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Sample records for namas phase ii

  1. Mexico-NAMA Programme | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico-NAMA Programme (Redirected from GIZ-Mexico NAMA Programme) Jump to: navigation, search Name GIZ-Mexico NAMA Programme AgencyCompany Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft fr...

  2. Chile-NAMA program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NAMA program Jump to: navigation, search Name Chile-NAMA program AgencyCompany Organization Ecofys Sector Climate Focus Area Transportation Topics Low emission development...

  3. Energy Efficiency NAMAs and Actions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NAMAs and Actions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Efficiency NAMAs and Actions AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations Foundation Sector:...

  4. Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo...

  5. Mexico-Ecofys NAMA Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ecofys NAMA Activities Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecofys-Mexico NAMA Activities AgencyCompany Organization Ecofys Sector Energy Focus Area Buildings, Transportation Topics...

  6. Trinidad and Tobago-Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trinidad and Tobago-Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs Jump to: navigation, search Name Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs AgencyCompany Organization...

  7. Trinidad and Tobago-Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trinidad and Tobago-Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs (Redirected from Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs) Jump to: navigation, search Name Building Capacity...

  8. Nama Database Wiki | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Topics: Finance, Low emission development planning, -NAMA Resource Type: Guidemanual, Lessons learnedbest practices, Training materials User Interface: Website ComplexityEase...

  9. NAMA Tool: Steps for Moving a NAMA from Idea Towards Implementation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on how to develop a NAMA. The tool navigates users to the relevant information, knowledge, instruments, and publications available. The process is structured into ten...

  10. Mexico-NAMA Programme | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to the implementation of NAMAs in Mexican key sectors (residential buildings, solar cooling) that are (co-)financed by the public andor private sector and that are framed by...

  11. China-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name China-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia AgencyCompany Organization United...

  12. Indonesia-IISD NAMA Support | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name Indonesia-IISD NAMA Support AgencyCompany Organization International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate Topics Background analysis, Low emission...

  13. Indonesia-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market...

  14. Thailand-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market...

  15. Philippines-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market...

  16. Vietnam-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market...

  17. Malaysia-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market...

  18. Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector...

  19. Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector...

  20. Cameroon-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector...

  1. CCAP-Data and Capacity Needs for Transportation NAMAs | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    docsresources973TransportNAMACapacity-Building.pdf Cost: Free Language: English CCAP-Data and Capacity Needs for Transportation NAMAs Screenshot References:...

  2. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuknecht, Nate; White, David; Hoste, Graeme

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  3. Project Home Again Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-30

    Phase II is a continuation of a charitable residential community project in New Orleans that builds affordable and energy efficient single detached residences that are storm resistant.

  4. Transport NAMA submissions to the UNFCCC: Domestic frameworks...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global The aim of this paper is to provide an insight into the broader domestic context in which a selection of these intentions to conduct NAMAs in the land transport...

  5. Combustion 2000: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-11-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This Phase, Phase 2, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase 3. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase 3 program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase 2 Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4,and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  6. GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for GRED III Phase II Citation Bernie Karl. 2010. GRED III Phase II. p....

  7. Condon Wind Project phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Condon Wind Project phase II Facility Condon Wind Project phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility...

  8. Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    similar analyses of the iron and steel, electric power, and aluminum industries in China, Brazil and Mexico." References "CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in...

  9. India-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market...

  10. Milford Wind Corridor Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Milford Wind Corridor Phase II Facility Milford Wind Corridor Phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  11. Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II & III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  12. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  13. Philippines-Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Redirected from Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Phase II)...

  14. Nine Canyon Wind Farm Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Farm Phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Nine Canyon Wind Farm Phase II Facility Nine Canyon Wind Farm Phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  15. I 95 Landfill Phase II Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I 95 Landfill Phase II Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name I 95 Landfill Phase II Biomass Facility Facility I 95 Landfill Phase II Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  16. DOE Awards Two Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Grants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Two Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Grants for Solid-State Lighting Technology DOE Awards Two Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Grants for Solid-State ...

  17. Victory Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Victory Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm II Facility Victory Gardens- Phase IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status...

  18. Solano Wind Project- phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name Solano Wind Project- phase II Facility Solano Wind Project- phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  19. BEATRIX-II, phase II: Data summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1996-05-01

    The BEATRIX-II experimental program was an International Energy Agency sponsored collaborative effort between Japan, Canada, and the United States to evaluate the performance of ceramic solid breeder materials in a fast-neutron environment at high burnup levels. This report addresses the Phase II activities, which included two in situ tritium-recovery canisters: temperature-change and temperature-gradient. The temperature-change canister contained a Li{sub 2}O ring specimen that had a nearly uniform temperature profile and was capable of temperature changes between 530 and 640{degrees}C. The temperature-gradient canister contained a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebble bed operating under a thermal gradient of 440 to 1100{degrees}C. Postirradiation examination was carried out to characterize the Phase II in situ specimens and a series of nonvented capsules designed to address the compatibility of beryllium with lithium-ceramic solid-breeder materials. The results of the BEATRIX-II, Phase II, irradiation experiment provided an extensive data base on the in situ tritium-release characteristics of Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} for lithium burnups near 5%. The composition of the sweep gas was found to be a critical parameter in the recovery of tritium from both Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Tritium inventories measured confirmed that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} exhibited very low tritium retention during the Phase II irradiation. Tritium inventories in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} after Phase II tended to be larger than those found for Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} in other in situ experiments, but the larger values may reflect the larger generation rates in BEATRIX-II. A series of 20 capsules was irradiated to determine the compatibility of lithium ceramics and beryllium under conditions similar to a fusion blanket. It is concluded that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} should remain leading candidates for use in a solid-breeder fusion-blanket application.

  20. SLUDGE BATCH 6 PHASE II FLOWSHEET SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.; Best, D.

    2010-03-30

    Two Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) runs were used to demonstrate that a fairly wide window of acid stoichiometry was available for processing SB6 Phase II flowsheet simulant (Tank 40 simulant) while still meeting the dual goals of acceptable nitrate destruction and controlled hydrogen generation. Phase II was an intermediate flowsheet study for the projected composition of Tank 40 after transfer of SB6/Tank 51 sludge to the heel of SB5. The composition was based on August 2009 projections. A window of about 50% in total acid was found between acceptable nitrite destruction and excessive hydrogen generation.

  1. Multiyear Program Plan Template - Phase II Guidance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multiyear Program Plan Template Phase II Guidance June 30, 2006 Foreword: The Purpose and Value of a Multiyear Program Plan Multiyear Program Plans (MYPPs) are intended primarily to serve as operational guides for programs to manage their activities and as a source of information to help EERE management identify clear linkages between key program activities and progress toward goals. It is understood, however, that they are also read by a broad group of program stakeholders and may serve other

  2. Phase II Smart Grid Data Access Funding Opportunity Winner Announced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Phase II Smart Grid Data Access Funding Opportunity Winner Announced Phase II Smart Grid Data Access Funding Opportunity Winner Announced January 8, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The ...

  3. Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing | Department of Energy Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing PDF icon Final Report Phase II:

  4. Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, James D; McClung, David W

    2006-11-06

    This report describes the preliminary design and the effort to date of Phase II of a Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer for use in networks of seismic stations for monitoring underground nuclear explosions. The design uses the latest technology of broadband seismic instrumentation. Each parameter of the seismometer is defined in terms of the known physical limits of the parameter. These limits are defined by the commercially available components, and the physical size constraints. A theoretical design is proposed, and a preliminary prototype model of the proposed instrument has been built. This prototype used the sensor module of the KS2000. The installation equipment (hole locks, etc.) has been designed and one unit has been installed in a borehole. The final design of the sensors and electronics and leveling mechanism is in process. Noise testing is scheduled for the last quarter of 2006.

  5. Phase II Accident Investigation Board Briefing | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Phase II Accident Investigation Board Briefing Phase II Accident Investigation Board Briefing Topic: Ted Wyka DOE, Provided a Brief on the Findings in the WIPP Accident Investigation. Information Provided included the Judgments of NEED and Causes That Contributed to the Incident. PDF icon AIB Brief - May 20, 2015 More Documents & Publications Accident Investigation Report Phase II Accident Investigation Report - Radiological Release WIPP Recovery Progress

  6. Final Report: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technology Phase II...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems Technology Phase II: Animas Valley, New Mexico Authors R.A. Cunniff and R.L. Bowers Published Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. Technical Report, 2003 DOI Not...

  7. DOE Issues WIPP Radiological Release Phase II Investigation Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigation Report WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) released the Accident Investigation Board (AIB) Phase II Report...

  8. OVAI Contract Report #2012-43 PHASE II ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVALUATION...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... OAI Number Site Name Occupation Range Phase II Report 33Pk184 Davis farmstead ca. ... Jefferson Patterson Park & Museum, Maryland Department of Planning. http:www.jefpat.org...

  9. Phase II Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, Reid; McPherson, Brian; Lee, Rober

    2011-08-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) one of seven regional partnerships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) carried out five field pilot tests in its Phase II Carbon Sequestration Demonstration effort, to validate the most promising sequestration technologies and infrastructure concepts, including three geologic pilot tests and two terrestrial pilot programs. This field testing demonstrated the efficacy of proposed sequestration technologies to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Risk mitigation, optimization of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols, and effective outreach and communication were additional critical goals of these field validation tests. The program included geologic pilot tests located in Utah, New Mexico, Texas, and a region-wide terrestrial analysis. Each geologic sequestration test site was intended to include injection of a minimum of ~75,000 tons/year CO{sub 2}, with minimum injection duration of one year. These pilots represent medium- scale validation tests in sinks that host capacity for possible larger-scale sequestration operations in the future. These validation tests also demonstrated a broad variety of carbon sink targets and multiple value-added benefits, including testing of enhanced oil recovery and sequestration, enhanced coalbed methane production and a geologic sequestration test combined with a local terrestrial sequestration pilot. A regional terrestrial sequestration demonstration was also carried out, with a focus on improved terrestrial MVA methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region.

  10. Multiyear Program Plan Template - Phase II Guidance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multiyear Program Plan Template - Phase II Guidance Multiyear Program Plan Template - Phase II Guidance EERE template and guidance for program managers to develop multiyear plans, updated for 2006 PDF icon eere_guide_mypp_0606.pdf More Documents & Publications EERE Program Management Guide - Appendix A EERE Program Management Guide - Chapter 4 EERE Program Management Guide - Appendices A-Q

  11. Accident Investigation Report Phase II | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Accident Investigation Report Phase II Accident Investigation Report Phase II On February 14, 2014, an airborne radiological release occurred at the Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. On March 4, 2014, an Accident Investigation Board (the Board) was appointed by Matthew Moury, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Safety, Security, and Quality Programs to determine the cause of the release. Because access to the underground was restricted following the

  12. Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texico phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico phase II Facility Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type...

  13. Phase II Smart Grid Data Access Funding Opportunity Winner Announced |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Phase II Smart Grid Data Access Funding Opportunity Winner Announced Phase II Smart Grid Data Access Funding Opportunity Winner Announced January 8, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The Energy Department on December 19 announced that San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) has won the second phase of the Smart Grid Data Access funding opportunity. SDG&E will receive an award of approximately $2 million to fully adopt its innovative program designed to get customers more

  14. Phase II beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1984-06-01

    The expansion of the National Synchrotron Light Source has been funded by the US Department of Energy. The Phase II program consists of both increased conventional facilities and six new beam lines. In this paper, an overview of the six beam lines which will be constructed during Phase II is presented. For five of the lines special radiation sources are necessary and the designs of four of the devices are complete. The relevant parameters of the insertion devices under construction and development are presented.

  15. Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories, Phase II Meeting Schedule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories, Phase II Meeting Schedule

  16. Ponnequin phase I and II (PSCo) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I and II (PSCo) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ponnequin phase I and II (PSCo) Wind Farm Facility Ponnequin phase I and II (PSCo) Sector Wind energy Facility Type...

  17. CRAD, Quality Assurance- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Quality Assurance Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  18. CRAD, Criticality Safety- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  19. CRAD, Management- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Management at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  20. CRAD, Emergency Management- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Emergency Management program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  1. CRAD, Fire Protection- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  2. CRAD, Training- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Training Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  3. CRAD, Safety Basis- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Safety Basis at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  4. CRAD, Radiological Controls- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Radiation Protection Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  5. CRAD, Engineering- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Engineering program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  6. CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Conduct of Operations program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  7. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  8. CRAD, Maintenance- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Maintenance program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  9. Study of phase I NOx control: Lessons learned for phase II NOx control strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, B.

    1996-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) is concerned with lowering the levels of acid rain in the USA. One of the contributions to acid rain is nitric oxides referred to as NO{sub x}. Title IV seeks NO{sub x} reductions from two groupings of utility steam generators. The first group, known as Phase I, was to have their reductions made by January 1, 1996. The purpose of this paper is to look back at Phase I to see what one can learn for use in Phase II compliance planning. Phase II units are scheduled to be in compliance by January 1, 2000. As such, this paper looks to answer four questions about Phase I units.

  10. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  11. Leading Edge Erosion Phase II Wind Tunnel Test Begins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edge Erosion Phase II Wind Tunnel Test Begins - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  12. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  13. ART CCIM PHASE II-A OFF-GAS SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST REPORT (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ART CCIM PHASE II-A OFF-GAS SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST REPORT Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ART CCIM PHASE II-A OFF-GAS SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST REPORT You are accessing...

  14. EA-1849-S-1: FONSI and Final Tuscarora Phase II Generating Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-1849-S-1: FONSI and Final Tuscarora Phase II Generating Facility, Elko County, NV EA-1849-S-1: FONSI and Final Tuscarora Phase II Generating Facility, Elko County, NV PDF icon...

  15. PHASE-FIELD SIMULATION OF IRRADIATED METALS: PART II: GAS BUBBLE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    METALS: PART II: GAS BUBBLE KINETICS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PHASE-FIELD SIMULATION OF IRRADIATED METALS: PART II: GAS BUBBLE KINETICS We present a phase-field ...

  16. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

    2012-09-28

    In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energys Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.

  17. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE II TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Stone, M.; Miller, D.

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitricformicglycolic and nitricformicsugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitricformicglycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitricglycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitricglycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): ? Phase I - A nitricformic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; ? Phase II - A nitricglycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste loading and was operated continuously for 25 days. Process data was collected throughout testing and included melter operation parameters and off-gas chemistry. In order to generate off-gas data in support of the flammability model development for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet, vapor space steady state testing in the range of ~300-750C was conducted under the following conditions, (i) 100% (nominal and excess antifoam levels) and 125% stoichiometry feed and (ii) with and without argon bubbling. Adjustments to feed rate, heater outputs and purge air flow were necessary in order to achieve vapor space temperatures in this range. Surge testing was also completed under nominal conditions for four days with argon bubbling and one day without argon bubbling.

  18. EA-1849-S1: Phase II Facility - Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tuscarora, NV | Department of Energy 849-S1: Phase II Facility - Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant in Tuscarora, NV EA-1849-S1: Phase II Facility - Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant in Tuscarora, NV Summary This Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) will evaluate the potential impacts of the Phase II Facility of the Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES No public comment opportunities at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD DOE/EA-1849,

  19. EA-1849-S1: Phase II Facility- Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant in Tuscarora, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) will evaluate the potential impacts of the Phase II Facility of the Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant.

  20. EA-1849-S-1: FONSI and Final Tuscarora Phase II Generating Facility, Elko

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    County, NV | Department of Energy EA-1849-S-1: FONSI and Final Tuscarora Phase II Generating Facility, Elko County, NV EA-1849-S-1: FONSI and Final Tuscarora Phase II Generating Facility, Elko County, NV PDF icon DOE_EA_1849_S1_Final_Tuscarora_PhaseII.pdf PDF icon DOE_EA_1849_S1_FONSI_Tuscarora_PhaseII.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1849-S-1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment EA-1849-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment EA-1849: Final Environmental Assessme

  1. TWO SBIR GRANTS AWARDED FOR SSL TECHNOLOGY (FY16 PHASE II RELEASE 1)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science and Basic Energy Sciences has awarded two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II Release 1 grants related to solid-state lighting. Phase...

  2. Clean Air Act Title IV: Lessons learned from Phase I; getting ready for Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments have required significant reductions in SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants in the US. This paper examines some of the key technical lessons learned in Phase I following retrofit of low NO{sub x} systems, FGD systems, and continuous emissions monitors. Some of the key problems encountered have been waterwall wastage as a result of low NO{sub x} burner retrofits; high LOI (carbon) ash as a result of low NO{sub x} operation; high O&M costs associated with CEMs; and the heat rate discrepancy which has arisen between CEMs and conventional heat rate calculations. As Phase II approaches, EPRI and the electric utility industry are investigating improvements in FGD systems (e.g., clear liquor scrubbing), advances in NO{sub x} control technologies, more robust CEM systems, and tools to help in the technology decision-making process.

  3. Evaluate fundamental approaches to longwall dust control. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babbitt, C.; Bartlett, P.; Kelly, J.; Ludlow, J.; Mangolds, A.; Rajan, S.; Ruggieri, S.; Varga, E.

    1983-03-31

    Increased levels of coal production on longwalls has brought with it higher levels of dust generation. Most United States longwalls have diffuculty complying with federal dust standards which are much stricter than those imposed in Europe. This program offers the mining industry the opportunity to sort out and share assessments of the dust control techniques in use today and those proposed for the future. This objective is being achieved through laboratory and field evaluations of both available and proposed dust control practices using innovative sampling procedures and state-of-the-art respirable dust monitors and instrumentation. In this manner, the effectiveness or lack of effectiveness of longwall dust control techniques can be quantified, thereby providing the information necessary for proper application of these techniques. This program is investigating nine different dust control techniques. This report documents the Phase II effort on each of the subprograms: Passive Barriers/Spray Air Movers for Dust Control at the Shearer; Practical Aspects of Deep Cutting; Stage Loader Dust Control; Longwall Automation Technology (remote control); Longwall Application of Ventilation Curtains; Reversed Drum Rotation; Reduction of Shield Generated Dust; Air Canopies for Longwalls; and Mining Practices. Each of these dust control methods was investigated, usually at a few or several mines, and the results were often supplemented by discussion with manufacturers and special sampling tests.

  4. Mechanical and Thermal Prototype Testing for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; ,

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results.

  5. Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bose, Sumit; Krok, Michael

    2011-02-08

    This document constitutes GE’s final report for the Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration program for DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Award DE-FC02-05CH11349. It contains the final report for Phase I in Appendix I, and the results the work performed in Phase II. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate a Microgrid Energy Management (MEM) framework for a broad set of Microgrid applications that provides unified controls, protection, and energy management. This project contributed to the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program goals by developing a fully automated power delivery microgrid network that: - Reduces carbon emissions and emissions of other air pollutants through increased use of optimally dispatched renewable energy, - Increases asset use through integration of distributed systems, - Enhances reliability, security, and resiliency from microgrid applications in critical infrastructure protection, constrained areas of the electric grid, etc. - Improves system efficiency with on-site, distributed generation and improved economic efficiency through demand-side management.

  6. TWO SBIR-STTR GRANTS SELECTED FOR AWARD FOR SSL TECHNOLOGY (FY15 PHASE II

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RELEASE 1) | Department of Energy Financial Opportunities » DOE Selections » TWO SBIR-STTR GRANTS SELECTED FOR AWARD FOR SSL TECHNOLOGY (FY15 PHASE II RELEASE 1) TWO SBIR-STTR GRANTS SELECTED FOR AWARD FOR SSL TECHNOLOGY (FY15 PHASE II RELEASE 1) The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science has selected for award two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)-Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) proposals targeting advances in solid-state lighting technology. The FY15 Phase II

  7. Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. Phase I - Resource...

  8. Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final ReportPhase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical FlushingU. S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 SupportJanuary 2004

  9. PHASE-FIELD SIMULATION OF IRRADIATED METALS: PART II: GAS BUBBLE KINETICS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect METALS: PART II: GAS BUBBLE KINETICS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PHASE-FIELD SIMULATION OF IRRADIATED METALS: PART II: GAS BUBBLE KINETICS We present a phase-field model for inert gas bubble formation and evolution in irradiated metals. The model evolves vacancy, self-interstitial, and fission gas atoms through a coupled set of Cahn-Hilliard and Allen-Cahn equations, capturing the processes of defect generation, recombination, annihilation

  10. DOE Awards Two Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Grants for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solid-State Lighting Technology | Department of Energy Two Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Grants for Solid-State Lighting Technology DOE Awards Two Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Grants for Solid-State Lighting Technology The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants targeting advances in solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The SBIR program seeks to increase the participation of small businesses in federal

  11. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification report, volumes I and II - 8/19/99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-09-10

    The Department of Energy policy (DOE P 450.4) is that safety is integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. In simple and straightforward terms, the Department will ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of this River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes are implemented within RFP to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The goal of an implemented ISMS is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The ISMS is comprised of the (1) described functions, components, processes, and interfaces (system map or blueprint) and (2) personnel who are executing those assigned roles and responsibilities to manage and control the ISMS. Therefore, this review evaluated both the ''paper'' and ''people'' aspects of the ISMS to ensure that the system is implemented within RPP. Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted an ISMS Phase I Verification of the TWRS from September 28-October 9, 1998. The resulting verification report recommended that TWRS-RL and the contractor proceed with Phase II of ISMS verification given that the concerns identified from the Phase I verification review are incorporated into the Phase II implementation plan.

  12. ART CCIM PHASE II-A OFF-GAS SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST REPORT (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect ART CCIM PHASE II-A OFF-GAS SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST REPORT Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ART CCIM PHASE II-A OFF-GAS SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST REPORT AREVA Federal Services (AFS) is performing a multi-year, multi-phase Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of replacing the existing joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the

  13. Design of a Rotatable Copper Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; Lari, Luisella; /LPHE, Lausanne

    2010-02-15

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. Design issues include: (1) Collimator jaw deflection and sagitta due to heating must be small when operated in the steady state condition, (2) Collimator jaws must withstand transitory periods of high beam impaction with no permanent damage, (3) Jaws must recover from accident scenario where up to 8 full intensity beam pulses impact on the jaw surface and (4) The beam impedance contribution due to the collimators must be small to minimize coherent beam instabilities.

  14. Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TIAX, LLC

    2005-05-04

    Phase I Due to the growing interest in establishing a domestic hydrogen infrastructure, several hydrogen fueling stations already have been established around the country as demonstration units. While these stations help build familiarity with hydrogen fuel in their respective communities, hydrogen vehicles are still several years from mass production. This limited number of hydrogen vehicles translates to a limited demand for hydrogen fuel, a significant hurdle for the near-term establishment of commercially viable hydrogen fueling stations. By incorporating a fuel cell and cogeneration system with a hydrogen fueling station, the resulting energy station can compensate for low hydrogen demand by providing both hydrogen dispensing and combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The electrical power generated by the energy station can be fed back into the power grid or a nearby facility, which in turn helps offset station costs. Hydrogen production capacity not used by vehicles can be used to support building heat and power loads. In this way, an energy station can experience greater station utility while more rapidly recovering capital costs, providing an increased market potential relative to a hydrogen fueling station. At an energy station, hydrogen is generated on-site. Part of the hydrogen is used for vehicle refueling and part of the hydrogen is consumed by a fuel cell. As the fuel cell generates electricity and sends it to the power grid, excess heat is reclaimed through a cogeneration system for use in a nearby facility. Both the electrical generation and heat reclamation serve to offset the cost of purchasing the equivalent amount of energy for nearby facilities and the energy station itself. This two-phase project assessed the costs and feasibility of developing a hydrogen vehicle fueling station in conjunction with electricity and cogenerative heat generation for nearby Federal buildings. In order to determine which system configurations and operational patterns would be most viable for an energy station, TIAX developed several criteria for selecting a representative set of technology configurations. TIAX applied these criteria to all possible technology configurations to determine an optimized set for further analysis, as shown in Table ES-1. This analysis also considered potential energy station operational scenarios and their impact upon hydrogen and power production. For example, an energy station with a 50-kWe reformer could generate enough hydrogen to serve up to 12 vehicles/day (at 5 kg/fill) or generate up to 1,200 kWh/day, as shown in Figure ES-1. Buildings that would be well suited for an energy station would utilize both the thermal and electrical output of the station. Optimizing the generation and utilization of thermal energy, hydrogen, and electricity requires a detailed look at the energy transfer within the energy station and the transfer between the station and nearby facilities. TIAX selected the Baseline configuration given in Table ES-1 for an initial analysis of the energy and mass transfer expected from an operating energy station. Phase II The purpose of this technical analysis was to analyze the development of a hydrogen-dispensing infrastructure for transportation applications through the installation of a 50-75 kW stationary fuel cell-based energy station at federal building sites. The various scenarios, costs, designs and impacts of such a station were quantified for a hypothetical cost-shared program that utilizes a natural gas reformer to provide hydrogen fuel for both the stack(s) and a limited number of fuel cell powered vehicles, with the possibility of using cogeneration to support the building heat load.

  15. Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan- Radiological Release Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose ofthis Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to specify U.S. Departme~t of Energy (DOE) actions for addressing Office of Environmental Management (EM) Headquarters (HQ) issues identified in the Accident Investigation Report for the Phase 2: Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) on February 14, 2014. The report identified 24 Conclusions and 40 Judgments of Need (JONs). Six of the Conclusions and five of the JONs were determined to be associated with EM HQ oversight of the operations. As such, EM HQ has taken the action to develop the CAP for those JONs specific to HQ (i.e., JONs 6,30,31 ,37 and 40). This report documents those corrective actions, along with the responsible office and due dates for completing the actions.

  16. OCCIDENTAL VERTICAL MODIFIED IN SITU PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF OIL FROM OIL SHALE. PHASE II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Reid M.

    1980-09-01

    The progress presented in this report covers the period June 1, 1980 through August 31, 1980 under the work scope for.Phase II of the DOE/Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. (OOSI) Cooperative Agreement. The major activities at OOSI 1s Logan Wash site during the quarter were: mining the voids at all levels for Retorts 7, 8 and 8x; completing Mini-Retort (MR) construction; continuing surface facility construction; tracer testing the MR 1 s; conducting Retorts 7 & 8 related Rock Fragmentation tests; setting up and debugging the Sandia B-61 trailer; and preparing the Phase II instrumentation plan.

  17. RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Tracy A; Walker, Randy M; Hill, David E; Gross, Ian G; Smith, Cyrus M; Abercrombie, Robert K

    2008-12-01

    This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies.

  18. Definition of the Semisubmersible Floating System for Phase II of OC4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Masciola, M.; Song, H.; Goupee, A.; Coulling, A.; Luan, C.

    2014-09-01

    Phase II of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation (OC4) project involved modeling of a semisubmersible floating offshore wind system as shown below. This report documents the specifications of the floating system, which were needed by the OC4 participants for building aero-hydro-servo-elastic models.

  19. Evaluation of Phase II glass formulations for vitrification of Hanford Site low-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, X.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A vendor glass formulation study was carried out at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), supporting the Phase I and Phase II melter vendor testing activities for Westinghouse Hanford Company. This study is built upon the LLW glass optimization effort that will be described in a separate report. For Phase I vendor melter testing, six glass formulations were developed at PNL and additional were developed by Phase I vendors. All the doses were characterized in terms of viscosity and chemical durability by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. Twelve Phase II glass formulations (see Tables 3.5 and 3.6) were developed to accommodate 2.5 wt% P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 1.0 wt% S0{sub 3} without significant processing problems. These levels of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and SO{sub 3} are expected to be the highest possible concentrations from Hanford Site LLW streams at 25 wt% waste loading in glass. The Phase H compositions formulated were 6 to 23 times more durable than the environmental assessment (EA) glass. They melt within the temperature range of 1160{degrees} to 1410{degrees}C to suit different melting technologies. The composition types include boron-free for volatilization sensitive melters; boron-containing glasses for coId-cap melters; Zr-containing, glasses for enhanced Iong-term durability; and Fe-containing glasses for reducing melting temperature and melt volatility while maintaining chemical durability.

