger particles resulting in much higher loss. However in the latter case, certain interesting alteration of the spectroscopic properties of the erbium ions were observed. These initial studies should be useful in incorporati...

  2. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  3. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    Radioactive Hazardous or Other Location LBL On-Site Bldgs.hazardous chemicals usedin the laboratory: and (v} The locationhazardous chemicals are present: and. (irl}The location and

  4. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  5. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  6. Programmability of Chemical Reaction Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Programmability of Chemical Reaction Networks Matthew Cook1 , David Soloveichik2 , Erik Winfree2 Chemical Reaction Networks (SCRNs), a for- mal model that considers a set of chemical reactions acting Logic Circuits, Vector Addition Systems, Petri Nets, Gate Implementability, Primitive Recursive

  7. Nonlinear chemical dynamics Francesc Sagusa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    Nonlinear chemical dynamics Francesc Saguésa and Irving R. Epsteinb a Departament de Química Física March 2003 The interdisciplinary field of nonlinear chemical dynamics has grown significantly in breadth an overview of some of the key results of nonlinear chemical dynamics, with emphasis on those areas most

  8. CHEMICAL LABORATORY SAFETY AND METHODOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    CHEMICAL LABORATORY SAFETY AND METHODOLOGY MANUAL August 2013 #12;ii Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince-Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 6472 Biological the safe use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

  9. Qualitative Theory and Chemical Explanation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisberg, Michael

    Abstract Roald Hoffmann and other theorists claim that we we ought to use highly idealized chemical modelsQualitative Theory and Chemical Explanation Michael Weisberg Stanford University February 15, 2003 ("qualitative models") in order to in- crease our understanding of chemical phenomena, even though other models

  10. 48 Chemical Engineering Education Incorporating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hesketh, Robert

    48 Chemical Engineering Education Incorporating GREEN ENGINEERING Into a Material and Energy prob- lems in chemical engineering. Problems of the type that can be used to motivate the student-mail: wilkes@umich.edu), Chemical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

  11. Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopyof Chemical Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zewail, Ahmed

    Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopyof Chemical Reactions - Joseph L. Kneeand AhmedH. Zewail California of chemical physics is to understand how chemi- cal reactions complete their journey from reactants to prod at the molecular level. The making of new bonds (and the breaking of old ones) in elementary chemical reactions

  12. Effects and Mechanisms of Mechanical Activation on Hydrogen Sorption/ Desorption of Nanoscale Lithium Nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, Leon, L.; Yang, Gary, Z.; Crosby, Kyle; Wwan, Xufei. Zhong, Yang; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Osborn, William; Hu, Jianzhi; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2012-04-26

    The objective of this project is to investigate and develop novel, mechanically activated, nanoscale Li3N-based and LiBH4-based materials that are able to store and release {approx}10 wt% hydrogen at temperatures near 100 C with a plateau hydrogen pressure of less than 10 bar. Four (4) material systems have been investigated in the course of this project in order to achieve the project objective. These 4 systems are (i) LiNH2+LiH, (ii) LiNH2+MgH2, (iii) LiBH4, and (iv) LiBH4+MgH2. The key findings we have obtained from these 4 systems are summarized below. *The thermodynamic driving forces for LiNH2+LiH and LiBH4 systems are not adequate to enable H2 release at temperatures < 100 C. *Hydrogen release in the solid state for all of the four systems is controlled by diffusion, and thus is a slow process. *LiNH2+MgH2 and LiBH4+MgH2 systems, although possessing proper thermodynamic driving forces to allow for H2 release at temperatures < 100 C, have sluggish reaction kinetics because of their diffusion-controlled rate-limiting steps. *Reducing particles to the nanometer length scale (< 50 nm) can improve the thermodynamic driving force to enable H2 release at near ambient temperature, while simultaneously enhancing the reaction kinetics as well as changing the diffusion-controlled rate-limiting step to gas desorption-controlled rate-limiting step. This phenomenon has been demonstrated with LiBH4 and offers the hope that further work along this direction will make one of the material systems, i.e., LiBH4, LiBH4+MgH2 and LiNH2+MgH2, possess the desired thermodynamic properties and rapid H2 uptake/release kinetics for on-board applications. Many of the findings and knowledge gained from this project have been published in archival refereed journal articles [1-15] and are accessible by general public. Thus, to avoid a bulky final report, the key findings and knowledge gained from this project will be succinctly summarized, particularly for those findings and knowledge available in the public domain. However, for those findings and knowledge that have not been published yet, more detailed information will be provided. The report will be divided into 4 major sections based on the material systems investigated.

