Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Nano-fabricated superconducting radio-frequency composites, method for producing nano-fabricated superconducting rf composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Superconducting rf is limited by a wide range of failure mechanisms inherent in the typical manufacture methods. This invention provides a method for fabricating superconducting rf structures comprising coating the structures with single atomic-layer thick films of alternating chemical composition. Also provided is a cavity defining the invented laminate structure.

Norem, James H.; Pellin, Michael J.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

2

Superconducting RF systems for eRHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed electron-hadron collider eRHIC will consist of a six-pass 30-GeV electron Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and one of RHIC storage rings operating with energy up to 250 GeV. The collider design extensively utilizes superconducting RF (SRF) technology in both electron and hadron parts. This paper describes various SRF systems, their requirements and parameters.

Belomestnykh S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Hahn, H. et al

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

3

The LHC Superconducting RF System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), the largest high energy physics laboratory worldwide, is constructing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the existing 27 km circumference LEP (Large Electron Positron) collider tunnel. For the LHC, superconducting cavities, operating at 4.5 K, will provide the required acceleration field for ramping the beam energy up to 7 TeV and for keeping the colliding proton beams tightly bunched. Superconducting cavities were chosen, not only because of their high acceleration field leading to a small contribution to the machine impedance, but also because of their high stored energy which minimises the effects of periodic transient beam loading associated with the high beam intensity (0.5 A). There will be eight single-cell cavities per beam, each delivering 2 MV (5.3 MV/m) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industrial firms, using niobium on copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A complete cavity prototype assembly in...

Boussard, Daniel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Nb-Pb superconducting RF-gun TESLA-FEL Report 2005-09  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nb-Pb superconducting RF-gun TESLA-FEL Report 2005-09 J. Sekutowicz, J. Iversen, G. Kreps, W Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA We report on the status of an electron RF-gun made of two superconducting RF-gun as it has been proposed by the BNL group. Measured values of quantum efficiency for lead

5

HOM Coupler Optimisation for the Superconducting RF Cavities in ESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The European Spallation Source (ESS) will be the world’s most powerful next generation neutron source. It consists of a linear accelerator, target, and instruments for neutron experiments. The linac is designed to accelerate protons to a ?nal energy of 2.5 GeV, with an average design beam power of 5 MW, for collision with a target used to produce a high neutron ?ux. A section of the linac will contain Superconducting RF (SCRF) cavities designed at 704 MHz. Beam induced HOMs in these cavities may drive the beam unstable and increase the cryogenic load, therefore HOM couplers are installed to provide suf?cient damping. Previous studies have shown that these couplers are susceptible to multipacting, a resonant process which can absorb RF power and lead to heating effects. This paper will show how a coupler suffering from multipacting has been redesigned to limit this effect. Optimisation of the RF damping is also discussed.

Ainsworth, R; Calaga, R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Large Grain Superconducting RF Cavities at DESY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DESY R and D program on cavities fabricated from large grain niobium explores the potential of this material for the production of approx. 1000 nine-cell cavities for the European XFEL. The program investigates basic material properties, comparing large grain material to standard sheet niobium, as well as fabrication and preparation aspects. Several single-cell cavities of TESLA shape have been fabricated from large grain niobium. A gradient up to 41 MV/m at Q0 = 1.4{center_dot}1010 (TB = 2K) was measured after electropolishing. The first three large grain nine-cell cavities worldwide have been produced under contract of DESY with ACCEL Instruments Co. The first tests have shown that all three cavities reach an accelerating gradient up to 30 MV/m after BCP (Buffered Chemical Polishing) treatment, what exceeds the XFEL requirements for RF test in the vertical cryostat.

Singer, W.; Brinkmann, A.; Ermakov, A.; Iversen, J.; Kreps, G.; Matheisen, A.; Proch, D.; Reschke, D.; Singer, X.; Spiwek, M.; Wen, H.; Brokmeier, H. G. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); GKSS, Max-Planck-Strasse, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

7

A new microphonics measurement method for superconducting RF cavities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mechanical vibrations of the superconducting cavity, also known as microphonics, cause shifts in the resonant frequency of the cavity. In addition to requiring additional RF power, these frequency shifts can contribute to errors in the closed loop phase and amplitude regulation. In order to better understand these effects, a new microphonics measurement method was developed, and the method was successfully used to measure microphonics on the half-wave superconducting cavity when it was operated in a production style cryostat. The test cryostat held a single ?=0.1 half-wave cavity which was operated at 162.5 MHz [1] and [2]. It's the first time that the National Instruments PXIe-5641R intermediate frequency transceiver has been used for microphonics measurements in superconducting cavities. The new microphonics measurement method and results will be shown and analyzed in this paper.

Gao,Zheng; He,Yuan; Chang,Wei; Powers, Tom [JLAB; Yue,Wei-ming; Zhu,Zheng-long; Chen,Qi

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Cerenkov Radiator Driven by a Superconducting RF Electron Gun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), Niowave, Inc., and Boeing have recently demonstrated operation of the first superconducting RF electron gun based on a quarter wave resonator structure. In preliminary tests, this gun has produced 10 ps long bunches with charge in excess of 78 pC, and with beam energy up to 396 keV. Initial testing occurred at Niowave's Lansing, MI facility, but the gun and diagnostic beam line are planned for installation in California in the near future. The design of the diagnostic beam line is conducive to the addition of a Cerenkov radiator without interfering with other beam line operations. Design and simulations of a Cerenkov radiator, consisting of a dielectric lined waveguide will be presented. The dispersion relation for the structure is determined and the beam interaction is studied using numerical simulations. The characteristics of the microwave radiation produced in both the short and long bunch regimes will be presented.

Poole, B R; Harris, J R

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

9

Superconducting laser photocathode RF gun at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Superconducting laser photocathode RF Superconducting laser photocathode RF gun at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Superconducting laser photocathode RF gun at BNL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Superconducting laser photocathode RF gun Developed at: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), New York and Advanced Energy Systems,

10

Superconducting RF Linac Technology for ERL Light Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Recovering Linacs (ERLs) offer an attractive alternative as drivers for light sources as they combine the desirable characteristics of both storage rings (high efficiency) and linear accelerators (superior beam quality). Using superconducting RF technology allows ERLs to operate more efficiently because of the inherent characteristics of SRF linacs, namely that they are high gradient-low impedance structures and their ability to operate in the long pulse or CW regime. We present an overview of the physics challenges encountered in the design and operation of ERL based light sources with particular emphasis on those issues related to SRF technology. These challenges include maximizing a cavity�������¢����������������s Qo to increase cryogenic efficiency, maintaining control of the cavity field in the presence of the highest feasible loaded Q and providing adequate damping of the higher-order modes (HOMs). If not sufficiently damped, dipole HOMs can drive the multipass beam breakup (BBU) instability which ERLs are particularly susceptible to. Another challenge involves efficiently extracting the potentially large amounts of HOM power that are generated when a bunch traverses the SRF cavities and which may extend over a high range of frequencies. We present experimental data from the Jefferson Lab FEL Upgrade, a 10 mA ERL light source presently in operation, aimed at addressing some of these issues. We conclude with an outlook towards the future of ERL based light sources.

Chris Tennant

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Cryogenic test of a proof-of-principle superconducting rf-dipole deflecting and crabbing cavity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent applications in need of compact low-frequency deflecting and crabbing cavities have initiated the design and development of new superconducting structures operating at high gradients with low losses. Previously, TM110-type deflecting and crabbing cavities were developed and have also been operated successfully. However, these geometries are not favorable designs for low operating frequencies. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is the first compact deflecting and crabbing geometry that has demonstrated high gradients and high shunt impedance. Since the fundamental operating mode is the lowest mode and is widely separated from the nearest higher order mode, the rf-dipole design is an attractive geometry for effective damping of the higher order modes in high current applications. A 400 MHz rf-dipole cavity was designed, fabricated, and tested as a proof-of-principle cavity. The cavity achieved high operating gradients, and the multipacting levels were easily processed and did not reoccur.

S. U. De Silva and J. R. Delayen

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

12

Superconducting RF Lab Facility Upgrades at Los Alamos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research and testing of multi-cell superconducting cavities demands extensive contamination control resources to achieve high-cavity fields. Facility upgrades at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) included the modernization of test equipment, expanding and modernizing cleanroom facilities, improving safety, and expanding the high-pressure rinse cleaning process equipment. Each upgrade was integrated into the facility to enable users to assemble prototype cryomodules. The scope of the upgrades, the new installed capability, and budget and schedule for certain aspects of the project are discussed in this paper.

Katonak, D.J.; Rusnak, B.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Design of a horizontal test cryostat for superconducting RF cavities for the FREIA facility at Uppsala University  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uppsala University is constructing a large scale facility, called FREIA (Facility for Research Instrumentation and Accelerator Development). FREIA includes a helium liquefier and an accelerator test facility and has the capacity to test superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavities with the same RF system and RF power level as in an accelerator. A central element of FREIA is a horizontal test cryostat connected in closed loop to a helium liquefier. This cryostat can house two fully equipped (tuners, piezo, power coupler, helium tank) superconducting cavities to perform full RF high power tests and operate at temperatures between 1.8 K and 4.2 K. The cryostat is designed to accommodate a large array of superconducting cavities and magnets, among which the European Spallation Source (ESS) type spoke and high-? elliptical cavities as well as TESLA/ILC type elliptical cavities. The present status of the project and the design of the cryostat are reported.

Chevalier, N. R.; Thermeau, J.-P.; Bujard, P.; Junquera, T. [Accelerators and Cryogenic Systems (ACS), 86 rue de Paris, 91400 Orsay (France); Hermansson, L.; Kern, R. Santiago; Ruber, R. [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

14

RF heating efficiency of the terahertz superconducting hot-electron bolometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report results of the numerical solution by the Euler method of the system of heat balance equations written in recurrent form for the superconducting hot-electron bolometer (HEB) embedded in an electrical circuit. By taking into account the dependence of the HEB resistance on the transport current we have been able to calculate rigorously the RF heating efficiency, absorbed local oscillator (LO) power and conversion gain of the HEB mixer. We show that the calculated conversion gain is in excellent agreement with the experimental results, and that the substitution of the calculated RF heating efficiency and absorbed LO power into the expressions for the conversion gain and noise temperature given by the analytical small-signal model of the HEB yields excellent agreement with the corresponding measured values.

Maslennikov, Sergey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Development of fundamental power coupler for high-current superconducting RF cavity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory took a project of developing a 704 MHz five-cell superconducting RF cavity for high-current linacs, including Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for planned electron-hadron collider eRHIC. The cavity will be fed by a high-power RF amplifier using a coaxial Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC), which delivers 20 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. The design of FPC is one of the important aspects as one has to take into account the heat losses dissipated on the surface of the conductor by RF fields along with that of the static heat load. Using a simple simulation model we show the temperature profile and the heat load dissipated along the coupler length. To minimize the heat load on FPC near the cavity end, a thermal intercept is required at an appropriate location on FPC. A 10 K intercept was chosen and its location optimized with our simulation code. The requirement on the helium gas flow rate for the effective heat removal from the thermal intercept is also discussed.

Jain P.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Xu, W.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

16

Proc. of the workshop on pushing the limits of RF superconductivity.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For three days in late September last year, some sixty experts in RF superconductivity from around the world came together at Argonne to discuss how to push the limits of RF superconductivity for particle accelerators. It was an intense workshop with in-depth presentations and ample discussions. There was added excitement due to the fact that, a few days before the workshop, the International Technology Recommendation Panel had decided in favor of superconducting technology for the International Linear Collider (ILC), the next major high-energy physics accelerator project. Superconducting RF technology is also important for other large accelerator projects that are either imminent or under active discussion at this time, such as the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) for nuclear physics, energy recovery linacs (ERLs), and x-ray free-electron lasers. For these accelerators, the capability in maximum accelerating gradient and/or the Q value is essential to limit the length and/or operating cost of the accelerators. The technological progress of superconducting accelerators during the past two decades has been truly remarkable, both in low-frequency structures for acceleration of protons and ions as well as in high-frequency structures for electrons. The requirements of future accelerators demand an even higher level of performance. The topics of this workshop are therefore highly relevant and timely. The presentations given at the workshop contained authoritative reviews of the current state of the art as well as some original materials that previously had not been widely circulated. We therefore felt strongly that these materials should be put together in the form of a workshop proceeding. The outcome is this report, which consists of two parts: first, a collection of the scholarly papers prepared by some of the participants and second, copies of the viewgraphs of all presentations. The presentation viewgraphs, in full color, are also available from the Workshop Presentations link on the workshop's web page at http://www.aps.anl.gov/conferences/RFSCLimits/. I would like to thank all of the participants for their lively contributions to the workshop and to these proceedings, and Helen Edwards and Hasan Padamsee for their help in developing the workshop program. I also thank Cathy Eyberger, Kelly Jaje, and Renee Lanham for working very hard to take care of the administrative details, in particular Cathy for editing this report.

Kim, K-J., Eyberger, C., editors

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

17

Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

Leibfritz, J.; Andrews, R.; Baffes, C.M.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Church, M.D.; Harms, E.R.; Klebaner, A.L.; Kucera, M.; Martinez, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Plasma processing of large curved surfaces for superconducting rf cavity modification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma based surface modification of niobium is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The development of the technology based on Cl2/Ar plasma etching has to address several crucial parameters which influence the etching rate and surface roughness, and eventually, determine cavity performance. This includes dependence of the process on the frequency of the RF generator, gas pressure, power level, the driven (inner) electrode configuration, and the chlorine concentration in the gas mixture during plasma processing. To demonstrate surface layer removal in the asymmetric non-planar geometry, we are using a simple cylindrical cavity with 8 ports symmetrically distributed over the cylinder. The ports are used for diagnosing the plasma parameters and as holders for the samples to be etched. The etching rate is highly correlated with the shape of the inner electrode, radio-frequency (RF) circuit elements, chlorine concentration in the Cl2/Ar gas mixtures, residence time of reactive species and temperature of the cavity. Using cylindrical electrodes with variable radius, large-surface ring-shaped samples and d.c. bias implementation in the external circuit we have demonstrated substantial average etching rates and outlined the possibility to optimize plasma properties with respect to maximum surface processing effect.

Upadhyay, J.; Im, Do; Popovi??, S.; Valente-Feliciano, A.-M.; Phillips, L.; Vuskovic, L

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

rf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RF RF It's what makes the protons go 'round. The latest in a series explaining particle physics in everyday language. Painless Physics Articles BEAM COOLING August 2, 1996 By Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs ACCELERATION August 16, 1996 By Dave Finley, Accelerator Division Head RF August 30, 1996 By Pat Colestock, Accelerator Division FIXED TARGET PHYSICS September 20, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section FIXED TARGET PHYSICS PART DEUX October 16, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section and Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris CROSS SECTION November 1, 1996 By Doreen Wackeroth, Theoretical Physics Edited by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris MAGNETS PART I November 15, 1996 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs

20

Detection of surface carbon and hydrocarbons in hot spot regions of niobium superconducting rf cavities by Raman spectroscopy  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Raman microscopy/spectroscopy measurements are presented on high purity niobium (Nb) samples, including pieces from hot spot regions of a tested superconducting rf cavity that exhibit a high density of etch pits. Measured spectra are compared with density functional theory calculations of Raman-active, vibrational modes of possible surface Nb-O and Nb-H complexes. The Raman spectra inside particularly rough pits in all Nb samples show clear differences from surrounding areas, exhibiting enhanced intensity and sharp peaks. While some of the sharp peaks are consistent with calculated NbH and NbH2 modes, there is better overall agreement with C-H modes in chain-type hydrocarbons. Other spectra reveal two broader peaks attributed to amorphous carbon. Niobium foils annealed to >2000°C in high vacuum develop identical Raman peaks when subjected to cold working. Regions with enhanced C and O have also been found by SEM/EDX spectroscopy in the hot spot samples and cold-worked foils, corroborating the Raman results. Such regions with high concentrations of impurities are expected to suppress the local superconductivity and this may explain the correlation between hot spots in superconducting rf (SRF) cavities and the observation of a high density of surface pits. The origin of localized high carbon and hydrocarbon regions is unclear at present but it is suggested that particular processing steps in SRF cavity fabrication may be responsible.

Cao, C.; Ford, D.; Bishnoi, S.; Proslier, T.; Albee, B.; Hommerding, E.; Korczakowski, A.; Cooley, L.; Ciovati, G.; Zasadzinski, J. F.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nanofabrication | Center for Functional Nanomaterials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanofabrication Facility Nanofabrication Facility nanofabrication The Nanofabrication Facility is housed in a class 100/1000 clean room (5,000 sq. ft) dedicated to state-of-the art patterning and processing of thin films, nanomaterials, and devices. The instrumentation in the facility has been optimized to provide maximum flexibility for its users, with capabilities to pattern a variety of materials over a wide range of size scales, from 10 nanometers to 10 millimeters. The clean room is utilized to fabricate devices for nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, biomedical engineering, photovoltaics, x-ray optics, nanomagnetics and beyond. Capabilities High-resolution patterning by electron beam lithography, nanoimprint lithography, and optical lithography Thin-film deposition by electron beam and thermal evaporation, DC

22

SUPERCONDUCTING RF STRUCTURES TEST FACILITIES AND H. Weise, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg, Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Synchrotron, Hamburg, Germany for the TESLA Collaboration Abstract The design of the TESLA superconducting electron than 16 thousand hours of operation demonstrated this technology. Results of single cavity tests followed by drying in a class 100 clean room; annealing at 800°C in an Ultra High Vacuum oven to relieve

23

Plasma treatment of bulk niobium surface for superconducting rf cavities: Optimization of the experimental conditions on flat samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerator performance, in particular the average accelerating field and the cavity quality factor, depends on the physical and chemical characteristics of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity surface. Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate nonsuperconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region and to remove the mechanically damaged surface layer, which improves the surface roughness. Here we show that the plasma treatment of bulk niobium (Nb) presents an alternative surface preparation method to the commonly used buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing methods. We have optimized the experimental conditions in the microwave glow discharge system and their influence on the Nb removal rate on flat samples. We have achieved an etching rate of 1.7???m/min using only 3% chlorine in the reactive mixture. Combining a fast etching step with a moderate one, we have improved the surface roughness without exposing the sample surface to the environment. We intend to apply the optimized experimental conditions to the preparation of single cell cavities, pursuing the improvement of their rf performance.

M. Raskovic, J. Upadhyay, L. Vuskovic, S. Popovic, A-M. Valente-Feliciano, L. Phillips

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Plasma treatment of bulk niobium surface for superconducting rf cavities: Optimization of the experimental conditions on flat samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerator performance, in particular the average accelerating field and the cavity quality factor, depends on the physical and chemical characteristics of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity surface. Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate nonsuperconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region and to remove the mechanically damaged surface layer, which improves the surface roughness. Here we show that the plasma treatment of bulk niobium (Nb) presents an alternative surface preparation method to the commonly used buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing methods. We have optimized the experimental conditions in the microwave glow discharge system and their influence on the Nb removal rate on flat samples. We have achieved an etching rate of 1.7???m/min? using only 3% chlorine in the reactive mixture. Combining a fast etching step with a moderate one, we have improved the surface roughness without exposing the sample surface to the environment. We intend to apply the optimized experimental conditions to the preparation of single cell cavities, pursuing the improvement of their rf performance.

M. Raskovic, J. Upadhyay, L. Vuskovic, S. Popovic, A-M. Valente-Feliciano, L. Phillips

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Comparative Simulation Studies of Multipacting in Higher-Order-Mode Couplers of Superconducting RF Cavities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multipacting (MP) in higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers of the International Linear Collider (ILC) baseline cavity and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) 12 GeV upgrade cavity is studied by using the ACE3P suites, developed by the Advanced Computations Department at SLAC. For the ILC cavity HOM coupler, the simulation results show that resonant trajectories exist in three zones, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 0.6?1.6 MV/m, 21?34 MV/m, 32?35 MV/m, and > 40MV/m, respectively. For the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade cavity HOM coupler, resonant trajectories exist in one zone, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 6?13 MV/m. Potential implications of these MP barriers are discussed in the context of future high energy pulsed as well as medium energy continuous wave (CW) accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency cavities. Frequency scaling of MP?s predicted in HOM couplers of the ILC, CBEAF upgrade, SNS and FLASH third harmonic cavity is given and found to be in good agreement with the analytical result based on the parallel plate model.

Li, Y. M. [Peking University, Beijing (China); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Liu, Kexin [Peking University, Beijing (China); Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Nanofabrication  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This is likely to change the way almost everything-from vaccines to computers to automobile tires to objects not yet imagined-is designed and made. It is anticipated that a new...

27

Advanced nanofabrication of thermal emission devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanofabricated thermal emission devices can be used to modify and modulate blackbody thermal radiation. There are many areas in which altering thermal radiation is extremely useful, especially in static power conversion, ...

Hurley, Fergus (Fergus Gerard)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Novel ASTA Users Facility At Fermilab: A Testbed For Superconducting RF Technology And ERL R&D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) currently under commissioning at Fermilab will enable a broad range of beam-based experiments to study fundamental limitations to beam intensity and to develop transformative approaches to particle-beam generation, acceleration and manipulation. ASTA incorporates a superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linac coupled to a photoinjector and small-circumference storage ring capable of storing electrons or protons. ASTA will establish a unique resource for R&D towards Energy Frontier facilities and a test-bed for SRF accelerators and high-brightness beam applications, including ERLs. The unique features of ASTA include: (1) a high repetition-rate, (2) one of the highest peak and average brightness within the U.S., (3) a GeV-scale beam energy, (4) an extremely stable beam, (5) the availability of SRF and high quality beams together, and (6) a storage ring capable of supporting a broad range of ring-based advanced beam dynamics experiments. These unique featur...

Shiltsev, V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Chapter 7 - Nanofabrication via atom optics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents a review of the basic concepts that are used for atomoptical nanofabrication, as well as a discussion of the progress to date in realizations of the techniques. As a new approach to nanofabrication, atom optics offers the possibility of several advantages over existing techniques. For one thing, the fundamental diffraction limit imposed on resolution, present in any process where one attempts to focus particles (whether photons, charged particles, or neutral atoms), can be very small for atoms. Furthermore, atom optics can be used both in a direct deposition mode, where neutral atoms are focused by atom lenses into an extremely fine spot as they deposit onto a substrate, and also in a lithography mode, where focused atoms are used to expose a suitable resist material. In the direct deposition mode, nanostructures can be fabricated in a clean, resist-free environment, with little or no damage to the underlying substrate. Thus, the process can be very localized, with very little scattering and resist penetration. In either mode, parallelism, which is advantageous when issues of fabrication speed and/or long-range spatial coherence are important, can be achieved with very high dimensional accuracy over a large area of the substrate using laser focusing of atoms in a laser interference pattern.

Jabez J. McClelland

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

WAFER TEST CAVITY -Linking Surface Microstructure to RF Performance: a ‘Short-­?Sample Test Facility’ for characterizing superconducting materials for SRF cavities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wafer Test cavity was designed to create a short sample test system to determine the properties of the superconducting materials and S?I?S hetero?structures. The project, funded by ARRA, was successful in accomplishing several goals to achieving a high gradient test system for SRF research and development. The project led to the design and construction of the two unique cavities that each severed unique purposes: the Wafer test Cavity and the Sapphire Test cavity. The Sapphire Cavity was constructed first to determine the properties of large single crystal sapphires in an SRF environment. The data obtained from the cavity greatly altered the design of the Wafer Cavity and provided the necessary information to ascertain the Wafer Test cavity’s performance.

Pogue, Nathaniel; Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

SPL RF Coupler Cooling Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy saving is an important challenge in accelerator design. In this framework, reduction of heat loads in a cryomodule is of fundamental importance due to the small thermodynamic efficiency of cooling at low temperatures. In particular, care must be taken during the design of its critical components (e.g. RF couplers, coldwarm transitions). In this framework, the main RF coupler of the Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) cryomodule at CERN will not only be used for RF powering but also as the main mechanical support of the superconducting cavities. These two functions have to be accomplished while ensuring the lowest heat in-leak to the helium bath at 2 K. In the SPL design, the RF coupler outer conductor is composed of two walls and cooled by forced convection with helium gas at 4.5 K. Analytical, semi-analytical and numerical analyses are presented in order to defend the choice of gas cooling. Temperature profiles and thermal performance have been evaluated for different operating conditions; a sensitivit...

Bonomi, R; Montesinos, E; Parma, V; Vande Craen, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Dissipative hydride precipitates in superconducting niobium cavities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first direct observation of the microstructural features exhibiting RF losses at high surface magnetic fields of above 100 mT in field emission free superconducting niobium cavities. The lossy areas were identified by advanced thermometry. Surface investigations using different techniques were carried out on cutout samples from lossy areas and showed the presence of dendritic niobium hydrides. This finding has possible implications to the mechanisms of RF losses in superconducting niobium at all field levels.

Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab; Ciovati, G.; / /Jefferson Lab; Wu, G.; /Argonne

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

R&D ERL: Low level RF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A superconducting RF (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is currently under development at the Collider-Accelerator Department (C-AD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The major components from an RF perspective are (a) a 5-cell SRF ERL cavity, (b) an SRF photocathode electron gun, and (c) a drive laser for the photocathode gun. Each of these RF subsystems has its own set of RF performance requirements, as well as common requirements for ensuring correct synchronism between them. A low level RF (LLRF) control system is currently under development, which seeks to leverage both technology and experience gained from the recently commissioned RHIC LLRF system upgrade. This note will review the LLRF system requirements and describe the system to be installed at the ERL.

Smith, K.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Chip-Scale Nanofabrication of Single Spins and Spin Arrays in Diamond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate a technique to nanofabricate nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond based on broad-beam nitrogen implantation through apertures in electron beam lithography resist. This method enables high-throughput nanofabrication of single NV centers on sub-100-nm length scales. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements facilitate depth profiling of the implanted nitrogen to provide three-dimensional characterization of the NV center spatial distribution. Measurements of NV center coherence with on-chip coplanar waveguides suggest a pathway for incorporating this scalable nanofabrication technique in future quantum applications.

Toyli, David M.; Weis, Christoph D.; Fuchs, D.; Schenkel, Thomas; Awschalom, David D.

2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

35

From Cleanroom to Desktop: Emerging Micro-Nanofabrication Technology for Biomedical Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review is motivated by the growing demand for low-cost, easy-to-use, compact-size yet powerful micro-nanofabrication technology to address emerging challenges of fundamental biology and translational medi...

Tingrui Pan; Wei Wang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Upgrade of the cryogenic CERN RF test facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990’s in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented.

Pirotte, O.; Benda, V.; Brunner, O.; Inglese, V.; Maesen, P.; Vullierme, B. [CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Koettig, T. [ESS - European Spallation Source, Box 176, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

37

Superconducting RF, the History, Challenges and Promise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After a short survey of on-going accelerator applications, I will discuss future applications prospects for this enabling technology, both near term and long term. A selection of technology highlights will serve as an introduction to outstanding issues for all types of applications, from pulsed high gradient to CW medium gradient. Finally I will touch upon the limits of niobium and the prospects of new materials. The talk will be targeted at a general audience.

Hasan Padamsee

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

38

Superconducting RF, the History, Challenges and Promise  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

After a short survey of on-going accelerator applications, I will discuss future applications prospects for this enabling technology, both near term and long term. A selection of technology highlights will serve as an introduction to outstanding issues for all types of applications, from pulsed high gradient to CW medium gradient. Finally I will touch upon the limits of niobium and the prospects of new materials. The talk will be targeted at a general audience.

Hasan Padamsee

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

39

The LHC superconducting cavities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The LHC RF system, which must handle high intensity (0.5 A d.c.) beams, makes use of superconducting single-cell cavities, best suited to minimizing the effects of periodic transient beam loading. There will be eight cavities per beam, each capable of delivering 2 MV (5 MV/m accelerating field) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industry, using niobium-on-copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A cavity unit includes a helium tank (4.5 K operating temperature) built around a cavity cell, RF and HOM couplers and a mechanical tuner, all housed in a modular cryostat. Four-unit modules are ultimately foreseen for the LHC (two per beam), while at present a prototype version with two complete units is being extensively tested. In addition to a detailed description of the cavity and its ancillary equipment, the first test results of the prototype will be reported.

Boussard, Daniel; Häbel, E; Kindermann, H P; Losito, R; Marque, S; Rödel, V; Stirbet, M

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Study of AC/RF properties of SRF ingot niobium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an attempt to correlate the performance of superconducting radiofrequency cavities made of niobium with the superconducting properties, we present the results of the magnetization and ac susceptibility of the niobium used in the superconducting radiofrequency cavity fabrication. The samples were subjected to buffer chemical polishing (BCP) surface and high temperature heat treatments, typically applied to the cavities fabrications. The analysis of the results show the different surface and bulk ac conductivity for the samples subjected to BCP and heat treatment. Furthermore, the RF surface impedance is measured on the sample using a TE011 microwave cavity for a comparison to the low frequency measurements.

Dhakal, Pashupati; Tsindlekht, Menachem I.; Genkin, Valery M.; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Beam dynamics studies for transverse electromagnetic mode type rf deflectors  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type rf deflectors: normal and superconducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to the conventional TM110 type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a single cell superconducting structure is enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the target point. Both the normal and superconducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the vertical kick of the beam.

Ahmed, Shahid; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Deitrick, Kirsten; De Silva, Subashini U.; Delayen, Jean R.; Spata, Mike; Tiefenback, Michael; Hofler, Alicia; Beard, Kevin

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Superconducting Cable  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

43

Superconducting Cable  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

44

RHIC Superconducting Accelerator and Electron Cooling Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organization Chart (PDF) Organization Chart (PDF) Accelerator R&D Division eRHIC R&D Energy Recovery Linac Photocathode R&D Superconducting RF Electron Cooling LARP Center for Accelerator Science and Education C-AD Accelerator R&D Division Superconducting RF Group Group Headed By: Sergey Belomestnykh This web site presents information on the Superconducting Accelerator and RHIC Electron Cooling Group, which is in the Accelerator R&D Division of the Collider-Accelerator Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Work is supported mainly by the Division of Nuclear Physics of the US Department of Energy. Upcoming Events: TBD Most recent events: 56 MHz 2nd External Review, March 8-9, 2011 External Review of the Energy Recovery Linac, February 17-18, 2010. Report of the Review Committee

45

Rf Feedback free electron laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

CFN Operations and Safety Awareness (COSA) Checklist Nanofabrication (Clean Room) Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanofabrication (Clean Room) Facility Nanofabrication (Clean Room) Facility Building 735 This COSA form must be completed for all experimenters working in the CFN and must be submitted to the CFN User Office for badge access. CFN Safety Awareness Policy: Each user must be instructed in the safe procedures in CFN related activities. CFN Facility Laboratory personnel shall keep readily available all relevant instructions and safety literature. Employee/Guest Name Life/Guest Number Department/Division ES&H Coordinator/Ext. Facility Manager COSA Trainer Guest User Staff USER ADMINISTRATION Checked in at User Administration and has valid BNL ID badge Safety Approval Form (SAF) approved. Training requirements completed (Indicate additional training specified in SAF or ESR in lines provided below):

47

Engineering Division Superconducting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10152014 Joseph V. Minervini 74 35 MW superconducting motor Superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SCFL) Technology & Engineering Division HTS (MgB 2 ) * DC superconducting...

48

Booster Subharmonic RF Capture Design  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Booster Subharmonic RF Capture Design 1 Booster Subharmonic RF Capture Design Nicholas S. Sereno, 7102002 1.0 Motivation and Requirements Successful operation of the APS storage...

49

Spectroscopy of Rf257  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The isotope Rf257 was produced in the fusion-evaporation reaction Pb208(Ti50,n)Rf257. Reaction products were separated and identified by mass. Delayed spectroscopy of Rf257 and its decay products was performed. A partial decay scheme with configuration assignments is proposed based on ? hindrance factors. The excitation energy of the 1/2+[620] configuration in No253 is proposed. The energy of this 1/2+ state in a series of N=151 isotones increases with nuclear charge, reflecting an increase in the N=152 gap. This gap is deduced to grow substantially from 850 to 1400 keV between Z=94 and 102. An isomeric state in Rf257, with a half-life of 160-31+42??s, was discovered by detecting internal conversion electrons followed by ? decay. It is interpreted as a three-quasiparticle high-K isomer. A second group of internal conversion electrons, with a half-life of 4.1-1.3+2.4 s, followed by ? decay, was also observed. These events might originate from the decay of excited states in Lr257, populated by electron-capture decay of Rf257. Fission of Rf257 was unambiguously detected, with a branching ratio of bRfSF=0.02±0.01.

J. Qian; A. Heinz; T. L. Khoo; R. V. F. Janssens; D. Peterson; D. Seweryniak; I. Ahmad; M. Asai; B. B. Back; M. P. Carpenter; A. B. Garnsworthy; J. P. Greene; A. A. Hecht; C. L. Jiang; F. G. Kondev; T. Lauritsen; C. J. Lister; A. Robinson; G. Savard; R. Scott; R. Vondrasek; X. Wang; R. Winkler; S. Zhu

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

50

Development of an RF Conditioning System for Charged-Particle Accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Charged-particle accelerators use various vacuum windows on their accelerating radio-frequency (RF) cavities to throughput very high RF power. Before being placed on the cavities, the windows should be cleaned, baked, and fully RF conditioned to prevent a poor vacuum from outgassing, as well as other forms of contamination. An example is the coaxial fundamental power coupler (FPC) with an annular alumina ceramic window for each of the 81 superconducting RF cavities in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linear accelerator. The FPCs needed to be tested up to 650-kW peak in a traveling wave and 2.6 MW with standing wave peaks in 1.3 and 60 pulses/s at 805 MHz. In this paper, an Experimental-Physics-and-Industrial-Control-System-based RF conditioning system for the SNS RF test facility is presented. This paper summarizes the hardware and software design strategies, provides the results obtained, and describes the future research scope.

Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Howlader, Mostofa [ORNL; Shajedul Hasan, Dr. S. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

RF Interconnection and Switching  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The components that connect, interface, transfer, and filter RF energy within a given system—or between systems—are critical elements in the operation of vacuum tube devices. Such hardware, usually passive, de...

Jerry C. Whitaker

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

ISG8-RF Sources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RF Sources - (WG3) RF Sources - (WG3) Orange Rm Yong Ho Chin, Christopher Nantista, and Sami G. Tantawi Parallel Sessions: Working Groups: WG1: Parameters, Design, Instrumentation and Tuning WG2: Damping Rings and ATF WG3: RF Sources WG4:Structures WG5: Ground Motion; Site Requirements and Investigations Monday Morning 9:00-10:30 Plenary Coffee Break 11:00-12:00 Planning Session. Monday Afternoon 13:30-15:30 High Gradient Issues (Joint with working group 4) Coffee Break 16:00-16:30 The 8-Pack Project -- D. Atkinson 16:30-17:30 High Gradient Issues and Discussions Continued. Tuesday Morning 9:30-10:30 Klystrons 9:30-10:00 Status of PPM Klystron Development for JLC -- Y. H. Chin 10:00-10:30 Design of 150MW Multi-Beam Klystron -- S. Matsumoto Coffee Break 11:00-11:30 Klystron Development at SLAC -- G. Caryotakis

53

CAMD Nanofabrication  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This is likely to change the way almost everythingfrom vaccines to computers to automobile tires to objects not yet imaginedis designed and made. It is anticipated that a...

54

Can RF help CMOS processors?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR C OMMUNICATIONS Can RF Help CMOS Processors? Eran SocherRF communication can help increase the wired communicationaluminum and low-K dielectrics help reduce wire delay but do

Socher, Eran; Chang, Mau-Chung Frank

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

Fukushima, Eiichi (Los Alamos, NM); Roeder, Stephen B. W. (La Mesa, CA); Assink, Roger A. (Albuquerque, NM); Gibson, Atholl A. V. (Bryan, TX)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Comparison of Measured and Calculated Coupling between a Waveguide and an RF Cavity Using CST Microwave Studio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate predications of RF coupling between an RF cavity and ports attached to it have been an important study subject for years for RF coupler and higher order modes (HOM) damping design. We report recent progress and a method on the RF coupling simulations between waveguide ports and RF cavities using CST Microwave Studio in time domain (Transit Solver). Comparisons of the measured and calculated couplings are presented. The simulated couplings and frequencies agree within {approx} 10% and {approx} 0.1% with the measurements, respectively. We have simulated couplings with external Qs ranging from {approx} 100 to {approx} 100,000, and confirmed with measurements. The method should also work well for higher Qs, and can be easily applied in RF power coupler designs and HOM damping for normal-conducting and superconducting cavities.