  20. Rigid Polyurethane Foam (RPF) Technology for Countermines (Sea) Program Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WOODFIN,RONALD L.; FAUCETT,DAVID L.; HANCE,BRADLEY G.; LATHAM,AMY E.; SCHMIDT,C.O.

    1999-10-01

    This Phase II report documents the results of one subtask initiated under the joint Department of Energy (DOE)/Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Countermine Warfare. The development of Rigid Polyurethane Foams for neutralization of mines and barriers in amphibious assault was the objective of the tasking. This phase of the program concentrated on formation of RPF in water, explosive mine simulations, and development of foam and fabric pontoons. Field experimentation was done primarily at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM between February 1996 and September 1998.

  1. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume II - Potentiometric Data Document Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    Volume II of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the potentiometric data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  2. PHASE II REMEDIAL INVESTlGATlOE FORMER AMCHITKA ARMY AIR BASE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    lWE&PREENING MEMORANDUL PHASE II REMEDIAL INVESTlGATlOE FORMER AMCHITKA ARMY AIR BASE AMCHITKA ISLAND, ALAS0 February 199: 111 IIllllllllllllllllllllll1111 AMC 0001 08 Submitted To: Department of the Army Alaska District, Corps of Engineers By: Shannon &Wilson, Inc. 2055 Hill Road Fairbanks, Alaska 997094244 TABLE OF CONTENTS m 1.0 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................. 1-1 2.0 SCOPE OF THE REMEDIAL

  3. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase II. Final report, January 30, 1995--January 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed Phase II of a project to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS). The project`s primary objectives are to preserve geoscience data in jeopardy of being destroyed and to make that data available to those who have a need to use it in future investigations. These data are available for donation to the public as a result of the downsizing that has occurred in the major petroleum and mining companies in the United States for the past decade. In recent years, these companies have consolidated domestic operations, sold many of their domestic properties and relinquished many of their leases. The scientific data associated with those properties are no longer considered to be useful assets and are consequently in danger of being lost forever. The national repository project will make many of these data available to the geoscience community for the first time. To address this opportunity, AGI sought support from the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1994 to initiate the NGDRS Phase I feasibility study to determine the types and quantity of data that companies would be willing to donate. The petroleum and mining companies surveyed indicated that they were willing to donate approximately five million well logs, one hundred million miles of seismic reflection data, millions of linear feet of core and cuttings, and a variety of other types of scientific data. Based on the positive results of the Phase I study, AGI undertook Phase II of the program in 1995. Funded jointly by DOE and industry, Phase II encompasses the establishment of standards for indexing and cataloging of geoscience data and determination of the costs of transferring data from the private sector to public-sector data repositories. Pilot projects evaluated the feasibility of the project for transfer of different data types and creation of a Web-based metadata supercatalog and browser.

  4. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume II. Detailed description of the model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the second of a seven volume series of our Phase II Final Report. This volume deals with detailed descriptions of the structure of each program member (subroutines and functions), the interrelation between the members of a submodel, and the interrelation between the various submodels as such. The systems model for fluidized bed combustors (FBC-II) consists of a systematic combination of the following interrelated areas: fluid mechanics and bubble growth, char combustion and associated kinetics for particle burnout, sulfur capture, NO/sub x/ formation and reduction, freeboard reactions, and heat transfer. Program outline is shown in Figure 1.1. Input variables (supplied by the user are inspected to check that they lie inside the allowed range of values and are input to the various routines as needed. The necessary physical and fluid mechanical properties are calculated and utilized in estimating char combustion and sulfur capture in the bed and the freeboard. NO/sub x/ and CO emissions are estimated by taking into account all relevant chemical reactions. A material and energy balance is made over the bed. Figure 1.1 shows a block diagram of the systems program. In this diagram, the overall structure of the FBC program is illustrated in terms of the various submodels that together constitute the systems program. A more detailed outline of the systems program is shown in Figure 1.2. In this figure, all important subroutine members of the FBC program are shown, and their linkage to each other, as well as to the main program is indicated. A description of the exact sequence in which these various routines are called at time of program execution is provided in Chapter 8 under the executive routine MAIN.

  5. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  6. Predicted Geology of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Phase II Drilling Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-04-20

    Pahute MesaOasis Valley (PM-OV) Phase II drilling will occur within an area that encompasses approximately 117 square kilometers (45 square miles) near the center of the Phase I PM-OV hydrostratigraphic framework model area. The majority of the investigation area lies within dissected volcanic terrain between Pahute Mesa on the north and Timber Mountain on the south. This area consists of a complex distribution of volcanic tuff and lava of generally rhyolitic composition erupted from nearby calderas and related vents. Several large buried volcanic structural features control the distribution of volcanic units in the investigation area. The Area 20 caldera, including its structural margin and associated caldera collapse collar, underlies the northeastern portion of the investigation area. The southern half of the investigation area lies within the northwestern portion of the Timber Mountain caldera complex, including portions of the caldera moat and resurgent dome. Another significant structural feature in the area is the west-northwest-trending Northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone, which bisects the northern portion of the investigation area and forms a structural bench. The proposed wells of the UGTA Phase II drilling initiative can be grouped into four generalized volcanic structural domains based on the stratigraphic distribution and structural position of the volcanic rocks in the upper 1,000 meters (3,300 feet) of the crust, a depth that represents the approximate planned total depths of the proposed wells.

  7. Summary of WPT FOA phase II demonstration performed on July 21, 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Perry T.; Onar, Omer C.

    2015-08-01

    This summary provides details of the activities, presentations and hardware demonstrations performed at the International Transportation Innovation Center (iTiC) in Greenville, South Carolina as deliverables for the wireless power transfer (WPT) FOA #000667 phase II gateway. This report does not attempt to identify all encompassing efforts from each of the partners leading up to the demonstration, but will attempt to provide a record which briefly describes the project deliverables met and expectations from the Department of Energy (DOE) as action items agreed to during the wrap-up session on July 21, 2015.

  8. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-07-27

    This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

  9. OVAI Contract Report #2012-43 PHASE II ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF SIX HISTORIC

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    RSI/PORTS 231 OVAI Contract Report #2012-43 PHASE II ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF SIX HISTORIC FARMSTEAD SITES (33PK185, 33PK203, 33PK206, 33PK211, 33PK217, AND 33PK218) WITHIN THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT (PORTS), PIKE COUNTY, OHIO By Albert M. Pecora, Ph.D. and Jarrod Burks, Ph.D. July 3, 2012 This document has been approved for public release: Henry H. Thomas (Signature on File) 07/12/12 Classification & Information Control Officer Ohio Valley Archaeology, Inc. 4889 Sinclair

  10. DOE Phase II SBIR: Spectrally-Assisted Vehicle Tracking - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villeneuve, Pierre V.

    2013-02-28

    The goal of this Phase II SBIR has been to develop a prototype software package to demonstrate spectrally-aided vehicle tracking. The primary application is to show improved target vehicle tracking performance in complex environments where traditional spatial tracker systems may show reduced performance. Examples include scenarios where the target vehicle is obscured by a large structure for an extended period of time, or where the target is engaging in extreme maneuvers amongst other civilian vehicles. The target information derived from spatial processing is unable to differentiate between the green versus the red vehicle. Spectral signature exploitation enables comparison of new candidate targets with existing track signatures. The ambiguity in this confusing scenario is resolved by folding spectral analysis results into each target nomination and association processes. The work performed over the two-year effort was divided into three general areas: algorithm refinement, software prototype development, and prototype performance demonstration. The tasks performed under this Phase II resulted in the completion of a software tool suitable for evaluation and testing of advanced tracking concepts.

  11. Climatepipes: User-friendly data access, data manipulation, data analysis and visualization of community climate models Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhary, Aashish

    2015-09-02

    In Phase I, we successfully developed a web-based tool that provides workflow and form-based interfaces for accessing, querying, and visualizing interesting datasets from one or more sources. For Phase II of the project, we have implemented mechanisms for supporting more elaborate and relevant queries.

  12. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume IV. FBC-Model-II manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the fourth of the seven volume series of our Phase II Final Report. The purpose of this manual is to describe how to access and use M.I.T.'s Fluidized Bed Combustor (FBC) System Program. Presently, the FBC program is stored in a Honeywell Computer System and can be accessed using the Multics interactive system. The intention in writing this manual is to answer the questions that may arise regarding the mechanics of operating the system program, as well as warn the user of possible pitfalls and mistakes that could be made. No attempt is made here to describe the internals of the systems program. The manual describes the procedures an individual would follow to become an active user of the system program. It then explains the various options available for reaching the Multics interactive system on Honeywell 6180 computer on which the program runs. For users outside the Metropolitan Boston area, a public network for data communications is described which is relatively inexpensive. As the system program is approached through Multics using a special command facility TPSA, a separate introduction is provided for Multics TPSA. This facility allows commands appropriate for testing the program and carrying out parametric studies to be executed in a convenient way. Multics TPSA was formulated to meet the needs of the FBC project in particular. Finally, some sample sessions are presented which illustrate the login and logout procedures, the command language, and the data manipulation features of the FBC program. The use of commands helpful in debugging the program is also illustrated.

  13. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership.

  14. SRNL PHASE II SHELF LIFE STUDIES - SERIES 1 ROOM TEMPERATURE AND HIGH RELATIVE HUMIDITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

    2012-09-12

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Phase II, Series 1 shelf-life corrosion testing for the Department of Energy Standard 3013 container is presented and discussed in terms of the localized corrosion behavior of Type 304 stainless steel in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures and the potential impact to the 3013 inner container. This testing was designed to address the influence of temperature, salt composition, initial salt moisture, residual stress and type of oxide/salt contact on the relative humidity inside a 3013 container and the initiation and propagation of localized corrosion, especially stress corrosion cracking. The integrated plan is being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory and SRNL. SRNL is responsible for conducting a corrosion study in small scale vessels containing plutonium oxide and chloride salts under conditions of humidity, temperature and oxide/salt compositions both within the limits of 3013 storage conditions as well as beyond the 3013 storage requirements to identify margins for minimizing the initiation of stress corrosion cracking. These worst case conditions provide data that bound the material packaged in 3013 containers. Phase I of this testing was completed in 2010. The Phase II, Series 1 testing was performed to verify previous results from Phase I testing and extend our understanding about the initiation of stress corrosion cracking and pitting that occur in 304L under conditions of room temperature, high humidity, and a specific plutonium oxide/salt chemistry. These results will aid in bounding the safe storage conditions of plutonium oxides in 3013 containers. A substantial change in the testing was the addition of the capability to monitor relative humidity during test exposure. The results show that under conditions of high initial moisture ({approx}0.5 wt%) and room temperature stress corrosion cracking occurred in 304L teardrop coupons in contact with the oxide/salt mixture at times as short as 85 days. In all cases, the cracking appeared to be associated with pitting or localized general corrosion. Crack initiation at other sites, such as surface imperfections or inclusions, cannot be excluded. Cracks appear in most cases to initiate through an intergranular mode and transition to a transgranular mode.

  15. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technical Training, Practical Training Phase II, Part 7 of 9

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiological Control Technician Training Practical Training Phase II Part 7 of 9 Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian

  16. Phase II: Field Detector Development For Undeclared/Declared Nuclear Testing For Treaty Verfiation Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriz, M.; Hunter, D.; Riley, T.

    2015-10-02

    Radioactive xenon isotopes are a critical part of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) for the detection or confirmation of nuclear weapons tests as well as on-site treaty verification monitoring. On-site monitoring is not currently conducted because there are no commercially available small/robust field detector devices to measure the radioactive xenon isotopes. Xenon is an ideal signature to detect clandestine nuclear events since they are difficult to contain and can diffuse and migrate through soils due to their inert nature. There are four key radioxenon isotopes used in monitoring: 135Xe (9 hour half-life), 133mXe (2 day half-life), 133Xe (5 day half-life) and 131mXe (12 day half-life) that decay through beta emission and gamma emission. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a leader in the field of gas collections and has developed highly selective molecular sieves that allow for the collection of xenon gas directly from air. Phase I assessed the development of a small, robust beta-gamma coincidence counting system, that combines collection and in situ detection methodologies. Phase II of the project began development of the custom electronics enabling 2D beta-gamma coincidence analysis in a field portable system. This will be a significant advancement for field detection/quantification of short-lived xenon isotopes that would not survive transport time for laboratory analysis.

  17. GERDA phase II detectors: Behind the production and characterisation at low background conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maneschg, Werner [Max-Planck-Institut fr Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fr Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    The low background GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) is designed to search for the rare neutrinoless double beta decay (0???) in {sup 76}Ge. Bare germanium diodes are operated in liquid argon which is used as coolant, as passive and soon active as well shield against external radiation. Currently, Phase I of the experiment is running using ?15 kg of co-axial High Purity Germanium diodes. In order to increase the sensitivity of the experiment 30 Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) diodes will be added within 2013. This presentation reviews the production chain of the new BEGe detectors from isotopic enrichment to diode production and testing. As demonstrated all steps were carefully planned in order to minimize the exposure of the enriched germanium to cosmic radiation. Following this premise, acceptance and characterisation measurement of the newly produced diodes have been performed within the HEROICA project in the Belgian underground laboratory HADES close to the diode manufacturer. The test program and the results from a subset of the recently terminated GERDA Phase II BEGe survey will be presented.

  18. The Potential Economic Impact of Electricity Restructuring in the State of Oklahoma: Phase II Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2001-10-30

    Because of the recent experiences of several states undergoing restructuring (e.g., higher prices, greater volatility, lower reliability), concerns have been raised in states currently considering restructuring as to whether their systems are equally vulnerable. Factors such as local generation costs, transmission constraints, market concentration, and market design can all play a role in the success or failure of the market. These factors along with the mix of generation capacity supplying the state will influence the relative prices paid by consumers. The purpose of this project is to provide a model and process to evaluate the potential price and economic impacts of restructuring the Oklahoma electric industry. The Phase I report concentrated on providing an analysis of the Oklahoma system in the near-term, using only present generation resources and customer demands. This Phase II study analyzed the Oklahoma power market in 2010, incorporating the potential of new generation resources and customer responses. Five key findings of this Phase II were made: (1) Projected expansion in generating capacity exceeds by over 3,000 MW the demands within the state plus the amount that could be exported with the current transmission system. (2) Even with reduced new plant construction, most new plants could lose money (although residential consumers would see lower rates) unless they have sufficient market power to raise their prices without losing significant market share (Figure S-1). (3) If new plants can raise prices to stay profitable, existing low-cost coal and hydro plants will have very high profits. Average prices to customers could be 5% to 25% higher than regulated rates (Figure S-1). If the coal and hydro plants are priced at cost-based rates (through long-term contracts or continued regulation) while all other plants use market-based rates then prices are lower. (4) Customer response to real-time prices can lower the peak capacity requirements by around 9%, lowering the need for new capacity and reduce prices during the peak demand. (5) Changes to electric prices on the order of 5% to 20% will have only a modest effect on overall economic activity within the state.

  19. Final phase I report and phase II work plan : QuickSite{reg_sign} investigation, Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2003-03-01

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated a grain storage facility approximately 1,100 ft north of Centralia (Figure 1.2). The CCC/USDA operated this facility from 1949 until 1971. None of the CCC/USDA structures remain. Two additional grain storage facilities currently exist in and near Centralia: the Nemaha County Co-op, approximately 4,000 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, and a private grain storage facility near the Don Morris residence, 3,500 ft north of the former CCC/USDA facility. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the grain storage industry to preserve grain. In April 1998, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled the domestic well at the Don Morris residence near Centralia (Figure 1.2) as part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program, which was initiated to determine whether carbon tetrachloride was present in domestic wells located near former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Kansas. Carbon tetrachloride was detected in the Morris well at 19.3 mg/L and confirmed at 25.4 mg/L, both concentrations above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 mg/L for carbon tetrachloride in drinking water. On the basis of the detection of carbon tetrachloride in the Morris well, the KDHE in August-September 1998 conducted preliminary investigations at the former CCC/USDA facility. For the details of previous investigations in the area and a summary of their findings, see the QuickSite{reg_sign} Phase I Work Plan for Centralia (Argonne 2002a). Because the KDHE found carbon tetrachloride at the former CCC/USDA facility at Centralia that might, in part, be linked to historical use of carbon tetrachloride-based grain fumigants at the facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an environmental site investigation at Centralia. However, the KDHE established in 1998 that the probable groundwater flow direction at the former CCC/USDA facility is not toward the Morris well, and thus the former facility is not responsible for the carbon tetrachloride measured in that well. The town of Centralia and all residents near the former CCC/USDA facility currently obtain their water from Rural Water District No.3 (RWD 3). Therefore, these local residents are not drinking and using contaminated groundwater. The investigation at Centralia is being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. At these facilities, Argonne is applying its QuickSite environmental site characterization methodology. QuickSite is Argonne's proprietary implementation system for the expedited site characterization (ESC) process. Argonne's Environmental Research Division developed the ESC process to optimize preremedial site characterization work at hazardous waste sites by obtaining and then applying a thorough understanding of a site's geology, hydrogeology, and hydrogeochemistry (e.g., Burton 1994). This approach is fundamental to successful site characterization because the geology and hydrogeology of a site largely govern the mobility and fate of contaminants there. Argonne's ESC process has been used successfully at a number of former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and Nebraska and has been adopted by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM 1998) as standard practice for environmental site characterization. This report documents the findings of the Phase I activities at Centralia. Section 1 provides a brief history of the area and the QuickSite process, a summary of the geologic/hydrogeologic model, objectives of the Phase I investigation, and a brief description of the sections contained in this report. Section 2 describes the investigative methods used during the Phase I investigation. Section 3 presents all of the data obtained during the investigation. Section 4 describes the interpretation of the pertinent data used to meet the technical objectives of the investigation, including the contaminant migration pathways in soil and groundwater. A summary of the findings is also provided in Section 4. Section 5 presents the conclusions of the investigation relative to the technical objectives and outlines recommendations for Phase II. To streamline the reporting process, materials from the Work Plan (Argonne 2002a) and relevant sections of the Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002b) are not repeated in detail in this report. Consequently, these documents must also be consulted to obtain the complete details of the Phase I investigative program.

  20. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting, I-35W Bridge, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Phase II Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, B. R.; Davis, R. G.

    2014-09-30

    On the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the GATEWAY program conducted a two-phase demonstration of LED roadway lighting on the main span, which is one of the country's oldest continuously operated exterior LED lighting installations. The Phase II report documents longer-term performance of the LED lighting system that was installed in 2008, and is the first report on the longer-term performance of LED lighting in the field.

  1. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackman, Thomas; Minor, Timothy; Pohll, Gregory

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during Phase I, in which the hydrologic framework was investigated and the development initiated. Phase II concentrates on practical implementation of the earlier work but emphasizes applications to the hydrology of the Lake Tahoe basin. Phase 1 efforts have been refined and extended by creating a toolset for geographic information systems (GIS) that is usable for disparate types of geospatial and geo-referenced data. The toolset is intended to serve multiple users for a variety of applications. The web portal for internet access to hydrologic and remotely sensed product data, prototyped in Phase I, has been significantly enhanced. The portal provides high performance access to LANDSAT-derived data using techniques developed during the course of the project. The portal is interactive, and supports the geo-referenced display of hydrologic information derived from remotely sensed data, such as various vegetative indices used to calculate water consumption. The platform can serve both internal and external constituencies using inter-operating infrastructure that spans both sides of the DRI firewall. The platform is intended grow its supported data assets and to serve as a template for replication to other geographic areas. An unanticipated development during the project was the use of ArcGIS software on a new computer system, called the IBM PureSytems, and the parallel use of the systems for faster, more efficient image processing. Additional data, independent of the portal, was collected within the Sagehen basin and provides detailed information regarding the processes that control hydrologic responses within mountain watersheds. The newly collected data include elevation, evapotranspiration, energy balance and remotely sensed snow-pack data. A Lake Tahoe basin hydrologic model has been developed, in part to help predict the hydrologic impacts of climate change. The model couples both the surface and subsurface hydrology, with the two components having been independently calibrated. Results from the coupled simulations involving both surface water and groundwater processes

  2. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF CHEMICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN DEEP AQUIFER MEDIA - PHASE II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta; Bruce Sass; Jennifer Ickes

    2000-11-28

    In 1998 Battelle was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under a Novel Concepts project grant to continue Phase II research on the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in deep saline formations. The focus of this investigation is to conduct detailed laboratory experiments to examine factors that may affect chemical sequestration of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations. Reactions between sandstone and other geologic media from potential host reservoirs, brine solutions, and CO{sub 2} are being investigated under high-pressure conditions. Some experiments also include sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) gases to evaluate the potential for co-injection of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} related gases in the deep formations. In addition, an assessment of engineering and economic aspects is being conducted. This current Technical Progress Report describes the status of the project as of September 2000. The major activities undertaken during the quarter included several experiments conducted to investigate the effects of pressure, temperature, time, and brine composition on rock samples from potential host reservoirs. Samples (both powder and slab) were taken from the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a potential CO{sub 2} host formation in the Ohio, the Eau Claire Shale, and Rome Dolomite samples that form the caprock for Mt. Simon Sandstone. Also, a sample with high calcium plagioclase content from Frio Formation in Texas was used. In addition, mineral samples for relatively pure Anorthite and glauconite were experimented on with and without the presence of additional clay minerals such as kaolinite and montmorillonite. The experiments were run for one to two months at pressures similar to deep reservoirs and temperatures set at 50 C or 150 C. Several enhancements were made to the experimental equipment to allow for mixing of reactants and to improve sample collection methods. The resulting fluids (gases and liquids) as well as the rock samples were characterized to evaluate the geochemical changes over the experimental period. Preliminary results from the analysis are presented in the report. More detailed interpretation of the results will be presented in the technical report at the end of Phase II.

  3. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Report: Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe Lederman

    2007-01-08

    This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II project (Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections) at Deep Web Technologies (http://www.deepwebtech.com). We have successfully completed all of the tasks defined in our SBIR Proposal work plan (See Table 1 - Phase II Tasks Status). The project was completed on schedule and we have successfully deployed an initial production release of the software architecture at DOE-OSTI for the Science.gov Alliance's search portal (http://www.science.gov). We have implemented a set of grid services that supports the extraction, filtering, aggregation, and presentation of search results from numerous heterogeneous document collections. Illustration 3 depicts the services required to perform QuickRank filtering of content as defined in our architecture documentation. Functionality that has been implemented is indicated by the services highlighted in green. We have successfully tested our implementation in a multi-node grid deployment both within the Deep Web Technologies offices, and in a heterogeneous geographically distributed grid environment. We have performed a series of load tests in which we successfully simulated 100 concurrent users submitting search requests to the system. This testing was performed on deployments of one, two, and three node grids with services distributed in a number of different configurations. The preliminary results from these tests indicate that our architecture will scale well across multi-node grid deployments, but more work will be needed, beyond the scope of this project, to perform testing and experimentation to determine scalability and resiliency requirements. We are pleased to report that a production quality version (1.4) of the science.gov Alliance's search portal based on our grid architecture was released in June of 2006. This demonstration portal is currently available at http://science.gov/search30 . The portal allows the user to select from a number of collections grouped by category and enter a query expression (See Illustration 1 - Science.gov 3.0 Search Page). After the user clicks search a results page is displayed that provides a list of results from the selected collections ordered by relevance based on the query expression the user provided. Our grid based solution to deep web search and document ranking has already gained attention within DOE, other Government Agencies and a fortune 50 company. We are committed to the continued development of grid based solutions to large scale data access, filtering, and presentation problems within the domain of Information Retrieval and the more general categories of content management, data mining and data analysis.

  4. Ultra-secure RF Tags for Safeguards and Security - SBIR Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twogood, Richard E

    2015-01-27

    This is the Final Report for the DOE Phase II SBIR project “Ultra-secure RF Tags for Safeguards and Security.” The topics covered herein include technical progress made, progress against the planned milestones and deliverables, project outcomes (results, collaborations, intellectual property, etc.), and a discussion on future expectations of deployment and impacts of the results of this work. In brief, all planned work for the project was successfully completed, on or ahead of schedule and on budget. The major accomplishment was the successful development of a very advanced passive ultra-secure RFID tag system with combined security features unmatched by any commercially available ones. These tags have high-level dynamic encrypted authentication, a novel tamper-proofing mechanism, system software including graphical user interfaces and networking, and integration with a fiber-optic seal mechanism. This is all accomplished passively (with no battery) by incorporating sophisticated hardware in the tag which harvests the energy from the RFID readers that are interrogating the tag. Based on initial feedback (and deployments) at DOE’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), it is anticipated these tags and their offspring will meet DOE and international community needs for highly secure RFID systems. Beyond the accomplishment of those original objectives for the ultra-secure RF tags, major new spin-off thrusts from the original work were identified and successfully pursued with the cognizance of the DOE sponsor office. In particular, new classes of less sophisticated RFID tags were developed whose lineage derives from the core R&D thrusts of this SBIR. These RF “tag variants” have some, but not necessarily all, of the advanced characteristics described above and can therefore be less expensive and meet far wider markets. With customer pull from the DOE and its national laboratories, new RFID tags and systems (including custom readers and software) for government needs in asset management and tracking were developed. These were tested at a national laboratory and other government facilities, and resulted in immediate procurement actions by the government and deployment of these new systems. Thus, commercialization of the results of this Phase II DOE SBIR was already underway before the end of the SBIR itself. More importantly, operations involving asset management at selected DoE and government sites are already being impacted favorably and could have much broader impacts in the near future.

  5. SBIR/STTR Phase II Release 1 Award Winners Announced, Includes Two Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently announced the FY 2014 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase II Release 1 award winners, including two hydrogen and fuel cell projects in Colorado and New Jersey.

  6. THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

    2010-08-31

    This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

  7. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    : " + ; . .Z + II . ? 8 . " ~. . . . a a' .; ,. ?> , . ' . : . ., ! , Environmental i r .,' : % , ~ ~ 9 . / ; i.3. -\ ,- I - 'I ' , 2 " .r: 1; . . , ~ . ,&- c . . a , ,, .,I;< . .' , , ? $ ; 1- !'I' . '...~ - .. :, , .I Closure Report for CAU No. 416 1: ' . Project Shoal Area I:' c!';,: .. 7. .. , . ~ 1 I' ,. Controlled Copy No. UNCONTROLLED { -* .. 4'. . 1 " . .. *. *" '.. . . , , ,I +' , ,.f.' I , I" I ', ', ctk;' . , I , '. :C, , I: : , . p . ? .,; . s

  8. Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

    2005-04-01

    This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

  9. Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2004-12-01

    This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

  10. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    II c )3 c F r c L LI L rr c - r I P- c OAK RlDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY h U W -l\ &?ir;; ITi' m . 8 ORNL/RASA-92/l Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley M . S. Uziel MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNLJRASA-92/l /- HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20

  11. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation: Phase II Results of a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.

    2013-11-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. The Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3), which operated under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 23, was established to verify the accuracy of these simulation tools [1]. This work was then extended under the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project under IEA Wind Task 30 [2]. Both of these projects sought to verify the accuracy of offshore wind turbine dynamics simulation tools (or codes) through code-to-code comparison of simulated responses of various offshore structures. This paper describes the latest findings from Phase II of the OC4 project, which involved the analysis of a 5-MW turbine supported by a floating semisubmersible. Twenty-two different organizations from 11 different countries submitted results using 24 different simulation tools. The variety of organizations contributing to the project brought together expertise from both the offshore structure and wind energy communities. Twenty-one different load cases were examined, encompassing varying levels of model complexity and a variety of metocean conditions. Differences in the results demonstrate the importance and accuracy of the various modeling approaches used. Significant findings include the importance of mooring dynamics to the mooring loads, the role nonlinear hydrodynamic terms play in calculating drift forces for the platform motions, and the difference between global (at the platform level) and local (at the member level) modeling of viscous drag. The results from this project will help guide development and improvement efforts for these tools to ensure that they are providing the accurate information needed to support the design and analysis needs of the offshore wind community.