  13. SPECIAL ISSUE: ENVIRONMENTAL NANOMATERIALS Arsenic Removal by Nanoscale Magnetite in Guanajuato, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    , Mexico Jesse Walter Farrell,1,* John Fortner,2 Sarah Work,3 Carolina Avendano,4 Natalia I. Gonzalez, Texas. 5 CITAG, Guanajuato, Mexico. 6 Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice. A water assessment of Guanajuato, Mexico, and surrounding areas indicated naturally occurring arsenic

  14. Nanoscale Confinement Effects between Thin Metallic Surfaces: Fundamentals and Potential Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez Caballero, Gustavo

    2012-02-14

    Density functional theory is used to study the physico-chemical effects of two metallic thin films separated by distances in a range of 4-10 amperes. In this condition, the electrons from the metallic thin film surfaces tunnel through the energy...

  15. Molecular simulation study of nanoscale friction between alkyl monolayers on Si,,111... immersed in solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Luzheng

    in solvents Luzheng Zhanga) and Shaoyi Jiangb) Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington monolayers immersed in liquid solvents. Three pairs of interfaces, ranging from hydrophobic CH3 /CH3 to hydrophilic OH/OH, were studied. Three solvents, including water, methanol, and n-decane were used

  16. A nanoscale numerical model of calcium silicate hydrate P.C. Fonseca a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrade, Jose

    to pre- dict the bulk properties of cement and concrete, such as shrinkage, creep, permeability and the properties of structural concrete are not fully under- stood. Models are becoming increasingly important, and cracking. C­S­H is responsible for much of the cohesive proper- ties in concrete but the chemical origin

  17. Rough interfaces, accurate predictions: The necessity of capillary modes in a minimal model of nanoscale hydrophobic solvation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suriyanarayanan Vaikuntanathan; Grant M Rotskoff; Alexander Hudson; Phillip Geissler

    2015-10-26

    Modern theories of the hydrophobic effect highlight its dependence on length scale, emphasizing in particular the importance of interfaces that emerge in the vicinity of sizable hydrophobes. We recently showed that a faithful treatment of such nanoscale interfaces requires careful attention to the statistics of capillary waves, with significant quantitative implications for the calculation of solvation thermodynamics. Here we show that a coarse-grained lattice model in the spirit of those pioneered by Chandler and coworkers, when informed by this understanding, can capture a broad range of hydrophobic behaviors with striking accuracy. Specifically, we calculate probability distributions for microscopic density fluctuations that agree very well with results of atomistic simulations, even many standard deviations from the mean, and even for probe volumes in highly heterogeneous environments. This accuracy is achieved without adjustment of free parameters, as the model is fully specified by well-known properties of liquid water. As illustrative examples of its utility, we characterize the free energy profile for a solute crossing the air-water interface, and compute the thermodynamic cost of evacuating the space between extended nanoscale surfaces. Together, these calculations suggest that a highly reduced model for aqueous solvation can serve as the basis for efficient multiscale modeling of spatial organization driven by hydrophobic and interfacial forces.

  18. European Conference on NanoFilms & Al-NanoFunc Final Conference: Microstructural and chemical characterization in the nano-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    , tranmission electron microscopy, Gold, polymers, thiols Abstract Nanoparticles with sizes typically below 20

  19. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  20. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laguna, G.R.; Peter, F.J.; Butler, M.A.

    1999-02-16

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir. 7 figs.