J. Shi; H. Chen; S. Zheng; D. Li; R.A. Rimmer; H. Wang

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

57

RF current sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

Moore, James A. (Powell, TN); Sparks, Dennis O. (Maryville, TN)

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

58

Feedback Configuration Tools for LHC Low Level RF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LHC Low Level RF System (LLRF) is a complex multi-VME crate system which is used to regulate the superconductive cavity gap voltage as well as to lower the impedance as seen by the beam through low latency feedback. This system contains multiple loops with several parameters to be set before the loops can be closed. In this paper, we present a suite of MATLAB based tools developed to perform the preliminary alignment of the RF stations and the beginnings of a closed loop model based alignment routine. We briefly introduce the RF system and in particular the base band (time domain noise based) network analyzer system built into the LHC LLRF. The main focus of this paper is the methodology of the algorithms used by the routines within the context of the overall system. Measured results are presented that validate the technique. Because the RF systems are located in a cavern 120 m underground in a location which is relatively un-accessible without beam and completely un-accessible with beam present or magnets are energized, these remotely operated tools are a necessity for the CERN LLRF team to maintain and tune their LLRF systems in a similar fashion as to what was done very successfully in PEP-II at SLAC.

Van Winkle, D.; Fox, J.; Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC; Baudrenghien, P.; Butterworth, A.; Molendijk, J.; /CERN

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

59

A New First-Principles Calculation of Field-Dependent RF Surface Impedance of BCS Superconductor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a need to understand the intrinsic limit of radiofrequency (RF) surface impedance that determines the performance of superconducting RF cavities in particle accelerators. Here we present a field-dependent derivation of Mattis-Bardeen theory of the RF surface impedance of BCS superconductors based on the shifted density of states resulting from coherently moving Cooper pairs. Our theoretical prediction of the effective BCS RF surface resistance (Rs) of niobium as a function of peak surface magnetic field amplitude agrees well with recently reported record low loss resonant cavity measurements from JLab and FNAL with carefully, yet differently, prepared niobium material. The surprising reduction in resistance with increasing field is explained to be an intrinsic effect.

Xiao, Binping [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Response of radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices to electromagnetic interference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of applications of high-temperature superconductor radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (rf SQUIDs) require a certain immunity of these sensors against electromagnetic interference (EMI). We have investigated effects of electromagnetic radiation in the high-frequency and ultrahigh-frequency range on various types of rf SQUIDs. It has been found that EMI of sufficient field strength reduces the voltage versus flux transfer function, and thus increases the flux noise of the SQUIDs. SQUIDs with a wire wound tank circuit coil have been found to be more sensitive to EMI than SQUIDs integrated into a superconducting microstrip resonator. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

Mueck, M.; Dechert, J.; Gail, J.; Kreutzbruck, M.; Schoene, S.; Weidl, R. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Giessen (Germany)] [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Secrets of superconductivity revealed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Secrets of superconductivity revealed Secrets of superconductivity revealed Secrets of superconductivity revealed The superconducting material Cerium-Colbalt-Indium5 reveals new secrets about how superconductivity and magnetism can be related. January 3, 2014 Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the superconducting properties of CeCoIn5 at the Morpheus instrument of the Spallation Neutron Source SINQ in Switzerland. (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute/Markus Fischer) Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the superconducting properties of CeCoIn5 at the Morpheus instrument of the Spallation Neutron Source SINQ in Switzerland. (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute/Markus Fischer) "Superconductivity continues to give new surprises. As its secrets are revealed, we learn more about the quantum world of electrons and can begin

63

Secrets of superconductivity revealed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Secrets of superconductivity revealed Secrets of superconductivity revealed Secrets of superconductivity revealed The superconducting material Cerium-Colbalt-Indium5 reveals new secrets about how superconductivity and magnetism can be related. January 3, 2014 Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the superconducting properties of CeCoIn5 at the Morpheus instrument of the Spallation Neutron Source SINQ in Switzerland. (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute/Markus Fischer) Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the superconducting properties of CeCoIn5 at the Morpheus instrument of the Spallation Neutron Source SINQ in Switzerland. (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute/Markus Fischer) "Superconductivity continues to give new surprises. As its secrets are revealed, we learn more about the quantum world of electrons and can begin

64

Improved nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

Fukushima, E.; Roeder, S.B.W.; Assink, R.A.; Gibson, A.A.V.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Superconductivity Program Overview High-Temperature Superconductivity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SuperconducTiviTy program haS Three FocuS areaS: SuperconducTiviTy program haS Three FocuS areaS: SuperconducTiviTy applicaTionS Developing HTS-based electric power equipment such as transmission and distribution cables and fault current limiters Second-generaTion Wire developmenT Developing high-performance, low-cost, second- generation HTS wire at long lengths STraTegic reSearch Supporting fundamental research activities to better understand relationships between the microstructure of HTS materials and their ability to carry large electric currents over long lengths Superconductivity Program Overview High-Temperature Superconductivity for Electric Systems Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability www.oe.energy.gov Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585

66

Fast Ferroelectric L-Band Tuner for Superconducting Cavities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design, analysis, and low-power tests are described on a ferroelectric tuner concept that could be used for controlling external coupling to RF cavities for the superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) in the electron cooler of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The tuner configuration utilizes several small donut-shaped ferroelectric assemblies, which allow the design to be simpler and more flexible, as compared to previous designs. Design parameters for 704 and 1300 MHz versions of the tuner are given. Simulation results point to efficient performance that could reduce by a factor-of-ten the RF power levels required for driving superconducting cavities in the BNL ERL.

Jay L. Hirshfield

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

67

Superconducting hot-electron nanobolometer with microwave bias and readout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new detection technique based on radio-frequency (RF) bias and readout of an antenna-coupled superconducting nanobolometer. This approach is suitable for Frequency-Division-Multiplexing (FDM) readout of large arrays using broadband low-noise RF amplifier. We call this new detector RFTES. This feasibility study was made on demonstrator devices which are made in all-Nb technology and operate at 4.2 K. The studied RFTES devices consist of an antenna-coupled superconducting nanobolometer made of ultrathin niobium films with transition temperature Tc = 5.2 K. The 0.65-THz antenna and nanobolometer are embedded as a load into a GHz-range coplanar niobium resonator (Tc = 8.9 K, Q = 4000). To heat the superconducting Nb nanobolometer close to the Tc, the RF power at resonator frequency f = 5.8 GHz is applied via a transmission line which is weakly coupled (-11 dB) to the loaded resonator. The THz-antenna of RFTES was placed in the focus of a sapphire immersion lens inside a He4-cryostat equipped with an ...

Kuzmin, A A; Shitov, S V; Abramov, N N; Ermakov, A B; Arndt, M; Wuensch, S H; Ilin, K S; Ustinov, A V; Siegel, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Superconducting 112 MHz QWR electron gun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory and Niowave, Inc. have designed and fabricated a superconducting 112 MHz quarter-wave resonator (QWR) electron gun. The first cold test of the QWR cryomodule has been completed at Niowave. The paper describes the cryomodule design, presents the cold test results, and outline plans to upgrade the cryomodule. Future experiments include studies of different photocathodes and use for the coherent electron cooling proof-of-principle experiment. Two cathode stalk options, one for multi-alkali photocathodes and the other one for a diamond-amplified photocathode, are discussed. A quarter-wave resonator concept of superconducting RF (SRF) electron gun was proposed at BNL for electron cooling hadron beams in RHIC. QWRs can be made sufficiently compact even at low RF frequencies (long wavelengths). The long wavelength allows to produce long electron bunches, thus minimizing space charge effects and enabling high bunch charge. Also, such guns should be suitable for experiments requiring high average current electron beams. A 112 MHz QWR gun was designed, fabricated, and cold-tested in collaboration between BNL and Niowave. This is the lowest frequency SRF gun ever tested successfully. In this paper we describe the gun design and fabrication, present the cold test results, and outline our plans. This gun will also serve as a prototype for a future SRF gun to be used for coherent electron cooling of hadrons in eRHIC.

Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Boulware, C.H.; Chang, X.; Grimm, T.L.; Rao, T.; Siegel, B.; Skaritka, J.; Than, R.; Winowski, M.; Wu, Q.; Xin, T.; Xue, L.

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

69

EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF RF BREAKDOWNS IN THE COUPLER OF THE TTF RF GUN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF RF BREAKDOWNS IN THE COUPLER OF THE TTF RF GUN J.-P. Carneiro , S I, the RF gun of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) has been operated with long RF pulses (up to 0.9 ms Fermilab has developed and delivered to DESY two RF guns for the operation of phase 1 of the TESLA Test

70

Superconducting VAR control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Static VAR control means employing an asymmetrically controlled Graetz bridge and a superconducting direct current coil having low losses and low cost characteristics.

Boenig, Heinrich J. (Los Alamos, NM); Hassenzahl, William V. (Piedmont, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Cryogenic vacuumm RF feedthrough device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cryogenic vacuum rf feedthrough device comprising: 1) a probe for insertion into a particle beam; 2) a coaxial cable comprising an inner conductor and an outer conductor, a dielectric/insulating layer surrounding the inner conductor, the latter being connected to the probe for the transmission of higher mode rf energy from the probe; and 3) a high thermal conductivity stub attached to the coaxial dielectric about and in thermal contact with the inner conductor which high thermal conductivity stub transmits heat generated in the vicinity of the probe efficiently and radially from the area of the probe and inner conductor all while maintaining useful rf transmission line characteristics between the inner and outer coaxial conductors.

Wu, Genfa (Yorktown, VA); Phillips, Harry Lawrence (Hayes, VA)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

72

Note on RF Photo-Cathode Gun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emittances in Laser-Driven RF Guns", Proc. 1988 Linear Acc.Palmer, "Preliminary Study of Gun Emittance Correction", BNLLaser-Driven RF Electron Guns", Nuc1. ln stt. Meth. , A275,

Kim, Kwang-Je

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Simulation of synchrotron motion with rf noise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical formulation is described that is behind an algorithm for synchrotron phase-space tracking with rf noise and some preliminary simulation results of bunch diffusion under rf noise obtained by actual tracking.

Leemann, B.T.; Forest, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Accelerator Cavities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Charlie Reece, an accelerator technology scientist, explains how superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities work.

Reece, Charlie

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

75

Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Accelerator Cavities  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Charlie Reece, an accelerator technology scientist, explains how superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities work.

Reece, Charlie

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

76

Intelligent Radio Frequency (RF) Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Intelligent Radio Frequency (RF) Monitoring ? 2009 Armstrong International, Inc. www.armstronginternational.com 2 ?Expect many enjoyable experiences!? David M. Armstrong Present Process Challenges ? Identifying a failure ? Procedure.... Armstrong Steam Trap Challenges ? Identifying a failure ? Manpower ? Location ? Magnitude of failure ? Energy loss ? Loss of heat transfer ? Justification for repair ? ?Speed of Implementation? ? Environmental concerns Manpower Location 4...

Kimbrough, B.

77

High-Power Rf Load  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact high-power RF load comprises a series of very low Q resonators, or chokes [16], in a circular waveguide [10]. The sequence of chokes absorb the RF power gradually in a short distance while keeping the bandwidth relatively wide. A polarizer [12] at the input end of the load is provided to convert incoming TE.sub.10 mode signals to circularly polarized TE.sub.11 mode signals. Because the load operates in the circularly polarized mode, the energy is uniformly and efficiently absorbed and the load is more compact than a rectangular load. Using these techniques, a load having a bandwidth of 500 MHz can be produced with an average power dissipation level of 1.5 kW at X-band, and a peak power dissipation of 100 MW. The load can be made from common lossy materials, such as stainless steel, and is less than 15 cm in length. These techniques can also produce loads for use as an alternative to ordinary waveguide loads in small and medium RF accelerators, in radar systems, and in other microwave applications. The design is easily scalable to other RF frequencies and adaptable to the use of other lossy materials.

Tantawi, Sami G. (San Mateo, CA); Vlieks, Arnold E. (Livermore, CA)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Josephson device with a matched rf source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analog simulation of a resistance-shunted ac Josephson junction coupled to an rf source with matching impedance reveals (1) added structure in the device's V-I curve even when the source is quiescent and (2) rf-induced steps with peak amplitudes between those produced by voltage and current rf sources. Both results are consistent with experimental data.

Longacre, A. Jr.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

6.763 Applied Superconductivity, Fall 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phenomenological approach to superconductivity, with emphasis on superconducting electronics. Electrodynamics of superconductors, London's model, and flux quantization. Josephson Junctions and superconducting quantum ...

Orlando, Terry P.

80

RF and structural characterization of new SRF films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past years, energetic vacuum deposition methods have been developed in different laboratories to improve Nb/Cu technology for superconducting cavities. Jefferson Lab is pursuing energetic condensation deposition via Electron Cyclotron Resonance. As part of this study, the influence of the deposition energy on the material and RF properties of the Nb thin film is investigated. The film surface and structure analyses are conducted with various techniques like X-ray diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Auger Electron Spectroscopy and RHEED. The microwave properties of the films are characterized on 50 mm disk samples with a 7.5 GHz surface impedance characterization system. This paper presents surface impedance measurements in correlation with surface and material characterization for Nb films produced on copper substrates with different bias voltages and also highlights emerging opportunities for developing multilayer SRF films with a new deposition system.

A.-M. Valente-Feliciano,H. L. Phillips,C. E. Reece,X. Zhao,D. Gu,R. Lukaszew,B. Xiao,K. Seo

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

RF Design Optimization for New Injector Cryounit at CEBAF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new injector superconducting RF (SRF) cryounit with one new 2-cell, B=0.6 cavity plus one refurbished 7-cell, B=0.97, C100 style cavity has been re-designed and optimized for the engineering compatibility of existing module for CEBAF operation. The optimization of 2-cell cavity shape for longitudinal beam dynamic of acceleration from 200keV to 533keV and the minimization of transverse kick due to the waveguide couplers to less than 1 mrad have been considered. Operating at 1497MHz, two cavities has been designed into a same footprint of CEBAF original quarter cryomodule to deliver an injection beam energy of 5MeV in less than 0.27{degree} rms bunch length and a maximum energy spread of 5keV.

Wang, Haipeng; Cheng, Guangfeng; Hannon, Fay E.; Hofler, Alicia S.; Kazimi, Reza; Preble, Joe; Rimmer, Robert A.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

National RF Test Facility as a multipurpose development tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additions and modifications to the National RF Test Facility design have been made that (1) focus its use for technology development for future large systems in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), (2) expand its applicability to technology development in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies (ECRF) at 60 GHz, (3) provide a facility for ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) 60-GHz ring physics studies, and (4) permit engineering studies of steady-state plasma systems, including superconducting magnet performance, vacuum vessel heat flux removal, and microwave protection. The facility will continue to function as a test bed for generic technology developments for ICRF and the lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF). The upgraded facility is also suitable for mirror halo physics experiments.

McManamy, T.J.; Becraft, W.R.; Berry, L.A.; Blue, C.W.; Gardner, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Loring, C.M. Jr.; Moeller, F.A.; Ponte, N.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Superconducting active impedance converter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

84

Superconducting active impedance converter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

Ginley, David S. (Albuquerque, NM); Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Decrease of the surface resistance in superconducting niobium resonator cavities by the microwave field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of the quality factor, Q, of Nb superconducting microwave resonators often show that Q increases by {approx_equal} 10%–30% with increasing radio-frequency (rf) field, H, up to {approx} 15-20 mT. Recent high temperature heat treatments can amplify this rf field-induced increase of Q up to {approx_equal} 50%–100% and extend it to much higher fields, but the mechanisms of the enhancement of Q(H) remain unclear. Here, we suggest a method to reveal these mechanisms by measuring temperature dependencies of Q at different rf field amplitudes. We show that the increase of Q(H) does not come from a field dependent quasi-particles activation energy or residual resistance, but rather results from the smearing of the density of state by the rf field.

Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Gurevich, Alexander V. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Secrets of superconductivity revealed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

material Cerium-Colbalt-Indium5 reveals new secrets about how superconductivity and magnetism can be related. January 3, 2014 Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the...

87

Superconducting thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Superconducting thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

Metzger, John D. (Eaton's Neck, NY); El-Genk, Mohamed S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Superconducting thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat is disclosed. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device. 4 figs.

Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

90

Alexei Abrikosov and Superconductivity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alexei Abrikosov and Superconductivity Alexei Abrikosov and Superconductivity Resources with Additional Information · Publications at ANL Alexei A. Abrikosov of the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is a recipient of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physics for his research in the area of superconductivity. Alexei Abrikosov Courtesy Argonne National Laboratory "Abrikosov's research [at ANL] centers on condensed-matter physics (the structure and behavior of solids and liquids), and concentrates on superconductivity, the ability of some materials to carry electrical current without resistance. He was the first to propose the concept of "type-II superconductors" in 1952 and constructed the theory of their magnetic properties, known as the Abrikosov vortex lattice.

91

Supertubes and Superconducting Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show the equivalence between configurations that arise from string theory of type IIA, called supertubes, and superconducting membranes at the bosonic level. We find equilibrium and oscillating configurations for a tubular membrane carrying a current along its axis.

Cordero, Ruben; Miguel-Pilar, Zelin [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del IPN, Edificio 9, Unidad Profesional 'Adolfo Lopez Mateos', Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

92

Superconducting transmission line particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

Gray, K.E.

1988-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

93

Superconducting transmission line particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

Gray, Kenneth E. (Naperville, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Progress in Superconducting Metamaterials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review progress in the development and applications of superconducting metamaterials. The review is organized in terms of several distinct advantages and unique properties brought to the metamaterials field by superconductivity. These include the low-loss nature of the meta-atoms, their compact structure, their extraordinary degree of nonlinearity and tunability, magnetic flux quantization and the Josephson effect, quantum effects in which photons interact with quantized energy levels in the meta-atom, as well as strong diamagnetism.

Philipp Jung; Alexey V. Ustinov; Steven M. Anlage

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

95

RF System Modeling for the CEBAF Energy Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An RF system model, based on MATLAB/SIMULINK, has been developed for analyzing the basic characteristics of the low level RF (LLRF) control system being designed for the CEBAF 12 GeV Energy Upgrade. In our model, a typical passband cavity representation is simplified to in-phase and quadrature (I&Q) components. Lorentz Force and microphonic detuning are incorporated as a new quadrature carrier frequency (frequency modulation). Beam is also represented as in-phase and quadrature components and superpositioned with the cavity field vector. Signals pass through two low pass filters, where the cutoff frequency is equal to half of the cavity bandwidth, then they are demodulated using the same detuning frequency. Because only baseband I&Q signals are calculated, the simulation process is very fast when compared to other controller-cavity models. During the design process we successfully analyzed gain requirements vs. field stability for different superconducting cavity microphonic backgrounds and Lorentz Force coefficients. Moreover, we were able to evaluate different types of a LLRF system’s control algorithm: GDR (Generator Driven Resonator) and SEL (Self Excited Loop) [1] as well as klystron power requirements for different cavities and beam loads.

Tomasz Plawski, J. Hovater

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Low jitter RF distribution system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A timing signal distribution system includes an optical frequency stabilized laser signal amplitude modulated at an rf frequency. A transmitter box transmits a first portion of the laser signal and receive a modified optical signal, and outputs a second portion of the laser signal and a portion of the modified optical signal. A first optical fiber carries the first laser signal portion and the modified optical signal, and a second optical fiber carries the second portion of the laser signal and the returned modified optical signal. A receiver box receives the first laser signal portion, shifts the frequency of the first laser signal portion outputs the modified optical signal, and outputs an electrical signal on the basis of the laser signal. A detector at the end of the second optical fiber outputs a signal based on the modified optical signal. An optical delay sensing circuit outputs a data signal based on the detected modified optical signal. An rf phase detect and correct signal circuit outputs a signal corresponding to a phase stabilized rf signal based on the data signal and the frequency received from the receiver box.

Wilcox, Russell; Doolittle, Lawrence; Huang, Gang

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

97

Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

98

7 Superconductivity March 12, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to measure. Current could be left flowing round a superconducting loop for several months without any and copper, do not seem to be superconducting, nor do the elements in Group IIA, such as calcium, but many

Thouless, David

99

RF Systems in a Neutrino Factory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on existing sources, I compile parameters for the RF systems for a neutrino factory which accelerates to 10 GeV.

Berg J. S.

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

RF Micro Devices | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Others) for this property. Partnering Center within NREL National Center for Photovoltaics Partnership Year 2009 RF Micro Devices is a company located in Greensboro, NC....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

High voltage RF feedthrough bushing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a multi-element, high voltage radio frequency bushing for trmitting RF energy to an antenna located in a vacuum container. The bushing includes a center conductor of complex geometrical shape, an outer coaxial shield conductor, and a thin-walled hollow truncated cone insulator disposed between central and outer conductors. The shape of the center conductor, which includes a reverse curvature portion formed of a radially inwardly directed shoulder and a convex portion, controls the uniformity of the axial surface gradient on the insulator cone. The outer shield has a first substantially cylindrical portion and a second radially inwardly extending truncated cone portion.

Grotz, Glenn F. (Huntington Station, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

RF/optical shared aperture for high availability wideband communication RF/FSO links  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An RF/Optical shared aperture is capable of transmitting and receiving optical signals and RF signals simultaneously. This technology enables compact wide bandwidth communications systems with 100% availability in clear air turbulence, rain and fog. The functions of an optical telescope and an RF reflector antenna are combined into a single compact package by installing an RF feed at either of the focal points of a modified Gregorian telescope.

Ruggiero, Anthony J; Pao, Hsueh-yuan; Sargis, Paul

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

103

Superconducting Magnet Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 - 6/13/06 3 - 6/13/06 Superconducting Magnet Division S&T Committee Program Review June 22-23, 2006 Conference Room A, Bldg. 725, BNL DRAFT AGENDA Thursday, June 22 0830 Executive Session to address the charge S. Aronson (25 min) 0855 Welcome S. Aronson (5 min) 0900 Superconducting Magnet Division Status & M. Harrison (45 + 15 min) Issues - mission statement, core competencies, themes, program, problems, etc. 1000 Themes - Nb3Sn, HTS, Direct wind, Accelerator integration, P. Wanderer (20 + 10 min) rapid cycling Core Competencies 1030 Superconducting Materials A. Ghosh (20 + 5 min) 1055 Break 1110 Magnetic Design R. Gupta (20 + 5 min) 1135 Magnet Construction M. Anerella (20 + 5 min) 1200 Magnet Testing G. Ganetis (20 + 5 min)

104

LANL: Superconductivity Technology Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sitemap | Lab Home | Phone Sitemap | Lab Home | Phone ABOUT LANL ContactsPhonebookPolicy CenterOrganizationMapsJobs Emergency NEWS LIBRARY JOBS Search Materials Physics & Applications: STC STC Home OUR FOCUS HTS Physics HTS Materials Development HTS Materials Processing Power Applications Electronic Materials FUTURE APPLICATIONS Biomedical Developments Magnetic Levitation Train MHD Ship CONTACTS Center Leader Ken Marken Program Administrator Brenda Espinoza Center Office Location: TA-03, Bdg. 0032, Rm. 141 Exploring technology at STC Superconductivity Technology Center (STC) The Superconductivity Technology Center (STC) coordinates a multidisciplinary program for research, development, and technology transfer in the area of high-temperature superconductivity. Our focus is on effective collaborations with American industry, universities, and other national laboratories to develop electric power and electronic device applications of high-temperature superconductors (HTS).

105

Large Superconducting Magnet Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The increase of energy in accelerators over the past decades has led to the design of superconducting magnets for both accelerators and the associated detectors. The use of Nb?Ti superconducting materials allows an increase in the dipole field by up to 10 T compared with the maximum field of 2 T in a conventional magnet. The field bending of the particles in the detectors and generated by the magnets can also be increased. New materials, such as Nb3Sn and high temperature superconductor (HTS) conductors, can open the way to higher fields, in the range 13–20 T. The latest generations of fusion machines producing hot plasma also use large superconducting magnet systems.

Védrine, P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

RF Surface Impedance Characterization of Potential New Materials for SRF-based Accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the development of new superconducting materials for possible use in SRF-based accelerators, it is useful to work with small candidate samples rather than complete resonant cavities. The recently commissioned Jefferson Lab RF Surface Impedance Characterization (SIC) system can presently characterize the central region of 50 mm diameter disk samples of various materials from 2 to 40 K exposed to RF magnetic fields up to 14 mT at 7.4 GHz. We report the recent measurement results of bulk Nb, thin film Nb on Cu and sapphire substrates, Nb{sub 3}Sn sample, and thin film MgB{sub 2} on sapphire substrate provided by colleagues at JLab and Temple University.

Xiao, Binping [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Eremeev, Grigory V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Phillips, H. Lawrence [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Kelley, Michael J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Tests of an RF Dipole Crabbing Cavity for an Electron-Ion Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the scheme of developing a medium energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab, we have designed a compact superconducting rf dipole cavity at 750 MHz to crab both electron and ion bunches and increase luminosities at the interaction points (IP) of the machine. Following the design optimization and characterization of the electromagnetic properties such as peak surface fields and shunt impedance, along with field nonuniformities, multipole components content, higher order modes (HOM) and multipacting, a prototype cavity was built by Niowave Inc. The 750 MHz prototype crab cavity has been tested at 4 K and is ready for re-testing at 4 K and 2 K at Jefferson Lab. In this paper we present the detailed results of the rf tests performed on the 750 MHz crab cavity prototype.

Castilla Loeza, Alejandro [ODU, JLAB; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Superconductivity | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Highlights Research Highlights Superconductivity Neutron diffraction reveals semiconducting phase and contributes to new understanding of iron-based superconductors Contact: Huibo Cao New VULCAN tests of Japanese cable for US ITER's central magnet system (2012) Contact: Ke An ARCS maps collaborative magnetic spin behavior in iron telluride (2011) Published Work: "Unconventional Temperature Enhanced Magnetism in Fe1:1Te" Contact: Igor Zaliznyak Doug Scalapino discusses "common thread" linking unconventional superconducting materials (2011) Contact: Douglas Scalapino Materials Engineering Research at SNS Helps International Collaboration on Fusion Energy Scientists and engineers at ORNL are working with the ITER Organization and the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency to resolve issues with a critical

109

Note on RF Photo-Cathode Gun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E.R. Gray and P.M. Giles, "Photo-cathodes in AcceleratorProceedings Note on RF Photo-Cathode Gun K. -J. Kim August106 LBL-29538 Note on RF Photo-Cathode G un Kwang-Je Kim

Kim, Kwang-Je

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

RF SYSTEM FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During accumulation the RF beam current in the spallation neutron source ring rises from 0 to 50 amperes. A clean, 250 nanosecond gap is needed for the extraction kicker risetime. Large momentum spread and small peak current are needed to prevent instabilities and stopband related losses. A robust RF system meeting these requirements has been designed.

BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRODOWSKI, J.; DELONG, J.; METH, M.; SMITH, K.; ZALTSMAN, A.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

111

Plasma Edge Cooling during rf Heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new approach to prevent the influx of high-Z impurities into the core of a tokamak discharge by using rf power to modify the edge plasma temperature profile is discussed. This concept is based on spectroscopic measurements on PLT (Princeton Large Torus) during ohmic heating and ATC (Adiabatic Toroidal Compressor) during rf heating.

S. Suckewer and R. J. Hawryluk

1978-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

112

Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that, in the 'jelly' model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

Veklenko, B. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Superconductivity of Zirconium Alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The superconducting transition temperatures of alloys between zirconium and VIIIth column elements are substantially higher than those of zirconium. The same is true for zirconium-gold alloys. This observation confirms a rule previously established about the height of transition temperatures.

B. T. Matthias and E. Corenzwit

1955-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Superconducting Magnet Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the 400 kW end of RIA's Fragment Separator are subjected to several orders of magnitude more radiation an order of magnitude as compared to that for present superconducting accelerator magnets. An OPERA3d model://www.phy.anl.gov/ria/ http://www.orau.org/ria/ Figure: On this chart of the nuclides, black squares represent stable nuclei

Gupta, Ramesh

115

Superconducting thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thermoelectricity is produced by applying a temperature differential to dissimilar electrically conducting or semiconducting materials, thereby producing a voltage that is proportional to the temperature difference. Thermoelectric generators use this effect to directly convert heat into electricity; however, presently-known generators have low efficiencies due to the production of high currents which in turn cause large resistive heating losses. Some thermoelectric generators operate at efficiencies between 4% and 7% in the 800{degrees} to 1200{degrees}C range. According to its major aspects and bradly stated, the present invention is an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. In particular, the invention is a thermoelectric generator that juxtaposes a superconducting material and a semiconducting material - so that the superconducting and the semiconducting materials touch - to convert heat energy into electrical energy without resistive losses in the temperature range below the critical temperature of the superconducting material. Preferably, an array of superconducting material is encased in one of several possible configurations within a second material having a high thermal conductivity, preferably a semiconductor, to form a thermoelectric generator.

Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

RF Cavity Characterization with VORPAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When designing a radio frequency (RF) accelerating cavity structure various figures of merit are considered before coming to a final cavity design. These figures of merit include specific field and geometry based quantities such as the ratio of the shunt impedance to the quality factor (R/Q) or the normalized peak fields in the cavity. Other important measures of cavity performance include the peak surface fields as well as possible multipacting resonances in the cavity. High fidelity simulations of these structures can provide a good estimate of these important quantities before any cavity prototypes are built. We will present VORPAL simulations of a simple pillbox structure where these quantities can be calculated analytically and compare them to the results from the VORPAL simulations. We will then use VORPAL to calculate these figures of merit and potential multipacting resonances for two cavity designs under development at Jefferson National Lab for Project X.

C. Nieter, C. Roark, P. Stoltz, C.D. Zhou, F. Marhauser

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

AFRD - Superconducting Magnets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Superconducting Magnets Superconducting Magnets Home Organization Diversity Safety Links Gallery/History Updated July 2008 Ever-stronger magnets (which must be cost-effective as well) are a key to building tomorrow's high-energy accelerators and upgrading today's. Our role— not only a leading R&D group but also the administrators of the multi-institutional National Conductor Development Program— to create both evolutionary improvements and paradigm shifts in the application of accelerator magnets, providing innovative technology that enables new science. Improvements in conductor, innovative structures to solve the challenges of high fields and brittle superconductors, and integration of computerized design and analysis tools are key. The performance requirements of modern accelerators continue to press the

118

Landscape of superconducting membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The AdS/CFT correspondence may connect the landscape of string vacua and the `atomic landscape' of condensed matter physics. We study the stability of a landscape of IR fixed points of N=2 large N gauge theories in 2+1 dimensions, dual to Sasaki-Einstein compactifications of M theory, towards a superconducting state. By exhibiting instabilities of charged black holes in these compactifications, we show that many of these theories have charged operators that condense when the theory is placed at a finite chemical potential. We compute a statistical distribution of critical superconducting temperatures for a subset of these theories. With a chemical potential of one milliVolt, we find critical temperatures ranging between 0.24 and 165 degrees Kelvin.

Frederik Denef; Sean A. Hartnoll

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

119

Supercurrent in superconducting graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of supercurrent in superconducting graphene is revisited and the supercurrent is calculated within the mean-field model employing the two-component wave functions on a honeycomb lattice with pairing between different valleys in the Brillouin zone. We show that the supercurrent within the linear approximation in the order-parameter-phase gradient is always finite even if the doping level is exactly zero.

N. B. Kopnin and E. B. Sonin

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

120

Superconducting magnet wire  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting tape or wire with an improved critical field is formed of alternating layers of a niobium-containing superconductor such as Nb, NbTi, Nb.sub.3 Sn or Nb.sub.3 Ge with a thickness in the range of about 0.5-1.5 times its coherence length, supported and separated by layers of copper with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170-600 .ANG..

Schuller, Ivan K. (Woodridge, IL); Ketterson, John B. (Evanston, IL); Banerjee, Indrajit (San Jose, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

122

Superconducting Topological Insulators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly resist scattering from defects, naturally achieving some of the most desirable traits for computing components and next-generation "spintronics" technologies. More recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies performed at ALS Beamlines 10.0.1 and 12.0.1 by the same collaboration have paved a way for these novel material properties to be taken even further. Their studies showed that by doping the TI, bismuth selenide, with copper, it's possible to make the topologically ordered electrons superconducting, dropping electrical resistance in the surface states all the way to zero.

123

Superconducting Topological Insulators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly resist scattering from defects, naturally achieving some of the most desirable traits for computing components and next-generation "spintronics" technologies. More recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies performed at ALS Beamlines 10.0.1 and 12.0.1 by the same collaboration have paved a way for these novel material properties to be taken even further. Their studies showed that by doping the TI, bismuth selenide, with copper, it's possible to make the topologically ordered electrons superconducting, dropping electrical resistance in the surface states all the way to zero.

124

Superconducting Topological Insulators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly resist scattering from defects, naturally achieving some of the most desirable traits for computing components and next-generation "spintronics" technologies. More recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies performed at ALS Beamlines 10.0.1 and 12.0.1 by the same collaboration have paved a way for these novel material properties to be taken even further. Their studies showed that by doping the TI, bismuth selenide, with copper, it's possible to make the topologically ordered electrons superconducting, dropping electrical resistance in the surface states all the way to zero.

125

Superconducting VAR control. [Patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Static VAR control means are described employing an asymmetrically controlled Graetz bridge and a superconducting direct current coil having low losses and low cost characteristics.

Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1980-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

126

SciTech Connect: Superconductivity  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

English Subject: Condensed Matter Physics, Superconductivity & Superfluidity(75) Word Cloud More Like This Full Text File size NAView Full Text View Full Text DOI: 10.2172...

127

Samsung: ENERGY STAR Referral (RF26VAB)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE referred the matter of Samsung refrigerator-freezer model RF26VAB to the EPA for appropriate action after DOE testing showed that the model does not meet the ENERGY STAR specification.

128

The Emergence of RF-Powered Computing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extracting power "from thin air" has a quality of science fiction about it, yet technology trends make it likely that in the near future, small computers in urban areas will use ambient RF signals for both power and communication. The first Web extra ... Keywords: Backscatter,RF signals,Radio frequency,Computers,Telemetry,TV,Power distribution,Wireless communication,Ubiquitous computing,emerging technologies,wireless communication,ubiquitous computing

Shyamnath Gollakota, Matthew Reynolds, Joshua Smith, David Wetherall

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

Christodoulou, Christos George (The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Christodoulou, Christos George (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Feldner, Lucas Matthew

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings are disclosed. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures. 20 figs.

Hull, J.R.

1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

132

Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures.

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Automatic Pole and Q-Value Extraction for RF Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental characterization of RF structures like accelerating cavities often demands for measuring resonant frequencies of Eigenmodes and corresponding (loaded) Q-values over a wide spectral range. A common procedure to determine the Q-values is the -3dB method, which works well for isolated poles, but may not be applicable directly in case of multiple poles residing in close proximity (e.g. for adjacent transverse modes differing by polarization). Although alternative methods may be used in such cases, this often comes at the expense of inherent systematic errors. We have developed an automation algorithm, which not only speeds up the measurement time significantly, but is also able to extract Eigenfrequencies and Q-values both for well isolated and overlapping poles. At the same time the measurement accuracy may be improved as a major benefit. To utilize this procedure merely complex scattering parameters have to be recorded for the spectral range of interest. In this paper we present the proposed algorithm applied to experimental data recorded for superconducting higher-order-mode damped multi-cell cavities as an application of high importance.