  12. Development of a pilot-scale kinetic extruder feeder system and test program. Phase II. Verification testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-12

    This report describes the work done under Phase II, the verification testing of the Kinetic Extruder. The main objective of the test program was to determine failure modes and wear rates. Only minor auxiliary equipment malfunctions were encountered. Wear rates indicate useful life expectancy of from 1 to 5 years for wear-exposed components. Recommendations are made for adapting the equipment for pilot plant and commercial applications. 3 references, 20 figures, 12 tables.

  13. Final Technical Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-02ER83371, Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, William; Wilkinson, David; Hamel, William; Zhou, Renbin; Nycz, Andrzej; Humphreys, Heather

    2006-04-14

    The purpose of this research was to develop a telerobotic master device consisting of a 7-axis backdrivable robotic arm, and a pressure-sensitive grip-controller integrated with a Compact Remote Console (CRC), thus creating a highly functional teleoperation station targeted to control a 6-axis industrial robotic arm and dexterous robotic hand to be used for demolition work in a nuclear setting. We successfully completed the development of one of the world?s smallest brushless motor controllers due partially to funding through this grant. These controllers are used to drive the motors in the master robotic arm. We also completed the development of an improved model of a highly advanced 4 degree-of-freedom arm ? this same arm is the core component in the teleoperation system. The WAM arm and a 3-axis gimbals were integrated with a commercially available CRC at our consultant?s lab at University of Tennessee. Additional support hardware and software were combined to tie the master control system to an existing industrial robot in the lab. A master controller for a dexterous hand was developed and became an integral part of the gimbals handle. Control algorithms were developed and the software was written and implemented. The entire system was then debugged and tested. Results of the prototype system are promising. The WAM Arm, gimbals, hand controller and CRC were successful integrated. Testing of the system to control the 6-axis industrial arm and prototype dexterous hand showed great potential. Relatively simple tasks were successfully performed at slow speeds. Some of the testing was hampered by problems with the slave dexterous hand. This is a prototype hand being developed by Barrett under a different Phase II program. Potential improvements and advancements to the system include improving the control code, and integration of a 2nd master controller arm in order to drive a 2nd slave arm and hand. In summary, the device is a complex system with advanced features and could be used as a universal platform for efficient controlling of robotic arms performing remote tasks in unstructured and uncertain environments such as those prevalent in environmental clean up.

  14. Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

    2012-01-01

    Under certain circumstances, powder from an accidently dropped container can become airborne and inhaled by people nearby such as those who are moving the containers. The inhaled fine particles can deposit on respiratory tracts and lungs, causing asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory illnesses and chronic symptoms. The objective of this study was to develop a standard procedure to measure the airborne concentrations of different size particles within the vicinity of a dropped container where a significant portion of the contained powder is ejected. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) was selected in this study to represent relatively heavy powders (7.16 g/cm3 specific gravity for WO{sub 3}). A typical can with the outer dimensions of 4.25 diameter and 4.875 tall was used as the container. The powder was dropped in two different configurations: 1) contained within a can covered by a lid that has a 0.25 diameter hole, and 2) contained within a can without a lid. The packing volume of the powder was 51.4 in3 (842.7 cm{sup 3}) and the target mass was 1936 g. The tests were carried out in a full-scale stainless steel environmental chamber with an interior volume of 852 ft3 (24.1 m3). The chamber system includes an internal recirculation loop with a rectangular air diffuser and 10 variable frequency drive fans to provide a typical room air recirculation flow pattern. Two air filters were installed in the chamber air supply duct and return duct to achieve the required low background particle concentration. The initial chamber air conditions were set at 70F ( 5F) and 50% ( 10%) RH. A supporting frame and releasing device were designed and built to trigger consistently the dropping of the can. The particle sampling inlet was placed 5 ft above the floor and 6 inches laterally away from the cans falling path. Concentrations of particles between 0.5 ?m and 20 ?m were recorded in units of mass and number of particles per unit volume. The data acquisition rate was once every 2 seconds during the first 2 hours. A test procedure was developed and verified. A total of thirty two drop tests were performed, eight in Phase I and twenty four in Phase II, covering variations in dropping height (8 ft or 4 ft from the floor), room air movement (0.25-0.30 m/s or 0.10-0.15 m/s near the ceiling), landing scenario (on a flat plate or a block), and lid condition ( lid hole or no lid). There were ten tests with flat plate and lid hole, ten tests with flat plate no lid and twelve tests with block no lid.

  15. Study of Row Phase Dependent Skew Quadrupole Fields in Apple-II Type EPUs at the ALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steier, C.; Marks, S.; Prestemon, Soren; Robin, David; Schlueter, Ross; Wolski, Andrzej

    2004-05-07

    Since about 5 years, Apple-II type Elliptically Polarizing Undulators (EPU) have been used very successfully at the ALS to generate high brightness photon beams with arbitrary polarization. However, both EPUs installed so far cause significant changes of the vertical beamsize, especially when the row phase is changed to change the polarization of the photons emitted. Detailed measurements indicate this is caused by a row phase dependent skew quadrupole term in the EPUs. Magnetic measurements revealed the same effect for the third EPU to be installed later this year. All measurements to identify and quantify the effect with beam will be presented, as well as some results of magnetic bench measurements and numeric field simulations.

  16. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion. Phase II, MHD propulsion: Testing in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doss, E.D.; Sikes, W.C.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  17. Phase II Calderon Process to Produce Direct Reduced Iron Research and Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2003-06-30

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  18. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2003-01-28

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  19. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2003-04-28

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  20. Integrability and nonintegrability of quantum systems. II. Dynamics in quantum phase space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Weimin (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (USA) Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (USA)); Feng, D.H.; Yuan, Jianmin (Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1990-12-15

    Based on the concepts of integrability and nonintegrability of a quantum system presented in a previous paper (Zhang, Feng, Yuan, and Wang, Phys. Rev. A 40, 438 (1989)), a realization of the dynamics in the quantum phase space is now presented. For a quantum system with dynamical group {ital G-script} and in one of its unitary irreducible-representation carrier spaces {ital h-german}{sub {Lambda}}, the quantum phase space is a 2{ital M}{sub {Lambda}}-dimensional topological space, where {ital M}{sub {Lambda}} is the quantum-dynamical degrees of freedom. This quantum phase space is isomorphic to a coset space {ital G-script}/{ital H-script} via the unitary exponential mapping of the elementary excitation operator subspace of {ital g-script} (algebra of {ital G-script}), where {ital H-script} ({contained in}{ital G-script}) is the maximal stability subgroup of a fixed state in {ital h-german}{sub {Lambda}}. The phase-space representation of the system is realized on {ital G-script}/{ital H-script}, and its classical analogy can be obtained naturally. It is also shown that there is consistency between quantum and classical integrability. Finally, a general algorithm for seeking the manifestation of quantum chaos'' via the classical analogy is provided. Illustrations of this formulation in several important quantum systems are presented.

  1. EIS-0129: New England/Hydro-Quebec 450 kV Transmission Line Interconnection- Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Regulatory Administration issued this EIS to explore the impacts of amending Presidential Permit PP-76 to allow the Vermont Electrical Company to operate at power levels above those stipulated in the permit and to build additional transmission facilities to distribute the increased power. Phase I of this project is detailed in EIS-0103.

  2. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%, NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard), coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input, all solid wastes benign cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustor; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  3. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAC Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  4. R and D for improved efficiency small steam turbines, Phase II. Report No. 1380-3. First quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansen, Dr., W.; Maillar, K. M.; Bender, D. A.; Brassert, W. L.; Capone, P. A.; Carter, A. F.; Heitmann, A. M.; Holland, J. E.; Lord, R. E.; Thirumalaisamy, S. N.

    1980-09-01

    Progress made in the second phase of a two-phase research, design and prototype development program is presented. Phase II consists of the detailed design of the prototype radial inflow steam turbine configuration selected during the first phase and subsequent fabrication and testing. At this time, the detailed aerodynamic design of the stage flowpath has been completed except for the crossover piping from the first stage exhaust to the second stage inlet. In addition, mechanical design effort has resulted in a definition of a rotor system. The aerodynamic design included the optimization of the overall flowpath geometry of the stages specified in the initial phase of the program. The detailed aerodynamic designs of the rotor blades, nozzle vanes, scroll and diffuser were based on the optimized geometry. The final blading selected for the stage is a radial design with 26 blades, 13 of which are splitters. Sixteen nozzle vanes have been specified. The mechanical design of the rotor system to date has included the specification of the rotor wheels and shafts with their polygon connection, and the design of the thrust and journal bearings and the gearing. In addition, various shaft sealing arrangements have been evaluated, subject to the constraints indicated by initial rotordynamic analyses. Indications are that a reasonably effective labyrinth seal is not precluded by shaft length limitations. As this type of seal has been long accepted by steam turbine users, its use in the prototype is most likely. Proven components have been specified wherever possible, i.e., redesign/development could not be justified. The rotor system has been designed for at least 100,000 hours life with the most severe operating conditions and loads. The system cannot be considered complete, however, until dynamic response of the rotors for all possible operating conditions is shown to be within acceptable limits.

  5. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2006-01-30

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets, briquettes, sinter and coke.

  6. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2005-07-29

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  7. Phase II Calderon Process to Produce Direct Reduced Iron Research and Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2007-03-31

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase 1 was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets, briquettes, sinter and coke.

  8. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2005-01-25

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  9. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2004-10-28

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  10. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2005-01-26

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  11. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2004-04-27

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  12. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2004-07-28

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  13. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon; Reina Calderon

    2004-01-27

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  14. Advanced conceptual design report. Phase II. Liquid effluent treatment and disposal Project W-252

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-31

    This Advanced Conceptual Design Report (ACDR) provides a documented review and analysis of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR), WHC-SD-W252-CDR-001, June 30, 1993. The ACDR provides further design evaluation of the major design approaches and uncertainties identified in the original CDR. The ACDR will provide a firmer basis for the both the design approach and the associated planning for the performance of the Definitive Design phase of the project.

  15. Development of the Radiation Stabilized Distributed Flux Burner, Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, A.; Sullivan, J.D.

    1997-06-01

    This report covers progress made during Phase 2 of a three-phase DOE-sponsored project to develop and demonstrate the Radiation Stabilized Distributed Flux burner (also referred to as the Radiation Stabilized Burner, or RSB) for use in industrial watertube boilers and process heaters. The goal of the DOE-sponsored work is to demonstrate an industrial boiler burner with NOx emissions below 9 ppm and CO emissions below 50 ppm (corrected to 3% stack oxygen). To be commercially successful, these very low levels of NOx and CO must be achievable without significantly affecting other measures of burner performance such as reliability, turndown, and thermal efficiency. Phase 1 of the project demonstrated that sub-9 ppm NOx emissions and sub-50 ppm CO emissions (corrected to 3% oxygen) could be achieved with the RSB in a 3 million Btu/Hr laboratory boiler using several methods of NOx reduction. The RSB was also tested in a 60 million Btu/hr steam generator used by Chevron for Thermally Enhanced Oil Recovery (TEOR). In the larger scale tests, fuel staging was demonstrated, with the RSB consistently achieving sub-20 ppm NOx and as low as 10 ppm NOx. Large-scale steam generator tests also demonstrated that flue gas recirculation (FGR) provided a more predictable and reliable method of achieving sub-9 ppm NOx levels. Based on the results of tests at San Francisco Thermal and Chevron, the near-term approach selected by Alzeta for achieving low NOx is to use FGR. This decision was based on a number of factors, with the most important being that FGR has proved to be an easier approach to transfer to different facilities and boiler designs. In addition, staging has proved difficult to implement in a way that allows good combustion and emissions performance in a fully modulating system. In Phase 3 of the project, the RSB will be demonstrated as a very low emissions burner product suitable for continuous operation in a commercial installation. As such, the Phase 3 field demonstration will represent the first installation in which the RSB will be operated continuously with a sub-9 ppm guarantee.

  16. Phase II final report and second update of the energy economic data base (EEDB) program. Volume 1 of 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations. The objective of the USDOE EEDB Program is to provide periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel and operating and maintenance) information of significance to the US Department of Energy. This information is intended to be used by USDOE in evaluating and monitoring US Civilian nuclear power programs, and to provide them with a consistent means of evaluating the nuclear option against alternatives. This report presents the Second Update of the EEDB for a cost and regulation date of January 1, 1979, prepared during Phase II of the EEDB Program. The Second Update is the first of a series of periodic updates marking the beginning of the next step in meeting the objective of the EEDB Program.

  17. Sustaining knowledge in the neutron generator community and benchmarking study. Phase II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, Tameka B.; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Cole, Benjamin Holland, II; Baldonado, Esther

    2010-08-01

    This report documents the second phase of work under the Sustainable Knowledge Management (SKM) project for the Neutron Generator organization at Sandia National Laboratories. Previous work under this project is documented in SAND2008-1777, Sustaining Knowledge in the Neutron Generator Community and Benchmarking Study. Knowledge management (KM) systems are necessary to preserve critical knowledge within organizations. A successful KM program should focus on people and the process for sharing, capturing, and applying knowledge. The Neutron Generator organization is developing KM systems to ensure knowledge is not lost. A benchmarking study involving site visits to outside industry plus additional resource research was conducted during this phase of the SKM project. The findings presented in this report are recommendations for making an SKM program successful. The recommendations are activities that promote sharing, capturing, and applying knowledge. The benchmarking effort, including the site visits to Toyota and Halliburton, provided valuable information on how the SEA KM team could incorporate a KM solution for not just the neutron generators (NG) community but the entire laboratory. The laboratory needs a KM program that allows members of the workforce to access, share, analyze, manage, and apply knowledge. KM activities, such as communities of practice (COP) and sharing best practices, provide a solution towards creating an enabling environment for KM. As more and more people leave organizations through retirement and job transfer, the need to preserve knowledge is essential. Creating an environment for the effective use of knowledge is vital to achieving the laboratory's mission.

  18. Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan- Radiological Release Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 22, 2015, the Department of Energy established an Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office (EM-LA) responsible for management of the environmental restoration and the legacy waste management programs at LANL. The NA-LA continues with the responsibility for the management of LANL's national security mission and the enduring waste management program (newly generated waste). As a result of this delineation in responsibilities, this corrective action plan was prepared collaboratively between NA-LA and EM-LA Field Offices, with joint responsibility for addressing the Judgement of Needs (JONs) identified in the Accident Investigation Board Accident Investigation Report, Phase 2 Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, February 14, 2014, dated April 2015.

  19. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Wurtz

    2009-07-01

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  20. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2005-09-01

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The wax patterns are used to create a ceramic shell by the application of a series of ceramic coatings, and the alloy is cast into the dewaxed shell mold (Fig. 1.1). However, the complexity of shape and the close dimensional tolerances required in the final casting make it difficult to determine tooling dimensions. The final linear dimension of the casting depends on the cumulative effects of the linear expansions or contractions in each step of the investment casting process (Fig. 1.2). In most cases, the mold geometry or cores restrict the shrinkage of the pattern or the cast part, and the final casting dimensions may be affected by time-dependent processes such as viscoelastic deformation of the wax, and viscoplastic creep and plastic deformations of the shell and alloy. The pattern die is often reworked several times to produce castings whose dimensions are within acceptable tolerances. To date, investment casting technology has been based on hands-on training and experience. Technical literature is limited to experimental, phenomenological studies aimed at obtaining empirical correlations for quick and easy application in industry. The goal of this project was to predict casting dimensions for investment castings in order to meet blueprint nominal during the first casting run. Several interactions have to be considered in a coupled manner to determine the shrinkage factors: these are the die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy interactions (as illustrated in Fig. 1.3). In this work, the deformations of the die-wax and shell-alloy systems were considered in a coupled manner, while the coupled deformation of the wax-shell system was not considered. Future work is needed in order to deliver to industry a computer program in which all three systems are coupled for determining the dimensions of the wax pattern, the shell mold, and casting in a sequential but coupled manner.

  1. Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Arc Steelmaking - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Iwao Iwasaki; Richard F. Kiesel; David J. Englund; David W. Hendrickson; Rodney L. Bleifuss

    2010-12-22

    The current trend in the steel industry is a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces, and an increasing number of alternative processes using metallic scrap iron, pig iron and metallized iron ore products. Currently, iron ores from Minnesota and Michigan are pelletized and shipped to the lower Great Lakes ports as blast furnace feed. The existing transportation system and infrastructure is geared to handling these bulk materials. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the needs of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling. A recent commercial installation employing Kobe Steels ITmk3 process, was installed in Northeastern Minnesota. The basic process uses a moving hearth furnace to directly reduce iron oxides to metallic iron from a mixture of iron ore, coals and additives. The resulting products can be shipped using the existing infrastructure for use in various steelmaking processes. The technology reportedly saves energy by 30% over the current integrated steelmaking process and reduces emissions by more than 40%. A similar large-scale pilot plant campaign is also currently in progress using JFE Steels Hi-QIP process in Japan. The objective of this proposal is to build upon and improve the technology demonstrated by Kobe Steel and JFE, by further reducing cost, improving quality and creating added incentive for commercial development. This project expands previous research conducted at the University of Minnesota Duluths Natural Resources Research Institute and that reported by Kobe and JFE Steel. Three major issues have been identified and are addressed in this project for producing high-quality nodular reduced iron (NRI) at low cost: (1) reduce the processing temperature, (2) control the furnace gas atmosphere over the NRI, and (3) effectively use sub-bituminous coal as a reductant. From over 4000 laboratory tube and box furnace tests, it was established that the correct combination of additives, fluxes, and reductant while controlling the concentration of CO and CO2 in the furnace atmosphere (a) lowers the operating temperature, (b) decreases the use of reductant coal (c) generates less micro nodules of iron, and (d) promotes desulphurization. The laboratory scale work was subsequently verified on 12.2 m (40 ft) long pilot scale furnace. High quality NRI could be produced on a routine basis using the pilot furnace facility with energy provided from oxy-gas or oxy-coal burner technologies. Specific strategies were developed to allow the use of sub-bituminous coals both as a hearth material and as part of the reaction mixture. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to study the overall carbothermic reduction and smelting process. The movement of the furnace gas on a pilot hearth furnace and larger simulated furnaces and various means of controlling the gas atmosphere were evaluated. Various atmosphere control methods were identified and tested during the course of the investigation. Based on the results, the appropriate modifications to the furnace were made and tested at the pilot scale. A series of reduction and smelting tests were conducted to verify the utility of the processing conditions. During this phase, the overall energy use characteristics, raw materials, alternative fuels, and the overall economics predicted for full scale implementation were analyzed. The results indicate that it should be possible to lower reaction temperatures while simultaneously producing low sulfur, high carbon NRI if the right mix chemistry and atmosphere are employed. Recommendations for moving the technology to the next stage of commercialization are presented.

  2. FY16 SBIR Phase II Release 1 Awards Announced: Includes Hydrogen Contaminants Detection, Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Catalysis, and Alkaline Membrane Electrolysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department has announced the 2016 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase II Release 1 awards, including three projects focused on catalysis for fuel cell and hydrogen production as well as hydrogen contaminants detection.

  3. Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg Ruskuaff

    2010-01-01

    This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the Corrective Action Strategy in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

  4. GRED III Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Engineered Geothermal Systems, Low Temp, Exploration Demonstration Projects. Project objectives: To gain a better understanding of the geothermal reservoir at Chena Hot Springs Resort in Alaska; Test and document the reliability of previous predictions as to the nature of the reservoir.

  5. Cori Phase II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    architecture enhanced for high performance computing; will feature 2X the out-of-order buffer depth of current Silvermont, Gatherscatter in hardware, Advanced Branch...

  6. Sampling and analysis plan for phase II of the Bear Creek Valley treatability study Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study is intended to provide site-specific data defining potential treatment technologies applicable to contaminated groundwater and surface water. This project directly supports Alternative 5 of the base action in the BCV Feasibility Study, and indirectly supports other alternatives through proof of concept. In that role, the ultimate goal is to install a treatment system that will remove uranium and nitrate from groundwater before it reaches Bear Creek. A secondary goal is the concurrent removal of technetium and several metals that impact ecological risk. This project is intended to produce hydraulic and treatment performance data required to design the treatment system to reach those goals. This project will also generate information that can be applied at other facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation. This report is the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for the field work component of Phase II of the BCV Treatability Study. Field work for this phase of the BCV Treatability Study consists of media testing. In-field continuous flow tests will be conducted over an extended time period (5 weeks) to generate data on long-term treatment effects on potential treatment media including sorbents and zero valent iron, over 28 weeks for constructed wetlands treatment, and over 24 weeks for algal mats treatment. The SAP addresses environmental sampling at the S-3 Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Samples will be taken from groundwater, effluent from test columns, effluent from an algal mat reactor, and effluent from a pilot-scale wetlands. This plan will be implemented as part of the BCV Phase II Treatability Study Best Management Practices Plan and in conjunction with the BCV Phase II Treatability Study Health and Safety Plan and the BCV Phase II Treatability Study Waste Management Plan.

  7. Multi-Institutional Phase II Clinical Study of Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer in East and Southeast Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Shingo; Ohno, Tatsuya; Thephamongkhol, Kullathorn; Chansilpa, Yaowalak

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of concurrent chemoradiotherapy using weekly cisplatin for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in East and Southeast Asia, a multi-institutional Phase II clinical study was conducted among eight Asian countries. Methods and Materials: Between April 2003 and March 2006, 120 patients (60 with bulky Stage IIB and 60 with Stage IIIB) with previously untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were enrolled in the present study. Radiotherapy consisted of pelvic external beam radiotherapy (total dose, 50 Gy) and either high-dose-rate or low-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy according to institutional practice. The planned Point A dose was 24-28 Gy in four fractions for high-dose-rate-intracavitary brachytherapy and 40-45 Gy in one to two fractions for low-dose-rate-intracavitary brachytherapy. Five cycles of weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) were administered during the radiotherapy course. Results: All patients were eligible for the study. The median follow-up was 27.3 months. Of the 120 patients, 100 (83%) received four or five cycles of chemotherapy. Acute Grade 3 leukopenia was observed in 21% of the patients, and Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in 6%. No patient failed to complete the radiotherapy course because of toxicity. The 2-year local control and overall survival rate for all patients was 87.1% and 79.6%, respectively. The 2-year major late rectal and bladder complication rate was 2.5% and 0%, respectively. Conclusion: The results have suggested that concurrent chemoradiotherapy using weekly cisplatin is feasible and effective for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in East and Southeast Asia.

  8. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume III. Model predictions and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the third of a seven volume series of our Phase II Final Report. This volume deals with parametric studies carried out using the FBC model. A comparison with available pilot plant data is included where such data are available. This volume in essence documents model performance; describing predictions on bubble growth, combustion characteristics, sulfur capture, heat transfer and related parameters. The model has approximately forty input variables which are at the disposal of the user. The user has the option to change a few or all of these input variables. In the parametric studies reported here, a large number of input variables whose variation is less critical to the predicted results, were maintained constant at the default values. On the other hand, those parameters whose selection is very important in design and operation of the FBC's were varied in suitable operating regions. The chief among such parameters are: bed temperature, coal feed size distribution (2 parameters), average bed-sorbent size, calcium to sulfur molar ratio, superficial velocity, excess air fraction, and bed weight (or bed height). The computations for obtaining the parametric relationships are based upon selection of a geometrical design for the combustor. Bed cross-section is 6' x 6', bed height is 4', and the freeboard height is 16'. The heat transfer tubes have 2'' OD, a pitch of 10'', and are located on an equilateral triangle pattern. The air distributor is a perforated plate with 0.1'' diameter holes on a rectangular grid with 0.75'' center-to-center spacing.

  9. A Phase II trial of subcutaneous amifostine and radiation therapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne, Pramila Rani . E-mail: rani.anne@mail.tju.edu; Machtay, Mitchell; Rosenthal, David I.; Brizel, David M.; Morrison, William H.; Irwin, David H.; Chougule, Prakash B.; Estopinal, Noel C.; Berson, Anthony; Curran, Walter J.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Intravenous amifostine 200 mg/m{sup 2} reduces xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients. This Phase II study evaluated subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine in a similar patient population. Patients and Methods: Patients received amifostine 500 mg, administered as two 250-mg s.c. injections 60 min before once-daily radiation for head-and-neck cancer (50-70 Gy in 5-7 weeks). The primary endpoint was the incidence of {>=}Grade 2 acute xerostomia. Results: Fifty-four patients received s.c. amifostine and radiotherapy. The incidence of {>=}Grade 2 acute xerostomia was 56% (95% CI, 43-69%) and the incidence of {>=}Grade 2 late xerostomia at 1 year was 45% (95% CI, 29-61%). The incidence of acute xerostomia was lower than reported previously with no amifostine in a controlled study; rates of acute xerostomia were similar between s.c. and i.v. amifostine in the two studies. The rate of late xerostomia with s.c. amifostine was intermediate between rates for i.v. amifostine and no amifostine, and not statistically significantly different from either historical control. Grades 1-2 nausea and emesis were the most common amifostine-related adverse events. Grade 3 amifostine-related adverse events reported by >1 patient included: dehydration (11%); rash (6%); and weight decrease, mucositis, dyspnea, and allergic reaction (each 4%). Seven patients (13%) had serious cutaneous adverse events outside the injection site. One-year rates of locoregional control, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 78%, 75%, and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Subcutaneous amifostine provides a well-tolerated yet simpler alternative to i.v. amifostine for reducing acute xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients.

  10. Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report Phase-II. Contractual reporting period October-December 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, Edward; The Salix Consortium

    2000-03-23

    The project undertaken by the Salix Consortium is a multi-phased, multi-partner endeavor. Phase 1 focused on initial development and testing of the technology and forging the necessary agreements to demonstrate commercial willow production. The Phase 1 objectives have been successfully completed: preparing design plans for 2 utility pulverized coal boilers for 20 MW of biopower capacity; developing fuel supply plans for the project with a goal of establishing 365 ha (900 ac) of willow; obtaining power production commitments from the power companies for Phase 2; obtaining construction and environmental permits; and developing an experimental strategy for crop production and power generation improvements needed to assure commercial success. The R and D effort also addresses environmental issues pertaining to introduction of the willow energy system.

  11. Five-year Local Control in a Phase II Study of Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost for Early Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Gary M.; Anderson, Penny R.; Bleicher, Richard J.; Litwin, Samuel; Li Tianyu; Swaby, Ramona F.; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie; Li Jinsheng; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Morrow, Monica; Goldstein, Lori J.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Conventional radiation fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy per day for early stage breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6-7 weeks. We report the 5-year results of a phase II study of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hypofractionation, and incorporated boost that shortened treatment time to 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: The study design was phase II with a planned accrual of 75 patients. Eligibility included patients aged {>=}18 years, Tis-T2, stage 0-II, and breast conservation. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost was used, and the whole breast received 2.25 Gy per fraction for a total of 45 Gy, and the tumor bed received 2.8 Gy per fraction for a total of 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Patients were followed every 6 months for 5 years. Results: Seventy-five patients were treated from December 2003 to November 2005. The median follow-up was 69 months. Median age was 52 years (range, 31-81). Median tumor size was 1.4 cm (range, 0.1-3.5). Eighty percent of tumors were node negative; 93% of patients had negative margins, and 7% of patients had close (>0 and <2 mm) margins; 76% of cancers were invasive ductal type: 15% were ductal carcinoma in situ, 5% were lobular, and 4% were other histology types. Twenty-nine percent of patients 29% had grade 3 carcinoma, and 20% of patients had extensive in situ carcinoma; 11% of patients received chemotherapy, 36% received endocrine therapy, 33% received both, and 20% received neither. There were 3 instances of local recurrence for a 5-year actuarial rate of 2.7%. Conclusions: This 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation with incorporated boost was associated with excellent local control, comparable to historical results of 6-7 weeks of conventional whole-breast fractionation with sequential boost.

