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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Wednesday, 28 January 2009 00:00 The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

2

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

3

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

4

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

5

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

6

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

7

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

8

Science Highlight July 2011 Better Batteries through Nanoscale 3D Chemical Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to hierarchical structures found in energy materials such as battery electrodes, fuel cells, and catalytic systems Science Highlight ­ July 2011 Better Batteries through Nanoscale 3D Chemical Imaging Concerns battery technology. Although Li-ion batteries, crucial in the boom of portable electronics, stand

Wechsler, Risa H.

9

Nanoscale chemical imaging using synchrotron x-ray enhanced scanning tunneling microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combination of synchrotron radiation with scanning tunneling microscopy provides a promising new concept for chemical imaging of nanoscale structures. It employs detection of local x-ray absorption, which directly yields chemical, electronic, and magnetic sensitivity. The study of the tip current in the far field (800 nm tip/sample separation) shows that insulator-coated tips have to be considered in order to reduce the background from stray photoelectron. A picture of the different channels contributing to the x-ray enhanced STM process is proposed. If during electron tunneling the sample is illuminated with monochromatic x-rays, characteristic absorption will arise, and core electrons are excited, which might modulate the conventional tunnel current and facilitate chemical imaging at the nanoscale.

Rose, Volker; Freeland, John W. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

10

NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemical and Nanoscale Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Science Nanoscale Science Learn about our research staff including staff profiles, publications, and contact information. The primary goal of the Chemical and Nanoscale Science Group, within NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center, is to understand photoconversion processes in nanoscale, excitonic photoconversion systems, such as semiconductor quantum dots, molecular dyes, conjugated molecules and polymers, nanostructured oxides, and carbon nanotubes. Closely associated with this goal are efforts to gain an understanding of how to use chemistry and physical tools to control and maximize the photoconversion process. The innovative chemistry and physics that evolve from these fundamental studies are used on a number of applied projects, maximizing the benefits from these discoveries.

11

Nano-scale Sensor Networks for Chemical Eisa Zarepour1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nano-scale Sensor Networks for Chemical Catalysis Eisa Zarepour1 Mahbub Hassan1 Chun Tung Chou1- searchers are now investigating the viability of nano-scale sensor networks (NSNs), which are formed natural gas to liquid fuel. Given that reliable wireless communi- cation at nano-scale is at very early

New South Wales, University of

12

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - National Security - Nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Engineering Nanoscale Engineering * Members * Contact * Publications * Overview * Nanospheres * Gel for Radioactive Decontamination * Advanced Radionuclide Sensor * Removal/Decontamination of Metal Substrates * Advanced Water Purification National Security Home National Security - Nanoscale Engineering Nanoscale Engineering Physical chemist Carol Mertz mixes a polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating for synthesized polymer nanospheres as polymer chemist Martha Finck examines a different PEG formulation. The coated nanospheres can be injected into humans following exposure to chemical, biological, or radiological toxins. The nanospheres selectively pick up these toxins and then are drawn out through a magnetic filtration system outside the body. Researchers in Nanoscale Engineering seek to bridge the gap between

13

XEDS STEM Tomography For 3D Chemical CharacterizationOf Nanoscale...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XEDS STEM Tomography For 3D Chemical CharacterizationOf Nanoscale Particles. XEDS STEM Tomography For 3D Chemical CharacterizationOf Nanoscale Particles. Abstract: We present a...

14

Nanoscale Imaging of Molecular Adsorption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...REICHLE, W.T., THE NATURE OF THE THERMAL-DECOMPOSITION OF A CATALYTICALLY...x 1019 N-m andTc = 52 4 s. The Sudan earthquake thus plots in the slow-earthquake...spacing of 7.6 A. Chemical and thermal analysis results were consistent with...

Heng Cai; Andrew C. Hillier; Kevin R. Franklin; C. Craig Nunn; Michael D. Ward

1994-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

15

Nano-scale scratching in chemical-mechanical polishing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process, a critical step in the manufacture of ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) semiconductor devices, undesirable nano-scale scratches are formed on the surfaces being ...

Eusner, Thor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Infrared Scattering Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy Using An External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser For Nanoscale Chemical Imaging And Spectroscopy of Explosive Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) is an apertureless superfocusing technique that uses the antenna properties of a conducting atomic force microscope (AFM) tip to achieve infrared spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. The instrument can be used either in imaging mode, where a fixed wavelength light source is tuned to a molecular resonance and the AFM raster scans an image, or in spectroscopy mode where the AFM is held stationary over a feature of interest and the light frequency is varied to obtain a spectrum. In either case, a strong, stable, coherent infrared source is required. Here we demonstrate the integration of a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) into an s-SNOM and use it to obtain infrared spectra of microcrystals of chemicals adsorbed onto gold substrates. Residues of the explosive compound tetryl was deposited onto gold substrates. s-SNOM experiments were performed in the 1260-1400 cm?1 tuning range of the ECQCL, corresponding to the NO2 symmetric stretch vibrational fingerprint region. Vibrational infrared spectra were collected on individual chemical domains with a collection area of *500nm2 and compared to ensemble averaged far-field reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) results.

Craig, Ian M.; Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Josberger, Erik E.; Raschke, Markus Bernd

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

17

Nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging with a single diamond NV center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid-state quantum emitters, such as artificially engineered quantum dots or naturally occurring defects in solids, are being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to biomedical imaging. Recently, these same systems have also been studied from the perspective of nanoscale metrology. In this letter we study the near-field optical properties of a diamond nanocrystal hosting a single nitrogen vacancy center. We find that the nitrogen vacancy center is a sensitive probe of the surrounding electromagnetic mode structure. We exploit this sensitivity to demonstrate nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with a single nitrogen vacancy center by imaging the local density of states of an optical antenna.

Ryan Beams; Dallas Smith; Timothy W. Johnson; Sang-Hyun Oh; Lukas Novotny; Nick Vamivakas

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

18

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - National Security - Nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanospheres for Human Detoxification Nanospheres for Human Detoxification Argonne scientists are developing technology that uses magnetic nanospheres for human detoxification of blood-borne toxins (radiological, biological, and chemical). Originally developed for in-field use by military personnel, the work also will have application in the early diagnosis and treatment of certain medical conditions. For more details, view the fact sheet. Nanospheres for Human Detoxification Intravenously injected into victims of radiological, chemical or biological attack, biodegradable nanospheres circulate through the bloodstream, where surface proteins bind to the targeted toxins. They are removed from the bloodstream by a small dual-channel shunt, inserted into an arm or leg artery, that circulates the blood through an external magnetic separator. Strong magnets in the shunt immobilize the iron-based particles, and clean blood flows back into the bloodstream. (Image courtesy of the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute)

19

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Presented by... Professor growing field which has provided for nanometric optical imaging in the near-field. Even though a variety of techniques are being developed with nanometric optical imaging potential, near-field optics remains the most

20

Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

must traverse the aqueous domains of the PEM and reach the catalyst at the cathode area of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is investigated using conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). A platinum-coated AFM tip is used as a nanoscale cathode in an operating

Buratto, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nanoscale Imaging of Photocurrent and Efficiency in CdTe Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanoscale Imaging of Photocurrent and Efficiency in CdTe Solar Cells ... The local collection characteristics of grain interiors and grain boundaries in thin-film CdTe polycrystalline solar cells are investigated using scanning photocurrent microscopy. ... photovoltaics; CdTe; scanning photocurrent microscopy; solar cells; NSOM ...

Marina S. Leite; Maxim Abashin; Henri J. Lezec; Anthony Gianfrancesco; A. Alec Talin; Nikolai B. Zhitenev

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Radiation-induced melting in coherent X-ray diffractive imaging at the nanoscale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coherent X-ray diffraction techniques play an increasingly significant role in imaging nanoscale structures which range from metallic and semiconductor samples to biological objects. The conventional knowledge about radiation damage effects caused by ever higher brilliance X-ray sources has to be critically revised while studying nanostructured materials.

Ponomarenko, O.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

23

A robust scanning diamond sensor for nanoscale imaging with single nitrogen-vacancy centres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A robust scanning diamond sensor for nanoscale imaging with single nitrogen-vacancy centres P and A. Yacoby1 * The nitrogen-vacancy defect centre in diamond1­4 has potential applications processing9 and bioimaging10 . These applications rely on the ability to pos- ition a single nitrogen-vacancy

Walsworth, Ronald L.

24

Nanoscale Imaging of Airborne Particles Mike Bogan Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diagnostics with an X-ray Laser? Lessons from the First Diagnostics with an X-ray Laser? Lessons from the First Nanoscale Imaging of Airborne Particles Mike Bogan Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA What does airborne particulate matter look like? How do we develop quantitative descriptors for particles of complex morphology? These challenges were highlighted in the NIST workshop report "Aerosol Metrology Needs for Climate Science" (Dec, 2011). Sure, we can capture aerosol particles on surfaces - removing them from their airborne state - and probe them with high resolution optical and chemical imaging tools, but what information do we lose about the airborne particles? How can we follow dynamics? In this talk we will explore these very basic questions and their importance to combustion

25

Revealing the nanoscale world: digital recreation of nanofibre images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Perdu(e) series of images are digital paintings of nanofibre images that produce integrated, convergent, formative images by breaking down the boundaries between art and science, macroscopic and microscopic worlds, and abstraction and representation. I have added the emotional interaction between the paintings of the nanofibres and the viewers to extend the experience of creating their own creative supermicroscopic world. The Perdu(e) series is a result of images that were not reproduced images but were produced through me, as an artist, by my imagination. By passing the images through a computer, scientific technology, and my hand, this series is a new origin for art. These modified, transformed images represent living beings that can directly communicate with the spectators through the emotional interaction.

Jiyoung Kang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The SFM/ToF-SIMS combination for advanced chemically-resolved analysis at the nanoscale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The combination of Time-of-flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) allows the 3D-compositional analysis of samples or devices. Typically, the topographical data obtained by SFM is used to determine the initial sample topography and the absolute depth of the ToF-SIMS analysis. Here ToF-SIMS and SFM data sets obtained on 2 prototypical samples are explored to go beyond conventional 3D-compositional analysis. SFM topographical and material contrast maps are combined with ToF-SIMS retrospective analysis to detect features that would have escaped a conventional ToF-SIMS data analysis. In addition, SFM data is used to extrapolate the chemical information beyond the spatial resolution of ToF-SIMS, allowing the mapping of the chemical composition at the nanoscale.

Laetitia Bernard; Jakob Heier; Wolfgang Paul; Hans J. Hug

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Three-dimensional Chemical Imaging of Embedded Nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dimensional Chemical Imaging of Embedded Nanoparticles using Atom Probe Tomography. Three-dimensional Chemical Imaging of Embedded Nanoparticles using Atom Probe Tomography....

28

Femtosecond Single-Shot Imaging of Nanoscale Ferromagnetic Order in Co/Pd Multilayers using Resonant X-ray Holography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first single-shot images of ferromagnetic, nanoscale spin order taken with femtosecond x-ray pulses. X-ray-induced electron and spin dynamics can be outrun with pulses shorter than 80 fs in the investigated fluence regime, and no permanent aftereffects in the samples are observed below a fluence of 25 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Employing resonant spatially-muliplexed x-ray holography results in a low imaging threshold of 5 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Our results open new ways to combine ultrafast laser spectroscopy with sequential snapshot imaging on a single sample, generating a movie of excited state dynamics.

Wang, Tianhan; Zhu, Diling; Benny Wu,; Graves, Catherine; Schaffert, Stefan; Rander, Torbjorn; Muller, leonard; Vodungbo, Boris; Baumier, Cedric; Bernstein, David P.; Brauer, Bjorn; Cros, Vincent; Jong, Sanne de; Delaunay, Renaud; Fognini, Andreas; Kukreja, Roopali; Lee, Sooheyong; Lopez-Flores, Victor; Mohanty, Jyoti; Pfau, Bastian; Popescu, 5 Horia

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Standoff imaging of chemicals using IR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we report on a standoff spectroscopic technique for identifying chemical residues on surfaces. A hand-held infrared camera was used in conjunction with a wavelength tunable mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) to create hyperspectral image arrays of a target with an explosive residue on its surface. Spectral signatures of the explosive residue (RDX) were extracted from the hyperspectral image arrays and compared with a reference spectrum. Identification of RDX was achieved for residue concentrations of 20 g per cm2 at a distance of 1.5 m, and for 5 g per cm2 at a distance of 15 cm.

Senesac, Larry R [ORNL] [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL] [ORNL; Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Nanoscale imaging of the electronic and structural transitions in vanadium dioxide.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the electronic and structural changes at the nanoscale in vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) in the vicinity of its thermally driven phase transition. Both electronic and structural changes exhibit phase coexistence leading to percolation. In addition, we observe a dichotomy between the local electronic and structural transitions. Nanoscale x-ray diffraction reveals local, nonmonotonic switching of the lattice structure, a phenomenon that is not seen in the electronic insulator-to-metal transition mapped by near-field infrared microscopy.

Qazilbash, M. M.; Tripathi, A.; Schafgans, A. A.; Kim, B.-J.; Kim, H.-T.; Cai, Z.; Holt, M. V.; Maser, J. M.; Keilmann, F.; Shpyrko, O. G.; Basov, D. N. (X-Ray Science Division); ( CNM); (Univ. of California at San Diego); (Electronics and Telecommunications Research IInst.); (Univ. of Science and Technology); (Munich Centre for Advanced Photonics and Center for NanoScience)

2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

31

Scanning photoelectron microscope for nanoscale three-dimensional spatial-resolved electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectroscopy for chemical analysis K. Horiba, Y. Nakamura, N. Nagamura, S. Toyoda, H. Kumigashira et al-level alignment at noble metal/organic interfaces Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 183302 (2011) Note: Heated sample platform three-dimensional spatial-resolved electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis K. Horiba,1,2,3,a) Y

Miyashita, Yasushi

32

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with STXM-multicomponent organic electronic devices that have intrinsically nanoscale dimensions. Understanding where charge transport and recombination occur in these materials helps explain the efficient performance of polymer-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and will lead to a new avenue of research on organic electronic devices, supporting emerging technologies such as molecular computing and promoting increased efficiencies in existing organic technologies (organic LEDs and solar cells).

33

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with STXM-multicomponent organic electronic devices that have intrinsically nanoscale dimensions. Understanding where charge transport and recombination occur in these materials helps explain the efficient performance of polymer-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and will lead to a new avenue of research on organic electronic devices, supporting emerging technologies such as molecular computing and promoting increased efficiencies in existing organic technologies (organic LEDs and solar cells).

34

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print Mapping the Nanoscale Landscape Print For the first time, researchers have successfully mapped the chemical structure of conjugated polymer blend films with a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This is not just another application of STXM. It is a breakthrough experiment on several levels. Correlating local composition to electronic/optical device characteristics will pave the way to characterizing a whole new class of materials with STXM-multicomponent organic electronic devices that have intrinsically nanoscale dimensions. Understanding where charge transport and recombination occur in these materials helps explain the efficient performance of polymer-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and will lead to a new avenue of research on organic electronic devices, supporting emerging technologies such as molecular computing and promoting increased efficiencies in existing organic technologies (organic LEDs and solar cells).

35

THREE-DIMENSIONAL IMAGING OF NANOSCALE MATERIALS BY UISNG COHERENT X-RAYS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray crystallography is currently the primary methodology used to determine the 3D structure of materials and macromolecules. However, many nanostructures, disordered materials, biomaterials, hybrid materials and biological specimens are noncrystalline and, hence, their structures are not accessible by X-ray crystallography. Probing these structures therefore requires the employment of different approaches. A very promising technique currently under rapid development is X-ray diffraction microscopy (or lensless imaging), in which the coherent X-ray diffraction pattern of a noncrystalline specimen is measured and then directly phased to obtain a high-resolution image. Through the DOE support over the past three years, we have applied X-ray diffraction microscopy to quantitative imaging of GaN quantum dot particles, and revealed the internal GaN-Ga2O3 core shell structure in three dimensions. By exploiting the abrupt change in the scattering cross-section near electronic resonances, we carried out the first experimental demonstration of resonant X-ray diffraction microscopy for element specific imaging. We performed nondestructive and quantitative imaging of buried Bi structures inside a Si crystal by directly phasing coherent X-ray diffraction patterns acquired below and above the Bi M5 edge. We have also applied X-ray diffraction microscopy to nondestructive imaging of mineral crystals inside biological composite materials - intramuscular fish bone - at the nanometer scale resolution. We identified mineral crystals in collagen fibrils at different stages of mineralization and proposed a dynamic mechanism to account for the nucleation and growth of mineral crystals in the collagen matrix. In addition, we have also discovered a novel 3D imaging modality, denoted ankylography, which allows for complete 3D structure determination without the necessity of sample titling or scanning. We showed that when the diffraction pattern of a finite object is sampled at a sufficiently fine scale on the Ewald sphere, the 3D structure of the object is determined by the 2D spherical pattern. We confirmed the theoretical analysis by performing 3D numerical reconstructions of a sodium silicate glass structure at 2 ? resolution from a 2D spherical diffraction pattern alone. As X-ray free electron lasers are under rapid development worldwide, ankylography may open up a new horizon to obtain the 3D structure of a non-crystalline specimen from a single pulse and allow time-resolved 3D structure determination of disordered materials.

Jianwei Miao

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

36

Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on diagnostics, imaging and therapy, with appropriate translational research and commercialization activities information (storage, processing and logic) and energy technologies. Prof. Krishnan is highly recognized

37

Nanoscale Pore Imaging and Pore Scale Fluid Flow Modeling in Chalk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For many rocks of high economic interest such as chalk, diatomite, tight gas sands or coal, nanometer scale resolution is needed to resolve the 3D-pore structure, which controls the flow and trapping of fluids in the rocks. Such resolutions cannot be achieved with existing tomographic technologies. A new 3D imaging method, based on serial sectioning and using the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technology has been developed. FIB allows for the milling of layers as thin as 10 nanometers by using accelerated Ga+ ions to sputter atoms from the sample surface. After each milling step, as a new surface is exposed, a 2D image of this surface is generated. Next, the 2D images are stacked to reconstruct the 3D pore or grain structure. Resolutions as high as 10 nm are achievable using such a technique. A new robust method of pore-scale fluid flow modeling has been developed and applied to sandstone and chalk samples. The method uses direct morphological analysis of the pore space to characterize the petrophysical properties of diverse formations. Not only petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability, relative permeability and capillary pressures) can be computed but also flow processes, such as those encountered in various IOR approaches, can be simulated. Petrophysical properties computed with the new method using the new FIB data will be presented. Present study is a part of the development of an Electronic Core Laboratory at LBNL/UCB.

Tomutsa, Liviu; Silin, Dmitriy

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

38

Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging via Combination of Scanning Tunneling and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems at atomic level Develop atomically resolved chemical imaging platform via combination of lowAtomic-Scale Chemical Imaging via Combination of Scanning Tunneling and Electron Energy Loss visualization of chemical reaction pathways to provide mechanistic understanding for catalytically important

39

Nanoscale Imaging with Resonant Coherent XRays: Extension of Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction to Nonperiodic Structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methodology of multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction, widely used for macromolecular structure determination, is extended to the imaging of nonperiodic nanostructures. We demonstrate the solution of the phase problem by a combination of two resonantly recorded coherent scattering patterns at the carbon K edge (285eV). Our approach merges iterative phase retrieval and x-ray holography approaches, yielding unique and rapid reconstructions. The element, chemical, and magnetic state specificity of our method further renders it widely applicable to a broad range of nanostructures, providing a spatial resolution that is limited, in principle, by wavelength only.

A. Scherz; D. Zhu; R. Rick; W. F. Schlotter; S. Roy; J. Lning; J. Sthr

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

40

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Fundamental Interactions Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fundamental Interactions Images Fundamental Interactions Images These images may be used freely as long as they are accompanied by a statement that they were used "Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory" (see disclaimer). To download a larger or high-resolution version of each picture, right-click on the "Download high-resolution image" text beneath the picture and select "Save Link/Image As..." from the resulting pop-up menu. Shock Tube with Joe Michael and Raghu Sivaramakrishnan Joe Michael (left) and Raghu Sivaramakrishnan stand in front of a shock tube developed for the study of the kinetics of chemical reactions at the high temperatures relevant for combusion. Download high resolution image. Thermochemical subnetwork diagram Shown is a thermochemical subnetwork relevant to the determination of the heat of formation of the OH radical. Vertices of the graph indicate thermochemical quantities, such as the heats of formation, while the lines of the graph represent the measurements connecting these quantities for different species. The Active Tables approach developed by Branko Ruscic at Argonne simultaneously optimizes the thermochemical quantities for all species in the graph, taking into account all of the existing experimental and theoretical results, and weighting them by their uncertainties. Download high resolution image.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

42

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

43

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

44

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

45

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

46

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

47

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

48

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial biofilms. Almost all bacteria can form biofilms-dynamic communities of cells enclosed in self-produced matrices of polymers that stick to other bacteria or surfaces in water-containing environments. Coordinated collectively, these bacteria defend against antagonists, break down recalcitrant materials, and produce biofuels. Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and UC Berkeley coupled infrared (IR) rays from ALS Beamline 1.4.3 to the first open-channel microfluidic platform to determine the chemistry that shapes biofilm development. This combination of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require chemical-scale information on biofilm phenotype and function, including Berkeley Lab's bioenergy efforts and subsurface biogeochemical studies.

49

The Center for Nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) at Argonne for interdisciplinary nanoscience and nanotechnology researchers can apply to use CNM for both nonproprietary The Center's goal is to...

50

CHEMICAL IMAGING OF LIVING CELLS BY SYNCHROTRON INFRARED MICROSPECTROMETRY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical mapping of proteins and lipids inside a single living cell and at a resolution of a few microns, has been performed using synchroton infrared microspectrometry. Modifications of the chemical distributions upon mitosis and necrosis has been investigated.

JAMIN,N.; DUMAS,P.; MONCUIT,J.; FRIDMAN,W.H.; TEILLAUD,J.L.; CARR,G.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

51

Chemical vapor detection with a multispectral thermal imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

military programs to adapt the FLIR for chemical de- tection.25 A navy FLIR has been deployed for chemical sensing.4 It is a standard common module FLIR modified with bandpass spectral filters. Agent detection

Chang, Chein-I

52

Correlation chemical shift imaging with low-power adiabatic pulses and constant-density spiral trajectories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we introduce the concept of correlation chemical shift imaging (CCSI). Novel CCSI pulse sequences are demonstrated on clinical scanners for two-dimensional Correlation Spectroscopy (COSY) and Total Correlation ...

Andronesi, Ovidiu C.

53

Developing Next-Generation Multimodal Chemical Imaging Capability by Combining STEM/APT/STXM/HIM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing Next-Generation Multimodal Chemical Imaging Capability by Combining STEM battery cathode materials at sub-nanometer spatial and chemical resolution and ppm-level mass sensitivity Develop a common analysis platform for integrating aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

54

Using Dynamic Quantum Clustering to Analyze Hierarchically Heterogeneous Samples on the Nanoscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic Quantum Clustering (DQC) is an unsupervised, high visual data mining technique. DQC was tested as an analysis method for X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) data from the Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) group. The TXM group images hierarchically heterogeneous materials with nanoscale resolution and large field of view. XANES data consists of energy spectra for each pixel of an image. It was determined that DQC successfully identifies structure in data of this type without prior knowledge of the components in the sample. Clusters and sub-clusters clearly reflected features of the spectra that identified chemical component, chemical environment, and density in the image. DQC can also be used in conjunction with the established data analysis technique, which does require knowledge of components present.

Hume, Allison; /Princeton U. /SLAC

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Vortex Dynamics in NanoScale Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Into the Vortex: Dynamics in Nanoscale Materials Into the Vortex: Dynamics in Nanoscale Materials Micron and nanosized magnets are of great interest for their potential applications in new electronic devices, such as magnetic random access memories. As the size of magnets is reduced to a 1-micron scale and below, the boundaries (surfaces, perimeters, etc) of the objects begin to profoundly influence both the static and dynamic behavior of the materials. Researchers from Argonne's Materials Science Division (MSD), Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), and Advanced Photon Source (APS) have recently examined the dynamics of 3- to 7-micron-diameter NiFe alloy disks with a combination of theoretical calculations and a new time-resolved magnetic imaging technique using synchrotron-based x-ray photoemission electron

56

Design of angle-tolerant multivariate optical elements for chemical imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of angle-tolerant multivariate optical elements for chemical imaging Olusola O. Soyemi in imaging applications. We report a method for the design of angle-insensitive MOEs based on modification of Bismarck Brown and Crystal Violet, was designed and its performance simulated. For angles of incidence

Myrick, Michael Lenn

57

Visualizing Chemical Compositions and Kinetics of Sol-Gel by Near-Infrared Multispectral Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visualizing Chemical Compositions and Kinetics of Sol-Gel by Near-Infrared Multispectral Imaging, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 Kinetics of sol-gel formation were studied using the recently developed near-infrared been studied extensively by many different spectroscopic techniques.4-15 Among them, the near-infrared

Reid, Scott A.

58

High-resolution chemical imaging of gold nanoparticles using hard x-ray ptychography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We combine resonant scattering with (ptychographic) scanning coherent diffraction microscopy to determine the chemical state of gold nanoparticles with high spatial resolution. Ptychographic images of the sample are recorded for a series of energies around the gold L{sub 3} absorption edge. From these data, chemical information in the form of absorption and resonant scattering spectra is reconstructed at each location in the sample. For gold nanoparticles of about 100 nm diameter, a spatial resolution of about 20-30 nm is obtained. In the future, this microscopy approach will open the way to operando studies of heterogeneous catalysts on the nanometer scale.

Hoppe, R.; Patommel, J.; Schroer, C. G. [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)] [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Reinhardt, J. [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany) [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Germany; Hofmann, G.; Grunwaldt, J.-D. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Damsgaard, C. D. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy and Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark)] [Center for Electron Nanoscopy and Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Wellenreuther, G.; Falkenberg, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

59

3D Chemical Image using TOFSIMS Revealing the Biopolymer Component Spatial and Lateral Distributions in Biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D D Chemical Imaging DOI: 10.1002/anie.201205243 3D Chemical Image using TOF-SIMS Revealing the Biopolymer Component Spatial and Lateral Distributions in Biomass** Seokwon Jung, Marcus Foston, Udaya C. Kalluri, Gerald A. Tuskan, and Arthur J. Ragauskas* Many researchers consider biofuels, including bioethanol and biodiesel, as a resource to supplement or replace large portions of future transportation fuel requirements. This shift in research focus is due in part to limitations in fossil resources and recent concerns about the environment. [1] Lignocellulosic biomass (for example, agricultural resides, forestry wastes, and energy crops) has been highlighted as a potential resource for biofuel production. [2] Lignocellulosic biomass is mainly composed of polysaccharides (that is, cellulose and hemicelluloses) and lignin (polyphenolic macro- molecules). [3] Cellulose,

60

Microfluidics and Nanoscale Research Profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidics and Nanoscale Science Research Profile Our research group is engaged in a broad range of activities in the general area of microfluidics and nanoscale science. At a primary level, our interest that when compared to macroscale tech- nology, microfluidic systems engender a number of distinct advantages

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nanoscale relaxation oscillator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA); Regan, Brian C. (Los Angeles, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA)

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

Nano-chemo-mechanical sensor array platform for high-throughput chemical analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a 2-D multiplexed cantilever array platform for high-throughput nanomechanical chemical sensing and analysis. After coating the cantilevers with alkane thiols having different functional end groups, we have performed vapor phase chemical sensing experiments with toluene and water vapor as targets. To overcome non-uniform responses caused by fabrication and imaging issues, the chemical response of each cantilever is self-calibrated using the thermal response of each cantilever. From these experiments, we could observe chemically induced nanoscale motion of cantilevers for various humidity or vapor concentration levels, and response differentiation with different functional end groups of thiols.

Si-Hyung Shawn Lim; Digvijay Raorane; Srinath Satyanarayana; Arunava Majumdar

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nanoscale Materials in Medicine  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by Auburn University Department of Chemical Engineering held on June 26, 2012

64

Argonne CNM Highlight: Graphene Research at the Center for Nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Graphene Research at the Center for Nanoscale Materials Graphene Research at the Center for Nanoscale Materials graphene research The 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics was recently awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov from the University of Manchester "for groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene." Graphene is an extraordinary material made up of hexagonally packed carbon atoms that are sp2 bonded. A sheet of graphene is only one atom thick making it nature's version of an ideal two-dimensional material. At the Center for Nanoscale Materials we are exploring state-of-the-art synthesis, characterization, processing, and novel applications of graphene. With the highest resolution microscopes we are able to characterize the structural, electronic, and chemical properties of

65

Recent developments of chemical imaging sensor systems based on the principle of the light-addressable potentiometric sensor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) is an electrochemical sensor with a field-effect structure to detect the variation of the Nernst potential at its sensor surface, the measured area on which is defined by illumination. Thanks to this light-addressability, the LAPS can be applied to chemical imaging sensor systems, which can visualize the two-dimensional distribution of a particular target ion on the sensor surface. Chemical imaging sensor systems are expected to be useful for analysis of reaction and diffusion in various electrochemical and biological samples. Recent developments of LAPS-based chemical imaging sensor systems, in terms of the spatial resolution, measurement speed, image quality, miniaturization and integration with microfluidic devices, are summarized and discussed.

Tatsuo Yoshinobu; Ko-ichiro Miyamoto; Torsten Wagner; Michael J. Schning

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Argonne CNM Highlight: Block copolymer lithography approach to nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Block copolymer lithography approach to nanoscale self-assembly Block copolymer lithography approach to nanoscale self-assembly hybrid organic-organomemtalliic block copolymer thin film cast on a silicon nitride membrane substrate This image created by Seth Darling and Nathan Ramanathan was selected for the September 2009 cover of Materials Today. Block copolymer lithography represents a promising next-generation alternative to traditional top-down methodologies. The figure shows an optical micrograph of a hybrid organic-organometallic block copolymer thin film cast on a silicon nitride membrane substrate, which reveals thickness-induced coloring effects reminiscent of art glass. This polymer self-assembles into an ordered nanoscale cylindrical morphology, the orientation of which can be controlled with film thickness. Cylinders

67

Quantification of nanoscale density fluctuations using electron microscopy: Light-localization properties of biological cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a study of the nanoscale mass-density fluctuations of heterogeneous optical dielectric media, including nanomaterials and biological cells, by quantifying their nanoscale light-localization properties. Transmission electron microscope images of the media are used to construct corresponding effective disordered optical lattices. Light-localization properties are studied by the statistical analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the localized eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscale. We validated IPR analysis using nanomaterials as models of disordered systems fabricated from dielectric nanoparticles. As an example, we then applied such analysis to distinguish between cells with different degrees of aggressive malignancy.