C. Potratz, H.-W. Glock, U. van Rienen, F. Marhauser

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Power superconducting power transmission cable  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

Ashworth, Stephen P. (Cambridge, GB)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties and Developments #12;Copyright 2003 and Magnetism: Materials Properties and Developments Extended abstracts of the 24th Risø International Symposium LABORATORY ROSKILDE, DENMARK #12;Risø International Symposium on Superconductivity and Magnetism: Material

136

Superconductivity Highlights | Neutron Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Superconductivity Superconductivity SHARE Superconductivity Highlights 1-6 of 6 Results Doug Scalapino discusses "common thread" linking unconventional superconducting materials December 01, 2012 - Douglas Scalapino was the inaugural speaker for a new joint lecture series sponsored by the Spallation Neutron Source and the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. New VULCAN tests of Japanese cable for US ITER's central magnet system February 01, 2012 - Neutron testing of the Japanese-made superconducting cable for the central solenoid (CS) magnetic system for US ITER begins next Tuesday, says Ke An, lead instrument scientist for the VULCAN Engineering Materials Diffractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. ARCS maps collaborative magnetic spin behavior in iron telluride

137

DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Force Research Laboratory Air Force Research Laboratory Air Liquide Air Products and Chemicals Inc. American Electric Power American Superconductor Argonne National Laboratory BOC Group Brookhaven National Laboratory Composite Technology Development Consolidated Edison Cryo-Industries of America Inc. Delta Star Inc. Directed Vapor Technologies Department of Defense Department of Homeland Security Electric Power Research Institute Entergy Florida State University Long Island Power Authority Los Alamos National Laboratory Metal Oxide Technologies Inc. Mipox International Corp. National Grid National Institute for Standards & Tech. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Nissan Electric Co. Ltd. Nexans nkt Cables Group Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oxford Superconducting Technology Pacific Gas and Electric

138

RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A 1.3 GHz RF test cell capable of operating both at high pressure and in vacuum with replaceable electrodes was designed, built, and power tested in preparation for testing the frequency and geometry effects of RF breakdown at Argonne National Lab. At the time of this report this cavity is still waiting for the 1.3 GHz klystron to be available at the Wakefield Test Facility. (3) Under a contract with Los Alamos National Lab, an 805 MHz RF test cavity, known as the All-Seasons Cavity (ASC), was designed and built by Muons, Inc. to operate either at high pressure or under vacuum. The LANL project to use the (ASC) was cancelled and the testing of the cavity has been continued under the grant reported on here using the Fermilab Mucool Test Area (MTA). The ASC is a true pillbox cavity that has performed under vacuum in high external magnetic field better than any other and has demonstrated that the high required accelerating gradients for many muon cooling beam line designs are possible. (4) Under ongoing support from the Muon Acceleration Program, microscopic surface analysis and computer simulations have been used to develop models of RF breakdown that apply to both pressurized and vacuum cavities. The understanding of RF breakdown will lead to better designs of RF cavities for many applications. An increase in the operating accelerating gradient, improved reliability and shorter conditioning times can generate very significant cost savings in many accelerator projects.

Johnson, Rolland

2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

139

CAMD Nanofabrication Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrastructure :: News :: Related sites National Nanotechnology Initiative Nano Technology Industries Advanced Materials Research Institute Institute of Physics Max-Planck...

140

CAMD Nanofabrication Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have significantly impacted, or are expected to impact, the state of the art in nanotechnology. "The winners of the Nano 50 awards are the best of the best - the innovative...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Rf capacitively-coupled electrodeless light source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An rf capacitively-coupled electrodeless light source is provided. The light source comprises a hollow, elongated chamber and at least one center conductor disposed within the hollow, elongated chamber. A portion of each center conductor extends beyond the hollow, elongated chamber. At least one gas capable of forming an electronically excited molecular state is contained within each center conductor. An electrical coupler is positioned concentric to the hollow, elongated chamber and the electrical coupler surrounds the portion of each center conductor that extends beyond the hollow, elongated chamber. A rf-power supply is positioned in an operable relationship to the electrical coupler and an impedance matching network is positioned in an operable relationship to the rf power supply and the electrical coupler.

Manos, Dennis M. (Williamsburg, VA); Diggs, Jessie (Norfolk, VA); Ametepe, Joseph D. (Roanoke, VA); Fugitt, Jock A. (Livingston, TX)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

X-Band RF Gun Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the MEGa-ray program at LLNL and the High Gradient research program at SLAC, a new X-band multi-cell RF gun is being developed. This gun, similar to earlier guns developed at SLAC for Compton X-ray source program, will be a standing wave structure made of 5.5 cells operating in the pi mode with copper cathode. This gun was designed following criteria used to build SLAC X-band high gradient accelerating structures. It is anticipated that this gun will operate with surface electric fields on the cathode of 200 MeV/m with low breakdown rate. RF will be coupled into the structure through a final cell with symmetric duel feeds and with a shape optimized to minimize quadrupole field components. In addition, geometry changes to the original gun, operated with Compton X-ray source, will include a wider RF mode separation, reduced surface electric and magnetic fields.

Vlieks, Arnold; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC; Anderson, Scott; Hartemann, Fred; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

143

Superconductive tunnel junction integrated circuit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Josephson Junction integrated circuits of the current injection type and magnetically controlled type utilize a superconductive layer that forms both Josephson Junction electrode for the Josephson Junction devices on the integrated circuit as well as a ground plane for the integrated circuit. Large area Josephson Junctions are utilized for effecting contact to lower superconductive layers and islands are formed in superconductive layers to provide isolation between the groundplane function and the Josephson Junction electrode function as well as to effect crossovers. A superconductor-barrier-superconductor trilayer patterned by local anodization is also utilized with additional layers formed thereover. Methods of manufacturing the embodiments of the invention are disclosed.

Jillie, D.W. Jr.; Smith, L.N.

1984-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

144

Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources.

Murduck, James M. (Lisle, IL); Lepetre, Yves J. (Lauris, FR); Schuller, Ivan K. (Woodridge, IL); Ketterson, John B. (Evanston, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

1989-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

146

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Hassenzahl, W.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Information entropic superconducting microcooler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider a design for a cyclic microrefrigerator using a superconducting flux qubit. Adiabatic modulation of the flux combined with thermalization can be used to transfer energy from a lower temperature normal metal thin film resistor to another one at higher temperature. The frequency selectivity of photonic heat conduction is achieved by including the hot resistor as part of a high frequency LC resonator and the cold one as part of a low-frequency oscillator while keeping both circuits in the underdamped regime. We discuss the performance of the device in an experimentally realistic setting. This device illustrates the complementarity of information and thermodynamic entropy as the erasure of the quantum bit directly relates to the cooling of the resistor.

A. O. Niskanen; Y. Nakamura; J. P. Pekola

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

148

Superconducting energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

Giese, R.F.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

High Tc Superconductivity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by C. Kim (SSRL), D. H. Lu (Stanford), K. M. Shen (Stanford) and Z.-X. Shen (Stanford/SSRL) by C. Kim (SSRL), D. H. Lu (Stanford), K. M. Shen (Stanford) and Z.-X. Shen (Stanford/SSRL) Extensive research efforts to study the novel electronic properties of high-Tc superconductors and their related materials by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy at a recently commissioned Beam Line 5-4 (led by Z.-X. Shen) continue to be successful, producing many important results. These results, which are highlighted by five articles recently published in Physical Review Letters and one in Science, brought our understanding steps closer to solving the mystery of the high-Tc superconductivity. With the development of the latest generation of ultra-high resolution electron spectrometers in the past few years, the technique of angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has recently experienced a renaissance. Nowhere is this revolution more evident than in the study of the high-temperature superconductors, which more than a decade after their discovery, continue to defy theoretical explanation. Recent ARPES experiments performed at Beam Line 5-4 have led to critical new discoveries about the fundamental nature of these mysterious superconductors and are now changing the way that the physics community views these materials. An excellent benchmark for the huge leap in detector resolution and technology is the recent work on Sr2RuO4. Although it belongs to a slightly different family than the high- temperature superconductors, its exotic superconducting mechanism (Tc = 1K) and complex electronic structure make it itself a fascinating material. In the past, due to poor resolutions, ARPES studies on this material were in disagreement with theory and other experimental techniques.

150

Onset of surface superconductivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the onset of superconductivity in the surface region of a metal. Surface effects are particularly important in systems with a short bulk coherence length {xi}{sub 0}. We show that, to the accuracy of the calculation, the surface transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital S}} equals the bulk transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital B}} if the electron-electron interaction is of the standard BCS form, i.e., a single attractive square well, extending up to some critical energy {omega}{sub 0} much smaller than the Fermi energy {var epsilon}{sub {ital F}}. If one takes into account, in addition, the repulsive part of the interaction extending beyond {omega}{sub 0} up to energies of order {var epsilon}{sub {ital F}}, then one may have {ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital S}}{gt}{ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital B}} in certain cases, although, due to restrictions imposed on the parameter values by various physical conditions, the relative increase of {ital T}{sub {ital c}} is very small, typically 10{sup {minus}3}, at least in the weak coupling limit. However, we also find a considerable gap enhancement, of order 20%, near the surface which could be of interest for critical-current measurements. Therefore we suggest an experimental reexamination of systems with short {xi}{sub 0}, i.e., superconducting degenerate semiconductors and the new high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} oxides in confined geometries where the surface-to-volume ratio is non-negligible.

Giamarchi, T.; Beal-Monod, M.T. (Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud 91405 Orsay, (France)); Valls, O.T. (Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay, (France) Center for the Science and Application of Superconductivity, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Brett Parker | Superconducting Magnet Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brett Parker Brett Parker Recent Presentations "BNL Direct Wind Magnets," (pdf) presentation dedicated to the memory of Pat Thompson given at the 22nd Magnet Technology Conference (MT22), September 11 - 16, 2011, Marseille, France A Review of BNL Direct-Wind Superconducting IR Magnet Experience, (pdf) presented at the 30th Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on High Luminosity e+e- Collisions, October 13 - 16, 2003, Stanford, California The Serpentine Coil Design for BEPC-II Superconducting IR Magnets, (pdf) presented at the "Mini-Workshop on BEPC-II IR Design", January 12 - 16, 2004, Beijing, P.R. China Ma nufacture of a Superconducting Octupole Magnet for the ALPHA Experiment at CERN using the Direct Wind Machine Presentations Prior to 2004 Superconducting Final Focus Magnet Issues (pdf), presented at

152

Mixed-mu superconducting bearings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

153

Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the ratio of voltage to current. The resistance of a material tells us how a low resistance, and they are therefore good conductors; other materials, likePhilosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity By Ohm's Law, resistance

Callender, Craig

154

EIS-0138: Superconducting Super Collider  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of constructing the Superconducting Super Collider, a large proton accelerator, at each of seven alternative locations.

155

Critical State of Superconducting Solenoids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The critical state is a term introduced by Bean [1] to describe the magnetic properties of a bulk type II superconductor. In this state every region of the superconducting material carries the maximum induced cri...

M. S. Lubell

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

A day in the life of the RF spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a misguided perception that RF spectrum space is fully allocated and fully used though even a superficial study of actual spectrum usage by measuring local RF energy shows it largely empty of radiation. Traditional ...

Cooley, James E. (James Edward)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Novel rf mems tunable filters with adjustable spurious suppression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the theory and design of fixed and Radio Frequency (RF) Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) -based tunable microwave filters for RF and microwave applications. The methodology for the design of coupled resonator filters...

Sekar, Vikram

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit.

DeVault, Robert C. (Knoxville, TN); McConnell, Benjamin W. (Knoxville, TN); Phillips, Benjamin A. (Benton Harbor, MI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit. 6 figs.

DeVault, R.C.; McConnell, B.W.; Phillips, B.A.

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

160

RF Design of the LCLS Gun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final dimensions for the LCLS RF gun are described. This gun, referred to as the LCLS gun, is a modified version of the UCLA/BNL/SLAC 1.6 cell S-Band RF gun [1], referred to as the prototype gun. The changes include a larger mode separation (15 MHz for the LCLS gun vs. 3.5 MHz for the prototype gun), a larger radius at the iris between the 2 cells, a reduced surface field on the curvature of the iris between the two cells, Z power coupling, increased cooling channels for operation at 120 Hz, dual rf feed, deformation tuning of the full cell, and field probes in both cells. Temporal shaping of the klystron pulse, to reduce the average power dissipated in the gun, has also been adopted. By increasing the mode separation, the amplitude of the 0-mode electric field on the cathode decreases from 10% of the peak on axis field for the prototype gun to less than 3% for the LCLS gun for the steady state fields. Beam performance is improved as shown by the PARMELA simulations. The gun should be designed to accept a future load lock system. Modifications follow the recommendations of our RF review committee [2]. Files and reference documents are compiled in Section IV.

Limborg-Deprey, C

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fabrication of Niobium sheet for RF cavities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................... 18 2 Fabrication of Niobium SRF Cavities............................................. 20 3 Fine Grain Cavities versus Single Crystal and Large Grain........... Cavities... typical to that of RF cavities in comparison with Cu at 77 and 300K. Nb has low surface resistance in the operating range of 1GHz among the metals. [27]. 2. Fabrication of Niobium SRF Cavities There are different approaches involved in making...

Balachandran, Shreyas

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Spontaneous fission properties of Rf104262  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have measured the mass and kinetic-energy distributions of fragments from the spontaneous fission (SF) of Rf104262. The Rf104262 was produced via the Pu244(22Ne,4n) reaction with a production cross section of ?0.7 nb using 114.4-MeV projectiles. The kinetic energies and times of the coincident fission fragments were measured using our rotating wheel system. From these data the half-life, mass, and kinetic-energy distributions were derived. The total kinetic-energy (TKE) distribution appears to consist of a single component with a most probable pre-neutron-emission TKE of 215±2 MeV. The mass distribution is symmetric with a full width at half maximum of about 22 mass numbers. These results are consistent with trends observed for other trans-berkelium spontaneously fissioning isotopes. We determined the half-life to be 2.1±0.2 s by measuring its spontaneous fission decay. We also attempted to observe the alpha decay of Rf104262 by searching for alpha decay correlated in time with SF from the alpha daughter, 1.2-ms No258. We observed no such decays and have set an upper limit of 0.8% (68% confidence level) on the alpha decay branch of Rf104262. © 1996 The American Physical Society.

M. R. Lane; K. E. Gregorich; D. M. Lee; M. F. Mohar; M. Hsu; C. D. Kacher; B. Kadkhodayan; M. P. Neu; N. J. Stoyer; E. R. Sylwester; J. C. Yang; D. C. Hoffman

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Configurations for short period rf undulators  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Several configurations for rf undulators energized at millimeter wavelengths and designed to produce coherent nanometer radiation from sub-GeV electron beams are analyzed and compared with one another. These configurations include a traveling-wave resonant ring, a standing wave resonator, and a resonator operating close to cutoff.

Kuzikov, S. V.; Jiang, Y.; Marshall, T. C.; Sotnikov, G. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Rf beam control for the AGS Booster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RF beam control systems for hadron synchrotrons have evolved over the past three decades into an essentially standard design. The key difference between hadron and lepton machines is the absence of radiation damping and existence of significant frequency variation in the case of hadrons. Although the motion of the hadron in the potential well of the rf wave is inherently stable it is not strongly damped. Damping must be provided by electronic feedback through the accelerating system. This feedback is typically called the phase loop. The technology of the rf beam control system for the AGS Booster synchrotron is described. First, the overall philosophy of the design is explained in terms of a conventional servo system that regulates the beam horizontal position in the vacuum chamber. The concept of beam transfer functions is fundamental to the mathematics of the design process and is reviewed. The beam transfer functions required for this design are derived from first principles. An overview of the beam signal pick-ups and high level rf equipment is given. The major subsystems, the frequency program, the heterodyne system, and beam feedback loops, are described in detail. Beyond accelerating the beam, the rf system must also synchronize the bunches in the Booster to the buckets in the AGS before transfer. The technical challenge in this process is heightened by the need to accomplish synchronization while the frequency is still changing. Details of the synchronization system are given. This report is intended to serve two purposes. One is to document the hardware and performance of the systems that have been built. The other is to serve as a tutorial vehicle from which the non-expert can not only learn the details of this system but also learn the principles of beam control that have led to the particular design choices made.

Brennan, J.M.

1994-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

165

Highly-textured thallium-barium-calcium-copper-oxide polycrystalline superconducting films on silver substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thick (8 to 10 {mu}m) Ba--Ca--Cu--O films have been rf magnetron sputtered onto Ag alloy (Consil 995) substrates. The films were given a post-deposition anneal in an over pressure of Tl in order to form the superconducting phases. Annealing protocols were done which result in predominantly the 1212 and 2212 phases. The substrate orientation was varied to determine its effect on film orientation. Material properties of the films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), ion beam backscattering spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrical characterization of the films was done using dynamic impedance (DI) at 10 kHz and rf surface resistance (R{sub s}) at 18 GHz in a TE{sub 011} fundamental mode cavity. 19 refs., 7 figs.

Arendt, P.; Elliott, N.; Cooke, D.W.; Dye, R.; Gray, E.; Hubbard, K.; Martin, J.; Reeves, G.; Brown, D.; Klapetzky, A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Engineering Design and Fabrication of an Ampere-Class Superconducting Photocathode Electron Gun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past three years, Advanced Energy Systems and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have been collaborating on the design of an Ampere- class superconducting photocathode electron gun. BNL performed the physics design of the overall system and RF cavity under prior programs. Advanced Energy Systems (AES) is currently responsible for the engineering design and fabrication of the electron gun under contract to BNL. We will report on the engineering design and fabrication status of the superconducting photocathode electron gun. The overall configuration of the cryomodule will be reviewed. The layout of the hermitic string, space frame, shielding package, and cold mass will be discussed. The engineering design of the gun cavity and removable cathode will be presented in detail and areas of technical risk will be highlighted. Finally, the fabrication sequence and fabrication status of the gun cavity will be discussed.

Ben-Zvi,I.

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

167

High-frequency absorption of the dynamic mixed state in the surface superconductivity region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the absorption of a high-frequency electromagnetic field in the type II superconductor Pb{sub 0.8}In{sub 0.2} in magnetic fields H{sub c2} < H < H{sub c3}. The absorption component proportional to the rate of variation of the external magnetic field is detected. We assume that this absorption component is associated with the dynamic mixed state of the superconducting shell containing 2D magnetic flux vortices (Kulik vortices). The motion of these vortices under the action of the critical current ensures the required difference between the external and internal magnetic inductions of the superconducting shell upon a change in the external magnetic field. This model correctly describes the observed behavior of absorption of rf electromagnetic radiation.

Berezin, V. A., E-mail: berezin@iptm.ru; Tulin, V. A., E-mail: tulin@iptm.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High-Purity Materials (Russian Federation)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Improved superconducting magnet wire  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

169

Superconducting digital logic amplifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a superconducting digital logic amplifier for interfacing between a Josephson junction logic circuit having output current and a higher voltage semiconductor circuit input. The amplifier comprising: an input terminal for connection to a ; an output terminal for connection to a semiconductor circuit input; an input, lower critical current, Josephson junction having first and second terminals; a first series string of at least three lower critical current Josephson junctions. The first series string being connected to the first terminal of the input Josephson junction such that the first series string is in series with the input Josephson junction to provide a series combination. The input terminal being connected to the first terminal of the input Josephson junction, and with the critical current of the lower critical current Josephson junctions of the input Josephson junction and the first series Josephson junctions being less than the output current of the low voltage Josephson junction circuit; a second series string of at least four higher critical current Josephson junctions. The second string being connected in parallel with the series combination to provide parallel strings having an upper common connection and a lower common connection. The lower common connection being connected to the second terminal of the input Josephson junction and the upper common connection being connected to the output terminal; and a pulsed DC current source connected the parallel strings at the upper common connection. The DC current source having a current at least equal to the critical current of the higher critical current Josephson junctions.

Przybysz, J.X.

1989-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

170

Development of Superconducting AC Fault Current Limiter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors have developed a new superconducting fault current limiter whose impedance during normal operation is very small. During fault conditions, the limiter behaves as a superconducting reactor. The limiter

Daisuke Ito; Eriko Yoneda; Tsutomu Fujioka…

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Test on Superconducting AC Fault Current Limiter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors have developed a new superconducting fault current limiter whose impedance during normal operation is very small. During fault conditions, the limiter behaves as a superconducting reactor. The limiter

Daisuke Ito; Eriko S. Yoneda…

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Development of superconducting crossbar-H-mode cavities for proton and ion accelerators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The crossbar-H-mode (CH) structure is the first superconducting multicell drift tube cavity for the low and medium energy range operated in the H21 mode. Because of the large energy gain per cavity, which leads to high real estate gradients, it is an excellent candidate for the efficient acceleration in high power proton and ion accelerators with fixed velocity profile. A prototype cavity has been developed and tested successfully with a gradient of 7??MV/m. A few new superconducting CH cavities with improved geometries for different high power applications are under development at present. One cavity (f=325??MHz, ?=0.16, seven cells) is currently under construction and studied with respect to a possible upgrade option for the GSI UNILAC. Another cavity (f=217??MHz, ?=0.059, 15 cells) is designed for a cw operated energy variable heavy ion linac application. Furthermore, the EUROTRANS project (European research program for the transmutation of high level nuclear waste in an accelerator driven system, 600 MeV protons, 352 MHz) is one of many possible applications for this kind of superconducting rf cavity. In this context a layout of the 17 MeV EUROTRANS injector containing four superconducting CH cavities was proposed by the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP) Frankfurt. The status of the cavity development related to the EUROTRANS injector is presented.

F. Dziuba; M. Busch; M. Amberg; H. Podlech; C. Zhang; H. Klein; W. Barth; U. Ratzinger

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

173

Conceptual design of an L-band recirculating superconducting traveling wave accelerating structure for ILC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With this paper, we propose the conceptual design of a traveling wave accelerating structure for a superconducting accelerator. The overall goal is to study a traveling wave (TW) superconducting (SC) accelerating structure for ILC that allows an increased accelerating gradient and, therefore reduction of the length of the collider. The conceptual studies were performed in order to optimize the acceleration structure design by minimizing the surface fields inside the cavity of the structure, to make the design compatible with existing technology, and to determine the maximum achievable gain in the accelerating gradient. The proposed solution considers RF feedback system redirecting the accelerating wave that passed through the superconducting traveling wave acceleration (STWA) section back to the input of the accelerating structure. The STWA structure has more cells per unit length than a TESLA structure but provides an accelerating gradient higher than a TESLA structure, consequently reducing the cost. In this paper, the STWA cell shape optimization, coupler cell design and feedback waveguide solution are considered. We also discuss the field flatness in the superconducting TW structure, the HOM modes and multipactor performance have been studied as well. The proposed TW structure design gives an overall 46% gain over the SW ILC structure if the 10 m long TW structure is employed.

Avrakhov, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Liu, Z.; Kazakov, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab; Yakovlev, V.; /Omega-P, New Haven /Yale U.; Gai, W.; /Argonne

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure.

Wu, Xin D. (Greenbelt, MD); Muenchausen, Ross E. (Espanola, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Magnetism and Superconductivity in Iron Pnictides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discovery of high temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides and chalcogenides has resulted in surprising new insights into high temperature superconductivity and its relationship with magnetism. Here we provide an overview of some of what is known about these materials and in particular about the interplay of magnetism and superconductivity in them. Similarities and contrasts with cuprate superconductors are emphasized and the superconducting pairing is discussed within the framework of spin fluctuation induced pairing.

Singh, David J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Third harmonic cavity design and RF measurements for the Frascati DA?NE collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Third harmonic passive RF cavities have been proposed for installation in both rings of the DA?NE factory collider to improve the Touschek lifetime and to increase the Landau damping. This paper illustrates the design of the harmonic cavities. The main requirements were to obtain a relatively low R/Q factor and a quality factor Q as high as possible to satisfy beam dynamics requirements and to damp all the higher order mode (HOM) to a harmless level in order to avoid multibunch instabilities. A spherical shape of the cavity central body has been chosen as an optimum compromise between a high Q resonator and a low R/Q factor. HOM suppression has been provided by a ferrite ring damper designed for the superconducting cavities of the high energy ring of the KEK-B factory. The design and electromagnetic properties of the resonant modes have been studied with MAFIA and HFSS codes. Cavities have been made of aluminum and the RF measurements have been performed to characterize them. The measurements are in a good agreement with numerical simulations results, demonstrating a satisfactory HOM damping.

David Alesini; Roberto Boni; Alessandro Gallo; Fabio Marcellini; Mikhail Zobov; Mauro Migliorati; Luigi Palumbo

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

A Numerical Treatment of the Rf SQUID: I. General Properties andNoise Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the characteristics and noise performance of rf Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) by solving the corresponding Langevin equations numerically and optimizing the model parameters with respect to noise energy. After introducing the basic concepts of the numerical simulations, we give a detailed discussion of the performance of the SQUID as a function of all relevant parameters. The best performance is obtained in the crossover region between the dispersive and dissipative regimes, characterized by an inductance parameter {beta}{prime}{sub L} {triple_bond} 2{pi}LI{sub 0}/{Phi}{sub 0} {approx} 1; L is the loop inductance, I{sub 0} the critical current of the Josephson junction, and {phi}{sub 0} the flux quantum. In this regime, which is not well explored by previous analytical approaches, the lowest (intrinsic) values of noise energy are a factor of about 2 above previous estimates based on analytical approaches. However, several other analytical predictions, such as the inverse proportionality of the noise energy on the tank circuit quality factor and the square of the coupling coefficient between the tank circuit and the SQUID loop, could not be well reproduced. The optimized intrinsic noise energy of the rf SQUID is superior to that of the dc SQUID at all temperatures. Although for technologically achievable parameters this advantage shrinks, particularly at low thermal fluctuation levels, we give an example for realistic parameters that leads to a noise energy comparable to that of the dc SQUID even in this regime.

Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Clarke, John

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Superconducting Topological Fluids in Josephson Junction Arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We argue that the frustrated Josephson junction arrays may support a topologically ordered superconducting ground state, characterized by a non-trivial ground state degeneracy on the torus. This superconducting quantum fluid provides an explicit example of a system in which superconductivity arises from a topological mechanism rather than from the usual Landau-Ginzburg mechanism.

M. Cristina Diamantini; Pasquale Sodano; Carlo A. Trugenberger

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

179

ILC RF System R and D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Linac Group at SLAC is actively pursuing a broad range of R&D to improve the reliability and reduce the cost of the L-band (1.3 GHz) rf system proposed for the ILC linacs. Current activities include the long-term evaluation of a 120 kV Marx Modulator driving a 10 MW Multi-Beam Klystron, design of a second-generation Marx Modulator, testing of a sheet-beam gun and beam transport system for a klystron, construction of an rf distribution system with remotely-adjustable power tapoffs, and development of a system to combine the power from many klystrons in low-loss circular waveguide where it would be tapped-off periodically to power groups of cavities. This paper surveys progress during the past few years.

Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

180

The new RF sources for accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several new RF sources are being developed for accelerator and collider applications. Assembly is nearing completion of a multiple beam inductive output tube at 352 MHz. An annular beam klystron is being developed to produce 10 MW pulses at 1.3 GHz. The annular beam approach provides significant cost reduction over similar multiple beam devices. Fabrication is underway on a 10 kW, periodic permanent magnet klystron at 2.815 GHz. Permanent magnets eliminate the solenoid and associated power supplies and cooling requirements to reduce operational cost. Investigations are beginning on a novel approach for driving accelerator cavities using pulse shaping to increase coupling efficiency and dramatically reduce RF power requirements.

Ives, Lawrence; Read, Michael; Ferguson, Patrick; Marsden, David; Collins, George; Jackson, R. H.; Bui, Thuc; Kimura, Takuji; Eisen, Edward [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., 690 Port Drive, San Mateo, CA, 94404, (650) 312-9575 (United States); Communications and Power Industries, LLC., 811 Hansen Way, Palo Alto, CA94304 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Safety assessment for the rf Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radio Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) is a part of the Magnetic Fusion Program's rf Heating Experiments. The goal of the Magnetic Fusion Program (MFP) is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion. RFTF is an experimental device which will provide an essential link in the research effort aiming at the realization of fusion power. This report was compiled as a summary of the analysis done to ensure the safe operation of RFTF.

Nagy, A.; Beane, F. (eds.)

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Radio frequency (RF) heated supersonic flow laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique supersonic flow apparatus which employs an inductively-coupled, radio frequency (RF) torch to supply high enthalpy source gas to the nozzle inlet is described. The main features of this system are the plasma tube, a cooled nozzle assembly, and a combustion/expansion chamber with a heat exchanger. A description of these components with current test data is presented. In addition, a discussion of anticipated experiments utilizing this system is included.

Wantuck, P.; Watanabe, H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Electronic structure of superconductivity refined  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electronic structure of superconductivity refined Electronic structure of superconductivity refined Electronic structure of superconductivity refined A team of physicists propose a new model that expands on a little understood aspect of the electronic structure in high-temperature superconductors. July 10, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

184

Ramesh Gupta | Superconducting Magnet Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ramesh Gupta Ramesh Gupta Ramesh Gupta has always been a leader in the world of superconducting magnets, which are essential to great modern accelerators such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Switzerland. For the past decade, Lab researchers have been exploring the use of new materials that become superconducting at higher temperatures. Gupta, head of the High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Research and Development Group in the Superconducting Magnet Division, is among those exploring avenues for HTS magnets that are energy efficient and have magnetic fields that are a million times stronger than the Earth's. These new magnets could revolutionize use in future accelerators, play a key role in energy efficiency and storage, and make possible new

185

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

186

Dynamical properties of superconducting nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamical properties of thin superconducting wires (nanowires) are studied using numerical simulations based on a one-dimensional time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation, which is modified by introducing an order parameter u characterizing the 'purity' of the superconductor material. It is established that relatively long nanowires (with lengths much greater than the coherence length) made of a 'pure' superconductor (u > 1) are characterized by two critical current density values: j{sub c1} and j{sub c2}. For j < j{sub c1}, the total current is entirely superconducting, whereas for j > j{sub c2}, the current is purely normal. In the intermediate region of current densities, j{sub c1} < j < j{sub c2}, the total current contains both superconducting and normal components (mixed state) and the nanowire exhibits the generation of high-frequency electromagnetic waves. The current-voltage characteristics are constructed and the radiation spectrum is obtained. The properties of short superconducting nanowires (with lengths on the order of the coherence length) coincide with those of the Josephson junction. In the case of an 'impure' superconductor (u < 1), the nanowire is characterized by a single critical current density.

Nikolaev, S. V.; Yugay, K. N. [Omsk State University (Russian Federation)], E-mail: yugay_klimenty@mail.ru

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

MICROSTRUCTURE OF SUPERCONDUCTING MGB(2).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, Akimitsu and co-workers [1] discovered superconductivity at 39 K in the intermetallic compound MgB{sub 2}. This discovery provides a new perspective on the mechanism for superconductivity. More specifically, it opens up possibilities for investigation of structure/properties in a new class of materials. With the exceptions of the cuprate and C{sub 60} families of compounds, MgB{sub 2} possesses the highest superconducting transition temperature T{sub c}. Its superconductivity appears to follow the BCS theory, apparently being mediated by electron-phonon coupling. The coherence length of MgB{sub 2} is reported to be longer than that of the cuprates [2]. In contrast to the cuprates, grain boundaries are strongly coupled and current density is determined by flux pinning [2,3]. Presently, samples of MgB{sub 2} commonly display inhomogeneity and porosity on the nanoscale, and are untextured. In spite of these obstacles, magnetization and transport measurements show that polycrystalline samples may carry large current densities circulating across many grains [3,4]. Very high values of critical current densities and critical fields have been recently observed in thin films [5,6]. These attributes suggest possible large scale and electronic applications. The underlying microstructure can be intriguing, both in terms of basic science and in applied areas. Subsequent to the discovery, many papers were published [1-13], most dealing with synthesis, physical properties, and theory. There have yet been few studies of microstructure and structural defects [11, 14]. A thorough understanding of practical superconducting properties can only be developed after an understanding of microstructure is gained. In this work we review transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of sintered MgB{sub 2} pellets [14]. Structural defects, including second phase particles, dislocations, stacking faults, and grain boundaries, are analyzed using electron diffraction, electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), high resolution imaging, and structural modeling.

ZHU,Y.; LI,Q.; WU,L.; VOLKOV,V.; GU,G.; MOODENBAUGH,A.R.

2001-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

A STATE VARIABLE DESCRIPTION OF THE RHIC RF CONTROL LOOPS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beam transfer function changes during the RHIC ramp. The response of the RF control loops changes as a result. A state-variable description of the beam and the RF control loops was developed. This description was used to generate a set of feedback matrices that keeps the response of the RF control loops constant during the ramp. This paper describes the state-variable description and its use in determining the K matrices.

SCHULTHEISS,C.; BRENNAN,J.M.

2002-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

190

Design and first cold test of BNL superconducting 112 MHz QWR for electron gun applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory and Niowave, Inc. have designed, fabricated, and performed the first cold test of a superconducting 112 MHz quarter-wave resonator (QWR) for electron gun experiments. The first cold test of the QWR cryomodule has been completed at Niowave. The paper discusses the cryomodule design, presents the cold test results, and outline plans to upgrade the cryomodule for future experiments. A quarter-wave resonator concept of superconducting RF (SRF) electron gun was proposed at BNL for electron cooling ion/proton beams at RHIC. QWRs can be made sufficiently compact even at low RF frequencies (long wavelengths). The long wavelength allows to produce long electron bunches, thus minimizing space charge effects and enabling high bunch charge. Also, such guns should be suitable for experiments requiring high average current electron beams. A 112 MHz QWR gun was designed, fabricated, and cold-tested in collaboration between BNL and Niowave. This is the lowest frequency SRF gun ever tested successfully. In this paper we describe the gun design and fabrication, present the cold test results, and outline plans for the cryomodule upgrade for future experiments.

Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Boulware, C.H.; Chang, X.; Grimm, T.L.; Siegel, B.; Than, R.; Winowski, M.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

Design parameters and commissioning of vertical inserts used for testing the XFEL superconducting cavities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The European XFEL is a new research facility currently under construction at DESY in the Hamburg area in Germany. From 2015 on, it will generate extremely intense X-ray flashes that will be used by researchers from all over the world. The superconducting XFEL linear accelerator consists of 100 accelerator modules with more than 800 RF-cavities inside. The accelerator modules, superconducting magnets and cavities will be tested in the accelerator module test facility (AMTF). This paper gives an overview of the design parameters and the commissioning of the vertical insert, used in two cryostats (XATC) of the AMTF-hall. The Insert serves as a holder for 4 nine-cell cavities. This gives the possibility to cool down 4 cavities to 2K in parallel and, consequently, to reduce the testing time. The following RF measurement, selected as quality check, will be done separately for each cavity. Afterwards the cavities will be warmed up again and will be sent to the accelerator module assembly.

Schaffran, J.; Bozhko, Y.; Petersen, B.; Meissner, D. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Chorowski, M.; Polinski, J. [Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

192

Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

Tantawi, Sami G. (San Mateo, CA); Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Mountain View, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

e Lens Solenoid | Superconducting Magnet Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Lens Solenoid Electron Lens Solenoid To increase the proton beam luminosity in RHIC, an electron lens (e-lens) magnet system with two superconducting solenoids is being built at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Initial Design of 200 mm, 6T Superconducting Solenoid for e-lens (pdf), R. Gupta, 3/30/10 Iterated Design of 200 mm, 6T Superconducting Solenoid for e-lens (pdf), R. Gupta, 4/6/10 Corrector Designs for Superconducting Solenoid for e-lens (pdf), R. Gupta, 4/14/10 eLens Layout (pdf), P. Kovach, 5/25/10 eLens Main Solenoid (pdf), A. Marone, 5/25/10 Optimization in Corrector Design for Superconducting Solenoid for e-Lens (pdf), R. Gupta, 6/15/10 Main Solenoid Axial Force Retention (pdf), A. Marone 8/24/10 Superconducting Solenoid for e-lens with Fringe Field Coil (pdf), R.

195

Superconducting Cable Having A Felexible Former  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Superconducting Cable Having A Flexible Former  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Nonlinear Electrodynamics of Superconducting Films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microwave-transmission measurements at 9.4 Gc/sec over a wide range of incident power have been used to study the nonlinear electrodynamics of thin superconducting films. By measuring the amplitude and phase of the fundamental transmitted field, the contributions of superelectrons and normal electrons to the electrodynamics of the films have been determined. In low microwave fields the nonlinear behavior of the films can be attributed to the breakup of superconducting pairs in agreement with the Ginzberg-Landau theory. In high microwave fields, regions of normal resistance appear through which a dc bias current cannot avoid passing. Most of the third-harmonic power is generated by these resistive regions.