  12. Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2006-05-01

    The Phase II Frenchman Flat groundwater flow model is a key element in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) corrective action strategy for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU). The objective of this integrated process is to provide an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground testing above background conditions exceeding the ''Safe Drinking Water Act'' (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. The computer model will predict the location of this boundary within 1,000 years and must do so at a 95 percent level of confidence. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. This report documents the development and implementation of the groundwater flow model for the Frenchman Flat CAU. Specific objectives of the Phase II Frenchman Flat flow model are to: (1) Incorporate pertinent information and lessons learned from the Phase I Frenchman Flat CAU models. (2) Develop a three-dimensional (3-D), mathematical flow model that incorporates the important physical features of the flow system and honors CAU-specific data and information. (3) Simulate the steady-state groundwater flow system to determine the direction and magnitude of groundwater fluxes based on calibration to Frenchman Flat hydrogeologic data. (4) Quantify the uncertainty in the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow due to uncertainty in parameter values and alternative component conceptual models (e.g., geology, boundary flux, and recharge).

  13. PHASE II CHARACTERIZATION SURVEY OF THE USNS BRIDGE (T AOE 10), MILITARY SEALIFT FLEET SUPPORT COMMAND, NAVAL STATION, NORFOLK, VIRGINIA DCN 5180-SR-01-0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NICK A. ALTIC

    2012-08-30

    In March 2011, the USNS Bridge was deployed off northeastern Honshu, Japan with the carrier USS Ronald Reagan to assist with relief efforts after the 2011 T?hoku earthquake and tsunami. During that time, the Bridge was exposed to air-borne radioactive materials leaking from the damaged Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant. The proximity of the Bridge to the air-borne impacted area resulted in the contamination of the ships air-handling systems and the associated components, as well as potential contamination of other ship surfaces due to either direct intake/deposition or inadvertent spread from crew/operational activities. Preliminary surveys in the weeks after the event confirmed low-level contamination within the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ductwork and systems, and engine and other auxiliary air intake systems. Some partial decontamination was performed at that time. In response to the airborne contamination event, Military Sealift Fleet Support Command (MSFSC) contracted Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under provisions of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, to assess the radiological condition of the Bridge. Phase I identified contamination within the CPS filters, ventilation systems, miscellaneous equipment, and other suspect locations that could not accessed at that time (ORAU 2011b). Because the Bridge was underway during the characterization, all the potentially impacted systems/spaces could not be investigated. As a result, MSFSC contracted with ORAU to perform Phase II of the characterization, specifically to survey systems/spaces previously inaccessible. During Phase II of the characterization, the ship was in port to perform routine maintenance operations, allowing access to the previously inaccessible systems/spaces.

  14. High-Efficiency, Cost-effective Thermoelectric Materials/Devices for Industrial Process Refrigeration and Waste Heat Recovery, STTR Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Timothy

    2011-01-07

    This is the final report of DoE STTR Phase II project, “High-efficiency, Cost-effective Thermoelectric Materials/Devices for Industrial Process Refrigeration and Waste Heat Recovery”. The objective of this STTR project is to develop a cost-effective processing approach to produce bulk high-performance thermoelectric (TE) nanocomposites, which will enable the development of high-power, high-power-density TE modulus for waste heat recovery and industrial refrigeration. The use of this nanocomposite into TE modules are expected to bring about significant technical benefits in TE systems (e.g. enhanced energy efficiency, smaller sizes and light weight). The successful development and applications of such nanocomposite and the resultant TE modules can lead to reducing energy consumption and environmental impacts, and creating new economic development opportunities.

  15. Measurement of the CP-violating phase βsJ/ψΦ in Bs0→J/ψΦ decays with the CDF II detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-04-23

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating parameter βsJ/ψΦ using approximately 6500 B0s→J/ψΦ decays reconstructed with the CDF II detector in a sample of pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb⁻¹ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. We find the CP-violating phase to be within the range βsJ/ψΦϵ [0.02,0.52]∪[1.08,1.55] at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential S-wavemore » contribution to the B0s→J/ψK⁺K⁻ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval 1.009sJ/ψΦ, we find the B0s decay width difference to be ΔΓs=0.075±0.035(stat)±0.006(syst) ps⁻¹. We also present the most precise measurements of the B0s mean lifetime τ(B0s)=1.529±0.025(stat)±0.012(syst) ps, the polarization fractions |A0(0)|²=0.524±0.013(stat)±0.015(syst) and |A II (0)|²=0.231±0.014(stat)±0.015(syst), as well as the strong phase δ⊥=2.95±0.64(stat)±0.07(syst) rad. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.« less

  16. Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Grammer

    2007-09-30

    This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts. Therefore, the results presented in this document are not final, and in many cases represent a report of 'progress to date' as numerous tasks were scheduled to extend into Year 3.

  17. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2 with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marutzky, Sam

    2009-07-01

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  18. Phase II - final report study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves NOSR 1 & 3, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Consultant under contract DE-AC01-96FE64202. This authorizes a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Petroleum Oil Shales Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 (NOSR 1 and 3) in Garfield County, Colorado (Figure 0.1). The report that follows is the Phase II Final Report for that study. Additional details are provided in the Addendum (the Phase 1 Property Description and Fact Finding Report). The key property elements that positively affect the estimated value of NOSR 1 and 3 include the following: working interest income from producing oil and gas leases, income from grazing or leasing of grazing rights, potential income from oil and gas leasing on exploratory (or nonprospective) acreage, potential value of trading surface real estate as ranch land for livestock grazing (56,577 acres). Key elements that negatively impact the estimated value include: environmental assessment costs, gas prices, operating budgets, and lease sale expenses.

  19. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume V. Appendix: stability and instability in fluidized-bed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the fifth of the seven volumes series of our Phase II Final Report. The material developed in this volume has not been incorporated into the system model. It will be used as a precursor of a transient model to be developed in the next phase of our model work. There have been various fluidized combustor models of differing complexity and scope published in the literature. Most of these models have identified and predicted - often in satisfactory agreement with results from pilot units - the key steady state combustor characteristics such as the mass of carbon in the bed (carbon loading), the combustion efficiency, the sulfur retention by the solid sorbent and the pollutant (mainly NO/sub x/) emissions. These models, however, cannot be in most instances successfully used to study the extinction and ignition characteristics of the combustor because they are isothermal in structure in the sense that the bed temperature is not an output variable but rather an input one and must be a priori specified. In order to remedy these inadequacies of the previous models, we here present a comprehensive account of the formulation and some typical results of a new nonisothermal model which has been developed in order to study, among other things, the ignition and extinction characteristics of the AFBC units. This model is able to predict the temperature patterns in the bed, the carbon loading, the combustion efficiency and the O/sub 2/ and CO concentration profiles in the combustor for the different design or operational characteristics.

  20. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pujari, V.J.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.

    1996-02-01

    The research program had as goals the development and demonstration of significant improvements in processing methods, process controls, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1370{degrees}C. In Phase I of the program a process was developed that resulted in a silicon nitride - 4 w% yttria HIP`ed material (NCX 5102) that displayed unprecedented strength and reliability. An average tensile strength of 1 GPa and a strength distribution following a 3-parameter Weibull distribution were demonstrated by testing several hundred buttonhead tensile specimens. The Phase II program focused on the development of methodology for colloidal consolidation producing green microstructure which minimizes downstream process problems such as drying, shrinkage, cracking, and part distortion during densification. Furthermore, the program focused on the extension of the process to gas pressure sinterable (GPS) compositions. Excellent results were obtained for the HIP composition processed for minimal density gradients, both with respect to room-temperature strength and high-temperature creep resistance. Complex component fabricability of this material was demonstrated by producing engine-vane prototypes. Strength data for the GPS material (NCX-5400) suggest that it ranks very high relative to other silicon nitride materials in terms of tensile/flexure strength ratio, a measure of volume quality. This high quality was derived from the closed-loop colloidal process employed in the program.

  1. Potential use of California lignite and other alternate fuel for enhanced oil recovery. Phase I and II. Final report. [As alternative fuels for steam generation in thermal EOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, R.; Shimizu, A.; Briggs, A.

    1980-02-01

    The Nation's continued reliance on liquid fossil fuels and decreasing reserves of light oils gives increased impetus to improving the recovery of heavy oil. Thermal enhanced oil recovery EOR techniques, such as steam injection, have generally been the most effective for increasing heavy oil production. However, conventional steam generation consumes a large fraction of the produced oil. The substitution of alternate (solid) fuels would release much of this consumed oil to market. This two-part report focuses on two solid fuels available in California, the site of most thermal EOR - petroleum coke and lignite. Phase I, entitled Economic Analysis, shows detailed cost comparisons between the two candidate fuels and also with Western coal. The analysis includes fuels characterizations, process designs for several combustion systems, and a thorough evaluation of the technical and economic uncertainties. In Phase II, many technical parameters of petroleum coke combustion were measured in a pilot-plant fluidized bed. The results of the study showed that petroleum coke combustion for EOR is feasible and cost effective in a fluidized bed combustor.

  2. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation within IEA Wind Task 30: Phase II Results Regarding a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.; Qvist, J.; Froyd, L.; Chen, X.; Azcona, J.; Uzungoglu, E.; Guedes Soares, C.; Luan, C.; Yutong, H.; Pengcheng, F.; Yde, A.; Larsen, T.; Nichols, J.; Buils, R.; Lei, L.; Anders Nygard, T.; et al.

    2014-03-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools (or codes) that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project, which operates under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 30. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of simulation codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating semisubmersible in 200 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants? codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  3. Final Report: Design & Evaluation of Energy Efficient Modular Classroom Structures Phase II / Volume I-VII, January 17, 1995 - October 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-10-30

    We are developing innovations to enable modular builders to improve the energy performance of their classrooms with no increase in first cost. The Modern Building Systems' (MBS) classroom building conforms to the stringent Oregon energy code, and at $18/ft{sup 2} ($1.67/m{sup 2}) (FOB the factory) it is at the low end of the cost range for modular classrooms. We have investigated daylighting, cross-ventilation, solar preheat of ventilation air, air-to-air heat exchanger, electric lighting controls, and down-sizing HVAC systems as strategies to improve energy performance. We were able to improve energy performance with no increase in first cost in all climates examined. Two papers and a full report on Phase I of this study are available. The work described in this report is from the second phase of the project. In the first phase we redesigned the basic modular classroom to incorporate energy strategies including daylighting, cross-ventilation, solar preheating of ventilation air, and insulation. We also explored thermal mass but determined that it was not a cost-effective strategy in the five climates we examined. Energy savings ranged from 6% to 49% with an average of 23%. Paybacks ranged from 1.3 years to 23.8 years, an average of 12.1 years. In Phase II the number of baseline buildings was expanded by simulating buildings that would be typical of those produced by Modern Building Systems, Inc. (MBS) for each of the seven locations/climates. A number of parametric simulations were performed for each energy strategy. Additionally we refined our previous algorithm for a solar ventilation air wall preheater and developed an algorithm for a roof preheater configuration. These algorithms were coded as functions in DOE 2.1E. We were striving for occupant comfort as well as energy savings. We performed computer analyses to verify adequate illumination on vertical surfaces and acceptable glare levels when using daylighting. We also used computational fluid dynamics software to determine air distribution from cross-ventilation and used the resulting interior wind speeds to calculate occupant comfort and allowable outside air temperatures for cross-ventilation.

  4. Sampling and analysis plan for Phase II of the Bear Creek Valley Treatability Study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study is intended to provide site-specific data defining potential treatment technologies applicable to contaminated groundwater and surface water. This project directly supports Alternative 5 of the base action in the BCV Feasibility Study and indirectly supports other alternatives through proof of concept. In that role, the ultimate goal is to install a treatment system that will remove uranium and nitrate from groundwater before it reaches Bear Creek. A secondary goal is the concurrent removal of technetium and several metals that affect ecological risk. This project is intended to produce hydraulic and treatment performance data required to design the treatment system to reach those goals. This project will also generate information that can be applied at other facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation. This report is the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for the field work component of Phase II of the BCV Treatability Study. Field work for this phase of the BCV Treatability Study consists of environmental and media testing. The SAP addresses environmental sampling at the S-3 Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Samples will be taken from groundwater, surface water, seeps, effluent from test columns, effluent from an algal mat reactor, and effluent from a pilot-scale wetland. Groundwater, surface water, and seeps will be monitored continuously for field parameters and sampled for analytical parameters during pump tests conducted periodically during the investigation. In-field continuous flow tests will be conducted over an extended time period (5 weeks) to generate data on long-term treatment effects on potential treatment effects on potential treatment media including sorbents and zero valent iron, over 28 weeks for constructed wetlands treatment, and over 24 weeks for algal mats treatment.

  5. Transport NAMA Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Website: www.transport-namadatabase.orgindex.phpMainPage Transport Toolkit Region(s): Latin America & Caribbean, Africa & Middle East, Europe, Asia Related Tools Climate...

  6. NAMA Database Wiki | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is to share these activities so that countries and other participants are able to learn from these experiences and gain insights into how mitigation activities can be...

  7. IISD NAMA Tools | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development (IISD) Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learnedbest practices Program Start: 2010 Program End: 2012 References: Climate...

  8. Bangladesh-NAMA Concepts | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry,...

  9. Navigating Transport NAMAs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership: Third Report Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap ... further results Find Another Tool...

  10. Final work plan : phase II investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-16

    From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri (Figure 1.1). During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of statewide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]) described as being approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. The identified concentrations in these two wells were above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) and the Missouri risk-based corrective action default target level (MRBCA DTL) values of 5.0 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride in water used for domestic purposes (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b, 2006). Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an investigation to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the potential risks to human health, public welfare, and the environment posed by the contamination. This work is being performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency of the USDA and the MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The site characterization at Savannah is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The investigation at Savannah is being conducted in phases. This approach is being used by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, with the approval of the MoDNR, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the investigation can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. Phase I of the Savannah program was conducted in October-November 2007 and January 2008 (Argonne 2007a, 2008). This site-specific Work Plan provides a brief summary of the Phase I findings and the results of groundwater level monitoring that has been ongoing since completion of the Phase I study and also outlines technical objectives, investigation tasks, and investigation methods for Phase II of the site characterization at Savannah.

  11. Evaluation of atmospheric transport models for use in Phase II of the historical public exposures studies at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood, A.S.; Killough, G.G.; Till, J.E.

    1999-08-01

    Five atmospheric transport models were evaluated for use in Phase II of the Historical Public Exposures Studies at the Rocky Flats Plant. Models included a simple straight-line Gaussian plume model (ISCST2), several integrated puff models (RATCHET, TRIAD, and INPUFF2), and a complex terrain model (TRAC). Evaluations were based on how well model predictions compared with sulfur hexafluoride tracer measurements taken in the vicinity of Rocky Flats in February 1991. Twelve separate tracer experiments were conducted, each lasting 9 hr and measured at 140 samplers in arcs 8 and 16 km from the release point at Rocky Flats. Four modeling objectives were defined based on the endpoints of the overall study: (1) the unpaired maximum hourly average concentration, (2) paired time-averaged concentration, (3) unpaired time-averaged concentration, and (4) arc-integrated concentration. Performance measures were used to evaluate models and focused on the geometric mean and standard deviation of the predicted-to-observed ratio and the correlation coefficient between predicted and observed concentrations. No one model consistently outperformed the others in all modeling objectives and performance measures. The overall performance of the RATCHET model was somewhat better than the other models.

  12. Measurement of the CP-Violating Phase beta_s in B0s -> J/Psi Phi Decays with the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; et al.

    2012-04-01

    We present a measurement of the \\CP-violating parameter \\betas using approximately 6500 $\\BsJpsiPhi$ decays reconstructed with the CDF\\,II detector in a sample of $p\\bar p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab. We find the \\CP-violating phase to be within the range $\\betas \\in [0.02, 0.52] \\cup [1.08, 1.55]$ at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential $S$-wave contribution to the $\\Bs\\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval $1.009 < m(K^+K^-)<1.028 \\gevcc$. Assuming the standard model prediction for the \\CP-violating phase \\betas, we find the \\Bs decay width difference to be $\\deltaG = 0.075 \\pm 0.035\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.006\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\ps$. We also present the most precise measurements of the \\Bs mean lifetime $\\tau(\\Bs) = 1.529 \\pm 0.025\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.012\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ ps, the polarization fractions $|A_0(0)|^2 = 0.524 \\pm 0.013\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ and $|A_{\\parallel}(0)|^2 = 0.231 \\pm 0.014\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$, as well as the strong phase $\\delta_{\\perp}= 2.95 \\pm 0.64\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.07\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\textrm{rad}$. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.

  13. Addendum for the Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, NevadaTest Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2007-05-01

    This document, which makes changes to Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--074, Revision 0 (May 2006) was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated June 20, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made: Section 6.0 Conceptual Model Uncertainty Analyses. Please note that in this section figures showing the observed versus simulated well head (Figures 6-1, 6-5, 6-7, 6-16, 6-28, 6-30, 6-32, 6-34, 6-37, 6-42, 6-47, 6-52, 6-57, 6-62, 6-71, and 6-86) have a vertical break in scale on the y axis. Section 7.0 Parameter Sensitivity Analysis. In Section 7.2, the parameter perturbation analysis defines two components of the objective function PHI. These two components include the WELL component that represents the head portion of the objective function as measured in wells and the FLUX component that represents the lateral boundary flux portion of the objective function. In the text and figures in Section 7.2, the phrases well portion of the objective function and head portion of the objective function are used interchangeably in discussions of the WELL component of the objective function.

  14. CATALYST ACTIVITY MAINTENANCE FOR THE LIQUID PHASE SYNTHESIS GAS-TO-DIMETHYL ETHER PROCESS PART II: DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE AS THE DEHYDRATION CATALYST FOR THE SINGLE-STEP LIQUID PHASE SYNGAS-TO-DME PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang-Dong Peng

    2002-05-01

    At the heart of the single-step liquid phase syngas-to-DME process (LPDME{trademark}) is a catalyst system that can be active as well as stable. In the Alternative Fuels I program, a dual-catalyst system containing a Cu-based commercial methanol synthesis catalyst (BASF S3-86) and a commercial dehydration material ({gamma}-alumina) was demonstrated. It provided the productivity and selectivity expected from the LPDME process. However, the catalyst system deactivated too rapidly to warrant a viable commercial process [1]. The mechanistic investigation in the early part of the DOE's Alternative Fuels II program revealed that the accelerated catalyst deactivation under LPDME conditions is due to detrimental interaction between the methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst [2,3]. The interaction was attributed to migration of Cu- and/or Zn-containing species from the synthesis catalyst to the dehydration catalyst. Identification of a dehydration catalyst that did not lead to this detrimental interaction while retaining adequate dehydration activity was elusive. Twenty-nine different dehydration materials were tested, but none showed the desired performance [2]. The search came to a turning point when aluminum phosphate was tested. This amorphous material is prepared by precipitating a solution containing Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with NH{sub 4}OH, followed by washing, drying and calcination. The aluminum phosphate catalyst has adequate dehydration activity and good stability. It can co-exist with the Cu-based methanol synthesis catalyst without negatively affecting the latter catalyst's stability. This report documents the details of the development of this catalyst. These include initial leads, efforts in improving activity and stability, investigation and development of the best preparation parameters and procedures, mechanistic understanding and resulting preparation guidelines, and the accomplishments of this work.

  15. Category:GEA Development Phases | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    this category, out of 5 total. G Property:GEADevelopmentPhase P Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Phase III -...

  16. Phase II Trial of Radiosurgery to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Defined High-Risk Tumor Volumes in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einstein, Douglas B.; Wessels, Barry; Bangert, Barbara; Fu, Pingfu; Nelson, A. Dennis; Cohen, Mark; Sagar, Stephen; Lewin, Jonathan; Sloan, Andrew; Zheng Yiran; Williams, Jordonna; Colussi, Valdir; Vinkler, Robert; Maciunas, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost to areas of high risk determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) functional imaging in addition to standard radiotherapy for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients in this prospective Phase II trial underwent surgical resection or biopsy for a GBM followed by SRS directed toward areas of MRS-determined high biological activity within 2 cm of the postoperative enhancing surgical bed. The MRS regions were determined by identifying those voxels within the postoperative T2 magnetic resonance imaging volume that contained an elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate ratio in excess of 2:1. These voxels were marked, digitally fused with the SRS planning magnetic resonance image, targeted with an 8-mm isocenter per voxel, and treated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group SRS dose guidelines. All patients then received conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: The median survival for the entire cohort was 15.8 months. With 75% of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 3 patients still alive 18 months after treatment, the median survival for RPA Class 3 has not yet been reached. The median survivals for RPA Class 4, 5, and 6 patients were 18.7, 12.5, and 3.9 months, respectively, compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiotherapy-alone historical control survivals of 11.1, 8.9, and 4.6 months. For the 16 of 35 patients who received concurrent temozolomide in addition to protocol radiotherapeutic treatment, the median survival was 20.8 months, compared with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer historical controls of 14.6 months using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Grade 3/4 toxicities possibly attributable to treatment were 11%. Conclusions: This represents the first prospective trial using selective MRS-targeted functional SRS combined with radiotherapy for patients with GBM. This treatment is feasible, with acceptable toxicity and patient survivals higher than in historical controls. This study can form the basis for a multicenter, randomized trial.

  17. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head-and-Neck Cancer: Final Analysis of a Phase I/II Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Saarilahti, Kauko; Atula, Timo; Collan, Juhani; Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Vaelimaeki, Petteri; Maekitie, Antti; Seppaenen, Marko; Minn, Heikki; Revitzer, Hannu; Kouri, Mauri; Kotiluoto, Petri; Seren, Tom; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli; Joensuu, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy and safety of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of inoperable head-and-neck cancers that recur locally after conventional photon radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: In this prospective, single-center Phase I/II study, 30 patients with inoperable, locally recurred head-and-neck cancer (29 carcinomas and 1 sarcoma) were treated with BNCT. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 50 to 98 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed by use of the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) and adverse effects by use of the National Cancer Institute common terminology criteria version 3.0. Intravenously administered L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (400 mg/kg) was administered as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Twenty-six patients received BNCT twice; four were treated once. Of the 29 evaluable patients, 22 (76%) responded to BNCT, 6 (21%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.1 and 20.3 months, and 1 (3%) progressed. The median progression-free survival time was 7.5 months (95% confidence interval, 5.4-9.6 months). Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 20% and 30%, respectively, and 27% of the patients survived for 2 years without locoregional recurrence. The most common acute Grade 3 adverse effects were mucositis (54% of patients), oral pain (54%), and fatigue (32%). Three patients were diagnosed with osteoradionecrosis (each Grade 3) and one patient with soft-tissue necrosis (Grade 4). Late Grade 3 xerostomia was present in 3 of the 15 evaluable patients (20%). Conclusions: Most patients who have inoperable, locally advanced head-and-neck carcinoma that has recurred at a previously irradiated site respond to boronophenylalanine-mediated BNCT, but cancer recurrence after BNCT remains frequent. Toxicity was acceptable. Further research on novel modifications of the method is warranted.

  18. A Phase II Study of Radiotherapy and Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast-Conserving Treatment for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, William C.; Kim, Janice; Kim, Edward; Silverman, Paula; Overmoyer, Beth; Cooper, Brenda W.; Anthony, Sue; Shenk, Robert; Leeming, Rosemary; Hanks, Shelli H.; Lyons, Janice A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Administering adjuvant chemotherapy before breast radiotherapy decreases the risk of systemic recurrence, but delays in radiotherapy could yield higher local failure. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of placing radiotherapy earlier in the breast-conserving treatment course for lymph node-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2004, 44 women with node-positive Stage II and III breast cancer were entered into this trial. Breast-conserving surgery and 4 cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2})/cyclophosphamide (600 mg/m{sup 2}) were followed by 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) delivered every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was concurrent with the first 2 cycles of paclitaxel. The breast received 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions with a tumor bed boost of 14 Gy in 7 fractions. Regional lymphatics were included when indicated. Functional lung volume was assessed by use of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide as a proxy. Breast cosmesis was evaluated with the Harvard criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival is 88%, and overall survival is 93%. There have been no local failures. Median follow-up is 75 months. No cases of radiation pneumonitis developed. There was no significant change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide either immediately after radiotherapy (p = 0.51) or with extended follow-up (p = 0.63). Volume of irradiated breast tissue correlated with acute cosmesis, and acute Grade 3 skin toxicity developed in 2 patients. Late cosmesis was not adversely affected. Conclusions: Concurrent paclitaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery shortened total treatment time, provided excellent local control, and was well tolerated.

  19. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2004-10-27

    Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

  20. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ?sJ/?? in Bs0?J/?? decays with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; DellOrso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.

    2012-04-01

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating parameter ?sJ/?? using approximately 6500 B0s?J/?? decays reconstructed with the CDF II detector in a sample of pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb? integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. We find the CP-violating phase to be within the range ?sJ/??? [0.02,0.52]?[1.08,1.55] at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential S-wave contribution to the B0s?J/?K?K? final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval 1.009phase ?sJ/??, we find the B0s decay width difference to be ??s=0.0750.035(stat)0.006(syst) ps?. We also present the most precise measurements of the B0s mean lifetime ?(B0s)=1.5290.025(stat)0.012(syst) ps, the polarization fractions |A0(0)|=0.5240.013(stat)0.015(syst) and |A II (0)|=0.2310.014(stat)0.015(syst), as well as the strong phase ??=2.950.64(stat)0.07(syst) rad. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.

  1. DUST AND GAS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS FROM THE HERITAGE HERSCHEL KEY PROJECT. II. GAS-TO-DUST RATIO VARIATIONS ACROSS INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM PHASES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Bot, Caroline; Bolatto, Alberto; Jameson, Katherine; Hughes, Annie; Hony, Sacha; Wong, Tony; Babler, Brian; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Fukui, Yasuo; Galametz, Maud; Galliano, Frederic; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Lee, Min-Young; Israel, Frank; Li, Aigen; and others

    2014-12-20

    The spatial variations of the gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) provide constraints on the chemical evolution and lifecycle of dust in galaxies. We examine the relation between dust and gas at 10-50pc resolution in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) based on Herschel far-infrared (FIR), H I 21cm, CO, and H? observations. In the diffuse atomic interstellar medium (ISM), we derive the GDR as the slope of the dust-gas relation and find GDRs of 380{sub ?130}{sup +250} 3 in the LMC, and 1200{sub ?420}{sup +1600} 120 in the SMC, not including helium. The atomic-to-molecular transition is located at dust surface densities of 0.05 M {sub ?}pc{sup 2} in the LMC and 0.03 M {sub ?}pc{sup 2} in the SMC, corresponding to A {sub V} ? 0.4 and 0.2, respectively. We investigate the range of CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor to best account for all the molecular gas in the beam of the observations, and find upper limits on X {sub CO} to be 6 10{sup 20}cm{sup 2}K{sup 1}km{sup 1} s in the LMC (Z= 0.5 Z {sub ?}) at 15pc resolution, and 4 10{sup 21}cm{sup 2}K{sup 1}km{sup 1} s in the SMC (Z= 0.2 Z {sub ?}) at 45pc resolution. In the LMC, the slope of the dust-gas relation in the dense ISM is lower than in the diffuse ISM by a factor ?2, even after accounting for the effects of CO-dark H{sub 2} in the translucent envelopes of molecular clouds. Coagulation of dust grains and the subsequent dust emissivity increase in molecular clouds, and/or accretion of gas-phase metals onto dust grains, and the subsequent dust abundance (dust-to-gas ratio) increase in molecular clouds could explain the observations. In the SMC, variations in the dust-gas slope caused by coagulation or accretion are degenerate with the effects of CO-dark H{sub 2}. Within the expected 5-20times Galactic X {sub CO} range, the dust-gas slope can be either constant or decrease by a factor of several across ISM phases. Further modeling and observations are required to break the degeneracy between dust grain coagulation, accretion, and CO-dark H{sub 2}. Our analysis demonstrates that obtaining robust ISM masses remains a non-trivial endeavor even in the local Universe using state-of-the-art maps of thermal dust emission.