Pradhan, Prabhakar; Damania, Dhwanil; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Dravid, Vinayak P. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Roy, Hemant K. [Department of Internal Medicine, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, Illinois 60201 (United States); Taflove, Allen [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

68

Chemical Force Microscopy Nanoscale Probing of Fundamental Chemical Interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Intermolecular forces impact a wide spectrum of problems in condensed phases: from molecular recognition, self-assembly, and protein folding at the molecular and nanometer scale, to interfacial fracture, frict...

Aleksandr Noy; Dmitry V. Vezenov

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Nanoscale friction and wear maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The nanoscale friction force follows a complex nonlinear...Studies have shown that the fundamental laws of friction, as...measurements using friction force microscopy: part I...J. N. 2007 Surface forces and nanorheology of molecularly...thin films. In Springer handbook of nanotechnology (ed...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Nanoscale Measurements of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Measurements of Glass Transition Temperature and Nanoscale Measurements of Glass Transition Temperature and Temperature-Dependent Mechanical Properties in Polymers M.P. Nikiforov, S. Jesse, L.T. Germinario (CNMS user, Eastman Chemical Co.), and S.V. Kalinin Achievement We report a novel method for local measurements of glass transition temperatures and the temperature dependence of elastic and loss moduli of polymeric materials. The combination of Anasys Instruments' heated tip technology, ORNL-developed band excitation scanning probe microscopy, and a "freeze-in" thermal profile technique allows quantitative thermomechanical measurements at high spatial resolution on the order of ~100 nm. Here, we developed an experimental approach for local thermomechanical probing that reproducibly tracks changes in the mechanical properties of

71

Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

Chinn, Diane (Pleasanton, CA); Stolz, Christopher J. (Lathrop, CA); Wu, Zhouling (Pleasanton, CA); Huber, Robert (Discovery Bay, CA); Weinzapfel, Carolyn (Tracy, CA)

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

72

Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in Complex Interfacial Systems. Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program explored the efficacy of using molecular-level manipulation, imaging and scanning tunneling spectroscopy in conjunction with supersonic molecular beam gas-surface scattering to significantly enhance our understanding of chemical processes occurring on well-characterized interfaces. One program focus was on the spatially-resolved emergent behavior of complex reaction systems as a function of the local geometry and density of adsorbate-substrate systems under reaction conditions. Another focus was on elucidating the emergent electronic and related reactivity characteristics of intentionally constructed single and multicomponent atom- and nanoparticle-based materials. We also examined emergent chirality and self-organization in adsorbed molecular systems where collective interactions between adsorbates and the supporting interface lead to spatial symmetry breaking. In many of these studies we combined the advantages of scanning tunneling (STM) and atomic force (AFM) imaging, scanning tunneling local electronic spectroscopy (STS), and reactive supersonic molecular beams to elucidate precise details of interfacial reactivity that had not been observed by more traditional surface science methods. Using these methods, it was possible to examine, for example, the differential reactivity of molecules adsorbed at different bonding sites in conjunction with how reactivity is modified by the local configuration of nearby adsorbates. At the core of this effort was the goal of significantly extending our understanding of interfacial atomic-scale interactions to create, with intent, molecular assemblies and materials with advanced chemical and physical properties. This ambitious program addressed several key topics in DOE Grand Challenge Science, including emergent chemical and physical properties in condensed phase systems, novel uses of chemical imaging, and the development of advanced reactivity concepts in combustion and catalysis including carbon management. These activities directly benefitted national science objectives in the areas of chemical energy production and advanced materials development.

Sibener, Steven J. [University of Chicago, IL (United States)] [University of Chicago, IL (United States)

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

73

Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide....  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the...

74

Nanoscale Material Properties | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanotechnology Drives New Levels of Performance Nanotechnology Drives New Levels of Performance GE scientists are discovering new material properties at the nanoscale that drive...

75

Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Anodes Novel Lithium Ion Anode Structures: Overview of New DOE BATT Anode Projects Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible Anodes for...

76

Formation of Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous Solid Films of Methanol and Ethanol. Formation of Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous Solid Films of...

77

Symmetry-Driven Spontaneous Self-assembly of Nanoscale Ceria...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Symmetry-Driven Spontaneous Self-assembly of Nanoscale Ceria Building Blocks to Fractal Super-octahedra. Symmetry-Driven Spontaneous Self-assembly of Nanoscale Ceria Building...

78

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Nanoscale Heterostructu...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Lithium-Ion Anodes Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible Anodes for...

79

Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory Print Tuesday, 21 May 2013 00:00 Research at the Advanced...

80

Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging Print Imaging Print The wavelengths of soft x-ray photons (1-15 nm) are very well matched to the creation of "nanoscopes" capable of probing the interior structure of biological cells and inorganic mesoscopic systems.Topics addressed by soft x-ray imaging techniques include cell biology, nanomagnetism, environmental science, and polymers. The tunability of synchrotron radiation is absolutely essential for the creation of contrast mechanisms. Cell biology CAT scans are performed in the "water window" (300-500 eV). Nanomagnetism studies require the energy range characteristic of iron, cobalt, and nickel (600-900 eV). Mid- and far-infrared (energies below 1 eV) microprobes using synchrotron radiation are being used to address problems such as chemistry in biological tissues, chemical identification and molecular conformation, environmental biodegradation, mineral phases in geological and astronomical specimens, and electronic properties of novel materials. Infrared synchrotron radiation is focused through, or reflected from, a small spot on the specimen and then analyzed using a spectrometer. Tuning to characteristic vibrational frequencies serves as a sensitive fingerprint for molecular species. Images of the various species are built up by raster scanning the specimen through the small illuminated spot.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Quantum effects in nanoscale Josephson junction circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum effects in nanoscale Josephson junction circuits SILVIA CORLEVI Doctoral Thesis Stockholm Josephson junction arrays with SQUID geometry. TRITA FYS 2006:31 ISSN 0280-316X ISRN KTH/FYS/­06:31­SE ISBN study on single-charge effects in nanoscale Josephson junctions and Cooper pair transistors (CPTs

Haviland, David

82

Oxygen Detection via Nanoscale Optical Indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen Detection via Nanoscale Optical Indicators Ruby N. Ghosh Dept. of Physics Michigan State University East Lansing, MI, USA weekschr@msu.edu Abstract--Oxygen plays a ubiquitous role in terrestrial developed an optical technique for monitoring oxygen in both gas and liquid phases utilizing nanoscale metal

Ghosh, Ruby N.

83

Applications of single molecule and nanoparticle imaging in chemical separation, photocatalysis, and drug delivery.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This dissertation includes five chapters. Chapter 1 introduces single molecule and nanoparticle imaging techniques and their applications. Chapter 2 is a study of electrophoretic migration (more)

Han, Rui

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Manufacturing ... There is a need to both quantify unit process emissions and the impacts of auxiliary equipment at the facility scale; (iii) There is a need for streamlined methodologies to assess upstream impacts of manufacturing chemicals, materials and equipment infrastructure. ...

Nikhil Krishnan; Sarah Boyd; Ajay Somani; Sebastien Raoux; Daniel Clark; David Dornfeld

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

85

Image-Based Chemical Screening Identifies Drug Efflux Inhibitors in Lung Cancer Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high-throughput studies using the SP technique. On the other hand, recently, automated image analysis aided by high-performance computing has enabled rapid advances in the development of high-throughput image-based assays (19-22). Considering...

Xiaofeng Xia; Jian Yang; Fuhai Li; Ying Li; Xiaobo Zhou; Yue Dai; Stephen T.C. Wong

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Product Volatilization as a Probe of the Physics and Chemistry of Latent Image Formation in Chemically Amplified Resists,  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Product Volatilization as a Probe of the Physics and Chemistry of Latent Image Formation in Chemically Amplified Resists, ... The products pass through an all-glass line that uses a high-flow gas stream to extract a small fraction of the product gases through a capillary for analysis. ... Because the rates of each of the sequential steps leading to thickness lossdeprotection, volatilization, and densificationcan be no slower than the overall observed rate of densification, the data in Table 3 provide a lower limit for the rates of volatilization and film densification at 100 C. ...

W. D. Hinsberg; F. A. Houle; G. M. Poliskie; D. Pearson; M. I. Sanchez; H. Ito

2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials | Argonne...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials Share Topic Programs Materials science Nanoscience...

88

Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Calcium and Strontium Titanate Perovskites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energetics of Magnesium, Strontium, and Barium DopedNanoscale Calcium and Strontium Titanate Perovskites Sulata

Sahu, Sulata Kumari

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Quantification of Nanoscale Density Fluctuations in Biological Cells/Tissues: Inverse Participation Ratio (IPR) Analysis of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ratio (IPR) Analysis of Transmission Electron Microscopy Images and Implications for Early-Stage Cancer analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscales. First, the IPR analysis is validated in experiments with models of disordered systems fabricated

Pradhan, Prabhakar

90

Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials An Office of Science User Facility U.S. Department of Energy Search CNM ... Search CNM Home About CNM Research Facilities People For Users Publications News & Highlights Events Jobs CNM Users Organization Contact Us Other DOE Nanoscale Science Research Centers Casimir force reduction Casimir Force Reduction through Nanostructuring By nanostructuring one of two interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, a new regime in the Casimir force was observed by researchers in the Center for Nanoscale Materials Nanofabrication & Devices Group working with collaborators at NIST, other national laboratories, and universities. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with <100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and,

91

Seminar Announcement Nanoscale High Field Chemistry with the Atomic Force Microscope and Patterning January 15, 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SEMINAR SEMINAR ANNOUNCMENT Thursday, January 15, 2009 11:00am - 12:00 noon EMSL Boardroom Nanoscale High Field Chemistry With the Atomic Force Microscope and Patterning Marco Rolandi Assistant Professor Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 Facile and affordable processes for the fabrication of nanostructures are fundamental to future endeavors in nanoscale science and engineering. The atomic force microscope was designed primarily for imaging, and has evolved into a versatile tool for nanoscale surface modification. We have developed an AFM based scheme capable of direct writing of glassy carbon nanowires as fast as 1 cm/s. In brief, when a bias is applied across the tip-sample gap a molecular precursor undergoes high field reactions that result in the deposition of a cross- linked product on the surface. In order to gain a

92

NERSC Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanocontrol of CO2 Nanocontrol of CO2 Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Goals * Collect experimental 2D-3D imaging data in order to investigate fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions; * Provide algorithms for better understanding of processes governing fluid-fluid and fluid-rock systems, related to geologic sequestration of CO2; * Develop image processing methods for analyzing experimental data and comparing it to simulations; * Detect/reconstruct material interfaces, quantify contact angles, derive contact angle distribution, etc. Impact * Unveil knowledge required for developing technology to store CO2 safely in deep surface rock formations, thus reducing amount of CO2 in atmosphere; More Personnel * CRD: Wes Bethel, Dani Ushizima, Gunther Weber (SciDAC-e award)

93

Quantitative High Content Imaging of Cellular Adaptive Stress Response Pathways in Toxicity for Chemical Safety Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Steven Wink , Steven Hiemstra , Suzanna Huppelschoten , Erik Danen , Marije Niemeijer , Giel Hendriks , Harry Vrieling , Bram Herpers , and Bob van de Water * ... (37-39) The true power of HCS using automated imagers lies in its ability to capture when and where specific molecular signaling events are taking place, enabling characterization of cellular responses to multiple changes in the environment with high time and spatial resolution, relatively high throughput (depending on the exact setup) and on a single cell basis, enabling the detection of heterogeneity within populations. ... (141) The members of this family are highly expressed in the liver and include PXR, RXR, CAR, AHR, and HXR. ...

Steven Wink; Steven Hiemstra; Suzanna Huppelschoten; Erik Danen; Marije Niemeijer; Giel Hendriks; Harry Vrieling; Bram Herpers; Bob van de Water

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

Dopant Distribution, Oxygen Stoichiometry and Magnetism of Nanoscale...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dopant Distribution, Oxygen Stoichiometry and Magnetism of Nanoscale Sn0.99Co0.01O. Dopant Distribution, Oxygen Stoichiometry and Magnetism of Nanoscale Sn0.99Co0.01O. Abstract: In...

95

Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer Workshop (NOMAD 2011)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer Workshop Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer Workshop NOMAD 2011 September 12 - 13, 2011 High-Flux Isotope Reactor * Spallation Neutron Source * Oak Ridge National Laboratory About the Workshop Contact Information Important Dates Application Form Sample Description NOMAD at SNS filler About the Workshop The acronym NOMAD stands for Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer. It is a diffractometer located at the Spallation Neutron Source and is designed for the determination of pair distribution functions from a wide range of materials spanning from dense gases to long range ordered crystalline materials. It combines a large accessible Q range, large detector coverage with high intensity while maintaining good resolution. For a typical sample of the order of ~0.5cm3 good statistical accuracy can be achieved in minutes or even seconds of data acquisition time.

96

Nanoscale Center Dedication | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nanoscale Center Dedication Nanoscale Center Dedication Nanoscale Center Dedication May 6, 2005 - 12:44pm Addthis Remarks by Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Thank you, Bob [Rosner] for that introduction. And let me also thank you, along with [University of Chicago] President Randel, for the leadership you are showing here. Argonne has long been a world class institution. It will soar to new heights under your joint direction. I also want to acknowledge Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich. Thank you for being here. More than that, thank you for your strong backing of Argonne and its employees. Congresswoman Judy Biggert, who chairs the Science Subcommittee on Energy, is also a good friend to this lab, and we value her support as well. I took over as Secretary of Energy three months ago, and I have to say this

97

Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Audit Report Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories DOE/IG-0788 February 2008 Department of Energy Washington, DC 2 0 5 8 5 February 28, 2008 MEMORANDUM FOR FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT: IhTFORMATION: Audit Report on "Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories" BACKGROUND The National Nanotechnology Initiative was established as a multi-agency research and development program in 200 1. As a part of the Initiative, the Department of Energy (Energy) is in the process of constructing Nanoscale Science Research Centers at six national laboratories. In addition to funding the construction and operation of these

98

Nanoscale Center Dedication | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nanoscale Center Dedication Nanoscale Center Dedication Nanoscale Center Dedication May 6, 2005 - 12:44pm Addthis Remarks by Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Thank you, Bob [Rosner] for that introduction. And let me also thank you, along with [University of Chicago] President Randel, for the leadership you are showing here. Argonne has long been a world class institution. It will soar to new heights under your joint direction. I also want to acknowledge Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich. Thank you for being here. More than that, thank you for your strong backing of Argonne and its employees. Congresswoman Judy Biggert, who chairs the Science Subcommittee on Energy, is also a good friend to this lab, and we value her support as well. I took over as Secretary of Energy three months ago, and I have to say this

99

Nanoscale Tubules Formed by Exfoliation of Potassium Hexaniobate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consist of sheets that curl into nanoscale rolls, to relieve built-in strain between silicate and brucite

100

Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

reconstructed from nano-tomography data (left panel). The distribution of the three transition metal ions is rendered and quantified in the middle and right columns. In this...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Nanoscale Molecular Transport by Synthetic DNA Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale Molecular Transport by Synthetic DNA Machines Jong-Shik Shin1 and Niles A. Pierce1,2 1 a processive bipedal DNA walker. Powered by externally controlled DNA fuel strands, the walker locomotes with a 5 nm stride by advancing the trailing foot to the lead at each step. On a periodic DNA track

Pierce, Niles A.

102

Nanoscale Thermal Transport andMicrorefrigeratorsonaChip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are promising candidates as thermal vias and thermal interface materials due to their inherently high thermal; superlattices; thermal boundary resistance; thermionics; thermotunneling; thermoelectrics I. INTRODUCTIONINVITED P A P E R Nanoscale Thermal Transport andMicrorefrigeratorsonaChip Devices for cooling high

103

Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the origin and physical effects of dynamic structural disorder (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale.

Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F. D. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

Nanoscale Calorimetry of Isolated Polyethylene Single Crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale Calorimetry of Isolated Polyethylene Single Crystals A. T. KWAN, M. YU. EFREMOV, E. A-film differential scanning calorimetry to investigate the melt- ing of isolated polyethylene single crystals of lamellar single crystals of polyethylene (PE). We obtain thickness, diffraction, and calorimetry data

Allen, Leslie H.

105

Nanoscale Spectroscopy and Nanotechnology 8 Scientific Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Nanoscale Spectroscopy and Nanotechnology 8 Scientific Program Gleacher Center Chicago, USA #12 Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago USA. (Invited, and Dept. of Medicine, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA. Fabrication and characterization of smart CNT

Kemner, Ken

106

LAMELLAR MAGNETISM ASSOCIATED WITH NANOSCALE EXSOLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LAMELLAR MAGNETISM ASSOCIATED WITH NANOSCALE EXSOLUTION IN THE ILMENITE-HEMATITE SOLID SOLUTION-hematite (FeTiO3-Fe2O3) solid solution is one of the most important magnetic phases in nature. Unusual magnetic, magnetic ordering, and exsolution. This presentation describes how this interaction leads to the phenomenon

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

107

A high-speed, flexible-scanning chemical imaging system using a light-addressable potentiometric sensor integrated with an analog micromirror  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A semiconductor-based chemical imaging sensor is a type of field-effect, label-free sensing system that can visualize a two-dimensional distribution of concentrations for specific chemical species on a sensor surface. This report presents the development of a high-speed, flexible chemical imaging sensor system using an analog micromirror as a light-addressing setup to scan the light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) surface from the underside. In the proposed system, a two-axis electrostatic comb-driven micromirror is used to control a modulated laser beam with rapid and tunable scanning capabilities. The position, X- and Y-axis step, direction of movement and speed of the moving laser spot can be arbitrarily defined using the programmed control on the angular rotation of the micromirror. A high-speed spatiotemporal recording of the change in pH at a rate of approximately 16fps (frames per second) using backside illumination has been achieved by the current setup. In addition, a high-resolution chemical image with 200k pixels of a test pattern in a sensor area of 14.5נ10.5mm2 was achieved within 40s. The frequency-dependent photovoltage, photovoltage-reference bias voltage characteristics, and pH sensitivity are also demonstrated and discussed systematically for optimization.

Anirban Das; Tsung-Cheng Chen; Chia-Ming Yang; Chao-Sung Lai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Argonne CNM News: Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar Energy Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar Energy Scanning tunneling microscopy tips A schematic of the Rhodobacter sphaerodes hexameric core, featuring the "special pair" (P) of degenerate bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules, and the active (a) and inactive (b) arms of BChl and bacteriopheophytin (BPh) molecules. The transient absorption (ΔA) spectra acquired following selective excitation of P are shown. Nature's process for storing solar energy occurs in light-absorbing protein complexes called photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs). Across billions of years of evolution, Nature has retained a common light-absorbing hexameric cofactor core for carrying out the very first chemical reaction of photosynthesis, the light-induced electron transfer across approximately 3

109

Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

Ren, Jianhua (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Russell, Scott (California State University, Stanislaus, Turlock, CA); Morishetti, Kiran (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

Hart, Bradley R. (Brentwood, CA); Talley, Chad E. (Brentwood, CA)

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

111

Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 20032012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ?1?nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivitythermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivityhas been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and thermal analysis using proximal probes has achieved spatial resolution of 10?nm, temperature precision of 50 mK, sensitivity to heat flows of 10 pW, and the capability for thermal analysis of sub-femtogram samples.

Cahill, David G., E-mail: d-cahill@illinois.edu; Braun, Paul V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Chen, Gang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Clarke, David R. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Fan, Shanhui [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Goodson, Kenneth E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Keblinski, Pawel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); King, William P. [Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Mahan, Gerald D. [Department of Physics, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Majumdar, Arun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Maris, Humphrey J. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Phillpot, Simon R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainseville, Florida 32611 (United States); Pop, Eric [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Shi, Li [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, Autin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Magnetic Alloys in Nanoscale Biomaterials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fe-Co composition gradient and Fe-Pt multilayer alloy films were tested as catalysts for growing vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The Fe-Co film yielded nanofibers with alloy tips in a wide compositional range varying from 8.15 pct Fe at the Co-rich end to 46.29 pct Fe in the middle of the wafer as determined by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Two Fe-Co cubic phases (SG Pm3m, Pm{bar 3}m) were identified by preliminary X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Magnetic measurements showed a substantially greater hysteresis loop area and coercivity in Fe-Co catalyst nanoparticles as compared to the as deposited Fe-Co film. The Fe-Pt film did not break into FePt alloy nanoparticles under the applied processing parameters and thus the utility of FePt as a VACNF catalyst has been inconclusive.

Leventouri, T. H. [Florida Atlantic University; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich [ORNL; Sorge, Korey D. [Florida Atlantic University; Klein, Kate L [ORNL; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Rack, P. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Anderson, Ian M [ORNL; Thompson, James R [ORNL; McKnight, Timothy E [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Electric potential distribution in nanoscale electroosmosis: from molecules to continuum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correlations in the electric double layer. 1. Counterionsand correlations in the electric double layer. 2 . SymmetricElectric potential distribution in nanoscale electroosmosis:

Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Chen, S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Center for Nanoscale Materials Brochure | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Acknowledgment Statements for Publications Fact Sheets & Other Documents Center for Nanoscale Materials Brochure Changing the World with Nanoscience CNM Brochure 2014.pdf...

115

Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered Nanoscale Particulate Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety in Nanotechnology Research Occupational Medicinenanotechnology revolution promises dramatic advancements in science, technology, medicineMedicine Implications of Engineered Nanoscale Particulate Matter The emerging nanotechnology

Kelly, Richard J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nanoscale contact engineering for Si/Silicide nanowire devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications of metal silicides ..1-3 1.4.Professor Yu Huang, Chair Metal silicides have been used inSummary Nanoscale metal silicides have garnered significant

Lin, Yung-Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Novel materials, computational spectroscopy, and multiscale simulation in nanoscale photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells convert solar energy to electricity using combinations of semiconducting sunlight absorbers and metallic materials as electrical contacts. Novel nanoscale materials introduce new paradigms for ...

Bernardi, Marco, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Electrically Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase Multiferroics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase2001). Chakhalian, J. et al. Magnetism at the interfacelocal nature of this magnetism. We find that the spontaneous

He, Q.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

(SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities User Facilities Dev X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for...

120

Electron-beam-driven nanoscale metamaterial light sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show experimentally that beams of free electrons can induce light emission from nanoscale planar photonic metamaterials. Wavelengths of emitted light are determined by both the...

Adamo, Giorgio; Ou, Jun-Yu; MacDonald, Kevin; De Angelis, Francesco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Zheludev, Nikolay

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Uncertainty Quantification for Nano-Scale Integrated Circuits...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Uncertainty Quantification for Nano-Scale Integrated Circuits and MEMS Design Event Sponsor: Mathematics and Computing Science Seminar Start Date: Jan 20 2015 - 10:30am Building...

122

Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

123

Nano-scale strengthening from grains, subgrains, and particles in Fe-based alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

x ULTRAFINE GRAINED MATERIALS Nano-scale strengthening fromSpringerlink.com Abstract Nano-scale strengthening has beenless than 20 h), develop nano-scale subgrains [15]. These

Lesuer, D. R.; Syn, C. K.; Sherby, O. D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Nano-scale magnetic film formation by decompression of supercritical CO?/ferric acetylacetonate solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROWTH OF NANO-SCALE MAGNETIC FILMS USING CO 2 RESS EX-113 GROWTH OF NANO-SCALE MAGNETIC FILMS USING A SUPERCRIT-of EDX analysis on nano-scale ?lms. . . . . . . . . . . 109

De Dea, Silvia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with polarized X-rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stoehr and H.C. Siegmann, Magnetism, Springer (2006) [93]Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials withABSTRACT Nanoscale magnetism is of paramount scientific

Fischer, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible Anodes for Lithium-ion Batteries Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible...

127

Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(HEMM) * Chemical reduction followed by HEMM * Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) * Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) * RF magnetron sputtering (RFMS) * Fluidized bed reactor (FBR) *...

128

Development of New Soft Ionization Mass Spectrometry Approaches for Spatial Imaging of Complex Chemical and Biological Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

world's first C60 SIMS FT-ICR MS. Unique capabilities for imaging biological samples: High mass accuracy spatial resolution (~10 µm) High spatial and mass resolution C60 secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS of the colony Conducted first multimodal imaging of biological materials using nano-DESI, SIMS, and matrix

129

Nanoscale atomic waveguides with suspended carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an experimentally viable setup for the realization of one-dimensional ultracold atom gases in a nanoscale magnetic waveguide formed by single doubly-clamped suspended carbon nanotubes. We show that all common decoherence and atom loss mechanisms are small guaranteeing a stable operation of the trap. Since the extremely large current densities in carbon nanotubes are spatially homogeneous, our proposed architecture allows to overcome the problem of fragmentation of the atom cloud. Adding a second nanowire allows to create a double-well potential with a moderate tunneling barrier which is desired for tunneling and interference experiments with the advantage of tunneling distances being in the nanometer regime.

V. Peano; M. Thorwart; A. Kasper; R. Egger

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

130

Argonne CNM: Manipulation of Nanoscale Materials for Energy & Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manipulation of Nanoscale Materials for Energy & Information Transduction Manipulation of Nanoscale Materials for Energy & Information Transduction Nanoscale materials absorb, dissipate, and propagate energy very differently from bulk materials. These properties offer unusual opportunities to induce, optimize, and control the conversion and transfer of energy and information at the nanoscale. The CNM applies recent advances in materials, theory, and characterization to create novel nanoscale materials for the control and transfer of energy, charge, and/or spin between homogeneous and heterogeneous materials. Propagation, Localization, and Interaction of Spin, Charge, Photons, and Phonons Realizing the promise of nanoscience hinges on the ability to understand and ultimately control the propagation of, localization of, and interaction between the basic quanta of energy and information - spin, charge, photons, and phonons - at the nanoscale. Key factors include continued advances in generating homogeneous nanoscale building blocks, finding means to hierarchically assemble the building blocks, and advanced scanning probe or other techniques for precisely initiating and monitoring propagation of these quanta at the nanoscale.

131

Novel Nanoscale Materials Reduce Electricity Needed for Sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

removal from sludge using less energy. The addition of nanoscale materials will increase the volume that removes as much water from digested sludge as possible. Dewatering is necessary to reduce the sludge of benchscale work that showed nanoscale materials enhanced the performance of polymer additives currently

132

A mesoscopic description of radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a formulation of the nanoscale radiative heat transfer (RHT) using concepts of mesoscopic physics. We introduce the analog of the Sharvin conductance using the quantum of thermal conductance. The formalism provides a convenient framework to analyse the physics of RHT at the nanoscale. Finally, we propose a RHT experiment in the regime of quantized conductance.

Svend-Age Biehs; Emmanuel Rousseau; Jean-Jacques Greffet

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

133

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Wednesday, 21 December 2005 00:00 Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

134

Hyperspectral imaging of plasmonic nanostructures with nanoscale resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasmons; (250.5403) Plasmonics. References and Links 1. S. A. Maier, Plasmonics: Fundamentals Spectrometer (AVIRIS)," Remote Sens. Environ. 65, 227-248 (1998). 9. E. D. Palik, ed. Handbook of Optical

Jonsson, Fredrik

135

Controlling light at the nanoscale: imaging and spectroscopy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

materials with spatial resolution down to nanometer length scales for, e.g., advanced solar energy and fuel cell applications. The extension of conventional optical spectroscopy...

136

Imaging nanoscale Fermi surface variations in an inhomogeneous superconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the highest energy electrons of the system reside, determine many material properties. Here we use a novel, the Fermi surface changes on nanometer length scales. Just as shifting tide lines expose variations of water of energy and position in the plane. By Fourier transforming constant energy slices of these surveys

Hudson, Eric

137

Nanoscale Charge Transport in Excitonic Solar Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excitonic solar cells, including all-organic, hybrid organic-inorganic and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), offer strong potential for inexpensive and large-area solar energy conversion. Unlike traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, where all the charge generation and collection processes are well understood, these excitonic solar cells contain extremely disordered structures with complex interfaces which results in large variations in nanoscale electronic properties and has a strong influence on carrier generation, transport, dissociation and collection. Detailed understanding of these processes is important for fabrication of highly efficient solar cells. Efforts to improve efficiency are underway at a large number of research groups throughout the world focused on inorganic and organic semiconductors, photonics, photophysics, charge transport, nanoscience, ultrafast spectroscopy, photonics, semiconductor processing, device physics, device structures, interface structure etc. Rapid progress in this multidisciplinary area requires strong synergetic efforts among researchers from diverse backgrounds. Such effort can lead to novel methods for development of new materials with improved photon harvesting and interfacial treatments for improved carrier transport, process optimization to yield ordered nanoscale morphologies with well defined electronic structures.

Venkat Bommisetty, South Dakota State University

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

138

Super-Resolution Fingerprinting Detects Chemical Reactions and Idiosyncrasies of Single DNA Pegboards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ the single-particle fluorescence nanoscopy technique points accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography (PAINT) using site-specific DNA probes to acquire two-dimensional density maps of specific features ...

Johnson-Buck, Alexander

139

Calibrated nanoscale dopant profiling using a scanning microwave microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scanning microwave microscope is used for calibrated capacitance spectroscopy and spatially resolved dopant profiling measurements. It consists of an atomic force microscope combined with a vector network analyzer operating between 1-20 GHz. On silicon semiconductor calibration samples with doping concentrations ranging from 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 3}, calibrated capacitance-voltage curves as well as derivative dC/dV curves were acquired. The change of the capacitance and the dC/dV signal is directly related to the dopant concentration allowing for quantitative dopant profiling. The method was tested on various samples with known dopant concentration and the resolution of dopant profiling determined to 20% while the absolute accuracy is within an order of magnitude. Using a modeling approach the dopant profiling calibration curves were analyzed with respect to varying tip diameter and oxide thickness allowing for improvements of the calibration accuracy. Bipolar samples were investigated and nano-scale defect structures and p-n junction interfaces imaged showing potential applications for the study of semiconductor device performance and failure analysis.