K. Rose and M. D. Sherrill

1966-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

198

Friction domination with superconducting strings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the evolution of a superconducting string network with arbitrary, constant string current in the friction dominated regime. In the absence of an external magnetic field the network always reaches a scaling solution. However, for string current stronger than a critical value, it is different than the usual horizon scaling of the nonsuperconducting string case. In this case the friction domination era never ends. Whilst the superconducting string network can be much denser than usually assumed, it can never dominate the universe energy density. It can, however, influence the cosmic microwave background radiation and the formation of large scale structure. When embedded in a primordial magnetic field of sufficient strength, the network never reaches scaling and, thus, eventually dominates the universe evolution.

Konstantinos Dimopoulos and Anne-Christine Davis

1998-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Coherence effects in hole superconductivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss the behavior of various observables that depend on matrix elements of operators in the superconducting state within the model of hole superconductivity. In this model, the gap exhibits a linear dependence on the band energy, and the bandwidth depends on the carrier concentration and can become very small for low hole density. We study, in particular, the behavior of ultrasonic attenuation, NMR relaxation rate, and electromagnetic absorption, and present results for parameters expected to be in the range that describes the high-Tc oxides. It is found that the energy dependence of the gap does not give rise to qualitatively different behavior, but significant differences from weak-coupling BCS behavior occur at low hole concentration due to the extreme narrowness of the band.

F. Marsiglio and J. E. Hirsch

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Static forces in a superconducting magnet bearing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Static levitation forces and stiffnesses in a superconducting bearing consisting of concentric ring magnets and a superconducting YBaCuO ring are investigated. In the field-cooled mode a levitation force of 20 N has been achieved. The axial and radial stiffnesses have values of 15 N/mm and 10 N/mm, respectively. An arrangement with two bearings supporting a high speed shaft is now under development. A possible application of superconducting magnetic bearings is flywheels for energy storage.

Stoye, P.; Fuchs, G. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung, Dresden (Germany)] [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung, Dresden (Germany); Gawalek, W.; Goernert, P. [Institut fuer Physikalische Hochtechnologie, Jena (Germany)] [Institut fuer Physikalische Hochtechnologie, Jena (Germany); Gladun, A. [Technische Univ., Dresden (Germany)] [Technische Univ., Dresden (Germany)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Booster Synchrotron RF System Upgrade for SPEAR3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent progress at the SPEAR3 includes the increase in stored current from 100 mA to 200 mA and top-off injection to allow beamlines to stay open during injection. Presently the booster injects 3.0 GeV beam to SPEAR3 three times a day. The stored beam decays to about 150 mA between the injections. The growing user demands are to increase the stored current to the design value of 500 mA, and to maintain it at a constant value within a percent or so. To achieve this goal the booster must inject once every few minutes. For improved injection efficiency, all RF systems at the linac, booster and SPEAR3 need to be phase-locked. The present booster RF system is basically a copy of the SPEAR2 RF system with 358.5 MHz and 40 kW peak RF power driving a 5-cell RF cavity for 1.0 MV gap voltage. These requirements entail a booster RF system upgrade to a scaled down version of the SPEAR3 RF system of 476.3 MHz with 1.2 MW cw klystron output power capabilities. We will analyze each subsystem option for their merits within budgetary and geometric space constraints. A substantial portion of the system will come from the decommissioned PEP-II RF stations.

Park, Sanghyun; /SLAC; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

202

RF cavity using liquid dielectric for tuning and cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for accelerating particles includes an RF cavity that contains a ferrite core and a liquid dielectric. Characteristics of the ferrite core and the liquid dielectric, among other factors, determine the resonant frequency of the RF cavity. The liquid dielectric is circulated to cool the ferrite core during the operation of the system.

Popovic, Milorad (Warrenville, IL); Johnson, Rolland P. (Newport News, VA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

203

Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure. 7 figures.

Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

204

Superconducting inductive displacement detection of a microcantilever  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate a superconducting inductive technique to measure the displacement of a micromechanical resonator. In our scheme, a type I superconducting microsphere is attached to the free end of a microcantilever and approached to the loop of a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometer. A local magnetic field as low as 100 $\\mu$T, generated by a field coil concentric to the SQUID, enables detection of the cantilever thermomechanical noise at $4.2$ K. The magnetomechanical coupling and the magnetic spring are in good agreement with image method calculations assuming pure Meissner effect. These measurements are relevant to recent proposals of quantum magnetomechanics experiments based on levitating superconducting microparticles.

Andrea Vinante

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

205

National High Magnetic Field Laboratory - Applied Superconductivity...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

viable present materials for superconducting application to electric power transmission lines, fault current limiters, transformers, electromagnets and motors. UW-Madison has...

206

National High Magnetic Field Laboratory - Applied Superconductivity...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

viable present materials for superconducting application to electric power transmission lines, fault current limiters, transformers, electromagnets and motors. Coated Conductors We...

207

Testing gravitational physics with superconducting gravimeters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting gravimeters are the most sensitive instruments to measure surface gravity changes at low frequencies. Currently, about twenty five superconducting gravimeters are operating in the world and their global network has been developed. We investigate possible applications of the superconducting gravimeters to tests of gravitational physics. Previous experimental searches for spatial anisotropies in the gravitational constant G and for gravitational waves, performed with gravimeters in 1960's to 1970's, can be improved by applications of the current superconducting gravimeters. Also, we describe other proposed applications of testing the universality of free-fall and searching for composition-dependent dilatonic waves, and discuss future works necessary for these geophysical tests.

Sachie Shiomi

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

208

Summary of Superconducting Fault Current Limiter Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) has become one of the forefront topics of current-limiting technology in the world. In this...

Linmang Wang; Pengzan Jiang; Dada Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Fermilab | Science | Particle Accelerators | Advanced Superconducting...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Superconducting Test Accelerator is America's only test bed for cutting-edge particle beams and for accelerator research aimed at Intensity Frontier proton accelerators. ASTA...

210

Etching of Niobium Sample Placed on Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavity Surface in Ar/CL2 Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma based surface modification is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. It has been proven with flat samples that the bulk Niobium (Nb) removal rate and the surface roughness after the plasma etchings are equal to or better than wet etching processes. To optimize the plasma parameters, we are using a single cell cavity with 20 sample holders symmetrically distributed over the cell. These holders serve the purpose of diagnostic ports for the measurement of the plasma parameters and for the holding of the Nb sample to be etched. The plasma properties at RF (100 MHz) and MW (2.45 GHz) frequencies are being measured with the help of electrical and optical probes at different pressures and RF power levels inside of this cavity. The niobium coupons placed on several holders around the cell are being etched simultaneously. The etching results will be presented at this conference.

Janardan Upadhyay, Larry Phillips, Anne-Marie Valente

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Cold Test Measurements on the GTF Prototype RF Gun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. Based on longitudinal phase space measurements showing a correlated energy spread the gun was removed and re-characterized in 2002. The low power RF measurements performed on the gun are described below. Perturbative bead measurements were performed to determine the field ratio in the two-cell gun, and network analyzer measurements were made to characterize the mode structure. A second probe was installed to monitor the RF field in the first cell, and a diagnostic was developed to monitor the high-power field ratio. Calibration of the RF probes, a model for analyzing RF measurements, and Superfish simulations of bead and RF measurements are described.

Gierman, S.M.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

212

Hydrogen-filled RF Cavities for Muon Beam Cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ionization cooling requires low-Z energy absorbers immersed in a strong magnetic field and high-gradient, large-aperture RF cavities to be able to cool a muon beam as quickly as the short muon lifetime requires. RF cavities that operate in vacuum are vulnerable to dark-current- generated breakdown, which is exacerbated by strong magnetic fields, and they require extra safety windows that degrade cooling, to separate RF regions from hydrogen energy absorbers. RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas will be developed that use the same gas volume to provide the energy absorber and the RF acceleration needed for ionization cooling. The breakdown suppression by the dense gas will allow the cavities to operate in strong magnetic fields. Measurements of the operation of such a cavity will be made as functions of external magnetic field and charged particle beam intensity and compared with models to understand the characteristics of this technology and to develop mitigating strategies if necessary.

CHARLES, Ankenbrandt

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic superconducting properties...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the Superconductivity Group Background|: i) Experiments... in high-magnetic-fields: Members of the superconductivity group in Durham have published arguably the most......

214

Study of Superconducting Fault Current Limiter Using Saturated Magnetic Core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a saturated magnetic core superconducting current limiter (SCSFCL) operation simulation results using finite element technique. The superconducting current limiter uses BSCCO tape to produce m...

F. Fajoni; E. Ruppert; C. A. Baldan…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Quantum transport and field-induced superconductivity in carbon nanotubes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? For my thesis, I conducted experiments to investigate superconductivity and superconducting proximity effect in carbon nanotubes. The measurements are carried out on carbon nanotube… (more)

Yang, Yanfei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnetism and superconductivity exist in harmony Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony Physicists have observed, for the first time in a single exotic phase,...

217

Wideband high efficiency CMOS envelope amplifiers for 4G LTE handset envelope tracking RF power amplifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

addition, the small equivalent resistance of 8? of the RF PAor inefficient. The equivalent resistance of RF PA, R PA ,normalized equivalent load resistance (R PA ) representing

Hassan, Muhammad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Interplay of superconductivity, magnetism, and density waves in rare-earth tritellurides and iron-based superconducting materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3. Magnetism in Metals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IV Superconductivity and Magnetism in Iron-PnictideIII Superconductivity, Magnetism and Charge-Density Waves in

Zocco, Diego Andrés

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Film Deposition, Cryogenic RF Testing and Materials Analysis of a Nb/Cu Single Cell SRF Cavity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we present preliminary results on using a cathodic-arc-discharge Nb plasma ion source to establish a Nb film-coated single-cell Cu cavity for SRF research. The polycrystalline Cu cavity was fabricated and mirror-surface-finished by a centrifugal barrel polishing (CBP) process at Jefferson Lab. Special pre-coating processes were conducted, in order to create a template-layer for follow-on Nb grain thickening. A sequence of cryogenic RF testing demonstrated that the Nb film does show superconductivity. But the quality factor of this Nb/Cu cavity is low as a result of high residual surface resistance. We are conducting a thorough materials characterization to explore if some microstructural defects or hydrogen impurities, led to such a low quality factor.

Zhao, Xin [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Palczerski, Ari [JLAB; Li, Yongming [Peking

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Quantum logic gates for superconducting resonator qudits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study quantum information processing using superpositions of Fock states in superconducting resonators as quantum d-level systems (qudits). A universal set of single and coupled logic gates is theoretically proposed for resonators coupled by superconducting circuits of Josephson junctions. These gates use experimentally demonstrated interactions and provide an attractive route to quantum information processing using harmonic oscillator modes.

Strauch, Frederick W. [Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts 01267 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cellulose-Bound Magnesium Diboride Superconductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellulose-Bound Magnesium Diboride Superconductivity Y.L. Lin and M.O. Pekguleryuz Department Canada Abstract--Two-phase superconductor tapes were produced by blending high purity magnesium diboride junctions. I. INTRODUCTION Magnesium diboride was found to be superconducting in 2001 by Nagamatsu et al. [1

Ryan, Dominic

222

Microcalorimeter Magnetic Sensor Geometries Using Superconducting Elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a numerical code developed to estimate performance of magnetic microcalorimeter configurations, including superconducting elements and SQUID characteristics. We present results of a preliminary design analysis showing that composite sensors with both superconducting and paramagnetic elements should realize substantial gains in magnetic flux signal per magnetization change of the paramagnet, compared to sensors containing only paramagnet.

Boyd, S. T. P. [University of New Mexico, MSC07 4220, Albuquerque NM 87131-0001 (United States); Cantor, R. H. [STAR Cryoelectronics, 25-A Bisbee Ct., Santa Fe NM 87508-1338 (United States)

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

Cryogenic structural materials for superconducting magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews research in the United States and Japan on structural materials for high-field superconducting magnets. Superconducting magnets are used for magnetic fusion energy devices and for accelerators that are used in particle-physics research. The cryogenic structural materials that we review are used for magnet cases and support structures. We expect increased materials requirements in the future.

Dalder, E.N.C.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

1985-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Studies of RF Noise Induced Bunch Lengthening at the LHC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radio Frequency (RF) noise induced bunch lengthening can strongly affect the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) performance through luminosity reduction, particle loss, and other effects. This work presents measurements from the LHC that better quantify the relationship between the RF noise and longitudinal emittance blowup and identify the performance limiting RF components. The experiments presented in this paper confirmed the predicted effects on the LHC bunch length growth. Dedicated measurements were conducted in the LHC to gain insight in the effect of RF noise to the longitudinal beam diffusion. It was evident that the growth rate of the bunch length is strongly related to the accelerating voltage phase noise power spectral density around f{sub s} + kf{sub rev}, as predicted in [4]. The noise threshold for 2.5 ps/hr growth was estimated to -101 dBc/Hz (SSB flat noise spectral density from f{sub s} to the edge of the closed loop bandwidth). A 9 dB margin is achieved with the current RF configuration and the BPL on. With this formalism it is now possible to estimate the effect of different operational and technical RF configurations on the LHC beam diffusion. This formalism could also be useful for the design of future RF systems and the budgeting of the allowed noise.

Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Baudrenghien, P.; Butterworth, A.; Molendijk, J.; /SLAC /CERN

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Superconducting multicell cavity development program at Los Alamos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The superconducting rf (SCRF) cavity Development Program at Los Alamos has designed, fabricated, and tested single-cell niobium cavities at 3-GHz and 805-MHz. This work is being done in preparation for procuring and testing a multicell niobium cavity. The multicell cavity is designed to accelerate protons at [beta] = 0.9; initial tests will be without beam. Progammmatic changes have required us to modify our plans to install a 6800-liter helium cryostat and a 12.8-g/s helium pump. We will use an installed cryostat to test the multicell cavity. Also, the cavity will be modified from a seven-cell to a four-cell structure to match the dimensions of the installed cryostat. Previous reports concentrated on 3-GHz results. In this paper, some of the latest results of the 805-MHz cavity tests are presented. Modifications to allow high pulsed power (HPP) testing on 805-MHz single- and four-cell cavities are proceeding. Glow discharge cleaning of an 805-MHz niobium cavity resulted in a decrease in cavity performance. The cavity was restored to previous performance levels with buffered chemical polishing (bcp). Initial results with high-pressure water cleaning show the process is useful in restoring cavity performance.

Rusnak, B.; Spalek, G.: Gray, E.; DiMarco, J.N.; DeHaven, R.; Novak, J.; Walstrom, P.; Zumbro, J.; Thiessen, H.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Langenbrunner, J. (Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Superconducting multicell cavity development program at Los Alamos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The superconducting rf (SCRF) cavity Development Program at Los Alamos has designed, fabricated, and tested single-cell niobium cavities at 3-GHz and 805-MHz. This work is being done in preparation for procuring and testing a multicell niobium cavity. The multicell cavity is designed to accelerate protons at {beta} = 0.9; initial tests will be without beam. Progammmatic changes have required us to modify our plans to install a 6800-liter helium cryostat and a 12.8-g/s helium pump. We will use an installed cryostat to test the multicell cavity. Also, the cavity will be modified from a seven-cell to a four-cell structure to match the dimensions of the installed cryostat. Previous reports concentrated on 3-GHz results. In this paper, some of the latest results of the 805-MHz cavity tests are presented. Modifications to allow high pulsed power (HPP) testing on 805-MHz single- and four-cell cavities are proceeding. Glow discharge cleaning of an 805-MHz niobium cavity resulted in a decrease in cavity performance. The cavity was restored to previous performance levels with buffered chemical polishing (bcp). Initial results with high-pressure water cleaning show the process is useful in restoring cavity performance.

Rusnak, B.; Spalek, G.: Gray, E.; DiMarco, J.N.; DeHaven, R.; Novak, J.; Walstrom, P.; Zumbro, J.; Thiessen, H.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Langenbrunner, J. [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Three-cell traveling wave superconducting test structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure with a small phase advance per cell rather than a standing wave structure may provide a significant increase of the accelerating gradient in the ILC linac. For the same surface electric and magnetic fields the STWA achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2 larger than TESLA-like standing wave cavities. The STWA allows also longer acceleration cavities, reducing the number of gaps between them. However, the STWA structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few hundreds of MW of circulating RF power from the structure output to the structure input. A test single-cell cavity with feedback was designed, manufactured and successfully tested demonstrating the possibility of a proper processing to achieve a high accelerating gradient. These results open way to take the next step of the TW SC cavity development: to build and test a travelingwave three-cell cavity with a feedback waveguide. The latest results of the single-cell cavity tests are discussed as well as the design of the test 3-cell TW cavity.

Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; /Euclid Techlabs, Solon; Kazakov, Sergey; Solyak, Nikolay; Wu, Genfa; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Three-cell traveling wave superconducting test structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure with a small phase advance per cell rather than a standing wave structure may provide a significant increase of the accelerating gradient in the ILC linac. For the same surface electric and magnetic fields the STWA achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2 larger than TESLA-like standing wave cavities. The STWA allows also longer acceleration cavities, reducing the number of gaps between them. However, the STWA structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few hundreds of MW of circulating RF power from the structure output to the structure input. A test single-cell cavity with feedback was designed, manufactured and successfully tested demonstrating the possibility of a proper processing to achieve a high accelerating gradient. These results open way to take the next step of the TW SC cavity development: to build and test a traveling-wave three-cell cavity with a feedback waveguide. The latest results of the single-cell cavity tests...

Avrakhov, Pavel; Kazakov, Sergey; Solyak, Nikolay; Wu, Genfa; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Molybdenum-rhenium superconducting suspended nanostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Suspended superconducting nanostructures of MoRe 50%/50% by weight are fabricated employing commonly used fabrication steps in micro- and nano-meter scale devices followed by wet-etching with Hydro-fluoric acid of a SiO{sub 2} sacrificial layer. Suspended superconducting channels as narrow as 50?nm and length 3??m have a critical temperature of ?6.5?K, which can increase by 0.5?K upon annealing at 400?°C. A detailed study of the dependence of the superconducting critical current and critical temperature upon annealing and in devices with different channel widths reveals that desorption of contaminants is responsible for the improved superconducting properties. These findings pave the way for the development of superconducting electromechanical devices using standard fabrication techniques.

Aziz, Mohsin; Christopher Hudson, David; Russo, Saverio [Centre for Graphene Science, College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF (United Kingdom)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

230

Upgrading EMMA to Use Low-frequency RF Cavities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EMMA is an experiment to study beam dynamics in fixed field alternating gradient accelerators (FFAGs). It accelerates the beam in about 10 turns using 1.3 GHz cavities in a mode like that used for muon accelerators. Many applications of FFAGs prefer to have slower acceleration, typically thousands of turns. To do so in EMMA would require the RF system to be replaced with a low-frequency, high-gradient system. This paper describes the motivation for studying slow acceleration in EMMA and the required parameters for an RF system to do that. It then describes the technology needed for the RF system.

Ohmori, C.; Berg, J.

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

231

Iris tilting and RF steering in the SLAC Linac  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For some time now, the sources of RF transverse beam steering in the SLAC Linac have been a mystery. The previously known sources, coupler asymmetries and survey misalignment, have predicted deflections which are frequently much smaller than the observed deflections. A new source of RF steering has been discovered: the tilting of accelerator irises. Measurements of iris tilting in a forty foot accelerator girder are compared with measurements of RF beam deflections and are found to be strongly correlated. 4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Seeman, J.T.

1985-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

232

Communication methods, systems, apparatus, and devices involving RF tag registration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

One technique of the present invention includes a number of Radio Frequency (RF) tags that each have a different identifier. Information is broadcast to the tags from an RF tag interrogator. This information corresponds to a maximum quantity of tag response time slots that are available. This maximum quantity may be less than the total number of tags. The tags each select one of the time slots as a function of the information and a random number provided by each respective tag. The different identifiers are transmitted to the interrogator from at least a subset of the RF tags.

Burghard, Brion J. (W. Richland, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

233

Type-1.5 Superconductivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate the existence of a novel superconducting state in high quality two-component MgB2 single crystalline superconductors where a unique combination of both type-1 (?1/?11/2) superconductor conditions is realized for the two components of the order parameter. This condition leads to a vortex-vortex interaction attractive at long distances and repulsive at short distances, which stabilizes unconventional stripe- and gossamerlike vortex patterns that we have visualized in this type-1.5 superconductor using Bitter decoration and also reproduced in numerical simulations.

Victor Moshchalkov; Mariela Menghini; T. Nishio; Q. H. Chen; A. V. Silhanek; V. H. Dao; L. F. Chibotaru; N. D. Zhigadlo; J. Karpinski

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

234

Microelectronic superconducting crossover and coil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T[sub c] superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO[sub 3]; and a third high T[sub c] superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps and which can be opened to the atmosphere between depositions. 13 figures.

Wellstood, F.C.; Kingston, J.J.; Clarke, J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Superconductivity in primitive hexagonal germanium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a first-principles calculation of the electron-phonon coupling constant ? (mass enchancement parameter) for the primitive hexagonal, high-pressure structural phase of Ge (75 GPa?p?105 GPa). Using the calculated value of ?, we estimate the superconducting transition temperature Tc to be in the range of 2 to 7 K. We discuss the contributions to ? from the different phonon modes and its dependence on the phonon frequency, electron-phonon matrix elements, and Fermi-surface nesting. The results are compared with previous calculations for primitive hexagonal Si.

Jose Luis Martins and Marvin L. Cohen

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Parametric Study of Electron Extraction from a Low Frequency Inductively Coupled RF-Plasma Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The electron extraction from a low-frequency (2 MHz) inductively-coupled rf-plasma cathode is characterizedA Parametric Study of Electron Extraction from a Low Frequency Inductively Coupled RF-Plasma Source and rf-plasma source, rf-power and xenon gas flow. The results demonstrate that the electron supply from

237

High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

Farrell, Roger, A.

2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

238

RF Micro Devices Inc RFMD | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RF Micro Devices Inc RFMD RF Micro Devices Inc RFMD Jump to: navigation, search Name RF Micro Devices, Inc. (RFMD) Place Greensboro, North Carolina Zip 27409-9421 Product RF Micro Devices, Inc. is a global leader in the design and manufacture of high-performance semiconductor components. Coordinates 44.576059°, -72.294016° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.576059,"lon":-72.294016,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

239

Development of the RF plasma source at atmospheric pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radio frequency (RF) plasma source operates by feeding helium or argon gas through two coaxial electrodes driven by a 13.56 \\{MHz\\} RF source. In order to prevent an arc discharge, a dielectric material is loaded outside the center electrode. A stable, arc-free discharge is produced at a flow rate of 1.5 l/min of helium gas. The temperature of the gas flame varies from 100 to 150 °C depending on the RF power. The breakdown voltage also changes when the flow rate varies. The plasma generation in a hot chamber is much more efficient than that in a cold chamber. The plasma characteristics are diagnosed by using optical emission spectroscopy. One of the applications of the RF plasma source is the printed circuit board (PCB) cleaning process, needed for environmental protection. The PCB cleaning device forms an asymmetric biaxial reactor.

Jung G. Kang; Hyoung S. Kim; Sung W. Ahn; Han S. Uhm

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

BN/Graphene/BN Transistors for RF Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this letter, we demonstrate the first BN/graphene/BN field-effect transistor for RF applications. This device structure can preserve the high mobility and the high carrier velocity of graphene, even when it is sandwiched ...

Taychatanapat, Thiti

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

Jeffrey, Frank R. (Ames, IA); Shanks, Howard R. (Ames, IA)

1982-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

242

Supply Chain Planning Analyst 4 Optical Components /RF Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Components/RF Products Technology Domain Teams. The SCPA will have responsibility for managing management, subcontract administration, procurement, mission assurance, engineering, and manufacturing Qualifications: The selected analysts must have the demonstrated ability to thrive in a dynamic environment

Heller, Barbara

243

RF power amplifier linearity compensation for MRI systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, a polar-feedback linearization system for use with MRI RF power amplifiers was designed and simulated. The design here presented is intended to replace Analogic's (located in Peabody, Massachusetts) ...

Torres Chico, Gabriel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Handbook for Gas Filled RF Cavity Aficionados'  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of hydrogen gas filled RF cavities in muon cooling channels has been proposed by Rolland Johnson. Impressive results have been obtained toward attaining high voltage gradients and rapid training in preliminary tests done at the FNAL MTA facility. However, so far it has not been possible to test them under conditions where they were subject to the transversal of a high intensity particle beam. This note is an attempt to bring together a description of some of the pertinent physical processes that take place in the dilute plasma that is generated in the hydrogen gas by the beam. Two effects dominate. The first is that the free electrons generated can load down the cavity and transfer its energy to heating the gas. The second is a question of what happens to the plasma in the longer term. There is an enormous literature on the subject of the subject of dilute hydrogen plasmas and we can tap into this information in order to understand and predict the behavior of the cavity.

Tollestrup, A.V.; Chung, Moses; Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

RF heating needs and plans for ITER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RF heating systems are required to deliver more than half of the total auxiliary power to operate ITER successfully through the different levels. To achieve this goal, systems in the range of ICRF, LHF and ECRF will be implemented for different tasks in different phases of operation. Power levels proposed to be used in different ranges will vary depending on the needs. Different mixes of power will depend on the physics needs of the experimental programmes. Lower Hybrid power of 20 MW at 5.0 GHz is not planned for the startup phase and therefore no procurement scheme exists at the present time. 20 MW will be delivered into the plasma at 40 to 55 MHz as well as at 170 GHz with the help of Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) and Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) systems respectively. All the heating systems will have the capability to operate in continuous mode. A dedicated ECH 3.0 MW system at 127.6 GHz will be used for plasma breakdown and start up.

Bora, Dhiraj; Beaumont, B.; Kobayashi, N.; Tanga, A. [ITER Organization, Joint Work Site, Cadarache (France); Goulding, R.; Swain, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Jacquinot, J. [Cabinet of High Commissioner for Atomic Energy, CEA Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

Pulses inside the pulse mode of operation at RF Gun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pulses inside the pulse mode of operation at RF Gun V. Vogel, V. Ayvazyan, K. Floettmann, D. Lipka a PiP mode of operation at RF Gun · What we need, to operate FLASH in the PiP mode · PiP study-Universitaet Bochum) Alternative: SC GUN DC GUN Cold GUN in PiP mode Cold Traveling wave GUN Why we need a PiP mode

247

Fabrication of superconducting nanowire single proton detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The future NASA Mars project will need an ultra-fast, highly sensitive photodetector to increase the bandwidth of free-space long-range communication, which is now done primarily using RF signals. Our original motivation ...

Yang, Joel K. (Joel Kwang wei)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Superconducting surface impedance under radiofrequency field  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Based on BCS theory with moving Cooper pairs, the electron states distribution at 0K and the probability of electron occupation with finite temperature have been derived and applied to anomalous skin effect theory to obtain the surface impedance of a superconductor under radiofrequency (RF) field. We present the numerical results for Nb and compare these with representative RF field-dependent effective surface resistance measurements from a 1.5 GHz resonant structure.

Xiao, Binping [JLAB, William and Mary College; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Kelley, Michael J. [JLAB, William and Mary College

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

RHIC Project | Superconducting Magnet Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RHIC Project RHIC Project The Superconducting Magnet Division supplied 1740 magnetic elements, in 888 cryostats, for the RHIC facility at BNL. Of these, 780 magnetic elements were manufactured by Northrop-Grumman (Bethpage, NY) and 360 were made by Everson Electric (Bethlehem, PA). The magnets made in industry used designs developed at BNL. The first cooldown of the magnets for the RHIC engineering run was in 1999. Since then, the magnets have operated very reliably. arc dipole coil and yoke Arc dipole coil and yoke, with magnetic flux lines The magnets provide modest field (3.45 Teslas in the arc dipoles) in a cost-effective design. Key features in the principal bending and focusing magnets include the use of NbTi Rutherford cable, a single-layer coil, and cold iron as both yoke and collar. The magnets operate in forced-flow

250

Superconducting Magnet Division | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Superconducting Magnet Division Superconducting Magnet Division Home Production & Testing LHC Dipole Acceptance APUL Schedule (pdf) Projects Main Projects HTS Magnet Program High Field Magnet R&D Linear Collider Final Focus e Lens Solenoid Correctors for J-PARC Correctors for SuperKEKB IR Magnets LARP APUL Past Projects BEPC-II IR Quadrupoles Bio-Med Variable Field MRI GSI Rapid Cycling Magnets Helical Magnets HERA upgrade LHC IR Dipoles RHIC Publications Search Publications Selected Cryogenic Data Notebook Proceedings of the 1968 Summer Study on Superconducting Devices and Accelerators Meetings & Workshops Safety Environmental, Safety & Health ES&H Documents Lockout-Tagout Personnel Staff Pages Ramesh Gupta Brett Parker Peter Wanderer Pe ter Wanderer, head of Brookhaven's Superconducting Magnet Division,

251

Near-zero modes in superconducting graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vortices in the simplest superconducting state of graphene contain very-low-energy excitations whose existence is connected to an index theorem that applies strictly to an approximate form of the relevant Bogoliubov–de ...

Ghaemi, Pouyan

252

New Advances in SuperConducting Materials  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Superconducting materials will transform the world's electrical infrastructure, saving billions of dollars once the technical details and installation are in place. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, new materials science concepts are bringing this essential technology closer to widespread industrial use.

None

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

253

Superconducting technology program Sandia 1996 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia`s Superconductivity Technology Program is a thallium-based high-temperature superconductor (HTS) research and development program consisting of efforts in powder synthesis and process development, open-system thick film conductor development, wire and tape fabrication, and HTS motor design. The objective of this work is to develop high-temperature superconducting conductors (wire and tape) capable of meeting requirements for high-power electrical devices of interest to industry. The research efforts currently underway are: (1) Process development and characterization of thallium-based high-temperature superconducting closed system wire and tape, (2) Investigation of the synthesis and processing of thallium-based thick films using two-zone processing, and (3) Cryogenic design of a 30K superconducting motor. This report outlines the research that has been performed during FY96 in each of these areas.

Roth, E.P.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Superconductivity for electric power systems: Program overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Largely due to government and private industry partnerships, electric power applications based upon high-temperature superconductivity are now being designed and tested only seven years after the discovery of the high-temperature superconductors. These applications offer many benefits to the national electric system including: increased energy efficiency, reduced equipment size, reduced emissions, increased stability/reliability, deferred expansion, and flexible electricity dispatch/load management. All of these benefits have a common outcome: lower electricity costs and improved environmental quality. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors research and development through its Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. This program will help develop the technology needed for U.S. industries to commercialize high-temperature superconductive electric power applications. DOE envisions that by 2010 the U.S. electric power systems equipment industry will regain a major share of the global market by offering superconducting products that outperform the competition.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Armored spring-core superconducting cable and method of construction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) is provided. The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may include a spring-core (20), at least one superconducting strand (24) wound onto the spring-core (20), and an armored shell (22) that encases the superconducting strands (24). The spring-core (20) is generally a perforated tube that allows purge gases and cryogenic liquids to be circulated through the armored superconducting cable (12), as well as managing the internal stresses within the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12). The armored shell (22) manages the external stresses of the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) to protect the fragile superconducting strands (24). The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may also include a conductive jacket (34) formed outwardly of the armored shell (22).

McIntyre, Peter M. (611 Montclair, College Station, TX 77840); Soika, Rainer H. (1 Hensel, #X4C, College Station, TX 77840)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Architecture for high critical current superconducting tapes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of, e.g., multilayer YBCO structures where individual YBCO layers are separated by a layer of an insulating material such as CeO.sub.2 and the like, a layer of a conducting material such as strontium ruthenium oxide and the like or by a second superconducting material such as SmBCO and the like.

Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Two pairing parameters in superconducting grains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unlike bulk superconductivity, where one energy scale, the energy gap, characterizes pairing correlations, we show that in small superconducting grains there exist two different such quantities. The first characterizes collective properties of the grain, such as the condensation energy, and the second single-particle properties. To describe these two energy scales, we define two corresponding pairing parameters, and show that although both reduce to the bulk gap for large grains, this occurs at different size scales.

M. Schechter; J. von Delft; Y. Imry; Y. Levinson

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

258

Microsoft PowerPoint - rf_5year_review  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RF Research Program RF Research Program DOE Review of C-Mod Five-Year Proposal May 13-14, 2003 MIT PSFC Presented by Steve J.Wukitch Outline: 1. Overview of the RF Program 2. Five-year plan Overview of the RF Program AT: validate steady state operation with target parameters β N = 3, I non = 100%, I BS ~ 70%, H 89 ~ 2.5, for t pulse > t L/R . BPX: demonstrate the viability of high performance plasmas, B T = 8T, I p = 2 MA, P = 6 MW, H 89 ≥ 2, Z eff < 1.5. B T = 5.4T, I p = 1.4 MA, P = 6 MW, H 89 = 2 (ITER demo) Exclusively use RF power for auxiliary heating and current drive. variable variable fixed Phase 2 x 4 Strap 4 Strap 2 x 2 Strap Antenna 4 MW 40-80 MHz J-port 2 x 4 MW 2 x 2 MW Power 40-80 MHz ~ 80 MHz Frequency E & J-port D & E-port 2005-2008 2002-2005 4.6 GHz 4.6 GHz Frequency 16 x 250 kW

259

RF Power Upgrade for CEBAF at Jefferson Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) is currently upgrading the 6GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to 12GeV. As part of the upgrade, RF systems will be added, bringing the total from 340 to 420. Existing RF systems can provide up to 6.5 kW of CW RF at 1497 MHZ. The 80 new systems will provide increased RF power of up to 13 kW CW each. Built around a newly designed and higher efficiency 13 kW klystron developed for JLab by L-3 Communications, each new RF chain is a completely revamped system using hardware different than our present installations. This paper will discuss the main components of the new systems including the 13 kW klystron, waveguide isolator, and HV power supply using switch-mode technology. Methodology for selection of the various components and results of initial testing will also be addressed. Notice: Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177. The U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce this manuscript for U.S. Government purposes.

Andrew Kimber,Richard Nelson

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Phase Stable RF-over-fiber Transmission using Heterodyne Interferometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New scientific applications require phase-stabilized RF distribution to multiple remote locations. These include phased-array radio telescopes and short pulse free electron lasers. RF modulated onto a CW optical carrier and transmitted via fiber is capable of low noise, but commercially available systems aren't long term stable enough for these applications. Typical requirements are for less than 50fs long term temporal stability between receivers, which is 0.05 degrees at 3GHz. Good results have been demonstrated for RF distribution schemes based on transmission of short pulses, but these require specialized free-space optics and high stability mechanical infrastructure. We report a method which uses only standard telecom optical and RF components, and achieves less than 20fs RMS error over 300m of standard single-mode fiber. We demonstrate stable transmission of 3GHz over 300m of fiber with less than 0.017 degree (17fs) RMS phase error. An interferometer measures optical phase delay, providing information to a feed-forward correction of RF phase.

Wilcox, R.; Byrd, J. M.; Doolittle, L.; Huang, G.; Staples, J. W.

2010-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity I.A. Garifullin a,n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity I.A. Garifullin a,n , P.V. Leksin s t r a c t A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used coefficient DF and the exchange splitting I of the conduction band in the F layer [1]. For pure Fe the value

Fominov, Yakov

262

Integrated Surface Topography Characterization of Variously Polished Niobium for Superconducting Particle Accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro-and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents flow. Interior surface chemical polishing (BCP/EP) to remove mechanical damage leaves surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely-used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is being used to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of EP is reported, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography.

Hui Tian, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley, G. Ribeill

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil experiment overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contaminant plumes are significant waste problems that require remediation in both the government and private sectors. The authors are developing an in situ process that uses RF/microwave stimulation to remove pollutants from contaminated soils. This process is more efficient than existing technologies, creates less secondary pollution, and is applicable to situations that are not amenable to treatment by existing technologies. Currently, the most commonly used process is soil vapor extraction. However, even when it is successful, this technology is energy inefficient. The authors objective is to combine RF/microwave energy application with soil vapor extraction to help mobilize and efficiently remove the soil contaminants, specifically demonstrating the viability of RF/microwave induced, in situ, soil remediation of light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL, DNAPL) contaminants.

Regan, A.H.; Palomares, M.E.; Polston, C.; Rees, D.E.; Roybal, W.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ross, T.J. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

A computer program for HVDC converter station RF noise calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HVDC converter station operations generate radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) noise which could interfere with adjacent communication and computer equipment, and carrier system operations. A generic Radio Frequency Computer Analysis Program (RAFCAP) for calculating the EM noise generated by valve ignition of a converter station has been developed as part of a larger project. The program calculates RF voltages, currents, complex power, ground level electric field strength and magnetic flux density in and around an HVDC converter station. The program requires the converter station network to be represented by frequency dependent impedance functions. Comparisons of calculated and measured values are given for an actual HVDC station to illustrate the validity of the program. RAFCAP is designed to be used by engineers for the purpose of calculating the RF noise produced by the igniting of HVDC converter valves.

Kasten, D.G.; Caldecott, R.; Sebo, S.A. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Liu, Y. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Bradley Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Los Alamos VXI-based modular RF control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the design and implementation of the Los Alamos modular RF control system, which provides high-performance feedback and/or feedforward control of RF accelerator cavities. This is a flexible, modular control system which has been realized in the industry-standard VXI cardmodular format. A wide spectrum of system functionality can be accommodated simply by incorporating only those modules and features required for a particular application. The fundamental principles of the design approach are discussed. Details of the VXI implementation are given, including the system architecture and interfaces, performance capabilities, and available features.

Jachim, S.P.; Ziomek, C.; Natter, E.F.; Regan, A.H.; Hill, J.; Eaton, L.; Gutscher, W.D.; Curtin, M.; Denney, P.; Hansberry, E.; Brooks, T.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The Los Alamos VXI-based modular RF control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the design and implementation of the Los Alamos modular RF control system, which provides high-performance feedback and/or feedforward control of RF accelerator cavities. This is a flexible, modular control system which has been realized in the industry-standard VXI cardmodular format. A wide spectrum of system functionality can be accommodated simply by incorporating only those modules and features required for a particular application. The fundamental principles of the design approach are discussed. Details of the VXI implementation are given, including the system architecture and interfaces, performance capabilities, and available features.

Jachim, S.P.; Ziomek, C.; Natter, E.F.; Regan, A.H.; Hill, J.; Eaton, L.; Gutscher, W.D.; Curtin, M.; Denney, P.; Hansberry, E.; Brooks, T.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The MuCool Test Area and RF Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MuCool RF Program focuses on the study of normal conducting RF structures operating in high magnetic field for applications in muon ionization cooling for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. This paper will give an overview of the program, which will include a description of the test facility and its capabilities, the current test program, and the status of a cavity that can be rotated in the magnetic field which allows for a more detailed study of the maximum stable operating gradient vs. magnetic field strength and angle.

Bross, A D; Jansson, A; Moretti, A; Yonehara, K; Huang, D; Torun, Y; Li, D; Norem, J; Palmer, R B; Stratakis, D

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Superconducting micronets: The Wheatstone bridge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using the Ginzburg-Landau theory, a particular superconducting (sc) micronet, called the Wheatstone bridge, is studied. This planar micronet is made of two nodes connected by three thin sc wires. A magnetic field is applied perpendicularly to its plane. The sc-normal second-order phase transition is characterized by only two configurations of the order parameter: cphiA=cphiB and cphiA=-cphiB, where cphiA and cphiB are the order parameters at the nodes. For temperatures near Tc, we show that only the cphiA=cphiB configuration is admissible for fluxes near ?=n?0, where n is an integer and ?0 is the flux quantum. Finally, the exact solution of the nonlinear Ginzburg-Landau equations for one-dimensional systems is numerically fitted to the boundary conditions of the Wheatstone bridge for the two configurations cphiA=cphiB and cphiA=-?B. Graphs of the Gibbs energy and of the spontaneous supercurrent, which for these two configurations is always a screening supercurrent, are given as functions of the total flux. A discontinuous transition between configurations occurs as a function of the flux.

Christine Ammann; Paul Erdös; Stephen B. Haley

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Modeling and Simulation of Resistive Superconducting Fault-Current Limiters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Superconducting fault-current limiters (SFCL) offer ideal performance in electrical ... simulation model for a novel resistive type superconducting fault-current limiter is proposed. This model includes the elect...

S. Nemdili; S. Belkhiat

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF CONDUCTING AND SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSMISSION LINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF CONDUCTING AND SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSMISSION LINES ANNE-SOPHIE BONNET propagation in the microstrip transmission lines used in microelectronics. In the first part, the case of the perfectly conducting strip. Key words. superconducting transmission lines, waveguides, spectral analysis

Ramdani, Karim - Institut de Mathématiques �lie Cartan, Université Henri Poincaré

271

A Modular Superconducting Generator for Offshore Wind Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, a new claw-pole type transverse flux superconducting generator topology is presented. The machine has a stationary superconducting field winding, which eliminates electrical brushes and cryocoupler...

Ozan Keysan; Dariusz Olczak…

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF A BRIGHT ELECTRON INJECTOR BASED ON A LASER-DRIVEN PHOTOCATHODE RF ELECTRON GUN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photocathode RF Electron Gun S. Chattopadhyay, Y.J. Chen, D.PHOTOCATHODE RF ELECTRON GUN' S. Chnttopndhyny. Y.J. Chen (Photocathode RF Electron Gun S. Chattopadhyay, Y.I. Chen, D.

Chattopadhyay, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Superconducting magnets for toroidal fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fusion reactors will soon be employing superconducting magnets to confine plasma in which deuterium and tritium (D-T) are fused to produce usable energy. At present there is one small confinement experiment with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils: Tokamak 7 (T-7), in the USSR, which operates at 4 T. By 1983, six different 2.5 x 3.5-m D-shaped coils from six manufacturers in four countries will be assembled in a toroidal array in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing at fields up to 8 T. Soon afterwards ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT-P) will begin operation at Oak Ridge with superconducting TF coils. At the same time there will be tokamaks with superconducting TF coils 2 to 3 m in diameter in the USSR and France. Toroidal field strength in these machines will range from 6 to 9 T. NbTi and Nb/sub 3/Sn, bath cooling and forced flow, cryostable and metastable - various designs are being tried in this period when this new application of superconductivity is growing and maturing.

Haubenreich, P.N.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Influence of the Radio-Frequency source properties on RF-based atom traps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss the quality required for the RF source used to trap neutral atoms in RF-dressed potentials. We illustrate this discussion with experimental results obtained on a Bose-Einstein condensation experimen...

O. Morizot; L. Longchambon; R. Kollengode Easwaran…

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Advances in Broadband RF Sensing for Real-time Control of Plasma-Based Semiconductor Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to standard RF metrology. The system uses an antenna in the glow discharge to excite the bulk plasma identification of process conditions for standard RF sensing, and 99:5 correct identification of process

Grizzle, Jessy W.

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerating rf station Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by a 1.25-T -decay channel with phase-rotation via rf (to compress... to beam tests; Test 70-MHz rf cavity (+ 1.25-T magnet) 3 m from target; Characterize ... Source:...

277

Microwave (MW) and Radio Frequency (RF) as Enabling Technologies for Advanced Manufacturing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Purpose, Context, Meeting Process, and Agenda for MW and RF as Enabling Technologies for Advanced Manufacturing on July 25, 2012

278

J-PARC Correctors | Superconducting Magnet Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnet Construction Magnet Construction The final turn of the J-PARC extracted proton beam is a superconducting combined function magnet line. The combined function magnets are dipole cable magnets, typical of cold mass collared magnets, but have been designed to include a large component of quadrupole field. This provides both bending and focussing of the proton beam prior to target impact, where neutrinos will be produced. The BNL Superconducting Magnet Division is using its direct wind facility to produce superconducting corrector magnets to be used in conjunction with the combined function magnets. combined function magnet The first direct wind magnet set designed and fabricated is a combined function magnet with an additional skew dipole. This magnet is intended to be used within the cable collared combined function dipole used for the

279

Superconducting technology program: Sandia 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia`s STP program is a thallium-based high-temperature superconductor (HTS) research and development program consisting of efforts in powder synthesis and process development, open-system thick film conductor development, wire and tape fabrication, and HTS motor design. The objective of this work is to develop high-temperature superconducting conductors (wire and tape) capable of meeting requirements for high-power electrical devices of interest to industry. The research efforts currently underway are: (1) process development and characterization of thallium-based high-temperature superconducting closed system wire and tape; (2) investigation of the synthesis and processing of thallium-based thick films using two-zone processing; and (3) cryogenic design of a 30K superconducting motor. This report outlines the research that has been performed during FY95 in each of these areas.

Roth, E.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Superconductivity Materials and Technology Dept.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF MUONS PASSING THROUGH GAS PRESSURED RF CAVITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of muons passing through matter. PHYSICAL MODEL We start our study with a classical scattering of muonsCOMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF MUONS PASSING THROUGH GAS PRESSURED RF CAVITIES A. Samolov, A. Godunov, and to validate a technical design of these new accelerating facilities, accu- rate and comprehensive simulations

Godunov, Alexander L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON HEATING IN RF GAS DISCHARGES: I. QUASILINEAR THEORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON HEATING IN RF GAS DISCHARGES: I. QUASILINEAR THEORY Yu.M. Aliev1 , I an interest in mechanisms of electron heating and power deposition in the plasma main- tained by radio parameters. Due to the large value of the mean free path (MFP) the main mechanism of electron heating turns

Kaganovich, Igor

282

RF power potential of 45 nm CMOS technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents the first measurements of the RF power performance of 45 nm CMOS devices with varying device widths and layouts. We find that 45 nm CMOS can deliver a peak output power density of around 140 mW/mm with ...

Putnam, Christopher

283

Wi-fi backscatter: internet connectivity for RF-powered devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

RF-powered computers are small devices that compute and communicate using only the power that they harvest from RF signals. While existing technologies have harvested power from ambient RF sources (e.g., TV broadcasts), they require a dedicated gateway ... Keywords: backscatter, energy harvesting, internet of things, wireless

Bryce Kellogg, Aaron Parks, Shyamnath Gollakota, Joshua R. Smith, David Wetherall

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Multiband Antenna-Receiver Integration using an RF Multiplexer with Sensitivity-Constrained Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S.M. Shajedul Hasan (hasan@vt.edu) Steven Ellingson (ellingson@vt.edu) RF Multiplexer Hasan be largely mitigated by: · Implementing design to be robust to variations RF Multiplexer Hasan / Ellingson #12;Motivation (2/2) Focus of this paper System Diagram of the prototype MMR RF Multiplexer Hasan

Ellingson, Steven W.

285

Multiband Antenna-Receiver Integration using an RF Multiplexer with Sensitivity-Constrained Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S.M. Hasan and S. W. Ellingson Wireless at Virginia Tech RF Multiplexer Hasan / Ellingson ­ July 10 be largely mitigated by: 2/14 RF Multiplexer Hasan / Ellingson ­ July 10, 2008 RFIC from Motorola Research (2/2) Focus of this paper System Diagram of the prototype MMR 3/14 RF Multiplexer Hasan / Ellingson

Ellingson, Steven W.

286

Integration of LED chip within patch antenna geometry for hybrid FSO/RF communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integration of LED chip within patch antenna geometry for hybrid FSO/RF communication J. Liao, A mode communi- cation transmitter using a LED integrated within the geometry of a planar patch antenna the geometry of the patch antenna to create a miniaturised LED/RF package. The RF channel can either work

Huang, Zhaoran "Rena"

287

Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are investigating a standing wave structure with an rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.

Neilson, Jeffrey; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

288

Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 10 figures.

Doss, J.D.

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

Superconducting switch concept applied to superconducting undulator phase-error correction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superconducting undulator (SCU) technology has the potential to significantly enhance the performance of synchrotron radiation sources for storage ring and FEL applications. Since 2002, our team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been performing R and D on superconducting undulators, including the fabrication of three Nb{sub 3}Sn prototypes. We have demonstrated experimentally the possibility to provide the prototype with trim coils that could be used for phase error correction. The research effort that we report here demonstrates the possibility to add degrees of freedom to the field correction provided by these coils in a cryogenic environment. By means of bridge of superconducting switches, we can modify the current direction through a trim coil. Here we describe the design of the experimental bridge we fabricated, the results we obtained and finally the generalized concept one could plan to apply to correct the phase errors with trim coils connected to a network of superconducting bridges.

Madur, A.; Trillaud, F.; Dietderich, D.; Marks, S.; Prestemon, S.; Schlueter, R. [LBNL, 1 Cyclotron Road, BERKELEY, CA, 94720 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

290

Pseudogap and Superconducting Gap in High-Temperature Superconductors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pseudogap and Superconducting Gap in Pseudogap and Superconducting Gap in High-Temperature Superconductors Two decades after the discovery of first high temperature superconductors, the microscopic mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity remains elusive. In conventional superconductors, it has been well established that electrons form so-called "Cooper pairs" to give rise to superconductivity. The pair binding manifests itself as an energy gap in many spectroscopic measurements. This energy gap, known as superconducting gap, appears at the superconducting transition temperature Tc where the resistance also vanishes. For high temperature superconductors, the story is more complicated. Over a wide region of compositions and temperatures, there exists an energy gap well above Tc. This energy gap is called pseudogap [1], because there is no direct correlation to the superconducting transition. The origin of this pseudogap and its relation to the superconducting gap are believed to hold the key for understanding the mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity - one of the outstanding problems in condensed matter physics. In this regard, researchers Kiyohisa Tanaka and Wei-Sheng Lee, along with their co-workers in Prof. Zhi-Xun Shen's group at Stanford University, have recently made an important discovery about the coexistence of two distinct energy gaps that have opposite doping dependence. Their observation not only provides a natural explanation for the contradictory results about the superconducting gap deduced from different experimental techniques, but also has profound implications on the mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity.

291

Putting Accelerator Technology to Work Fully Superconducting GunFully Superconducting Gun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Putting Accelerator Technology to Work Fully Superconducting GunFully Superconducting Gun BNL PS Gun LANL/AES NC or AES FS gun e- 1.5-2.5 MeV 500-300 mA CW * e- 1.6-2.8 MeV 500-300 mA CW Beam cavity with low current beam * NC gun with derated gradient FS gun permits 25% higher current Ilan Ben

292

Superconducting high-pressure phases of disilane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Superconducting high-pressure phases of disilane 10.1073/pnas.1005242107 Xilian...DC 20015 High-pressure structures of disilane (Si2H6) are investigated extensively...linear-response calculations for Pm-3m disilane at 275 GPa show a large electron-phonon...

Xilian Jin; Xing Meng; Zhi He; Yanming Ma; Bingbing Liu; Tian Cui; Guangtian Zou; Ho-kwang Mao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Testing Gravitational Physics with Superconducting Gravimeters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......being improved in geo- physics.29),30) Therefore...would fall at different rates towards the Sun and other...Testing Gravitational Physics with Superconducting...such dilatonic waves pass the Earth, because of...tests of gravitational physics in the previous sections......

Sachie Shiomi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Flux Exclusion Superconducting Quantum Metamaterial: Towards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Recently, arrays of Josephson junction devices have been proposed as a possible solution. However-atoms containing Josephson junctions15­19 , experiments have been conducted on single superconducting qubit meta-atoms20,21 and one- dimensional Josephson junction metamaterials22 . The recently discovered class of iron

Zheludev, Nikolay

295

Aluminum in Superconducting Magnets Robert J. Weggel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum in Superconducting Magnets Robert J. Weggel Magnet Optimization Research Engineering is aluminum, either ultrapure, as quenchstabilization matrix metal, and/or alloyed and coldworked and heat for magnets in which the stresses and strains are modest. The strongest aluminum alloy commercially available

McDonald, Kirk

296

The Development of the Linac Coherent Light Source RF Gun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first x-ray laser user facility based upon a free electron laser (FEL) requiring extraordinary beam quality to saturate at 1.5 angstroms within a 100 meter undulator.[1] This new type of light source is using the last kilometer of the three kilometer linac at SLAC to accelerate the beam to an energy as high as 13.6 GeV and required a new electron gun and injector to produce a very bright beam for acceleration. At the outset of the project it was recognized that existing RF guns had the potential to produce the desired beam but none had demonstrated it. Therefore a new RF gun or at least the modification of an existing gun was necessary. The parameters listed in Table 1 illustrate the unique characteristics of LCLS which drive the requirements for the electron gun as given in Table 2. The gun beam quality needs to accommodate emittance growth as the beam is travels through approximately one kilometer of linac and two bunch compressors before reaching the undulator. These beam requirements were demonstrated during the recent commissioning runs of the LCLS injector and linac [2] due to the successful design, fabrication, testing and operation of the LCLS gun. The goal of this paper is to relate the technical background of how the gun was able to achieve and in some cases exceed these requirements by understanding and correcting the deficiencies of the prototype s-band RF photocathode gun, the BNL/SLAC/UCLA Gun III. This paper begins with a brief history and technical description of Gun III and the Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SLAC, and studies of the gun's RF and emittance compensation solenoid. The work at the GTF identified the gun and solenoid deficiencies, and helped to define the specifications for the LCLS gun. Section 1.1.5 describes the modeling used to compute and correct the gun RF fields and Section 1.1.6 describes the use of these fields in the electron beam simulations. The magnetic design and measurements of the emittance compensation solenoid are discussed in Section 1.1.7. The novel feature of the LCLS solenoid is the embedded quadrupole correctors. The thermo-mechanical engineering of the LCLS gun is discussed in Section 1.1.8, and the cold and hot RF tests are described in Section 1.1.9. The results of this work are summarized and concluding remarks are given in Section 1.1.10.

Dowell, David H.; Jongewaard, Erik; Lewandowski, James; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Li, Zenghai; Schmerge, John; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

297

Superconductivity and the environment: a Roadmap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is universal agreement between the United Nations and governments from the richest to the poorest nations that humanity faces unprecedented global challenges relating to sustainable energy, clean water, low-emission transportation, coping with climate change and natural disasters, and reclaiming use of land. We have invited researchers from a range of eclectic research areas to provide a Roadmap of how superconducting technologies could address these major challenges confronting humanity.Superconductivity has, over the century since its discovery by Kamerlingh Onnes in 1911, promised to provide solutions to many challenges. So far, most superconducting technologies are esoteric systems that are used in laboratories and hospitals. Large science projects have long appreciated the ability of superconductivity to efficiently create high magnetic fields that are otherwise very costly to achieve with ordinary materials. The most successful applications outside of large science are high-field magnets for magnetic resonance imaging, laboratory magnetometers for mineral and materials characterization, filters for mobile communications, and magnetoencephalography for understanding the human brain.The stage is now set for superconductivity to make more general contributions. Humanity uses practically unthinkable amounts of energy to drive our modern way of life. Overall, global power usage has been predicted to almost double from 16.5 to 30 TW in the next four decades (2011 Equinox Summit: Energy 2030 http://wgsi.org/publications-resources).The economy with which electrons carry energy compels the continued quest for efficient superconducting power generation, energy storage, and power transmission. The growing global population requires new arable land and treatment of water, especially in remote areas, and superconductivity offers unique solutions to these problems. Exquisite detectors give warning of changes that are otherwise invisible. Prediction of climate and disasters will be helped by future supercomputer technologies that support huge amounts of data and sophisticated modeling, and with the aid of superconductivity these systems might not require the energy of a large city.We present different sections on applications that could address (or are addressing) a range of environmental issues. The Roadmap covers water purification, power distribution and storage, low-environmental impact transport, environmental sensing (particularly for the removal of unexploded munitions), monitoring the Earth's magnetic fields for earthquakes and major solar activity, and, finally, developing a petaflop supercomputer that only requires 3% of the current supercomputer power provision while being 50 times faster.Access to fresh water. With only 2.5% of the water on Earth being fresh and climate change modeling forecasting that many areas will become drier, the ability to recycle water and achieve compact water recycling systems for sewage or ground water treatment is critical. The first section (by Nishijima) points to the potential of superconducting magnetic separation to enable water recycling and reuse.Energy. The Equinox Summit held in Waterloo Canada 2011 (2011 Equinox Summit: Energy 2030 http://wgsi.org/publications-resources) identified electricity use as humanity's largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. Our appetite for electricity is growing faster than for any other form of energy. The communiqué from the summit said 'Transforming the ways we generate, distribute and store electricity is among the most pressing challenges facing society today.... If we want to stabilize CO2 levels in our atmosphere at 550 parts per million, all of that growth needs to be met by non-carbon forms of energy' (2011 Equinox Summit: Energy 2030 http://wgsi.org/publications-resources). Superconducting technologies can provide the energy efficiencies to achieve, in the European Union alone, 33–65% of the required reduction in greenhouse gas emissions according to the Kyoto Protocol (Hartikainen et al 2003 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 16 9

Shigehiro Nishijima; Steven Eckroad; Adela Marian; Kyeongdal Choi; Woo Seok Kim; Motoaki Terai; Zigang Deng; Jun Zheng; Jiasu Wang; Katsuya Umemoto; Jia Du; Pascal Febvre; Shane Keenan; Oleg Mukhanov; Lance D Cooley; Cathy P Foley; William V Hassenzahl; Mitsuru Izumi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

rf power system for thrust measurements of a helicon plasma source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A rf power system has been developed, which allows the use of rf plasma devices in an electric propulsion test facility without excessive noise pollution in thruster diagnostics. Of particular importance are thrust stand measurements, which were previously impossible due to noise. Three major changes were made to the rf power system: first, the cable connection was changed from a balanced transmission line to an unbalanced coaxial line. Second, the rf power cabinet was placed remotely in order to reduce vibration-induced noise in the thrust stand. Finally, a relationship between transmission line length and rf was developed, which allows good transmission of rf power from the matching network to the helicon antenna. The modified system was tested on a thrust measurement stand and showed that rf power has no statistically significant contribution to the thrust stand measurement.

Kieckhafer, Alexander W.; Walker, Mitchell L. R. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, High-Power Electric Propulsion Laboratory, College of Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Performance of Magnesium Cathode in the S Band RF Gun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the preliminary results of the performance of magnesium cathode in a high frequency RF gun. The quantum efficiency of magnesium showed a dramatic improvement upon laser cleaning, increasing from 10{sup -5} to 4x10{sup -4} after two hours of cleaning. The spatial uniformity of emission also improved from a spot to spot variation of 10 to a variation of 2. Measurements with charges >1 nC indicate that the transient variation of the field due to the shielding effect of the electron in the vicinity of the cathode may play a critical role in the efficient extraction of electrons. Comprehensive theory that includes the electron emission in the presence of a time dependent Schottky effect and RF effects will be discussed.

Srinivasan-Rao, T.; /Brookhaven; Palmer, D.T.; /SLAC; Ben-Zvi, I.; /Brookhaven; Miller, R.H.; /SLAC; Wang, X.J.; Woodle, M.; /Brookhaven

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

RF generation in the DARHT Axis-II beam dump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have occasionally observed radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic signals in the downstream transport (DST) of the second axis linear induction accelerator (LIA) at the dual-axis radiographic hydrodynamic testing (DARHT) facility. We have identified and eliminated some of the sources by eliminating the offending cavities. However, we still observe strong RF in the range 1 GHz t0 2 GHz occurring late in the {approx}2-{micro}s pulse that can be excited or prevented by varying the downstream tune. The narrow frequency width (<0.5%) and near exponential growth at the dominant frequency is indicative of a beam-cavity interaction, and electro-magnetic simulations of cavity structure show a spectrum rich in resonances in the observed frequency range. However, the source of beam produced RF in the cavity resonance frequency range has not been identified, and it has been the subject of much speculation, ranging from beam-plasma or beam-ion instabilities to unstable cavity coupling.

Ekdahl, Carl A. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

HIGH-POWER RF DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMFOR THE 8-PACK PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 8-Pack Project at SLAC is a prototype rf system whose goal is to demonstrate the high-power X-band technology developed in the NLC/GLC (Next/Global Linear Collider) program. In its first phase, it has reliably produced a 400 ns rf pulse of over 500 MW using a solidstate modulator, four 11.424 GHz klystrons and a dualmoded SLED-II pulse compressor. In Phase 2, the output power of the system has been delivered into the bunker of the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator) and divided between several accelerator structures for beam acceleration. The authors describe here the design, cold-test measurements, and processing of this power distribution system. Due to the high power levels and the need for efficiency, overmoded waveguide and components are used. For power transport, the TE{sub 01} mode is used in 7.44 cm and 4.064 cm diameter circular waveguide. Only near the structures is standard WR90 rectangular waveguide employed. Components used to manipulate the rf power include transitional tapers, mode converters, overmoded bends, fractional directional couplers, and hybrids.

Nantista, C

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

302

Structural properties of amorphous carbon thin films deposited by LF (100 kHz), RF (13.56 MHz), and pulsed RF (13.56 MHz) plasma CVD  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Amorphous carbon thin films were deposited by LF (100 kHz), RF (13.56 MHz), and pulsed RF (13.56 MHz) plasma CVD with DC self-bias voltage of? ... properties of the deposited films in an asymmetric plasma reactor...

Dong-Sun Kim

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

1 -SUBTIDAL 2 -INTERTIDAL RB ROCK UB UNCONSOLIDATED AB AQUATIC BED RF -REEF OW -OPEN WATER/ AB AQUATIC BED RF REEF RS ROCKY SHORE US -UNCONSOLIDATED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M - MARINE 1 - SUBTIDAL 2 - INTERTIDAL RB ­ ROCK UB ­ UNCONSOLIDATED AB ­ AQUATIC BED RF - REEF OW - OPEN WATER/ AB ­ AQUATIC BED RF­ REEF RS ­ ROCKY SHORE US - UNCONSOLIDATED BOTTOM BOTTOM Unknown Bottom ­ UNCONSOLIDATED AB ­ AQUATIC RF ­ REEF OW - OPEN WATER/ AB ­ AQUATIC RF­ REEF SB ­ STREAMBED RS - ROCKY US

Gray, Matthew

304

Torsional texturing of superconducting oxide composite articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of texturing a multifilamentary article having filaments comprising a desired oxide superconductor or its precursors by torsionally deforming the article is provided. The texturing is induced by applying a torsional strain which is at least about 0.3 and preferably at least about 0.6 at the surface of the article, but less than the strain which would cause failure of the composite. High performance multifilamentary superconducting composite articles having a plurality of low aspect ratio, twisted filaments with substantially uniform twist pitches in the range of about 1.00 inch to 0.01 inch (25 to 0.25 mm), each comprising a textured desired superconducting oxide material, may be obtained using this texturing method. If tighter twist pitches are desired, the article may be heat treated or annealed and the strain repeated as many times as necessary to obtain the desired twist pitch. It is preferred that the total strain applied per step should be sufficient to provide a twist pitch tighter than 5 times the diameter of the article, and twist pitches in the range of 1 to 5 times the diameter of the article are most preferred. The process may be used to make a high performance multifilamentary superconducting article, having a plurality of twisted filaments, wherein the degree of texturing varies substantially in proportion to the radial distance from the center of the article cross-section, and is substantially radially homogeneous at any given cross-section of the article. Round wires and other low aspect ratio multifilamentary articles are preferred forms. The invention is not dependent on the melting characteristics of the desired superconducting oxide. Desired oxide superconductors or precursors with micaceous or semi-micaceous structures are preferred. When used in connection with desired superconducting oxides which melt irreversibly, it provides multifilamentary articles that exhibit high DC performance characteristics and AC performance markedly superior to any currently available for these materials. In a preferred embodiment, the desired superconducting oxide material is BSCCO 2223.

Christopherson, Craig John (Grafton, MA); Riley, Jr., Gilbert N. (Marlborough, MA); Scudiere, John (Bolton, MA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Design, construction, system integration, and test results of the 1 MW CW RF system for the e-gun cavity in the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven's ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) requires a 1 MW CW RF system for the superconducting electron gun cavity. The system consists primarily of a klystron tube, transmitter, and High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS). The 703.75 MHz klystron made by CPl, Inc. provides RF power of 1MW CW with efficiency of 65%. It has a single output window, diode-type electron gun, and collector capable of dissipating the entire beam power. It was fully factory tested including 24-hour heat run at 1.1 MW CWo The solid state HVPS designed by Continental Electronics provides up to 100 kV at low ripple and 2.1 MW CW with over 95% efficiency. With minimal stored energy and a fast shut-down mode no crowbar circuit is needed. Continental 's transmitter includes PLC based user interface and monitoring, RF pre-amplifier, magnet and Vac-Ion pump supplies, cooling water instrumentation, and integral safety interlock system. BNL installed the klystron, HVPS, and transmitter along with other items, such as circulator, water load, and waveguide components. The collaboration of BNL, CPI, and Continental in the design, installation, and testing was essential to the successful operation of the 1MW system.

Lenci,S.J.; Eisen, E. L.; Dickey, D. L.; Sainz, J. E.; Utay, P. F.; Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

306

Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper oxide materials (cuprates). This discovery casts new doubts on any direct link between the pseudogap phase and high-temperature superconductivity and adds fire to the debate over one of the great scientific mysteries of our time: What causes high-temperature superconductivity?

307

Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper oxide materials (cuprates). This discovery casts new doubts on any direct link between the pseudogap phase and high-temperature superconductivity and adds fire to the debate over one of the great scientific mysteries of our time: What causes high-temperature superconductivity?

308

Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Wednesday, 26 April 2006 00:00 Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper oxide materials (cuprates). This discovery casts new doubts on any direct link between the pseudogap phase and high-temperature superconductivity and adds fire to the debate over one of the great scientific mysteries of our time: What causes high-temperature superconductivity?

309

ORNL Publishes Study on Superconducting Wire Performance | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ORNL Publishes Study on Superconducting Wire Performance ORNL Publishes Study on Superconducting Wire Performance ORNL Publishes Study on Superconducting Wire Performance August 23, 2013 - 4:06pm Addthis The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recently released a new study on advances in superconducting wire technology. A team led by ORNL's Amit Goyal demonstrated that the ability to control nanoscale imperfections in superconducting wires results in materials with excellent and customized performance. The team's findings are published in Nature Publishing Group's Scientific Reports. The full press release and link to the new report are available on ORNL's website. Dr. Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) research at ORNL, won the Department's 2011 E.O. Lawrence Award in the inaugural category of

310

Design of the fundamental power coupler and photocathode inserts for the 112MHz superconducting electron gun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 112 MHz superconducting quarter-wave resonator electron gun will be used as the injector of the Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) proof-of-principle experiment at BNL. Furthermore, this electron gun can be the testing cavity for various photocathodes. In this paper, we present the design of the cathode stalks and a Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) designated to the future experiments. Two types of cathode stalks are discussed. Special shape of the stalk is applied in order to minimize the RF power loss. The location of cathode plane is also optimized to enable the extraction of low emittance beam. The coaxial waveguide structure FPC has the properties of tunable coupling factor and small interference to the electron beam output. The optimization of the coupling factor and the location of the FPC are discussed in detail. Based on the transmission line theory, we designed a half wavelength cathode stalk which significantly brings down the voltage drop between the cavity and the stalk from more than 5.6 kV to 0.1 kV. The transverse field distribution on cathode has been optimized by carefully choosing the position of cathode stalk inside the cavity. Moreover, in order to decrease the RF power loss, a variable diameter design of cathode stalk has been applied. Compared to the uniform shape of stalk, this design gives us much smaller power losses in important locations. Besides that, we also proposed a fundamental power coupler based on the designed beam parameters for the future proof-of-principle CEC experiment. This FPC should give a strong enough coupling which has the Q external range from 1.5e7 to 2.6e8.

Xin, T.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Wang, E.; Liang, X.

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

311

Superconductivity with stripes | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers The brightness and energy of X-ray beams are critical properties for research. The APS Upgrade will make our X-ray beams brighter, meaning more X-rays can be focused onto a smaller, laser-like spot, allowing researchers to gather more data in greater detail in less time. Superconductivity with stripes November 12, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint The physics of low-temperature superconductivity is fairly well understood, but the ultimate goal of achieving the phenomenon at much higher temperatures remains tantalizingly elusive. The most promising high-temperature superconductor candidates are generally considered to be

312

High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Temperature Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects Superconductivity Power Equipment www.oe.energy.gov Phone: 202-586-1411 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585. Plugging America Into the Future of Power "A National Effort to Introduce New Technology into the Power Delivery Infrastructure" "In order to meet President Obama's ambitious energy goals, we must modernize the nation's electrical grid to improve the transmission, storage and reliability of clean energy across the country and help to move renewable energy from the places it can be produced to the places it can be used. The Department of Energy is working with industry partners to develop the

313

Energy Programs | Center for Emergent Superconductivity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Center for Emergent Superconductivity (CES) Center for Emergent Superconductivity (CES) The mission of the CES is to advance the frontier of understanding and control of the materials, mechanisms, and critical currents of superconductors, including existing and new materials, and to communicate Center and other research results throughout national and international communities. More... Principal Investigators CES News Publications Recent CES Presentations EFRC Acknowledgements Reference Document (pdf) Guide to EFRC Science Review Documents (pdf) CES-EFRC Materials Catalog (restricted) CES-EFRC April 2009 Kickoff Meeting (restricted) CES-EFRC 2010 Winter Workshop (restricted) CES Fall Workshop: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 April 2, 2012 Review (restricted) Story Archives Recent News atomic-scale microscopy Opposing Phenomena Possible Key to High-Efficiency Electricity Delivery

314

Superconducting cuprate heterostructures for hot electron bolometers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transport properties of the resistive state of quasi-two dimensional superconducting heterostructures containing ultrathin La{sub 2?x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} layers synthesized using molecular beam epitaxy are studied. The electron transport exhibits strong deviation from Ohm's law, ?V??I{sup 3}, with a coefficient ?(T) that correlates with the temperature variation of the resistivity d?/dT. Close to the normal state, analysis of the nonlinear behavior in terms of electron heating yields an electron-phonon thermal conductance per unit area g{sub e?ph}?1 W/K cm{sup 2} at T = 20 K, one-two orders of magnitude smaller than in typical superconductors. This makes superconducting LaSrCuO heterostructures to be attractive candidate for the next generation of hot electron bolometers with greatly improved sensitivity.

Wen, B.; Yakobov, R.; Vitkalov, S. A. [Department of Physics, City College of New York, New York 10031 (United States)] [Department of Physics, City College of New York, New York 10031 (United States); Sergeev, A. [SUNY Research Foundation, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14226 (United States)] [SUNY Research Foundation, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14226 (United States)

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

315

Manufacturing and Testing of Accelerator Superconducting Magnets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manufacturing of superconducting magnet for accelerators is a quite complex process that is not yet fully industrialized. In this paper, after a short history of the evolution of the magnet design and construction, we review the main characteristics of the accelerator magnets having an impact on the construction technology. We put in evidence how the design and component quality impact on construction and why the final product calls for a total-quality approach. LHC experience is widely discussed and main lessons are spelled out. Then the new Nb3Sn technology, under development for the next generation magnet construction, is outlined. Finally, we briefly review the testing procedure of accelerator superconducting magnets, underlining the close connection with the design validation and with the manufacturing process.

Rossi, L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

A transmission calibration method for superconducting resonators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method is proposed and experimentally explored for \\textit{in-situ} calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response was modeled in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microst...

Cataldo, Giuseppe; Barrentine, Emily M; Brown, Ari D; Moseley, Samuel H; U-Yen, Kongpop

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A simple figure of merit for high temperature superconducting switches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discovery of the new high temperature superconductors has revived interest in many special applications, including superconducting switches. For comparison of switch types, a simple figure of merit based in switch performance is proposed, derived for superconducting switches, and then calculated for thyristors and vacuum switches. The figure of merit is then used to show what critical current density would be needed for superconducting switches to compete with more conventional switches. 46 refs., 1 fig.