  2. Liquid phase Fischer-Tropsch (II) demonstration in the LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit. Volume 1/2, Main Report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatt, B.L.

    1995-09-01

    This report presents results from a demonstration of Liquid Phase Fischer-Tropsch (LPFT) technology in DOE`s Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. The run was conducted in a bubble column at the AFDU in May--June 1994. The 10-day run demonstrated a very high level of reactor productivity for LPFT, more than five times the previously demonstrated productivity. The productivity was constrained by mass transfer limitations, perhaps due to slurry thickening as a result of carbon formation on the catalyst. With a cobalt catalyst or an improved iron catalyst, if the carbon formation can be avoided, there is significant room for further improvements. The reactor was operated with 0.7 H{sub 2}/CO synthesis gas in the range of 2400--11700 sl/hr-kg Fe, 175--750 psig and 270--300C. The inlet gas velocity ranged from 0.19 to 0.36 ft/sec. The demonstration was conducted at a pilot scale of 5 T/D. Catalyst activation with CO/N{sub 2} proceeded well. Initial catalyst activity was close to the expectations from the CAER autoclave runs. CO conversion of about 85% was obtained at the baseline condition. The catalyst also showed good water-gas shift activity and a low {alpha}. At high productivity conditions, reactor productivity of 136 grams of HC/hr -- liter of slurry volume was demonstrated, which was within the target of 120--150. However, mass transfer limitations were observed at these conditions. To alleviate these limitations and prevent excessive thickening, the slurry was diluted during the run. This enabled operations under kinetic control later in the run. But, the dilution resulted in lower conversion and reactor productivity. A new reactor internal heat exchanger, installed for high productivity conditions, performed well above design,and the system never limited the performance. The control can expected, the reactor temperature control needed manual intervention. The control can be improved by realigning the utility oil system.

  3. About APPLE II Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-19

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180 deg. requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  4. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Barber

    2010-09-01

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  5. PARS II

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... September 9, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 103 Project Updating and Reporting Page 49 4. Click to begin entering funding values. 5. Click + sign to expand detail for OPC, TEC, and UND, if ...

  6. DSO216_Phase_II_Summary_Updates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Limiting Wind Output to Scheduled Value and Curtailing Schedules to Actual Wind Generation Updated: December 13, 2013 I. PURPOSE The purpose of Dispatcher Standing Order (DSO)...

  7. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  8. KODE Novus Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In Service Owner DeWind Developer DeWind Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Guymon OK Coordinates 36.53170885, -101.3325691 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  9. Computerized Operator Support System Phase II Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrich, Thomas A.; Boring, Ronald L.; Lew, Roger T.; Thomas, Kenneth D.

    2015-02-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) prototype for nuclear control room process control is proposed and discussed. The COSS aids operators in addressing rapid plant upsets that would otherwise result in the shutdown of the power plant and interrupt electrical power generation, representing significant costs to the owning utility. In its current stage of development the prototype demonstrates four advanced functions operators can use to more efficiently monitor and control the plant. These advanced functions consist of: (1) a synthesized and intuitive high level overview display of system components and interrelations, (2) an enthalpy-based mathematical chemical and volume control system (CVCS) model to detect and diagnose component failures, (3) recommended strategies to mitigate component failure effects and return the plant back to pre-fault status, and (4) computer-based procedures to walk the operator through the recommended mitigation actions. The COSS was demonstrated to a group of operators and their feedback was collected. The operators responded positively to the COSS capabilities and features and indicated the system would be an effective operator aid. The operators also suggested several additional features and capabilities for the next iteration of development. Future versions of the COSS prototype will include additional plant systems, flexible computer-based procedure presentation formats, and support for simultaneous component fault diagnosis and dual fault synergistic mitigation action strategies to more efficiently arrest any plant upsets.

  10. Play Fairway Analysis Phase II Selections

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department's investment in play fairway analysis is helping the geothermal industry isolate drilling sites nationwide that are most likely to yield geothermal energy.

  11. Vietnam-IISD NAMA Support | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name Vietnam-IISDNAMA Support AgencyCompany Organization International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate Topics Background analysis, Low emission...

  12. Copenhagen Accord NAMA Submissions Implications for the Transport...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization: GTZ, Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP), Transport Research Laboratory(TRL), International Association for Public Transport (UITP), Veolia...

  13. BORE II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore » upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  14. DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Software Development for Phase

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    II Building Types | Department of Energy Score: Software Development for Phase II Building Types DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Software Development for Phase II Building Types DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Software Development for Phase II Building Types PDF icon asset_score_assumptions_july_2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Weekend/Weekday Ozone Study in the South Coast Air Basin Users Perspective on Advanced Fuel Cell Bus Technology Tankless Gas Water

  15. NSLS-II RF SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Holub, B.; Kawashima, Y.; Ma, H.; Towne, N.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II is a new third generation light source being constructed at Brookhaven Lab. The storage ring is optimized for low emittance by use of damping wigglers to reduce the emittance to below 1 nm-rad. The RF systems are designed to provide stable beam through tight RF phase and amplitude stability requirements.

  16. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

    2006-05-29

    The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

  17. Part II

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Friday, No. 233 December 4, 2015 Part II Department of Defense General Services Administration National Aeronautics and Space Administration 48 CFR Chapter 1 Federal Acquisition Regulations; Rules VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:22 Dec 03, 2015 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\04DER2.SGM 04DER2 wgreen on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with RULES2 75902 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 233 / Friday, December 4, 2015 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL SERVICES

  18. Part II

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    251 December 31, 2015 Part II Department of Defense General Services Administration National Aeronautics and Space Administration 48 CFR Chapter 1 Federal Acquisition Regulations; Final Rules VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Dec 30, 2015 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\31DER2.SGM 31DER2 tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with RULES2 81886 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 251 / Thursday, December 31, 2015 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

  19. Ii1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -r Ii1 5uitc 79% 955 L%fan~Plu,S.W.. Worhingm. D.C.200242134, 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVtRSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance.)l- flL.o* with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September, The recommendat:on y0.0-02 includes 26 colleges and

  20. Electric Utility Phase I Acid Rain Compliance Strategies for the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    The Acid Rain Program is divided into two time periods; Phase I, from 1995 through 1999, and Phase II, starting in 2000. Phase I mostly affects power plants that are the largest sources of SO2 and NOx . Phase II affects virtually all electric power producers, including utilities and nonutilities. This report is a study of the effects of compliance with Phase I regulations on the costs and operations of electric utilities, but does not address any Phase II impacts.

  1. ARM - RHUBC II Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instruments Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home ARM Field Campaigns Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Deployment Instruments Science Team RHUBC-II Wiki Site Tour News RHUBC-II Backgrounder (PDF, 300K) News & Press Images Experiment Planning RHUBC-II Proposal Abstract Science Plan (PDF, 267KB) Science Objectives Contacts Eli Mlawer, Principal Investigator Dave Turner, Principal Investigator RHUBC II Instruments RHUBC-II Instruments - Cerro Toco, Chile Guest Instruments Instrument

  2. NMSSUP Phase 2 Transition/Readiness Verification Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Material Safeguards and Security Upgrade Project (NMSSUP) Phase II TransitionReadiness Verification Workshop Tuesday, April 30, 2013 Hilton Santa Fe Buffalo Thunder, Santa...

  3. Solvent Refined Coal-II (SRC-II) detailed environmental plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    This document describes environmental research which will: aid in the development of an environmentally acceptable SRC-II process; and provide data for environmental assessment of the process. The SRC-II process is described, criteria for selection of samples to undergo environmental analyses are given, and approximate timelines are presented for obtaining pertinent samples. At this time, the SRC-II process is at the pilot-plant stage of development and a demonstration facility is scheduled to begin operation in 1984. Since design criteria may change, the environmental research described in this document is organized in four phases which correlate with and will provide information early in process development. Phase I research (screening) evaluates samples from existing SRC-II facilities (pilot, process demonstration unit (PDU), bench) which may bracket potential demonstration/commercial practice in terms of physical and chemical criteria. The samples are being subjected to a battery of short-term biomedical and ecological assays. Chemical fractionation and analysis are being performed to determine compounds and compound classes of potential concern. Phase II (baseline) research will evaluate SRC-II materials which are considered most representative of potential demonstration/commercial practice. These materials will be subjected to longer-term, more-extensive biological and ecological analyses relative to effects and environmental fate. Phase III research will examine effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential environmental properties of SRC-II materials. Phase IV research (onsite monitoring) will develop methods and initiate environmental monitoring for effects at the SRC-II demonstration facility and potential commercial sites. This document also describes industrial hygiene programs which must occur throughout SRC-II process development.

  4. WIPP SEIS-II - Main Menu

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Start Here Volume III Comment Response Document Summary Supplement Volume I Volume I Chapters Supplement Volume II Volume II Appendices MAIN MENU To view a particular volume of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, click on the corresponding box. NOTE Volume III, the Comment Response Document, contains links to original comments and to DOE responses. Tips for using those links are contained in a note represented by the following icon: When

  5. PARS II TRAINING

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    13, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i Project Assessment and Reporting System PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release 1.1) Department of Energy September 13, 2010 September 13,, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1: Find and View a Project

  6. I IIII1IiI II1Ii

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    * 'I I IIII1IiI II1Ii 1111 1111 I - I' p. r. * *: * * * .** I I ,e L 'I r - I OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH ADEC ?Date ______ Time - Location /oie_ / I C 4'.'-?- 1D& Reason for Photo ' 1 By _________ Ro1 # 7'93 Frame' # ,'9 I *.' ' .- - . *c *\ I '' . *. , * " . ... *l; .; . '' N 1 * ' ' * ' '" ), q . L *" ' r 'I . I ' , * I ", * _; . ':. -* - - ! .) f' '' . . * 'i; . ,- , . F) .* :-- .' *, 'I 1 - . '.. ' t; , çv ' . ,* I i * #' *. '3 "' i * '- *1 '4 *' ,:- - a 4 t ' - * ', %

  7. Phase I (CATTS Theory), Phase II (Milne Point), Phase III (Hydrate Ridge)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-31

    This study introduces a new type of “cumulative seismic attribute” (CATT) which quantifies gas hydrates resources in Hydrate Ridge offshore Oregon. CATT is base on case-specific transforms that portray hydrated reservoir properties. In this study we used a theoretical rock physics model to correct measured velocity log data.

  8. Sputtered II-VI Alloys and Structures forTandem PV: Final Subcontract Report, 9 December 2003 - 30 July 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compaan, A. D.; Collins, R.; Karpov, V. G.; Giolando, D.

    2008-09-01

    This report elaborates on Phase 3 and provides summaries of the first two Phases. Phase 3 research work was divided into five task areas covering different aspects of the II-VI tandem cell.

  9. Aegir II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aegir II Jump to: navigation, search Name Aegir II Facility Aegir II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Location Lake Michigan MI Coordinates...

  10. Penascal II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Penascal II Jump to: navigation, search Name Penascal II Facility Penascal II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Iberdrola...

  11. Glacier II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Glacier II Facility Glacier II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer...

  12. Wilton Wind Energy Center II II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Facility Wilton Wind Energy Center II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  13. TRUPACT-II, a regulatory perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, P.C.; Spooner, O.R.

    1995-12-31

    The Transuranic Package Transporter II (TRUPACT-II) is a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) certified Type B packaging for the shipment of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) material by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The NRC approved the TRUPACT-II design as meeting the requirements of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR 71) and issued Certificate of Compliance (CofC) Number 9218 to the DOE. There are currently 15 certified TRUPACT-IIs. Additional TRUPACT-IIs will be required to make more than 15,000 shipments of CH-TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The TRUPACT-II may also be used for the DOE inter-site and intra-site shipments of CH-TRU waste. The Land Withdrawal Act (Public Law 102-579), enacted by the US Congress, October 30, 1992, and an agreement between the DOE and the State of New Mexico, signed August 4, 1987, both stipulate that only NRC approved packaging may be used for shipments of TRU waste to the WIPP. Early in the TRUPACT-II development phase it was decided that the transportation system (tractor, trailer, and TRUPACT-II) should be highway legal on all routes without the need for oversize and/or overweight permits. In large measure, public acceptance of the DOE`s efforts to safely transport CH-TRU waste depends on the public`s perception that the TRUPACT-II is in compliance with all applicable regulations, standards, and quality assurance requirements. This paper addresses some of the numerous regulations applicable to Type B packaging, and it describes how the TRUPACT-II complies with these regulations.

  14. Late Toxicity and Patient Self-Assessment of Breast Appearance/Satisfaction on RTOG 0319: A Phase 2 Trial of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy-Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Following Lumpectomy for Stages I and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chafe, Susan; Moughan, Jennifer; McCormick, Beryl; Wong, John; Pass, Helen; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Arthur, Douglas W.; Petersen, Ivy; White, Julia; Vicini, Frank A.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Late toxicities and cosmetic analyses of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on RTOG 0319 are presented. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages I to II breast cancer ?3 cm, negative margins, and ?3 positive nodes were eligible. Patients received three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT; 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 days). Toxicity and cosmesis were assessed by the patient (P), the radiation oncologist (RO), and the surgical oncologist (SO) at 3, 6, and 12 months from the completion of treatment and then annually. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to grade toxicity. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluable. Median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1.7-6.4 years). Eighty-two percent of patients rated their cosmesis as good/excellent at 1 year, with rates of 64% at 3 years. At 3 years, 31 patients were satisfied with the treatment, 5 were not satisfied but would choose 3D-CRT again, and none would choose standard radiation therapy. The worst adverse event (AE) per patient reported as definitely, probably, or possibly related to radiation therapy was 36.5% grade 1, 50% grade 2, and 5.8% grade 3 events. Grade 3 AEs were all skin or musculoskeletal-related. Treatment-related factors were evaluated to potentially establish an association with observed toxicity. Surgical bed volume, target volume, the number of beams used, and the use of bolus were not associated with late cosmesis. Conclusions: Most patients enrolled in RTOG 0319 were satisfied with their treatment, and all would choose to have the 3D-CRT APBI again.

  15. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS Experimental Determination of the Symmetry Energy of a Low Density Nuclear Gas ...II-1 S....

  16. ACRA-II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident

  17. Limon II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Limon II Facility Limon II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources...

  18. Preliminary PBFA II design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D. L.; VanDevender, J. P.; Martin, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    The upgrade of Sandia National Laboratories particle beam fusion accelerator, PBFA I, to PBFA II presents several interesting and challenging pulsed power design problems. PBFA II requires increasing the PBFA I output parameters from 2 MV, 30 TW, 1 MJ to 4 MV, 100 TW, 3.5 MJ with the constraint of using much of the same PBFA I hardware. The increased PBFA II output will be obtained by doubling the number of modules (from 36 to 72), increasing the primary energy storage (from 4 MJ to 15 MJ), lowering the pulse forming line (PFL) output impedance, and adding a voltage doubling network.

  19. PARS II | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II PARS II Welcome to PARS II PARS II is the Department's official "System of Record" for capital asset project performance information. Because PARS II uses the same data as maintained in our contractors' project management systems, everyone from the Federal Project Director's staff to the Secretary of Energy will have easy access to the same data. The PARS II software application is managed by the MA Office of Engineering and

  20. Luz II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name: Luz II Place: Jerusalem, Israel Zip: 91450 Sector: Solar Product: Jerusalem-based utility-scale solar power plant developer. Coordinates:...

  1. Network II Database

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-11-07

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Rail and Barge Network II Database is a representation of the rail and barge system of the United States. The network is derived from the Federal Rail Administration (FRA) rail database.

  2. _Part II - Contract Clauses

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M0572 dated 3215 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Page I - 1 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012)...

  3. PARS II Training Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PARS II presentation hand-outs and step-by-step "how to" exercises for each course are available for download. Users who are attending Web classes should download these documents prior to attending...

  4. Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign, Phase II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From August to October 2009, a team of researchers from the United States and Italy are ... of Applied Physics) in Florence, Italy * Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory ...

  5. Caprock Wind Ranch phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown Developer Cielo Wind Power Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Quay County NM...

  6. Sweetwater Phase II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & BrownCatamount Developer DKRWBabcock & BrownCatamount Energy Purchaser Austin Energy...

  7. DOE Issues WIPP Radiological Release Phase II Investigation Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    radiological event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. ... second from left, receives the New Mexico Patriotic Employer Award from the N.M. ...

  8. 4 Archaeological Testing 33PK210 Phase II.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  9. Goat Mountain Phase II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner CieloEdison Mission Group Developer CieloEdison Mission Group Energy Purchaser Market Location...

  10. Moulton Chandler Hills Wind Farm Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Great River Energy Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Great River Energy Location Near...

  11. Low Cost Heliostat Development Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusek, Stephen M.

    2014-04-21

    The heliostat field in a central receiver plant makes up roughly one half of the total plant cost. As such, cost reductions for the installed heliostat price greatly impact the overall plant cost and hence the plant’s Levelized Cost of Energy. The general trend in heliostat size over the past decades has been to make them larger. One part of our thesis has been that larger and larger heliostats may drive the LCOE up instead of down due to the very nature of the precise aiming and wind-load requirements for typical heliostats. In other words, it requires more and more structure to precisely aim the sunlight at the receiver as one increases heliostat mirror area and that it becomes counter-productive, cost-wise, at some point.

  12. LWR design decision methodology: Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01

    Techniques were identified to augment existing design process at the component and system level in order to optimize cost and safety between alternative system designs. The method was demonstrated using the Surry Low Pressure Injection System (LPIS). Three possible backfit options were analyzed for the Surry LPIS, assessing the safety level of each option and estimating the acquisition and installation costs for each. (DLC)

  13. Biglow Canyon Phase II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Portland General Electric Developer Orion Energy Group Energy Purchaser Portland General Electric Location Sherman County OR...

  14. Phase II Final Report Computer Optimization of Electron Guns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Lawrence Ives; Thuc Bui; Hien Tran; Michael Read; Adam Attarian; William Tallis

    2011-04-15

    This program implemented advanced computer optimization into an adaptive mesh, finite element, 3D, charged particle code. The routines can optimize electron gun performance to achieve a specified current, beam size, and perveance. It can also minimize beam ripple and electric field gradients. The magnetics optimization capability allows design of coil geometries and magnetic material configurations to achieve a specified axial magnetic field profile. The optimization control program, built into the charged particle code Beam Optics Analyzer (BOA) utilizes a 3D solid modeling package to modify geometry using design tables. Parameters within the graphical user interface (currents, voltages, etc.) can be directly modified within BOA. The program implemented advanced post processing capability for the optimization routines as well as the user. A Graphical User Interface allows the user to set up goal functions, select variables, establish ranges of variation, and define performance criteria. The optimization capability allowed development of a doubly convergent multiple beam gun that could not be designed using previous techniques.

  15. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Rutledge

    2011-02-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership (SWP) on Carbon Sequestration designed and deployed a medium-scale field pilot test of geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Aneth oil field. Greater Aneth oil field, Utah's largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 455 million barrels of oil (72 million m3). Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation. Because it represents an archetype oil field of the western U.S., Greater Aneth was selected as one of three geologic pilots to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO2 sequestration under the auspices of the SWP on Carbon Sequestration, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. The pilot demonstration focuced on the western portion of the Aneth Unit as this area of the field was converted from waterflood production to CO2 EOR starting in late 2007. The Aneth Unit is in the northwestern part of the field and has produced 149 million barrels (24 million m3) of the estimated 450 million barrels (71.5 million m3) of the original oil in place - a 33% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil makes the Aneth Unit ideal to demonstrate both CO2 storage capacity and EOR by CO2 flooding. This report summarizes the geologic characterization research, the various field monitoring tests, and the development of a geologic model and numerical simulations conducted for the Aneth demonstration project. The Utah Geological Survey (UGS), with contributions from other Partners, evaluated how the surface and subsurface geology of the Aneth Unit demonstration site will affect sequestration operations and engineering strategies. The UGS-research for the project are summarized in Chapters 1 through 7, and includes (1) mapping the surface geology including stratigraphy, faulting, fractures, and deformation bands, (2) describing the local Jurassic and Cretaceous stratigraphy, (3) mapping the Desert Creek zone reservoir, Gothic seal, and overlying aquifers, (4) characterizing the depositional environments and diagenetic events that produced significant reservoir heterogeneity, (5) describing the geochemical, petrographic, and geomechanical properties of the seal to determine the CO2 or hydrocarbon column it could support, and (6) evaluating the production history to compare primary production from vertical and horizontal wells, and the effects of waterflood and wateralternating- gas flood programs. The field monitoring demonstrations were conducted by various Partners including New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, University of Utah, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Cambridge Geosciences. The monitoring tests are summarized in Chapters 8 through 12, and includes (1) interwell tracer studies during water- and CO2-flood operations to characterize tracer behavoirs in anticipation of CO2-sequestration applications, (2) CO2 soil flux monitoring to measure background levels and variance and assess the sensitivity levels for CO2 surface monitoring, (3) testing the continuous monitoring of self potential as a means to detect pressure anomalies and electrochemical reaction due to CO2 injection, (4) conducting time-lapse vertical seismic profiling to image change near a CO2 injection well, and (5) monitoring microseismicity using a downhole string of seismic receivers to detect fracture slip and deformation associated with stress changes. Finally, the geologic modeling and numerical simulation study was conducted by researcher at the University of Utah. Chapter 13 summarizes their efforts which focused on developing a site-specific geologic model for Aneth to better understand and design CO2 storage specifically tailored to oil reservoirs.

  16. Phase II -- Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA). Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale (US) photovoltaic (PV) electric generation systems and recent developments in PV module technology. This report updates the project`s progress, reviews the status and performance of the various PV installations during 1994, summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions for the year, and outlines future work. The PVUSA project has five objectives. These are designed to narrow the gap between a large utility industry that is unfamiliar with PV and a small PV industry that is aware of a potentially large utility market but unfamiliar with how to meet its requirements. The objectives are: Evaluate the performance, reliability, and cost of promising PV modules and balance-of-system (BOS) components side by side at a single location; Assess PV system operation and maintenance in a utility setting; Compare US utilities hands-on experience in designing, procuring, and operating PV systems; and, Document and disseminate knowledge gained from the project.

  17. Top Crop Wind Farm (Phase II) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MW) 198198 MW 198,000 kW 198,000,000 W 198,000,000,000 mW 0.198 GW Number of Units 132 Commercial Online Date 2010 Wind Turbine Manufacturer GE Energy References WENDI1...

  18. Maple Ridge Wind Farm phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Developer 'PPM EnergyHorizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser NYSERDAMarket Location Lewis County NY Coordinates 43.775565, -75.584614 Show Map Loading map......

  19. NREL Combined Experimental Final Report--Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C. P.; Musial, W. P.; Scott, G. N.; Simms, D. A.

    1992-08-01

    Predicting peak power and loads on a fixed-pitch wind turbine. How does the performance of the airfoil in the wind tunnel differ from the performance of an operating horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT)?

  20. Funding Phases for Small Business Innovation Research and Small...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    awards provide up to 150,000 or up to 225,000, depending on the technology topic. Phase II funding awards provide up to 1 million or up to 1.5 million, depending on the...

  1. ARM - RHUBC II Science Objectives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Objectives Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home ARM Field Campaigns Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Deployment Instruments Science Team RHUBC-II Wiki Site Tour News RHUBC-II Backgrounder (PDF, 300K) News & Press Images Experiment Planning RHUBC-II Proposal Abstract Science Plan (PDF, 267KB) Science Objectives Contacts Eli Mlawer, Principal Investigator Dave Turner, Principal Investigator RHUBC II Science Objectives To conduct clear-sky radiative closure studies in order to reduce the

  2. ARM - RHUBC II Science Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Team Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home ARM Field Campaigns Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Deployment Instruments Science Team RHUBC-II Wiki Site Tour News RHUBC-II Backgrounder (PDF, 300K) News & Press Images Experiment Planning RHUBC-II Proposal Abstract Science Plan (PDF, 267KB) Science Objectives Contacts Eli Mlawer, Principal Investigator Dave Turner, Principal Investigator RHUBC II Science Team Principal Investigators Eli Mlawer, Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc.

  3. Decommissioning experience from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henslee, S.P.; Rosenberg, K.E.

    2002-03-28

    Consistent with the intent of this International Atomic Energy Agency technical meeting, decommissioning operating experience and contributions to the preparation for the Coordinated Research Project from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II activities will be discussed. This paper will review aspects of the decommissioning activities of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, make recommendations for future decommissioning activities and reactor system designs and discuss relevant areas of potential research and development. The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) was designed as a 62.5 MWt, metal fueled, pool reactor with a conventional 19 MWe power plant. The productive life of the EBR-II began with first operations in 1964. Demonstration of the fast reactor fuel cycle, serving as an irradiation facility, demonstration of fast reactor passive safety and lastly, was well on its way to close the fast breeder fuel cycle for the second time when the Integral Fast Reactor program was prematurely ended in October 1994 with the shutdown of the EBR-II. The shutdown of the EBR-II was dictated without an associated planning phase that would have provided a smooth transition to shutdown. Argonne National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy arrived at a logical plan and sequence for closure activities. The decommissioning activities as described herein fall into in three distinct phases.

  4. ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor phase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    : Hydrometeor phase Hydrometeor phase such as liquid ice or mixed phase Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  5. U.S.-Canada Clean Energy Dialogue (CED) Action Plan II | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Action Plan II U.S.-Canada Clean Energy Dialogue (CED) Action Plan II Action Plan II describes initiatives that the U.S.-Canada Clean Energy Dialogue Working Groups plan to implement under Phase II of the CED to further progress toward a low-carbon economy that enhances energy security and revitalizes our economies through the creation of clean energy jobs PDF icon U.S.-Canada Clean Energy Dialogue Action Plan II More Documents & Publications U.S.-Canada Clean Energy Dialogue

  6. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  7. _Part II - Contract Clauses

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09/30/2015 to Mod 0588 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Page I - 1 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012) (REPLACED M473) ............................................................. 8 2. FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984) ................................................................................................. 8 3. FAR 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (APR 1984) ........................................... 9

  8. Enclosure II June

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enclosure II June 10,2010 Hanford Radiological Health and Safety Document 1 Forward The Richland Operations Office and the Office of River Protection have established a supplemental set of contractual requirements and an expectation that the contractor organizations establish the mechanisms necessary to maintain site consistency, optimize site-wide radiological programs to provide an overall benefit to the government, and support DOE in the management oflong-term risks relative to radiological

  9. MS, II-J

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I' ; ,' Departm&th of Energy 1 MS, II-J Washington. DC 20585 ' . I I The Honorable John Gallagher ,)fl', /',' ' 103 E. Michigan Avenue .i., ,.' Battle Creek, Michigan 49016 _. Dear Mayor Gallagheri d,---, " '/ approachto openness i.n: with the: public. In (FUSRAP)i.is responsible agencies, determining ~author~ity, performing remedial action to cleanup sites to meet current radiological protection requirements.. A conservative set of technical evaluation guidelines is used in these

  10. PARS II TRAINING | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TRAINING PARS II TRAINING BASICS TRAINING WORKBOOK PDF icon PARS II TRAINING More Documents & Publications PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103)

  11. Ashtabula II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ashtabula II Wind Farm Facility Ashtabula II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  12. Heber II Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Heber II Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Heber II Geothermal Facility General Information Name Heber II Geothermal Facility...