Huber, H. P.; Hochleitner, M.; Hinterdorfer, P. [University of Linz, Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Altenbergerstrasse 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Humer, I.; Smoliner, J. [Technical University of Vienna, Institute for Solid State Electronics, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Fenner, M.; Moertelmaier, M.; Rankl, C.; Tanbakuchi, H.; Kienberger, F. [Agilent Technologies, Inc., 5301 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara, California 95051 (United States); Imtiaz, A.; Wallis, T. M.; Kabos, P. [National Institute for Standards and Technology, Electromagnetic Division, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3337 (United States); Kopanski, J. J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Semiconductor Measurements Division, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8120 (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Nanoscale Growth Twins in Sputtered Copper Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................. 7 I.1.3. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) .................................... 8 I.2. Fabrication of copper thin films .................................................... 12... to the exposure of the film growth surface to the solution, impurities may be introduced. I.1.3. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) CVD is a chemical process used to produce high-purity, high-performance thin films and often used in the semiconductor industry...

Anderoglu, Osman

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Safety at the Center for Nanoscale Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

case of emergency or if you need help or assistance case of emergency or if you need help or assistance dial Argonne's Protective Force: 911 (from Argonne phones) or (630) 252-1911 (from cell phones) Safety at Work As a staff member or user at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), you need to be aware of safety regulations at Argonne National Laboratory. You are also required to have taken any safety, orientation, and training classes or courses specified by your User Work Authorization(s) and/or work planning and control documents prior to beginning your work. For safety and security reasons, it is necessary to know of all facility users present in the CNM (Buildings 440 and 441). Users are required to sign in and out in the visitors logbook located in Room A119. Some detailed emergency information is provided on the Argonne National

142

Carbon-bearing fluids at nanoscale interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behaviour of fluids at mineral surfaces or in confined geometries (pores, fractures) typically differs from their bulk behaviour in many ways due to the effects of large internal surfaces and geometrical confinement. We summarize research performed on C-O-H fluids at nanoscale interfaces in materials of interest to the earth and material sciences (e.g., silica, alumina, zeolites, clays, rocks, etc.), emphasizing those techniques that assess microstructural modification and/or dynamical behaviour such as gravimetric analysis, small-angle (SANS) neutron scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations will be described that provide atomistic characterization of interfacial and confined fluid behaviour as well as aid in the interpretation of the neutron scattering results.

Cole, David [Ohio State University; Ok, Salim [Ohio State University, Columbus; Phan, A [Ohio State University, Columbus; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Striolo, Alberto [Oklahoma University; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Fabrication of nanoscale charge density wave systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanoscale charge density wave systems of quasi-one-dimensional o ? TaS 3 crystals were fabricated.Goldelectrodes 400 nm wide were made by standard lift-off technique on o ? TaS 3 nanocrystals prepared by deposition on silicon substrates. Interface resistance was higher than 100 G ? just after evaporation and were significantly reduced by electron-beam irradiation. The electrodes were tested down to 80 mK and were found quite durable for cryogenic measurement. The temperature dependence of the resistance of the nanocrystal was represented as the variable-range-hopping-type conduction with one dimension over the wide range of temperature from 4.2 to 100 K. This behavior was different from that of conventional bulk samples.

Katsuhiko Inagaki; Takeshi Toshima; Satoshi Tanda; Kazuhiko Yamaya; Shinya Uji

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

145

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

146

Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory Whirlpools on the Nanoscale Could Multiply Magnetic Memory Print Tuesday, 21 May 2013 00:00 Research at the Advanced Light Source may lead to four-bit magnetic cells housed on nanoscale metal disks, instead of the two-bit magnetic domains of standard magnetic memories. In magnetic vortices, parallel electron spins point either clockwise or counterclockwise, while in their crowded centers the spins point either down or up. "From the scientist's point of view, magnetism is about controlling electron spin," says Peter Fischer of the Materials Sciences Division, who leads the work at beamline 6.1.2. Four orientations could provide multibits in a new kind of memory. The next step is to control the states independently and simultaneously.

147

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Vacancy-Induced Nanoscale Wire Structure in Gallium Selenide Layers Print Low-dimensional materials have gained much attention not only because of the nonstop march toward miniaturization in the electronics industry but also for the exotic properties that are inherent in their small size. One approach for creating low-dimensional structures is to exploit the nanoscale or atomic-scale features that exist naturally in the three-dimensional (bulk) form of materials. By this means, a group from the University of Washington has demonstrated a new way of creating one-dimensional nanoscale structures (nanowires) in the compound gallium selenide. In short, ordered lines of structural vacancies in the material stimulate the growth of "one-dimensional" structures less than 1 nanometer in width.

148

Thermophysical properties study of micro/nanoscale materials.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Thermal transport in low-dimensional structure has attracted tremendous attentions because micro/nanoscale materials play crucial roles in advancing micro/nanoelectronics industry. The thermal properties are essential for (more)

Feng, Xuhui

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Negative pressure characteristics of an evaporating meniscus at nanoscale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study aims at understanding the characteristics of negative liquid pressures at the nanoscale using molecular dynamics simulation. A nano-meniscus is formed by placing liquid argon on a platinum wall between two ...

Maroo, Shalabh C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Shedding light on Nature's nanoscale control of solar energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shedding light on Nature's nanoscale control of solar energy July 30, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint Across billions of years of evolution, nature has retained a common light-absorbing...

151

Electronic structure and transport in molecular and nanoscale electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two approaches based on first-principles method are developed to qualitatively and quantitatively study electronic structure and phase-coherent transport in molecular and nanoscale electronics, where both quantum mechanical ...

Qian, Xiaofeng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Secretarial Policy Statement on Nanoscale Safety - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CURRENT DOE P 456.1, Secretarial Policy Statement on Nanoscale Safety by Bill McArthur Functional areas: Nano Technology, Safety The safety of its employees, the public, and the...

153

Perspectives Nanotechnology and the public: Effectively communicating nanoscale science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perspectives Nanotechnology and the public: Effectively communicating nanoscale science August 2006 Key words: nanotechnology, communication, public knowledge, public understanding the public on concepts and applications associated with nanotechnology. The goal of our work

Crone, Wendy C.

154

Design and implementation of nanoscale fiber mechanical testing apparatus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rapid growth in the synthetic manufacturing industry demands higher resolution mechanical testing devices, capable of working with nanoscale fibers. A new device has been developed to perform single-axis tensile tests ...

Brayanov, Jordan, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Nanoscale structure and transport : from atoms to devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale structures present both unique physics and unique theoretical challenges. Atomic-scale simulations can find novel nanostructures with desirable properties, but the search can be difficult if the wide range of ...

Evans, Matthew Hiram

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

3D Tracking at the Nanoscale | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3D Tracking at the Nanoscale A new theory shows that reactivity at catalytic sites inside narrow pores is controlled by how molecules move at the pore openings. Like cars...

157

Tunable, Nanoscale Free-Electron Source of Photons and Plasmons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The passage of a free-electron beam through a nano-hole in a periodically layered metal/dielectric structure creates a new type of tuneable, nanoscale radiation source, analogous to...

Adamo, G; MacDonald, K F; Zheludev, N I; Fu, Y H; Wang, C -m; Tsai, D P; Garca de Abajo, F J

158

In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxides and their tailored structures are at the heart of electrochemical energy storage technologies and advances in understanding and controlling the dynamic behaviors in the complex oxides, particularly at the interfaces, during electrochemical processes will catalyze creative design concepts for new materials with enhanced and better-understood properties. Such knowledge is not accessible without new analytical tools. New innovative experimental techniques are needed for understanding the chemistry and structure of the bulk and interfaces, more importantly how they change with electrochemical processes in situ. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used extensively to study electrode materials ex situ and is one of the most powerful tools to obtain structural, morphological, and compositional information at nanometer scale by combining imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy, e.g., EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (EELS). Determining the composition/structure evolution upon electrochemical cycling at the bulk and interfaces can be addressed by new electron microscopy technique with which one can observe, at the nanometer scale and in situ, the dynamic phenomena in the electrode materials. In electrochemical systems, for instance in a lithium ion battery (LIB), materials operate under conditions that are far from equilibrium, so that the materials studied ex situ may not capture the processes that occur in situ in a working battery. In situ electrochemical operation in the ultra-high vacuum column of a TEM has been pursued by two major strategies. In one strategy, a 'nano-battery' can be fabricated from an all-solid-state thin film battery using a focused ion beam (FIB). The electrolyte is either polymer based or ceramic based without any liquid component. As shown in Fig. 1a, the interfaces between the active electrode material/electrolyte can be clearly observed with TEM imaging, in contrast to the composite electrodes/electrolyte interfaces in conventional lithium ion batteries, depicted in Fig.1b, where quantitative interface characterization is extremely difficult if not impossible. A second strategy involves organic electrolyte, though this approach more closely resembles the actual operation conditions of a LIB, the extreme volatility In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry by Ying Shirley Meng, Thomas McGilvray, Ming-Che Yang, Danijel Gostovic, Feng Wang, Dongli Zeng, Yimei Zhu, and Jason Graetz of the organic electrolytes present significant challenges for designing an in situ cell that is suitable for the vacuum environment of the TEM. Significant progress has been made in the past few years on the development of in situ electron microscopy for probing nanoscale electrochemistry. In 2008, Brazier et al. reported the first cross-section observation of an all solid-state lithium ion nano-battery by TEM. In this study the FIB was used to make a 'nano-battery,' from an all solid-state battery prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In situ TEM observations were not possible at that time due to several key challenges such as the lack of a suitable biasing sample holder and vacuum transfer of sample. In 2010, Yamamoto et al. successfully observed changes of electric potential in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery in situ with electron holography (EH). The 2D potential distribution resulting from movement of lithium ions near the positive-electrode/electrolyte interface was quantified. More recently Huang et al. and Wang et al. reported the in situ observations of the electrochemical lithiation of a single SnO{sub 2} nanowire electrode in two different in situ setups. In their approach, a vacuum compatible ionic liquid is used as the electrolyte, eliminating the need for complicated membrane sealing to prevent the evaporation of carbonate based organic electrolyte into the TEM column. One main limitation of this approach is that EELS spectral imaging is not possible due to the high plasmon signal of the ionic li

Graetz J.; Meng, Y.S.; McGilvray, T.; Yang, M.-C.; Gostovic, D.; Wang, F.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, Y.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

CNEEC - TRG3: Nanoscale Control in Catalysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

achieve the required catalytic properties to enable efficient and cost-effective energy conversion devices. In this thrust we are focusing our efforts on electro-chemical...

160

Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Technique: Microanalysis Insights into Atmospheric Chemistry of Fly Ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Airborne fly ash from coal combustion may represent a source of bioavailable iron (Fe) in the open ocean. However, few studies have been made focusing on Fe speciation and distribution in coal fly ash. In this study, chemical imaging of fly ash has been performed using a dual-beam FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope) system for a better understanding of how simulated atmospheric processing modify the morphology, chemical compositions and element distributions of individual particles. A novel approach has been applied for cross-sectioning of fly ash specimen with a FIB in order to explore element distribution within the interior of individual particles. Our results indicate that simulated atmospheric processing causes disintegration of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in fly ash particles. Aluminosilicate-phase Fe in the inner core of fly ash particles is more easily mobilized compared with oxide-phase Fe present as surface aggregates on fly ash spheres. Fe release behavior depends strongly on Fe speciation in aerosol particles. The approach for preparation of cross-sectioned specimen described here opens new opportunities for particle microanalysis, particular with respect to inorganic refractive materials like fly ash and mineral dust.

Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Laskin, Alexander

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

ITP Nanomanufacturing: Manufacturing of Surfaces with Nanoscale...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

These molds and dies are then used to image these features onto surfaces via plastic injection molding, stamping, forging, die casting, or pressing. This approach will be...

162

NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemical and Materials Science Staff  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical and Materials Science Staff Chemical and Materials Science Staff The Chemical and Materials Science staff members at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory work within one of five groups: the Chemical and Nanoscale Science Group, the Theoretical Materials Science Group, the Materials Science Group, the Process Technology and Advanced Concepts Group, and the Fuel Cells Group. Access the staff members' background, areas of expertise, and contact information below. Jao van de Lagemaat Director Marisa Howe Project Specialist Chemical & Nanoscale Science Group Nicole Campos Administrative Professional Paul Ackerman Natalia Azarova Brian Bailey Matthew C. Beard Matt Bergren Raghu N. Bhattacharya Julio Villanueva Cab Rebecca Callahan Russ Cormier Ryan Crisp Alex Dixon Andrew J. Ferguson Arthur J. Frank

163

Nanoscale Advances in Catalysis and Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this perspective, we present an overview of nanoscience applications in catalysis, energy conversion, and energy conservation technologies. We discuss how novel physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials can be applied and engineered to meet the advanced material requirements in the new generation of chemical and energy conversion devices. We highlight some of the latest advances in these nanotechnologies and provide an outlook at the major challenges for further developments.

Li, Yimin; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

164

Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light Title Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Choi, Jong Hyun, Donald Lucas, and Catherine P. Koshland Journal Journal of Physics: Conference Series Volume 59 Start Page 54 Issue 1 Pagination 54-59 Abstract Laser interaction with nanoscale particles is distinct and different from laser-bulk material interaction, where a hot plasma is normally created. Here, we review our studies on 193 nm laser ablation of various nanoscale particles including NaCl, soot, polystyrene, and gold. The 20 ns laser beam with fluences up to 0.3 J/cm2 irradiates nanoparticles in a gas stream at laser repetition rates from 10 to 100 Hz. The particle size distributions before and after irradiation are measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and particle morphology is examined with electron microscopy. All the nanomaterials studied exhibit a similar disintegration pattern and similar particle formation characteristics. No broadband emission associated with particle heating or optical breakdown is observed. The nanoparticles formed after irradiation have a smaller mean diameter and an order of magnitude higher number concentration with a more spherical shape compared to the original particles. We use the photon-atom ratio (PAR) to interpret the laser-particle interaction energetics.

165

Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The ability to make materials with nanoscale dimensions opens vast opportunities for creating custom materials with unique properties. The properties of materials on the nanoscale (more)

Zaniewski, Anna Monro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Nano-scale positioning, control and motion planning in hard disk drives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Nano-scale Positioning, Control andABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION Nano-scale Positioning, Controlmm) height (mm) mini micro nano pico femto Figure 2.8:

Boettcher, Uwe

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Peering into the Interfaces of Nanoscale Polymeric Materials | Advanced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ironing Out the Details of the Earth's Core Ironing Out the Details of the Earth's Core Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Peering into the Interfaces of Nanoscale Polymeric Materials JANUARY 6, 2012 Bookmark and Share Schematic configuration of the marker XPCS experiments. The use of resonance enhanced X-ray scattering for XPCS enables one to intensify, by more than one order of magnitude, the probing electrical field in the regions of interest within single nanometer polymer films. The development of polymer nanostructures and nanoscale devices for a wide variety of applications could emerge from new information about the interplay between nanoscale interfaces in polymeric materials, thanks to

168

2-5 Interfacial & Nanoscale Science Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INSF Overview INSF Overview Interfacial & Nanoscale Science Facility The Interfacial & Nanoscale Science (I&NS) Facility is a world-class resource for scientific expertise and instrumentation related to the study of interfacial phenomena and nanoscience and technology. This section summarizes the capabilities that exist in the I&NS Facility, along with research programs associated with facility users. Activities in the I&NS Facility address national needs in environmental restoration, waste management, pollution preven- tion, energy, and national security through research that specializes in preparation, charac- terization, interactions, and reactivity of interfaces and nanoscale materials. The range of scientific expertise and instrumentation within the I&NS Facility provides a unique envi-

169

SURFACE ELASTICITY MODELS FOR STATIC AND DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF NANOSCALE BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURFACE ELASTICITY MODELS FOR STATIC AND DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF NANOSCALE BEAMS by Chang Liu B) THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (Vancouver) February 2010 © Chang Liu, 2010 #12;ii Abstract Nanoscale beam of nanoscale beams. The objective is to provide NEMS designers with an efficient set of tools that can predict

Phani, A. Srikantha

170

A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

At a very small, or "nano" scale, materials behave differently. The study of nanomaterials is much more than miniaturization - scientists are discovering how changes in size change a material's properties. From sunscreen to computer memory, the applications of nanoscale materials research are all around us. Researchers at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials are creating new materials, methods and technologies to address some of the world's greatest challenges in energy security, lightweight but durable materials, high-efficiency lighting, information storage, environmental stewardship and advanced medical devices.

Divan, Ralu; Rosenthal, Dan; Rose, Volker; Wai Hla, Saw; Liu, Yuzi

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Nanoscale Advances in Catalysis and Energy Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(50) Energy conversion and transport in nanomaterials differs significantly from that in bulk materials because of classical and quantum size effects on energy carriers such as photons, phonons, electrons, and molecules. ... (52) Photovoltaic cells convert the photon energy directly to electricity by separating the excited electron?hole pairs in photovoltaic materials. ... By band engineering through controlling the size, shape, chemical composition, and heterojunction of semiconductor materials, nanomaterials provide the opportunity to achieve high efficiencies for sunlight to charge conversion and chemical conversions at the electrode surfaces at the same time. ...

Yimin Li; Gabor A. Somorjai

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

172

Poly(ethyleneimine) as a Passivating Agent for Ta Chemical Mechanical Planarization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of approximately 3 times in the Ta removal rate in a model CMP slurry upon addition of 3000 ppm PEI. © 2010 allow reduced downforce or higher removal rates. These observations are consistent with an increase and Ta removal and nanoscale planarization.3,4 Cu is easily chemically etched, so the chemical component

Suni, Ian Ivar

173

Why Area Might Reduce Power in Nanoscale CMOS Paul Beckett  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why Area Might Reduce Power in Nanoscale CMOS Paul Beckett School of Electrical and Computer Engineering RMIT University Melbourne, Australia 3000 Email: pbeckett@rmit.edu.au Seth Copen Goldstein School-- In this paper we explore the relationship between power and area. By exploiting parallelism (and thus using more

Goldstein, Seth Copen

174

Bioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(IV) (UO2[s], uraninite) Anthropogenic · Release of mill tailings during uranium mining - MobilizationBioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale Zero-valent Iron Angela Athey Advisers: Dr. Reyes Undergraduate Student Fellowship Program April 15, 2011 #12;Main Sources of Uranium Natural · Leaching from

Fay, Noah

175

Nanoscale Thermotropic Phase Transitions Enhance Photothermal Microscopy Signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the material undergoes a phase transition. Herein, we show that thermotropic phase transitions in 4-Cyano-41 Nanoscale Thermotropic Phase Transitions Enhance Photothermal Microscopy Signals A. Nicholas G-objects in various environments. It uses a photo-induced change in the refractive index of the environment. Taking

Boyer, Edmond

176

Benchmark density functional theory calculations for nanoscale conductance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benchmark density functional theory calculations for nanoscale conductance M. Strange,a I. S. The transmission functions are calculated using two different density functional theory methods, namely state density functional theory DFT . The resulting NEGF- DFT formalism provides a numerically efficient

Thygesen, Kristian

177

The attractions of magnetism for nanoscale data storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...remodelling of society by electricity and electronics owed...magnetism for nanoscale data storage 283 The irony...was made assuming one data bit every 40 nm on the...atom representing one data bit, a piece of material...are unimaginable! The big problem facing this idea...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

NANO-SCALE CALORIMETRY OF ISOLATED POLYETHYLENE SINGLE CRYSTALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;NANO-SCALE CALORIMETRY OF ISOLATED POLYETHYLENE SINGLE CRYSTALS BY ALEX TAN KWAN B.S., Stanford) device, the nanocalorimeter, it was possible to investigate the melting of isolated polyethylene (PE, a simple Ni-foil calorimeter, to measure the heat capacity of a thin polyethylene film to verify

Allen, Leslie H.

179

Cover image Darwin and physics? The relevance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CharlesSantoriandYoshihisaYamamoto 174 Nuclear magnetic resonance: The benefits of travel Alison.C.Glattli,M.-S.Choi,C.MoraandT.Kontos N&Vp175 213 imaging nanoscale Fermi-surface variations in an inhomogeneous superconductor W.D.Wise

Loss, Daniel

180

New Nanoscale Engineering Breakthrough Points to Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Patterning High-density Arrays of Nanospheres with Self Assembly Patterning High-density Arrays of Nanospheres with Self Assembly Cells Forming Blood Vessels Send Their Copper to the Edge A Molecular Cause for One Form of Deafness Water Theory is Watertight Nanowire Micronetworks from Carbon-Black Nanoparticles Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Nanoscale Engineering Breakthrough Points to Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles MARCH 7, 2007 Bookmark and Share Nenad Markovic and Vojislav Stamenkovic with the new three-chamber UHV system at Argonne. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have developed an advanced concept in nanoscale catalyst engineering - a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Nanoscale-Ordered Materials Diffractometer at SNS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale-Ordered Materials Diffractometer Nanoscale-Ordered Materials Diffractometer Inside the NOMAD detector tank. Inside the NOMAD detector tank. NOMAD is a high-flux, medium-resolution diffractometer that uses a large bandwidth of neutron energies and extensive detector coverage to carry out structural determinations of local order in crystalline and amorphous materials. It enables studies of a large variety of samples ranging from liquids, solutions, glasses, polymers, and nanocrystalline materials to long-range-ordered crystals. The enhanced neutron flux at SNS, coupled with the advanced neutron optics and detector features of NOMAD, allows for unprecedented access to high-resolution pair distribution functions, small-contrast isotope substitution experiments, small sample sizes, and parametric studies.

182

Argonne CNM Highlight: Quasi-Crystalline Order at Nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quasi-Crystalline Order at Nanoscale Quasi-Crystalline Order at Nanoscale Polyimide Nanofilter TEM showing the two-dimensional dodecagonal quasi-crystalline structure self-assembled from 5-nm Au and 13.4-nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Nanoparticles have a strong tendency to form periodic structures. Mixing and matching of two different types of nanoparticles allows the formation of binary nanoparticle superlattices isostructural to ionic or intermetallic compounds. In addition to periodic superlattices, binary mixtures of nearly spherical nanoparticles could lead to the growth of quasi-crystals. CNM staff in the Nanobio Interfaces Group, together with colleagues from the University of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania, have found that two-dimensional dodecagonal quasi-crystals can be formed in mixtures

183

ST ATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS Nanoscale Science Research Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ST ST ATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS Nanoscale Science Research Center Class Waiver, W(C)-200S-001 The 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act, 15 U.S.c. §7501 et seq., (the "Nanotechnology Act"), signed into lawon December 3,2003, codifies programs and activities supported by the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) and provides for the establishment of a network of advanced technology user facilities and centers. An "advanced technology user facility" is defined as "a nanotechnology research development facility supported, in whole or in part, by Federal funds that is open to all United States researchers on a competitive, merit- reviewed basis." 15 U.S.c. § 7509(5). DOE has established five user facilities under the Nanotechnology Act, known as Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), which are funded by the

184

Coupled ionic and electronic heat transport at the nanoscale.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In modeling thermal transport in nanoscale systems, classical molecular dynamics (MD) explicitly represents phonon modes and scattering mechanisms, but electrons and their role in energy transport are missing. Furthermore, the assumption of local equilibrium between ions and electrons often fails at the nanoscale. We have coupled MD (implemented in the LAMMPS MD package) with a partial differential equation based representation of the electrons (implemented using finite elements). The coupling between the subsystems occurs via a local version of the two-temperature model. Key parameters of the model are calculated using the Time Dependent Density Functional Theory with either explicit or implicit energy flow. We will discuss application of this work in the context of the US DOE Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT).

Olmsted, David L.; Modine, Normand Arthur; Beck, M. J. (University of Kentucky); Jones, Reese E.; Hatcher, R. M. (Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories); Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Wagner, Gregory John

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Size and load dependence of nanoscale electric contact resistance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nanoscale electrical resistance between a platinum-coated atomic force microscope tip and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface is measured as a function of normal load and tip radius. These measurements are complemented by molecular dynamics simulations that relate load and radius to contact area. Simulation-predicted contact area and experimentally-measured resistance are used to calculate contact resistivity. The results show that the effect of load on resistance can be captured by the real contact area, while tip size, although in part captured by area, affects contact resistivity itself, potentially through interface distance. Our study provides new insight into the effect of load and geometry on nanoscale electric contact and, more significantly, highlights the role of atomic-scale contact features in determining contact resistance.

Zhijiang Ye; Hyeongjoo Moon; Min Hwan Lee; Ashlie Martini

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Nanoscale Cluster Detection in Massive Atom Probe Tomography Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent technological advances in atom probe tomography (APT) have led to unprecedented data acquisition capabilities that routinely generate data sets containing hundreds of millions of atoms. Detecting nanoscale clusters of different atom types present in these enormous amounts of data and analyzing their spatial correlations with one another are fundamental to understanding the structural properties of the material from which the data is derived. Extant algorithms for nanoscale cluster detection do not scale to large data sets. Here, a scalable, CUDA-based implementation of an autocorrelation algorithm is presented. It isolates spatial correlations amongst atomic clusters present in massive APT data sets in linear time using a linear amount of storage. Correctness of the algorithm is demonstrated using large synthetically generated data with known spatial distributions. Benefits and limitations of using GPU-acceleration for autocorrelation-based APT data analyses are presented with supporting performance results on data sets with up to billions of atoms. To our knowledge, this is the first nanoscale cluster detection algorithm that scales to massive APT data sets and executes on commodity hardware.

Seal, Sudip K [ORNL] [ORNL; Yoginath, Srikanth B [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, Michael K [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Wednesday, 29 August 2012 00:00 Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

188

Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

189

Physical and Chemical Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

data image data image Physical and Chemical Applications Research in this area includes: Chemical analysis (femtosecond laser ablation). Advanced sensors (laser ultrasonics). Advanced materials and nanotechnology for clean energy- hydrogen storage, nanostructured organic light-emitting diodes, nanowires, and nanoparticles). Photons to fuels (biosynthetic pathways for generating hydrocarbon biofuels in photosynthetic organisms). Advanced Sensor Development Sensor-based control of industrial processes can help companies: Decrease production costs; Reduce waste of raw materials on manufacturing lines; Lower manufacturing downtime from equipment maintenance; Increase the energy efficiency of manufacturing processes; Detect equipment failure early, before it becomes a major liability;

190

Nanoscale Gold for Enhanced Protein Electrochemistry, Ebolavirus Immunosensors, and In Vivo Distribution Measurements.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Different applications using gold at the nanoscale level are discussed in this dissertation. The first section includes relevant background into nanoparticles, specifically, monolayer protected gold (more)

Huffman, Brian Joseph

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Atomic-Level Study of Ion-Induced Nanoscale Disordered Domains...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The simulations suggest that it is possible to design and fabricate nanoscale optoelectronic devices based on SiC using ion-beam-induced order-disorder transformation....

192

Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

(SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities User Facilities Dev X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for...

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - altered nanoscale topographies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bioelectric Scanning Probe Microscopies Summary: . Fumagalli, G. Gomila, et al. Nano Letters (2009) Topography Capacitance Dielectric constant 4. Nanoscale... to measure...

194

Tiny tool measures heat at the nanoscale > EMC2 News > The Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fellowship In This Section EMC2 News Archived News Stories Tiny tool measures heat at the nanoscale February 26th, 2014 Robinson Group Design of the spectrometer to...

195

Super-Resolution Optical Imaging of Biomass Chemical-Spatial Structure: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-410  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective for this project is to characterize and develop new methods to visualize the chemical spatial structure of biomass at varying stages of the biomass degradation processes in situ during the process.

Ding, S. Y.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A tomographic technique for the simultaneous imaging of temperature, chemical species, and pressure in reactive flows using absorption spectroscopy with frequency-agile lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper proposes a technique that can simultaneously retrieve distributions of temperature, concentration of chemical species, and pressure based on broad bandwidth, frequency-agile tomographic absorption spectroscopy. The technique holds...

Cai, Weiwei; Kaminski, Clemens F.

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

197

Optical imaging for the new grammar of drug discovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...enabling optical imaging platform will combine optical...validating highly specific chemical and biological tools...are generated through chemical reactions and therefore...enabling optical imaging platform will combine optical...validating highly specific chemical and biological tools...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Formation of hollow nanocrystals through the nanoscale kirkendall effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate that hollow nanocrystals can be synthesized through a mechanism analogous to the Kirkendall Effect, in which pores form due to the difference in diffusion rates between two components in a diffusion couple. Cobalt nanocrystals are chosen as a primary example to show that their reaction in solution with oxygen, sulfur or selenium leads to the formation of hollow nanocrystals of the resulting oxide and chalcogenides. This process provides a general route to the synthesis of hollow nanostructures of large numbers of compounds. A simple extension of this process yields platinum-cobalt oxide yolk-shell nanostructures which may serve as nanoscale reactors in catalytic applications.

Yin, Yadong; Rioux, Robert M.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Hughes, Steven; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2004-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

199

Nano-Biotechnology: Structure and Dynamics of Nanoscale Biosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale biosystems are widely used in numerous medical applications. The approaches for structure and function of the nanomachines that are available in the cell (natural nanomachines) are discussed. Molecular simulation studies have been extensively used to study the dynamics of many nanomachines including ribosome. Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) serve as prototypes for biological channels such as Aquaporins (AQPs). Recently, extensive investigations have been performed on the transport of biological nanosystems through CNTs. The results are utilized as a guide in building a nanomachinary such as nanosyringe for a needle free drug delivery.

Manjasetty, Babu A; Ramaswamy, Y S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Nanoscale topographical replication of graphene architecture by artificial DNA nanostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite many studies on how geometry can be used to control the electronic properties of graphene, certain limitations to fabrication of designed graphene nanostructures exist. Here, we demonstrate controlled topographical replication of graphene by artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nanostructures. Owing to the high degree of geometrical freedom of DNA nanostructures, we controlled the nanoscale topography of graphene. The topography of graphene replicated from DNA nanostructures showed enhanced thermal stability and revealed an interesting negative temperature coefficient of sheet resistivity when underlying DNA nanostructures were denatured at high temperatures.