Honig, E.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Fabrication and characterization of aluminum airbridges for superconducting microwave circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superconducting microwave circuits based on coplanar waveguides (CPW) are susceptible to parasitic slotline modes which can lead to loss and decoherence. We motivate the use of superconducting airbridges as a reliable method for preventing the propagation of these modes. We describe the fabrication of these airbridges on superconducting resonators, which we use to measure the loss due to placing airbridges over CPW lines. We find that the additional loss at single photon levels is small, and decreases at higher drive powers.

Chen, Zijun; Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Bochmann, J.; Chen, Yu; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Mutus, J. Y.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Neill, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States); Megrant, A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States); Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M., E-mail: martinis@physics.ucsb.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

319

A dc superconducting fault current limiter using die-pressed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model of a superconducting fault current limiter on a polycrystalline high-temperature superconductor basis is checked in the dc short circuit regime. Protection of load takes place under the conditions described in this paper. The use of ceramic materials with superconducting-normal metal-superconducting Josephson junction network having an S-type current-voltage characteristic (CVC) is shown to be effective for fault current limiter devices.

A G Mamalis; M I Petrov; D A Balaev; K A; D M Gohfeld; S V Militsyn; S G; V I Kirko; I N Vottea

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Support system design for a superconducting MRI magnet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shields cooled to intermediate temperanires. The rest of the heat transfer is solid conduction through various components. One of these components is the magnet support system. The support system for a superconducting magnet suspends the components at 4.... A design of a support system for a superconducting magnet was developed. This system will be used to suspend the Texas Accelerator Center (TAC) liquid helium cooled, four tesla, one meter bore, superconducting coils (cold mass) inside a room...

Watts, Louis Chad

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

High temperature superconductive flux gate magnetometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes a different type of HTS superconducting magnetometer based on the non-linear magnetic behavior of bulk HTS materials. The device design is based on the generation of second harmonics which arise as a result of non-linear magnetization observed in Type-II superconductors. Even harmonics are generated from the non-linear interaction of an ac excitation signal with an external DC magnetic field which acts as a bias signal.

Gershenson, M. (Naval Coastal Systems Center, Panama City, FL (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Magnetism and superconductivity in quark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic properties of quark matter and its relation to the microscopic origin of the magnetic field observed in compact stars are studied. Spontaneous spin polarization appears in high-density region due to the Fock exchange term, which may provide a scenario for the behaviors of magnetars. On the other hand, quark matter becomes unstable to form spin density wave in the moderate density region, where restoration of chiral symmetry plays an important role. Coexistence of magnetism and color superconductivity is also discussed.

T. Tatsumi; E. Nakano; K. Nawa

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Superconducting nano-layer coating without insulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The superconducting nano-layer coating without insulator layer is studied. The magnetic-field distribution and the forces acting on a vortex are derived. Using the derived forces, the vortex-penetration field and the lower critical magnetic field can be discussed. The vortex-penetration field is identical with the multilayer coating, but the lower critical magnetic field is not. Forces acting on a vortex from the boundary of two superconductors play an important role in evaluations of the free energy.

Kubo, Takayuki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We explore bright-light control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching). In an experiment, we...

Tanner, Michael G; Makarov, Vadim; Hadfield, Robert H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic superconducting transition...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

susceptibility is anisotropic... Outline: 1. Superconductivity and Magnetic Fields 2. The Spin-Paramagnetic Transition 3. Spin... indicates an anisotropic ... Source:...

326

SciTech Connect: Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

that extends from room temperature to the superconducting transition. Although polarized neutron scattering studies hint at magnetic order associated with the pseudogap, there is...

327

New Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

announced that their superconducting magnet system passed a landmark reliability test, demonstrating its potential suitability for wide-scale commercial applications. This...

328

Superconducting fault-current limiter and inductor design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) that uses a biased superconducting inductor in a diode or thyristor bridge circuit was analyzed for transmission systems in 69, 138, and 230 rms kV utility transmission systems. The limiter was evaluated for costs with all components - superconducting coil, diode and/or SCR power electronics, high voltage insulation, high voltage bushings and vapor cooled leads, dewar, and refrigerator - included. A design was undertaken for the superconducting cable and coils for both diode and SCR 69 kV limiter circuits.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Chowdhuri, P.; Schermer, R.I.; Wollan, J.J.; Weldon, D.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Progress on a Superconducting Planar Undulator in the UK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superconducting (SC) undulators can potentially reach a higher field, for short period devices, than permanent magnet devices. The latest design work on a proposed superconducting planar undulator being designed in the UK by the STFC is presented. The initial layout of the undulator, including superconducting fill factor and the cryogenic system is presented. Calculations of the wakefield heating effects due to different vacuum vessels and electron beam configurations are also presented. Another important issue for superconducting planar undulators is the effect of engineering tolerances of the pole pieces: the computer simulated effects, for different size pole errors, on the electron beam trajectory and phase error through the device are also shown.

Scott, D. J.; Clarke, J. A. [ASTeC, Daresbury Laboratory, STFC, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Baynham, E.; Bradshaw, T.; Brummitt, A.; Burton, G.; Carr, S.; Hills, M.; Lintern, A.; Rochford, J.; Taylor, O.; Watson, S. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, STFC, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

330

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum-stabilized superconducting cables...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New superconducting technology will help America reduce the demand for additional electric power Summary: ,000-amp, 3-phase superconducting cable at American Electric Power's...

331

Ultrananocrystalline diamond films with optimized dielectric properties for advanced RF MEMS capacitive switches  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An efficient deposition process is provided for fabricating reliable RF MEMS capacitive switches with multilayer ultrananocrystalline (UNCD) films for more rapid recovery, charging and discharging that is effective for more than a billion cycles of operation. Significantly, the deposition process is compatible for integration with CMOS electronics and thereby can provide monolithically integrated RF MEMS capacitive switches for use with CMOS electronic devices, such as for insertion into phase array antennas for radars and other RF communication systems.

Sumant, Anirudha V.; Auciello, Orlando H.; Mancini, Derrick C.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Production and decay properties of the 1.9-s isomeric state in {sup 261}Rf  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1.9-s isomeric state ({sup 261}Rf{sup b}) in {sup 261}Rf was directly populated in the {sup 248}Cm({sup 18}O,5n){sup 261}Rf{sup b} reaction. Alpha and spontaneous fission (SF) decays of {sup 261}Rf{sup b}, as well as the 68-s state {sup 261}Rf{sup a}, was investigated with a rotating wheel apparatus under low background conditions attained by a gas-jet transport system coupled to the RIKEN gas-filled recoil ion separator. An identification of {sup 261}Rf{sup b} was based on {alpha}-{alpha} correlations linking {alpha} decays of {sup 261}Rf{sup b} and its daughter {sup 257}No. The {alpha}-particle energy of {sup 261}Rf{sup b} was measured to be 8.52 {+-} 0.05 MeV. The half-life was determined to be 1.9 {+-} 0.4 s based on both 8.52-MeV {alpha} and SF decays. The {alpha} and SF branches are 0.27 {+-} 0.06 and 0.73 {+-} 0.06, respectively. The cross section for the {sup 248}Cm({sup 18}O,5n){sup 261}Rf{sup b} reaction is {sigma}({sup 261}Rf{sup b}) = 11 {+-} 2 nb at 95.1 MeV, which gives a cross-section ratio of {sigma}({sup 261}Rf{sup a})/{sigma}({sup 261}Rf{sup b}) = 1.1 {+-} 0.2.

Haba, H.; Kaji, D.; Kikunaga, H.; Kudou, Y.; Morimoto, K.; Morita, K.; Ozeki, K.; Sumita, T.; Yoneda, A.; Kasamatsu, Y.; Komori, Y.; Ooe, K.; Shinohara, A. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

RF heating systems evolution for the WEST project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tore Supra is dedicated to long pulse operation at high power, with a record in injected energy of 1 GJ (2.8 MW × 380 s) and an achieved capability of 12 MW injected power delivered by 3 RF systems: Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD), Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH). The new WEST project (W [tungsten] Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) aims at fitting Tore Supra with an actively cooled tungsten coated wall and a bulk tungsten divertor. This new device will offer to ITER a test bed for validating the relevant technologies for actively cooled metallic components, with D-shaped H-mode plasmas. For WEST operation, different scenarii able to reproduce ITER relevant conditions in terms of steady state heat loads have been identified, ranging from a high RF power scenario (15 MW, 30 s) to a high fluence scenario (10 MW, 1000 s). This paper will focus on the evolution of the RF systems required for WEST. For the ICRH system, the main issues are its ELM resilience and its CW compatibility, three new actively cooled antennas are being designed, with the aim of reducing their sensitivity to the load variations induced by ELMs. The LH system has been recently upgraded with new klystrons and the PAM antenna, the possible reshaping of the antenna mouths is presently studied for matching with the magnetic field line in the WEST configuration. For the ECRH system, the device for the poloidal movement of the mirrors of the antenna is being changed for higher accuracy and speed.

Magne, R.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Argouarch, A.; Berger-By, G.; Bernard, J. M.; Bouquey, F.; Charabot, N.; Colas, L.; Corbel, E.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Guilhem, D.; Hillairet, J.; Jacquot, J.; Joffrin, E.; Litaudon, X.; Lombard, G.; Mollard, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); and others

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

334

Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadron Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of superconducting magnets to large-scale particle accelerators was successfully demonstrated with the completion of the Tevatron at Fermilab in 1983. This machine, utilizing dipole magnets operating at 4.5 T, has been operating successfully for the past 12 years. This success was followed a few years later by HERA, an electron-proton collider that uses superconducting quadrupoles and dipoles of a design similar to those in the Tevatron. The next major project was the ill-fated SSC, which was cancelled in 1993. However, the SSC R&D effort did succeed in demonstrating the reliable operation of dipole magnets up to 6.6 T. The LHC, now under construction, pushes the ductile superconductor, NbTi, to its limit in dipoles designed to operate at fields of 8.6 T at 1.8 K. Several recent studies have addressed the issues involved in taking the next step beyond the LHC. The Division of Particles and Fields Workshop on Future Hadron Facilities in the U.S., held at Indiana U. in 1994, examined two possible facilities--a 2-TeV on 2-TeV collider and a 30-Tev on 30-Tev collider. The participants arrived at the following conclusions with regard to superconducting magnets: (1) Superconducting magnets are the enabling technology for high energy colliders. As such, the highest priority for the future of hadron facilities in the U.S. is the reassembly of a U.S. superconducting magnet R&D program. (2) emphasis on conductor development and new magnet designs; and (3) goals of such a program might be (a) the development of a 9-10 Tesla magnet based on NbTi technology; (b) the development of high quality quadrupoles with gradients in the range 250-300 T/m; and (c) initiation of R&D activities aimed at moving beyond the existing technology as appears to be required for the development of a magnet operating at 12-15 Tesla. In order to reach fields above 10 T, magnet designers must turn to new materials with higher critical fields than that of NbTi. Several candidate conductors exist; unfortunately, all of these new materials are brittle, and thus pose new challenges to the magnet designers. At the same time that the forces on the magnet windings are increasing due to the higher Lorentz force associated with the higher magnetic fields, the conductor tensile strain must be limited to less than about 0.5% to prevent damage to the brittle superconducting material. Also, coil fabrication methods must be changed. If the superconductor is in the reacted, or brittle, state, the coil winding procedure must be modified to prevent overstraining. If the alternative wind and react approach is used, new insulating materials must be used that can survive the high temperature reactions (650 to 800 C) necessary to form the superconducting compounds. The issues associated with high-field dipole magnets have been discussed at a number of workshops, including those at DESY in 1991 and LBL in 1992. These workshops were extremely useful in defining the problems and focusing the attention of both materials and magnet experts on high-field dipole magnets; however, since neither set of proceedings was published, the information is not readily available. More recently, a workshop was held in Erice, Italy, under the sponsorship of the Ettore Maiorana Center for Scientific Culture. This international workshop was attended by 20 scientists from Europe, Japan, and the U.S., and the summary of that work, which represents the most recent and thorough assessment of the status of high-field magnets for accelerator magnets, is presented.

Scanlan, R.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Dell'Orco, D.; McInturff, A.D.; Asner, A.; Collings, E.W.; Dahl, P.F.; Desportes, H.; Devred, A.; Garre, R.; Gregory, E.; Hassenzahl, W.; Lamm, M.; Larbalestier, D.; Leory, D.; McIntyre, P.; Miller, J.; Shintomi, T.; ten Kate, H.; Wipf, S.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

E-Print Network 3.0 - aps linac rf Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the gradient... - cient use of the linacs and the RF power, at the cost ... Source: Berg, J. Scott - Department of Physics, Brookhaven National Laboratory Collection: Physics 4...

336

TESLA FEL Report 200602 Finite Element Analyses for RF Photoinjector Gun Cavities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TESLA FEL Report 200602 Finite Element Analyses for RF Photoinjector Gun ..............................................................................................................................................................19 3.1. DESY GUN 2..................................................................................................................................................19 3.2. DESY GUN 4

337

E-Print Network 3.0 - argon rf plasma Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 6 REVERSE-VORTEX PLASMA STABILIZATION: EXPERIMENTS AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION Summary: -Frequency (RF)...

338

RF-driven advanced modes of ITER operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of the Radio Frequency heating and current drive systems on the ITER advanced scenarios is analyzed by means of the CRONOS suite of codes for integrated tokamak modelling. As a first step, the code is applied to analyze a high power advanced scenario discharge of JET in order to validate both the heating and current drive modules and the overall simulation procedure. Then, ITER advanced scenarios, based on Radio Frequency systems, are studied on the basis of previous results. These simulations show that both hybrid and steady-state scenarios could be possible within the ITER specifications, using RF heating and current drive only.

Garcia, J.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Decker, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Hawkes, N.; Imbeaux, F.; Litaudon, X.; Mailloux, J.; Peysson, Y.; Schneider, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Brix, M. [UKAEA/Euratom Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

339

High-voltage R-F feedthrough bushing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a multi-element, high voltage radio frequency bushing for transmitting rf energy to an antenna located in a vacuum container. The bushing includes a center conductor of complex geometrical shape, an outer coaxial shield conductor, and a thin-walled hollow truncated cone insulator disposed between central and outer conductors. The shape of the center conductor, which includes a reverse curvature portion formed of a radially inwardly directed shoulder and a convex portion, controls the uniformity of the axial surface gradient on the insulator cone. The outer shield has a first substantially cylindrical portion and a second radially inwardly extending truncated cone portion.

Grotz, G.F.

1982-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

340

Asymmetric Bimodal Accelerator Cavity for Raising rf Breakdown Thresholds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider an axisymmetric microwave cavity for an accelerator structure whose eigenfrequency for its second lowest TM-like axisymmetric mode is twice that of the lowest such mode, and for which the fields are asymmetric along its axis. In this cavity, the peak amplitude of the rf electric field that points into either longitudinal face can be smaller than the peak field which points out. Computations show that a structure using such cavities might support an accelerating gradient about 47% greater than that for a structure using similar single-mode cavities, without an increase in breakdown probability.

Kuzikov, S. V. [Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06510 (United States); Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov Street, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Kazakov, S. Yu. [Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06510 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Jiang, Y. [Physics Department, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8120 (United States); Hirshfield, J. L. [Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06510 (United States); Physics Department, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8120 (United States)

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

THERMAL MODELING OF ION EXCHANGE COLUMNS WITH SPHERICAL RF RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models have been developed to simulate the thermal performance of RF columns fully loaded with radioactive cesium. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated during Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process upset conditions with a focus on implementation at Hanford. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results will provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on RF. The current full-scale design for the SCIX system includes a central cooling tube, and one objective of these calculations was to examine its elimination to simplify the design. Results confirmed that a column design without a central cooling tube is feasible for RF, allowing for the possibility of significant design simplifications if it can be assumed that the columns are always filled with liquid. With active cooling through the four outer tubes, the maximum column diameter expected to maintain the temperature below the assumed media and safety limits is 26 inches, which is comparable to the current design diameter. Additional analysis was conducted to predict the maximum column temperatures for the previously unevaluated accident scenario involving inadvertent drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, with retention of the ion exchange media and cesium in the column. As expected, much higher maximum temperatures are observed in this case due to the poor heat transfer properties of air versus liquid. For this hypothetical accident scenario involving inadvertent and complete drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, the modeling results indicate that the maximum temperature within a 28 inch diameter RF column with external cooling is expected to exceed 250 C within 2 days, while the maximum temperature of a 12 inch column is maintained below 100 C. In addition, the calculation results demonstrate that the cooling tube system external to an air-filled column is not highly effective at reducing the maximum temperature, but the baseline design using a central cooling tube inside the column provides sufficient cooling to maintain the maximum temperature near the assumed safety limit.

Lee, S.; King, W.

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Glass antenna for RF-ion source operation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An antenna comprises a plurality of small diameter conductive wires disposed in a dielectric tube. The number and dimensions of the conductive wires is selected to improve the RF resistance of the antenna while also facilitating a reduction in thermal gradients that may create thermal stresses on the dielectric tube. The antenna may be mounted in a vacuum system using a low-stress antenna assembly that cushions and protects the dielectric tube from shock and mechanical vibration while also permitting convenient electrical and coolant connections to the antenna.

Leung, Ka Ngo (Hercules, CA); Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette (Berkeley, CA); Perkins, Luke T. (Plainsboro, NJ)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Frequency and amplitude control for an experimental linac rf drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, India Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. S. P. Bhattacharyya, The Texas Accelerator Center (TAC) experimental linear accelerator uses a radio- frequency quadrupole (RFQ) to accelerate a 10 mA beam of H ions to 500 keV. It is to be used as an injector... to form a high-energy input beam for large circular accelerators. The pulsed beam will require 100 kW peak rf power at 473 MHz. To satisfy the beam dynamics requirements for particle acceleration and to minimize beam spill, the frequency of the source...

Atre, Mahesh Purushottam

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Capacitively coupled RF voltage probe having optimized flux linkage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

Moore, James A. (Powell, TN); Sparks, Dennis O. (Maryville, TN)

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

345

Magnetic phase diagram of small superconducting two-loop networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The critical magnetic behaviour of simple superconducting micro-networks is illustrat- ed by discussing several properties of super- conducting micro-networks [1-3], see also [4]. This theoretical activity has beenL-277 Magnetic phase diagram of small superconducting two-loop networks J. Riess Centre de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

346

A CURRENT CONTROLLED VARIABLE DELAY SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSMISSION LINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I I I I 1388 A CURRENT CONTROLLED VARIABLE DELAY SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSMISSION LINE S. M. Anlage, H line. The device makes use of the change in kinetic inductance of a superconducting transmission line, fabrication of transmission lines with such films provides the means for constructing a continuously variable

Anlage, Steven

347

Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure is disclosed. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing. 9 figs.

Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.; Abdoud, R.G.

1996-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

MOTT INSULATORS, SPIN LIQUIDS AND QUANTUM DISORDERED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COURSE 7 MOTT INSULATORS, SPIN LIQUIDS AND QUANTUM DISORDERED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY MATTHEW P.A. FISHER insulators and quantum magnetism 583 3.1 Spin models and quantum magnetism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637 #12;MOTT INSULATORS, SPIN LIQUIDS AND QUANTUM DISORDERED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY Matthew P.A. Fisher

349

Superconductivity in gallium-substituted Ba8Si46 clathrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

superconductor, with an onset at T-C approximate to 3.3 K. For x=10 and higher, no superconductivity was observed down to T=1.8 K. This represents a strong suppression of superconductivity with increasing Ga content, compared to Ba8Si46 with T-C approximate to 8...

Li, Yang; Zhang, Ruihong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Ning; Luo, Z. P.; Ma, Xingqiao; Cao, Guohui; Feng, Z. S.; Hu, Chia-Ren; Ross, Joseph H., Jr.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

EIS-0138-S: Superconducting Super Collider, Supplemental, Waxahatchie, Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this supplementary statement to analyze the environmental impacts of design modifications to the Superconducting Super Collider that were made following the publication of the Record of Decision that selected Ellis County, Texas, as the location of the laboratory facility. This statement supplements DOE/EIS-0138, Superconducting Super Collider.

351

Singlet oxygen luminescence detection with a fibre-coupled superconducting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Singlet oxygen luminescence detection with a fibre-coupled superconducting nanowire single Triplet State Singlet State 1O2 Ground State Oxygen 3O2 Singlet oxygen Free space singlet oxygen luminescence detection Fibre-based singlet oxygen luminescence detection References Superconducting Detector

Greenaway, Alan

352

Non-Abelian Superconducting Pumps Valentina Brosco,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-Abelian Superconducting Pumps Valentina Brosco,1,2 Rosario Fazio,3,4 F. W. J. Hekking,5; published 17 January 2008) Cooper pair pumping is a coherent process. We derive a general expression for the adiabatic pumped charge in superconducting nanocircuits in the presence of level degeneracy and relate

Joye, Alain

353

Index of /research/alcator/facility/Procedures/RF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RF RF [ICO] Name Last modified Size Description [DIR] Parent Directory - [ ] 0D8C3B68.pdf 08-May-2003 07:16 60K [ ] 0D8C3B68 Driver Kaptons.PDF 08-May-2003 07:16 69K [ ] 2002-10-28 - FMIT-3 Tuning to 78 MHZ.pdf 08-May-2003 07:16 425K [ ] FMIT 1 Crowb-et Access.pdf 08-May-2003 07:16 38K [ ] FMIT 1 Trans-cess.doc..pdf 08-May-2003 07:16 38K [ ] FMIT 1 Transformer Entry.pdf 08-May-2003 07:16 46K [ ] FMIT 2 Crowba-et access.pdf 08-May-2003 07:16 38K [ ] FMIT 2 Trans-cess.doc..pdf 08-May-2003 07:16 38K [ ] FMIT 2 Transformer Entry.pdf 08-May-2003 07:16 46K [ ] FMIT 3 Crowb-et Access.pdf 08-May-2003 07:16 38K [ ] FMIT 3 Trans-et Access.pdf 08-May-2003 07:16 38K [ ] FMIT 4 Crowb-et Access.pdf 08-May-2003 07:16 38K

354

Non-fusion applications of RF and microwave technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The processing of materials using rf and/or microwave power is a broad area that has grown significantly in the past few years. The authors have applied rf and microwave technology in the areas of ceramic sintering, plasma processing, and waste processing. The sintering of ceramics in the frequency range of 50 MHz-28 GHz has lead to unique material characteristics compared to materials that have been sintered conventionally. It has been demonstrated that sintering can be achieved in a variety of materials, including alumina, zirconia, silicon carbide, and boron carbide. In the area of plasma processing, progress has been made in the development and understanding of high density plasma sources, including inductively coupled plasma (ICP) sources. The effects of processing conditions on the ion energy distribution at the substrate surface (a critical processing issue) have been determined for a variety of process gases. The relationship between modeling and experiment is being established. Microwave technology has also been applied to the treatment of radioactive and chemical waste. The application of microwaves to the removal of contaminated concrete has been demonstrated. Details of these programs and other potential application areas are discussed.

Caughman, J.B.O.; Baity, F.W.; Bigelow, T.S.; Gardner, W.L.; Hoffman, D.J.; Forrester, S.C.; White, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

System studies of rf current drive for MST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two rf schemes are being studied on the MST reversed field pinch for their potential in current profile control experiments. MHD modeling has shown that a substantial externally-driven off axis parallel current can improve stability of the dominant core tearing modes. A radially localized axisymmetric population of fast electrons has been observed by SXR emission during LH injection (100kW at 800MHz), and is consistent with CQL3D modeling which predicts a small driven current. Computational work suggests that doubling the input power will statistically improve the LH-induced SXR signal to background ratio, and that about 2MW of injected power (an order of magnitude increase) will drive enough current for stabilization of tearing modes. Additionally, a 1 MW 5.5 GHz electron Bernstein wave (EBW) experiment is under construction, which utilizes a very simple and compact antenna compatible with the demands of the RFP. EBW allows access to electron cyclotron heating and current drive in the overdense plasma. Coupling of the external electromagnetic wave to the EBW has been demonstrated, and initial tests at {approx}100kW power have produced a small, localized xray flux consistent with rf heating and high diffusivity of fast electrons. Computational work is currently underway to answer the very important questions of how much power is required, and what level of electron diffusivity is tolerable, to generate a consequential amount of EBW current.

Anderson, J. K.; Burke, D. R.; Forest, C. B.; Goetz, J. A.; Hendries, E. R.; Seltzman, A. H.; Thomas, M. A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Diem, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN (United States); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, CA (United States); Kaufman, M. C. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

356

Library for RF Interactions in Orbit Following Codes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new code-library has been developed to handle quasi-linear wave particle interactions in orbit following Monte Carlo codes, RFOF (RF interactions in Orbit Following codes). This library will enable a large number of orbit following codes to model fast ion acceleration during ICRF and Lower Hybrid heating. The RFOF consists of two main modules: one evaluates the resonance condition, the other the resulting RF acceleration. The resonance condition is tested at each step along the orbit and the location of the next upcoming resonance is predicted. When a particle reaches the resonance, a quasi-linear acceleration is calculated with a novel Monte Carlo technique that avoids the time-consuming evaluation of phase-space derivatives of the interaction strength. In RFOF the wave-particles interactions are assumed to be localized to a single point on the orbit. This is often valid for the ion cyclotron and lower hybrid frequency ranges, but prevents the treatment of bounce and precessional resonances. The RFOF has been developed within the European Task Force for Integrated Tokamak Modelling, enabling interaction between experts in different fields. As a result the code is designed with a simple and generic interface, with a minimum of assumptions on e.g. the geometry. Successful integration with the two orbit following codes, ASCOT and SPOT, has already been demonstrated.

Johnson, T.; Hellsten, T.; Hoeoek, L. J. [Association EURATOM-VR, rary for RF Interactions in Orbit Following CoKTH (Sweden); Salmi, A. [Association Euratom - TEKES, Aalto University (Finland); Steinbrecher, G. [Association EURATOM-MEdC, Univ. of Craiova (Romania); Eriksson, L.-G. [European Commission, Research Directorate General (Belgium); Schneider, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

357

Development of a machine protection system for the Superconducting Beam Test Facility at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fermilab's Superconducting RF Beam Test Facility currently under construction will produce electron beams capable of damaging the acceleration structures and the beam line vacuum chambers in the event of an aberrant accelerator pulse. The accelerator is being designed with the capability to operate with up to 3000 bunches per macro-pulse, 5Hz repetition rate and 1.5 GeV beam energy. It will be able to sustain an average beam power of 72 KW at the bunch charge of 3.2 nC. Operation at full intensity will deposit enough energy in niobium material to approach the melting point of 2500 C. In the early phase with only 3 cryomodules installed the facility will be capable of generating electron beam energies of 810 MeV and an average beam power that approaches 40 KW. In either case a robust Machine Protection System (MPS) is required to mitigate effects due to such large damage potentials. This paper will describe the MPS system being developed, the system requirements and the controls issues under consideration.

Warner, A.; Carmichael, L.; Church, M.; Neswold, R.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DUPONT SUPERCONDUCTIVITY FOR AN ADVANCE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DUPONT SUPERCONDUCTIVITY FOR AN ADVANCE DUPONT SUPERCONDUCTIVITY FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-FC36-99GO10287; W(A)-99-008; CH-1002 The Petitioner, DuPont Superconductivity (hereinafter "DuPont"), has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions arising from its participation under the above referenced contract entitled "High Temperature Superconducting Reciprocating Magnetic Separator". This contract relates to the construction of 1/4 commercial scale High Temperature Superconducting (hereinafter "HTS") Reciprocating Magnetic Separations Unit for the purification ofkaoline clay and titanium dioxide. It is anticipated that this project will be performed in three phases, over a period of

359

Los Alamos scientists see new mechanism for superconductivity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New mechanism for superconductivity New mechanism for superconductivity Los Alamos scientists see new mechanism for superconductivity Researchers have posited an explanation for superconductivity that may open the door to the discovery of new, unconventional forms of superconductivity. November 24, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

360

Superconducting phase transitions in ultrathin TiN film.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building on the complete account of quantum contributions to conductivity, we demonstrate that the resistance of thin superconducting films exhibits a non-monotonic temperature behavior due to the competition between weak localization, electron-electron interaction, and superconducting fluctuations. We show that superconducting fluctuations give rise to an appreciable decrease in the resistance even at temperatures well exceeding the superconducting transition temperature, T{sub c}, with this decrease being dominated by the Maki-Thompson process. The transition to a global phase-coherent superconducting state occurs via the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) transition, which we observe both by power-law behavior in current-voltage characteristics and by flux flow transport in the magnetic field. The ratio T{sub BKT}/T{sub c} follows the universal relation.

Baturina, T. I.; Postolova, S. V.; Mironov, A. Yu.; Glatz, A.; Baklanov, M. R.; Vinokur, V. M. (Materials Science Division); (A. V. Rzhanov Inst. Semicond. Phys.); (IMEC)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Surface Impedance in the Surface Superconducting State  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To enable a simple calculation of the microwave surface resistance, the surface superconducting state is approximated by a model in which a layer of uniform order parameter is considered superposed on the normal bulk. Appropriate values for the order parameter and thickness of this layer were chosen with the use of the numerical solutions of the Ginsburg-Landau equations by Fink and Kessinger. A Gorter-Casimir temperature dependence was used for the order parameter and the Maki temperature dependence for ?. Our experiments on Pb-In alloys at frequencies of 9.5, 23, and 55 Gc/sec are in good agreement with the calculations.

Allen Rothwarf; Jonathan I. Gittleman; Bruce Rosenblum

1967-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

362

Nanometric constrictions in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the design, fabrication and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators with nanoscopic constrictions. By reducing the size of the center line down to 50 nm, the radio frequency currents are concentrated and the magnetic field in its vicinity is increased. The device characteristics are only slightly modified by the constrictions, with changes in resonance frequency lower than 1% and internal quality factors of the same order of magnitude as the original ones. These devices could enable the achievement of higher couplings to small magnetic samples or even to single molecular spins and have applications in circuit quantum electrodynamics, quantum computing and electron paramagnetic resonance.

Mark David Jenkins; Uta Naether; Miguel Ciria; Javier Sesé; James Atkinson; Carlos Sánchez-Azqueta; Enrique del Barco; Johannes Majer; David Zueco; Fernando Luis

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

363

Lattice Vibrations and Superconductivity in Layered Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 2, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOB ER, 1970 Lattice Vibrations and Superconductivity in Layered Structures* B. E. Allen, G. P. Alldredge, and F. W. de bette DePartment of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (Received 18... monolayers of identical particles, stacked atop one another to form a 21-layer slab. A side view of this system is shown in Fig. 1. The films alternately have atomic masses m and M, with m corresponding to the outermost films. The crys- tal structure...

Allen, Roland E.; Alldredg, GP; WETTE, FWD.

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

R&D Requirements, RF Gun Mode Studies, FEL-2 Steady-State Studies, Preliminary FEL-1 Time-Dependent Studies, and Preliminary Layout Option Investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R&D Requirements, RF Gun Mode Studies, FEL-2 Steady-Stateinitial studies of the RF gun mode-coupling and potentialas more novel rf photocathode gun configurations – these may

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Simulation of Ion Back BomBardment in a High Average Current RF Photo-Gun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Average Current RF Photo-Gun J. Qiang Lawrence Berkeleycurrent radio-frequency (RF) photo-gun using a particle-in-of high average current RF photo-guns have been proposed or

Qiang, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Permanent-magnet helicon sources and arrays: a new type of rf plasma Francis F. Chena)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Permanent-magnet helicon sources and arrays: a new type of rf plasma Francis F. Chena) and Humberto mechanism of RF coupling. However, the requirement of a dc magnetic field has prevented their wide acceptance in industry. The use of permanent magnets greatly simplifies helicon sources, and arrays of small

Chen, Francis F.

367

Permanent-magnet helicon sources and arrays: A new type of rf plasmaa... Francis F. Chenb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Permanent-magnet helicon sources and arrays: A new type of rf plasmaa... Francis F. Chenb mechanism of rf coupling. However, the requirement of a dc magnetic field has prevented their wide acceptance in industry. The use of permanent magnets greatly simplifies helicon sources, and arrays of small

Chen, Francis F.

368

PERFORMANCE STATUS OF THE RF-GUN BASED INJECTOR OF THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERFORMANCE STATUS OF THE RF-GUN BASED INJECTOR OF THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC S. Schreiber. For this, an rf-gun based photoinjec- tor was installed late 1998 and is in operation since then gun [4] to match the beam charcteristics as close as pos- sible to the TESLA proposal. It is able

369

Studies of TTF RF Photocathode Gun using acoustic sensors J. Nelson and M. Ross  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Studies of TTF RF Photocathode Gun using acoustic sensors J. Nelson and M. Ross SLAC November 27 RF high voltage breakdown locations in the photocathode gun system. It is not known if the acoustic gun [4] to locate its breakdown events during operation with a pulse length of 300µs and a pulse

370

FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH THE RF GUN BASED INJECTOR FOR THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH THE RF GUN BASED INJECTOR FOR THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC S. Schreiber was produced by a sub-harmonic in- jector using a thermionic gun, a buncher cavity, and one standard Linear Collider, a laser driven rf gun has been de- veloped and been brought in operation late fall 1998

371

Improved wireless security for GMSK-based devices using RF fingerprinting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gaussian minimum shift keying (GMSK) is employed in current global system for mobile (GSM) networks and remains a viable option for future wireless systems. Physical layer (PHY) security is demonstrated using RF fingerprints from ... Keywords: GMSK, GSM networks, Gaussian minimum shift keying, MDA, PHY security, RF fingerprinting, SEI, authentication, electronic security, multiple discriminant analysis, physical layer, specific emitter identification, wireless networks, wireless security

Donald R. Reising; Michael A. Temple; Michael J. Mendenhall

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Laser-rf creation and diagnostics of seeded atmospheric pressure air and nitrogen plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser-rf creation and diagnostics of seeded atmospheric pressure air and nitrogen plasmas Siqi Luo to the ambient air. The atmospheric-pressure plasma is then maintained with the 13.56 MHz rf power. Using of atmospheric-pressure air plasmas The kinetics of reactions and transitions in atmospheric- pressure air

Scharer, John E.

373

Tore Supra LH transmitter upgrade, a new RF driver for the power spectrum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New real time tools have been developed for testing new 700kW/3.7GHz/CW klystrons and for the operations on very long plasma shots. After the commissioning of the 18 series tubes on the high power test bed facility, the installation of the first 8 klystrons in the Tore Supra transmitter and the adjustment tests on load, this upgrade work has been materialized during the last 2010 campaign by a successful operation on the Full Active Multijunction (FAM) C3 antenna, with new performances: 3.5MW/40s on plasma. The RF output power control in amplitude and phase has been improved for a better control of the wave spectrum launched into the plasma. The new klystrons have no modulating anode and the high cathode voltage must be adjusted with the RF input power in order to optimize the RF output power with a minimization of the thermal power losses in the collector. A new phase correction, depending on the 3 RF output power ranges used, has been introduced. The improvements made in 2009 and 2010 on the generic phase loop and the procedures used during the real time tests of the RF transfer functions in amplitude and phase are detailed below. All RF measurements systems, RF safety systems and the RF calibration procedures have been revised in order to have the best consistency, reproducibility and with a measurement error against the calorimetry measurement lower than 10%.

Berger-By, G.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Bouquey, F.; Corbel, E.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Lombard, G.; Magne, R.; Mollard, P.; Pagano, M.; Prou, M.; Samaille, F.; Volpe, D.; Volpe, R. [CEA IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

374

Proposal of an Arc Detection Technique Based on RF Measurements for the ITER ICRF Antenna  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RF arc detection is a key operational and safety issue for the ICRF system on ITER. Indeed the high voltages inside the antenna put it at risk of arcing, which could cause substantial damage. This paper describes the various possibilities explored by circuit simulation and the strategy now considered to protect the ITER ICRF antenna from RF arcs.

Huygen, S.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Messiaen, A.; Vervier, M.; Vrancken, M. [LPP/ERM-KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels (Belgium); Wooldridge, E. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

375

High tunability barium strontium titanate thin films for rf circuit applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High tunability barium strontium titanate thin films for rf circuit applications N. K. Pervez,a) P) Large variations in the permittivity of rf magnetron sputtered thin-film barium strontium titanate have/cm. © 2004 American Institute of Physics. [DOI: 10.1063/1.1818724] Barium strontium titanate (BST) is a solid

York, Robert A.

376

Radar Vibrometry: Investigating the Potential of RF microwaves to measure vibrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radar Vibrometry: Investigating the Potential of RF microwaves to measure vibrations K A Tsolis, C classification process. Recent research on vibrometry, the process of conducting vibration measurements. With this study we make a primary investigation of the capabilities of RF radar systems to measure vibrations. We

Haddadi, Hamed

377

Ambient-RF-Energy-Harvesting Sensor Node with Capacitor-Leakage-Aware Duty Cycle Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems, RF powered systems present a new challenge for the energy management. A WSN node repeatedly in the capacitor. Therefore, we implemented an adaptive duty cycle control scheme that is optimized for RF energy but is not affected by weather and so it is more stable than solar and wind power. Almost all energy management

Tentzeris, Manos

378

Analytical Model for RF Power Performance of Deeply Scaled CMOS Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

predictions from the model with measured load-pull data on 45 nm CMOS devices. II. MODEL DESCRIPTION The power by the load resistor. Fig. 1: Circuit diagram of a reduced conduction angle RF power amplifier. Fig. 2Analytical Model for RF Power Performance of Deeply Scaled CMOS Devices Usha Gogineni1 , Jesús del

del Alamo, Jesús A.

379

Study of high pressure gas filled RF cavities for muon collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next-generation high-energy lepton collider machine. Operating an RF cavity in a multi-Tesla magnet is a critical requirement in a muon accelerator and a cooling channel. However, the maximum RF gradient in a vacuum RF cavity is strongly limited by an external magnetic field. Dense hydrogen gas filled RF cavity has been proposed since it is functional of generating a high RF accelerating gradient in a strong magnetic field and making an ionization cooling process at the same time. A critical issue of the cavity is a beam- induced plasma that consumes a considerable amount of RF power. The gas filled RF test cell was made and measured the RF loading due to a beam-induced plasma by using an intense proton beam at Fermilab. By doping an electronegative gas in dense hydrogen, the plasma loading effect is significantly mitigated. The result shows that the cavity is functional with a muon collider beam. Recent progress is shown in this presentation.

Yonehara, Katsuya

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

RF propagation in an HVAC duct system: impulse response characteristics of the channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RF propagation in an HVAC duct system: impulse response characteristics of the channel Pavel V, the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) duct system in buildings is a complex network of hollow at RF and microwave frequencies of com- mon interest. HVAC ducts can be used as a wireless communication

Stancil, Daniel D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A Time-AverageModel of the RF PlasmaSheath Demetre J, Economou.3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Time-AverageModel of the RF PlasmaSheath Demetre J, Economou.3 Department of Chemical Engineering 97077 Richard C. Alkire* Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 6t801 ABSTRACT A time-average model of the RF plasma sheath was developed. The ion "fluid" equations

Economou, Demetre J.

382

Design of the Prototypical Cryomodule for the EUROTRANS Superconducting Linac for Nuclear Waste Transmutation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of the Prototypical Cryomodule for the EUROTRANS Superconducting Linac for Nuclear Waste Transmutation

Barbanotti, S; Blache, P; Commeaux, C; Duthil, P; Panzeri, N; Pierini, P; Rampnoux, E; Souli, M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Studies on the Matching Network of the High Power Radio Frequency Transmitter for the NBI RF Ion Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radio frequency (RF) driven ion source has been developed at ASIPP (Institute of Plasma Physics, CAS) for the neutral beam injector with a 1 MHz, 25 kW RF power supply system. The paper describes the studies pe...

Renxue Su; Zhimin Liu; Yahong Xie; Yuqian Chen; Yuming Gu…

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The external magnetic field dependence of RF splitting of57Fe hyperfine lines. NMR + Mössbauer double resonance experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the results of an experimental investigation of a RF splitting of57Fe hyperfine lines in the regime of NMR and Mössbauer ... have been performed as a function of RF field intensity and static magnetic

F. G. Vagizov

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR FIXED CST AND RF COLUMNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of a small column ion exchange (SCIX) process for the Savannah River Site waste processing program, transient and steady state two-dimensional heat transfer models have been constructed for columns loaded with cesium-saturated crystalline silicotitanate (CST) or spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) beads and 6 molar sodium tank waste supernate. Radiolytic decay of sorbed cesium results in heat generation within the columns. The models consider conductive heat transfer only with no convective cooling and no process flow within the columns (assumed column geometry: 27.375 in ID with a 6.625 in OD center-line cooling pipe). Heat transfer at the column walls was assumed to occur by natural convection cooling with 35 C air. A number of modeling calculations were performed using this computational heat transfer approach. Minimal additional calculations were also conducted to predict temperature increases expected for salt solution processed through columns of various heights at the slowest expected operational flow rate of 5 gpm. Results for the bounding model with no process flow and no active cooling indicate that the time required to reach the boiling point of {approx}130 C for a CST-salt solution mixture containing 257 Ci/liter of Cs-137 heat source (maximum expected loading for SCIX applications) at 35 C initial temperature is about 6 days. Modeling results for a column actively cooled with external wall jackets and the internal coolant pipe (inlet coolant water temperature: 25 C) indicate that the CST column can be maintained non-boiling under these conditions indefinitely. The results also show that the maximum temperature of an RF-salt solution column containing 133 Ci/liter of Cs-137 (maximum expected loading) will never reach boiling under any conditions (maximum predicted temperature without cooling: 88 C). The results indicate that a 6-in cooling pipe at the center of the column provides the most effective cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum temperature with either ion exchange material. Sensitivity calculations for the RF resin porosity, the ambient external column temperature, and the cooling system configuration were performed under the baseline conditions to assess the impact of these parameters on the maximum temperatures. It is noted that the cooling mechanism at the column boundary (forced versus natural convection) and the cooling system configuration significantly impact the maximum temperatures. The analysis results provide quantitative information associated with process temperature control requirements and management of the SCIX column.

Lee, S

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

386

Extended Supersymmetry in Gapped and Superconducting Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In view of the many quantum field theoretical descriptions of graphene in $2+1$ dimensions, we present another field theoretical feature of graphene, in the presence of defects. Particularly, we shall be interested in gapped graphene in the presence of a domain wall and also for superconducting graphene in the presence of a vortex. As we explicitly demonstrate, the gapped graphene electrons that are localized on the domain wall are associated with four $N=2$ one dimensional supersymmetries, with each pair combining to form an extended $N=4$ supersymmetry with non-trivial topological charges. The case of superconducting graphene is more involved, with the electrons localized on the vortex being associated with $n$ one dimensional supersymmetries, which in turn combine to form an $N=2n$ extended supersymmetry with no-trivial topological charges. As we shall prove, all supersymmetries are unbroken, a feature closely related to the number of the localized fermions and also to the exact form of the associated oper...

Oikonomou, V K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Extended Supersymmetry in Gapped and Superconducting Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In view of the many quantum field theoretical descriptions of graphene in $2+1$ dimensions, we present another field theoretical feature of graphene, in the presence of defects. Particularly, we shall be interested in gapped graphene in the presence of a domain wall and also for superconducting graphene in the presence of a vortex. As we explicitly demonstrate, the gapped graphene electrons that are localized on the domain wall are associated with four $N=2$ one dimensional supersymmetries, with each pair combining to form an extended $N=4$ supersymmetry with non-trivial topological charges. The case of superconducting graphene is more involved, with the electrons localized on the vortex being associated with $n$ one dimensional supersymmetries, which in turn combine to form an $N=2n$ extended supersymmetry with no-trivial topological charges. As we shall prove, all supersymmetries are unbroken, a feature closely related to the number of the localized fermions and also to the exact form of the associated operators. In addition, the corresponding Witten index is invariant under compact and odd perturbations.

V. K. Oikonomou

2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Simulating weak localization using superconducting quantum circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding complex quantum matter presents a central challenge in condensed matter physics. The difficulty lies in the exponential scaling of the Hilbert space with the system size, making solutions intractable for both analytical and conventional numerical methods. As originally envisioned by Richard Feynman, this class of problems can be tackled using controllable quantum simulators. Despite many efforts, building an quantum emulator capable of solving generic quantum problems remains an outstanding challenge, as this involves controlling a large number of quantum elements. Here, employing a multi-element superconducting quantum circuit and manipulating a single microwave photon, we demonstrate that we can simulate the weak localization phenomenon observed in mesoscopic systems. By engineering the control sequence in our emulator circuit, we are also able to reproduce the well-known temperature dependence of weak localization. Furthermore, we can use our circuit to continuously tune the level of disorder, a parameter that is not readily accessible in mesoscopic systems. By demonstrating a high level of control and complexity, our experiment shows the potential for superconducting quantum circuits to realize scalable quantum simulators.

Yu Chen; P. Roushan; D. Sank; C. Neill; Erik Lucero; Matteo Mariantoni; R. Barends; B. Chiaro; J. Kelly; A. Megrant; J. Y. Mutus; P. J. J. O'Malley; A. Vainsencher; J. Wenner; T. C. White; Yi Yin; A. N. Cleland; John M. Martinis

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

389

Midwest superconductivity consortium. 1993 Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, in the fourth year of operations further strengthened its mission to advance the science and understanding of high T{sub c} superconductivity. The goals of the organization and the individual projects continue to reflect the current needs for new knowledge in the field and the unique capabilities of the institutions involved. Group efforts and cooperative laboratory interactions to achieve the greatest possible synergy under the Consortium continue to be emphasized. Industrial affiliations coupled with technology transfer initiatives were expanded. Activities of the participants during the past year achieved an interactive and high level of performance. The number of notable achievements in the field contributed by Consortium investigators increased. The programmatic research continues to focus upon key materials-related problems in two areas. The first area has a focus upon {open_quotes}Synthesis and Processing{close_quotes} while the second is centered around {open_quotes}Limiting Features in Transport Properties of High T{sub c} Materials{close_quotes}.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Superconducting materials for large scale applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant improvements in the properties ofsuperconducting materials have occurred recently. These improvements arebeing incorporated into the latest generation of wires, cables, and tapesthat are being used in a broad range of prototype devices. These devicesinclude new, high field accelerator and NMR magnets, magnets for fusionpower experiments, motors, generators, and power transmission lines.These prototype magnets are joining a wide array of existing applicationsthat utilize the unique capabilities of superconducting magnets:accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider, fusion experiments suchas ITER, 930 MHz NMR, and 4 Tesla MRI. In addition, promising newmaterials such as MgB2 have been discovered and are being studied inorder to assess their potential for new applications. In this paper, wewill review the key developments that are leading to these newapplications for superconducting materials. In some cases, the key factoris improved understanding or development of materials with significantlyimproved properties. An example of the former is the development of Nb3Snfor use in high field magnets for accelerators. In other cases, thedevelopment is being driven by the application. The aggressive effort todevelop HTS tapes is being driven primarily by the need for materialsthat can operate at temperatures of 50 K and higher. The implications ofthese two drivers for further developments will be discussed. Finally, wewill discuss the areas where further improvements are needed in order fornew applications to be realized.

Scanlan, Ronald M.; Malozemoff, Alexis P.; Larbalestier, David C.

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

391

Development of superconducting magnet systems for HIFExperiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing superconducting focusing quadrupoles for near-term experiments and future driver accelerators. Following the fabrication and testing of several models, a baseline quadrupole design was selected and further optimized. The first prototype of the optimized design achieved a conductor-limited gradient of 132 T/m in a 70 mm bore, with measured field harmonics within 10 parts in 10{sup 4}. In parallel, a compact focusing doublet was fabricated and tested using two of the first-generation quadrupoles. After assembly in the cryostat, both magnets reached their conductor-limited quench current. Further optimization steps are currently underway to improve the performance of the magnet system and reduce its cost. They include the fabrication and testing of a new prototype quadrupole with reduced field errors as well as improvements of the cryostat design for the focusing doublet. The prototype units will be installed in the HCX beamline at LBNL, to perform accelerator physics experiments and gain operational experience. Successful results in the present phase will make superconducting magnets a viable option for the next generation of integrated beam experiments.

Sabbi, Gian Luca; Faltens, A.; Leitzke, A.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Martovets ky, N.; Chiesa, L.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Goodzeit, C.; Hwang, P.; Hinson, W.; Meinke, R.

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

392

RF Heating in Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ECRIS-Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources are able to feed accelerators with intense currents of highly charged ions. In ECRIS a high density-high temperature plasma is generated by means of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating inside a B-min, MHD stable trap. The state of the art about the principal heating mechanisms will be given. The paper will specially discuss the most critical and still open issues concerning the influence of the magnetic field and of the RF frequency on the plasma heating, as well as the impact of possible non-linear pumping wave-to-plasma interactions. The contribution of INFN-LNS will be specifically underlined. A short review on the future perspectives for the design of new generation ion sources will be given in conclusion.

Mascali, D. [INFN - LNS, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria, 6 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G. [INFN - LNS, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

393

Structurefunction of the Na/H Exchanger Regulatory Factor (NHE-RF) 2199 The Journal of Clinical Investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 representing full-length NHE-RF as well as truncated and mutant forms of NHE-RF were deter- mined using/H exchanger activity that is not regulated by PKA. NHE-RF in the presence of ATP and Mg but not PKA, in

Hall, Randy A

394

Fiber Optic Cryogenic Sensors for Superconducting Magnets and Superconducting Power Transmission lines at CERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design, fabrication and tests of a new generation of superconducting magnets for the upgrade of the LHC require the support of an adequate, robust and reliable sensing technology. The use of Fiber Optic Sensors is becoming particularly challenging for applications in extreme harsh environments such as ultra-low temperatures, high electromagnetic fields and strong mechanical stresses offering perspectives for the development of technological innovations in several applied disciplines.

Chiuchiolo, A; Cusano, A; Bajko, M; Perez, J C; Bajas, H; Giordano, M; Breglio, G; Palmieri, L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Next Generation Fast RF Interlock Module and ATCA Adapter for ILC High Availability RF Test Station Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High availability interlocks and controls are required for the ILC (International Linear Collider) L-Band high power RF stations. A new F3 (Fast Fault Finder) VME module has been developed to process both fast and slow interlocks using FPGA logic to detect the interlock trip excursions. This combination eliminates the need for separate PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) control of slow interlocks. Modules are chained together to accommodate as many inputs as needed. In the next phase of development the F3's will be ported to the new industry standard ATCA (Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture) crate (shelf) via a specially designed VME adapter module with IPMI (Intelligent Platform Management Interface). The goal is to demonstrate auto-failover and hot-swap for future partially redundant systems.

Larsen, R

2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

396

Pressurized H_{2} rf Cavities in Ionizing Beams and Magnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major technological challenge in building a muon cooling channel is operating RF cavities in multi-tesla external magnetic fields. We report the first experimental characterization of a high pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity for use with intense ionizing beams and strong external magnetic fields. RF power consumption by beam-induced plasma was investigated with hydrogen and deuterium gases with pressures between 20 and 100 atm and peak RF gradients between 5 and 50 MV/m. The energy absorption per ion pair-RF cycle ranges from 10?18 to 10?16 J. The low pressure case agrees well with an analytical model based on electron and ion mobilities. Varying concentrations of oxygen gas were investigated to remove free electrons from the cavity and reduce the RF power consumption. Measurements of the electron attachment time to oxygen and rate of ion-ion recombination were also made. Additionally, we demonstrate the operation of the gas-filled RF cavity in a solenoidal field of up to 3 T, finding no major magnetic field dependence. These results indicate that a high pressure gas-filled cavity is potentially a viable technology for muon ionization cooling.

Chung, M.; et al.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

LHC Magnet Program | Superconducting Magnet Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnet Program Magnet Program The Superconducting Magnet Division is building a number of dipole magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is now under construction at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. Scheduled to begin operation in 2007, this machine will collide beams of protons with the unprecedented energy of 7 TeV per beam to explore the nature of matter at its most basic level (RHIC can collide beams of protons with energies of 0.25 TeV, but is mostly used to collide heavy ions with energies of 0.1 TeV per nucleon). The magnets are being built as part of the US program, recommended by the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) and approved by Congress, to contribute to the construction and, later, use of that frontier machine by the US high energy physics community. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and

398

HERA Upgrade Project | Superconducting Magnet Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HERA Upgrade Project HERA Upgrade Project As part of the HERA luminosity upgrade, 6 superconducting Interaction Region quadrupoles were delivered, accepted, and are in service. These 6 layer magnets were designed to include the main quadrupole focus, a skew quad, a normal and skew dipole, and a final sextupole layer. Because of the physical space constraints imposed by the existing detector region components, the DESY magnets were of necessity designed to be very compact. In addition, they are also are required to operate within the solenoidal detector fields at the collision points, so all construction materials had to be non magnetic. Two types of DESY magnets were fabricated. The first, designated as G0, was a two meter long, constant radius magnet. The second, designated GG, is a

399

J-PARC Correctors | Superconducting Magnet Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

J-PARC Correctors J-PARC Correctors Physics Japan is constructing a 50 Gev, high intensity proton accelerator at a site near the Japanese high energy research laboratory, KEK. The project is called J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex). The site is at Tokai and is part of the Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). KEK and JAERI are jointly responsible for its construction. J-PARC will serve many uses. One of the uses will be to produce neutrinos that will be directed toward a detector located in Kamiokande, Japan. The neutrinos will be produced when protons are extracted from J-PARC and are directed by magnets in a beam line to strike a target. Further information about the neutrino experiment is available. KEK and the BNL Superconducting Magnet Division are working together to

400

HTS Magnet Program | Superconducting Magnet Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HTS Magnet Program HTS Magnet Program High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) have the potential to revolutionize the field of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators, energy storage and medical applications. This is because of the fact that as compared to the conventional Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS), the critical current density (Jc ) of HTS falls slowly both: as a function of increasing field, and as a function of increasing temperature These unique properties can be utilized to design and build: HTS magnets that produce very high fields (20 - 50 T) HTS magnets that operate at elevated temperatures (20 - 77 K) This is a significant step forward over the convention LTS magnets which generally operate at a temperature of ~4 K and with field usually limited

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Meetings & Workshops | Superconducting Magnet Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Meetings & Workshops Meetings & Workshops S&T Committee Program Review June 22 - 23, 2006 Second Annual VLHC Meeting October 16 - 18, 2000 Workshop on the Effect of Synchrotron Radiation in the VLHC September 18 - 20, 2000 Proceedings of the 1968 Summer Study on Superconducting Devices and Accelerators Upcoming Events JAN 17 Friday East Coast Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics - Lecture "The Nation's Nuclear Physics Program and the Role of the Government" Presented by Dr. Jehanne Gillo, U.S. Department of Energy, Nuclear Physics 9:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium Friday, January 17, 2014, 9:30 am Hosted by: Director's Office JAN 22 Wednesday Brookhaven Lecture "491st Brookhaven Lecture: Juergen Thieme of Photon Sciences Directorate" Presented by Juergen Thieme, Brookhaven Lab's Photon Sciences Directorate

402

LOTO Authorized Personnel | Superconducting Magnet Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) Personnel Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) Personnel Primary Authorized Employee Have the training and/or experience to exercise group and system-level judgments, and are authorized to lockout and tagout any equipment for which they have division's approval. If coordinated multiple lock and tags are applied by more than one employee, those of the "primary authorized employee" must be the first to be applied and the last to be removed. SMD - LOTO Primary Authorized Personnel Name Phone # Systems/Group Raymond Ceruti Ext. 7116 Mechanical Engineering Technical Support John Cintorino Ext. 2544 Magnet Test & Measurement Joseph D'Ambra Ext. 3764 Superconducting Materials R&D Sebastian Dimaiuta Ext. 5265 Electrical Systems Technical Support Glenn Jochen Ext. 7320 Mechanical Engineering Technical Support

403

The Lichnerowicz-Weitzenboeck formula and superconductivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive the Lichnerowicz-Weitzenboeck formula for the two-component order parameter superconductor, which provides a twofold view of the kinetic energy of the superconductor. For the one component order parameter superconductor we review the connection between the Lichnerowicz-Weitzenboeck formula and the Ginzburg-Landau theory. For the two-component case we claim that this formula opens a venue to describe inhomogeneous superconducting states intertwined by spin correlations and charged dislocation. In this case the Lichnerowicz-Weitzenboeck formula displays local rotational and electromagnetic gauge symmetry (SU(2) Circled-Times U(1)) and relies on local commuting momentum and spin operators. The order parameter lives in a space with curvature and torsion described by Elie Cartan geometrical formalism. The Lichnerowickz-Weitzenboeck formula leads to first order differential equations that are a three-dimensional version of the Seiberg-Witten equations.

Vargas-Paredes, Alfredo A.; Doria, Mauro M. [Departamento de Fisica dos Solidos, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)] [Departamento de Fisica dos Solidos, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Neto, Jose Abdala Helayeel [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, 22290-160 Rio de Janeiro RJ (Brazil)] [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, 22290-160 Rio de Janeiro RJ (Brazil)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Superconductive silicon nanowires using gallium beam lithography.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work was an early career LDRD investigating the idea of using a focused ion beam (FIB) to implant Ga into silicon to create embedded nanowires and/or fully suspended nanowires. The embedded Ga nanowires demonstrated electrical resistivity of 5 m-cm, conductivity down to 4 K, and acts as an Ohmic silicon contact. The suspended nanowires achieved dimensions down to 20 nm x 30 nm x 10 m with large sensitivity to pressure. These structures then performed well as Pirani gauges. Sputtered niobium was also developed in this research for use as a superconductive coating on the nanowire. Oxidation characteristics of Nb were detailed and a technique to place the Nb under tensile stress resulted in the Nb resisting bulk atmospheric oxidation for up to years.

Henry, Michael David; Jarecki, Robert Leo,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Superconducting strip in an oblique magnetic field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As an example for a seemingly simple but actually intricate problem, we study the Bean critical state in a superconducting strip of finite thickness d and width 2w?d placed in an oblique magnetic field. The analytical solution is obtained to leading order in the small parameter d?w. The critical state depends on how the applied magnetic field is switched on, e.g., at a constant tilt angle, or first the perpendicular and then the parallel field component. For these two basic scenarios we obtain the distributions of current density and magnetic field in the critical states. In particular, we find the shapes of the flux-free core and of the lines separating regions with opposite direction of the critical currents, the detailed magnetic field lines (along the vortex lines), and both components of the magnetic moment. The component of the magnetic moment parallel to the strip plane is a nonmonotonic function of the applied magnetic field.

G. P. Mikitik; E. H. Brandt; M. Indenbom

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Superconducting Fault Current Limiter for Transmission Voltage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Within a collaboration of American Superconductor, Siemens, Nexans and Southern California Edison one electrical phase of a resistive superconducting fault current limiter for the 115 kV transmission voltage level has been designed and manufactured. The active part of the limiter consists of 63 bifilar coils made of 12 mm wide steel-stabilized YBCO conductor and is housed in a cryostat operated at 5 bar and 74 K. The first phase was completely assembled and successfully subjected to power switching tests and high voltage tests. The basic design of the system and the test results are reported. The work was funded in part by US-DOE under Contract Number DE-FC26-07NT43243.

Hans-Peter Kraemer; Wolfgang Schmidt; Hong Cai; Bruce Gamble; David Madura; Tim MacDonald; Joe McNamara; Walther Romanosky; Greg Snitchler; Nicolas Lallouet; Frank Schmidt; Syed Ahmed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Quench anaylsis of MICE spectrometer superconducting solenoid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MICE superconducting spectrometer solenoids fabrication and tests are in progress now. First tests of the Spectrometer Solenoid discovered some issues which could be related to the chosen passive quench protection system. Both solenoids do not have heaters and quench propagation relied on the 'quench back' effect, cold diodes, and shunt resistors. The solenoids have very large inductances and stored energy which is 100% dissipated in the cold mass during a quench. This makes their protection a challenging task. The paper presents the quench analysis of these solenoids based on 3D FEA solution of coupled transient electromagnetic and thermal problems. The simulations used the Vector Fields QUENCH code. It is shown that in some quench scenarios, the quench propagation is relatively slow and some areas can be overheated. They describe ways of improving the solenoids quench protection in order to reduce the risk of possible failure.

Kashikhin, Vladimir; Bross, Alan; /Fermilab; Prestemon, Soren; / /LBL, Berkeley

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Transformer current sensor for superconducting magnetic coils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A transformer current sensor having primary turns carrying a primary current for a superconducting coil and secondary turns only partially arranged within the primary turns. The secondary turns include an active winding disposed within the primary turns and a dummy winding which is not disposed in the primary turns and so does not experience a magnetic field due to a flow of current in the primary turns. The active and dummy windings are wound in opposite directions or connected in series-bucking relationship, and are exposed to the same ambient magnetic field. Voltages which might otherwise develop in the active and dummy windings due to ambient magnetic fields thus cancel out. The resultant voltage is purely indicative of the rate of change of current flowing in the primary turns.

Shen, Stewart S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Wilson, C. Thomas (Norris, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Development of an L-Band RF Electron Gun for SASE in the Infrared Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We conduct research on Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) in the infrared region using the 40 MeV, 1.3 GHz L-band linac of Osaka University. The linac equipped with a thermionic electron gun can accelerate a high-intensity single-bunch beam though its normalized emittance is high. In order to advance the research on SASE, we have begun development of an RF gun for the L-band linac in collaboration with KEK. We will report conceptual design of the RF gun and present the status of development of another RF gun for STF at KEK.

Kashiwagi, Shigeru; Kato, Ryukou; Isoyama, Goro [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Hayano, Hitoshi; Urakawa, Junji [Accelerator Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

Arc Detection and Interlock Module for the PEP II Low Level RF System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new arc detection and interlock generating module for the SLAC PEP-II low-level RF VXI-based system has been developed. The system is required to turn off the RF drive and high voltage power supply in the event of arcing in the cavity windows, klystron window, or circulator. Infrared photodiodes receive arc signals through radiation resistant optical fibers. Gain and bandwidth are selectable for each channel to allow tailoring response. The module also responds to interlock requests from other modules in the VXI system and communicates with the programmable logic controller (PLC) responsible for much of the low-level RF system's interlock functionality.

Tighe, R.; /SLAC

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

RF-driven ion source with a back-streaming electron dump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel ion source is described having an improved lifetime. The ion source, in one embodiment, is a proton source, including an external RF antenna mounted to an RF window. To prevent backstreaming electrons formed in the beam column from striking the RF window, a back streaming electron dump is provided, which in one embodiment is formed of a cylindrical tube, open at one end to the ion source chamber and capped at its other end by a metal plug. The plug, maintained at the same electrical potential as the source, captures these backstreaming electrons, and thus prevents localized heating of the window, which due to said heating, might otherwise cause window damage.

Kwan, Joe; Ji, Qing

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

412

Operation of a planar-electrode ion trap array with adjustable RF electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One path to scaling-up trapped atomic ions for large-scale quantum computing and simulation is to create a two-dimensional array of ion traps in close proximity to each other. A method to control the interactions between nearest neighboring ions is demonstrated and characterized here, using an adjustable radio-frequency (RF) electrode between trapping sites. A printed circuit board planar-electrode ion trap is demonstrated, trapping laser-cooled $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions. RF shuttling and secular-frequency adjustment are shown as a function of the power applied to the addressed RF electrode. The trapped ion's heating rate is measured via a fluorescence recooling method.

Muir Kumph; Philip Holz; Kirsten Langer; Michael Niedermayr; Michael Brownnutt; Rainer Blatt

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

413

High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Power Superconducting Continuous Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions

414

J. Robert Schrieffer and the BCS Theory of Superconductivity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

J. Robert Schrieffer and the BCS Theory of Superconductivity J. Robert Schrieffer and the BCS Theory of Superconductivity Resources with Additional Information J. Robert Schrieffer Courtesy of NHMFL Robert Schrieffer received his BS from M.I.T. in 1953 and his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1957. Upon entering the University of Illinois, "he immediately began research with Professor John Bardeen. After working out a problem dealing with electrical conduction on semiconductor surfaces, Schrieffer spent a year in the laboratory, applying the theory to several surface problems. In the third year of graduate studies, he joined Bardeen and [Leon] Cooper in developing the theory of superconductivity, which constituted his doctoral dissertation."1 Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer were awarded the 1972 Nobel Prize in Physics "for their jointly developed theory of superconductivity, usually called the BCS-theory".

415

Proceedings of the 1968 Summer Study on Superconducting Devices and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1968 Summer Study on Superconducting Devices and 1968 Summer Study on Superconducting Devices and Accelerators Brookhaven National Laboratory June 10 - July 19, 1968 1968 summer study on superconducting devices and accelerators at Brookhaven National Laboratory is considered as one of the most important and defining meeting that led to the application of superconductivity in modern particle accelerators and storage rings. One must admire that bold vision, and years of persistent and hard work of number of scientists, engineers and technicians which turned that vision in to reality. Moreover, the research work presented then, serves as a good reference material even today. Given its historical and scientific importance, the entire proceedings of this six week study is made available now on the web for easy and wide access.

416

Simulation and Analysis of Superconducting Traveling-Wave Parametric Amplifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting parametric amplifiers have great promise for quantum-limited readout of superconducting qubits and detectors. Until recently, most superconducting parametric amplifiers had been based on resonant structures, limiting their bandwidth and dynamic range. Broadband traveling-wave parametric amplifiers based both on the nonlinear kinetic inductance of superconducting thin films and on Josephson junctions are in development. By modifying the dispersion property of the amplifier circuit, referred to as dispersion engineering, the gain can be greatly enhanced and the size can be reduced. We present two theoretical frameworks for analyzing and understanding such parametric amplifiers: (1) generalized coupled-mode equations and (2) a finite difference time domain (FDTD) model combined with a small signal analysis. We show how these analytical and numerical tools may be used to understand device performance.

Saptarshi Chaudhuri; Jiansong Gao; Kent Irwin

2015-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

417

Towards measuring variations of Casimir energy by a superconducting cavity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a Casimir cavity, one plate of which is a thin superconducting film. We show that when the cavity is cooled below the critical temperature for the onset of superconductivity, the sharp variation (in the far infrared) of the reflection coefficient of the film engenders a variation in the value of the Casimir energy. Even though the relative variation in the Casimir energy is very small, its magnitude can be comparable to the condensation energy of the superconducting film, and this gives rise to a number of testable effects, including a significant increase in the value of the critical magnetic field, required to destroy the superconductivity of the film. The theoretical ground is therefore prepared for the first experiment ever aimed at measuring variations of the Casimir energy itself.

Giuseppe Bimonte; Enrico Calloni; Giampiero Esposito; Leopoldo Milano; Luigi Rosa

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

Overview of diagnostic system in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first plasma was achieved in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) on September 26, 2006....H ? radiation array, 20 triple probes for diverter plasma, a one-channel visible ...

X. Gao

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

High Temperature Superconducting Racetrack Coils for Electric Motor Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

American Superconductor Corporation (ASC) has designed and fabricated racetrack-shaped field coils from PbBSSCO-2223 high temperature superconducting (HTS) wire for a 125 HP, four-pole motor currently being devel...

J. P. Voccio; C. B. Prum; M. J. Navarro…

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Superconductivity in Bundles of Double-Wall Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present electrical and thermal specific heat measurements that show superconductivity in double-wall carbon nanotube (DWCNT) bundles. Clear evidence, comprising a resistance drop as a function of temperature, magnetoresistance ...

Shi, Wu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cryogenic deformation of high temperature superconductive composite structures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improvement in a process of preparing a composite high temperature oxide superconductive wire is provided and involves conducting at least one cross-sectional reduction step in the processing preparation of the wire at sub-ambient temperatures.

Roberts, Peter R. (Groton, MA); Michels, William (Brookline, MA); Bingert, John F. (Jemez Springs, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

25 kV Superconducting Fault Current Limiter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our technological progress in die field of superconductivity over the last ten years made possible the manufacture of industrial lengths of conductors, consisting of NbTi ultra-fine filaments, embedded in a Cu-30...

T. Verhaege; J. P. Tavergnier; A. Février…

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

SciTech Connect: Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High-Temperature Bi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) Cu (3) O (10+delta) Cuprate Superconductor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced...

424

Novel Approach to Linear Accelerator Superconducting Magnet System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superconducting Linear Accelerators include a superconducting magnet system for particle beam transportation that provides the beam focusing and steering. This system consists of a large number of quadrupole magnets and dipole correctors mounted inside or between cryomodules with SCRF cavities. Each magnet has current leads and powered from its own power supply. The paper proposes a novel approach to magnet powering based on using superconducting persistent current switches. A group of magnets is powered from the same power supply through the common, for the group of cryomodules, electrical bus and pair of current leads. Superconducting switches direct the current to the chosen magnet and close the circuit providing the magnet operation in a persistent current mode. Two persistent current switches were fabricated and tested. In the paper also presented the results of magnetic field simulations, decay time constants analysis, and a way of improving quadrupole magnetic center stability. Such approach substantially reduces the magnet system cost and increases the reliability.

Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

425

Levitation pressure and friction losses in superconducting bearings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting bearing having at least one permanent magnet magnetized with a vertical polarization. The lower or stator portion of the bearing includes an array of high-temperature superconducting elements which are comprised of a plurality of annular rings. An annular ring is located below each permanent magnet and an annular ring is offset horizontally from at least one of the permanent magnets. The rings are composed of individual high-temperature superconducting elements located circumferentially along the ring. By constructing the horizontally-offset high-temperature superconducting ring so that the c-axis is oriented in a radial direction, a higher levitation force can be achieved. Such an orientation will also provide substantially lower rotational drag losses in the bearing.

Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

13 kA Superconducting Busbars Manufacturing Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the LHC, the superconducting Main Bending magnets and Quadrupole magnets are series-connected electrically in different excitation circuits by means of superconducting busbars, carrying a maximum current of 13 kA. These superconducting busbars consist of a superconducting Rutherford cable thermally and electrically coupled to a copper section all along the length. The function of the copper section is essentially to provide an alternative path for the magnet current in case of resistive transition. The production of these components was originally outsourced. The decision to import the technology at CERN led to a global re-engineering of the standard process. Although based on the procedures adopted during the LHC construction, a few modifications and improvements have been implemented, profiting of the experience gained in the last few years. This document details the manufacturing process of the 13 kA busbars as it is actually performed at CERN, emphasizing the new solutions adopted during the first mon...

Principe, R; Fornasiere, E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Characterization of Nb?Sn superconducting strand under pure bending  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterizing the strain-dependent behavior of technological Nb?Sn superconducting strand has been an important subject of research for the past 25 years. Most of the effort has focused on understanding the uniaxial tension ...

Harris, David L., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

8 - Superconducting fault current limiters and power cables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter addresses the technology of superconducting power cables and superconducting fault current limiters. The first part of the chapter is a general summary of the electric power grid. This sets the stage for a discussion of the historical development of superconducting AC and DC cables, which begins with low temperature superconductor-based systems. It then describes the present state of superconducting cable technology and gives a summary of some of the major programs around the world. Whereas power cables may be thought of as a replacement for conventional power system components, fault current limiters and fault current controllers have no conventional equivalent in the power grid. Several conceptually different fault current limiter designs are described. Their state of development and installation on the power grid are described.

W. Hassenzahl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

9 - Superconducting fault current limiters and power cables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter addresses the technology of superconducting power cables and superconducting fault current limiters (FCL). The first part of the chapter is a general summary of the electric power grid. This sets the stage for a discussion of the historical development of superconducting AC and DC cables, which begins with low temperature superconductor (LTS)-based systems. It then describes the present status of superconducting cable technology and summarizes some of the major programs around the world. Whereas power cables may be thought of as a replacement for conventional power system components, \\{FCLs\\} and fault current controllers (FCC) have no conventional equivalent in the power grid. Several conceptually different FCL designs are described. The status of their development and installation on the power grid are described.

W. Hassenzahl

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors Wednesday, April 30, 2014 HTSC Figure 1 Fig. 1. Measured electronic structure of underdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2 in...

431

Estimating the cost of large superconducting thin solenoid magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of thin superconducting solenoid magnets can be estimated if one knows the magnet stored energy, the magnetic field volume product or the overall mass of the superconducting coil and its cryostat. This report shows cost data collected since 1979 for large superconducting solenoid magnets used in high energy physics. These magnets are characterized in most cases by the use of indirect two phase helium cooling and a superconductor stabilizer of very pure aluminum. This correlation can be used for making a preliminary cost estimate of proposed one of a kind superconducting magnets. The magnet costs quoted include the power supply and quench protection system but the cost of the helium refrigerator and helium distribution system is not included in the estimated cost.

Green, M.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); St. Lorant, S.J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Luminescence and Squeezing of a Superconducting Light Emitting Diode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate a semiconductor $p$-$n$ junction in contact with superconducting leads that is operated under forward bias as a light-emitting diode. The presence of superconductivity results in a significant increase of the electroluminescence in a certain frequency window. We demonstrate that the tunneling of Cooper pairs induces an additional luminescence peak on resonance. There is a transfer of superconducting to photonic coherence which results in the emission of entangled photon pairs and squeezing of the fluctuations in the quadrature amplitudes of the emitted light. The squeezing angle can be electrically manipulated by changing the relative phase of the order parameters in the superconductors. We finally derive the conditions for lasing in the system and show that the laser threshold is reduced due to superconductivity. This shows how macroscopic coherence of a superconductor can be used to control the properties of light.

Patrik Hlobil; Peter P. Orth

2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

433

Luminescence and Squeezing of a Superconducting Light Emitting Diode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate a semiconductor $p$-$n$ junction in contact with superconducting leads that is operated under forward bias as a light-emitting diode. The presence of superconductivity results in a significant increase of the electroluminescence in a certain frequency window. We demonstrate that the tunneling of Cooper pairs induces an additional luminescence peak on resonance. There is a transfer of superconducting to photonic coherence which results in the emission of entangled photon pairs and squeezing of the fluctuations in the quadrature amplitudes of the emitted light. The squeezing angle can be electrically manipulated by changing the relative phase of the order parameters in the superconductors. We finally derive the conditions for lasing in the system and show that the laser threshold is reduced due to superconductivity. This shows how macroscopic coherence of a superconductor can be used to control the properties of light.

Hlobil, Patrik

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Superconducting generators for large off shore wind turbines   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes four novel superconducting machine concepts, in the pursuit of finding a suitable design for large offshore wind turbines. The designs should be reliable, modular and light-weight. The main novelty ...

Keysan, Ozan

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

atlas superconducting magnet: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Room temperature, water cooled copper magnets produceSuperconducting Magnet Division TEST RESULTS OF HTS COILS AND AN R&D MAGNET FOR RIA* R. Gupta, M. Anerella, M. Harrison,...

436

Strain-induced time-reversal odd superconductivity in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-reversal symmetry breaking superconductors are exotic phases of matter with fascinating properties, which are, however, encountered rather sparsely. Here we identify the possibility of realizing such a superconducting ground state that exhibits an $f+is$ pairing symmetry in strained graphene. Although the underlying attractive interactions need to be sufficiently strong and comparable in pristine graphene to support such pairing state, we argue that strain can be conducive for its formation even for weak interactions. We show that quantum-critical behavior near the transition is controlled by a multicritical point, characterized by various critical exponents computed here in the framework of an $\\epsilon$-expansion near four spacetime dimensions. Furthermore, a vortex in this mixed superconducting state hosts a pair of Majorana fermions supporting a quartet of insulating and superconducting orders, among which topologically nontrivial quantum spin Hall insulator. These findings suggest that strained graphene could provide a platform for the realization of exotic superconducting states of Dirac fermions.

Bitan Roy; Vladimir Juricic

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Cooling of superconducting devices by liquid storage and refrigeration unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is disclosed for cooling superconducting devices. The system includes a cryogen cooling system configured to be coupled to the superconducting device and to supply cryogen to the device. The system also includes a cryogen storage system configured to supply cryogen to the device. The system further includes flow control valving configured to selectively isolate the cryogen cooling system from the device, thereby directing a flow of cryogen to the device from the cryogen storage system.

Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Urbahn, John Arthur; Steinbach, Albert Eugene

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

438

Superconducting ohmic heating solenoid concept for ISX-C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The employment of a superconducting ohmic heating solenoid is presented for ISX-C based on currently available superconducting technology. The magnet is designed to be cryostable and to generate the required flux swing of 4.5 V/s while simultaneously meeting the limitations imposed by available space and structural interfacing to the torroidal coils. A novel spliceless pancake winding scheme is proposed which offers excellent cooling and completely supports the cable conductor throughout the winding.

Shen, S.S.; Brown, R.L.; Gray, W.H.; Lubell, M.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Strong enhancement of superconductivity in a nanosized Pb bridge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent experiments with a superconducting nanosized Pb bridge formed between a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a substrate, superconductivity has been detected at magnetic fields, that are a few times larger than the third (surface) critical field. We describe the observed phenomenon on the basis of a numerical solution of the Ginzburg-Landau equations in a model structure consisting of six conoids. The spatial distribution of the superconducting phase is shown to be strongly inhomogeneous, with a concentration of the superconducting phase near the narrowest part (the “neck”) of the bridge. We show that suppression of superconductivity in the bridge by applied magnetic field or by temperature first occurs near the bases and then in the neck region, what leads to a continuous superconducting-to-normal resistive transition. A position of the transition midpoint depends on temperature and, typically, is by one order of magnitude higher than the second critical field Hc2. We find that the vortex states can be realized in the bridge at low temperatures T/Tcbridge that are characterized by a varying vorticity as a function of the bridge’s height.

V.R. Misko; V.M. Fomin; J.T. Devreese

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Higgsless superconductivity from topological defects in compact BF terms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1)-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact low-energy effective BF theories. In the average field approximation, the corresponding uniform emergent charge creates a gap for the (D-2)-dimensional branes via the Magnus force, the dual of the Lorentz force. One particular combination of intrinsic and emergent charge fluctuations that leaves the total charge distribution invariant constitutes an isolated gapless mode leading to superfluidity. The remaining massive modes organise themselves into a D-dimensional charged, massive vector. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2) and the topological order (4) are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D this type of superconductivity is explicitly realized as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

M. Cristina Diamantini; Carlo A. Trugenberger

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

BEAM-BASED ALIGNMENT OF TTF RF-GUN USING V-CODE* W. Beinhauer, R. Cee, W. Koch, M. Krassilnikov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEAM-BASED ALIGNMENT OF TTF RF-GUN USING V-CODE* W. Beinhauer, R. Cee, W. Koch, M. Krassilnikov , A), located after the RF- gun cavity, showed non-zero readings. Moreover the readings depended on RF-power, RF-phase and primary and secondary solenoid currents. This effect could be ex- plained by misalignments of the gun

442

Deeply-scaled GaN high electron mobility transistors for RF applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to the unique combination of large critical breakdown field and high electron velocity, GaN-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) have great potential for next generation high power RF amplifiers. The ...

Lee, Dong Seup

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

RF phase modulation of optical signals and optical/electrical signal processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analog RF phase modulation of optical signals has been a topic of interest for many years, mainly focusing on Intensity Modulation Direct Detection (IMDD). The virtues of coherent detection combined with the advantages of ...

Andrikogiannopoulos, Nikolas I

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Todd, State-of-the art electron guns and injector de- signs,7] Summary of working group on guns and injectors, 41st Ad-A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and

Baptiste, Kenneth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Analysis of slice transverse emittance evolutioin in a photocathode RF gun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evolution at 1 nC for the LCLS gun including the solenoidevolution at 1 nC for the LCLS gun including the solenoidevolution in a photocathode RF gun Zhirong Huang, Yuantao

Huang, Zhirong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Experimental evaluation of 350 MHz RF accelerator windows for the low energy demonstration accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radio frequency (RF) windows are historically a point where failure occurs in input power couplers for accelerators. To obtain a reliable, high-power, 350 MHz RF window for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) project of the Accelerator Production of Tritium program, RF windows prototypes from different vendors were tested. Experiments were performed to evaluate the RF windows by the vendors to select a window for the LEDA project. The Communications and Power, Inc. (CPI) windows were conditioned to 445 kW in roughly 15 hours. At 445 kW a window failed, and the cause of the failure will be presented. The English Electronic Valve, Inc. (EEV) windows were conditioned to 944 kW in 26 hours and then tested at 944 kW for 4 hours with no indication of problems.

Cummings, K.; Rees, D.; Roybal, W. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

E-Print Network 3.0 - active rf pulse Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that the duty ratios of the pulse are kept large for small input. Then, an RF pulse train is generated by mixing... the modulated envelope with the phase modulated carrier. The...

448

Tunable Substrate Integrated Waveguide Filters Implemented with PIN Diodes and RF MEMS Switches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the first fully tunable substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) filter implemented with PIN diodes and RF MEMS switches. The methodology for tuning SIW filters is explained in detail and is used to create three separate designs...

Armendariz, Marcelino

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

449

Characteristics of Hydrogen Negative Ion Source with FET based RF System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characteristics of radio frequency (RF) plasma production were investigated using a FET inverter power supply as a RF generator. High density hydrogen plasma was obtained using an external coil wound a cylindrical ceramic tube (driver region) with RF frequency of lower than 0.5 MHz. When an axial magnetic field around 10 mT was applied to the driver region, an electron density increased drastically and attained to over 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in the driver region. Effect of the axial magnetic field in driver and expansion region was examined. Lower gas pressure operation below 0.5 Pa was possible with higher RF frequency. H{sup -} density in the expansion region was measured by using laser photo-detachment system. It decreased as the axial magnetic field applied, which was caused by the increase of energetic electron from the driver.

Ando, A.; Matsuno, T.; Funaoi, T.; Tanaka, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aoba-yama, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Tsumori, K.; Takeiri, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho, Toki, 509-5292 (Japan)

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

450

RF sputtering for controlling dihydride and monohydride bond densities in amorphous silicon hydride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicone produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous solicone hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

Jeffery, F.R.; Shanks, H.R.

1980-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

451

PRODUCTION OF LARGE VOLUME CYLINDRICAL RF PLASMA USING CIRCULAR MAGNETIC LINE CUSP FIELD  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large volume cylindrical rf (radio frequency) plasma source using a circular magnetic line cusp field has been developed for various large scale plasma processings. In this type of plasma source, a capacitively coupled 13.56 \\{MHz\\} rf plasma is produced in a circular magnetic line cusp field. Two versions of the plasma source have been constructed and tasted. The first version has a pair of peripheral rf electrodes placed outside the ionization chamber and is suitable for preparing a large volume uniform plasma. This plasma source can attain uniformity within 107 cm?3 over a 30 cm diameter region. The other which is provided with parallel doughnut plate electrodes forming part of the chamber wall serves as a high current plasma source, where the electron density is proportional to the rf power and equal to 7 × 109 cm?3 for 500 W.

K. YAMAUCHI; M. SHIBAGAKI; A. KONO; K. TAKAHASHI; T. SHEBUYA; E. YABE; K. TAKAYAMA

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Characteristics of single and dual radio-frequency (RF) plasma sheaths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The characteristics of radio-frequency (RF) plasma sheaths have been topics of much scientific ... in the study of physical phenomena in dusty plasmas. The sheaths behave special properties under various ... as c...

Zhong-ling Dai; You-nian Wang

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

The analysis of conductive solid samples by r.f. capacitively coupled plasma at atmospheric pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radiofrequency capacitively coupled plasma (rf CCP) with tip-ring electrode geometry has been used for the analysis of Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, and V in low and medium alloyed steel. The sample is used as...

Sorin D. Anghel; Tiberiu Frentiu…

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

E-Print Network 3.0 - average current rf Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

management estimates the channel upon a frame recep- tion. MIMO... MHz bandwidth. 6.2 Simulation Results We compare the average energy per bit of RF chain management... measure...

455

The splitting of hyperfine lines of57Fe nuclei in RF magnetic field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown experimentally, that for Moessbauer nuclei affected by the radio-frequency (RF) magnetic field of sufficient intensity at frequencies corresponding to ... occurs. Depending on the frequency of alterna...

F. G. Vagizov

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

RF Analysis of ITER Remote Steering Antenna for Electron-Cyclotron Plasma Heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An application of remote RF beam steering concept, based on image multiplication phenomena in a corrugated square waveguide, to electron-cyclotron plasma heating and current drive for ITER has been ... breakdown,...

G.G. Denisov; S.V. Kuzikov; N. Kobayashi

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Ignition of rf-Excited Lasers with Solid State and Tube Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An rf-excited CO2 laser has been developed at the Technical University Vienna. The construction bases upon a fast axial gas flow system with the gas flow divided into eight discharge tubes. The equivalent distrib...

B. Walter; M. Bohrer; D. Schuöcker

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric rf device Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: atmospheric rf device Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Packaging of Ka-Band Patch Antenna and Optoelectronic Components for Dual-Mode Indoor Wireless Communication...

459

Ion energy cost in a combined inductive-capacitive rf discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental measurements were made of the ion energy cost ? as a function of the parameters of a combined rf inductive-capacitive discharge at low pressures (p<10?2 Torr). It was established that ?...does not de...

S. V. Dudin; A. V. Zykov; K. I. Polozhii; V. I. Farenik

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Wide-Range Bolometer with RF Readout TES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To improve both scalability and noise-filtering capability of a Transition-Edge Sensor (TES), a new concept of a thin-film detector is suggested, which is based on embedding a microbridge TES into a high-Q planar GHz range resonator weakly coupled to a 50 Ohm-readout transmission line. Such a TES element is designed as a hot-electron microbolometer coupled to a THz range antenna and as a load of the resonator at the same time. A weak THz signal coupled to the antenna heats the microbridge TES, thus reducing the quality factor of the resonator and leading to a power increment in the readout line. The power-to-power conversion gain, an essential figure of merit, is estimated to be above 10. To demonstrate the basic concept, we fabricated and tested a few submicron sized devices from Nb thin films for operation temperature about 5 K. The dc and rf characterization of the new device is made at a resonator frequency about 5.8 GHz. A low-noise HEMT amplifier is used in our TES experiments without the need for a SQU...

Shitov, S V; Kuzmin, A A; Merker, M; Arndt, M; Wuensch, S H; Ilin, K S; Erhan, E; Ustinov, A; Siegel, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Laser cooling and sympathetic cooling in a linear quadrupole rf trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER COOLING AND SYMPATHETIC COOLING IN A LINEAR QUADRUPOLE RF TRAP A Dissertation by VLADIMIR LEONIDOVICH RYJKOV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2003 Major Subject: Physics LASER COOLING AND SYMPATHETIC COOLING IN A LINEAR QUADRUPOLE RF TRAP A Dissertation by VLADIMIR LEONIDOVICH RYJKOV Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Ryjkov, Vladimir Leonidovich

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

462

Comparison of the theory and the practice of rf current drive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theory of rf-driven plasma currents is applied to the lower-hybrid experiments on the PLT tokamak. Particular emphasis is placed on those experiments in which the plasma current was varying. The comparison between theory and experiment is made with respect to the efficiency with which rf energy was converted to poloidal magnetic field energy. Good agreement is found irrespective of whether the current was increasing, constant, or decreasing.

Karney, C.F.F.; Fisch, N.J.; Jobes, F.C.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Revised April 2013 Toronto Nanofabrication Centre (TNFC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Periodic re-training is encouraged as the operation and capabilities of a lab/cleanroom may evolve. 3. There must be another qualified user or staff member in the lab/cleanroom at all times. 4. Users who require be replaced with new ones. 10. No food, drinks or chewing gum is permitted in the lab/cleanroom. No smoking

Sokolowski, Marla

464

Center for Functional Nanomaterials: Nanofabrication Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contact training schedule booking calendar booking rules SOP thin-film processing cleanroom up Wright Lu (COSA) Tues 10:30-11 AM no no yes Lesker sputterer up Lu Stein Tues...

465

UCSB Nanofabrication Facility College of Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technologies Meggitt Endevco Luxtera Calient Networks Fulltec Semiconductor FLIR Qmagiq Semisouth Labs

Akhmedov, Azer

466

UHV-STM Nanofabrication on Silicon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (UHV-STM) offers intriguing opportunities to explore the...

Peter M. Albrecht; Laura B. Ruppalt; Prof. Joseph W. Lyding

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Utilizing Nanofabrication to Construct Strong, Luminescent Materials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and hardness of these nanocomposite materials are higher than polycarbonate and some carbon nanotube reinforced nanocomposites. Strong luminescence is observed in the new...

468

nanofabricaTion A Resource for Nanoscience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for waveguides · MEMS angle, force, and tactile sensors · MEMS gas analysis systems · Microfluidic systems

Blanchette, Robert A.

469

Nanofabrication with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Precision Engineering Center has recently begun a research program into applications of STM to Nanotechnology. Few tools permit humans to control events and processes at the manometer level, and of those, the STM is the most well-suited to the task. A versatile new ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) STM is being built to study the use of STM for the manipulation of nanometer-scale particles. Part of the STM`s usefulness will be due to its being positioned directly beneath the focused ion beam (FIB). The interface of the STM with the FIB will allow the STM to take advantage of the FIB for long-range imaging and as a particle source; the FIB can in turn use the STM for in situ, high-resolution imaging of micromachined features.

Shedd, G.M.; Russell, P.E.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Method of constructing a superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Flywheel energy storage using superconducting magnetic bearings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Storage of electrical energy on a utility scale is currently not practicable for most utilities, preventing the full utilization of existing base-load capacity. A potential solution to this problem is Flywheel Energy Storage (FES), made possible by technological developments in high-temperature superconducting materials. Commonwealth Research Corporation (CRC), the research arm of Commonwealth Edison Company, and Argonne National Laboratory are implementing a demonstration project to advance the state of the art in high temperature superconductor (HTS) bearing performance and the overall demonstration of efficient Flywheel Energy Storage. Currently, electricity must be used simultaneously with its generation as electrical energy storage is not available for most utilities. Existing storage methods either are dependent on special geography, are too expensive, or are too inefficient. Without energy storage, electric utilities, such as Commonwealth Edison Company, are forced to cycle base load power plants to meet load swings in hourly customer demand. Demand can change by as much as 30% over a 12-hour period and result in significant costs to utilities as power plant output is adjusted to meet these changes. HTS FES systems can reduce demand-based power plant cycling by storing unused nighttime capacity until it is needed to meet daytime demand.

Abboud, R.G. [Commonwealth Research Corp., Chicago, IL (United States); Uherka, K.; Hull, J.; Mulcahy, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

MAGNETIC DESIGN OF A SUPERCONDUCTING AGS SNAKE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory plans to build a partial helical snake for polarized proton acceleration in the AGS. It will be a 3 Tesla superconducting magnet having a magnetic length of 1.9 meter. AGS needs only one magnet and currently there is no plan to build a prototype. Therefore, the first magnet itself must function at the design operating field and provide the required field quality, spin rotation and deflections on the particle beam. New software have been developed that exchanges input/output between the OPERA3d field design program, the Pro-Engineering CAD model and the software that drives the machine to make slots in aluminum cylinders where blocks of 6-around-I NbTi wires are placed. This new software have been used to carry out a number of iterations to satisfy various design requirements and to assure that the profile that is used in making field computations is the same that is used in cutting metal. The optimized coil cross-section is based on a two layer design with both inner and outer layers having five current blocks per quadrant. The ends are based on a design concept that will be used for the first time in accelerator magnets.

GUPTA,R.; LUCCIO,A.; MORGAN,G.; MACKAY,W.; POWER,K.; ROSER,T.; WILLEN,E.; OKAMURA,M.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

473

New Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind Turbine Generators  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AML Superconductivity and Magnetics, in conjunction with DOE's Argonne National Laboratory, recently announced that their superconducting magnet system passed a landmark reliability test, demonstrating its potential suitability for wide-scale commercial applications.

474

Steady-State Heat Transfer in He II through Porous Superconducting Cable Insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The LHC program includes the study of thermal behavior of the superconducting cables wound in the dipole magnet cooled by superfluid helium (He II). Insulation of these superconducting cables forms the major ... ...

B. J. P. Baudouy; F.-P. Juster; C. Meuris…

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

New Concept of a Superconducting Fault Current Limiter and Its Evaluation of Quenching Feature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper reviews the concept of a new superconducting fault current limiter with NbTi AC superconducting wire for the suppression of short-circuit currents. This fault current limiter takes full advantag...

Kiyoshi Okaniwa; Tsukushi Hara; Takahiko Yamamoto…

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Fabrication of superconducting wire using organometallic precursors and infiltration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organometallic precursors from naphthenic acid and metal nitrates were used for the synthesis of YBCO oxide superconducting compounds. The characteristics of metal naphthenates as organometallic precursors were investigated by IR spectra, viscosity measurements, and infiltration. 123 superconducting compound obtained from 123 naphthenate showed a Tc of 90{degree}K and a rather dense and elongated microstructure. Also, the melting behavior of Ba-cuprates which were used for 123 making was studied. A low-temperature melting process was developed to fabricate silver-sheathed superconducting wire with the powder-in-tube method; flowing argon gas is introduced to the system at 930-945{degree}C to reduce the melting temperature of the 123 compound without silver sheath melting. It resulted in a 90{degree}K Tc superconducting core with dense and locally aligned microstructure. SEM-EDS and XRD analysis, 4-probe resistance and Jc measurements, and carbon-content determinations were carried out to characterize the microstructure, grain alignment, and superconducting properties of the samples.

Lee, Y.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Report on discussions with utility engineers about superconducting generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report relates to a series of discussions with electric utility engineers concerning the integration of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) generators into the present electric power system. The current and future interest of the utilities in the purchase and use of HTS generators is assessed. Various performance and economic factors are also considered as part of this inspection of the utility prospects for HTS generators. Integration of HTS generators into the electric utility sector is one goal of the Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI). The SPI, a major part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems, features vertical teaming of a major industrial power apparatus manufacturers, a producer of HTS wire, and an end-user with assistance and technical support for the national laboratories. The SPI effort on HTS generators is headed by a General Electric Corporation internal team comprised of the Corporate Research Laboratories, Power Generation Engineering, and Power Systems Group. Intermagnetics General corporation, which assisted in the development of the superconducting coils, is the HTS wire and tape manufacturer. Additional technical support is provided by the national laboratories: Argonne, Los Alamos, and Oak Ridge, and the New York State Institute on Superconductivity. The end-user is represented by Niagara-Mohawk and the Electric Power Research Institute.

none,

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Shock wave formation of superconductive ceramic oxide electric and magnetic circuit elements with improved microstructures and mechanical properties. 10 figs.

Nellis, W.J.; Maple, M.B.; Geballe, T.H.

1987-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

479

Application of new simulation algorithms for modeling rf diagnostics of electron clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traveling wave rf diagnostics of electron cloud build-up show promise as a non-destructive technique for measuring plasma density and the efficacy of mitigation techniques. However, it is very difficult to derive an absolute measure of plasma density from experimental measurements for a variety of technical reasons. Detailed numerical simulations are vital in order to understand experimental data, and have successfully modeled build-up. Such simulations are limited in their ability to reproduce experimental data due to the large separation of scales inherent to the problem. Namely, one must resolve both rf frequencies in the GHz range, as well as the plasma modulation frequency of tens of MHz, while running for very long simulations times, on the order of microseconds. The application of new numerical simulation techniques allow us to bridge the simulation scales in this problem and produce spectra that can be directly compared to experiments. The first method is to use a plasma dielectric model to measure plasma-induced phase shifts in the rf wave. The dielectric is modulated at a low frequency, simulating the effects of multiple bunch crossings. This allows simulations to be performed without kinetic particles representing the plasma, which both speeds up the simulations as well as reduces numerical noise from interpolation of particle charge and currents onto the computational grid. Secondly we utilize a port boundary condition model to simultaneously absorb rf at the simulation boundaries, and to launch the rf into the simulation. This method improves the accuracy of simulations by restricting rf frequencies better than adding an external (finite) current source to drive rf, and absorbing layers at the boundaries. We also explore the effects of non-uniform plasma densities on the simulated spectra.

Veitzer, Seth A.; Smithe, David N.; Stoltz, Peter H. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO, 80303 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

480

Superstructure for high current applications in superconducting linear accelerators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superstructure for accelerating charged particles at relativistic speeds. The superstructure consists of two weakly coupled multi-cell subunits equipped with HOM couplers. A beam pipe connects the subunits and an HOM damper is included at the entrance and the exit of each of the subunits. A coupling device feeds rf power into the subunits. The subunits are constructed of niobium and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. The length of the beam pipe between the subunits is selected to provide synchronism between particles and rf fields in both subunits.

Sekutowicz, Jacek (Elbchaussee, DE); Kneisel, Peter (Williamsburg, VA)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nanofabricated superconducting rf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Proceedings of the 1968 Summer Study on Superconducting Devices and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

selected cryogenic data notebook selected cryogenic data notebook (Digitized and put on web from the original report : BNL 10200-R, Revised August 1980) Compiled and Edited by J.E. Jensen, W.A. Tuttle, R.B. Stewart, H. Brechna and A.G. Prodell Brookhaven National Laboratory NOTE: The indexing is primitive. A useful place to start may be the Subject Index A PDF viewer is required to see most articles. Cover Page Introduction Subject Index Expanded subject index (under construction) Disclaimer Click here to go to Material Properties Important to the Design of A Large Superconducting Magnet Click Here to View the Proceedings of the 1968 Summer Study on Superconducting Devices and Accelerators Go to the Home Page of the Superconducting Magnet Division (SMD) at BNL Go to the Workshop Page at SMD Go to the Publication Page at SMD

482

SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLE MAGNETS FOR THE LHC INSERTION REGIONS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLE MAGNETS FOR THE LHC INSERTION SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLE MAGNETS FOR THE LHC INSERTION REGIONS E. Willen, M. Anerella, J. Cozzolino, G. Ganetis, A. Ghosh, R. Gupta, M. Harrison, A. Jain, A. Marone, J. Muratore, S. Plate, J. Schmalzle, P. Wanderer, K.C. Wu, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA Abstract Dipole bending magnets are required to change the horizontal separation of the two beams in the LHC. In Intersection Regions (IR) 1, 2, 5, and 8, the beams are brought into collision for the experiments located there. In IR4, the separation of the beams is increased to accommodate the machine's particle acceleration hardware. As part of the US contribution to the LHC Project, BNL is building the required superconducting magnets. Designs have been developed featuring a single

483

A worldwide overview of superconductivity development efforts for utility applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress and prospects for the application of high temperature superconductivity to the electric power sector has been the topic of an IEA Implementing Agreement begun in 1990. The present task members are: Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States. As a result of the Implementing Agreement, work has been performed by the Operating Agent with the full participation of all of the member countries. This work has facilitated the exchange of information among experts in all member countries and is the basis for much of the information contained in this paper. This paper summarizes progress toward application of high temperature superconductivity to devices for use in the electric power sector such as: fault-current limiters, cables, superconducting magnetic energy Storage, rotating machinery, transformers, and flywheels incorporating magnetic bearings. Such devices are being designed, built and tested throughout the world.

Giese, R.F.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Superconductivity for electric systems program plan, FY 1996--FY 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This describes a comprehensive, integrated approach for the development of HTS (high-temperature superconductivity) technology for cost-effective use in electric power applications. This approach supports the program`s mission: to develop the technology that could lead to industrial commercialization of HTS electric power applications, such as fault-current limiters, motors, generators, transmission cables, superinductors, and superconducting energy storage. The vision is that, by 2010, the US power systems equipment industry will regain a major share of the global market by offering superconducting products that outperform the competition; and in US, the power grid will gain increased efficiency and stability by incorporating many kinds of HTS devices. After an overview and a discussion of the program plan (wires, systems technology, partnership initiative), this document discusses technology status, stakeholders, and the role of US DOE.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Uniformly wound superconducting coil and method of making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coil of superconducting wire for a superconducting magnet having a relaely dense and uniformly spaced winding to enhance the homogeneity and strength of the magnetic field surrounding the coil and a method of winding the same wherein the mandrel used to wind said coil comprises removable spacers and retainers forming a plurality of outwardly opening slots, each of said slots extending generally about the periphery of the mandrel and being sized to receive and outwardly align and retain successive turns of the superconducting wire within each slot as the wire is wound around and laterally across the mandrel to form a plurality of wire ribbons of a predetermined thickness laterally across the mandrel.

Mookerjee, Sumit (Cedar Hill, TX); Weijun, Shen (Beijun, CN); Yager, Billy (Waxahachie, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Uniformly wound superconducting coil and method of making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coil of superconducting wire for a superconducting magnet is described having a relatively dense and uniformly spaced winding to enhance the homogeneity and strength of the magnetic field surrounding the coil and a method of winding the same wherein the mandrel used to wind said coil comprises removable spacers and retainers forming a plurality of outwardly opening slots, each of said slots extending generally about the periphery of the mandrel and being sized to receive and outwardly align and retain successive turns of the superconducting wire within each slot as the wire is wound around and laterally across the mandrel to form a plurality of wire ribbons of a predetermined thickness laterally across the mandrel. 8 figures.

Mookerjee, S.; Weijun, S.; Yager, B.

1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

487

Fiber Bragg Grating Cryo-Sensors for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design, fabrication and tests of the new generation of superconducting magnets for the High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL - LHC) require the support of an adequate sensing technology able to assure the integrity of the strain sensitive and brittle superconducting cables through the whole service life of the magnet: assembly up to 150 MPa, cool down to 1.9 K and powering up to about 16 kA. A precise temperature monitoring is also needed in order to guarantee the safe working condition of the superconducting cables in the power transmission lines (SC - Link) designed to feed the magnet over long distance. Temperature and strain FBGs based monitoring systems have been implemented in the first SC-Link prototype and in two subscale dipole magnets and tested in the cryogenic test facility at CERN at 30 K, 77 K and 1.9 K.

Chiuchiolo, A; Perez, J; Bajas, H; Consales, M; Giordano, M; Breglio, G; Cusano, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

New phase of matter discovered In superconducting material  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New phase of matter discovered In superconducting material New phase of matter discovered In superconducting material New phase of matter discovered In superconducting material Tiny crystals, probed with a device called a resonant ultrasound spectrometer, are helping solve the long-time mystery of "pseudogap behavior" in copper oxide superconductors. June 6, 2013 Arkady Shekhter setting up the resonant ultrasound measurement in a flow cryostat. Arkady Shekhter setting up the resonant ultrasound measurement in a flow cryostat. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email News flash: The pseudogap is indeed a phase of matter. Albert Migliori, LANL Fellow and Seaborg Institute director noted that, "the key effects were so small that extreme attention to eliminating spurious signals

489

Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity Wednesday, November 20, 2013 - 2:00pm SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Pablo Esquinazi, University of Leipzig We review different experimental results that indicate the existence of granular superconductivity at high temperatures at graphite interfaces. In particular we will discuss the following experimental results: The temperature and magnetic field dependence of the electrical resistance of bulk and thin graphite samples and its relation with the existence of two-dimensional (2D) interfaces. The anomalous hysteresis in the magnetoresistance observed in graphite thin samples as well as its enhancement restricting the current path within the sample. The Josephson behavior of the current-voltage characteristics with

490

General trend for pressurized superconducting hydrogen-dense materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-standing prediction that hydrogen can assume a metallic state under high pressure, combined with arguments put forward more recently that this state might even be superconducting up to high temperatures, continues to spur tremendous research activities toward the experimental realization of metallic hydrogen. These efforts have however so far been impeded by the enormous challenges associated with the exceedingly large required pressure. Hydrogen-dense materials, of the MH{sub 4} form (where M can be, e.g., Si, Ge, or Sn) or of the MH{sub 3} form (with M being, e.g., Al, Sc, Y, or La), allow for the rather exciting opportunity to carry out a proxy study of metallic hydrogen and associated high-temperature superconductivity at pressures within the reach of current techniques. At least one experimental report indicates that a superconducting state might have been observed already in SiH{sub 4}, and several theoretical studies have predicted superconductivity in pressurized hydrogen-rich materials; however, no systematic dependence on the applied pressure has yet been identified so far. In the present work, we have used first-principles methods in an attempt to predict the superconducting critical temperature (T{sub c}) as a function of pressure (P) for three metal-hydride systems of the MH{sub 3} form, namely ScH{sub 3}, YH{sub 3}, and LaH{sub 3}. By comparing the obtained results, we are able to point out a general trend in the T{sub c}-dependence on P. These gained insights presented here are likely to stimulate further theoretical studies of metallic phases of hydrogen-dense materials and should lead to new experimental investigations of their superconducting properties.

Kim, D. Y.; Scheicher, R. H.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Kang, T. W.; Ahuja, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Simulation of RF Cavity Dark Current In Presence of Helical Magnetic Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to produce muon beam of high enough quality to be used for a Muon Collider, its large phase space must be cooled several orders of magnitude. This task can be accomplished by ionization cooling. Ionization cooling consists of passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal focusing channel. But first high power tests of RF cavity with beryllium windows in solenoidal magnetic field showed a dramatic drop in accelerating gradient due to RF breakdowns. It has been concluded that external magnetic fields parallel to RF electric field significantly modifies the performance of RF cavities. However, magnetic field in Helical Cooling Channel has a strong dipole component in addition to solenoidal one. The dipole component essentially changes electron motion in a cavity compare to pure solenoidal case, making dark current less focused at field emission sites. The simulation of dark current dynamic in HCC performed with CST Studio Suit is presented in this paper.

Romanov, Gennady; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

RF Heating and Current Drive in Magnetically Confined Plasma: a Historical Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The history of high power RF waves injected into magnetically confined plasma for the purposes of heating to fusion relevant temperatures spans nearly five decades. The road to success demanded the development of the theory of wave propagation in high temperature plasma in complex magnetic field geometries, development of antenna structures and transmission lines capable of handling high RF powers, and the development of high power RF (microwave) sources. In the early days, progress was hindered by the lack of good confinement of energetic particles formed by high power RF wave-plasma interactions. For example, in the ion cyclotron resonance frequency regime (ICRF) ions with energies in the multi-100keV, or even MeV range may be formed due to the presence of efficient 'minority species' absorption. Electrons with similar energies can be formed upon the injection of RF waves in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) or lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF) because of quasi-linear Landau (cyclotron) interactions between waves and particles. In this paper a summary of four decades of historical evolution of wave heating and current drive results will be given.

Porkolab, Miklos [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Science and Fusion Center and Department of Physics, NW 16-288, 167 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

493

Buffer layers for REBCO films for use in superconducting devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A superconducting article includes a substrate having a biaxially textured surface. A biaxially textured buffer layer, which can be a cap layer, is supported by the substrate. The buffer layer includes a double perovskite of the formula A.sub.2B'B''O.sub.6, where A is rare earth or alkaline earth metal and B' and B'' are different transition metal cations. A biaxially textured superconductor layer is deposited so as to be supported by the buffer layer. A method of making a superconducting article is also disclosed.

Goyal, Amit; Wee, Sung-Hun

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

494

Superconducting fault current limiter for power utility application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent accomplishments in the development of superconducting fault current limiters for power systems are outlined. These accomplishments include the comprehensive requirement for fault current limiters developed by SCE; down-selection; bridge concepts; shunt concepts; and high resistivity matrix substrates for HTS conductors. The proposed Phase II SPI-FCL Program is outlined. It is concluded that the SPI fault current limiter program will benefit both the power utility industry as well as the high temperature superconductivity community and progress of Phase I is right on target.

Leung, E. [Martin Marietta Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

495

TESTING AND EVALUATION OF SUPERCONDUCTING CABLES FOR THE LHC.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As one of the activities of the US-LHC Accelerator Project, BNL is testing short samples of superconducting cables that will be used in the main LHC dipoles and quadrupoles. The purpose of these tests is to verify that the reels of superconducting cables as supplied by the vendors meet the required critical current specifications. The short-sample testing facility and the computer-assisted testing techniques for acquiring the data will be described. We also describe the data analysis, data storage, and data transmission methods.

THOMAS,R.; GHOSH,A.; MCCHESNEY,D.; JAIN,A.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

496

Optical data transmission at the superconducting super collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digital and analog data transmissions via fiber optics for the Superconducting Super Collider have been investigated. The state of the art of optical transmitters, low loss fiber waveguides, receivers and associated electronics components are reviewed and summarized. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the radiation environment on the performance of an optical data transmission system components. Also, the performance of candidate components of the wide band digital and analog transmission systems intended for deployment of the Superconducting Super Collider Detector is discussed. 27 refs., 15 figs.

Leskovar, B.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z