  13. Kibby Mountain II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kibby Mountain II Jump to: navigation, search Name Kibby Mountain II Facility Kibby Mountain II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Under...

  14. Papalote Creek II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Papalote Creek II Jump to: navigation, search Name Papalote Creek II Facility Papalote Creek II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  15. Marengo II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Marengo II Wind Farm Facility Marengo II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  16. Springview II Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springview II Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Springview II Wind Project Facility Springview II Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  17. Meadow Lake II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Meadow Lake II Facility Meadow Lake II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind...

  18. Klondike II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Klondike II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Klondike II Wind Farm Facility Klondike II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  19. Vansycle Ridge II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vansycle Ridge II Jump to: navigation, search Name Vansycle Ridge II Facility Vansycle Ridge II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  20. Carleton College II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carleton College II Jump to: navigation, search Name Carleton College II Facility Carleton College II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  1. Little Pringle II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Little Pringle II Facility Little Pringle II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SWI Wind...

  2. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REACTIONS Temperature dependence of the isospin distillation in nuclear fragmentation ................................ II-1 D. V. Shetty for the NIMROD Collaboration Midrapidity emission in nuclear fragmentation .................................................................................. II-2 D. V. Shetty for the NIMROD Collaboration Isospin dependence of the <N/Z> in nuclear fragmentation .............................................................. II-3 D. V. Shetty, for the

  3. PM_Ph_II_CAIP_F.book

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Restoration Project U.S. Depa rtme nt o f En erg y Na tio nal Nucle ar Secu rity Ad ministration Ne vada S ite O ffice Environmental Restoration Project U.S. Depa rtme nt o f En erg y Na tio nal Nucle ar Secu rity Ad ministration Ne vada S ite O ffice Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada July 2009 Approved for public release; further

  4. U.S.-Canada Clean Energy Dialogue (CED) Action Plan II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Environment Canada released the U.S.-Canada Clean Energy Dialogue (CED) Action Plan II, outlining the next phase of activities the two countries will...

  5. H-coal pilot plant. Phase II. Construction. Phase III. Operation. Annual report No. 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-04

    At the request of DOE Oak Ridge, ASFI agreed to assume responsibility for completion of Plant construction in December, 1979, at which time Badger Plants' on-site work was ended. This construction effort consisted of electric heat tracing and insulation of piping and instrumentation. At the close of the reporting period the work was completed, or was projected to be completed, within the ASFI budgeted amounts and by dates that will not impact Plant operations. Engineering design solutions were completed for problems encountered with such equipment as the High Pressure Letdown Valves; Slurry Block Valves; Slurry Pumps; the Bowl Mill System; the Dowtherm System; and the Ebullating Pump. A Corrosion Monitoring Program was established. With the exception of Area 500, the Antisolvent Deashing Unit, all operating units were commissioned and operated during the reporting period. Coal was first introduced into the Plant on May 29, 1980, with coal operations continuing periodically through September 30, 1980. The longest continuous coal run was 119 hours. A total of 677 tons of Kentucky No. 11 Coal were processed during the reporting period. The problems encountered were mechanical, not process, in nature. Various Environmental and Health programs were implemented to assure worker safety and protection and to obtain data from Plant operations for scientific analysis. These comprehensive programs will contribute greatly in determining the acceptability of long term H-Coal Plant operations.

  6. Commissioning and Early Operation for the NSLS-II Booster RF System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marques, C.; Cupolo, J.; Davila, P.; Gao, F.; Goel, A.; Holub, B.; Kulpin, J.; McDonald, K.; Oliva, J.; Papu, J.; Ramirez, G.; Rose, J.; Sikora, R.; Sorrentino, C.; Towne, N.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a third generation 3GeV, 500mA synchrotron light source. We discuss the booster synchrotron RF system responsible for providing power to accelerate an electron beam from 200MeV to 3GeV. The RF system design and construction are complete and is currently in the operational phase of the NSLS-II project. Preliminary operational data is also discussed.

  7. Breezy Bucks II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Breezy Bucks II Facility Breezy Bucks II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Breezy Bucks II...

  8. Salty Dog II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Salty Dog II Facility Salty Dog II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Salty Dog II LLC...

  9. World Bank-MENA Regional-NAMAs and Corresponding Climate Finance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis, Background analysis Website http:www.worldbank.org UN Region Northern Africa, Western Asia References World Bank1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  10. NAMA-Programme for the construction sector in Asia | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Market analysis Website http:www.unep.orgsbcipdfs...

  11. PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Modification 407 I-1 PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES I.1 FAR 52.252-2, CLAUSES INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE (FEB 1998) This Contract incorporates one or more clauses by reference, with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer will make their full text available. Also, the full text of a clause may be accessed electronically at these addresses: http://www.arnet.gov/far/

  12. PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728 Modification 479 I-1 PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES I.1 FAR 52.252-2 CLAUSES INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE (FEB 1998) This Contract incorporates one or more clauses by reference, with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer will make their full text available. Also, the full text of a clause may be accessed electronically at these addresses: https://www.acquisition.gov/far/index.html

  13. PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I Contract No. DE-AC27-08RV14800 Modification No. 330 I-1 PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES I.1 FAR 52.252-2 CLAUSES INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE (FEB 1998) This Contract incorporates one or more clauses by reference, with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer will make their full text available. Also, the full text of a clause may be accessed electronically at these addresses: http://www.arnet.gov/far/

  14. L I II C

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -- - L I II C rr u c c c 7 i' :- ' r' ' 7 i ' -- A' t i ()lL.H~ ORAU 89/i-29 Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTIONS ALBANYRESEARCHCENTER ALBANY, OREGON P. R. C O lTEN Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 NOTICES Tha opiniona l xprSaaJd harJln do not n acoaa~rlly ranKI thy oplnioru of thJ l

  15. II.1 Itic

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    i! il II.1 Itic ihl j' ieil - Department of Emrgy \ Washington, DC20585 1 ' . The Honorable Bill. Johnson 30 Church Street Rochester, New York, 14614, Dear Mayor Johnion: I. ,Se$retary of EnergL Hazel.O'Leary has annouqced a .new appro the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with' .,support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward ttie e related to the, former Eastman Kodak Research Laboratoryisit jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecesior information is

  16. Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju; Naus, Dan J

    2012-05-01

    The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

  17. NGNP PHASE I REVIEW

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NGNP PHASE I REVIEW NEAC REACTOR TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE CURRENT STATUS DECEMBER 9, 2010 EPACT 2005 REQUIREMENTS * FIRST PROJECT PHASE REVIEW-On a determination by the Secretary...

  18. Fusion Power Demonstrations I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doggett, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    In this report we present a summary of the first phase of the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. During this first phase, we investigated two configurations, performed detailed studies of major components, and identified and examined critical issues. In addition to these design specific studies, we also assembled a mirror-systems computer code to help optimize future device designs. The two configurations that we have studied are based on the MARS magnet configuration and are labeled FPD-I and FPD-II. The FPD-I configuration employs the same magnet set used in the FY83 FPD study, whereas the FPD-II magnets are a new, much smaller set chosen to help reduce the capital cost of the system. As part of the FPD study, we also identified and explored issues critical to the construction of an Engineering Test Reactor (ETR). These issues involve subsystems or components, which because of their cost or state of technology can have a significant impact on our ability to meet FPD's mission requirements on the assumed schedule. General Dynamics and Grumman Aerospace studied two of these systems, the high-field choke coil and the halo pump/direct converter, in great detail and their findings are presented in this report.

  19. Ohio Hydropower Potential Inventory Phase I report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The dams researched in the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) files were those contained in a list of Ohio dams provided by the ODNR. The result of this file research is a list of 997 dams contained herein that tabulates information on hydraulic head, stream flow, drainage area, and usage. This listing indicated that all but 137 of the 997 dams can be eliminated from consideration for Phase II research. The second phase would be required to further identify which of the 137 dams might have viable hydroelectric potential and define their basic hydroelectric parameters.

  20. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R. [Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Yeates, Todd O., E-mail: yeates@mbi.ucla.edu [Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Molecular Biology Institute, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); University of California, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The idea of attacking the phase problem by crowdsourcing is introduced. Using an interactive, multi-player, web-based system, participants work simultaneously to select phase sets that correspond to better electron-density maps in order to solve low-resolution phasing problems. The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as crowdsourcing. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of individuals, each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30 phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it possible to extract meaningful information in cases where limited resolution might otherwise prevent initial phasing.

  1. Fundemental Academic Training Instructor's Guide Phase 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Part 3 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Fundamental Academic Training Instructor's Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide 1.01- ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide 1.01- iii Table of Contents Page Module 1.01 Basic Mathematics and

  2. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for heavy element production...II-1 P. K.Sahu, J. B. Natowitz, R. Wada, K. Hagel, T. Materna, Z. Chen, L. Qin, M. Barbui,...

  3. Phase I A Phase I B Phase I C

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Parcel 9 Parcel 8 Phase I A Phase I B Phase I C Parcel 7 Parcel 6 Parcel 4 Parcel 3 Parcel D Parcel H Parcel 6A T 61 87 3 105 2 OSE 63 28 126 45 COS OSW 100 GH 102 STP SST 301 300 Mag-82 Mag-81 Mag-80 Mag-83 Mag-84 Mound Closure Project - Current Parcels and Buildings FILE NAME: mnd_bldg_parcel_owner_c.mxd DATE: Legend Parcel - DOE Parcel - MMCIC Pond Building Ownership DOE Leased MMCIC Road - paved Railroad 200 0 200 100 Feet O:\Sites\OH\Mound\ProjectWorkArea\PawelS\mnd_bldg_parcel_owner_c.mxd

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  5. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency of phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention.

  6. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1992-05-26

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency or phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention. 6 figs.

  7. ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: ICFT- An Initial...

  8. Timber Road II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Road II Jump to: navigation, search Name Timber Road II Facility Timber Road II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind...

  9. Nobles Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Farm II Jump to: navigation, search Name Nobles Wind Farm II Facility Nobles Wind Farm II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  10. Shiloh II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shiloh II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Shiloh II Wind Farm Facility Shiloh II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  11. Oliver II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Oliver II Wind Farm Facility Oliver II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra...

  12. CWES II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name CWES II Wind Farm Facility CWES II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest...

  13. Continuous flow system for controlling phases separation near ? transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chorowski, M.; Poli?ski, J.; Kempi?ski, W.; Trybu?a, Z.; ?o?, Sz.; Cho?ast, K.; Kociemba, A.

    2014-01-29

    As demands on 3He are increasing and conventional 3He production through tritium decay is decreasing, alternative 3He production methods are becoming economically viable. One such possibility is to use entropy filters for extraction of the 3He isotope from natural gas. According to the phase diagram of the 3He, its solidification is impossible by only lowering of the temperature. Hence during the cooling process at stable pressure we can reach ?-point and pass to the special phase - He II. The total density of HeII is a sum of the two phases: normal the superfluid ones. It is possible to separate these two phases with an entropy filter - the barrier for the classically-behaving normal phase. This barrier can also be used to separate the two main isotopes of He: 4He and 3He, because at temperatures close to the 4He-?-point the 3He isotope is part of the normal phase. The paper presents continuous flow schemes of different separation methods of 3He from helium commodity coming from natural gas cryogenic processing. An overall thermodynamic efficiency of the 3He/4He separation process is presented. A simplified model of continuous flow HeI -HeII recuperative heat exchanger is given. Ceramic and carbon porous plugs have been tested in entropy filter applications.

  14. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes...

  15. Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Form for the SES program ...

  16. Cinergy Ventures II LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cinergy Ventures II LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cinergy Ventures II, LLC Place: Cincinnati, Ohio Zip: OH 45202 Product: The venture capital arm of Cinergy Corp....

  17. Harvest Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Harvest Wind Farm II Facility Harvest Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner John...

  18. Kotzebue Wind Project II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project II Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  19. Tatanka Wind Project II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Tatanka Wind Project II Facility Tatanka Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  20. Endicott Biofuels II LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Endicott Biofuels II LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Endicott Biofuels II, LLC Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77060-3235 Sector: Biofuels Product: Houston-based biofuels producer...

  1. Cabazon Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Cabazon Wind Farm II Facility Cabazon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Goldman Sachs...

  2. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stimulate the digestion of fat and protein and acts as a satiety agent, suppressing hunger and inhibiting food intake. Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is known to partly...

  3. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... L. W. May, S. Wuenschel, B. Stein, and S. J. Yennello Analysis of 86,78Kr + 64,58Ni data taken on the upgraded NIMROD-ISiS...... II-28 S. Wuenschel, S. ...

  4. Oak Ridge Associated Universities II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities II Prepared for Division of Fuel - Cycle and Material Safety II U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission L RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE W. R. GRACE PROPERTY WAYNE, NEW JERSEY P. W. FRAME Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division FINAL REPORT January 1983 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE W.R. GRACE PROPERTY WAYNE, NEW JERSEY Prepared for Division of Fuel Cycle and Material Safety U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission P.

  5. Phase-field Modeling of Displacive Phase Transformations in Elasticall...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Phase-field Modeling of Displacive Phase Transformations in Elastically Anisotropic and Inhomogeneous Polycrystals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Phase-field Modeling...

  6. Jefferson Lab News - HAPPEx II reveals proton isn't very strange |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab HAPPEx II reveals proton isn't very strange April 23, 2006 The most precise measurement yet of strange quarks in the proton, performed at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) by the second phase of the Hall A Proton Parity Experiment (HAPPEx II), shows that the strange quark contribution to the proton's overall charge distribution and magnetic moment is small, indeed: it's so small, at less than 1 percent of the proton's

  7. Crystal phase identification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Michael, Joseph R. (Albuquerque, NM); Goehner, Raymond P. (Albuquerque, NM); Schlienger, Max E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample. This invention provides a method and apparatus for unambiguously identifying and determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample by using an electron beam generator, such as a scanning electron microscope, to obtain a backscattered electron Kikuchi pattern of a sample, and extracting crystallographic and composition data that is matched to database information to provide a quick and automatic method to identify crystalline phases.

  8. Phase Change | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phase Change June 16, 2009 Phase change is a phrase used in physics to indicate a change of the state of matter. For example, some materials can be in the solid, liquid or gaseous phases. Water can be ice liquid water, or steam. Chemically, it is essentially the same entity, but looks, feels and behaves quite differently. Sometimes the change of phase happens very quickly, sometimes relatively slowly. Toss an ice cube into a hot fire and the water doesn't stay very long as a solid, passing

  9. EBR-II Data Digitization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Su-Jong; Rabiti, Cristian; Sackett, John

    2014-08-01

    1. Objectives To produce a validation database out of those recorded signals it will be necessary also to identify the documents need to reconstruct the status of reactor at the time of the beginning of the recordings. This should comprehends the core loading specification (assemblies type and location and burn-up) along with this data the assemblies drawings and the core drawings will be identified. The first task of the project will be identify the location of the sensors, with respect the reactor plant layout, and the physical quantities recorded by the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) data acquisition system. This first task will allow guiding and prioritizing the selection of drawings needed to numerically reproduce those signals. 1.1 Scopes and Deliverables The deliverables of this project are the list of sensors in EBR-II system, the identification of storing location of those sensors, identification of a core isotopic composition at the moment of the start of system recording. Information of the sensors in EBR-II reactor system was summarized from the EBR-II system design descriptions listed in Section 1.2.

  10. Fundemental Academic Training Study Guide Phase 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Module 1.01 Basic Mathematics and Algebra Study Guide Part 4 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Fundamental Academic Training Study Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Module 1.01 Basic Mathematics and Algebra Study Guide 1.01-ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Module 1.01 Basic Mathematics and Algebra Study Guide 1.01-iii Table of Contents Page Module 1.01 Basic

  11. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Wednesday, 23 February 2011 00:00 Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of

  12. ARM - RHUBC II News & Press

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News & Press Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home ARM Field Campaigns Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Deployment Instruments Science Team RHUBC-II Wiki Site Tour News RHUBC-II Backgrounder (PDF, 300K) News & Press Images Experiment Planning RHUBC-II Proposal Abstract Science Plan (PDF, 267KB) Science Objectives Contacts Eli Mlawer, Principal Investigator Dave Turner, Principal Investigator RHUBC II News & Press Media Coverage Pagosa Sun "Scientists Test Research Equipment

  13. PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    104 Contractor Monthly Upload PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload PDF icon PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload More Documents & Publications PARS II TRAINING PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II TRAINING

  14. UPVG phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Utility PhotoVoltaic Group (UPVG), supported by member dues and a grant from the US Department of Energy, has as its mission the acceleration of the use of cost-effective small-scale and emerging large-scale applications of photovoltaics for the benefit of electric utilities and their customers. Formed in October, 1992, with the support of the American Public Power Association, Edison Electric Institute, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the UPVG currently has 90 members from all sectors of the electric utility industry. The UPVG`s efforts as conceived were divided into four phases: Phase 0--program plan; Phase 1--organization and strategy development; Phase 2--creating market assurance; and Phase 3--higher volume purchases. The Phase 0 effort developed the program plan and was completed early in 1993. The Phase 1 goal was to develop the necessary background information and analysis to lead to a decision as to which strategies could be undertaken by utilities to promote greater understanding of PV markets and achieve increased volumes of PV purchases. This report provides the details of the UPVG`s Phase 2 efforts to initiate TEAM-UP, its multiyear, 50-MW hardware initiative.

  15. EBR-II Superheater Duplex Tube Examination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel M. Wachs; Dennis D. Keiser; Douglas L. Porter; Naoyuki Kisohara

    2008-12-01

    After 30 years of operation, the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Superheater 710 at Argonne National Laboratory-West (now Idaho National Laboratory) was decommissioned. As part of its post-service examination, four duplex tube sections were removed and Charpy impact testing was performed to characterize the crack arresting ability of nickel-bonded tube interfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination was also performed to characterize and identify changes in bond material microstructure. From room temperature to 400 degrees C, all samples demonstrated ductility and crack-stopping ability similar to that exhibited by beginning-of-life samples. However, at low temperature (-5 degrees C), samples removed from the lower region of the superheater (near the sodium inlet) failed while those from the upper region (near the sodium outlet) did not. SEM analysis revealed that all the tube-tube interfaces showed evidence of iron diffusion into the nickel braze, which resulted in the formation of a multiphase diffusion structure. Yet, significant void formation was only observed in the bond layer of the tubes removed from the lower region. This may be due to a change in the crystal microstructure of one of the phases within the bond layer that occurs in the 350 to 450 degrees C temperature range, which results in a lower density and the formation of porosity. Apparently, only the samples from the higher temperature region were exposed to this transition temperature, and the resulting large voids that developed acted as stress concentrators that led to low-temperature embrittlement and failure of the Charpy impact specimens.

  16. PART II … CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities Modification # 0515 Conformed Copy Section I - Page 1 of 275 PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES TABLE OF CONTENTS I 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012) ............................................................................... 7 I 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984) ................................................................................ 7 I 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (APR 1984) ..................................... 8 I

  17. ARM - Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign-II (RHUBC-II)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home ARM Field Campaigns Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Deployment Instruments Science Team RHUBC-II Wiki Site Tour News RHUBC-II Backgrounder (PDF, 300K) News & Press Images Experiment Planning RHUBC-II Proposal Abstract Science Plan (PDF, 267KB) Science Objectives Contacts Eli Mlawer, Principal Investigator Dave Turner, Principal Investigator Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign-II (RHUBC-II) At an elevation of more than 5000 meters and

  18. HPC Colony II: FAST_OS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme Scale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HPC Colony II: FASTOS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme Scale HPC...

  19. Lessons Learned from PEP-II LLRF and Longitudinal Feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, J.D.; Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.H.; Van Winkle, D.; Teytelman, D.; /Dimtel, Redwood City

    2010-08-26

    The PEP-II B-Factory collider ended the final phase of operation at nearly twice the design current and 4X the design luminosity. To highlight the evolution from the original conceptual design through to the 1.2E34 final machine we choose one example each from the broadband feedback and from the LLRF system. They illustrate the original design estimation missed some very significant details, and how in the course of PEP-II operation unexpected difficulties led to significant insights and new approaches which allowed higher machine performance. We present valuable 'lessons learned' which are of interest to designers of next generation feedback and impedance controlled LLRF systems.

  20. PHYSICAL SCIENCES, Physics Phase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SCIENCES, Physics Phase competition in trisected superconducting dome I. M. Vishik, 1, 2 M Hashimoto, 3 R.-H. He, 4 W. S. Lee, 1, 2 F. Schmitt, 1, 2 D. H. Lu, 3 R. G. Moore, 1...

  1. During Phase 3, WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MORE- WIPP UPDATE: April 14, 2014 Phase 3 activities begin Two teams re-entered the WIPP underground facility on Saturday, moving closer to suspected location of the February 14 contamination release. It was the third re- entry in two weeks. The teams traveled farther into the mine than previous entries, evaluating ground conditions and checking for contamination. No contamination was detected and ground conditions were better than expected. During Phase 3, WIPP employees will enter the mine

  2. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  3. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  4. PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II 103 Updating Projects and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release 1.1), September, 2010. PDF icon Workbook More Documents & Publications PARS II TRAINING PARS II TRAINING PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload

  5. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation Phase III Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, Donna

    2013-12-01

    This project integrated state-of-the-art exploration technologies with a geologic framework and reservoir modeling to ultimately determine the efficacy of future geothermal production within the PLPT reservation. The information gained during this study should help the PLPT to make informed decisions regarding construction of a geothermal power plant. Additional benefits included the transfer of new technologies and geothermal data to the geothermal industry and it created and/or preserved nearly three dozen jobs accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. A variety of tasks were conducted to achieve the above stated objectives. The following are the tasks completed within the project: 1. Permitting 2. Shallow temperature survey 3. Seismic data collection and analysis 4. Fracture stress analysis 5. Phase I reporting Permitting 7. Shallow temperature survey 8. Seismic data collection and analysis 9. Fracture stress analysis 10. Phase I reporting 11. Drilling two new wells 12. Borehole geophysics 13. Phase II reporting 14. Well testing and geochemical analysis 15. Three-dimensional geologic model 16. Three-dimensional reservoir analysis 17. Reservation wide geothermal potential analysis 18. Phase III reporting Phase I consisted of tasks 1 5, Phase II tasks 6 8, and Phase III tasks 9 13. This report details the results of Phase III tasks. Reports are available for Phase I, and II as separate documents.

  6. Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-17

    Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

  7. Destilaria Joao Paulo II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Joao Paulo II Jump to: navigation, search Name: Destilaria Joao Paulo II Place: Sao Simao, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 14200-000 Product: Brazil based ethanol producer located in Sao...

  8. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of fat and protein and acts as a satiety agent, suppressing hunger and inhibiting food intake. Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is known to partly regulate CCK-8 (a CCK with...

  9. World War II | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    at NNSA Blog Home World War II World War II Keeping the "Spirit of '45 Alive" in Kansas City National Security Campus employees commemorated the 70th anniversary of the end...

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - IPASRC II Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsIPASRC II Campaign ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : IPASRC II...

  11. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  12. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  13. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  14. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  15. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  16. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  17. II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION The objectives of most compliance requirements for DOE programs are generic in nature. For example, most programs have eligibility requirements. While the criteria for determining eligibility vary by program, the objective of the compliance requirement that only eligible entities participate is consistent across all programs. Rather than repeat these compliance requirements, audit objectives, and suggested audit procedures for each program, they are

  18. Windland (Boxcar II) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Windland (Boxcar II) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Windland (Boxcar II) Wind Farm Facility Windland (Boxcar II) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  19. Champion (Roscoe II) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Champion (Roscoe II) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Champion (Roscoe II) Wind Farm Facility Champion (Roscoe II) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  20. University of Minnesota Morris II - PES | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Morris II - PES Jump to: navigation, search Name University of Minnesota Morris II - PES Facility University of Minnesota Morris II - PES Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community...

  1. Mountain View Power Partners II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Mountain View Power Partners II Wind Farm Facility Mountain View Power Partners II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale...

  2. Langdon II - FPL Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Langdon II - FPL Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Langdon II - FPL Wind Farm Facility Langdon II - FPL Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility...

  3. Karen Avenue Wind Farm II (San Gorgonio Farms) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Farm II (San Gorgonio Farms) Jump to: navigation, search Name Karen Avenue Wind Farm II (San Gorgonio Farms) Facility Karen Avenue Windfarm II (San Gorgonio Farms) Sector Wind...

  4. AE Biofuels Inc formerly Marwich II Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marwich II Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: AE Biofuels Inc. (formerly Marwich II Ltd.) Place: West Palm Beach, Florida Zip: 33414 Sector: Biofuels Product: Marwich II, Ltd....

  5. Buffalo Ridge II Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Buffalo Ridge II Wind Power Project Facility Buffalo Ridge II Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial...

  6. II

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    describes the concen- 1) because control devices, such as baghouse filters and tration of hydrogen ions along a scale (from 0 to 14) that electrostatic precipitators, remove most...

  7. II*

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    alone. That number represents the net inflow of foreign oil as a percentage of total oil consumption. By this measure, U.S. Trends dependence has never reached 50.0 percent on...

  8. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LIST OF FIGURES 1 General location of Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2 General location of the South Plant facility, Granite City Steel Division, Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 Diagram of the New Betatron Building, Granite City Steel facility, Granite City, Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4 View looking north northwest at the New

  9. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    l7aa AMY y ~UJs,bp 7 DOE/OR/20722-20 *1 F F c Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Contract No. DE-AC05-810R20722 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY REPORT FOR THE FORMER MIDDLESEX SAMPLING PLANT Middlesex, New Jersey Bechtel Job 14501 Bechtel National, Inc. Advanced Technology Division March 1985 Technical Information Center Office of Scientific and Technical Information U.S. Department of Energy ---___- __-_ __~__ .-_. ..__ - ~-___ LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared as an nccount of

  10. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 11 View looking west at scissors lift used to access top of shield wall and upper-level horizontal beams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  11. LIQUID PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH (III & IV) DEMONSTRATION IN THE LAPORTE ALTERNATIVE FUELS DEVELOPMENT UNIT. Final Topical Report. Volume I/II: Main Report. Task 1: Engineering Modifications (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration) and Task 2: AFDU Shakedown, Operations, Deactivation (Shut-Down) and Disposal (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1999-06-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch technology was successfully demonstrated in DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. Earlier work at LaPorte, with iron catalysts in 1992 and 1994, had established proof-of-concept status for the slurry phase process. The third campaign (Fischer-Tropsch III), in 1996, aimed at aggressively extending the operability of the slurry reactor using a proprietary cobalt catalyst. Due to an irreversible plugging of catalyst-wax separation filters as a result of unexpected catalyst fines generation, the operations had to be terminated after seven days on-stream. Following an extensive post-run investigation by the participants, the campaign was successfully completed in March-April 1998, with an improved proprietary cobalt catalyst. These runs were sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., and Shell Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (SSFI). A productivity of approximately 140 grams (gm) of hydrocarbons (HC)/ hour (hr)-liter (lit) of expanded slurry volume was achieved at reasonable system stability during the second trial (Fischer-Tropsch IV). The productivity ranged from 110-140 at various conditions during the 18 days of operations. The catalyst/wax filters performed well throughout the demonstration, producing a clean wax product. For the most part, only one of the four filter housings was needed for catalyst/wax filtration. The filter flux appeared to exceed the design flux. A combination of use of a stronger catalyst and some innovative filtration techniques were responsible for this success. There was no sign of catalyst particle attrition and very little erosion of the slurry pump was observed, in contrast to the Fischer-Tropsch III operations. The reactor operated hydrodynamically stable with uniform temperature profile and gas hold-ups. Nuclear density and differential pressure measurements indicated somewhat higher than expected gas hold-up (45 - 50 vol%) during Fischer-Tropsch IV operations. The high gas hold-up was confirmed by a dynamic gas disengagement test conducted at the end of the run. Heat transfer in the reactor was better than expected. Heat, mass and elemental balance calculations indicated excellent closure. After the initial learning curve with system dynamics, the plant was restarted very quickly (24 hours and 17 hours) following two plant trips. This demonstrates the ease and flexibility of the slurry technology. In-situ reduction of catalyst pre-cursor was completed successfully during F-T IV operations. Water measurements proved to be inaccurate due to wax/oil contamination of the analytical system. However, the reduction appeared to proceed well as close to expected syngas conversion was obtained at the beginning of the run. The selectivity to wax was lower than expected, with higher methane selectivity. Returning to the baseline condition indicated a productivity decline from 135-140 to 125-130 gm HC/hr-lit. of reactor volume in two weeks of operation. This may be a result of some catalyst loss from the reactor as well as initial catalyst deactivation. Significant quantities of product and samples were collected for further processing and analysis by the participants. Gas, liquid and solid phase mixing were studied as planned at two operating conditions using radioactive materials. A large amount of data were collected by ICI Tracerco using 43 detectors around the reactor. The data are being analyzed by Washington University as part of the Hydrodynamic Program with DOE.