Moon, Y.; Seo, S.; Park, J.; Park, T.; Ahn, J. R., E-mail: jrahn@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, J.; Dugasani, S. R. [Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, S. H. [College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, S. H., E-mail: sunghapark@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Kinetics of Analyte Capture on Nanoscale Sensors J. E. Solomon* and M. R. Pauly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Kinetics of Analyte Capture on Nanoscale Sensors J. E. Solomon* and M. R. Pauly *Condensed analyte capture efficiency is a crucial measure of the ultimate sensitivity of such devices years, the potential use of nanoscale electromechanical systems has been considered for high

Paul, Mark

202

Surface-Phonon Polariton Contribution to Nanoscale Radiative Heat Transfer. Emmanuel Rousseau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface-Phonon Polariton Contribution to Nanoscale Radiative Heat Transfer. Emmanuel Rousseau-sud Campus Polytechnique RD 128 91127 Palaiseau cedex, France Heat transfer between two plates of polar far-field value. In this article, we show that nanoscale heat transfer is dominated by the coupling

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

203

Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped Emmanuel Rousseau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped silicon the role of surface plasmons for nanoscale radiative heat transfer between doped silicon surfaces. We derive a new accurate and closed-form expression of the radiative near- field heat transfer. We also

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

204

Local Heating in Nanoscale Conductors Yu-Chang Chen, Michael Zwolak, and Massimiliano Di Ventra*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local Heating in Nanoscale Conductors Yu-Chang Chen, Michael Zwolak, and Massimiliano Di Ventra Received October 2, 2003 ABSTRACT We report first-principles calculations of local heating in nanoscale heat dissipation, the single molecule heats less than the gold point contact. We also find that

Zwolak, Michael

205

A mean field approach for computing solid-liquid surface tension for nanoscale interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mean field approach for computing solid-liquid surface tension for nanoscale interfaces Chi are largely determined by the solid-liquid surface tension. This is especially true for nanoscale systems with high surface area to volume ratios. While experimental techniques can only measure surface tension

Nielsen, Steven O.

206

Tunable Nanoscale Plasmon Antenna for Localization and Enhancement of Optical Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tunable Nanoscale Plasmon Antenna for Localization and Enhancement of Optical Energy Douglas Howe used. The coupling of optical energy with the surface plasmons that occur on the surface of metals the optical energy that couples with surface plasmons that exist on nanoscale metal structures. Gold

La Rosa, Andres H.

207

Nanoscale patterning of graphene through femtosecond laser ablation R. Sahin, E. Simsek, and S. Akturk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale patterning of graphene through femtosecond laser ablation R. Sahin, E. Simsek, and S.164.158.129 On: Mon, 10 Feb 2014 15:01:27 #12;Nanoscale patterning of graphene through femtosecond laser ablation 2014) We report on nanometer-scale patterning of single layer graphene on SiO2/Si substrate through

Simsek, Ergun

208

Coherent Control of Nanoscale Light Localization in Metamaterial: Creating and Positioning Isolated Subwavelength Energy Hot Spots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a subwavelength local- ization of optical energy. A desired nanoscale light hot spot can be engineered simplyCoherent Control of Nanoscale Light Localization in Metamaterial: Creating and Positioning Isolated Subwavelength Energy Hot Spots T. S. Kao,1 S. D. Jenkins,2 J. Ruostekoski,2 and N. I. Zheludev1,* 1

Zheludev, Nikolay

209

Nanoscale Science Research Centers | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nanoscale Science Research Centers Nanoscale Science Research Centers Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers Electron-Beam Microcharacterization Centers Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home User Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The five NSRCs are DOE's premier user centers for interdisciplinary research at the nanoscale, serving as the basis for a national program that encompasses new science, new tools, and new computing capabilities. Each center has particular expertise and capabilities in selected theme areas, such as synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials; catalysis; theory,

210

Nanoscale Graphene Disk: A Natural Functionally Graded Material --The Thermal Conductivity of Nanoscale Graphene Disk by Molecular Dynamics Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this letter, we investigate numerically (by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics) and analytically the thermal conductivity of nanoscale graphene disks (NGDs), and discussed the possibility to realize FGM with only one material, NGDs. We found that the NGD has a graded thermal conductivity and can be used as FGM in a large temperature range. Moreover, we show the dependent of NGDs' thermal conductivity on radius and temperature. Our study may inspire experimentalists to develop NGD based FGMs and help heat removal of hot spots on chips by graphene.

Yang, Nuo; Ma, Dengke; Lu, Tingyu; Li, Baowen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

212

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

213

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

214

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

215

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

216

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic applications. Now, an international collaboration working at the ALS has shown that the interface is not required. Using only intense synchrotron light, the group has been able to create and control 2DEGs at the bare surfaces of the insulating oxides SrTiO3 and KTaO3. As well as suggesting a potential methodology to spatially pattern 2DEGs in a wide variety of complex oxides, this discovery opens a new avenue for spectroscopic investigation of these novel electronic systems.

217

Conversion of lignin precursors to carbon fibers with nanoscale graphitic domains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is one of the most abundant and inexpensive natural biopolymers. It can be efficiently converted to low cost carbon fiber, monolithic structures or powders that could be used directly in the production of anodes for lithium-ion batteries. In this work, we report processing parameters relevant for the conversion of lignin precursors into electrochemically active carbon fibers, the impact of lignin precursor modification on melt processing and the microstructure of the final carbon material. The conversion process encompasses melt spinning of the lignin precursor, oxidative stabilization and a low temperature carbonization step in a nitrogen/hydrogen atmosphere. To assess electrochemical performance, we determined resistivities of individual carbon fiber samples and characterized the microstructure by scanning electron microscopy and neutron diffraction. The chemical modification and subsequent thermomechanical processing methods reported here are effective for conversion into carbon fibers while preserving the macromolecular backbone structure of lignin. Modification of softwood lignin produced functionalities and rheological properties that more closely resemble hardwood lignin thereby enabling the melt processing of softwood lignin in oxidative atmospheres (air). Structural characterization of the carbonized fibers reveals nanoscale graphitic domains that are linked to enhanced electrochemical performance.

Chatterjee, Sabornie [ORNL; Jones, Eric B [ORNL; Clingenpeel, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; McKenna, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; McNutt, Nicholas W [ORNL; Keffer, David J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Johs, Alexander [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Chemical Sciences Division | Advanced Materials |ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Sciences Chemical Sciences Division SHARE Chemical Sciences Division The Chemical Sciences Division performs discovery and uses inspired research to understand, predict, and control the physical processes and chemical transformations at multiple length and time scales, especially at interfaces. The foundation of the division is a strong Basic Energy Sciences (BES) portfolio that pushes the frontiers of catalysis, geosciences, separations and analysis, chemical imaging, neutron science, polymer science, and interfacial science. Theory is closely integrated with materials synthesis and characterization to gain new insights into chemical transformations and processes with the ultimate goal of predictive insights. Applied research programs naturally grow out of our fundamental

219

Engineered Nano-scale Ceramic Supports for PEM Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Engineered Nano-scale Ceramic Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Eric L. Brosha, Anthony Burrell, Neil Henson, Jonathan Phillips, and Tommy Rockward Los Alamos National Laboratory Timothy Ward, Plamen Atanassov University of New Mexico Karren More Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fuel Cell Technologies Program Kick-off Meeting September 30 - October 1, 2009 Washington DC Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Fuel Cell Technologies Objectives  Develop a ceramic alternative to carbon material supports for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathode that exhibits an enhanced resistance to corrosion and Pt coalescence while preserving positive attributes of carbon such as

220

Los Alamos scientists detect and track single molecules with nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanotube "glowsticks" transform surface science tool kit Nanotube "glowsticks" transform surface science tool kit Los Alamos scientists detect and track single molecules with nanoscale carbon cylinders Researchers have now shown that semiconducting carbon nanotubes have the potential to detect and track single molecules in water. January 10, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ADVANCED HEAT EXCHANGERS USING TUNABLE NANOSCALE-MOLECULAR ASSEMBLY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam condensation heat transfer on smooth horizontal tubes and enhanced tubes (TURBO-CDI and TURBO-CSL) along with nanoscale hydrophobic coated tubes was studied experimentally. Hydrophobic coatings have been created through self-assembled mono layers (SAMs) on copper alloy (99.9% Cu, 0.1% P) surfaces to enhance steam condensation through dropwise condensation. In general, a SAM system with a long-chain, hydrophobic group is nano-resistant, meaning that such a system forms a protective hydrophobic layer with negligible heat transfer resistance but a much stronger bond. When compared to complete filmwise condensation, the SAM coating on a plain tube increased the condensation heat transfer rate by a factor of 3 for copper alloy surfaces, under vacuum pressure (33.86 kPa) and by a factor of about 8 times when operated at atmospheric pressure (101 kPa). Lifetime of maintaining dropwise condensation is greatly dependent on the processing conditions.

Kwang J. Kim; Thomas W. Bell; Srinivas Vemuri; Sailaja Govindaraju

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Neural assembly models derived through nano-scale measurements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments of a three-year project focused on developing technical capabilities for measuring and modeling neuronal processes at the nanoscale. It was successfully demonstrated that nanoprobes could be engineered that were biocompatible, and could be biofunctionalized, that responded within the range of voltages typically associated with a neuronal action potential. Furthermore, the Xyce parallel circuit simulator was employed and models incorporated for simulating the ion channel and cable properties of neuronal membranes. The ultimate objective of the project had been to employ nanoprobes in vivo, with the nematode C elegans, and derive a simulation based on the resulting data. Techniques were developed allowing the nanoprobes to be injected into the nematode and the neuronal response recorded. To the authors's knowledge, this is the first occasion in which nanoparticles have been successfully employed as probes for recording neuronal response in an in vivo animal experimental protocol.

Fan, Hongyou; Branda, Catherine; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E.; Forsythe, James Chris

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Electric-field-driven polymer entry into asymmetric nanoscale channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electric-field-driven entry process of flexible charged polymers such as single stranded DNA (ssDNA) into asymmetric nanoscale channels such as alpha-hemolysin protein channel is studied theoretically and using molecular dynamics simulations. Dependence of the height of the free-energy barrier on the polymer length, the strength of the applied electric field and the channel entrance geometry is investigated. It is shown that the squeezing effect of the driving field on the polymer and the lateral confinement of the polymer before its entry to the channel crucially affect the barrier height and its dependence on the system parameters. The attempt frequency of the polymer for passing the channel is also discussed. Our theoretical and simulation results support each other and describe related data sets of polymer translocation experiments through the alpha-hemolysin protein channel reasonably well.

Narges Nikoofard; Hossein Fazli

2012-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

224

Atomic Calligraphy: The Direct Writing of Nanoscale Structures using MEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) based method for the resist free patterning of nano-structures. Using a focused ion beam (FIB) to customize larger MEMS machines, we fabricate apertures as small as 50 nm on plates that can be moved with nanometer precision over an area greater than 20x20 {\\mu}m^2. Depositing thermally evaporated gold atoms though the apertures while moving the plate results in the deposition of nanoscale metal patterns. Adding a shutter only microns above the aperture, enables high speed control of not only where but also when atoms are deposited. Using a shutter, different sized apertures can be selectively opened and closed for nano-structure fabrication with features ranging from nano- to micrometers in scale. The ability to evaporate materials with high precision, and thereby fabricate circuits and structures in situ, enables new kinds of experiments based on the interactions of a small number of atoms and eventually even single atoms.

Matthias Imboden; Han Han; Jackson Chang; Flavio Pardo; Cristian A. Bolle; Evan Lowell; David J. Bishop

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

225

Friction-Induced Fluid Heating in Nanoscale Helium Flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the mechanism of friction-induced fluid heating in nanoconfinements. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the temperature variations of liquid helium in nanoscale Poiseuille flows. It is found that the fluid heating is dominated by different sources of friction as the external driving force is changed. For small external force, the fluid heating is mainly caused by the internal viscous friction in the fluid. When the external force is large and causes fluid slip at the surfaces of channel walls, the friction at the fluid-solid interface dominates over the internal friction in the fluid and is the major contribution to fluid heating. An asymmetric temperature gradient in the fluid is developed in the case of nonidentical walls and the general temperature gradient may change sign as the dominant heating factor changes from internal to interfacial friction with increasing external force.

Li Zhigang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nanoscale patterning of graphene through femtosecond laser ablation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on nanometer-scale patterning of single layer graphene on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate through femtosecond laser ablation. The pulse fluence is adjusted around the single-pulse ablation threshold of graphene. It is shown that, even though both SiO{sub 2} and Si have more absorption in the linear regime compared to graphene, the substrate can be kept intact during the process. This is achieved by scanning the sample under laser illumination at speeds yielding a few numbers of overlapping pulses at a certain point, thereby effectively shielding the substrate. By adjusting laser fluence and translation speed, 400?nm wide ablation channels could be achieved over 100??m length. Raster scanning of the sample yields well-ordered periodic structures, provided that sufficient gap is left between channels. Nanoscale patterning of graphene without substrate damage is verified with Scanning Electron Microscope and Raman studies.

Sahin, R.; Akturk, S., E-mail: selcuk.akturk@itu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak 34469, Istanbul (Turkey); Simsek, E. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

227

Excess lithium storage and charge compensation in nanoscale Li4+xTi5O12  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lithium titanate spinel (Li4Ti5O12; LTO) is a promising candidate for anodes in lithium-ion batteries due to its excellent cyclability and safety performance, and has been known as a 'zero-strain' material that allows reversible lithium insertiondeinsertion with little change in the lattice parameters. For a better understanding of lithium reaction mechanisms in this material, it has been of great interest to identify where lithium is inserted and how it migrates during charge and discharge, which is often difficult with x-ray and electron scattering techniques due to the low scattering power of lithium. In this study, we employed atomic-resolution annular bright-field imaging to directly image the lithium on interstitial sites in nanoscale LTO, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy to measure local lithium occupancy and electronic structure at different states of charge. During lithiation, charge compensation occurs primarily at O sites, rather than at Ti sites, and no significant change was found in the projected density of states (Ti 3d) until the voltage was lowered to ~50mV or below. The Li K-edge spectra were simulated via abinitio calculations, providing a direct correlation between the near-edge fine structure and the local lithium coordination. During the initial states of discharge, lithium ions on 8a sites migrate to 16c sites (above 740mV). Further lithiation causes the partial re-occupation of 8a sites, initially in the near-surface region at ~600mV, and then in the bulk at lower voltages (~50mV). We attribute the enhanced capacity in nanostructured LTO to extra storage of lithium in the near-surface region, primarily at {111} facets.

Feng Wang; Lijun Wu; Chao Ma; Dong Su; Yimei Zhu; Jason Graetz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Chemical & EngChemical/Engineering Materials Division | Neutron Science |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical and Engineering Materials Division Chemical and Engineering Materials Division SHARE Chemical and Engineering Materials Division CEMD Director Mike Simonson The Chemical and Engineering Materials Division (CEMD) supports neutron-based research at SNS and HFIR in understanding the structure and dynamics of chemical systems and novel engineering materials. The user community takes advantage of division-supported capabilities of neutron scattering for measurements over wide ranges of experimental and operating conditions, including studies of chemical and physical changes in situ. User experiments with diffraction, small-angle scattering, inelastic and quasielastic scattering, and neutron imaging instruments address a range of problems in chemistry and in engineering materials research. Current areas of research supported by the division include the structure

229

Diffraction phase microscopy: monitoring nanoscale dynamics in materials science [Invited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) utilizes the fact that the phase of an imaging field is much more sensitive than its amplitude. As fields from the source interact with the specimen,...

Edwards, Chris; Zhou, Renjie; Hwang, Suk-Won; McKeown, Steven J; Wang, Kaiyuan; Bhaduri, Basanta; Ganti, Raman; Yunker, Peter J; Yodh, Arjun G; Rogers, John A; Goddard, Lynford L; Popescu, Gabriel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Spiral precipitation patterns in confined chemical gardens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical gardens are mineral aggregates that grow in three dimensions with plant-like forms and share properties with self-assembled structures like nano-scale tubes, brinicles or chimneys at hydrothermal vents. The analysis of their shapes remains a challenge, as their growth is influenced by osmosis, buoyancy and reaction-diffusion processes. Here we show that chemical gardens grown by injection of one reactant into the other in confined conditions feature a wealth of new patterns including spirals, flowers, and filaments. The confinement decreases the influence of buoyancy, reduces the spatial degrees of freedom and allows analysis of the patterns by tools classically used to analyze two-dimensional patterns. Injection moreover allows the study in controlled conditions of the effects of variable concentrations on the selected morphology. We illustrate these innovative aspects by characterizing quantitatively, with a simple geometrical model, a new class of self-similar logarithmic spirals observed in a large zone of the parameter space.

Florence Haudin; Julyan H. E. Cartwright; Fabian Brau; A. De Wit

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

ATTACHMENT CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SMALL-SCALE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS USING NANOSCALE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SMALL-SCALE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS USING NANOSCALE MATERIALS, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, RICHLAND,WASH[NGTON Proposed Adion: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to conduct indoor small-scale research and development projects and small-scale pilot projects using nanoscale materials. Nanoscale materials are engineered materials consisting of, or containing structures of between 1 and 100 nanometers (nm) that make use of properties unique to nanoscale forms of materials. Location of Action: The proposed action would occur on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site and in the vicinity ofPNNL facilities in the State of Washington. Description of the Proposed Action:

232

THERMAL HEAT TRANSPORT AT THE NANO-SCALE LEVEL AND ITS APPLICATION TO NANO-MACHINING.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Nano-manufacturing is receiving significant attention in industry due to the ever-growing interest in nanotechnology in research institutions. It is hypothesized that single-step or direct-write nano-scale (more)

Wong, Basil T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Applications of a new theory extending continuum mechanics to the nanoscale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this dissertation, we present the Slattery-Oh-Fu theory extending continuum mechanics to the nanoscale and its applications. We begin with an analysis of supercritical adsorption of argon, krypton, and methane on Graphon before we fully develop...

Fu, Kaibin

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Mechanics of Indentation into Micro- and Nanoscale Forests of Tubes, Rods, or Pillars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The force-depth behavior of indentation into fibrillar-structured surfaces such as those consisting of forests of micro- or nanoscale tubes or rods is a depth-dependent behavior governed by compression, bending, and buckling ...

Wang, Lifeng

235

Nanoscale Interplay of Strain and Doping in a High-Temperature Superconductor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The highest-temperature superconductors are electronically inhomogeneous at the nanoscale, suggesting the existence of a local variable that could be harnessed to enhance the superconducting pairing. Here we report the relationship between local doping ...

Ilija Zeljkovic; Jouko Nieminen; Dennis Huang; Tay-Rong Chang; Yang He; Horng-Tay Jeng; Zhijun Xu; Jinsheng Wen; Genda Gu; Hsin Lin; Robert S. Markiewicz; Arun Bansil; Jennifer E. Hoffman

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

236

Generalizations of the Landau-Zener theory in the physics of nanoscale systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale systems have sizes intermediate between atomic and macroscopic ones. Therefore their treatment often requires a combination of methods from atomic and condensed matter physics. The conventional Landau-Zener theory, being a powerful tool...

Sinitsyn, Nikolai

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Single-chain Nanoparticles: Synthesis of Nano-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Single-chain Nanoparticles: Synthesis of Nano-scale Architectures:00 AM, IMS Room 20 Recent efforts by our lab to fold single polymer chains into nano

Alpay, S. Pamir

238

Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films Studied Using Atom Probe Tomography: Comparison Of Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films...

239

Novel Chemical Strategies for Labeling Small Molecule Ligands for Androgen, Progestin, and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors for Imaging Prostate and Breast Cancer and the Heart  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary of Progress The specific aims of this project can be summarized as follows: Aim 1: Prepare and evaluate radiolabeled ligands for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?), a new nuclear hormone receptor target for tumor imaging and hormone therapy. Aim 2: Prepare steroids labeled with a cyclopentadienyl tricarbonyl technetium or rhenium unit. Aim 3: Prepare and evaluate other organometallic systems of novel design as ligand mimics and halogenated ligands for nuclear hormone receptor-based tumor imaging. As is described in detail below, we made excellent progress on all three of these aims; the highlights of our progress are the following: we have prepared the first fluorine-18 labeled analogs of ligands for the PPAR? receptor and used these in tissue distribution studies in rats we have developed three new methods for the synthesis of cyclopentadienyltricarbonyl rhenium and technetium (CpRe(CO)3 and CpTc(CO)3) systems and we have adapted these to the synthesis of steroids labeled with these metals, as well as ligands for other receptor systems we have prepared a number of fluorine-18 labeled steroidal and non-steroidal androgens and measured their tissue distribution in rats we have prepared iodine and bromine-labeled progestins with high progesterone receptor binding affinity we have prepared inorganic metal tricarbonyl complexes and steroid receptor ligands in which the metal tricarbonyl unit is an integral part off the ligand core.

Katzenellenbogen, John, A.

2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

240

Liposome-based mucus-penetrating particles (MPP) for mucosal theranostics: Demonstration of diamagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (diaCEST) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Mucus barriers lining mucosal epithelia reduce the effectiveness of nanocarrier-based mucosal drug delivery and imaging (theranostics). Here, we describe liposome-based mucus-penetrating particles (MPP) capable of loading hydrophilic agents, e.g., the diaCEST MRI contrast agent barbituric acid (BA). We observed that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated liposomes containing ?7mol% PEG diffused only ~10-fold slower in human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) compared to their theoretical speeds in water. 7mol%-PEG liposomes contained sufficient BA loading for diaCEST contrast, and provided improved vaginal distribution compared to 0 and 3mol%-PEG liposomes. However, increasing PEG content to ~12mol% compromised BA loading and vaginal distribution, suggesting that PEG content must be optimized to maintain drug loading and in vivo stability. Non-invasive diaCEST MRI illustrated uniform vaginal coverage and longer retention of BA-loaded 7mol%-PEG liposomes compared to unencapsulated BA. Liposomal MPP with optimized PEG content hold promise for drug delivery and imaging at mucosal surfaces.

Tao Yu; Kannie W.Y. Chan; Abraham Anonuevo; Xiaolei Song; Benjamin S. Schuster; Sumon Chattopadhyay; Qingguo Xu; Nikita Oskolkov; Himatkumar Patel; Laura M. Ensign; Peter C.M. van Zjil; Michael T. McMahon; Justin Hanes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

CHEMICAL MARKETING  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKETING ... The reason, I believe, is that the chemical industry has been blind (until very recently) to the need for paying attention to marketing. ... Its marketing needs are now like those of a matureno longer a growingindustry. ...

1960-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

Microsoft PowerPoint - Nanoscale_Gai_2013.pptx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

oxygen stoichiometry has a large influence on the physical and chemical properties of complex oxides. Most of the functionality in e.g. catalysis and electrochemistry depends in...

243

Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than Fe into the structure of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) has been shown to greatly enhance the magnetic properties of the particles, tailoring them to different commercial uses. However, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is often carried out at high temperatures with toxic solvents resulting in high environmental and energy costs. Additionally, these ferrite nanoparticles are not intrinsically biocompatible, and to make them suitable for insertion into the human body is a rather intricate task. A relatively unexplored resource for magnetic nanomaterial production is subsurface Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, as these microorganisms are capable of producing large quantities of nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at ambient temperatures. Metal-reducing bacteria live in environments deficient in oxygen and conserve energy for growth through the oxidation of hydrogen or organic electron donors, coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals such as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. This can result in the formation of magnetite via the extracellular reduction of amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides causing the release of soluble Fe(II) and resulting in complete recrystallization of the amorphous mineral into a new phase. Some previous studies have reported altering the composition of biogenic magnetite produced by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for industrial and environmental applications. However, research into the commercial exploitation of bacteria to form magnetic minerals has focused primarily on magnetotactic bacteria which form magnetosomal magnetite internally using very different pathways to those bacteria forming magnetite outside the cell. Magnetotactic bacteria live at the sediment-water interface and use internal nanomagnets to guide them to their preferred environmental niche using the Earth's magnetic field. Since magnetotactic bacteria generally grow optimally under carefully controlled microaerobic conditions, the culturing processes for these organisms are challenging and result in low yields of nanomagnetite. Despite these limitations, magnetotactic bacteria have bee

Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

244

CHEMPHYSCHEM 2001, 2, 361 366 WILEY-VCH-Verlag GmbH, D-69451 Weinheim, 2001 1439-4235/01/02/06 $ 17.50+.50/0 361 Inducing Single-Molecule Chemical Reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-4235/01/02/06 $ 17.50+.50/0 361 Inducing Single-Molecule Chemical Reactions with a UHV-STM: A New Dimension for Nano at a single-molecule level open up entirely new opportunities in chemistry on the nanoscale. In this article elementary chemical reaction steps on surfaces. Prospects for future oppor- tunities of single-molecule

Hla, Saw-Wai

245

NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

SUGAMA,T.

2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

246

Measuring oxygen reduction/evolution reactions on the nanoscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficiency of fuel cells and metal-air batteries is significantly limited by the activation of oxygen reduction and evolution reactions (ORR/OER). Despite the well-recognized role of oxygen reaction kinetics on the viability of energy technologies, the governing mechanisms remain elusive and until now addressable only by macroscopic studies. This lack of nanoscale understanding precludes optimization of material architecture. Here we report direct measurements of oxygen reduction/evolution reactions and oxygen vacancy diffusion on oxygen-ion conductive solid surfaces with sub-10 nanometer resolution. In electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), the biased scanning probe microscopy tip acts as a moving, electrocatalytically active probe exploring local electrochemical activity. The probe concentrates an electric field in a nanometer-scale volume of material, and bias-induced, picometer-level surface displacements provide information on local electrochemical processes. Systematic mapping of oxygen activity on bare and Pt-functionalized yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) surfaces is demonstrated. This approach allows directly visualization of ORR/OER activation process at the triple-phase boundary, and can be extended to broad spectrum of oxygen-conductive and electrocatalytic materials.

Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kumar, Amit [ORNL; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Ciucci, Francesco [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Nanoscale order in ZnSe:(Mg, O)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-assembling of 1O4Mg identical tetrahedral clusters resulting in the nanoscale order in ZnSe:(Mg, O) is presented. Co-doping transforms ZnSe into Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O{sub y}Se{sub 1?y} alloy of MgO, MgSe, ZnO and ZnSe. The decrease of a sum of the enthalpies of the constituent compounds and diminution of the strain energy are the causes of this phenomenon. The self-assembling conditions are obtained from the free energy minimum when magnesium and oxygen are in the dilute and ultra dilute limits, correspondingly. The occurrence of 1O4Mg clusters and completion of self-assembling when all oxygen atoms are in clusters are results of the continuous phase transitions. The self-assembling occurrence temperature does not depend on the oxygen content and it is a function of magnesium concentration. Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O{sub y}Se{sub 1?y} with all oxygen atoms in clusters can be obtained in temperature ranges from T = 206 C (x = 0.001, y = 110{sup ?4}) to T = 456 C (x = 0.01, y = 110{sup ?4}) and from T = 237 C (x = 0.001, y = 110{sup ?6}) to T = 462 C (x = 0.01, y = 110{sup ?6})

Elyukhin, Vyacheslav A. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Centro de Investigacin y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Avenida Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, 07360 Mxico (Mexico)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

248

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Li-ion Anode Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by University of Pittsburgh at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about nanoscale...

249

Computational insights of water droplet transport on graphene sheet with chemical density  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface gradient has been emerging as an intriguing technique for nanoscale particle manipulation and transportation. Owing to its outstanding and stable chemical properties, graphene with covalently bonded chemical groups represents extraordinary potential for the investigation of nanoscale transport in the area of physics and biology. Here, we employ molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the fundamental mechanism of utilizing a chemical density on a graphene sheet to control water droplet motions on it. Simulation results have demonstrated that the binding energy difference among distinct segment of graphene in terms of interaction between the covalently bonded oxygen atoms on graphene and the water molecules provides a fundamental driving force to transport the water droplet across the graphene sheet. Also, the velocity of the water droplet has showed a strong dependence on the relative concentration of oxygen atoms between successive segments. Furthermore, a multi-direction channel provides insights to guide the transportation of objects towards a targeted position, separating the mixtures with a system of specific chemical functionalization. Our findings shed illuminating lights on the surface gradient method and therefore provide a feasible way to control nanoscale motion on the surface and mimic the channelless microfluidics.

Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao, E-mail: xqwang@uga.edu [College of Engineering and NanoSEC, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

250

NANOSCALE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SENSORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under this funding, we proposed to: i) develop a ChemFET sensor platform, ii) develop a ChemDiode sensor platform, iii) synthesize receptor molecules suitable for chemical sensing, iv) study the electrostatic potential changes induced by receptor/target binding on surfaces and v) develop VLSI fabrication approaches for micron-scale chemical sensor devices. The accomplishments under these various thrusts are summarized in this section.

Ronald Andres, School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

251

Characterization of particulate matter deposited in diesel particulate filters: Visual and analytical approach in macro-, micro- and nano-scales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-scale analytical investigations of particulate matter (soot and ash) of two loaded diesel particulate filters (DPF) from (a) a truck (DPF1) and (b) a passenger car (DPF2) reveal the following: in DPF1 (without fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 130-270 {mu}m thick, homogeneous porous cake with pronounced orientation. Soot aggregates consist of 15-30 nm large individual particles exhibiting relatively mature internal nanostructures, however, far from being graphite. Ash aggregates largely accumulate at the outlet part of DPF1, while minor amounts are deposited directly on the channel walls all along the filter length. They consist of crystalline phases with individual particles of sizes down to the nanoscale range. Chemically, the ash consists mainly of Mg, S, Ca, Zn and P, elements encountered in lubricating oil additives. In the passenger car DPF2 (with fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 200-500 {mu}m thick, inhomogeneous porous cake consisting of several superposed layers corresponding to different soot generations. The largest part of the soot cake is composed of unburned, oriented soot aggregates left behind despite repeated regenerations, while a small part constitutes a loose layer with randomly oriented aggregates, which was deposited last and has not seen any regeneration. Fe-oxide particles of micro- to nano-scale sizes, originating from the fuel-borne additive, are often dispersed within the part of the soot cake composed of the unburned soot leftovers. The individual soot nanoparticles in DPF2 are approximately 15-40 nm large and generally less mature than in the truck DPF1. The presence of soot leftovers in DPF2 indicates that the addition of fuel-borne material does not fully compensate for the temperatures needed for complete soot removal. Ash in DPF2 is filling up more than half of the filter volume (at the downstream part) and is dominated by Fe-oxide aggregates, due to the Fe-based fuel-borne additive, but otherwise its chemical composition reflects compounds of lubricating oil additives. (author)

Liati, Anthi; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Panayotis [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for I.C. Engines, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CIVIL, ARCHITECTURAL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL Experience. DEPARTMENT OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING · Degree programs in cell and tissue engineering, medical imaging, and neural engineering These are exciting times for biomedical engineering and for Illinois Tech

Heller, Barbara

253

Reflection mode imaging with nanoscale resolution using a compact extreme ultraviolet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Schwarzschild condenser and a freestanding zone plate objective. The reported results advance the development-produced plasma source and normal-incidence multilayer mirrors," Opt. Lett. 14, 539-541 (1989). 6. I. A. Artioukov in the Schwarzschild configuration using a soft-x-ray laser at 18.2 nm," Opt. Lett. 17, 157-159 (1992). 9. T. Haga, H

Rocca, Jorge J.

254

Atomic-Resolution Imaging of the Nanoscale Origin of Toughness in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or high-strength steels, in gas-turbine engines for power generation and aerospace applications would, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea AdVanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon or phases has traditionally been the most potent means to develop enhanced toughness in structural ceramics

Ritchie, Robert

255

Recovery Act Provides Big Boost with a Nanoscale Focus | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Provides Big Boost with a Nanoscale Focus Provides Big Boost with a Nanoscale Focus Recovery Act Provides Big Boost with a Nanoscale Focus October 14, 2010 - 9:46am Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? The Center for Functional Nanomaterials is getting a new electron microscope that will be valuable for solar cell research -- one of 7 ARRA-funded additions at the Brookhaven National Laboratory facility. Editor's note: cross posted from the Brookhaven National Laboratory The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is receiving more than $5 million in new equipment and upgrades funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The new acquisitions will fill gaps in the current facility to meet the needs of

256

Chemical Occurrences  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Classification of Chemical Occurrence Reports into the following four classes: Occurrences characterized by serious energy release, injury or exposure requiring medical treatment, or severe environmental damage, Occurrences characterized by minor injury or exposure, or reportable environmental release, Occurrences that were near misses including notable safety violations and Minor occurrences.

257

Parallel nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A New Device for Combinatorial Analysis of Complex nano-Scale Material Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Parallel nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A New Device for Combinatorial Analysis of Complex nano-Scale Material Systems Patrick James McCluskey, and Joost J. Vlassak Division of Engineering is presented for the combinatorial analysis of complex nano-scale material systems. The parallel nano

258

Impact of Nano-scale Through-Silicon Vias on the Quality of Today and Future 3D IC Designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Nano-scale Through-Silicon Vias on the Quality of Today and Future 3D IC Designs Dae Hyun sub-micron dimensions in a few years. This downscaling of TSVs requires research on the impact of nano. In this paper, we investigate, for the first time, the impact of nano-scale TSVs on the area, wirelength, delay

Lim, Sung Kyu

259

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - People - National Security -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Security National Security Nuclear Forensics and Nanoscale Engineering Chemical Analysis and Research Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Management and Support David B. Chamberlain, Chemical Engineer and Department Manager phone: 630/252-7699, fax: 630/972-4409, e-mail: david.chamberlain@anl.gov M.S., Chemical Engineering, University of Idaho Spent fuel reprocessing Radiological forensics Sealed radioactive source characterization Radioactive materials and national security Mary Anne Yates, Senior Technical Advisor/Senior Chemist phone: 630/252-7699, fax: 630/972-4409, e-mail: mayates@anl.gov Ph.D., Nuclear Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University Homeland Security Counterterrorism Publications in nuclear, atomic, and particle physics Jodi L. Canaday, Administrative Secretary

260

Electron-beam patterning of polymer electrolyte films to make multiple nanoscale gates for nanowire transistors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report an electron-beam based method for the nanoscale patterning of the poly(ethylene oxide)/LiClO$_{4}$ polymer electrolyte. We use the patterned polymer electrolyte as a high capacitance gate dielectric in single nanowire transistors and obtain subthreshold swings comparable to conventional metal/oxide wrap-gated nanowire transistors. Patterning eliminates gate/contact overlap which reduces parasitic effects and enables multiple, independently controllable gates. The method's simplicity broadens the scope for using polymer electrolyte gating in studies of nanowires and other nanoscale devices.

D. J. Carrad; A. M. Burke; R. W. Lyttleton; H. J. Joyce; H. H. Tan; C. Jagadish; K. Storm; H. Linke; L. Samuelson; A. P. Micolich

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nanoscale structural evolution of electrically driven insulator to metal transition in vanadium dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural evolution of tensile strained vanadium dioxide thin films was examined across the electrically driven insulator-to-metal transition by nanoscale hard X-ray diffraction. A metallic filament with rutile (R) structure was found to be the dominant conduction pathway for an electrically driven transition, while the majority of the channel area remained in the monoclinic M1 phase. The filament dimensions were estimated using simultaneous electrical probing and nanoscale X-ray diffraction. Analysis revealed that the width of the conducting channel can be tuned externally using resistive loads in series, enabling the M1/R phase ratio in the phase coexistence regime to be tuned.

Freeman, Eugene, E-mail: exf181@psu.edu; Shukla, Nikhil; Datta, Suman [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Stone, Greg; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Gopalan, Venkatraman [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Paik, Hanjong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Moyer, Jarrett A. [Department of Physics and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Cai, Zhonghou; Wen, Haidan [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Schlom, Darrell G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

262

The Properties of Confined Water and Fluid Flow at the Nanoscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has been focused on the development of accurate computational tools to study fluids in confined, nanoscale geometries, and the application of these techniques to probe the structural and electronic properties of water confined between hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates, including the presence of simple ions at the interfaces. In particular, we have used a series of ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations and quantum Monte Carlo calculations to build an understanding of how hydrogen bonding and solvation are modified at the nanoscale. The properties of confined water affect a wide range of scientific and technological problems - including protein folding, cell-membrane flow, materials properties in confined media and nanofluidic devices.

Schwegler, E; Reed, J; Lau, E; Prendergast, D; Galli, G; Grossman, J C; Cicero, G

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

263

C. D. (Chengdu) Liang Nanoscale Synthesis and Functional Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries 2010 Energy Storage Program Manager's Recognition Award 2010 ORNL Significant Event Award, New Programs and Awards in Advanced Battery Chemistry 2007 Project Management Certificate Associate, Chemical Sciences Division, ORNL 2002­2005 Research Fellow, Tennessee Advanced Material

Pennycook, Steve

264

Nanoscale Vibrational Analysis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the Raman excitation source. We find that for arc-discharge SWNTs, both the radial breathing mode (RBM in SWNTs grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The direct comparison between arc-discharge and CVD scientists and engineers. The main reason behind such wide- ranging attention lies in their unique electrical

Cronin, Steve

265

Micro- and nano-scale hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers by coaxial electrospinning: Preparation and gas sensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the preparation of micro- and nano-scale hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers using a coaxial electrospinning technique and their gas sensing properties in terms of CO. The diameter of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers can be controlled from 200 nm to several micrometers by changing the viscosity of electrospinning solutions. Lower viscosities produce slim hollow nanofibers. In contrast, fat hollow microfibers are obtained in the case of higher viscosities. A simple mathematical expression is presented to predict the change in diameter of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers as a function of viscosity. The successful control over the diameter of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers is expected to bring extensive applications. To test a potential use of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers in chemical gas sensors, their sensing properties to CO are investigated at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Microstructures of as-prepared and calcined hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers prepared by the electrospinning technique with a coaxial needle. Dynamic response at various CO concentrations for the sensor fabricated with the hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers. Highlights: > Hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers were synthesized using a coaxial electrospinning technique. > Their diameter can be controlled by changing the viscosity of electrospinning solutions. > Lower viscosities produce slim hollow nanofibers. > In contrast, fat hollow microfibers are obtained in the case of higher viscosities. > Successful control over the diameter of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers will bring extensive applications.

Zhang Jin; Choi, Sun-Woo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Sub, E-mail: sangsub@inha.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Heat Transfer across the Interface between Nanoscale Solids and Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(4-7) Relative to heat transferred via solidsolid interfaces, heat dissipation from the active device region to the gas environment is usually negligible. ... Long VO2 NWs were cantilevered from a substrate and were locally heated using a focused laser, allowing the laser-heating induced phase transition and the resultant domain structures along the NW to be optically imaged. ... By imaging the laser-heating induced metalinsulator phase transition along single, free-standing VO2 NWs, we determined the heat transfer coefficient between the NW and the gas environment over a wide range of pressure and down to the submicrometer scale. ...

Chun Cheng; Wen Fan; Jinbo Cao; Sang-Gil Ryu; Jie Ji; Costas P. Grigoropoulos; Junqiao Wu

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

267

Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meetings Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators" is scarcely older than for one or two dozen people grew to include nearly a hundred. Chemical accelerators is a name sug- gested-volt region. Thus chemical accelerators can provide the same type of information for elemen- tary chemical

Zare, Richard N.

268

Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature Anders Lervik transient non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations, heat-transfer through nanometer-scale interfaces processes. We show that the modeling of heat transfer across a nanodroplet/fluid interface requires

Kjelstrup, Signe

269

Nanoscale Heat Transfer at Contact Between a Hot Tip and a Substrate Stphane Lefvre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale Heat Transfer at Contact Between a Hot Tip and a Substrate Stéphane Lefèvre Laboratoire d three heat transfer modes with experimental data and modeling. We conclude that the three modes in "International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 49, 1-2 (2006) 251-258" DOI : 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2005

Boyer, Edmond

270

Cryogenic etching of nano-scale silicon trenches with resist masks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cryogenic silicon etching using SF"6-O"2 at the sub-50 nm scale has been developed for nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) and nano-photonics systems where high aspect ratio trenches are desired. It was found that the SF"6-O"2 chemistry at cryogenic ... Keywords: Electron beam lithography, Nano-imprint lithography, Nano-scale pattern transfer, Nanofabrication, Plasma etching

Y. Wu; D. L. Olynick; A. Goodyear; C. Peroz; S. Dhuey; X. Liang; S. Cabrini

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Nanoscience This course explores the frontiers of science on the nanoscale. Many developing 21st  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscience MSc/PgDip This course explores the frontiers of science on the nanoscale. Many and behaviours of systems in this submicrometrescale size domain. The multidisciplinary nature of nanoscience. The projects take place primarily in research labs associated with nanoscience located in the University

Strathclyde, University of

272

Polymeric Nanoscale All-Solid State Battery Steven E. Bullock1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polymeric Nanoscale All-Solid State Battery Steven E. Bullock1 , and Peter Kofinas2 1 Department to an all solid- state polymer battery. Such a battery would have greater safety, without potential, the search for an all solid-state battery has continued. Research on polymeric materials for batteries has

Kofinas, Peter

273

Material Standards for EHS for Engineered Nanoscale Materials Material Standards for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;Material Standards for EHS for Engineered Nanoscale Materials Material Standards of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD Workshop Co-Chairs and Principle Report Editors Dianne L. Poster, John A. Small, Michael T. Postek National Institute of Standards and Technology Sponsored by U

Magee, Joseph W.

274

Nanoscale Manipulation of Surfaces and Interfaces: Engineering Electrical Properties Through Nanofabrication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimensionalities, like graphene and carbon nanotubes also need to be studied for potential use in nanoscale devices. Graphene has been found to be electronically tunable by doping, causing it to be able to function as a semiconductor or as a metallic conductor...

Smith, Gregory J.

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Nanoscale photon management in silicon solar cells Sangmoo Jeong, Shuang Wang, and Yi Cui  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits. For power generation, low-cost fossil fuel has, however, been pre- ferred to renewable energy and wind, can be accessed easily in most of the world. In particular, the solar energy deliveredNanoscale photon management in silicon solar cells Sangmoo Jeong, Shuang Wang, and Yi Cui Citation

Cui, Yi

276

Nanoscale Joule heating, Peltier cooling and current crowding at graphenemetal contacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale Joule heating, Peltier cooling and current crowding at graphene­metal contacts Kyle L are the Joule and Peltier effects. The Joule effect9 occurs as charge carriers dissipate energy within the lattice, and is pro- portional to resistance and the square of the current. The Peltier effect17

King, William P.

277

Selective removal of atoms as a new method for fabrication of nanoscale patterned media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The method of 'selective removal of atoms' is proposed for purposeful efficient modification of a solid atomic composition under exposure to an accelerated ion beam of a certain energy. Such modification can dramatically change the physical properties ... Keywords: ion irradiation, nanodevices, nanoscale structure, patterned media, selective removal of atoms

B. A. Gurovich; D. I. Dolgy; E. A. Kuleshova; E. Z. Meilikhov; A. G. Domantovsky; K. E. Prikhodko; K. I. Maslakov; B. A. Aronzon; V. V. Rylkov; A. Yu. Yakubovsky

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Nanoscale Triboelectric-Effect-Enabled Energy Conversion for Sustainably Powering Portable Electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale Triboelectric-Effect-Enabled Energy Conversion for Sustainably Powering Portable , and 128 mW/cm3 , respectively, and an energy conversion efficiency as high as 10-39% has been demonstrated: Harvesting energy from our living environment is an effective approach for sustainable, maintenance

Wang, Zhong L.

279

Nanoscale tunable reduction of graphene oxide for graphene electronics , D. Wang2*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale tunable reduction of graphene oxide for graphene electronics Z. Wei1* , D. Wang2* , S contributed equally to this work. paul.sheehan@nrl.navy.mil elisa.riedo@physics.gatech.edu Graphene is now in graphene oxide (GO) has risen for producing large-scale flexible conductors and for its potential to open

280

Controlled formation of nanoscale wrinkling patterns on polymers using focused ion beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controlled formation of nanoscale wrinkling patterns on polymers using focused ion beam Myoung of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA b Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shillim, Kwanak, Seoul 151

Hutchinson, John W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels: Observations on deformation microstructure, nanoscale dimples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels: Observations on deformation microstructure, nanoscale hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels has been a subject of significant research, one of the major challenges in tackling hydrogen embrittlement is that the mechanism of embrittlement is not fully resolved

Chen, Sow-Hsin

282

Molecular dynamics simulations of the nano-scale room-temperature oxidation of aluminum single crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular dynamics simulations of the nano-scale room-temperature oxidation of aluminum single Abstract The oxidation of aluminum single crystals is studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with dynamic charge transfer between atoms. The simulations are performed on three aluminum low-index surfaces

Southern California, University of

283

Novel Nanoscale Catalysts and Desulfurizers for Aviation Fuels Martin Duran* and Abdul-Majeed Azad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reforming catalysts for jet fuel", The Ohio Fuel Cell Symposium of the Ohio Fuel Cell Coalition, May 23Novel Nanoscale Catalysts and Desulfurizers for Aviation Fuels Martin Duran* and Abdul-Majeed Azad) to hydrogen through steam reforming poses a challenge since these fuels contain sulfur up to about 1000 ppm

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

284

Transport Simulation of a Nanoscale Silicon Rod Field-Effect C. Dwyer, R. Taylor, L. Vicci  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://ftp.cs.unc.edu/pub/packages/GRIP/publication_addenda /TSNSRFET. I. INTRODUCTION Recent advances in nanoscience enable new possibilities for nanoscale computer CMOS inverter in the shape of a 3D rod lattice. The junctions between rods are metallized DNA strands components of the fabrication technique starting with its transistors. The importance of low power digital

Dwyer, Chris

285

ESM of Ionic and Electrochemical Phenomena on the Nanoscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of energy storage and conversion devices is ultimately controlled by series of intertwined ionic and electronic transport processes and electrochemical reactions at surfaces and interfaces, strongly mediated by strain and mechanical processes [1-4]. In a typical fuel cell, these include chemical species transport in porous cathode and anode materials, gas-solid electrochemical reactions at grains and triple-phase boundaries (TPBs), ionic and electronic flows in multicomponent electrodes, and chemical and electronic potential drops at internal interfaces in electrodes and electrolytes. All these phenomena are sensitively affected by the microstructure of materials from device level to the atomic scales as illustrated in Fig. 1. Similar spectrum of length scales and phenomena underpin operation of other energy systems including primary and secondary batteries, as well as hybrid systems such flow and metal-air/water batteries.

Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Kumar, Amit [Pennsylvania State University; Balke, Nina [ORNL; McCorkle, Morgan L [ORNL; Guo, Senli [ORNL; Arruda, Thomas M [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Chemical & Engineering Materials | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical and Engineering Materials Chemical and Engineering Materials SHARE Chemical and Engineering Materials Neutron-based research at SNS and HFIR in Chemical and Engineering Materials strives to understand the structure and dynamics of chemical systems and novel engineering materials. The user community takes advantage of capabilities of neutron scattering for measurements over wide ranges of experimental and operating conditions, including studies of chemical and physical changes in situ. User experiments with diffraction, small-angle scattering, inelastic and quasi-elastic scattering, and neutron imaging instruments address a range of problems in chemistry and in engineering materials research. Current areas of research supported within Chemical and Engineering Materials include: The structure and dynamics of electrical energy storage materials

287

Chemical and Engineering Materials | Neutron Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical and Engineering Materials Chemical and Engineering Materials SHARE Chemical and Engineering Materials Neutron-based research at SNS and HFIR in Chemical and Engineering Materials strives to understand the structure and dynamics of chemical systems and novel engineering materials. The user community takes advantage of capabilities of neutron scattering for measurements over wide ranges of experimental and operating conditions, including studies of chemical and physical changes in situ. User experiments with diffraction, small-angle scattering, inelastic and quasi-elastic scattering, and neutron imaging instruments address a range of problems in chemistry and in engineering materials research. Current areas of research supported within Chemical and Engineering Materials include: The structure and dynamics of electrical energy storage materials

288

Chemical & Engineering Materials | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical and Engineering Materials Chemical and Engineering Materials SHARE Chemical and Engineering Materials Neutron-based research at SNS and HFIR in Chemical and Engineering Materials strives to understand the structure and dynamics of chemical systems and novel engineering materials. The user community takes advantage of capabilities of neutron scattering for measurements over wide ranges of experimental and operating conditions, including studies of chemical and physical changes in situ. User experiments with diffraction, small-angle scattering, inelastic and quasi-elastic scattering, and neutron imaging instruments address a range of problems in chemistry and in engineering materials research. Current areas of research supported within Chemical and Engineering Materials include: The structure and dynamics of electrical energy storage materials

289

Chemical Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Science Chemical Science Compton double ionization of helium in the region of the cross-section maximum B. Krässig, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, E.P. Kanter, H. Schmidt-Böcking, W. Schmitt, S.H. Southworth, Th. Weber, and L. Young Crystal structure analysis of microporous Na16Nb12.8Ti3.2O44.8(OH)3.2l8H2O and Na/Nb/Zr/O/H2O phases A. Tripathi, J. Parise, M. Nyman, T.M. Nenoff, and W. Harrison Double K-photoionization of heavy atoms R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, E.P. Kanter, B. Krässig, and S.H. Southworth Forward-backward asymmetries of atomic photoelectrons S.H. Southworth, B. Krässig, E.P. Kanter, J.C. Bilheux, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, and L. Young In situreduction of various iron oxides to form high-surface-area Fe-metal catalysts as studied by high-resolution powder diffraction

290

2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A new instrument developed by LLNL scientists and engineers, the Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (MM-DTEM), captures billionth-of-a-meter-scale images with frame rates more than 100,000 times faster than those of conventional techniques. The work was done in collaboration with a Pleasanton-based company, Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions (IDES) Inc. Using this revolutionary imaging technique, a range of fundamental and technologically important material and biological processes can be captured in action, in complete billionth-of-a-meter detail, for the first time. The primary application of MM-DTEM is the direct observation of fast processes, including microstructural changes, phase transformations and chemical reactions, that shape real-world performance of nanostructured materials and potentially biological entities. The instrument could prove especially valuable in the direct observation of macromolecular interactions, such as protein-protein binding and host-pathogen interactions. While an earlier version of the technology, Single Shot-DTEM, could capture a single snapshot of a rapid process, MM-DTEM captures a multiframe movie that reveals complex sequences of events in detail. It is the only existing technology that can capture multiple electron microscopy images in the span of a single microsecond.

Lagrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

291

2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new instrument developed by LLNL scientists and engineers, the Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (MM-DTEM), captures billionth-of-a-meter-scale images with frame rates more than 100,000 times faster than those of conventional techniques. The work was done in collaboration with a Pleasanton-based company, Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions (IDES) Inc. Using this revolutionary imaging technique, a range of fundamental and technologically important material and biological processes can be captured in action, in complete billionth-of-a-meter detail, for the first time. The primary application of MM-DTEM is the direct observation of fast processes, including microstructural changes, phase transformations and chemical reactions, that shape real-world performance of nanostructured materials and potentially biological entities. The instrument could prove especially valuable in the direct observation of macromolecular interactions, such as protein-protein binding and host-pathogen interactions. While an earlier version of the technology, Single Shot-DTEM, could capture a single snapshot of a rapid process, MM-DTEM captures a multiframe movie that reveals complex sequences of events in detail. It is the only existing technology that can capture multiple electron microscopy images in the span of a single microsecond.

Lagrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

292

Polarization transfer NMR imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

Sillerud, Laurel O. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Enabling direct nanoscale observations of biological reactions with dynamic TEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological processes can occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales; from femtoseconds to hours and from angstroms to meters. Although no single experimental method can fully cover this entire phase space, many new biological insights can be expected from a better understanding of the processes that occur on the very fast timescales and very small length scales. In this regard, new instruments that use fast x-ray or electron pulses are now available that are expected to reveal new mechanistic insights for macromolecular protein dynamics. To ensure that any observed conformational change is physiologically relevant and not constrained by three-dimensional crystal packing, it would be preferable for experiments to utilize smaller protein samples such as single particles or two-dimensional crystals that mimic the target proteins native environment. These samples arent typically amenable to x-ray analysis, but transmission electron microscopy has successfully imaged such sample geometries for over 40 years and permits data acquisition using both direct imaging and diffraction modes. While conventional transmission electron microscopes (TEM) have only visualized biological samples with atomic resolution in an arrested or frozen state, the recent development of the dynamic TEM (DTEM) extends electron microscopy capabilities into dynamics. A new 2nd generation DTEM that is currently being constructed has the potential to observe live biological processes with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution by using pulsed electron packets to probe the sample on the micro- and nanosecond timescale. In addition to the enhanced temporal resolution, the DTEM also operates in the pump-probe regime that can permit visualizing reactions propagating in real-time. This article reviews the experimental parameters necessary for coupling DTEM with in situ liquid microscopy to allow direct imaging of protein conformational dynamics in a fully hydrated environment.

Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

294

Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cnse.albany.edu cnse.albany.edu Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments Dr. Michael A. Carpenter College of NanoScale Science and Engineering Energy & Environmental Technology Applications Center University at Albany - SUNY Dr. Sang-Hyun Oh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Minnesota-Twin Cities 6/11/13 ! Oh group, University of Minnesota Carpenter Group, CNSE cnse.albany.edu Harsh Environment Chemical Sensors Nanocomposite Materials * Optical analysis of Au SPR bands * YSZ, TiO 2 , CeO 2 matrix materials * 500-800°C operating environment * SOFC, Jet engines, turbines * CO, H 2 , NO x , R x S Goals of Research are Two-Fold 1. Develop prototype nanorod materials for use in next generation sensing devices

295

A flexible, highly stable electrochemical scanning probe microscope for nanoscale studies at the solid-liquid interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

low-noise measurements in ambient, in situ, and electrochemical environments. II. DESIGNA flexible, highly stable electrochemical scanning probe microscope for nanoscale studies at the solid-liquid interface, specifically in electrolyte environments. Quantification of system noise limits

Gimzewski, James

296

Coherent control of nanoscale light localization: creating and positioning isolated sub-wavelength energy hot-spots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new paradigm was suggested for achieving prescribed light localization with nanoscale accuracy. Well isolated energy hot-spots as small as ?/10 can be created and positioned at...

Kao, Tsung Sheng; Jenkins, Stewart; Ruostekoski, Janne; Zheludev, Nikolay

297

3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone at the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone 3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone at the Nanoscale Scientists studying osteoporosis and other skeletal diseases are interested in the 3D structure of bone and its responses to conditions such as weightlessness, radiation (of particular interest to astronauts) and vitamin D deficiency. The current gold standard, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), provides 3D images of trabeculae, the small interior struts of bone tissue, and electron microscopy can provide nanometer resolution of thin tissue slices. Hard X-ray transmission microscopy has provided the first 3D view of bone structure within individual trabeculae on the nanoscale. figure 1 Figure 1 Micro-CT (left) shows trabecular structure inside of bone. Transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM; center and right) can reveal localized details of osteocyte lacunae and their processes.

298

Quantitative luminescence imaging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

Erwin, David N. (San Antonio, TX); Kiel, Johnathan L. (San Antonio, TX); Batishko, Charles R. (West Richland, WA); Stahl, Kurt A. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Quantitative luminescence imaging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

300

Field-induced gap and quantized charge pumping in a nanoscale helical wire  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose several physical phenomena based on nanoscale helical wires. Applying a static electric field transverse to the helical wire induces a metal to insulator transition, with the band gap determined by the applied voltage. A similar idea can be applied to geometrically construct one-dimensional systems with arbitrary external potential. With a quadrupolar electrode configuration, the electric field could rotate in the transverse plane, leading to a quantized dc charge current proportional to the frequency of the rotation. Such a device could be used as a standard for the high-precession measurement of the electric current. The inverse effect implies that passing an electric current through a helical wire in the presence of a transverse static electric field can lead to a mechanical rotation of the helix. This effect can be used to construct nanoscale electromechanical motors. Finally, our methodology also enables ways of controlling and measuring the electronic properties of helical biological molecules such as the DNA.

Xiao-Liang Qi and Shou-Cheng Zhang

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nanoscale retention-loss dynamics of polycrystalline PbTiO{sub 3} nanotubes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observed the nanoscale retention dynamics of polycrystalline PbTiO{sub 3} nanotubes using piezoresponse force microscopy. We found that the retention loss of the nanodot domains on the nanotubes showed the stretched exponential relaxation behaviors with stretched exponential factor n being less than 1 (0.523 and 0.692), which are similar to the thin films. In addition, the nanodot domains showed a diverse relaxation time constant {tau} due to different remnant polarization of each dot domains.

Choi, H.; Kim, Y.; Hong, S.; Sung, T.-H.; Shin, H.; No, K. (Materials Science Division); (Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology); (Hanyang Univ.); (Kookmin Univ.)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of thin films: sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy at buried interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

roughness of 5-10 nm (Red Optronics, Mountain View, CA) withroughness of 5-10 nm (Red Optronics, Mountain View, CA) androughness of 5-10 nm (Red Optronics, Mountain View, CA) with

Kweskin, S.J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Molecular level control of nanoscale composition and morphology: Toward photocatalytic nanocomposites for solar-to-chemical energy conversion of biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the factors influencing nanocrystal formation is a challenge yet to be realized. In comparison to the large number of studies on nanocrystal synthesis and their applications, the number of studies on the effect of the precursor chemistry on nanocrystal composition and shape remains low. Although photochemical fabrication of metalsemiconductor nano-heterostructures is reported in literature, control over the free particle formation and the site of metal deposition have not been achieved. Moreover, utilization of metal- semiconductor nano-heterostructures in photocatalytic reactions other than water splitting is hardly explored. In this thesis, we studied the effect of chalcogenide precursor reactivity on the composition, morphology and the axial anisotropy of cadmiumchalcogenide nanocrystals. We also investigated the influence of the irradiation wavelength in synthesizing metal-semiconductor nano-heterostructures. Finally, we showed that metal semiconductor nano-heterostructures can be used as a photocatalyst for alcohol dehydrogenation reactions. We explored the pathways for the formation of Pt and Pd nanoparticles on CdS and CdS{sub 0.4}Se{sub 0.6} nanorods. This study revealed that the wavelength of irradiation is critical to control free-standing vs. bound metal (Pt and Pd) nanoparticles to semiconductor. Additionally, we observed that metal photodeposition occurs on specific segments of axially anisotropic, compositionally graded CdS0.4Se0.6 nanorods due to the band-gap differential between their nano-domains. We used semiconductor-metal heterostructures for sunlightdriven dehydrogenation and hydrogenolysis of benzyl alcohol. Heterostructure composition dictates activity (turnovers) and product distribution. A few metal (Pt, Pd) islands on the semiconductor surface significantly enhance activity and selectivity and also greatly stabilize the semiconductor against photoinduced etching and degradation.

Ruberu, Thanthrige P. [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Chemical Imaging of Catalyst Deactivation during the Conversion of Renewables at the Single Particle Level: The Etherification of Biomass-based Polyols with Alkenes over H-Beta Zeolites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The etherification of biomass-based alcohols with various linear {alpha}-olefins under solvent-free conditions was followed in a space- and time-resolved manner on 9 {micro}m large H-Beta zeolite crystals by confocal fluorescence microscopy. This allowed us to visualize the interaction with the substrate and distribution of the coke products into the catalyst at the level of an individual zeolite crystal during the etherification process. The spectroscopic information obtained on the micrometer-scale zeolite was in line with the results obtained with bulk characterization techniques and further confirmed by the catalytic results obtained both for micrometer-scale and nanoscale zeolites. This allowed us to explain the influence of the substrate type (glycerol, glycols, and alkenes) and zeolite properties (Si/Al ratio and particle size) on the etherification activity. The etherification of the biomass-based alcohols takes place mainly on the external surface of the zeolite particles. The gradual blockage of the external surface of the zeolite results in a partial or total loss of etherification activity. The deactivation could be attributed to olefin oligomerization. The high conversions obtained in the etherification of 1,2-propylene glycol with long linear alkenes (up to 80%) and the pronounced deactivation of the zeolite observed in the etherification of glycerol with long linear alkenes (max. 20% conversion) were explained by the spectroscopic measurements and is due to differences in the adsorption, i.e., in the center of the zeolite particle for glycerol and on the external surface in the case of glycols.

A Parvulescu; D Mores; E Stavitski; C Teodorescu; P Bruijnicx; R Klein Gebbing; B Weckhuysen

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Artificial Brownian motors: Controlling transport on the nanoscale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In systems possessing spatial or dynamical symmetry breaking, Brownian motion combined with unbiased external input signals, deterministic and random alike, can assist directed motion of particles at submicron scales. In such cases, one speaks of Brownian motors. In this review the constructive role of Brownian motion is exemplified for various physical and technological setups, which are inspired by the cellular molecular machinery: the working principles and characteristics of stylized devices are discussed to show how fluctuations, either thermal or extrinsic, can be used to control diffusive particle transport. Recent experimental demonstrations of this concept are surveyed with particular attention to transport in artificial, i.e., nonbiological, nanopores, lithographic tracks, and optical traps, where single-particle currents were first measured. Much emphasis is given to two- and three-dimensional devices containing many interacting particles of one or more species; for this class of artificial motors, noise rectification results also from the interplay of particle Brownian motion and geometric constraints. Recently, selective control and optimization of the transport of interacting colloidal particles and magnetic vortices have been successfully achieved, thus leading to the new generation of microfluidic and superconducting devices presented here. The field has recently been enriched with impressive experimental achievements in building artificial Brownian motor devices that even operate within the quantum domain by harvesting quantum Brownian motion. Sundry akin topics include activities aimed at noise-assisted shuttling other degrees of freedom such as charge, spin, or even heat and the assembly of chemical synthetic molecular motors. This review ends with a perspective for future pathways and potential new applications.

Peter Hnggi and Fabio Marchesoni

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

306

CAMD Cleanroom Chemical List  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CAMD Cleanroom Chemical List Chemicals on this list are routine use chemicals in the CAMD Cleanroom and are available to users for general use. All others (*) are approved for use...

307

chemical analysis | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemical analysis chemical analysis Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

308

TRENDS in Chemical Marketing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TRENDS in Chemical Marketing ... BEFORE any chemical sales organization, can meet or establish new trends in marketing, it must be completely aware of the problem it faces. ...

W. M. RUSSELL

1955-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

309

Tiny images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The human visual system is remarkably tolerant to degradations in image resolution: in a scene recognition task, human performance is similar whether $32 \\times 32$ color images or multi-mega pixel images are used. With ...

Torralba, Antonio

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

310

Chemical Safety Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program Home Chemical Safety Topical Committee Library Program Contacts Related Links Site Map Tools 2013 Chemical Safety Workshop Archived Workshops Contact Us Health and Safety HSS Logo Chemical Safety Program logo The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Chemical Safety web pages provide a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of chemical management. This page is supported by the Chemical Safety Topical Committee which was formed to identify chemical safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursue solutions to issues identified. Noteworthy products are the Chemical Management Handbooks and the Chemical Lifecycle Cost Analysis Tool, found under the TOOLS menu. Chemical Management Handbook Vol (1) Chemical Management Handbook Vol (2)

311

Conversion of Waste CO2 and Shale Gas to High-Value Chemicals  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

acid using known technologies or combined with Schematic illustrating the NovomerPraxair semi-integrated process to produce high- value chemical intermediates. Graphic image...

312

Chemical Management Contacts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Contacts for additional information on Chemical Management and brief description on Energy Facility Contractors Group

313

About Chemical Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in our homes and can result in serious injuries if not properly handled. Household items such as bleach can result in harmful chlorine gas or hydrochloric acid if carelessly used. Gasoline fumes from containers for lawnmowers or boats can result in major health hazards if inhaled. DOE Oak Ridge uses thousands of chemicals in its varied research and other operations. New chemicals are or can be created as a result of the research or other activities. DOE follows national safety requirements in storing and handling these chemicals to minimize the risk of injuries from its chemical usage. However, accidents can occur despite careful attention to proper handling and storage procedures.

314

Direct Nanoscale Observations of CO2 Sequestration during Brucite [Mg(OH)2] Dissolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct Nanoscale Observations of CO2 Sequestration during Brucite [Mg(OH)2] Dissolution ... The dissolution and carbonation of brucite on (001) cleavage surfaces was investigated in a series of in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments at varying pH (212), temperature (2340 C), aqueous NaHCO3 concentration (1051 M), and PCO2 (01 atm). ... Simultaneously with dissolution of brucite, the growth of a Mgcarbonate phase (probably dypingite) was directly observed. ...

J. Hvelmann; C. V. Putnis; E. Ruiz-Agudo; H. Austrheim

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

315

Nuclear waste management using alpha particle physical phenomena by nanoscale investigations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is investigated from the aspect of its nanoscale behaviour. Four materials are selected as the nuclear waste container. Using the irradiation-induced amorphisation, some characteristics are examined. The Displacement Per Atom (dpa) is affected by the ion dose using the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter 2008 (SRIM 2008) code system, which is a computer package of molecular dynamic simulations. The dpa is changed completely and kinetic energy is transferred to the target by the nuclear collision. The length of the material is a function of the ion collisions. It is concluded that a thickness of 204 nm is the optimised length of a waste drum by crystalline silicotitanate.

Taeho Woo; Taewoo Kim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Nickel Ferrite Aerogels with Monodisperse Nanoscale Building BlocksThe Importance of Processing Temperature and Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nickel Ferrite Aerogels with Monodisperse Nanoscale Building BlocksThe Importance of Processing Temperature and Atmosphere ... Using two-step (air/argon) thermal processing, sol?gel-derived nickel?iron oxide aerogels are transformed into monodisperse, networked nanocrystalline magnetic oxides of NiFe2O4 with particle diameters that can be ripened with increasing temperature under argon to 4.6, 6.4, and 8.8 nm. ... nickel ferrites; magnetic nanomaterials; nanoarchitectures; aerogels; sol?gel chemistry; single magnetic domains; thermal processing ...

Katherine A. Pettigrew; Jeffrey W. Long; Everett E. Carpenter; Colin C. Baker; Justin C. Lytle; Christopher N. Chervin; Michael S. Logan; Rhonda M. Stroud; Debra R. Rolison

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

317

Course: ECE 597EN/697EN Energy Transport and Conversion at the Nanoscale Instructor: Zlatan Aksamija (zlatana@engin.umass.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Course: ECE 597EN/697EN Energy Transport and Conversion at the Nanoscale Instructor: Zlatan simulation. Suggested Textbook: Nanoscale Energy Transport and Conversion by Gang Chen (Oxford University. Energy Conversion and Coupled Transport Processes 9. Special Topics I: Thermoelectric and Photovoltaic

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

318

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Publications - National Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Security National Security Nuclear Forensics and Nanoscale Engineering 2008 Chen, H., M. D. Kaminski, P. Pytel, L. Macdonald, and A. J. Rosengart, Capture of magnetic carriers within large arteries using external magnetic fields, Journal of Drug Targeting, 16(4), 2008. Derzon, M. S., M. M. Hopkins, P. C. Galambos, K. E. Achyuthan, C. J. Bourdon, I. Brener, J. Cullor, C. D. James, M. Kaminski, J. L. McClain, V. M. Peck, D. W. Peterson, K. Rahimian, E. F. Spink, J. A. Timlin, C. S. Yun, G. V. Ludwig, Timely multi-threat biological, chemical, and nuclide detection: a platform, a metric, key results, International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialization, 7(4), 413-435, 2008. Kaminski, Michael D., Yumei Xie , Carol J. Mertz, Martha R. Finck, Haitao Chen, and Axel J. Rosengart, Encapsulation and Release of Plasminogen Activator From Biodegradable Magnetic Microcarriers, Eur. Journal of Pharm, July 2008.

319

Advances in Imaging Secondary Ion Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Words membrane organization, chemical composition imaging, NanoSIMS, ToF-SIMS, dynamic SIMS Abstract cited articles · Top downloaded articles · Our comprehensive search FurtherANNUAL REVIEWS #12;SIMS ToF-SIMS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Dynamic SIMS

Boxer, Steven G.

320

Chaotic oscillation and random-number generation based on nanoscale optical-energy transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By using nanoscale energy-transfer dynamics and density matrix formalism, we demonstrate theoretically and numerically that chaotic oscillation and random-number generation occur in a nanoscale system. The physical system consists of a pair of quantum dots (QDs), with one QD smaller than the other, between which energy transfers via optical near-field interactions. When the system is pumped by continuous-wave radiation and incorporates a timing delay between two energy transfers within the system, it emits optical pulses. We refer to such QD pairs as nano-optical pulsers (NOPs). Irradiating an NOP with external periodic optical pulses causes the oscillating frequency of the NOP to synchronize with the external stimulus. We find that chaotic oscillation occurs in the NOP population when they are connected by an external time delay. Moreover, by evaluating the time-domain signals by statistical-test suites, we confirm that the signals are sufficiently random to qualify the system as a random-number generator (RNG). This study reveals that even relatively simple nanodevices that interact locally with each other through optical energy transfer at scales far below the wavelength of irradiating light can exhibit complex oscillatory dynamics. These findings are significant for applications such as ultrasmall RNGs.

Makoto Naruse; Song-Ju Kim; Masashi Aono; Hirokazu Hori; Motoichi Ohtsu

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Capacitive chemical sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

322

Chemicals from Metabolic Pathways  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A few basic raw materials, petroleum, natural gas, +S from oil or natural gas, and O2 + N2 from air, generate first primary (or platform) chemicals, next secondary (commodity) chemicals, then intermediates, and f...

John Villadsen; Jens Nielsen; Gunnar Lidn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology 4 units Prof. Richard Brutchey, Fall 2014 (Lecture = 12:00�12:50 pm MWF) CHEM 455 is an upper-division undergraduate course in Chemical Nanotechnology. The intent

Rohs, Remo

324

Chemicals and health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemicals and health ... I must add here that some chemicals are indeed dangerous in the environment, largely because they persist, they don't break down, and they can therefore build up in the food chain. ...

1980-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

325

Biobased Chemicals Without Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unlike most other companies using biology to make chemicals, LanzaTech does not rely on biomass feedstocks. ...

MELODY BOMGARDNER

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

326

Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemical Processes ICEHT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes (ICEHT) Place: Hellas, Greece Zip:...

327

People Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Images People Images Several hundred of the 1700 U.S. scientists contributing to the LHC accelerator and experiments gathered in June 2008 in CERN's building 40 CE0252 Joel...

328

HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY PHD PROGRAM 2013-2014 Student Handbook #12;Program Contacts at the beginning of each semester. Laboratory Rotations Students in the Chemical Biology Program are expected an interest in having Chemical Biology Program Students in their labs. Students may rotate in the labs

Church, George M.

329

Computational Chemical Materials Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Thermal barrier coatings, wear resistance coatings, radiation resistant materials · Materials for opticalHome Computational Chemical and Materials Engineering Tahir Cagin Chemical Engineering Department to understand behavior and properties of materials as a function of ­ Chemical constitution ­ Composition

330

A computational investigation of the phase behavior and capillary sublimation of water confined between nanoscale hydrophobic plates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A computational investigation of the phase behavior and capillary sublimation of water confined behavior and capillary sublimation of water confined between nanoscale hydrophobic plates Andrew L 11210, USA 3 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712, USA 4

Ferguson, Andrew

331

Direct Measurement of Ion Beam Induced, Nanoscale Roughening of GaN Bentao Cui and P. I. Cohen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Measurement of Ion Beam Induced, Nanoscale Roughening of GaN Bentao Cui and P. I. Cohen of a surface roughening term due to curvature-dependent sputtering or asymmetric attachment of vacancies change using atomic force microscopy, we show a method to measure the ion-roughening coefficient. Using

Cohen, Philip I.

332

Probing nanoscale photo-oxidation in organic films using spatial hole burning near-field scanning optical microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probing nanoscale photo-oxidation in organic films using spatial hole burning near-field scanning from a stationary NSOM tip to induce photo-oxidation. The reduction in the fluorescence yield resulting photo-oxidation as a function of time, position, and environment free from the limits of far

Buratto, Steve

333

Ammonia synthesis by N2 and steam electrolysis in molten hydroxide suspensions of nanoscale Fe2O3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hydroxide suspensions of nanoscale Fe2O3 10.1126/science.1254234...hydroxide suspension of nano-Fe2O3. At 200C in an electrolyte with...loaded into carbon black as an anode, again at a low rate; note that tin...which consumed water at the anode and air at the cathode at 0...

Stuart Licht; Baochen Cui; Baohui Wang; Fang-Fang Li; Jason Lau; Shuzhi Liu

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

334

Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal-Insulator Domain Walls in Vanadium Dioxide Nanobeams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal- Insulator Domain Walls localized alternating Peltier heating and cooling as well as Joule heating concentrated at the M-I domain the monoclinic phase identification. KEYWORDS: Vanadium dioxide, thermoreflectance microscopy, Peltier effect

Wu, Junqiao

335

Intrinsic vacancy induced nanoscale wire structure in heteroepitaxial Ga2Se3/Si(001) Taisuke Ohta,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intrinsic vacancy induced nanoscale wire structure in heteroepitaxial Ga2Se3/Si(001) Taisuke Ohta,1-blende structure of -Ga2Se3, which contains ordered 110 arrays of Ga vacancies. These ordered vacancy lines structural vacancies of semiconducting chalcogenides lead to numerous interesting structural, electronic

Olmstead, Marjorie

336

Nanoscale sensing methodology via functional control of an ion channel-forming peptide, Gramicidin A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be useful as a platform for sensing chemical or biochemicalplatform. Furthermore, the capability to tailor the chemicalplatforms hold potential for various biosensing applications, including sensing of enzyme activity or chemical

Macrae, Michael X.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

American Chemical Society-Chinese Chemical Society Alliance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

American Chemical Society-Chinese Chemical Society Alliance ... The American Chemical Society and the Chinese Chemical Society (CCS) formed a three-year collaborative alliance in 2010 to address shared global concerns. ...

MARINDA LI WU; YAO JIANNIAN

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

Chemical exchange program analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of unneeded chemicals and the amount spent on new purchases, but will also avoid disposal costs. If SNL/NM were to realize a 5 percent reduction in chemical inventory and a 10 percent reduction in disposal of unused chemicals the total savings would be $189, 200 per year.

Waffelaert, Pascale

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Single shot extreme ultraviolet laser imaging of nanostructures with wavelength resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have demonstrated near-wavelength resolution microscopy in the extreme ultraviolet. Images of 50 nm diameter nanotubes were obtained with a single {approx}1 ns duration pulse from a desk-top size 46.9 nm laser. We measured the modulation transfer function of the microscope for three different numerical aperture zone plate objectives, demonstrating that 54 nm half-period structures can be resolved. The combination of near-wavelength spatial resolution and high temporal resolution opens myriad opportunities in imaging, such as the ability to directly investigate dynamics of nanoscale structures.

Jones, Juanita; Brewer, Courtney A.; Brizuela, Fernando; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Martz, Dale H.; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik H.; Attwood, David T.; Vinogradov, Alexander V.; Artyukov, Igor A.; Ponomareko, Alexander G.; Kondratenko, Valeriy V.; Marconi, Mario C.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

Phase imaging of magnetic nanostructures using resonant soft x-ray holography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate phase imaging by means of resonant soft x-ray holography. Our holographic phase-contrast method utilizes the strong energy-dependence of the refractive index at a characteristic x-ray absorption resonance. The general concept is shown by using a Co?Pd multilayer sample which exhibits random nanosized magnetic domains. By tuning below the Co L-edge resonance, our quantitative and spectroscopic phase method allows high-contrast imaging of nanoscale electronic and magnetic order while increasing the probing depth and decreasing the radiation dose by an order of magnitude. The complex refractive index is quantitatively obtained through the interference between resonant and nonresonant scattering.

A. Scherz; W. F. Schlotter; K. Chen; R. Rick; J. Sthr; J. Lning; I. McNulty; Ch. Gnther; F. Radu; W. Eberhardt; O. Hellwig; S. Eisebitt

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors | Advanced Photon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Unlikely Route to Ferroelectricity An Unlikely Route to Ferroelectricity How to Make a Splash Pressure-Tuning the Quantum Phase Transition in a Model 2-D Magnet Reappearing Superconductivity Surprises Scientists Manipulating Genes with Hidden TALENs Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors MAY 18, 2012 Bookmark and Share This collage shows the ring-shaped, isotropic x-ray diffraction pattern and electron microscope cross-section of the three-dimensional amorphous or quasi-ordered biophotonic nanostructure in spongy medullary feather barbs responsible for the vivid turquoise plumage of the Plum-throated Cotinga

342

Nanoscale compositional banding in binary thin films produced by ion-assisted deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the ion-assisted deposition of a binary material, the ion beam can induce the formation of nanoscale ripples on the surface of the growing thin film and compositional banding within its bulk. We demonstrate that this remains true even if the curvature dependence of the sputter yields and ballistic mass redistribution are negligible, and the two atomic species are completely miscible. The concentration of the species with the lower of the two sputter yields is higher at the crests of the ripples than at their troughs. Depending on the angles of incidence of the two atomic species, the incident flux of atoms with the higher sputter yield can either stabilize or destabilize the initially flat surface of the thin film.

Mark Bradley, R. [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

343

Fabrication and performance of nanoscale ultra-smooth programmeddefects for EUV Lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed processes for producing ultra-smooth nanoscale programmed substrate defects that have applications in areas such as thin film growth, EUV lithography, and defect inspection. Particle, line, pit, and scratch defects on the substrates between 40 and 140 nm wide 50 to 90 nm high have been successfully produced using e-beam lithograpy and plasma etching in both Silicon and Hydrosilsequioxane films. These programmed defect substrates have several advantages over those produced previously using gold nanoparticles or polystyrene latex spheres--most notably, the ability to precisely locate features and produce recessed as well as bump type features in ultra-smooth films. These programmed defects were used to develop techniques for film defect mitigation and results are discussed.

Olynick, D.L.; Salmassi, F.; Liddle, J.A.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; Spiller, E.; Baker, S.L.; Robinson, J.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Distribution of nanoscale nuclei in the amorphous dome of a phase change random access memory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nanoscale crystal nuclei in an amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} bit in a phase change memory device were evaluated by fluctuation transmission electron microscopy. The quench time in the device (?10 ns) afforded more and larger nuclei in the melt-quenched state than in the as-deposited state. However, nuclei were even more numerous and larger in a test structure with a longer quench time (?100 ns), verifying the prediction of nucleation theory that slower cooling produces more nuclei. It also demonstrates that the thermal design of devices will strongly influence the population of nuclei, and thus the speed and data retention characteristics.

Lee, Bong-Sub, E-mail: bongsub@gmail.com; Darmawikarta, Kristof; Abelson, John R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Coordinated Sciences Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Raoux, Simone; Shih, Yen-Hao; Zhu, Yu [IBM/Macronix PCRAM Joint Project, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Bishop, Stephen G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Coordinated Sciences Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Coordinated Sciences Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nano-scale optical and electrical probes of materials and processes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the investigations and milestones of the Nano-Scale Optical and Electrical Probes of Materials and Processes Junior/Senior LDRD. The goal of this LDRD was to improve our understanding of radiative and non-radiative mechanisms at the nanometer scale with the aim of increasing LED and solar cell efficiencies. These non-radiative mechanisms were investigated using a unique combination of optical and scanning-probe microscopy methods for surface, materials, and device evaluation. For this research we utilized our new near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) system to aid in understanding of defect-related emission issues for GaN-based materials. We observed micrometer-scale variations in photoluminescence (PL) intensity for GaN films grown on Cantilever Epitaxy pattern substrates, with lower PL intensity observed in regions with higher dislocation densities. By adding electrical probes to the NSOM system, the photocurrent and surface morphology could be measured concurrently. Using this capability we observed reduced emission in InGaN MQW LEDs near hillock-shaped material defects. In spatially- and spectrally-resolved PL studies, the emission intensity and measured wavelength varied across the wafer, suggesting the possibility of indium segregation within the InGaN quantum wells. Blue-shifting of the InGaN MQW wavelength due to thinning of quantum wells was also observed on top of large-scale ({micro}m) defect structures in GaN. As a direct result of this program, we have expanded the awareness of our new NSOM/multifunctional SPM capability at Sandia and formed several collaborations within Sandia and with NINE Universities. Possible future investigations with these new collaborators might include GaN-based compound semiconductors for green LEDs, nanoscale materials science, and nanostructures, novel application of polymers for OLEDs, and phase imprint lithography for large area 3D nanostructures.

Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

An atomistic methodology of energy release rate for graphene at nanoscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms packed into a honeycomb architecture, serving as a fundamental building block for electric devices. Understanding the fracture mechanism of graphene under various conditions is crucial for tailoring the electrical and mechanical properties of graphene-based devices at atomic scale. Although most of the fracture mechanics concepts, such as stress intensity factors, are not applicable in molecular dynamics simulation, energy release rate still remains to be a feasible and crucial physical quantity to characterize the fracture mechanical property of materials at nanoscale. This work introduces an atomistic simulation methodology, based on the energy release rate, as a tool to unveil the fracture mechanism of graphene at nanoscale. This methodology can be easily extended to any atomistic material system. We have investigated both opening mode and mixed mode at different temperatures. Simulation results show that the critical energy release rate of graphene is independent of initial crack length at low temperature. Graphene with inclined pre-crack possesses higher fracture strength and fracture deformation but smaller critical energy release rate compared with the graphene with vertical pre-crack. Owing to its anisotropy, graphene with armchair chirality always has greater critical energy release rate than graphene with zigzag chirality. The increase of temperature leads to the reduction of fracture strength, fracture deformation, and the critical energy release rate of graphene. Also, higher temperature brings higher randomness of energy release rate of graphene under a variety of predefined crack lengths. The energy release rate is independent of the strain rate as long as the strain rate is small enough.

Zhang, Zhen; Lee, James D., E-mail: jdlee@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, the George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Wang, Xianqiao [College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

347

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - News & Highlights - Photo  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facilities People Publications Awards News & Highlights Events Site Index Facilities People Publications Awards News & Highlights Events Site Index Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home >Chemical Sciences & Engineering > Fundamental Interactions Catalysis & Energy Conversion Electrochemical Energy Storage Nuclear & Environmental Processes National Security Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Center for Electrical Energy Storage: Tailored Interfaces Computational Postdoctoral Fellowships Contact Us CSE Intranet Chemical Sciences & Engineering Photo Archives We offer a variety of high resolution images in a number of categories covering research done in the Chemical Sciences & Engineering Division. Simply choose a category below and you'll be taken to a page from which you can download photographs.

348

Chemical Structure and Dynamics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2154-3 2154-3 UC-400 Annual Report 2000 Chemical Structure and Dynamics Steven D. Colson, Associate Director Robin S. McDowell, Program Manager and the Staff of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program April 2001 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RL01830 Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report Contents Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report 1. Introduction Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program......................................................... 1-3 2. Reaction Mechanisms at Liquid Interfaces Structure and Reactivity of Ice Surfaces and Interfaces G. A. Kimmel, Z. Dohnálek, K. P. Stevenson, R. S. Smith,

349

Image Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mosaic of earth and sky images Mosaic of earth and sky images Image Resources Free image resources covering energy, environment, and general science. Here are some links to energy- and environment-related photographic databases. Berkeley Lab Photo Archive Berkeley Lab's online digital image collection. National Science Digital Library (NSDL) NSDL is the Nation's online library for education and research in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The World Bank Group Photo Library A distinctive collection of over 11,000 images that illustrate development through topics such as Agriculture, Education, Environment, Health, Trade and more. Calisphere Compiles the digital collections of libraries, museums, and cultural heritage organizations across California, and organizes them by theme, such

350

CHEMICAL UNIONS FORM ALLIANCE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL UNIONS FORM ALLIANCE ... The Paper, Allied-Industrial, Chemical & Energy "Workers International Union (PACE) and the United Steelworkers of America (USWA) are industrial unions that have similar histories and many chemical and petroleum industry members, say union officials. ... PACE has created strategic alliances with several companies, said PACE President Boydlfoung in a statement, adding that it made sense to try the same thing with other unions. ...

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Postdoctoral opening: image-based profiling The Carpenter laboratory (a.k.a. Imaging Platform) at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT has an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.k.a. Imaging Platform) at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT has an opening, including: · Predicting how new chemical compounds act in cells · Identifying

Carpenter, Anne E.

352

Chemicals (2010 MECS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Chemicals Sector (NAICS 325) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

353

Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biomass Pyrolysis for Chemicals The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for (more)

Wild, Paul de

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter , with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weakly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

356

Chemical Market Prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical Market Prices ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1945-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

357

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

358

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter , with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

359

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter , with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

360

EMSL - Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

imaging en Diffusional Motion of Redox Centers in Carbonate Electrolytes . http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsdiffusional-motion-redox-centers-carbonate-electrolytes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Studying the semiconductor-metal phase transition in nanoscale vanadium dioxide, doped with ions of 3d-elements on a silicon surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanoscale vanadium dioxide doped with chromium and iron is obtained via molecular layering method on the surface of a single-crystal silicon. The qualitative and quantitative composition of the samples is dete...

D. V. Nazarov; O. M. Osmolowskaya

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Wrinkle-Based Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Nano-Scale Thin Pt Film Deposited on Polymeric Substrate: Verification and Uncertainty Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nano-scale thin films are extensively utilized in semiconductor, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), and nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) [13]. As feature sizes of the devices decrease, the critical d...

H-J. Choi; J-H. Kim; H-J. Lee; S-A. Song; H-J. Lee; J-H. Han

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Synthesis of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors by Molecular Beam Epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the industrial revolution, detection and monitoring of toxic matter, chemical wastes, and air pollutants has become an important environmental issue. Thus, it leads to the development of chemical sensors for various environmental applications. The recent disastrous oil spills over the near-surface of ocean due to the offshore drilling emphasize the use of chemical sensors for prevention and monitoring of the processes that might lead to these mishaps.1, 2 Chemical sensors operated on a simple principle that the sensing platform undergoes a detectable change when exposed to the target substance to be sensed. Among all the types of chemical sensors, solid state gas sensors have attracted a great deal of attention due to their advantages such as high sensitivity, greater selectivity, portability, high stability and low cost.3, 4 Especially, semiconducting metal oxides such as SnO2, TiO2, and WO3 have been widely used as the active sensing platforms in solid state gas sensors.5 For the enhanced properties of solid state gas sensors, finding new sensing materials or development of existing materials will be needed. Thus, nanostructured materials such as nanotubes,6-8 nanowires,9-11 nanorods,12-15 nanobelts,16, 17 and nano-scale thin films18-23 have been synthesized and studied for chemical sensing applications.

Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

CHEMICAL ABBREVIATION KEY ABBREVIATION CHEMICAL NAME HAZARDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irritant destain Methanol,acetic acid,H2O Flammable, Corrosive - acid DI H2O Deionized water DCM Nitric acid Corrosive - acid KAc Potassium acetate Irritant KCl Potassium chloride Irritant K2H PO4 Corrosive - base LiCl Lithium chloride Harmful MeOH Methanol Flammable #12;CHEMICAL ABBREVIATION KEY

Pawlowski, Wojtek

365

THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Reed, of the Illinois Geological Survey...Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation, Richmond...Board of Health, Madison, Wis. Division...Pennsylvania. Division of Chemical Education: Chairman...the University of Illinois; on execu-tive...from 10 or more plants were macerated...

1939-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

366

Chemical Signals Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Signals · Types · Production · Transmission · Reception · Reading: Ch 10 except boxes 10.1 and 10.2 #12;What is chemical communication? · Movement of molecules from sender to receiver · Methods compounds are volatile. - 5-20 carbon compounds - carbon (MW=12) + hydrogen is less dense than oxygen (MW

Wilkinson, Gerald S.

367

Chemical Engineering Andrew Zydney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;ChE Employment (2003 at PSU) Merck Dow ExxonMob Air Products Amgen PPG Sunoco Kraft Foods NRC Procter, microelectronics, consumer products, biotechnology, fuels / energy, environmental engineering, etc. ·Chemical Engineers focus on the processes involved in making new products, including chemical reactions

Maranas, Costas

368

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 Risk and Safety Manager 5535 Security 7058 #12;- 3 - FOREWORD This reference manual outlines the safe

Bolch, Tobias

369

Data Image  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data image refers to the sum of all information 74/100,000 available in all datasets linked to aspecific name; to all those who have access to databases that name is actually the data image of the real person...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Enhanced Chemical Cleaning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Cleaning Chemical Cleaning Renee H. Spires Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Project Manager July 29, 2009 Tank Waste Corporate Board 2 Objective Provide an overview of the ECC process and plan 3 Chemical Cleaning * Oxalic Acid can get tanks clean - Tank 16 set a standard in 1982 - Tanks 5-6 Bulk OA cleaning results under evaluation * However, the downstream flowsheet and financial impacts of handling the spent acid were unacceptable Before After Tank 16 Tank 16 4 Oxalic Acid Flowsheet Impacts Evap Sludge Washing Evap Feed/Drop Tank 8 Wt% Oxalic Acid Neutralization Tank Solids Liquid High oxalate concentration Negligible oxalate concentration * Oxalates from chemical cleaning impact salt processing * A process change was needed Evaporator Saltstone Vaults DWPF Filled Canisters 5 Vision * Eliminate the impacts to the Tank Farm

371

Directed Assembly of Bi Metallic Nanoparticles by Pulsed Laser Induced Dewetting: a Unique Nanoscale Time and Length Scale Regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulsed laser induced dewetting (PLiD) was used to assemble patterned, nanoscale metallic thin film features into bi metallic nanoparticles. The liquid-phase flow is related to a conventional droplet impact test and in appropriate dimensions have inertial and viscoinertial flow characteristics. The final size, morphology, composition, and inter-diffusion of the nanoparticles is governed by the interplay of capillary, inertial and viscous forces and an appropriate dimensional regime defined by competing Rayleigh-Plateau and spinodal instabilities.

Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Rack, P. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Wu, Yeuyeng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Perfect light trapping in nanoscale thickness semiconductor films with resonant back reflector and spectrum-splitting structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The optical absorption of nanoscale thickness semiconductor films on top of light-trapping structures based on optical interference effects combined with spectrum-splitting structures is theoretically investigated. Nearly perfect absorption over a broad spectrum range can be achieved in $solar absorption and low carrier thermalization loss can be achieved when the light-trapping structures with wedge-shaped spacer layer or semiconductor films are combined with spectrum-splitting structures.

Liu, Jiang-Tao; Yang, Wen; Li, Jun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Multiple Reference Fourier Transform Holography: Five Images for the Price  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Multiple Reference Fourier Transform Multiple Reference Fourier Transform Holography: Five Images for the Price of One Improving the quality of a high magnification image on an optical microscope is simply a matter of cranking up the intensity of the illumination lamp. The same is true for x-ray microscopes, but complications arise when there just aren't enough x-rays or even worse when the sample is susceptible to damage caused by the intense x-ray beam. To address these challenges we have demonstrated a novel technique for improving the quality of a microscopic image without increasing the x-ray exposure to the specimen. This affords new opportunities to explore materials prone to soft x-ray damage, like polymer or biological samples. Our technique uses coherent x-ray scattering to simultaneously acquire multiple images of a specimen, which can easily be combined later to enhance the image quality. Applying our technique in the weak illumination limit we imaged a nanoscale test object by detecting only 2500 photons.

374

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Specimen Curriculum for Chemical Engineering Focus Area: Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Chem 220B 3 hours Physical Chemistry Chem 230 3 hours Chemical Reactor Engineering ChBE 225 3Specimen Curriculum for Chemical Engineering Focus Area: Chemical Engineering Semester hours SOPHOMORE YEAR FALL SPRING Chem 219A

Bordenstein, Seth

376

Chapter 22 - Heterogeneous Catalytic Reduction for Water Purification: Nanoscale Effects on Catalytic Activity, Selectivity, and Sustainability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reductive catalysis is a promising water treatment technology that employs heterogeneous metal catalysts (e.g., Pd nanoparticles on a support) to convert dihydrogen to adsorbed atomic hydrogen in order to promote reactions with functional groups in various contaminants. Reductive catalysis has several potential advantages, including high selectivity for a given target, fast rates under mild conditions, and low production of harmful by-products. The technology has been applied mostly for remediation of groundwater contaminated with halogenated hydrocarbons and for treatment of nitrate, but recent studies have expanded the range of target contaminants to include perchlorate and N-nitrosamines. Palladium-based catalysts hold tremendous promise for their ability to selectively destroy several drinking water contaminants, and some compounds that exhibit slow reaction kinetics with Pd alone are rapidly degraded when a second, promoter metal is added to the catalyst. However, there is a lack of information about the long-term sustainability of these catalytic treatment processes, which is a major consideration in their possible adoption for remediation applications. Recent research has focused on the nanoscale characterization of these heterogeneous catalysts in order to develop an improved understanding of their mechanisms of deactivation and the pathways for regeneration. Two examples of studies from the authors laboratories, involving (i) hydrodehalogenation of iodinated X-ray contrast media with Ni or Pd catalysts and (ii) selective reduction of nitrate with a regenerable Pd-In/alumina catalyst, are discussed in this chapter.

Timothy J. Strathmann; Charles J. Werth; John R. Shapley

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Ab-initio friction forces on the nanoscale: A DFT study of fcc Cu(111)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While there are a number of models that tackle the problem of calculating friction forces on the atomic level, providing a completely parameter-free approach remains a challenge. Here we present a quasi-static model to obtain an approximation to the nanofrictional response of dry, wearless systems based on quantum mechanical all-electron calculations. We propose a mechanism to allow dissipative sliding, which relies on atomic relaxations. We define two different ways of calculating the mean nanofriction force, both leading to an exponential friction-versus-load behavior for all sliding directions. Since our approach does not impose any limits on lengths and directions of the sliding paths, we investigate arbitrary sliding directions for an fcc Cu(111) interface and detect two periodic paths which form the upper and lower bound of nanofriction. For long aperiodic paths the friction force convergences to a value in between these limits. For low loads we retrieve the Derjaguin generalization of Amontons-Coulomb kinetic friction law which appears to be valid all the way down to the nanoscale. We observe a non-vanishing Derjaguin-offset even for atomically flat surfaces in dry contact.

Michael Wolloch; Gregor Feldbauer; Peter Mohn; Josef Redinger; Andrs Vernes

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

378

Nanoscale transport of phonons: Dimensionality, subdiffusion, molecular damping, and interference effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine heat transport carried by acoustic phonons in the systems composed of nanoscale chains of masses coupled to two thermal baths of different temperatures. Thermal conductance is obtained by using linearized Landauer-type formula for heat flux with phonon transmission probability calculated within atomistic Green's functions (AGF) method. AGF formalism is extended onto dissipative chains of masses with harmonic coupling beyond nearest-neighbor approximation, while atomistic description of heat reservoirs is also included into computational scheme. In particular, the phonon lifetimes and the phonon frequency shifts are discussed for harmonic lattices of different dimensions. Further, resonant structure of phonon transmission spectrum is analyzed with respect to reservoir-induced effects, molecular damping, and mass-to-mass harmonic coupling. Analysis of transmission zeros (antiresonances) and their accompanied Fano-shape resonances are discussed as a result of interference effects between different vibrational modes. Finally, we also predict subdiffusive transport regime for low-frequency ballistic phonons propagated along a linear chain of harmonically coupled masses.

Walczak, Kamil; Yerkes, Kirk L. [Aerospace Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

379

Chemical Evolution and Chemical State of the Long Valley Magma...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magma Chamber Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Chemical Evolution and Chemical State of the Long Valley Magma Chamber Abstract...

380

Surface Chemical Dynamics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface Chemical Dynamics Surface Chemical Dynamics The goal of the Surface Chemical Dynamics Program is to elucidate the underlying physical processes that determine the products (selectivity) and yield (efficiency) of chemical transformations relevant to energy-related chemistry on catalytic and nanostructured surfaces. Achieving this end requires understanding the evolution of the reactant-molecule/surface complex as molecules adsorb, bonds dissociate, surface species diffuse, new bonds form and products desorb. The pathways and time scales of these processes are ultimately determined by a multidimensional potential energy surface that is a function of the geometric and electronic structures of the surface and the reactant, product, intermediate and transition-state molecular and atomic species.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Chemicals from Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Added Chemicals from Biomass. Volume I: Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas (www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/pdfs/35523.pdf) . 6. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical...

David R. Dodds; Richard A. Gross

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

382

Chemical decontamination specification preparation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the first low-concentration chemical decontamination in the United States at Vermont Yankee in 1979, > 75 decontamination applications have been made at > 20 nuclear electrical generating stations. Chemical decontamination has become a common technique for reducing person-rem exposures. Two vendors are currently offering low-concentration chemical decontamination reagents for application in boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor systems. All technical aspects associated with the chemical decontamination technology have been commercially tested and are well advanced beyond the research and development stage. Extensive corrosion and material compatibility testing has been performed on the major solvent systems with satisfactory results. The material compatibility testing for the three main solvent systems, CANDECON, CITROX, and LOMI, has been documented in numerous Electric Power Research Institute reports.

Miller, M.A.; Remark, J.F.; Vandergriff, D.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Western Chemical Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Western Chemical Information ... For the most part, the units are small because production is geared to the needs of the 11 states, Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, and Arizona, not to the entire country. ...

FREDERICK G. SAWYER

1949-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

384

Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) and looping cycles in general represent an important new ... technologies, which can be deployed for direct combustion as well as be used in gasification...2...stream suitable fo...

Edward John (Ben) Anthony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Chemicals from coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter contains sections titled: Chemicals from Coke Oven Distillate; The Fischer-Tropsch Reaction; Coal Hydrogenation; Substitute Natural Gas (SNG); Synthesis Gas Technology; Calcium Carbide; Coal and the Environment; and Notes and References

Harold A. Wittcoff; Bryan G. Reuben; Jeffrey S. Plotkin

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

388

Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy-access environments, this device could make SSR surveying considerably more efficient and less expensive, particularly when geophone intervals of 25 cm or less are required. The most recent research analyzed the difference in seismic response of the geophones with variable geophone spike length and geophones attached to various steel media. Experiments investigated the azimuthal dependence of the quality of data relative to the orientation of the rigidly attached geophones. Other experiments designed to test the hypothesis that the data are being amplified in much the same way that an organ pipe amplifies sound have so far proved inconclusive. Taken together, the positive results show that SSR imaging within a few meters of the earth's surface is possible if the geology is suitable, that SSR imaging can complement GPR imaging, and that SSR imaging could be made significantly more cost effective, at least in areas where the topography and the geology are favorable. Increased knowledge of the Earth's shallow subsurface through non-intrusive techniques is of potential benefit to management of DOE facilities. Among the most significant problems facing hydrologists today is the delineation of preferential permeability paths in sufficient detail to make a quantitative analysis possible. Aquifer systems dominated by fracture flow have a reputation of being particularly difficult to characterize and model. At chemically contaminated sites, including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and others at Department of Defense (DOD) installations worldwide, establishing the spatial extent of the contamination, along with the fate of the contaminants and their transport-flow directions, is essential to the development of effective cleanup strategies. Detailed characterization of the shallow subsurface is important not only in environmental, groundwater, and geotechnical engineering applications, but also in neotectonics, mining geology, and the analysis of petroleum reservoir analogs. Near-surface seismology is in the vanguard of non-intrusive approaches to increase knowledge of the shallow subsurface; our

Steeples, Don W.

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

389

Nanomaterial processing using self-assembly-bottom-up chemical and biological approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanotechnology is touted as the next logical sequence in technological evolution. This has led to a substantial surge in research activities pertaining to the development and fundamental understanding of processes and assembly at the nanoscale. Both top-down and bottom-up fabrication approaches may be used to realize a range of well-defined nanostructured materials with desirable physical and chemical attributes. Among these, the bottom-up self-assembly process offers the most realistic solution toward the fabrication of next-generation functional materials and devices. Here, we present a comprehensive review on the physical basis behind self-assembly and the processes reported in recent years to direct the assembly of nanoscale functional blocks into hierarchically ordered structures. This paper emphasizes assembly in the synthetic domain as well in the biological domain, underscoring the importance of biomimetic approaches toward novel materials. In particular, two important classes of directed self-assembly, namely, (i) self-assembly among nanoparticlepolymer systems and (ii) external field-guided assembly are highlighted. The spontaneous self-assembling behavior observed in nature that leads to complex, multifunctional, hierarchical structures within biological systems is also discussed in this review. Recent research undertaken to synthesize hierarchically assembled functional materials have underscored the need as well as the benefits harvested in synergistically combining top-down fabrication methods with bottom-up self-assembly.

Rajagopalan Thiruvengadathan; Venumadhav Korampally; Arkasubhra Ghosh; Nripen Chanda; Keshab Gangopadhyay; Shubhra Gangopadhyay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering", National Academies Press, Washington, DC, 2003. #12;2 B1 PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering Bylaws Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering College of Engineering and Architecture Approved by Voiland School faculty

Collins, Gary S.

391

History Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History Images History Images Los Alamos History in Images Los Alamos has a proud history and heritage of almost 70 years of science and innovation. The people of the Laboratory work on advanced technologies to provide the best scientific and engineering solutions to many of the nation's most crucial security challenges. Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Back in the day Back in the day LA bridge in Los Alamos LA bridge in Los Alamos 1945 Army-Navy "E" Award 1945 Army-Navy "E" Award Louis Rosen Louis Rosen Bob Van Ness Robert Kuckuck and Michael Anastasio Bob Van Ness Robert Kuckuck and Michael Anastasio TA-18 TA-18 Elmer Island TU-4 assembly area Elmer Island TU-4 assembly area

392

Nanoscale topographic pattern formation on Kr{sup +}-bombarded germanium surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nanoscale pattern formation of Ge surfaces uniformly irradiated by Kr{sup +} ions was studied in a low-contamination environment at ion energies of 250 and 500 eV and at angles of 0 Degree-Sign through 80 Degree-Sign . The authors present a phase diagram of domains of pattern formation occurring as these two control parameters are varied. The results are insensitive to ion energy over the range covered by the experiments. Flat surfaces are stable from normal incidence up to an incidence angle of {theta} = 55 Degree-Sign from normal. At higher angles, the surface is linearly unstable to the formation of parallel-mode ripples, in which the wave vector is parallel to the projection of the ion beam on the surface. For {theta} {>=} 75 Degree-Sign the authors observe perpendicular-mode ripples, in which the wave vector is perpendicular to the ion beam. This behavior is qualitatively similar to those of Madi et al. for Ar{sup +}-irradiated Si but is inconsistent with those of Ziberi et al. for Kr{sup +}-irradiated Ge. The existence of a window of stability is qualitatively inconsistent with a theory based on sputter erosion [R. M. Bradley and J. M. Harper, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 6, 2390 (1988)] and qualitatively consistent with a model of ion impact-induced mass redistribution [G. Carter and V. Vishnyakov, Phys. Rev. B 54, 17647 (1996)] as well as a crater function theory incorporating both effects [S. A. Norris et al., Nat. Commun. 2, 276 (2011)]. The critical transition angle between stable and rippled surfaces occurs 10 Degree-Sign -15 Degree-Sign above the value of 45 Degree-Sign predicted by the mass redistribution model.

Perkinson, Joy C.; Madi, Charbel S.; Aziz, Michael J. [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

394

Chemical Cleaning Program Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Cleaning Chemical Cleaning Program Review Neil Davis Deputy Program Manager Waste Removal & Tank Closure July 29, 2009 SRR-STI-2009-00464 2 Contents Regulatory drivers Process overview Preliminary results Lessons learned Path forward 3 Regulatory Drivers The Federal Facilities Agreement establishes milestones for the removal of bulk waste and closure of each non-compliant tank Per the Dispute Resolution: - "DOE shall complete operational closure of Tanks 19 and 18 by 12/31/2012" - "DOE shall complete operational closure of 4 tanks by 9/30/2015" SRR intention to close 4 tanks by 9/30/2010, or as soon as possible Tanks 5 & 6 will be 2 of the 4 tanks 4 Tank Closure Process Bulk Waste Removal Mechanical Heel Removal Chemical Cleaning Annulus

395

Chemical Label Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Label Information Chemical Label Information Chemical Name CAS No. NFPA 704 Label Data Hazard Information Health Fire Reactivity Other acetone 67641 1 3 0 Eye, skin and mucous membrane irritatiion. Central nervous system depression. chloroform 67663 2 0 0 CAR [1] and TERAT [2] Liver and kidney disorders. Eye and skin irritation. Central nervous system depression. Cardiac arrythmia. ethanol 64175 0 3 0 Skin and eye irritation. ethyl alcohol 64175 0 3 0 Skin and eye irritation. hydrofluoric acid 7664393 4 0 0 Acute [3] - Skin contact can lead to bone damage. Skin, eye and mucous membrane irritation. hydrogen peroxide (35 to 52%) 7722841 2 0 1 OX Very irritating to the skin, eye and respiratory tract. hydrogen peroxide (> 52%) 7722841 2 0 3 OX Extremely irritating to the skin, eye and respiratory tract.

396

Chemical Storage-Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage - Storage - Overview Ali T-Raissi, FSEC Hydrogen Storage Workshop Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois August 14-15, 2002 Hydrogen Fuel - Attributes * H 2 +½ O 2 → H 2 O (1.23 V) * High gravimetric energy density: 27.1 Ah/g, based on LHV of 119.93 kJ/g * 1 wt % = 189.6 Wh/kg (0.7 V; i.e. η FC = 57%) * Li ion cells: 130-150 Wh/kg Chemical Hydrides - Definition * They are considered secondary storage methods in which the storage medium is expended - primary storage methods include reversible systems (e.g. MHs & C-nanostructures), GH 2 & LH 2 storage Chemical Hydrides - Definition (cont.) * The usual chemical hydride system is reaction of a reactant containing H in the "-1" oxidation state (hydride) with a reactant containing H in the "+1" oxidation

397

Chemical profiles of switchgrass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

profiles profiles of switchgrass Zhoujian Hu a,b , Robert Sykes a,c , Mark F. Davis a,c , E. Charles Brummer a,d , Arthur J. Ragauskas a,b,e, * a BioEnergy Science Center, USA b School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA c National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, CO 80401, USA d Institute for Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Genomics, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA e Forest Products and Chemical Engineering Department, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 15 April 2009 Received in revised form 10 December 2009 Accepted 10 December 2009 Available online 13 January 2010 Keywords: Switchgrass Morphological components Chemical

398

Micromachined chemical jet dispenser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dispenser for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 .mu.m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (.about.200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA)

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

399

A View from the Middle for Chemical Reactions | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

chemical dynamics. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of University of California, San Diego Laser induced...

400

Chemical Logging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemical Logging Chemical Logging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Chemical Logging Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Presence and geochemical composition of fluid producing zones Thermal: Calcium-alkalinity ratios versus depth assist in defining warm and hot water aquifers Dictionary.png Chemical Logging: Chemical logging produces a chemical profile of the formation fluid within a well based on the measurement of changes in the chemical composition of the drilling fluid during drilling operations.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

End station for nanoscale magnetic materials study: Combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and soft X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have constructed an end station for nanoscale magnetic materials study at the soft X-ray beamline HiSOR BL-14 at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center. An ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was installed for an in situ characterization of nanoscale magnetic materials in combination with soft X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopy experiment. The STM was connected to the XMCD experimental station via damper bellows to isolate it from environmental vibrations, thus achieving efficient spatial resolution for observing Si(111) surface at atomic resolution. We performed an in situ experiment with STM and XMCD spectroscopy on Co nanoclusters on an Au(111) surface and explored its practical application to investigate magnetic properties for well-characterized nanoscale magnetic materials.

Ueno, Tetsuro; Sawada, Masahiro; Namatame, Hirofumi [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, 2-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Kishimizu, Yusuke; Kimura, Akio [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Taniguchi, Masaki [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, 2-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Introduction to the Quantitative Analysis of Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Microscopy Images for Cell-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Images for Cell- Based Screening Vebjorn Ljosa, Anne E. Carpenter* Imaging Platform, Broad Institute to discover samples of interest or annotate large sets of chemically or genetically perturbed samples. One im. In the case of hundreds of phenotype-relevant genes or chemicals discovered in a single screen

Carpenter, Anne E.

403

3 - Chemically derived graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The synthesis of graphene via chemical functionalisation of graphite is reviewed, including investigations that unravelled the atomic structure of resulting graphene oxide (GO) sheets in the suspension. The fundamental properties of GO are discussed and a summary of recent advances in device applications is provided.

R.S. Sundaram

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Design for chemical recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...than design. Life-cycle assessment (LCA), resource envi- ronmental profile analysis...product from cradle to grave. Although LCA is considered to be an evaluation tool and...polyol from oil. 7. The design check using LCA In order to check that chemical recycling...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Germany's Chemical Plans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

THE DIRECTION OF PROPOSED PLANT investments in the German Federal Republic is on the brink of significant change, according to the 1956 picture of capital expenditure projects. Leading German chemical companies are spending less on new plants in L956 than ...

1956-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

406

Chemical Plant Expansion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite $4 billion of capital expenditure for plant expansion over the past seven years, a high level of construction activity is expected to continue ... A marked increase in capital expenditures of t h e six largest chemical companies too place in 1951 over 1950. ...

JOHN M. WEISS

1952-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

407

NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

None

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

408

Chemicals from Coal Coking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemicals from Coal Coking ... Since 2009, she has been at INCAR-CSIC, researching the preparation and characterization of carbon materials (cokes and fibers) and nanomaterials (nanotubes and graphenes) and their catalytic, environmental, and energy applications. ... He then joined the Fundamental Studies Section of the British Coke (later Carbonization) Research Association, eventually becoming Head of Fundamental Studies. ...

Marcos Granda; Clara Blanco; Patricia Alvarez; John W. Patrick; Rosa Menndez

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and the microfluidic platform will have a significant impact on several scientific disciplines that require...

410

Accepted Manuscript Title: Infrared chemical imaging: spatial resolution evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-La Roche A.G., Basel, Switzerland.6 (c) Multi-Dimensional Signal Processing Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, Baskin School7 of Engineering, University of California, 1156 High Street, Mailcode is more or less equal to22 the wavelength of the light (i.e. 2.5 to 25 m). Unfortunately, the spatial

Milanfar, Peyman

411

Local Optical Spectroscopies for Subnanometer Spatial Resolution Chemical Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evanescently coupled photon scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) have special requirements in terms of stability and optical access. We have made substantial improvements to the stability, resolution, and noise floor of our custom-built visible-photon STM, and will translate these advances to our infrared instrument. Double vibration isolation of the STM base with a damping system achieved increased rigidity, giving high tunneling junction stability for long-duration and high-power illumination. Light frequency modulation with an optical chopper and phase-sensitive detection now enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the tunneling junction during irradiation.

Weiss, Paul

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

412

American Chemical Society Award Winners, Chicago, III.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

American Chemical Society Award Winners, Chicago, III. ... Copyright 1970 American Chemical Society ...

1970-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

CSD: Research Programs: Chemical Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CSD: Research: Chemical Physics CSD: Research Programs: Chemical Physics CSD: Research: Chemical Physics CSD: Research Programs: Chemical Physics LBL Logo A-Z CSD Research Highlights CSD Directory Chemical Sciences Division A-Z Index Phone Book Search Berkeley Lab INTRODUCTION TO CSD NATIONAL FACILITIES & CENTERS RESEARCH PROGRAMS Atomic, Molecular & Optical Sciences Catalytic Science Chemical Physics The Glenn T. Seaborg Center (GTSC) STUDENT & POSTDOCTORAL OPPORTUNITIES NEWS & EVENTS CSD CONTACTS LBNL HOME Privacy & Security Notice DOE UC Berkeley CSD > Research Programs > Chemical Physics The Chemical Physics Program of the Chemical Science Division of LBNL is concerned with the development of both experimental and theoretical methodologies for studying molecular structure and dynamical processes at the most fundamental level, and with the application of these to specific

414

Work Practices for Chemical Fumehoods  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Practices for Chemical Fumehoods Practices for Chemical Fumehoods (Reviewed May 16, 2011) Always use a chemical fumehood when working with toxic and/or volatile chemicals, not on an open bench. Chemical fumehoods are designed to provide protection for the user from chemical and radiological contaminants. However, they do not absolutely eliminate exposure, even under ideal conditions. Careless work practices can result in considerable exposure to users who may believe they are protected. To optimize the performance of the chemical hood, adhere to the following work practices: 1. Ensure that your chemical hood has a current inspection sticker (dated within the last year). The face velocity should be between 80 and 120 linear feet per minute (lfpm). 2. Verify that the chemical hood is drawing air.

415

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

Wurden, Glen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

Wurden, G.A.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

417

Digital Compressive Quantitation and Hyperspectral Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 20, 2013 ... produced using multivariate curve resolution (MCR) to pre-process mixture training spectra, thus facilitating the quantitation of mixtures even when no pure chemical component .... simulated annealing to ?nd the rotation matrix elements that ... the image registration was also performed in Matlab R2012a.

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

418

Cu oxide nanowire array grown on Si-based SiO{sub 2} nanoscale islands via nanochannels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cu oxide nanowire array on Si-based SiO{sub 2} nanoscale islands was fabricated via nanochannels of Si-based porous anodic alumina (PAA) template at room temperature under a pulse voltage in a conventional solution for copper electrodeposition. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the main composite of the oxide nanowire is Cu{sub 2}O. The nanowires had a preferential growth direction (1 1 1) and connected with the nanoscale SiO{sub 2} islands, which was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Such Si-based nanostructure is useful in the nanoelectrics application. The growth mechanism of Cu oxide nanowires in Si-based PAA template was discussed. The formation of Cu{sub 2}O is due to the alkalinity of the anodized solution. However, the oscillations of the potential and current during the experiment trend to bring on a small amount of copper and CuO in the nanowires.

Mei, Y.F. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China) and Department of Physics, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)]. E-mail: meiyongfeng@nju.org.cn; Siu, G.G. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Yang, Y. [Department of Physics, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Fu, Ricky K.Y. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Hung, T.F. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wu, X.L. [Department of Physics, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

419

Chemically graftedChemically grafted nanoparticlesnanoparticles Quantum dot Nanoparticle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemically graftedChemically grafted nanoparticlesnanoparticles Quantum dot Nanoparticle (~ 5nm Pb atomic force microscope tip: tether nanoparticle to oxide dot, or H-terminated pit after HF etch Ebeam

Plotkin, Steven S.

420

FL44CH17-Chang ARI 18 October 2011 18:22 Nanoscale Electrokinetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Microvortices: How Microhydrodynamics Affects Nanofluidic Ion Flux Hsueh-Chia Chang,1 Gilad Yossifon,2 and Evgeny A. Demekhin3 1 Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Center for Microfluidics of Mechanical Engineering, Micro- and Nanofluidics Laboratory, Technion ­ Israel Institute of Technology

Chang, Hsueh-Chia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Harvard Center for Nanoscale Systems ACADEMIC RATES (effective 04/01/14, subject to change)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/hour G05 Bio-Materials Facility $30/day $55/hour $165/hour 6 G06 Chemical Nanotechnology and SLF/hour $55/hour $165/hour SLF-4 Transparency Photomask Writer $30/hour $55/hour $165/hour SPM-1, SPM-2

422

Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology 1 Faculty of Engineering, Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Engineering with Fine Chemicals Processing, run jointly with the Department of Chemistry for chemical engineering graduates with formal training in synthetic chemistry and process developmentChemical Engineering and Chemical Technology 1 Faculty of Engineering, Department of --Chemical

423

Chemical Sciences Division: Directory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION TO CSD NATIONAL FACILITIES & CENTERS RESEARCH STUDENT & POSTDOCTORAL OPPORTUNITIES NEWS & EVENTS CSD CONTACTS LBNL HOME Privacy & Security Notice DOE UC Berkeley CSD Directory A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Rebecca Abergel CSD Project Scientist; The Glenn T. Seaborg Center. Musahid Ahmed CSD Staff Scientist, Chemical Physics Program/Chemical Dynamics Beamline Publications Richard A. Andersen Professor of Chemistry, UC Berkeley; CSD Senior Faculty Scientist, The Glenn T. Seaborg Center Publications John Arnold Professor of Chemistry, UC Berkeley; CSD Faculty Scientist, Catalytic Science Program Publications B Ali Belkacem CSD Deputy and Senior Staff Scientist; Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences Program Leader

424

Chemical vapor deposition sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Chemical composition of melanin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical composition of melanin Chemical composition of melanin Name: Peggy M Siemers Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What is the chemical composition of Melanin by specific amino acids, or the DNA code for melanin? Replies: This is a good question! The answer is somewhat complex and I'm sure I don't have all the details but here goes... First, there is not a specific DNA code for melanin because like many biomolecules, it is not the result of a single gene product. People that are deficient in melanin are oculo/dermal albinos and I believe there have been seven different types of mutations. These different mutations reflect the multiple steps required to produce melanin. The original building block for melanin is tyrosine, one of the amino acids. This amino acid is modified by enzymes to produce the building block (monomer) for melanin synthesis by a process called polymerization that is also controlled by an enzyme. The polymers ,I believe, can attain diff3erent lengths and they can also form aggregates of different sizes alone and in combination with other molecules such as proteins. This is in part responsible for differences in coloration seen within and between individuals. NEWTON RULES

426

Miniature Chemical Sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new chemical detection technology has been realized that addresses DOE environmental management needs. The new technology is based on a variant of the sensitive optical absorption technique, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Termed evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), the technology employs a miniature solid-state optical resonator having an extremely high Q-factor as the sensing element, where the high-Q is achieved by using ultra-low-attenuation optical materials, ultra-smooth surfaces, and ultra-high reflectivity coatings, as well as low-diffraction-loss designs. At least one total-internal reflection (TIR) mirror is integral to the resonator permitting the concomitant evanescent wave to probe the ambient environment. Several prototypes have been designed, fabricated, characterized, and applied to chemical detection. Moreover, extensions of the sensing concept have been explored to enhance selectivity, sensitivity, and range of application. Operating primarily in the visible and near IR regions, the technology inherently enables remote detection by optical fiber. Producing 11 archival publications, 5 patents, 19 invited talks, 4 conference proceedings, a CRADA, and a patent-license agreement, the project has realized a new chemical detection technology providing >100 times more sensitivity than comparable technologies, while also providing practical advantages.

Andrew C. R. Pipino

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

427

chemicals | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coal-to-chemicals facilities in South Africa. To put chemicals production from coalpetcoke into context, refer to Figure 1, which shows the many potential products that can be...

428

CHEMICAL MAKERS INVEST IN SOLAR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MAKERS INVEST IN SOLAR ... CAPACITY BOOST: New projects target raw materials and research ... The projects will increase capacity and advance research for chemical components of both traditional polysilicon solar cells and newer thin-film modules. ...

MELODY VOITH

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

429

Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

Keenan, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

430

BUILDING A CHEMICAL LASER WEAPON  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

BUILDING A CHEMICAL LASER WEAPON ... Under fire, Airborne Laser program director confronts challenges of revolutionary weapons system ...

WILLIAM G. SCHULZ

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

431

LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

432

Naming chemical compounds: Calculator drill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

36. Bits and pieces, 13. A calculator can be programmed to drill students on chemical compound naming rules.

David Holdsworth; Evelyn Lacanienta

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Last Revised: 04/03/2014 UNDERGRADUATE MINOR IN "NANOSCALE SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The goal of this Minor is to enhance the background, knowledge and skills in the topical area the student significant background in Nanotechnology, and uses an approach to promote independent thinking: Materials Science CHEM 478: Molecular Modeling CSE 568M Imaging Sensors 3 CHEM 401: Physical Chemistry I

Subramanian, Venkat

434

ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY a post graduate course (doktorandkurs) when: February 10 ­ 28, 2014 where: Chemical Ecology, Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agriculture (SLU to modern analytical methods used in Chemical Ecological and Ecotoxicological research, such as: methods

435

Structural phase transitions on the nanoscale: The crucial pattern in the phase-change materials Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeTe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural phase transitions on the nanoscale: The crucial pattern in the phase-change materials Ge; published 4 December 2007 Phase-change materials are of immense importance for optical recording-increasing demands on the density, speed, and stability of memory. Phase-change PC materials already play impor- tant

436

RSNA 2002: Image Fusion Image Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of anatomical feature #12;RSNA 2002: Image Fusion Types of Data to be Registered Anatomic CT, MRI, US DigitizedRSNA 2002: Image Fusion Image Fusion: Introduction to the Technology Charles A. Pelizzari, Ph.D. Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology The University of Chicago #12;RSNA 2002: Image Fusion "Fusion

Pelizzari, Charles A.

437

Nanoscale Phase Separation, Cation Ordering, and Surface Oxygen Chemistry in Pristine Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 for Li-Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Li-rich layered material Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 possesses high voltage and high specific capacity, which makes it an attractive candidate for the transportation industry and sustainable energy storage systems. The rechargeable capacity of the Li-ion battery is linked largely to the structural stability of the cathode materials during the charge-discharge cycles. However, the structure and cation distribution in pristine (un-cycled) Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 have not yet been fully characterized. Using a combination of aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy, X-ray dispersive energy spectroscopy (XEDS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and complementary multislice image simulation, we have probed the crystal structure, cation/anion distribution, and electronic structure of Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 nanoparticle. We discovered that the electronic structure and valence state of transition metal ions show significant variations, which have been identified to be attributed to the oxygen deficiency near the particle surfaces. Characterization of the nanoscale phase separation and cation ordering in the pristine material are critical for understanding the capacity and voltage fading of this material for battery application.

Gu, Meng; Genc, Arda; Belharouak, Ilias; Wang, Dapeng; Amine, Khalil; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Zhang, Jiguang; Browning, Nigel D.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

438

Chemical kinetics modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Chemical sensing flow probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

Laguna, George R. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Chemical Hydrogen Storage Research and Development | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Chemical Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Chemical Hydrogen Storage Research and Development DOE's chemical hydrogen storage R&D is focused on developing low-cost...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Chemical Resources | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Resources Chemical Resources Chemical Inventory All Sample Preparation Labs are stocked with an assortment of common solvents, acids, bases, buffers, and other reagents. See our Chemical Inventories for a list of available reagents. If you need large quantities of any chemicals, please order or bring your own supply (see below). Chemical Inventories Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) If you will be working with any samples or reagents that are significantly toxic, reactive, corrosive, flammable, or otherwise especially hazardous, we may require an approved SOP before you can begin work. Examples: Reagents with an NFPA Rating of 3 or 4 in any category, nanomaterials, heavy metals, pyrophoric materials, water reactive materials. BLANK SOP SSRL BLANK SOP LCLS Ordering Chemicals

442

Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to faciliate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate intallation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Center for Nanoscale Materials Director Petford-Long chats with 'Science in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News News Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Experts Guide Media Contacts Social Media Photos Videos Fact Sheets, Brochures and Reports Summer Science Writing Internship Petford-Long (background, arms folded) looks on as a group of eighth-grade girls makes a trial run of their toy car - a car for which they built and installed a pulley transmission - during Argonne's 2012 "Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day." To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Petford-Long (background, arms folded) looks on as a group of eighth-grade girls makes a trial run of their toy car - a car for which they built and installed a pulley transmission - during Argonne's 2012 "Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day." To view a larger version of the image, click on it.

448

Fabrication of Ordered Array of Tips-pentacene Micro- and Nano-scale Single Crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

light emitting diode OM Optical microscope OTFT Organic thin film transistors PDMS Poly(dimethylsiloxane) PMMA Poly(methyl methacrylate) PR Photoresist PSC Polymer solar cells RIE Reactive Ion Etching SEM Scanning electron microscope Tips.... ............................................... 15 Figure 10. Optical microscope (OM) images of big and flat Tips-pentacene on (a) Silicon (b) Silicon with 50nm thick oxide (c) Silicon with 1000nm oxide and (d) Silicon with 100 nm PMMA coating...

Xia, Ning

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

449

Thermalization properties at mK temperatures of a nanoscale optomechanical resonator with acoustic-bandgap shield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical measurements of a nanoscale silicon optomechanical crystal cavity with a mechanical resonance frequency of 3.6GHz are performed at sub-kelvin temperatures. We infer optical-absorption-induced heating and damping of the mechanical resonator from measurements of phonon occupancy and motional sideband asymmetry. At the lowest probe power and lowest fridge temperature (10mK), the localized mechanical resonance is found to couple at a rate of 400Hz (Q=9x10^6) to a thermal bath of temperature 270mK. These measurements indicate that silicon optomechanical crystals cooled to millikelvin temperatures should be suitable for a variety of experiments involving coherent coupling between photons and phonons at the single quanta level.

Sean M. Meenehan; Justin D. Cohen; Simon Groeblacher; Jeff T. Hill; Amir H. Safavi-Naeini; Markus Aspelmeyer; Oskar Painter

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

450

Delay of Light in an Optical Bottle Resonator with Nanoscale Radius Variation: Dispersionless, Broadband, and Low Loss  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown theoretically that an optical bottle resonator with a nanoscale radius variation can perform a multinanosecond long dispersionless delay of light in a nanometer-order bandwidth with minimal losses. Experimentally, a 3mm long resonator with a 2.8nm deep semiparabolic radius variation is fabricated from a 19???m radius silica fiber with a subangstrom precision. In excellent agreement with theory, the resonator exhibits the impedance-matched 2.58ns (3 bytes) delay of 100ps pulses with 0.44??dB/ns intrinsic loss. This is a miniature slow light delay line with the record large delay time, record small transmission loss, dispersion, and effective speed of light.

M. Sumetsky

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

451

Split image optical display  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

452

Nano-scale brushes: How to build a smart surface coating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Via computer simulations, we demonstrate how a densely grafted layer of polymers, a {\\it brush}, could be turned into an efficient switch through chemical modification of some of its end-monomers. In this way, a surface coating with reversibly switchable properties can be constructed. We analyze the fundamental physical principle behind its function, a recently discovered surface instability, and demonstrate that the combination of a high grafting density, an inflated end-group size and a high degree of monodispersity are conditions for an optimal functionality of the switch.

Holger Merlitz; Gui-Li He; Chen-Xu Wu; Jens-Uwe Sommer

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

CHEMICAL SENSORS School of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL SENSORS CHEM 6282 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Chemical sensors theory of chemical recognition, electrochemical, optical, mass sensors and data reduction. Text: J. Janata, "Principles of Chemical Sensors", 2010 Springer NOTE: GT Library purchased an e

Sherrill, David

454

Experimental characterization and chemical kinetics study of chemical looping combustion .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is one of the most promising technologies to achieve carbon capture in fossil fuel power generation plants. A novel rotary-bed reactor (more)

Chen, Tianjiao, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Chemical comminution of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the present research is to study the chemical reactivity of a mixture of methyl alcohol and aqueous sodium hydroxide solution in the temperature range 298 to 363 K, and a caustic concentration of 0 to 10 wt. %, on an Iowa bituminous coal. The sample studied was collected from coal zone 4, equivalent to most historical references to Laddsdale coal. The coals in this zone are typical high-sulfur, high-ash middle Pennsylvania Cherokee group coals. The apparent rank is high-volatile C bituminous coal. The relatively high content of sulfur and 23 other elements in these coals is related to near neutral (6-8) pH conditions in the depositional and early diagenetic environments, and to postdepositional sphalerite/calcite/pyrite/kaolinite/barite mineralization.

Mamaghani, A.H.; Beddow, J.K.; Vetter, A.F.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Recommended inorganic chemicals for calibration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All analytical techniques depend on the use of calibration chemicals to relate analyte concentration to an instrumental parameter. A fundamental component in the preparation of calibration solutions is the weighing of a pure chemical or metal before preparing a solution standard. The analyst must be assured that the purity, stoichiometry, and assay of the chemical are known. These terms have different meanings, and each has an important influence. This report is intended to assist the analyst in the selection and use of chemical standards for instrumental calibration. Purity, stoichiometry, and preparation of solutions for different purposes are discussed, and a critical evaluation of the best materials available for each element is presented for use in preparing solutions or calibration standards. Information on the chemical form, source, purity, drying, and appropriate precautions is given. In some cases, multiple sources or chemical forms are available. Certain radioactive elements, the transuranic elements, and the noble gases are not considered.

Moody, J.R.; Greenberg, R.R.; Pratt, K.W.; Rains, T.C.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

millionImaging research infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Centre for Imaging Technology Commercialization, led by Aaron Fenster $34 million Hybrid imaging infrastructureimaging #12;IMAGING Investment $100 millionImaging research infrastructure Formation

Denham, Graham

458

NMR imaging of components and materials for DOE application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The suitability for using NMR imaging to characterize liquid, polymeric, and solid materials was reviewed. The most attractive applications for NMR imaging appear to be liquid-filled porous samples, partially cured polymers, adhesives, and potting compounds, and composite polymers/high explosives containing components with widely varying thermal properties. Solid-state NMR line-narrowing and signal-enhancing markedly improve the imaging possibilities of true solid and materials. These techniques provide unique elemental and chemical shift information for highly complex materials and complement images with similar spatial resolution, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT).

Richardson, B.R.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Detection of concealed and buried chemicals by using multifrequency excitations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a new type of concealed and buried chemical detection system by stimulating and enhancing spectroscopic signatures with multifrequency excitations, which includes a low frequency gradient dc electric field, a high frequency microwave field, and higher frequency infrared (IR) radiations. Each excitation frequency plays a unique role. The microwave, which can penetrate into the underground and/or pass through the dielectric covers with low attenuation, could effectively transform its energy into the concealed and buried chemicals and increases its evaporation rate from the sample source. Subsequently, a gradient dc electric field, generated by a Van De Graaff generator, not only serves as a vapor accelerator for efficiently expediting the transportation process of the vapor release from the concealed and buried chemicals but also acts as a vapor concentrator for increasing the chemical concentrations in the detection area, which enables the trace level chemical detection. Finally, the stimulated and enhanced vapors on the surface are detected by the IR spectroscopic fingerprints. Our theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that more than sixfold increase in detection signal can be achieved by using this proposed technology. The proposed technology can also be used for standoff detection of concealed and buried chemicals by adding the remote IR and/or thermal spectroscopic and imaging detection systems.

Gao Yaohui; Chen, Meng-Ku; Yang, Chia-En; Chang, Yun-Ching; Yao, Jim; Cheng Jiping; Yin, Stuart [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Hui Rongqing [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States); Ruffin, Paul; Brantley, Christina; Edwards, Eugene [US Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Luo, Claire [General Opto Solutions, LLC State College, Pennsylvania 16803 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Chemical Engineering | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical and Engineering Materials Clean Energy Nuclear Sciences Computer Science Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Engineering SHARE Engineering Engineering at ORNL is integrated with nearly all of the scientific research areas and user facilities. In particular, ORNL has core capabilities chemical engineering and systems engineering. Chemical engineering moves knowledge gained from fundamental chemical research toward applications. For example, this capability supports the development of fuel reprocessing techniques and enables radioisotope production, isotope separation, and development of isotope applications. This capacity also contributes to advances in energy efficiency, renewable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

FAQS Reference Guide- Chemical Processing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the February 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1176-2010, Chemical Processing Functional Area Qualification Standard.

462

Chemical substructure analysis in toxicology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary examination of chemical-substructure analysis (CSA) demonstrates the effective use of the Chemical Abstracts compound connectivity file in conjunction with the bibliographic file for relating chemical structures to biological activity. The importance of considering the role of metabolic intermediates under a variety of conditions is illustrated, suggesting structures that should be examined that may exhibit potential activity. This CSA technique, which utilizes existing large files accessible with online personal computers, is recommended for use as another tool in examining chemicals in drugs. 2 refs., 4 figs.

Beauchamp, R.O. Jr. [Center for Information on Toxicology and Environment, Raleigh, NC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Light with nonzero chemical potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic states and processes involving light are discussed in which the chemical potential of light is nonzero. Light with nonzero chemical potential is produced in photochemical reactions for example in a light emitting diode. The chemical potential of black-body radiation becomes negative upon a Joule expansion. The isothermal diffusion of light which is a common phenomenon is driven by the gradient in the chemical potential. These and other examples support the idea that light can be interpreted as a gas of photons with properties similar to a material gas.

F. Herrmann; P. Wrfel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

ChemicalChemical StratigraphyStratigraphy Oxygen, Carbon, Strontium,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2/25/2009 1 ChemicalChemical StratigraphyStratigraphy Oxygen, Carbon, Strontium, Sulphur Isotopes Change. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department evolves over time, with the geological time line running from right to left in this graph. The increased

Miami, University of

465

Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) is a powerful imaging modality having a range of important applications to medicine and industry. The basic principles of NMRI are reviewed in...

Rothwell, William P

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Quantum-secured imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have built an imaging system that uses a photon's position or time-of-flight information to image an object, while using the photon's polarization for security. This ability allows us to obtain an image which is secure against an attack in which the object being imaged intercepts and resends the imaging photons with modified information. Popularly known as "jamming," this type of attack is commonly directed at active imaging systems such as radar. In order to jam our imaging system, the object must disturb the delicate quantum state of the imaging photons, thus introducing statistical errors that reveal its activity.

Mehul Malik; Omar S. Magaa-Loaiza; Robert W. Boyd

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

467

Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Theranostics and Imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nanoparticle constituted with nanoscale or nanostructured materials can be modified by approximate 1,500 potential sites. This unique property of nanoparticle is the foundation to employ nanostructures possible...

Xue Xue; Xing-Jie Liang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Modified CVD of nanoscale structures in and EVD of thin layers on porous ceramic membranes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments on the modified chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and the electrochemical vapour deposition (EVD) of yttria-stabilized zirconia on porous substrates are reported. It is shown that, in the CVD stage, deposition occurs in a small (<20 ?m) region at the edge of the substrate, very likely leading to pore narrowing. This result illustrates the feasibility of the CVD technique for the modification of ceramic membranes to the (sub)nanometer scale. Film growth in the EVD stage is shown to be controlled by the inpore diffusion of the oxygen source reactant for short (<5 h) deposition times. The yttria to zirconia ratio in the deposited film is determined by the ratio present in the vapour phase. Very thin (?2 ?m) films can be deposited, which have a potential application in solid oxide fuel cells.

L.G.J. de Haart; Y.S. Lin; K.J. de Vries; A.J. Burggraaf

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

XAS Catches the Chemical Form of Mercury in Fish  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

view large image view large image contact info Friday, 29 August 2003 X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Catches the Chemical Form of Mercury in Fish - SSRL Scientists Reveal New Findings in Science Article The presence of "methyl mercury" in fish is well-known, but until now the detailed chemical identity of the mercury has remained a mystery. In an x-ray absorption spectroscopy study published in the August 29 issue of Science (Science 301, 2003: 1203; Science now: Murky Picture on Fish Mercury), SSRL scientists report that the chemical form of mercury involves a sulfur atom (most likely in a so-called aliphatic form). The study presents significant new knowledge - because the toxic properties of mercury (or any element) are critically dependent upon its chemical form - and represents an important milestone in developing an understanding of how harmful mercury in fish might actually be. The study was carried out by SSRL staff scientists Ingrid Pickering and Graham George and postdoctoral fellow Hugh Harris using SSRL's structural molecular biology beam line 9-3. The very high flux, excellent beam stability and state-of-the-art detector technology allowed the team to measure samples of fish containing micromolar levels of mercury, much lower than had previously been possible.

471

Comparison of the structural and chemical composition of two unique micro/nanostructures produced by femtosecond laser interactions on nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural and chemical composition of two unique microstructures formed on nickel, with nanoscale features, produced using femtosecond laser surface processing (FLSP) techniques is reported in this paper. These two surface morphologies, termed mounds and nanoparticle-covered pyramids, are part of a larger class of self-organized micro/nanostructured surfaces formed using FLSP. Cross-sections of the structures produced using focused ion beam milling techniques were analyzed with a transmission electron microscope. Both morphologies have a solid core with a layer of nanoparticles on the surface. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy by scanning transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the nanoparticles are a nickel oxide, while the core material is pure nickel.

Zuhlke, Craig A.; Anderson, Troy P.; Alexander, Dennis R. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

472

November 2006 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.4 LABORATORY-SPECIFIC SAFETY PLANS 4.5 LABORATORY SAFETY AUDITS 4.6 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN REVIEW 5.0 LABORATORYNovember 2006 1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (November 2006) Department of Chemistry Vanderbilt University #12;November 2006 2 1.0 INTRODUCTION 2.0 THE LABORATORY STANDARD 3.0 SCOPE AND APPLICATION 4

Bordenstein, Seth

473

MATLAB Applications in Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATLAB® Applications in Chemical Engineering James A. Carnell North Carolina State University MATLAB is a powerful code-based mathematical and engineering calculation program. It performs all introduction to MATLAB in chemical engineering, and in no way attempts to be a comprehensive MATLAB learning

Al-Juhani, Abdulhadi A.

474

Preferred orientation of nanoscale order at the surface of amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report evidence that as-deposited amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin films contain nanoscale clusters that exhibit a preferred orientation, attributed to the earliest stages of heterogeneous nucleation. Fluctuation transmission electron microscopy reveals structural order in the samples, but (220)-related contributions are suppressed. When homogeneous nucleation is promoted via electron bombardment, the sample remains diffraction amorphous but the (220) contribution appears. We simulated data for randomly oriented nanoscale order using ab initio molecular-dynamics models of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. The simulated (220) contribution always has larger magnitude than higher-order signals; thus, the lack of the experimental signal indicates a significant preferred orientation.

Tony Li, Tian; Abelson, John R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Coordinated Science Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1308 W. Main St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Hoon Lee, Tae; Elliott, Stephen R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

475

Mapping Ionic Currents and Reactivity on the Nanoscale: Electrochemical Strain Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-state electrochemical processes in oxides underpin a broad spectrum of energy and information storage devices, ranging from Li-ion and Li-air batteries, to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) to electroresistive and memristive systems. These functionalities are controlled by the bias-driven diffusive and electromigration transport of mobile ionic species, as well as intricate a set of electrochemical and defect-controlled reactions at interfaces and in bulk. Despite the wealth of device-level and atomistic studies, little is known on the mesoscopic mechanisms of ion diffusion and electronic transport on the level of grain clusters, individual grains, and extended defects. The development of the capability for probing ion transport on the nanometer scale is a key to deciphering complex interplay between structure, functionality, and performance in these systems. Here we introduce Electrochemical Strain Microscopy, a scanning probe microscopy technique based on strong strain-bias coupling in the systems in which local ion concentrations are changed by electrical fields. The imaging capability, as well as time- and voltage spectroscopies analogous to traditional current based electrochemical characterization methods are developed. The reversible intercalation of Li and mapping electrochemical activity in LiCoO2 is demonstrated, illustrating higher Li diffusivity at non-basal planes and grain boundaries. In Si-anode device structure, the direct mapping of Li diffusion at extended defects and evolution of Li-activity with charge state is explored. The electrical field-dependence of Li mobility is studied to determine the critical bias required for the onset of electrochemical transformation, allowing reaction and diffusion processes in the battery system to be separated at each location. Finally, the applicability of ESM for probing oxygen vacancy diffusion and oxygen reduction/evolution reactions is illustrated, and the high resolution ESM maps are correlated with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging. The future potential for deciphering mechanisms of electrochemical transformations on an atomically-defined single-defect level is discussed.

Kalinin, S.V. (Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, ORNL) [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, ORNL

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

476

Chemical analysis quality assurance at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is a uranium reprocessing facility operated by Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company for the Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The chemical analysis support required for the plant processes is provided by a chemical analysis staff of 67 chemists, analysts, and support personnel. The documentation and defense of the chemical analysis data at the ICPP has evolved into a complete chemical analysis quality assurance program with training/qualification and requalification, chemical analysis procedures, records management and chemical analysis methods quality control as major elements. The quality assurance procedures are implemented on a central analytical computer system. The individual features provided by the computer system are automatic method selection for process streams, automation of method calculations, automatic assignment of bias and precision estimates at analysis levels to all method results, analyst specific daily requalification or with-method-use requalification, untrained or unqualified analyst method lockout, statistical testing of process stream results for replicate agreement, automatic testing of process results against pre-established operating, safety, or failure limits at varying confidence levels, and automatic transfer and report of analysis data plus the results of all statistical testing to the Production Department.

Hand, R.L.; Anselmo, R.W.; Black, D.B.; Jacobson, J.J.; Lewis, L.C.; Marushia, P.C.; Spraktes, F.W.; Zack, N.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Contribution of nano-scale effects to the total efficiency of converters of thermal neutrons on the basis of gadolinium foils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the influence of nano-scale layers of converters made from natural gadolinium and its 157 isotope into the total efficiency of registration of thermal neutrons. Our estimations show that contribution of low-energy Auger electrons with the runs about nanometers in gadolinium, to the total efficiency of neutron converters in this case is essential and results in growth of the total efficiency of converters. The received results are in good consent to the experimental data.

D. A. Abdushukurov; D. V. Bondarenko; Kh. Kh. Muminov; D. Yu. Chistyakov

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

478

NMR imaging of materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in the area of NMR imaging has been driven by the widespread success of medical imaging. John M. Listerud of the Pendergrass Diagnostic Research Laboratories, Steven W. Sinton of Lockheed, and Gary P. Drobny of the University of Washington describe the principal image reconstruction methods, factors limiting spatial resolution, and applications of imaging to the study of materials.

Listerud, J.M.; Sinton, S.W.; Drobny, G.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

480

Manhattan Project: Trinity Images  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

IMAGES IMAGES Trinity Test Site (July 16, 1945) Resources > Photo Gallery The first 0.11 seconds of the Nuclear Age These seven photographs of the Trinity test were taken by time-lapse cameras. The last is 109 milliseconds, or 0.109 seconds, after detonation. Scroll down to view each individual image. The photographs are courtesy the Los Alamos National Laboratory, via the Federation of American Scientists web site. The animation is original to the Office of History and Heritage Resources. The dawn of the Nuclear Age (Trinity image #1) The dawn of the Nuclear Age Trinity image #2 Trinity image #3 Trinity image #4 Trinity image #5 Trinity, 0.09 seconds after detonation (Trinity image #6) Trinity, 0.09 seconds after detonation Trinity, 0.11 seconds after detonation (Trinity image #7)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanoscale chemical imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Image registration method for medical image sequences  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Image registration of low contrast image sequences is provided. In one aspect, a desired region of an image is automatically segmented and only the desired region is registered. Active contours and adaptive thresholding of intensity or edge information may be used to segment the desired regions. A transform function is defined to register the segmented region, and sub-pixel information may be determined using one or more interpolation methods.

Gee, Timothy F.; Goddard, James S.

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

482

Synthesis of nano-scale fast ion conducting cubic Li7La3Zr2O12  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A solution-based process was investigated for synthesizing cubic Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO), which is known to exhibit the unprecedented combination of fast ionic conductivity, and stability in air and against Li. Solgel chemistry was developed to prepare solid metaloxide networks consisting of 10nm cross-links that formed the cubic LLZO phase at 600? C. Solgel LLZO powders were sintered into 96% dense pellets using an induction hot press that applied pressure while heating. After sintering, the average LLZO grain size was 260nm, which is 13 times smaller compared to LLZO prepared using a solid-state technique. The total ionic conductivity was 0.4mScm?1 at 298K, which is the same as solid-state synthesized LLZO. Interestingly, despite the same room temperature conductivity, the solgel LLZO total activation energy is 0.41eV, which 1.6 times higher than that observed in solid-state LLZO (0.26eV). We believe the nano-scale grain boundaries give rise to unique transport phenomena that are more sensitive to temperature when compared to the conventional solid-state LLZO.

Jeff Sakamoto; Ezhiylmurugan Rangasamy; Hyunjoung Kim; Yunsung Kim; Jeff Wolfenstine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Magnonic band structure, complete bandgap, and collective spin wave excitation in nanoscale two-dimensional magnonic crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the observation of a complete bandgap and collective spin wave excitation in two-dimensional magnonic crystals comprised of arrays of nanoscale antidots and nanodots, respectively. Considering that the frequencies dealt with here fall in the microwave band, these findings can be used for the development of suitable magnonic metamaterials and spin wave based signal processing. We also present the application of a numerical procedure, to compute the dispersion relations of spin waves for any high symmetry direction in the first Brillouin zone. The results obtained from this procedure have been reproduced and verified by the well established plane wave method for an antidot lattice, when magnetization dynamics at antidot boundaries are pinned. The micromagnetic simulation based method can also be used to obtain isofrequency contours of spin waves. Isofrequency contours are analogous of the Fermi surfaces and hence, they have the potential to radicalize our understanding of spin wave dynamics. The physical origin of bands, partial and full magnonic bandgaps have been explained by plotting the spatial distribution of spin wave energy spectral density. Although, unfettered by rigid assumptions and approximations, which afflict most analytical methods used in the study of spin wave dynamics, micromagnetic simulations tend to be computationally demanding. Thus, the observation of collective spin wave excitation in the case of nanodot arrays, which can obviate the need to perform simulations, may also prove to be valuable.

Kumar, D.; Barman, A., E-mail: abarman@bose.res.in [Thematic Unit of Excellence on Nanodevice Technology, Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 098 (India); K?os, J. W.; Krawczyk, M. [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Umultowska 85, Pozna? 61-614 (Poland)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

484

Nano-scale manipulation of silicate-substituted apatite chemistry impacts surface charge, hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and cell attachment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study characterised the effect of nano-scale variation in hydroxyapatite (HA) surface-chemistry, by manipulation of silicate substitution level, on surface charge, hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and cell attachment. Substitution with 0.4 wt% Si (SA04) had a significant impact on surface charge, but did not affect hydrophilicity as compared to stoichiometric HA. Increasing silicon content to 0.8 wt% (SA08) did not alter surface charge, but significantly increased hydrophilicity as compared to SA04. A silicon content of 1.5 wt% (SA15) significantly altered surface charge but showed no statistical variation in hydrophilicity as compared to SA08. Study of both competitive (serum) and single (fibronectin) protein adsorption, in addition to osteoblast-like cell attachment, demonstrated increased protein adsorption and cell attachment on SA08. In contrast protein adsorption to SA04 and SA15 showed equivalent to intermediate behaviour while cell attachment demonstrated impaired to equivalent performance as compared to HA. This data indicates that the enhanced bioactivity of SA08 may be related to the influence that surface physiochemical characteristics have on its interaction with serum proteins.

N. Rashid; Ian S. Harding; Tom Buckland; Karin A. Hing

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

NETL: Gasification Systems Video, Images & Photos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Video, Images, Photos Video, Images, Photos Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Video, Images & Photos The following was established to show a variety of Gasification Technologies: Gasfication powerplant photo Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology (Mar 2008) Movie Icon Windows Media Video (WMV-26MB) [ view | download ] NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants. Proposed APS Advanced Hydrogasification Process Proposed APS Advanced Hydrogasification Process* TRDU and Hot-Gas Vessel in the EERC Gasification Tower Transport reactor development unit

486

New Science for Chemicals Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the State-of-the-Science of Endocrine Disruptors (WHO,461, 472 (2009). 17. NRC, Science and Decisions: AdvancingPOLICYFORUM SCIENCE AND REGULATION New Science for Chemicals

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Chemical Conversions of Natural Precursors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many products from the flavour industry are primary products from renewable resources or secondary products obtained by chemical conversions of the primary products. In general these secondary products are key...

Peter H. van der Schaft

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Genotoxicity of complex chemical mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies, specifically on carbon monoxide. Schmiedeberg focused on liver and its detoxification mechanisms. Lewin?s work included chronic toxicity of narcotics, along with toxicity of chemicals such as methanol, glycerol, acrolein and chloroform...

Phillips, Tracie Denise

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

489

Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics ^ ^ iCi| Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics ^ ^ iCi| under AEC Contract A T (30-1)-3780 " ■ ' Annual Report (1970) Principal In-vestigator: Martin Karpins Institution: Harvard University The research performed under this contract can best be sunmarized under several headings. (a) Alkali-Halideg Alkali-Halide (MX^ M*X*) Exchange Reactions. This project is being continued. A careful study of certain

490

Fifty-Year Trends in the Chemical Industry: What Do They Mean for Chemical Education?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fifty-Year Trends in the Chemical Industry: What Do They Mean for Chemical Education? ... Environmental Chemistry ...

George W. Parshall; Chadwick A. Tolman

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Sandia National Laboratories: MOgene Green Chemicals LLC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MOgene Green Chemicals LLC Sandia to Partner with MOgene Green Chemicals on ARPA-E REMOTE Project On October 2, 2013, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Research &...

492

Chemical Safety Program - Library | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Standard Safe Management of Mercury DOE Documents & Guidelines Chemical Management Handbook Volumes 1 -3 DOE Handbook, "Chemical Process Hazards Analysis," DOE-HDBK-1100-2004,...

493

PNNL Chemical Hydride Capabilities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Hydride Capabilities PNNL Chemical Hydride Capabilities Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC....

494

Chemical Safety Program | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of chemical management. This content is supported by the Chemical Safety Topical Committee which was formed to identify...

495

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids for the Capture and Transport of Concentrated Solar Thermal Energy for Power Generation Chemically Reactive Working Fluids SunShot CSP...

496

Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Developing chemical kinetic mechanisms and applying them to simulating engine combustion processes. deer09aceves.pdf More Documents & Publications Chemical Kinetic Research on...

497

Tribo-Chemical Modeling of Copper CMP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRIBO-CHEMICAL MODELING OF COPPER CMP Shantanu Tripathi 1 ,Technical Area: CMP (Copper) Abstract We are developing antribo-chemical model of copper CMP that considers abrasive

Tripathi, Shantanu; Doyle, Fiona; Dornfeld, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF TEXAS CITY CHEMICALS, INC.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1956, when the Texas City Chemicals Company went bankrupt. The plant was purchased by Smith-Douglas Company, a Division of Borden Chemical Company, Bordon, Inc. From information...

499

Correlation Between Optical Properties And Chemical Composition...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Between Optical Properties And Chemical Composition Of Sputter-deposited Germanium Cxide (GeOx) Films . Correlation Between Optical Properties And Chemical Composition Of...

500

Harvard Center for Nanoscale Systems Non-Academic Rates (effective 04/01/14, subject to change)  

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Bio-Materials Facility $195/day $165/hour $220/hour 5 G06 Chemical Nanotechnology and SLF Facility Multisizer 3 Coulter Counter $65/hour $165/hour $220/hour SLF-4 Transparency Photomask Writer $195/hour $165