  12. LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baradaran, Samira; Bergmann, Uwe; Durr, Herrmann; Gaffney, Kelley; Goldstein, Julia; Guehr, Markus; Hastings, Jerome; Heimann, Philip; Lee, Richard; Seibert, Marvin; Stohr, Joachim; ,

    2012-08-08

    The LCLS-II New Instruments workshops chaired by Phil Heimann and Jerry Hastings were held on March 19-22, 2012 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The goal of the workshops was to identify the most exciting science and corresponding parameters which will help define the LCLS-II instrumentation. This report gives a synopsis of the proposed investigations and an account of the workshop. Scientists from around the world have provided short descriptions of the scientific opportunities they envision at LCLS-II. The workshops focused on four broadly defined science areas: biology, materials sciences, chemistry and atomic, molecular and optical physics (AMO). Below we summarize the identified science opportunities in the four areas. The frontiers of structural biology lie in solving the structures of large macromolecular biological systems. Most large protein assemblies are inherently difficult to crystallize due to their numerous degrees of freedom. Serial femtosecond protein nanocrystallography, using the 'diffraction-before-destruction' approach to outrun radiation damage has been very successfully pioneered at LCLS and diffraction patterns were obtained from some of the smallest protein crystals ever. The combination of femtosecond x-ray pulses of high intensity and nanosized protein crystals avoids the radiation damage encountered by conventional x-ray crystallography with focused beams and opens the door for atomic structure determinations of the previously largely inaccessible class of membrane proteins that are notoriously difficult to crystallize. The obtained structures will allow the identification of key protein functions and help in understanding the origin and control of diseases. Three dimensional coherent x-ray imaging at somewhat lower resolution may be used for larger objects such as viruses. The chemistry research areas of primary focus are the predictive understanding of catalytic mechanisms, with particular emphasis on photo- and heterogeneous catalysis. Of particular interest is the efficient conversion of light to electrical or chemical energy, which requires understanding the non-adiabatic dynamics of electronic excited states. Ultrafast x-ray scattering presents an excellent opportunity to investigate structural dynamics of molecular systems with atomic resolution, and x-ray scattering and spectroscopy present an excellent opportunity to investigating the dynamics of the electronic charge distribution. Harnessing solar energy to generate fuels, either indirectly with photovoltaics and electrochemical catalysis or directly with photocatalysts, presents a critical technological challenge that will require the use of forefront scientific tools such as ultrafast x-rays. At the center of this technical challenge is the rational design of efficient and cost effective catalysts. Important materials science opportunities relate to information technology applications, in particular the transport and storage of information on increasingly smaller length- and faster time-scales. Of interest are the understanding of the intrinsic size limits associated with the storage of information bits and the speed limits of information or bit processing. Key questions revolve about how electronic charges and spins of materials can be manipulated by electric and magnetic fields. This requires the exploration of speed limits subject to the fundamental conservation laws of energy and linear and angular momentum and the different coupling of polar electric and axial magnetic fields to charge and spin. Of interest are novel composite materials, including molecular systems combining multi electric and magnetic functionality. Ultrafast x-rays offer the required probing speed, can probe either the charge or spin properties through polarization control and through scattering and spectroscopy cover the entire energy-time-momentum-distance phase space. In the field of atomic and molecular science, LCLS II promises to elucidate the fundamental interactions among electrons and between electrons and nuclei, and to explore the fron

  13. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-06-06

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line. 2 figs.

  14. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line.

  15. Phase change compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH); Griffen, Charles W. (Mason, OH)

    1986-01-01

    Compositions containing crystalline, long chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  16. Phase change compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1989-01-01

    Compositions containing crystalline, straight chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  17. Commissioning of NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willeke, F.

    2015-05-03

    NSLS-II, the new 3rd generation light source at BNL was designed for a brightness of 1022 photons s-1mm-2mrad-2 (0.1%BW)-1. It was constructed between 2009 and 2014. The storage ring was commissioned in April 2014 which was followed by insertion device and beamline commissioning in the fall of 2014. All ambitious design parameters of the facility have already been achieved except for commissioning the full beam intensity of 500mA which requires more RF installation. This paper reports on the results of commissioning.

  18. II.CONTRACT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 II.CONTRACT ID CODE ~AGE 1 of AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT PAGES AC 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 3. EFFECTNE DATE 2. AMENDMENTfMODIFICA TION NO. 4. REQUISITIONIPURCHASE REQ. NO. See Block 16c. NOPR 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 05008 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05008 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration P.O. Box 2050 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 P.O. Box 2050 Oak Ridge, TN

  19. HSWA Part II Permit Modification

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    PART II EPA AUTHORIZATION UNDER THE HAZARDOUS AND SOLID WASTE AMENDMENTS OF 1984 Pursuant to Section 227 of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (hereafter referred to as HSWA"), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (hereafter referred to as "EPA") is granted authority to issue or deny Permits or those portions of Permits affected by the requirements established by HSWA. By this authority and pursuant to Sections 3002(b), 3 004(d), and 3005 of the Resource

  20. Lyalpha EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lyalpha EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM LUMINOSITY ... FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EQUIVALENT WIDTH ...

  1. FORGE Phase Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FORGE Phase Infographic FORGE Phase Infographic FORGE Phase Infographic More Documents & Publications Multimedia FORGE Infographic EGS Data Library

  2. BNL ATF II beamlines design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedurin, M.; Jing, Y.; Stratakis, D.; Swinson, C.

    2015-05-03

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is currently undergoing a major upgrade (ATF-II). Together with a new location and much improved facilities, the ATF will see an upgrade in its major capabilities: electron beam energy and quality and CO2 laser power. The electron beam energy will be increased in stages, first to 100-150 MeV followed by a further increase to 500 MeV. Combined with the planned increase in CO2 laser power (from 1-100 TW), the ATF-II will be a powerful tool for Advanced Accelerator research. A high-brightness electron beam, produced by a photocathode gun, will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. Besides the energy range (up to a possible 500 MeV in the final stage) the electron beam can be tailored to each experiment with options such as: small transverse beam size (<10 um), short bunch length (<100 fsec) and, combined short and small bunch options. This report gives a detailed overview of the ATFII capabilities and beamlines configuration.

  3. South Africa-Integrating Sub-national Actors into National Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Actors into National Mitigation Strategies Through Vertically Integrated NAMAs (V-NAMAs) Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa-Integrating Sub-national Actors...

  4. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1999-08-03

    An interferometer is disclosed which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 11 figs.

  5. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, Gary E. (Santa Cruz, CA)

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  6. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, Gary E. (Santa Cruz, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  7. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  8. Abstracts of Phase 1 awards, (fiscal year) 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Contained in this booklet are abstracts of the Phase I awards made in Fiscal Year 1987 under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). The program is designed for implementation in a three-phase process, with Phase I determining the scientific or technical merit and feasibility of ideas proposed for investigation. The period of performance in this initial phase is relatively brief, typically about 6 months, and the awards are limited to $50,000. Phase II is the principal research or research and development effort, and the awards are as high as $500,000 for work to be performed in periods of up to 2 years. Phase III is the commercial application. The 111 Phase I projects described were selected in a highly competitive process from a total of 942 proposals received in response to the 1987 Solicitation. They cover the fields of chemistry, materials, control systems, plant natural products, instrumentation, nuclear medicine, health and environmental effects, high energy physics, particle accelerators, nuclear physics, plasma diagnostics and confinement, fusion energy systems, robotics and remote systems, nuclear reactors, space nuclear power, fuel cycle, decontamination/decommissioning, commputers in nuclear plants, coal, enhanced oil recovery/tar sands, fossil energy, photovoltaics, solar thermal, ceramics for heat engines, and industrial separation, conversion and recovery processes. (DLC)

  9. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Brett Anthony

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  10. Phase Change Material Tower

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Innovative Technology Solutions for Sustainability ABENGOA SOLAR SunShot Concentrating Solar Power Program Review 2013 April 24, 2013 Luke Erickson Phase Change Material Tower Innovative technology solutions for sustainability ABENGOA SOLAR Project Details Title: "Conversion Tower for Dispatchable Solar Power" Award: $3,875,104 from ARPA-E HEATS Program Project Term: 1/11/2012 to 1/10/2015 Project Plan: 2012: Modeling and begin lab scale demonstration 2013: Lab scale to prototype 2014:

  11. Gas-Phase Diagnostics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phase Diagnostics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  12. ExodusII Finite Element Data Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-05-14

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface. (exodus II is based on netcdf)

  13. Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Liaison | Department of Energy Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Form for the SES program emphasizes the range of communications and public relations aspects of executive positions as found in official correspondence and documentation, as well as, formal and informal verbal communications, and it describes the major competencies within this activity PDF icon Part II -

  14. SIMMER II analysis of the CAMEL II C6 and C7 experiments (simulated fuel penetration into a primary control assembly)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVault, G.P.

    1985-02-01

    The CAMEL C6 and C7 tests, performed at Argonne National Laboratory, simulated asymmetric midplane fuel injection into a nonvoided fully withdrawn primary control assembly during the meltdown phase of a hypothetical core-disruptive accident in a liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor. These tests were modeled with no a priori knowledge of the experimental results using the SIMMER-II code. Subsequent comparison of calculations with experimental results showed good agreement. 21 figures, 3 tables.

  15. PARS II Training Materials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    attachments, and running standard, pre-built reports. PARS 102 Presentation PARS 102 Workbook PARS 103 - Updating Projects and Reporting Introduction to PARS II, finding and...

  16. Concrete Pour in NSLS-II Ring

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bruno Semon

    2013-07-22

    The mezzanine floor of the ring building tunnel for NSLS-II was completed when the last concrete was placed in February 2011.

  17. Bore II - Advanced Wellbore Technology Characterizes Groundwater...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This Return to Search Bore II - Advanced Wellbore Technology Characterizes Groundwater Flow and Contamination Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This...

  18. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and...

  19. Administrative Assistant II | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administrative Assistant II Department: ESH&S Supervisor(s): Rob Sheneman Requisition Number: 1600013 Position Summary: The successful candidate will manage critical data and...

  20. SWAMI II technology transfer plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

  1. Phase-field Modeling of Displacive Phase Transformations in Elastically

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anisotropic and Inhomogeneous Polycrystals (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Phase-field Modeling of Displacive Phase Transformations in Elastically Anisotropic and Inhomogeneous Polycrystals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Phase-field Modeling of Displacive Phase Transformations in Elastically Anisotropic and Inhomogeneous Polycrystals Authors: Heo, T W ; Chen, L Q Publication Date: 2014-03-06 OSTI Identifier: 1169262 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-651372 DOE Contract Number:

  2. Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporating an

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extended Trispyrazolate Linker | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporating an Extended Trispyrazolate Linker Previous Next List Tabacaru, Aurel; Galli, Simona; Pettinari, Claudio; Masciocchi, Norberto; McDonald, Thomas M.; and Long, Jeffrey R. Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-organic Frameworks Incorporating an Extended Trispyrazolate Linker. Cryst. Eng. Comm., 17,

  3. SPIDERS Phase III

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SPIDERS Phase III John Bothof Burns & McDonnell Definition The U.S. Department of Energy's official definition of a microgrid is "a group of interconnected loads and distributed energy resources within clearly defined electrical boundaries that acts as a single controllable entity with respect to the grid [and can] connect and disconnect from the grid to enable it to operate in both grid-connected or island-mode." Definition The U.S. Department of Energy's official definition of a

  4. Isothermal kinetic of phase transformation and mixed electrical conductivity in Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.P.; Corbel, G.; Kodjikian, S.; Fang, Q.F.; Lacorre, P. . E-mail: Philippe.Lacorre@univ-lemans.fr

    2006-11-15

    Bismuth niobate (Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}) exists under two crystallographic modifications, a tetragonal (type-III) phase between 800 and 900 deg. C, and a pseudocubic (type-II) phase above and below this thermal range. The quenching at room temperature of pseudocubic type-II phase made it possible to carry out a detailed study of the transformation kinetics of this metastable type-II phase to the stable type-III phase, using isothermal in situ X-ray diffraction. The obtained Avrami exponent and activation energy for the transition are around 2.5 and 3.25 eV, respectively. The value of the Avrami exponent is consistent with a three-dimensional diffusion-controlled transformation with constant nucleation rate. Investigations of electrical properties using AC impedance spectroscopy and Wagner polarization method show that the tetragonal phase exhibits higher ionic and electronic conductivities than those of the pseudocubic form. Such a deviation is likely to originate from different distributions of cations/electronic-lone-pairs and oxygen vacancies. - Graphical abstract: The metastable type-II form of Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}, whose phase transformation kinetics to type-III form is studied in isothermal conditions, is shown to have a larger volume and a lower anionic (and electronic) conductivity than the type-III form of thisorite-type bismuth niobate.

  5. HPC Colony II: FAST_OS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scale (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect HPC Colony II: FAST_OS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme Scale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HPC Colony II: FAST_OS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme Scale HPC Colony II has been a 36-month project focused on providing portable performance for leadership class machines-a task made difficult by the emerging variety of more complex computer architectures. The project attempts to move the burden of

  6. Helical Nanofilament Phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L Hough; H Jung; D Kruerke; M Heberling; M Nakata; C Jones; D Chen; D Link; N Clark; et al.

    2011-12-31

    In the formation of chiral crystals, the tendency for twist in the orientation of neighboring molecules is incompatible with ordering into a lattice: Twist is expelled from planar layers at the expense of local strain. We report the ordered state of a neat material in which a local chiral structure is expressed as twisted layers, a state made possible by spatial limitation of layering to a periodic array of nanoscale filaments. Although made of achiral molecules, the layers in these filaments are twisted and rigorously homochiral - a broken symmetry. The precise structural definition achieved in filament self-assembly enables collective organization into arrays in which an additional broken symmetry - the appearance of macroscopic coherence of the filament twist-produces a liquid crystal phase of helically precessing layers.

  7. Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration - Phase I Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William L. Osborn, Susan Petty, Trenton T. Cladouhos, Joe Iovenitti, Laura Nofziger, Owen Callahan, Douglas S. Perry and Paul L. Stern

    2011-10-23

    Phase I of the Newberry Volcano Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration included permitting, community outreach, seismic hazards analysis, initial microseismic array deployment and calibration, final MSA design, site characterization, and stimulation planning. The multi-disciplinary Phase I site characterization supports stimulation planning and regulatory permitting, as well as addressing public concerns including water usage and induced seismicity. A review of the project'????s water usage plan by an independent hydrology consultant found no expected impacts to local stakeholders, and recommended additional monitoring procedures. The IEA Protocol for Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems was applied to assess site conditions, properly inform stakeholders, and develop a comprehensive mitigation plan. Analysis of precision LiDAR elevation maps has concluded that there is no evidence of recent faulting near the target well. A borehole televiewer image log of the well bore revealed over three hundred fractures and predicted stress orientations. No natural, background seismicity has been identified in a review of historic data, or in more than seven months of seismic data recorded on an array of seven seismometers operating around the target well. A seismic hazards and induced seismicity risk assessment by an independent consultant concluded that the Demonstration would contribute no additional risk to residents of the nearest town of La Pine, Oregon. In Phase II of the demonstration, an existing deep hot well, NWG 55-29, will be stimulated using hydroshearing techniques to create an EGS reservoir. The Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration is allowing geothermal industry and academic experts to develop, validate and enhance geoscience and engineering techniques, and other procedures essential to the expansion of EGS throughout the country. Successful development will demonstrate to the American public that EGS can play a significant role in reducing foreign energy dependence, and provide clean, renewable, baseload geothermal power generation in the State of Oregon.

  8. Assessing the Importance and Impact of Glycomics and Glycosciences Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolandz, Dorothy

    2013-02-07

    Glycans form one of the four basic classes of macromolecules in living systems, along with nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. They are composed of individual sugar units that can be linked to one another in multiple ways, enabling them to form complex three-dimensional structures. In living systems, glycans are involved in myriad processes that are part of normal cellular physiology, development, and signaling, as well as in the development of both chronic and infectious diseases. Because of their ubiquity on cell surfaces, they are key components of biological interfaces and are involved in molecular recognition and signaling. They are also important molecules in cell adhesion and cell movement. Meanwhile, glycans on proteins inside cells participate in the cells responses to incoming signals, for example by helping to modulate gene expression and protein functions. Glycan polymers such as cellulose are important components of plant cell walls. Understanding how such walls are assembled and how they can be deconstructed is fundamental to basic plant biology, but also in the development of applications such as efficient conversion of biomass into fuels. Glycan polymers derived from plants and other organisms can also serve as sources of new materials with wide-ranging applications from tissue engineering scaffolds to flexible electronic displays. Achieving an understanding of the structures and functions of glycans is fundamental to understanding biology. The National Research Council report resulting from this project, Transforming Glycoscience: A Roadmap for the Future, discusses the impact glycoscience can have across health, energy, and materials science and lays out a roadmap of research goals whose achievement could help the field become a widely-recognized and integrated discipline rather than a niche area studied by a small number of specialists. Despite advances, gaps remain in the current suite of tools for investigating glycans and these tools often require expert users and facilities, presenting a barrier for many investigators. The field is poised to benefit from the pursuit of the framework laid out in the study, which incorporates not only human physiology and health but also plant, animal, and microbial research and efforts to improve tools for synthesis, analysis, data management, and other fundamental research infrastructure.

  9. Michigan Technological Center for Nanostructured and Lightweight Materials in the Department of Chemical Engineering (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, M.; Rogers, T.; King, J.; Holles, J.; Keith, J.; Heiden, P.; Cornilsen, B.; Allen, J.

    2009-12-10

    Summaries of the followings tasks are given in this report: Task 1 - Lightweight, Thermally Conductive Bipolar Plates for Improved Thermal Management in Fuel Cells; Task 2 - Exploration of pseudomorphic nanoscale overlayer bimetallic catalysts; Task 3 - Hybrid inorganic/organic polymer nanocomposites; Task 4 - Carbonaceous Monolithic Electrodes for Fuel Cells and Rechargeable Batteries; and Task 5 - Movement and Freeze of Water in Fuel Cell Electrodes.

  10. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2005-10-14

    The commercialization path of the Calderon technology for making a feedstock for steelmaking with assistance from DOE initially focused on making coke and work was done which proved that the Calderon technology is capable of making good coke for hard driving blast furnaces. U.S. Steel which participated in such demonstration felt that the Calderon technology would be more meaningful in lowering the costs of making steel by adapting it to the making of iron--thus obviating the need for coke. U.S. Steel and Calderon teamed up to jointly work together to demonstrate that the Calderon technology will produce in a closed system iron units from iron concentrate (ore) and coal competitively by eliminating pelletizing, sintering, coking and blast furnace operation. If such process steps could be eliminated, a huge reduction in polluting emissions and greenhouse gases (including CO{sub 2}) relating to steelmaking would ensue. Such reduction will restructure the steel industry away from the very energy-intensive steelmaking steps currently practiced and drastically reduce costs of making steel. The development of a technology to lower U.S. steelmaking costs and become globally competitive is a priority of major importance. Therefore, the development work which Calderon is conducting presently under this Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy becomes more crucial than ever. During the 3rd quarter of 2005 which the present report covers, virtually all the effort to advance the Calderon technology to make iron units was concentrated towards forming a team with a steelmaker who needs both iron units in the form of hot metal and a substitute for natural gas (SNG), both being major contributors to higher costs in steelmaking. Calderon felt that a very good candidate would be Steel Dynamics (SDI) by virtue that it operates a rotary hearth facility in Butler, Indiana that uses large amounts of natural gas to reduce briquettes made from ore and coal that they subsequently melt in a submerged arc furnace that is a large consumer of electric power. This facility is operated as a division of SDI under the name of Iron Dynamics (IDI). It is no secret that IDI has had and still has a great number of operational problems, including high cost for natural gas.

  11. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Technical Report - Assessing Climate Change Effects on Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteman, Cameron; Capps, Scott

    2014-11-05

    Specialized Vertum Partners software tools were prototyped, tested and commercialized to allow wind energy stakeholders to assess the uncertainties of climate change on wind power production and distribution. This project resulted in three commercially proven products and a marketing tool. The first was a Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) based resource evaluation system. The second was a web-based service providing global 10m wind data from multiple sources to wind industry subscription customers. The third product addressed the needs of our utility clients looking at climate change effects on electricity distribution. For this we collaborated on the Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index (SAWTi), which was released publicly last quarter. Finally to promote these products and educate potential users we released “Gust or Bust”, a graphic-novel styled marketing publication.

  12. 48C Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Selections

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Departments of Energy and the Treasury worked in partnership to develop, launch, and award the funds for 48C Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit program.  The Advanced Energy Manufacturing...

  13. 48C Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Fact Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 48C Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit program was initiated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to support investments in projects that establish, expand or re-equip...

  14. SBIR Phase II Final Report - Multi-Protocol Energy Management Gateway for Home-Area Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, Jason

    2015-02-06

    Significant amounts of electricity, natural gas, and heating oil are wasted by homeowners due to inefficient operation and inadequate maintenance of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment. Coincidents work under this award reduces energy waste, saves consumers money, and reduces carbon emissions. It does so in three ways: First, Coincidents approach replaces the traditional thermostat with a wireless network of sensors and controllers that measure temperature, humidity and occupancy in multiple rooms in the house. The Internet of Things is a technology trend holding the promise of ubiquitous inexpensive sensors. The reality, however, is that energy and HVAC monitoring and management is a patchwork of incompatible protocols and expensive proprietary technologies. Coincidents multi-protocol architecture, developed in part under this award tackles this problem and brings low cost interoperable sensor and control devices to market. Second, the Coincident system eliminates hard-to-program and rigid thermostat schedules and instead provides automatic operation of heating and cooling by combining individual temperature and comfort preferences with energy-saving targets, real-time utility use information, weather data, and room utilization patterns. Energy efficiency technology must be appealing to consumers otherwise it will not be used. The Coincident user interface has engaging features such as remote control from any smart phone or web browser and per-room performance breakdowns. Expected energy savings resulting from more efficient operation of heating and air conditioning equipment are in the range of 10-20%. Third, the Coincident system provides heating and air-conditioning contractors with fine-grained performance data for every residence they support (subject to customer privacy controls). This data is integrated from diverse networks within the residence and includes HVAC performance and fuel use data. This information allows the partner to validate energy savings and identify potential system faults (whether from installation problems or maintenance issues). When combined with professional installation as part of high-efficiency HVAC upgrade, energy savings levels of 20-30% can be achieved. Economic feasibility of energy efficiency technology is one of the key challenges addressed in this award. The Coincident system is engineered to be delivered at a disruptive price point, making the system financially feasible for new and retrofit homes of all types and sizes. The Coincident system is intended to be sold through the HVAC professionalthe industry most capable of improving HVAC efficiency. Providing HVAC contractors with detailed home performance data motivates them to sell the product, provides them with maintenance and upgrade revenue opportunities, and therefore delivers customer savings and environmental benefits. Having demonstrated technical and financial feasibility, Coincident has won additional grants and awards, participated in pilot projects, started partnership discussions with several HVAC equipment vendors, and has lined up several large channel partners ready to participate in large pilot rollouts.

  15. Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-26

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

  16. Institute for High Heat Flux Removal (IHHFR). Phases I, II, and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Ronald D.

    2014-08-31

    The IHHFR focused on interdisciplinary applications as it relates to high heat flux engineering issues and problems which arise due to engineering systems being miniaturized, optimized, or requiring increased high heat flux performance. The work in the IHHFR focused on water as a coolant and includes: (1) the development, design, and construction of the high heat flux flow loop and facility; (2) test section development, design, and fabrication; and, (3) single-side heat flux experiments to produce 2-D boiling curves and 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements for single-side heated test sections. This work provides data for comparisons with previously developed and new single-side heated correlations and approaches that address the single-side heated effect on heat transfer. In addition, this work includes the addition of single-side heated circular TS and a monoblock test section with a helical wire insert. Finally, the present work includes: (1) data base expansion for the monoblock with a helical wire insert (only for the latter geometry), (2) prediction and verification using finite element, (3) monoblock model and methodology development analyses, and (4) an alternate model development for a hypervapotron and related conjugate heat transfer controlling parameters.

  17. Electric Vehicle Communications Standards Testing and Validation - Phase II: SAE J2931/1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Gowri, Krishnan

    2013-01-15

    Vehicle to grid communication standards enable interoperability among vehicles, charging stations and utility providers and provide the capability to implement charge management. Several standards initiatives by the Society of Automobile Engineers (SAE), International Standards Organization and International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC), and ZigBee/HomePlug Alliance are developing requirements for communication messages and protocols. Recent work by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with SAE and automobile manufacturers has identified vehicle to grid communication performance requirements and developed a test plan as part of SAE J2931/1 committee work. This laboratory test plan was approved by the SAE J2931/1 committee and included test configurations, test methods, and performance requirements to verify reliability, robustness, repeatability, maximum communication distance, and authentication features of power line carrier (PLC) communication modules at the internet protocol layer level. The goal of the testing effort was to select a communication technology that would enable automobile manufacturers to begin the development and implementation process. The EPRI/Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) testing teams divided the testing so that results for each test could be presented by two teams, performing the tests independently. The PNNL team performed narrowband PLC testing including the Texas Instruments (TI) Concerto, Ariane Controls AC-CPM1, and the MAXIM Tahoe 2 evaluation boards. The scope of testing was limited to measuring the vendor systems communication performance between Electric Vehicle Support Equipment (EVSE) and plug-in electric vehicles (PEV). The testing scope did not address PEVs CAN bus to PLC or PLC to EVSE (Wi-Fi, cellular, PLC Mains, etc.) communication integration. In particular, no evaluation was performed to delineate the effort needed to translate the IPv6/SEP2.0 messages to PEVs CAN bus. The J2931/1 laboratory test results were presented to the SAE membership on March 20-22, 2012. The SAE committee decided to select HomePlug GreenPHY (HPGP) as the communication technology to use between the PEV and EVSE. No technology completely met all performance requirements. Both the MAXIM Tahoe 2 and TI Concerto met the 100Kbps throughput requirement, are estimated to meet the latency measurement performance, and met the control pilot impairment requirements. But HPGP demonstrated the potential to provide a data throughput rate of 10x of the requirement and either met or showed the potential to meet the other requirements with further development.

  18. Phase I Report U.S. DOE GRED II Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ltd, 2003) Flow Test At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003)...

  19. DOE-ER-46139-Phase II-Final-Report-Tritt-2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry M. Tritt

    2011-10-21

    This proposal emphasizes investigations of the thermal and electrical transport properties of new and novel solid-state materials, with the specific goal of achieving higher efficiency solid-state thermoelectric materials. This program will continue to build a very strong collaborative research effort between researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ONRL) and Clemson University. We propose three new faculty hires and major equipment purchases in order to further enhance our level of national recognition. We will be positioned for competition for major non-EPSCoR DOE and DOD funding (i.e. NSF-Materials Research Center) and able to address many other areas of DOE and national importance. Graduate and undergraduate students will be extensively involved in this project, spending significant time at ORNL, thus gaining important training and educational opportunities. We will also include an outreach program to bring in outside students and faculty. An External Advisory Board of distinguished scientists will provide oversight to the program.

  20. 4.2.1 GRED Drilling Award- GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Alaska; to test and document the reliability of previous predictions as to the nature of the reservoir; and to find a hotter resource to scale up power production at Chena...

  1. Phase I Report, Us Doe Gred Ii Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site...

  2. Advanced turbine systems phase II - conceptual design and product development. Final report, August 1993--July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    The National Energy Strategy (NES) calls for a balanced program of greater energy efficiency, use of alternative fuels, and the environmentally responsible development of all U.S. energy resources. Consistent with the NES, a Department of Energy (DOE) program has been created to develop Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS). The technical ATS requirements are based upon two workshops held in Greenville, SC that were sponsored by DOE and hosted by Clemson University. The objective of this 8-year program, managed jointly by DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, and, Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy, is to develop natural-gas-fired base load power plants that will have cycle efficiencies greater than 60%, lower heating value (LHV), be environmentally superior to current technology, and also be cost competitive. The program will include work to transfer advanced technology to the coal- and biomass-fueled systems being developed in other DOE programs.

  3. Wireless Roadside Inspection Phase II Tennessee Commercial Mobile Radio Services Pilot Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzese, Oscar; Lascurain, Mary Beth; Capps, Gary J; Siekmann, Adam

    2011-05-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program is researching the feasibility and value of electronically assessing truck and bus driver and vehicle safety at least 25 times more often than is possible using only roadside physical inspections. The WRI program is evaluating the potential benefits to both the motor carrier industry and to government. These potential benefits include reduction in accidents, fatalities and injuries on our highways and keeping safe and legal drivers and vehicles moving on the highways. WRI Pilot tests were conducted to prototype, test and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of electronically collecting safety data message sets from in-service commercial vehicles and performing wireless roadside inspections using three different communication methods. This report summarizes the design, conduct and results of the Tennessee CMRS WRI Pilot Test. The purpose of this Pilot test was to demonstrate the implementation of commercial mobile radio services to electronically request and collect safety data message sets from a limited number of commercial vehicles operating in Tennessee. The results of this test have been used in conjunction with the results of the complimentary pilot tests to support an overall assessment of the feasibility and benefits of WRI in enhancing motor carrier safety (reduction in accidents) due to increased compliance (change in motor carrier and driver behavior) caused by conducting frequent safety inspections electronically, at highway speeds, without delay or need to divert into a weigh station

  4. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification review plan - 7/29/99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-09-10

    The purpose of this review is to verify the implementation status of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) for the River Protection Project (RPP) facilities managed by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) and operated by Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC). This review will also ascertain whether within RPP facilities and operations the work planning and execution processes are in place and functioning to effectively protect the health and safety of the workers, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The RPP ISMS should support the Hanford Strategic Plan (DOERL-96-92) to safely clean up and manage the site's legacy waste and deploy science and technology while incorporating the ISMS central theme to ''Do work safely'' and protect human health and the environment.

  5. Fluor Hanford Integrated Safety Management System Phase II Verification Vol 1 & Vol 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PARSONS, J.E.

    2000-07-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to conducting work efficiently and in a manner that ensures protection of the workers, public, and environment. DOE policy mandates that safety management systems be used to systematically integrate safety into management and work practices at all levels while accomplishing mission goals in an effective and efficient manner. The purpose of the Fluor Hanford (FH) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) verification was to determine whether FH's ISM system and processes are sufficiently implemented to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of the DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) verification was to determine whether RL has established processes that adequately describe RL's role in safety management and if those processes are sufficiently implemented.

  6. Phase II -- Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA): Safety and health action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, K.

    1994-09-01

    To establish guidelines for the implementation and administration of an injury and illness prevention program for PVUSA and to assign specific responsibilities for the execution of the program. To provide a basic Safety and Health Action Plan (hereinafter referred to as Plan) that assists management, supervision, and project personnel in the recognition, evaluation, and control of hazardous activities and/or conditions within their respective areas of responsibility.

  7. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

    1989-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

  8. EA-1831: Phase II ICCS Initiative Funding Award for Calera Corporation, Moss Landing, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds for a project that would receive flue gas from the gas-fired Moss Landing, CA power plant and capture CO2 for permanent storage in a cementitious substitute material and process useless byproducts into useable chemicals. NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. NEPA coverage for this project is now a CX as of 9/17/2012.

  9. Phase II Final Project Report SBIR Project: "A High Efficiency PV to Hydrogen Energy System"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slade, A; Turner, J; Stone, K; McConnell, R

    2008-09-02

    The innovative research conducted for this project contributed greatly to the understanding of generating low-cost hydrogen from solar energy. The projects research identified two highly leveraging and complementary pathways. The first pathway is to dramatically increase the efficiency of converting sunlight into electricity. Improving solar electric conversion efficiency directly increases hydrogen production. This project produced a world record efficiency for silicon solar cells and contributed to another world record efficiency for a solar concentrator module using multijunction solar cells. The projects literature review identified a second pathway in which wasted heat from the solar concentration process augments the electrolysis process generating hydrogen. One way to do this is to use a heat mirror that reflects the heat-producing infrared and transmits the visible spectrum to the solar cells; this also increases solar cell conversion efficiency. An economic analysis of this concept confirms that, if long-term concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) and solid-oxide electrolyzer cost goals can be achieved, hydrogen will be produced from solar energy cheaper than the cost of gasoline. The potential public benefits from this project are significant. The project has identified a potential energy source for the nations future electricity and transportation needs that is entirely home grown and carbon free. As CPV enter the nations utility markets, the opportunity for this approach to be successful is greatly increased. Amonix strongly recommends further exploration of this projects findings.

  10. R-MCJ10042201-1A_PADT_PhaseII-report-final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Mark Christian

    2010-04-22

    The thrust of this R&D effort was to develop technology that serves the SOFC industry and help developers in this industry to succeed. In particular this project focused on fluid handling equipment that supported the SOFC stack. Two devices were developed: the Hot Anode Recycle Blower (HARB) blower which will serve hot anode gas requirements in FutureGen demonstration units, and the small multi stage (SMS) blower which will serve warm anode and cathode gas requirements for SOFC and other fuel cell industries.

  11. Near-infrared line identification in type Ia supernovae during the transitional phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, Brian; Baron, E.; Wisniewski, John P.; Miller, Timothy R. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, 440 West Brooks Street, Room 100, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Parrent, Jerod T. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Thomas, R. C. [Computational Cosmology Center, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 50B-4206, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marion, G. H. [University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We present near-infrared synthetic spectra of a delayed-detonation hydrodynamical model and compare them to observed spectra of four normal Type Ia supernovae ranging from day +56.5 to day +85. This is the epoch during which supernovae are believed to be undergoing the transition from the photospheric phase, where spectra are characterized by line scattering above an optically thick photosphere, to the nebular phase, where spectra consist of optically thin emission from forbidden lines. We find that most spectral features in the near-infrared can be accounted for by permitted lines of Fe II and Co II. In addition, we find that [Ni II] fits the emission feature near 1.98 ?m, suggesting that a substantial mass of {sup 58}Ni exists near the center of the ejecta in these objects, arising from nuclear burning at high density.

  12. FERN Blue Ribbon Wind Farm II* | Open Energy Information

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    II* Jump to: navigation, search Name FERN Blue Ribbon Wind Farm II* Facility FERN Blue Ribbon Wind Farm II* Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed...

  13. Hopkins Ridge II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Hopkins Ridge II Wind Farm Facility Hopkins Ridge II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  14. Panther Creek II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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  15. Woodward Mountain I & II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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    Mountain I & II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodward Mountain I & II Wind Farm Facility Woodward Mountain Wind Ranch I and II Sector Wind energy Facility Type...

  16. Michigan Wind II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Michigan Wind II Wind Farm Facility Michigan Wind II Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status...

  17. North Dakota Wind II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name North Dakota Wind II Wind Farm Facility North Dakota Wind II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  18. Lake Benton II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Benton II Wind Farm Facility Lake Benton II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  19. Smoky Hills II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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    Smoky Hills II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Smoky Hills II Wind Farm Facility Smoky Hills II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  20. Tres Vaqueros II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Tres Vaqueros II Wind Farm Facility Tres Vaqueros II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  1. Venture Wind II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Venture Wind II Wind Farm Facility Venture Wind II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  2. Meadow Lake II (3Q10) | Open Energy Information

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    II (3Q10) Jump to: navigation, search Name Meadow Lake II (3Q10) Facility Meadow Lake II (3Q10) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  3. Dry Lake II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Dry Lake II Wind Farm Facility Dry Lake II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  4. Foote Creek Rim II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Foote Creek Rim II Wind Farm Facility Foote Creek Rim II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  5. Meridian Way II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Meridian Way II Wind Farm Facility Meridian Way II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  6. MinWind I & II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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    I & II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name MinWind I & II Wind Farm Facility MinWind I & II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  7. Wild Horse II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wild Horse II Wind Farm Facility Wild Horse II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  8. Hull Wind II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Hull Wind II Wind Farm Facility Hull II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Hull...

  9. Adv. Nuclear Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    II Due Date Adv. Nuclear Solicitation Part II Due Date November 23, 2016 12:01AM to 11:59PM EST ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS SOLICITATION PART II

  10. Minco II Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minco II Wind Energy Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Minco II Wind Energy Center Facility Minco II Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  11. Microsoft Word - Vol II_FM.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2006 EPA/600/R-05/144bF Air Quality Criteria for Lead Volume II of II EPA/600/R-05/144bF October 2006 Air Quality Criteria for Lead Volume II National Center for Environmental Assessment-RTP Division Office of Research and Development U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Research Triangle Park, NC PREFACE National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) are promulgated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to meet requirements set forth in Sections 108 and 109 of the U.S.

  12. Certification report for final closure of Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This report represents the Geotek Engineering Company, Inc., (Geotek) record of activities to support certification of final closure Of the subject Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II. Ex as noted herein, final closure of the landfill was completed in accordance with the Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill 11 Closure/Post Closure Plan, Revision 2, submitted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on April 14, 1992, and approved by TDEC on May 27, 1994 (the ``Closure Plan``). minor modification to the Closure Plan allowing partial closure of the Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II (Phase 1) was approved by TDEC on August 3, 1994. The Phase I portion of the closure for the subject landfill was completed on March 25, 1995. A closure certification report entitled Certification Report for Partial Closure of Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II was submitted to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (LMES) on March 28, 1995. The final closure represents the completion of the closure activities for the entire Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II Site. The contents of this report and accompanying certification are based on observations by Geotek engineers and geologists during closure activities and on review of reports, records, laboratory test results, and other information furnished to Geotek by LMES.

  13. A Fixed Gap APPLE II Undulator for SLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A.; Ingold, G.; Jakob, B.; Vollenweider, C.

    2007-01-19

    To vary the polarization vector of an APPLE II undulator continuously from 0 - 180 deg., all four magnet arrays need to be movable. Following the adjustable-phase undulator approach by R. Carr, a 3.4 m long fixed gap undulator for SLS with a gap of 11.6 mm has been constructed. It will be installed in fall 2006. The gap drive is replaced by a pair-wise shift of the magnet arrays to change the energy, while the polarization is changed by shifts of diagonal arrays. The high injection efficiency and standard operation top-up mode at the SLS allows this simplified undulator design. The design as well as the operational aspects will be discussed.

  14. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer phase grating designs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick (Oakland, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Diffraction phase gratings are employed in phase-shifting point diffraction interferometers to improve the interferometric fringe contrast. The diffraction phase grating diffracts a zeroth-order diffraction of light at a first power level to the test-beam window of a mask that is positioned at the image plane and a first-order diffraction at a second power to the reference-beam pinhole. The diffraction phase grating is preferably selected to yield a desired ratio of the first power level to second power level.

  15. Eight Pulse Performance of DARHT Axis II - Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, Martin E.

    2015-12-08

    The DARHT-II accelerator produces a 1.65-kA, 17-MeV beam in a 1600-ns pulse. Standard operation of the DARHT Axis II accelerator involves extracting four short pulses from the 1.6 us long macro-pulse produced by the LIA. The four short pulses are extracted using a fast kicker in combination with a quadrupole septum magnet and then transported for several meters to a high-Z material target for conversion to x-rays for radiography. The ability of the DARHT Axis 2 kicker to produce more than the standard four pulse format has been previously demonstrated. This capability was developed to study potential risks associated with beam transport during an initial commissioning phase at low energy (8 MeV) and low current (1.0 kA).The ability of the kicker to deliver more than four pulses to the target has been realized for many years. This note describes the initial results demonstrating this capability.

  16. Windy Flats Phase III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase III Jump to: navigation, search Name Windy Flats Phase III Facility Windy Flats Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Proposed...

  17. Solano Phase 3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase 3 Jump to: navigation, search Name Solano Phase 3 Facility Solano Phase 3 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Sacramento...

  18. Cleveland Project Phase 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase 2 Jump to: navigation, search Name Cleveland Project Phase 2 Facility Cleveland Project Phase 2 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status...

  19. Tillamook Windfloat Phase 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Windfloat Phase 1 Jump to: navigation, search Name Tillamook Windfloat Phase 1 Facility Tillamook Windfloat Phase 1 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status...

  20. H{sub ?} SPECTRAL DIVERSITY OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: CORRELATIONS WITH PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutirrez, Claudia P.; Hamuy, Mario; Gonzlez-Gaitn, Santiago [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Anderson, Joseph P. [Departamento de Astronoma, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Folatelli, Gastn [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Morrell, Nidia I.; Phillips, Mark M.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Stritzinger, Maximilian D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); McCarthy, Patrick [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Suntzeff, Nicholas B., E-mail: cgutierr@das.uchile.cl [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of the H{sub ?} profiles of hydrogen-rich Type II supernovae. A total of 52 Type II supernovae having well-sampled optical light curves and spectral sequences were analyzed. Concentrating on the H{sub ?} P-Cygni profile we measure its velocity from the FWHM of the emission and the ratio of absorption to emission (a/e) at a common epoch at the start of the recombination phase, and search for correlations between these spectral parameters and photometric properties of the V-band light curves. Testing the strength of various correlations we find that a/e appears to be the dominant spectral parameter in terms of describing the diversity in our measured supernova properties. It is found that supernovae with smaller a/e have higher H{sub ?} velocities, more rapidly declining light curves from maximum during the plateau and radioactive tail phase, are brighter at maximum light, and have shorter optically thick phase durations. We discuss possible explanations of these results in terms of physical properties of Type II supernovae, speculating that the most likely parameters that influence the morphologies of H{sub ?} profiles are the mass and density profile of the hydrogen envelope, together with additional emission components due to circumstellar interaction.

  1. Medicine Bow Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Medicine Bow Wind Farm II Facility Medicine Bow Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Platte...

  2. Green Ridge Power Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

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    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Ridge Power Wind Farm II Facility Green Ridge Power Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  3. Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Type II topoisomerases are molecular machines that regulate DNA supercoiling and separate interlocked...

  4. EVERETT L. REDMOND II Senior Director, Policy Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EVERETT L. REDMOND II Senior Director, Policy Development 1201 F Street, NW, Suite 1100 ... and the Administration's climate change goals. Sincerely yours, Everett L. Redmond II

  5. The Three-Dimensional Structural Basis of Type II Hyperprolinemia...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Three-Dimensional Structural Basis of Type II Hyperprolinemia Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Three-Dimensional Structural Basis of Type II Hyperprolinemia Type ...

  6. Buffalo Mountain Wind Energy Center II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Buffalo Mountain Wind Energy Center II Facility Buffalo Mountain Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  7. NREL Research Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

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    II Jump to: navigation, search Name NREL Research Wind Farm II Facility NREL Research Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer...

  8. Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (SMMPA) Wind Farm Ii...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ii Jump to: navigation, search Name Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (SMMPA) Wind Farm Ii Facility Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (SMMPA) Sector Wind energy...

  9. Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 Volume II, ...

  10. 54 USC Subtitle II - Outdoor Recreation Programs | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II - Outdoor Recreation Programs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: 54 USC Subtitle II - Outdoor Recreation...

  11. Neal Hot Springs II Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Neal Hot Springs II Geothermal Project Project Location Information...

  12. Jingning County Baihe II Station Hydropower Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Baihe II Station Hydropower Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Jingning County Baihe II Station Hydropower Co. Ltd. Place: Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China Zip: 310002...

  13. Cedar Creek Wind Farm II (Nordex) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nordex) Jump to: navigation, search Name Cedar Creek Wind Farm II (Nordex) Facility Cedar Creek II (Nordex) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status...

  14. Whitewater Hill Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Whitewater Hill Wind Farm II Facility Whitewater Hill Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Cannon...

  15. Klondike III II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Klondike III II Wind Farm Facility Klondike III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  16. Langdon II - Otter Tail Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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    Otter Tail Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Langdon II - Otter Tail Wind Farm Facility Langdon II - Otter Tail Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  17. Oak Creek Energy Systems Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

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    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Oak Creek Energy Systems Wind Farm II Facility Oak Creek Energy Systems Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status...

  18. San Emidio II Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: San Emidio II Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates...

  19. First Magnet Girder Installed in NSLS-II Storage Ring

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Frank Lincoln

    2013-07-19

    Supervisor Frank Lincoln explains how the first magnet girder is installed in the storage ring of Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II).

  20. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reader, Part II. Sun story. Includes glossary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. Includes glossary You are ...

  1. Lamar Wind Energy Project II | Open Energy Information

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    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Lamar Wind Energy Project II Facility Lamar Wind Energy Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  2. Lincoln Wind Energy Facility II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Lincoln Wind Energy Facility II Facility Lincoln Wind Energy Facility Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service...

  3. Digitally controlled distributed phase shifter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Vawter, Gregory A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A digitally controlled distributed phase shifter is comprised of N phase shifters. Digital control is achieved by using N binary length-weighted electrodes located on the top surface of a waveguide. A control terminal is attached to each electrode thereby allowing the application of a control signal. The control signal is either one or two discrete bias voltages. The application of the discrete bias voltages changes the modal index of a portion of the waveguide that corresponds to a length of the electrode to which the bias voltage is applied, thereby causing the phase to change through the underlying portion of the waveguide. The digitally controlled distributed phase shift network has a total phase shift comprised of the sum of the individual phase shifters.

  4. Digitally controlled distributed phase shifter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-08-17

    A digitally controlled distributed phase shifter is comprised of N phase shifters. Digital control is achieved by using N binary length-weighted electrodes located on the top surface of a waveguide. A control terminal is attached to each electrode thereby allowing the application of a control signal. The control signal is either one or two discrete bias voltages. The application of the discrete bias voltages changes the modal index of a portion of the waveguide that corresponds to a length of the electrode to which the bias voltage is applied, thereby causing the phase to change through the underlying portion of the waveguide. The digitally controlled distributed phase shift network has a total phase shift comprised of the sum of the individual phase shifters.

  5. Bacillus MGA3 aspartokinase II gene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schendel, Frederick J. (Oakdale, MN); Flickinger, Michael C. (St. Paul, MN)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides the isolated DNA sequence encoding the .alpha.B dimer subunit of the lysine-sensitive aspartokinase II isozyme from the thermophilic methylotrophic Bacillus sp. MGA3.

  6. PARS II Course Registration | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Click the link below to access the MS XL PARS II Course Registration Form. Select the Open option. Select the Save As option to save a copy of the registration form to your...

  7. NSLS-II Transport Line Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller R. P.; Wahl, W.; Anderson, A.; Benish, B.; DeBoer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hu, J.-P.; Johanson, M.P.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Padrazo, D.; Roy, K.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.

    2012-05-20

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state-of-the-art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The first part of the Linac to Booster Transport (LBT) line has been installed for linac commissioning. This part includes all components necessary to commission the NSLS-II linac. The second part of this transport line is undergoing installation. Initial results of hardware commissioning will be discussed. The Booster to Storage Ring (BSR) transport line underwent a design review. The first part of the BSR transport line, consisting of all components necessary to commission the booster will be installed in 2012 for booster commissioning. We report on the final design of the BSR line along with the plan to commission the booster.

  8. ARM - Campaign Instrument - splatt-ii

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Single Particle Laser Ablasion Time flown on Aircraft (SPLATT-II)...

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - ARESE II IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsARESE II IOP Campaign Links ARM UAV Program Science Plan ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at...

  10. SBIR/STTR FY15 Phase 2 Release 2 Awards Announced-Includes Projects to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Increase Fuel Cell Performance and Durability | Department of Energy 5 Phase 2 Release 2 Awards Announced-Includes Projects to Increase Fuel Cell Performance and Durability SBIR/STTR FY15 Phase 2 Release 2 Awards Announced-Includes Projects to Increase Fuel Cell Performance and Durability June 23, 2015 - 4:12pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase II Release 2 Awards, including

  11. NSLS-II Radio Frequency Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose J.; Gao F.; Goel, A.; Holub, B.; Kulpin, J.; Marques, C.; Yeddulla, M.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II is a 3 GeV X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The NSLS-II RF system consists of the master oscillator, digital low level RF controllers, linac, booster and storage ring RF sub-systems, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system.

  12. Microsoft Word - Vol II.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Volume II Institutional Controls Plan January 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Revision 8 Final This page intentionally left blank Emergency Contact Legacy Management 24-hour Monitored Security Telephone Number (877) 695-5322 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan Doc. No. S03496-8.0-Final Volume II-Institutional Controls Plan January 2015 Page i Contents Abbreviations

  13. Photospheric magnitude diagrams for type II supernovat: A promising tool to compute distances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrguez, smar; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Hamuy, Mario, E-mail: olrodrig@astro.puc.cl [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-12-01

    We develop an empirical color-based standardization for Type II supernovae (SNe II), equivalent to the classical surface brightness method given in Wesselink. We calibrate this standardization using SNe II with host galaxy distances measured using Cepheids, and a well-constrained shock breakout epoch and extinction due to the host galaxy. We estimate the reddening with an analysis of the B V versus V I color-color curves, similar to that of Natali et al. With four SNe II meeting the above requirements, we build a photospheric magnitude versus color diagram (similar to an H-R diagram) with a dispersion of 0.29 mag. We also show that when using time since shock breakout instead of color as the independent variable, the same standardization gives a dispersion of 0.09 mag. Moreover, we show that the above time-based standardization corresponds to the generalization of the standardized candle method of Hamuy and Pinto for various epochs throughout the photospheric phase. To test the new tool, we construct Hubble diagrams for different subsamples of 50 low-redshift (cz < 10{sup 4} km s{sup 1}) SNe II. For 13 SNe within the Hubble flow (cz {sub CMB} > 3000 km s{sup 1}) and with a well-constrained shock breakout epoch we obtain values of 68-69 km s{sup 1} Mpc{sup 1} for the Hubble constant and a mean intrinsic scatter of 0.12 mag or 6% in relative distances.

  14. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 1: Title II design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 1 provides a comprehensive narrative description of the proposed facility and systems, the basis for each of the systems design, and the engineering assessments that were performed to support the technical basis of the Title II design. The intent of the system description presented is to provide WHC an understanding of the facilities and equipment provided and the A/E`s perspective on how these systems will operate.

  15. Method for aqueous phase reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA); Hart, Todd R. (Kennewick, WA)

    2000-01-01

    A method for converting liquid organic material in a mixture into a product utilizing a catalyst in the form of a plurality of porous particles wherein each particle is a support having nickel metal catalytic phase or reduced nickel deposited thereon in a first dispersed phase and an additional metal deposited onto the support in a second dispersed phase. The additional metal is effective in retarding or reducing agglomeration or sintering of the nickel metal catalytic phase without substantially affecting the catalytic activity, thereby increasing the life time of the catalyst.

  16. Phase-locked loop with controlled phase slippage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mestha, L.K.

    1994-03-29

    A system for synchronizing a first subsystem controlled by a changing frequency sweeping from a first frequency to a second frequency, with a second subsystem operating at a steady state second frequency is described. Trip plan parameters are calculated in advance to determine the phase relationship between the frequencies of the first subsystem and second subsystem in order to obtain synchronism at the end of the frequency sweep of the first subsystem. During the time in which the frequency of the first subsystem is sweeping from the first frequency to the second frequency, the phase locked system compares the actual phase difference with the trip plan phase difference and incrementally changes the sweep frequency in a manner so that phase lock is achieved when the first subsystem reaches a frequency substantially identical to that of the second subsystem. 10 figures.

  17. Phase-locked loop with controlled phase slippage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mestha, Lingappa K. (Cedar Hill, TX)

    1994-01-01

    A system for synchronizing a first subsystem controlled by a changing frequency sweeping from a first frequency to a second frequency, with a second subsystem operating at a steady state second frequency. Trip plan parameters are calculated in advance to determine the phase relationship between the frequencies of the first subsystem and second subsystem in order to obtain synchronism at the end of the frequency sweep of the first subsystem. During the time in which the frequency of the first subsystem is sweeping from the first frequency to the second frequency, the phase locked system compares the actual phase difference with the trip plan phase difference and incrementally changes the sweep frequency in a manner so that phase lock is achieved when the first subsystem reaches a frequency substantially identical to that of the second subsystem.

  18. Synthesis and properties of titanomagnetite (Fe3-xTixO4) nanoparticles: A tunable solid-state Fe(II/III) redox system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearce, Carolyn I.; Qafoku, Odeta; Liu, Juan; Arenholz, Elke; Heald, Steve M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Gorski, Christopher A.; Henderson, C. Michael B.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2012-12-01

    Titanomagnetite (Fe3-xTixO4) nanoparticles were synthesized by room temperature aqueous precipitation, in which Ti(IV) replaces Fe(III) and is charge compensated by conversion of Fe(III) to Fe(II) in the unit cell. A comprehensive suite of tools was used to probe composition, structure, and magnetic properties down to site-occupancy level, emphasizing distribution and accessibility of Fe(II) as a function of x. Synthesis of nanoparticles in the range 0 ? x ? 0.6 was attempted; Ti, total Fe and Fe(II) content were verified by chemical analysis. TEM indicated homogeneous spherical 10 12 nm particles. ?-XRD and Mssbauer spectroscopy on anoxic aqueous suspensions verified the inverse spinel structure and Ti(IV) incorporation in the unit cell up to x ? 0.38, based on Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio deduced from the unit cell edge and Mssbauer spectra. Nanoparticles with a higher value of x possessed a minor amorphous secondary Fe(II)/Ti(IV) phase. XANES/EXAFS indicated Ti(IV) incorporation in the octahedral sublattice (B-site) and proportional increases in Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio. XA/XMCD indicate these increases arise from increasing B-site Fe(II), and that these charge-balancing equivalents segregate to those B-sites near particle surfaces. Dissolution studies showed that this segregation persists after release of Fe(II) into solution, in amounts systematically proportional to x and thus the Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio. A mechanistic reaction model was developed entailing mobile B-site Fe(II) supplying a highly interactive surface phase that undergoes interfacial electron transfer with oxidants in solution, sustained by outward Fe(II) migration from particle interiors and concurrent inward migration of charge-balancing cationic vacancies in a ratio of 3:1.

  19. HPC Colony II: FAST_OS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scale (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect HPC Colony II: FAST_OS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme Scale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HPC Colony II: FAST_OS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme Scale × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional

  20. Volume II Volume II U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 DOE/NV/l 0630-20 Volume II Volume II U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT - 1990 Volume II - Appendices Editors: Elizabeth M. McDowell and Stuart C. Blakk September 1991 Work Performed Under Contract No. DE-AC08-89NV10630 prepared by: Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. Post Office Box 98521 Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8521 DOE/NV/l 0630-20 Volume II U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT -