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1

Copenhagen Accord NAMA Submissions Implications for the Transport Sector |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Copenhagen Accord NAMA Submissions Implications for the Transport Sector Copenhagen Accord NAMA Submissions Implications for the Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Bridging the Gap: Copenhagen Accord NAMA Submissions Agency/Company /Organization: GTZ, Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP), Transport Research Laboratory(TRL), International Association for Public Transport (UITP), Veolia Transport Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Case studies/examples Website: www.transport2012.org/bridging/ressources/files/1/586,NAMA-submissions Country: Armenia, Botswana, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Jordan, Republic of Macedonia, Madagascar, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Papua New Guinea, Sierra Leone, Singapore

2

NAMA Tool: Steps for Moving a NAMA from Idea Towards Implementation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool: Steps for Moving a NAMA from Idea Towards Implementation Tool: Steps for Moving a NAMA from Idea Towards Implementation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: NAMA Tool: Steps for Moving a NAMA from Idea Towards Implementation Agency/Company /Organization: Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Topics: Low emission development planning, -NAMA User Interface: Website Cost: Free References: NAMA Tool: Steps for moving a NAMA from idea towards implementation[1] Overview "The NAMA-Tool provides developers and implementers of NAMA with brief step-by-step instructions on how to develop a NAMA. The tool navigates users to the relevant information, knowledge, instruments, and publications available. The process is structured into ten steps. The 10-step approach is designed to supply users with more data and accessible instruments for

3

Bangladesh-NAMA Concepts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh-NAMA Concepts Bangladesh-NAMA Concepts (Redirected from NAMAs in Least Developed Countries) Jump to: navigation, search Name NAMA Concepts for Bangladesh Agency/Company /Organization International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Bangladesh Southern Asia References International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)[1] "This policy brief presents the results of a screening exercise to identify NAMA concepts for Bangladesh. Multiple government planning documents were

4

Nama Database Wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nama Database Wiki Nama Database Wiki Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NAMA Database Wiki Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Finance, Low emission development planning, -NAMA Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices, Training materials User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.nama-database.org/ The NAMA Database is an expanding resource containing the latest activities taking place around the world on Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs). The mission is to create a valuable resource for policy makers, researchers and other interested stakeholders to increase knowledge-sharing

5

Chile-NAMA program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Chile-NAMA program Jump to: navigation, search Name Chile-NAMA program Agency/Company /Organization Ecofys Sector Climate Focus Area Transportation Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Website http://www.ecofys.com/en/proje Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country Chile South America References Supporting NAMA development in Chile[1] Program Overview Ecofys is supporting the Chilean Environment Ministry in selecting and developing a NAMA proposal in the transport sector. The NAMA development is based on a participatory process involving stakeholders from the public and

6

IISD NAMA Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IISD NAMA Tools IISD NAMA Tools Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IISD NAMA Support Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Program Start: 2010 Program End: 2012 References: Climate and Energy program[1] IISD is currently undertaking two projects that focus on Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) as part of its climate change and energy portfolio. The first project will will focus on innovative policy NAMAs-defined as NAMAs that support policies that offer emission reductions, have a low or negative cost to governments, and generate positive spill-over effects. Such policies and measures will generate revenue over their life-cycle, but

7

Energy Efficiency NAMAs and Actions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NAMAs and Actions Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Efficiency NAMAs and Actions AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Foundation Sector Energy Focus Area Energy...

8

Event:Technical Workshop & Peer Exchange 'NAMA finance and MRV...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technical Workshop & Peer Exchange 'NAMA finance and MRV' Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Technical Workshop & Peer Exchange 'NAMA finance and MRV': on 20120911...

9

Mexico-NAMA Programme | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-NAMA Programme Mexico-NAMA Programme Jump to: navigation, search Name GIZ-Mexico NAMA Programme Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Buildings - Residential, Energy Efficiency, People and Policy Topics - Energy Access, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.conavi.gob.mx/docum Program Start 2011 Program End 2015 Country Mexico Central America References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview The programme aims at contributing to the implementation of NAMAs in Mexican key sectors (residential buildings, solar cooling) that are (co-)financed by the public and/or private sector and that are framed by an

10

Indonesia-IISD NAMA Support | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia-IISD NAMA Support Indonesia-IISD NAMA Support Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-IISD NAMA Support Agency/Company /Organization International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country Indonesia, Vietnam UN Region South-Eastern Asia References IISD-Indonesia-NAMA Support[1] IISD-Vietnam-NAMA Support[2] Abstract IISD has undertaken capacity building work for NAMAs development in Indonesia and Vietnam This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "IISD-Indonesia-NAMA Support" ↑ "IISD-Vietnam-NAMA Support" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Indonesia-IISD_NAMA_Support&oldid=700050"

11

Ecofys-Chile NAMA program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-Chile NAMA program Ecofys-Chile NAMA program Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecofys-Chile NAMA program Agency/Company /Organization Ecofys Sector Climate Focus Area Transportation Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Website http://www.ecofys.com/en/proje Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country Chile South America References Supporting NAMA development in Chile[1] Program Overview Ecofys is supporting the Chilean Environment Ministry in selecting and developing a NAMA proposal in the transport sector. The NAMA development is based on a participatory process involving stakeholders from the public and private sector as well as civil society. The main goal of the project is to develop a detailed NAMA proposal which will attract international support

12

Bangladesh-NAMA Concepts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Bangladesh-NAMA Concepts Jump to: navigation, search Name NAMA Concepts for Bangladesh Agency/Company /Organization International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Bangladesh Southern Asia References International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)[1]

13

Mexico-Ecofys NAMA Activities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NAMA Activities NAMA Activities Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecofys-Mexico NAMA Activities Agency/Company /Organization Ecofys Sector Energy Focus Area Buildings, Transportation Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type Workshop Website http://www.ecofys.com/com/publ Country Mexico Central America References Ecofys - Mexico [1] Mexico-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions[2] Overview Ecofys is working with Mexico on NAMA templates for the building and transport sectors (sectoral template testing), on quantifying emission reduction contributions and held a road-testing workshop on Sectoral No-Lose Targets in Mexico in 2008. Outcomes, Lessons Learned and Good Practices

14

Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Burundia

15

NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http:www.unep.orgsbcipdfs Program End 2017 Country China,...

16

GIZ-Mexico NAMA Programme | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NAMA Programme NAMA Programme Jump to: navigation, search Name GIZ-Mexico NAMA Programme Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Buildings - Residential, Energy Efficiency, People and Policy Topics - Energy Access, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.conavi.gob.mx/docum Program Start 2011 Program End 2015 Country Mexico Central America References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview The programme aims at contributing to the implementation of NAMAs in Mexican key sectors (residential buildings, solar cooling) that are (co-)financed by the public and/or private sector and that are framed by an

17

Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy NAMAs Policy NAMAs Jump to: navigation, search Name Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs Agency/Company /Organization International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Partner Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Trinidad and Tobago Caribbean References International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)"

18

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Rwanda

19

CCAP-Data and Capacity Needs for Transportation NAMAs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CCAP-Data and Capacity Needs for Transportation NAMAs CCAP-Data and Capacity Needs for Transportation NAMAs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CCAP-Data and Capacity Needs for Transportation NAMAs Agency/Company /Organization: Center for Clean Air Policy Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Low emission development planning, -NAMA Website: www.ccap.org/docs/resources/973/Transport_NAMA_Capacity-Building.pdf Cost: Free Language: English CCAP-Data and Capacity Needs for Transportation NAMAs Screenshot References: CCAP-Data and Capacity Needs for Transportation NAMAs[1] Report 1: Data Availability "The current report is the first in a series exploring the issue of data and capacity needs to support effective implementation and evaluation of transportation NAMAs. The purpose of this research is to support the

20

Philippines-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Philippines-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Program End 2017 Country Philippines South-Eastern Asia References Buildings and Climate Change[1] Program Overview This project will support countries to develop Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMA) for the building sector. The NAMAs will be developed and apply common MRV methodologies for buildings in line with work by CDM and UNEP/ISO. NAMA will deliver significant GHG emission

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

India-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia India-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name India-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Program End 2017 Country India Southern Asia References Buildings and Climate Change[1] Program Overview This project will support countries to develop Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMA) for the building sector. The NAMAs will be developed and apply common MRV methodologies for buildings in line with work by CDM and UNEP/ISO. NAMA will deliver significant GHG emission

22

Indonesia-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Indonesia-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Program End 2017 Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References Buildings and Climate Change[1] Program Overview This project will support countries to develop Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMA) for the building sector. The NAMAs will be developed and apply common MRV methodologies for buildings in line with work by CDM and UNEP/ISO. NAMA will deliver significant GHG emission

23

Thailand-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Thailand-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Program End 2017 Country Thailand South-Eastern Asia References Buildings and Climate Change[1] Program Overview This project will support countries to develop Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMA) for the building sector. The NAMAs will be developed and apply common MRV methodologies for buildings in line with work by CDM and UNEP/ISO. NAMA will deliver significant GHG emission

24

Event:Webinar: Developing a NAMA - Approaches and tools | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar: Developing a NAMA - Approaches and tools Webinar: Developing a NAMA - Approaches and tools Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Webinar: Developing a NAMA - Approaches and tools: on 2012/09/11 This webinar will outline the broad approach to designing a NAMA, and some of the key considerations. An example of a NAMA concept from South Africa will be presented, along with an update of the current status of the UNFCCC negotiations (in particular, the Bangkok sessions taking place from 30 August to 5 September). Event Details Name Webinar: Developing a NAMA - Approaches and tools Date 2012/09/11 Organizer United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Tags LEDS, training, CLEAN Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Event:Webinar:_Developing_a_NAMA_-_Approaches_and_tools&oldid=507

25

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

26

Ecofys-How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Ecofys-How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com/w/images/4/49/Ecofy How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Screenshot References: How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work[1] "This short paper identifies three types of issues as potential obstacles for NAMAs in this early stage of development. First, it highlights the importance of dealing with local ownership, which is quite time intensive.

27

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

28

Event:Technical Workshop & Peer Exchange 'NAMA finance and MRV' | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

& Peer Exchange 'NAMA finance and MRV' & Peer Exchange 'NAMA finance and MRV' Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Technical Workshop & Peer Exchange 'NAMA finance and MRV': on 2012/09/11 Objectives of the workshop include: Identifying next steps in the implementation of NAMAs in the energy and industry sector Drafting an MRV-design for mitigation actions in the industry and energy sector Identifying capacity building needs in the implementation of NAMAs The workshop will run September 11th-13th. Event Details Name Technical Workshop & Peer Exchange 'NAMA finance and MRV' Date 2012/09/11 Location Bangkok, Thailand Organizer International Partnership on Mitigation and MRV Tags LEDS, Training, CLEAN Website Event Website Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

29

Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013

30

Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.iisd.org/climate/de Program Start 2012

31

World Bank-MENA Regional-NAMAs and Corresponding Climate Finance...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Corresponding Climate Finance Instruments Jump to: navigation, search Name World Bank-MENA Regional-NAMAs and Corresponding Climate Finance Instruments AgencyCompany...

32

NAMA-Programme for the construction sector in Asia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NAMA-Programme for the construction sector in Asia NAMA-Programme for the construction sector in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name NAMA-Programme for the construction sector in Asia Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Market analysis Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Program End 2017 Country China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References Buildings and Climate Change[1] Program Overview This project will support countries to develop Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMA) for the building sector. The NAMAs will be developed and apply common MRV methodologies for buildings in line with

33

Vietnam-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Vietnam-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Program End 2017 Country Vietnam South-Eastern Asia References Buildings and Climate Change[1] Program Overview This project will support countries to develop Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMA) for the building sector. The NAMAs will be developed and apply common MRV methodologies for buildings in line with

34

China-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » China-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name China-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Program End 2017 Country China Eastern Asia References Buildings and Climate Change[1] Program Overview This project will support countries to develop Nationally Appropriate

35

Malaysia-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Malaysia-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Malaysia-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Program End 2017 Country Malaysia South-Eastern Asia References Buildings and Climate Change[1] Program Overview This project will support countries to develop Nationally Appropriate

36

Trinidad and Tobago-Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trinidad and Tobago-Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs Trinidad and Tobago-Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs Jump to: navigation, search Name Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs Agency/Company /Organization International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Partner Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Trinidad and Tobago Caribbean References International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

37

Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation

38

PUBLIC SUBMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6.html[2/3/2012 12:44:00 PM] 6.html[2/3/2012 12:44:00 PM] PUBLIC SUBMISSION As of: February 03, 2012 Received: January 19, 2012 Status: Pending_Post Tracking No. 80f9b24f Comments Due: January 20, 2012 Submission Type: Web Docket: DOE-HQ-2012-0004 U.S. Department of Energy Audit Guidance: For-Profit Recipients Comment On: DOE-HQ-2012-0004-0001 Audit Guidance: For-Profit Recipients Document: DOE-HQ-2012-0004-DRAFT-0006 Comment on FR Doc # 2011-32622 Submitter Information Name: Eric Russell Address: 836 Thurber Drive West Apt 1 Columbus, Ohio, 43215 Email: ejrussell02@yahoo.com Phone: 615-972-9984 General Comment See attached file(s) Attachments Response to DOE For Profit Audit Federal Register Notice Response to U.S. Department of Energy Request for Information Federal Register Notice 2011-32622

39

PUBLIC SUBMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-2012%2010-10-11-600/Document%20List%2003-02-2012%2010-10-11-600_docs/Martin%20WeblerCover_DRAFT-0004.html[2/3/2012 12:40:30 PM] 2-2012%2010-10-11-600/Document%20List%2003-02-2012%2010-10-11-600_docs/Martin%20WeblerCover_DRAFT-0004.html[2/3/2012 12:40:30 PM] PUBLIC SUBMISSION As of: February 03, 2012 Received: January 05, 2012 Status: Pending_Post Tracking No. 80f8e384 Comments Due: January 20, 2012 Submission Type: Web Docket: DOE-HQ-2012-0004 U.S. Department of Energy Audit Guidance: For-Profit Recipients Comment On: DOE-HQ-2012-0004-0001 Audit Guidance: For-Profit Recipients Document: DOE-HQ-2012-0004-DRAFT-0004 Comment on FR Doc # 2011-32622 Submitter Information Name: Martin Webler Address: 866 Macarthur Dr 866 Macarthur Dr Pittsburgh, PA, 15228 General Comment In working with the "316 Audits" over the past year, I noted some general improvements in the guidance that would help clarify things for the auditor, the recipients and DOE personnel. I hope you

40

PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT SUBMISSION  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

19. Certification for Paperwork Reduction Act Submissions On behalf of this Federal agency, I certify that the collection of information encompassed ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

2013 Allocation Request Submissions Due September 28  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Allocation Request Submissions Due September 28 2013 Allocation Request Submissions Due September 28 August 1, 2012 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) The deadline for submissions...

42

National Bridge Inventory Record Data Submission Requirement...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Bridge Inventory Record Data Submission Requirement National Bridge Inventory Record Data Submission Requirement 2011.09.02 OECM-NBI Record Data Submission Req.pdf More...

43

Science Brief Submission Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Brief Submission Form Science Brief Submission Form Science Brief Submission Form Print Tuesday, 01 May 2007 00:00 Science Brief Guidelines and Submission Form Please fill out the form below to submit a Science Brief and send ONE image (may be a composite of up to four images) from your publication directly to us at alscommunications@lbl.gov. Please note: The image must be high resolution, and, if there is text on the image, it must be scalable. We will let you know as soon as it is posted! * Required Your Name * Your Email Address * Your Affiliation Title of Publication * Link to Publication (if available) Beamline(s) * Journal Citation * Description of Research * 200 word maximum Image Caption * 50 word maximum Submit Never submit passwords through Google Forms. Powered by Google Docs Report Abuse - Terms of Service - Additional Terms

44

SSRL28 Abstract Submission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visitor Info Visitor Info General Info Need more information? Contact: Cathy Knotts Manager, URA SSRL, MS 99 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 28th Annual Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Users' Meeting Menlo Park, California USA October 17-19, 2001 Oral Abstract Submissions - Due August 24 Poster Abstract Submissions - Due September 28 Users are invited to submit abstracts highlighting research activities conducted over the past year at SSRL for poster presentations at the Users' Meeting. Please use the abstract submission form via the web. POSTER SESSION Posters will be displayed throughout the meeting and will be highlighted during a poster session and reception on Thursday, October 19. The poster session will be located just steps away from the main auditorium and the vendor display area. Users presenting posters must also register for the Users' Meeting.

45

Supply Chain - Submissions | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submissions Sustainable Supply Chains Submissions Let's Talk About Sustainable Supply Chain You are here Data.gov Communities Sustainable Supply Chain Sustainable Supply...

46

Optimization Online - Stochastic Programming Submissions - 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stochastic Programming Submissions - 2013. January 2013. Generating moment matching scenarios using optimization techniques. Sanjay Mehrotra, David...

47

Inside RHIC | Submission Guidelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submission Guidelines Submission Guidelines "Inside RHIC" is an online publication covering news and views of the RHIC and AGS program at Brookhaven National Laboratory at the level of engineers and students. The RHIC AGS Users Group is sponsoring this effort, and we have tried to cover the breadth of the efforts at RHIC, from physics results to machine and detector development. The articles are relatively short and not so technical; a few hundred words are enough. It is a web publication, so length is not critical, but it is better to be concise. If you write an article for RHIC News, here's what is needed: The text of the article (a plain ASCII text file is adequate, even preferable, although we can deal with almost any format) The first few sentences (maybe 100 words) should summarize the point

48

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - October 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All Areas Submissions - October 2013. Network Optimization Optimization Models for Differentiating Quality of Service Levels in Probabilistic Network Capacity...

49

Optimization Online - Robust Optimization Submissions - 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robust Optimization Submissions - 2013. January 2013. Robust Least Square Semidefinite Programming with Applications to Correlation Stress Testing

50

Optimization Online - Integer Programming Submissions - 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integer Programming Submissions - 2013. January 2013. (Mixed) Integer Linear Programming On the Augmented Lagrangian Dual for Integer Programming

51

VIA ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

39 MacDougal Street, Third Floor * New York, New York 10012 * (212) 992-8932 * www.policyintegrity.org 39 MacDougal Street, Third Floor * New York, New York 10012 * (212) 992-8932 * www.policyintegrity.org March 21, 2011 VIA ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION Office of the General Counsel US Department of Energy Washington, DC Attention: Regulatory Burden RFI - Docket No. DOE-HQ-2011-0014-0001 Subject: Response to Request for Information on "Reducing Regulatory Burden," 76 Fed. Reg. 6123 (Feb. 3, 2011) The Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University School of Law submits the following comments to the Department of Energy ("DOE") in response to its request for comments on the formulation of a preliminary plan for retrospective analysis as required by Executive Order 13,563.

52

Publication Submission Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pages Pages publicationsubmission Sign In Launch the Developer Dashboard SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE | Stanford | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | AD | PPA | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES LCLS : Linac Coherent Light Source An Office of Science User Facility Search this site... Search Help (new window) Top Link Bar LCLS Lasers Expand Lasers LCLS Quick Launch Home About LCLS Expand About LCLS LCLS News Expand LCLS News User Resources Expand User Resources Instruments Expand Instruments Proposals Publications Expand Publications Schedules Machine Status Machine FAQs Safety Organization Expand Organization Directories Expand Directories Staff Resources Contact Us All Site Content Department of Energy Page Content Publication Submission Form Th Tell LCLS about new publications Please submit this form to notify LCLS about new publications relating to

53

Structure validation in the submission, review and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Release of powder CIF dictionary (ver. 1.0) · 1998 ­ Automated submission by email ­ use of the VRF

Magee, Joseph W.

54

EDRA / Places Awards -- Call for Submissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submissions 2001 edra / Places Awards Jury Allan B. Jacobsannounce our fourth annual awards for Place Design, Planningsociology and psychology. Awards will be presented in July,

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - August 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All Areas Submissions - August 2012. Convex and ... Dual-level scenario trees - Scenario generation and applications in energy planning. Michal Kaut, Kjetil T.

56

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - December 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All Areas Submissions - December 2012. Linear, Cone and ... Solving the integrated airline recovery problem using column-and-row generation. Stephen J ...

57

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - June 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All Areas Submissions - June 2012. Convex and ... A new warmstarting strategy for the primal-dual column generation method. Jacek Gondzio, Pablo Gonzlez- ...

58

Optimization Online - Search or Browse Submissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Search or Browse Optimization Online Submissions. Advanced Search using Our Search Engine. Enter your search terms: name of author(s), title, keywords,...

59

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - May 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All Areas Submissions - May 2013. Convex and Nonsmooth Optimization About uniform regularity of collections of sets. Alexander Y. Kruger, Nguyen H. Thao.

60

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - June 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All Areas Submissions - June 2013. Nonlinear Optimization A Riemannian symmetric rank-one trust-region method. Wen Huang, P.-A. Absil, K. A. Gallivan.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

2013-10-17: State Laboratory Annual Submission Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State Laboratory Annual Submission Process. Purpose: For State Laboratory weights and measures staff to review annual ...

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

62

ARM - Data Product Registration and Submission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DocumentationData Product Registration and Submission DocumentationData Product Registration and Submission Policies, Plans, Descriptions Data Documentation Home Data Sharing and Distribution Policy Data Management and Documentation Plan Data Product Registration and Submission Reading netCDF and HDF Data Files Time in ARM netCDF Data Files Data Archive Documentation ARM Archive's Catalog of Data Streams (Updated monthly) Access to Historical ARM Data More on Understanding and Finding ARM Data Data Quality Problem Reporting Data Product Registration and Submission The procedure for principal investigators to submit ARM science research products, field campaign data, or DOE-supported research data to the ARM Data Archive is the following: To begin, use the Data Product Registration and Submission form. Identify yourself-either from the pick list or by manual entry.

63

arXiv.org help - Submission Version Availability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submission Version Availability Beginning in October 1997, all official versions of papers submitted are made publicly available through the archive Web interface. An "official"...

64

EDRA / Places Awards -- Sixth Annual Call for Submissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixth Annual EDRA/Places Awards Submissions are accepted insixth annual EDRA/Places Awards for Place Design, Planningor related discipline. Awards will be presented in May,

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Guide for the Submission of Unsolicited Proposals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GUIDE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GUIDE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF UNSOLICITED PROPOSALS The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh Office has operational responsibility of the DOE Unsolicited Proposal (USP) Program. All unsolicited proposals should be forwarded by Email to John N. Augustine at DOEUSP@NETL.DOE.GOV who will serve as the single point of contact for all Department of Energy (DOE) unsolicited proposals. Please direct all unsolicited proposals, abstracts and correspondence to: John N. Augustine, Mail Stop 921-107 Unsolicited Proposal Manager U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 Email: DOEUSP@NETL.DOE.GOV -1- TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 3

66

Research Highlights Sorted by Submission Date  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submission Date Submission Date January 2014 Forecast Calls for Better Models: Examining the Core Components of Arctic Clouds to Clear Their Influence on Climate ARM ASR Ovink, J. December 2013 Effect of Environmental Instability on the Sensitivity of Convection to the Rimed Ice Species ASR Van Weverberg, K. All Mixed Up-Probing Large and Small Scale Turbulence Structures in Continental Stratocumulus Clouds ARM ASR Fang, M., Albrecht, B. A. Ground Stations Likely Get a Boost from Satellites to Estimate Carbon Dioxide Emissions ARM Roeder, L. R. November 2013 Spectro-microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California ARM ASR Gilles, M., Moffet, R. Digging Into Climate Models' Needs with SPADE ARM ASR Gustafson, W. I. Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model ARM ASR

67

Research Highlights Sorted by Submission Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HighlightsSort HighlightsSort Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlights sorted by Submission Data "Invisible" Giants in the Sky ARM ASR Kassianov, E. "Radiance Assimilation" Correction Method Improves Water Vapor Radiosonde Observations in the Upper Troposphere ARM Soden, B. J. "Roobik" Is Part of the Answer, Not a Puzzle ARM Turner, D. D. 2007 Floods Not a Complete Washout in U.S. Great Plains ARM ASR Bhattacharya, A. A "Little" Respect: Droplet Nucleation Finally Included in Global Climate Model ARM Ghan, S. J.

68

Requirements and Submission Process for Qualified Software  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requirements and Submission Process for Qualified Software The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) verifies and maintains the list of software that qualifies for the calculation of the energy and power cost savings for commercial building tax deductions under tax code Section 179D. The software requirements are listed under Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Code §179D (c)(1) and (d) Regulations, Notice 2006-52

69

BABAR Web job submission with Globus Authentication and AFS Access  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present two versions of a grid job submission system produced for the BaBar experiment. Both use globus job submission to process data spread across various sites, producing output which can be combined for analysis. The problems encountered with authorization and authentication, data location, job submission, and the input and output sandboxes are described, as are the solutions. The total system is still some way short of the aims of enterprises such as the EDG, but represent a significant step along the way.

Forti, Alessandra

2003-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

70

Notice of OMB Action Approving DOE Submission to Extend Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OMB Action Approving DOE Submission to Extend Information OMB Action Approving DOE Submission to Extend Information Collection Request Title: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants Notice of OMB Action Approving DOE Submission to Extend Information Collection Request Title: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has issued a Notice of OMB Action approving the Department of Energy's request to extend for three years the Information Collection Request Title: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants, OMB Control No. 1910-5149 that DOE is developing for submission to OMB pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Supporting documentation for the request was submitted in September and October, 2011. Comments were due on or before November 7, 2011. ICR Supporting Statement (PDF). OMB Form 83-I (PDF). SGIG Reporting Guidance

71

DOE 10 CFR Part 431 EERE-2010-BT-TP-0036 RIN 1904-AC-38 Submission...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 CFR Part 431 EERE-2010-BT-TP-0036 RIN 1904-AC-38 Submission of Comments by Howe Corporation DOE 10 CFR Part 431 EERE-2010-BT-TP-0036 RIN 1904-AC-38 Submission of Comments by Howe...

72

O:\\A76\\FAIR\\Fair Act 2008\\Guidance\\PDF\\GUIDE TO INVENTORY SUBMISSION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

O:A76FAIRFair Act 2008GuidancePDFGUIDE TO INVENTORY SUBMISSION ATTCH 2.pdf.prn.pdf&0; O:A76FAIRFair Act 2008GuidancePDFGUIDE TO INVENTORY SUBMISSION ATTCH...

73

Supply Implications  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Supply Implications. European export gasoline volumes likely to remain unchanged Uncertainties are weighted towards less availability But the quality of the available ...

74

Microsoft Word - Flash_09-04_Submission_requirements.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 1 4 1 June 26, 2009 DATE: June 12, 2009 MEMORANDUM FOR ALL PROGRAM ELEMENTS FROM: PMCDP CERTIFICATION REVIEW BOARD SUBJECT: Project Management Career Development Program Certification Process Requirement Change One June 12, 2009, the Certification Review Board (CRB) identified new requirements regarding timely submission of certification packages for CRB approval. Effective immediately, in order for Level 1 and 2 packages to be eligible for certification action at the next scheduled Board meeting, packages must successfully pass the independent review and OCEM approval phases no later than two weeks prior to that upcoming Board meeting. It is strongly recommended Level 1 and 2 packages ready for CRB consideration be submitted to

75

Procedures for Rights Handling in the RFC Independent Submission Stream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document specifies the procedures by which authors of RFC Independent Submission documents grant the community "incoming" rights for copying and using the text. It also specifies the "outgoing " rights the community grants to readers and users of those documents, and it requests that the IETF Trust manage the outgoing rights to effect this result. Status of This Memo This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this memo is unlimited. Copyright Notice Copyright (c) 2009 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the

R. Braden

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

DOE Extends Deadline for Submission of Smart Grid RFI Reply Comments |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deadline for Submission of Smart Grid RFI Reply Deadline for Submission of Smart Grid RFI Reply Comments DOE Extends Deadline for Submission of Smart Grid RFI Reply Comments July 16, 2010 - 3:20pm Addthis Due to an unexpectedly large public response, the Department of Energy will extend by two weeks the deadline for submission of reply comments in response to its two Smart Grid RFIs. Originally set at July 26, the new deadline will be August 9, 2010. The Department's Smart Grid RFIs (both released in May 2010) were intended to inform the Department as it develops policies regarding the integration of broadband technologies with the Smart Grid. The first RFI solicited comments from electric utilities, consumer groups, and other stakeholders on ongoing federal, state, and private efforts to use or allow

77

Ex parte submission of SANYO North America Corp. and SANYO E&E Corp. |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

parte submission of SANYO North America Corp. and SANYO E&E parte submission of SANYO North America Corp. and SANYO E&E Corp. Ex parte submission of SANYO North America Corp. and SANYO E&E Corp. On November 2, 2010, Nobuko Horii of SANYO North America Corp., Kaz Fukukura and Paul Ramsbottom of SANYO E&E Corp, and Alan Fishel and Adam Bowser of Arent Fox LLP met with Timothy Lynch, Stephanie Weiner, Michael Kido and Laura Barhydt of the Office of the General Counsel and Ashley Armstrong of the Building Technologies Program to discuss ongoing energy-efficiency compliance and certification under Parts 430 and 431 of the Department's rules and regulations with respect to certain Sanyo refrigeration products and forthcoming guidance on such products. Specifically, Sanyo requested that interested parties be permitted to

78

View the Apps for Vehicles Phase One Submissions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

View the Apps for Vehicles Phase One Submissions View the Apps for Vehicles Phase One Submissions View the Apps for Vehicles Phase One Submissions January 24, 2013 - 11:13am Addthis 9 of the 37 entries for the Apps for Vehicles competition. 9 of the 37 entries for the Apps for Vehicles competition. Ian Kalin Director of the Energy Data Initiative How can I participate? Visit the competition website to view the submitted ideas. Starting on March 15, you'll be able to vote for your favorite completed apps. Apps for Vehicles The Open Data Initiative reached another milestone last week with the completion of the first phase of the Apps for Vehicles Challenge. This incentive-based competition seeks to improve safety and fuel efficiency through data innovation. Thirty-seven entries were submitted to the Challenge's judges, which are all publically viewable on the competition

79

ADVANTAGES OF THE PROGRAM-BASED LOGBOOK SUBMISSION GUI AT JEFFERSON LAB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DTlite is a Tcl/Tk script that is used as the primary interface for making entries into Jefferson Lab's electronic logbooks. DTlite was originally written and implemented by a user to simplify submission of entries into Jefferson Lab?s electronic logbook, but has subsequently been maintained and developed by the controls software group. The use of a separate, script-based tool for logbook submissions (as opposed to a web-based submission tool bundled with the logbook database/interface) provides many advantages to the users, as well as creating many challenges to the programmers and maintainers of the electronic logbook system. The paper describes the advantages and challenges of this design model and how they have affected the development lifecycle of the electronic logbook system.

T. McGuckin

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

80

NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security Challenges: Abstract Submission Presentation Title: The Impact of Climate Variability on Biofuel liters in 1996 to 24.6 billion liters in 2007 (Renewable Fuels Association, 2008), and the target annual use of biofuels by 2022 specified in the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act is 136 billion

Miami, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Aggressiveness of Order Submissions, Revisions and Cancellations during the Market Preopening Period.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyses the impact of the limit order book information on the aggressiveness observed in the submission of limit orders and the revision or cancellation of orders queued in the preopening period of an electronic limit order book equity market. To our knowledge we are the first to do so. We model each side of the order book separately using ordered probit models for submissions, forward and backward revisions, and order cancellations. In essence, we rank the aggressiveness of order submissions, revisions and cancellations based upon the impact of the action on the execution probability of the order. The empirical results indicate that the aggressiveness of order submissions and forward price revisions react to the existing and subsequent changes in the execution probability driven in part by the depth on either side of the order book. We find that backward price revisions less affected by order book depth, except that aggressive backward bid price revisions reduce when there is an increase in the ask depth below the top of the order book. This suggests that the bid side relies on the ask side to provide liquidity. We find that the aggressiveness of order cancellations increases on both sides of the order book when the depth at the top of the ask order book increases. Order submissions and forward and backward revisions aggression increase on the bid side when there is an increase in the height on both sides; however, we find mixed reactions on the ask side. Finally, the results indicates that aggressiveness observed in order cancellations is not impacted by the magnitude of the inside spread.

Michael Bowe; Stuart Hyde; Ike Johnson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Implications for National Policy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The World Is Flat: Making Materials Matter. National Policy Implications. Toni Marechaux. Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. National Research...

83

Metadata Provided to OSTI via 241.4 (Software Submission) | Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

4 (Software Submission) 4 (Software Submission) Print page Print page Email page Email page STI Metadata Elements Required (R), Required, but allows for default value (RWD), or Optional (O). Metadata Element Description Required/Optional Record Status Identifies the software product as new or revised R Software Title The title, acronym, and short KWIC (keywords in context) title of the software. R Software Developer(s) Unlimited number is acceptable; the primary software developer should be listed first. Allows for NONE as an option for few cases where necessary. R E-mail Address(es) Provide in same order as developer names. Will not be available to end-user. O Site Product Number Unique site number that identifies software product. O DOE Contract Number Required for all (can be NONE) R R&D Project ID

84

27th Annual SSRL Users' Meeting -- Poster Session & Abstract Submission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poster Session Poster Session Poster Abstract Submissions - Due October 9 Users are invited to display posters highlighting research activities conducted over the past year at SSRL. Posters will be displayed throughout the meeting and will be highlighted during a poster session and reception on Thursday, October 19. Graduate students submitting posters must also register for the Users' Meeting and are eligible for one of four poster prizes. All posters require submission of the poster abstract form via the web no later than October 9. Each author will be assigned a 48" x 48" foam board on which diagrams, graphs, data, pictures and a small amount of text may be mounted. The foam board will be mounted on an easel. Each author will be expected to remain with his/her poster presentation throughout the poster session on Thursday afternoon.

85

Committee for Limited Submissions in the Sciences and Engineering (ComLSSE) Professor R. Hampton, Division of Biological Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Committee for Limited Submissions in the Sciences and Engineering (ComLSSE) AY10-11 Professor R. Hampton, Division of Biological Sciences Professor W. Hodgkiss, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Chair Professor D. Kleinfeld, Division of Physical Sciences Professor M. Krstic, Jacobs School of Engineering

Gleeson, Joseph G.

86

A submission to the Australian Greenhouse Office draft document: Analysis of the Potential Policy Options for Energy Efficiency Improvements to Televisions The Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. This submission is in response to the draft Analysis of the Potential Policy Options for Energy Efficiency Improvements to Televisions, produced by Energy Consult Pty Ltd for the Australian Greenhouse Office in August 2004.

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Inquiry into School Libraries and Teacher Librarians in Australian Schools QCEC submission to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Education and Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Queensland Catholic Education Commission (QCEC) welcomes the opportunity to make this submission to the House of Representatives Inquiry into school libraries and teacher librarians in Australian Schools, which will inquire into and report on the role, adequacy and resourcing of school libraries and teacher librarians in Australias public and private schools. This submission is made on behalf of the 22 Catholic school employing authorities and the 288 Catholic schools in Queensland. Some of the individual schooling authorities and teacher librarians may choose to make separate submissions. Background Teaching and learning in schools is achieved through the complex interaction of people and physical structures. School libraries are included in this. As there is the tendency to variously term school libraries as resource centre, information service centre a statement of what is meant by a school library in this submission becomes necessary.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Searching for Global Dimming Evidence at SGP and Update of ARM Submissions to BSRN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Searching for Global Dimming Evidence at SGP and Searching for Global Dimming Evidence at SGP and Update of ARM Submissions to BSRN G. Hodges Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction Global dimming, usually defined as a reduction of incoming solar radiation (insolation) at the surface of the earth, is a topic being discussed with increasing frequency. A recent news article on global dimming in the web-based newspaper the Guardian Unlimited seems to have brought this issue to the forefront with scientists and laypeople alike. In fact, there is a special session devoted to global dimming at the upcoming May 17-21 American Geophysical Union (AGU) meeting in Montreal, Canada. The article quotes Atsumu Ohmura and references his findings on this subject.

89

PanDA Pilot Submission using Condor-G: Experience and Improvements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) is the workload management system of the ATLAS experiment, used to run managed production and user analysis jobs on the grid. As a late-binding, pilot-based system, the maintenance of a smooth and steady stream of pilot jobs to all grid sites is critical for PanDA operation. The ATLAS Computing Facility (ACF) at BNL, as the ATLAS Tier1 center in the US, operates the pilot submission systems for the US. This is done using the PanDA 'AutoPilot' scheduler component which submits pilot jobs via Condor-G, a grid job scheduling system developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In this paper, we discuss the operation and performance of the Condor-G pilot submission at BNL, with emphasis on the challenges and issues encountered in the real grid production environment. With the close collaboration of Condor and PanDA teams, the scalability and stability of the overall system has been greatly improved over the last year. We review improvements made to Condor-G resulting from this collaboration, including isolation of site-based issues by running a separate Gridmanager for each remote site, introduction of the 'Nonessential' job attribute to allow Condor to optimize its behavior for the specific character of pilot jobs, better understanding and handling of the Gridmonitor process, as well as better scheduling in the PanDA pilot scheduler component. We will also cover the monitoring of the health of the system.

Zhao X.; Hover John; Wlodek Tomasz; Wenaus Torre; Frey Jaime; Tannenbaum Todd; Livny Miron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

REPORT NO. 3 health implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT NO. 3 health implications of fallout from nuclear weapons testing through 1961 May 1962 Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;REPORT NO. 3 health implications of fallout from nuclear............................................................................................. 10 iii #12;REPORT OF THE FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF FALLOUT FROM NUCLEAR

91

Evaluated Submissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 0; Chapman; 1; hjr1; Citizen Kane, The Other Side of the Wind, Don Quixote ... 15335; 811; 8; 0; 0; rutgers; SDD; S12; Denmark = 5.1 mill., No answer ...

92

PUBLIC SUBMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that DOE is not requiring an audit of financial statements solely to address this audit requirement and DOE will not recognize andor reimburse any costs associated with the...

93

PUBLIC SUBMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

management processes in-lieu of the DOENNSA management processes o reduce low value DOE Orders and implementation of consensus standards such as the International...

94

Abstract Submission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

L. Modeling and Simulation of Processes, Microstructures, and Behavior M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and Ultrafine-Grain Materials N.

95

Implications of the Public Utility Regulatory Act for Energy Efficiency in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Public Utility Regulatory Act (PURA) as amended in 1982 and the Substantive Rules of the Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) establish a comprehensive regulatory system for electric, telephone, and water utilities. The rules which cover electric utilities contain provisions requiring certain electric utilities to prepare energy efficiency plans. In their plans, utilities must consider the potential for economically producing capacity through supply-side and demand-side alternatives to new power plant construction. These alternatives are identified in the definition of energy efficiency included in the Rules. Supply-side alternatives are: optimizing existing and planned generation, transmission, and distribution facilities; purchasing power from cogenerators and small power producers; utilizing direct conversion of renewable resources; and improving power plant productivity and efficiency. Demand-side options are conservation and load management programs that can be implemented to improve customer utilization of energy. The initial plan submissions were made in December 1984, so the energy efficiency plan, and its implications are emerging. This paper describes and discusses the energy efficiency plan as it pertains to conservation and load management programs and its likely effects on the allowable cost of service expenditures for conservation and load management programs, policies for new power plant construction and cogeneration.

Biedrzycki, C. J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

O:\A76\FAIR\Fair Act 2008\Guidance\PDF\GUIDE TO INVENTORY SUBMISSION ATTCH 2.pdf.prn.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY / OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT 2008 IGCA INVENTORY GUIDE TO INVENTORY SUBMISSION This document presents the instructions for submission of the 2008 Department of Energy (DOE) Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities (IGCA) Inventory. This inventory will be used to respond to various reporting requirements including, but not limited to, the Federal Activities Inventory Reform Act of 1998, Public Law 105-270 (FAIR Act) and the inventory of inherently governmental activities required by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). It is important to note that for the 2008 IGCA Inventory, the Under Secretary for National Nuclear Security is requiring the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) office at headquarters to obtain, review and submit for inclusion in the Department's complete IGCA

97

Energy conditions and their implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy conditions and their implications Matt Visser Physics Department Washington University Saint;#16;s (Los Alamos) Midwest Relativity 9 November 1999. #12; Abstract: The energy conditions of general- itational #12;elds and cosmological geometries. However, the energy conditions are beginning to look a lot

Visser, Matt

98

CNF and DNF Considered Harmful for Computing Prime Implicants/Implicates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several methods to compute the prime implicants and the prime implicates of a negation normal form (NNF) formula are developed and implemented. An algorithm PI is introduced that is an extension to negation normal form of an algorithm given by ... Keywords: dissolution, prime implicants/implicates

Anavai Ramesh; George Becker; Neil V. Murray

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Economic Growth in Urban Regions: Implications for Future Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications for Future Transportation Robert Cervero,implications for future transportation policy. The collapseimplications for future transportation policy. Smart

Cervero, Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Mitigating Climate Change through Energy Efficiency: Implications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigating Climate Change through Energy Efficiency: Implications of China's 20 % Energy Intensity Reduction Target Speaker(s): Jiang Lin Date: March 13, 2007 - 12:00pm Location:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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101

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments and Initiatives Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments and...

102

Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation. San...

103

Temperature and Violent Crime: Implications of Climate Change...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature and Violent Crime: Implications of Climate Change? Print E-mail Temperature and Violent Crime: Implications of Climate Change? Friday, September 20, 2013 Featured by...

104

Lithium Diffusion in Graphitic Carbon and Implications for the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon and Implications for the Rate Capability of Anodes Title Lithium Diffusion in Graphitic Carbon and Implications for the Rate Capability of Anodes Publication Type Journal...

105

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power Title Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar...

106

Energy Implications of Economizer Use in California Data Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Energy Implications of Economizer Use in California Data Centers Title Energy Implications of Economizer Use in California Data Centers...

107

Potential Land Use Implications of a Global Biofuels Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the potential production and implications of a global biofuels industry. We

Gurgel, Angelo C.

108

Economic and policy implications of pandemic influenza.  

SciTech Connect

Pandemic influenza has become a serious global health concern; in response, governments around the world have allocated increasing funds to containment of public health threats from this disease. Pandemic influenza is also recognized to have serious economic implications, causing illness and absence that reduces worker productivity and economic output and, through mortality, robs nations of their most valuable assets - human resources. This paper reports two studies that investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic flu outbreak. Policy makers can use the growing number of economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. Experts recognize that pandemic influenza has serious global economic implications. The illness causes absenteeism, reduced worker productivity, and therefore reduced economic output. This, combined with the associated mortality rate, robs nations of valuable human resources. Policy makers can use economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. In this paper economists examine two studies which investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic influenza outbreak. Resulting policy implications are also discussed. The research uses the Regional Economic Modeling, Inc. (REMI) Policy Insight + Model. This model provides a dynamic, regional, North America Industrial Classification System (NAICS) industry-structured framework for forecasting. It is supported by a population dynamics model that is well-adapted to investigating macro-economic implications of pandemic influenza, including possible demand side effects. The studies reported in this paper exercise all of these capabilities.

Smith, Braeton J.; Starks, Shirley J.; Loose, Verne W.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Abstract Submission Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

John Rice John Rice 617-253-6052 rice@psfc.mit.edu Observations Of Toroidal Rotation Profiles Show Active Transport Of Momentum Detailed measurements of rotation profile evolution in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak show that momentum can be spontaneously transported by the plasma or driven by microwaves A new imaging x-ray spectrometer has allowed unprecedented measurement of spontaneous toroidal rotation, that is flows generated in the absence of external momentum input. Until recently, such detailed measurements were only possible during heating by injection of neutral beams of atoms. These beams imparted significant momentum to the plasmas and masked the underlying behavior. Plasma rotation is important because it has the potential to stabilize small and large-scale instabilities. However reactor-scale devices

110

Project Submission Template  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Cooperation International Cooperation Project Title: Country/Organizations: Foreign: Foreign POC: U.S: U.S. POC: Technology Area: Scope of Collaborative Research and Development: Justification of Approach: Work Completed to Date: Overview of Proposed Scope for FY12: Summary Brief Description of Specific Project(s): Timeline: Estimated Cost: Status: CONTINUATION or NEW? Type of Contracting Instrument: (Int'l agreements, lab-lab agreement, etc) Participant Organizations General Scope Budget Foreign (Technical Scope) US (Overhead rate) (Technical Scope) TOTAL Budget Breakdown: Overhead rates and experimental work: APPROVE ____________________ DISAPPROVE ____________________ Approving Official: Associate PDAS, Alice Williams, EM-2.1

111

TMS Meeting Submission Request  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ORGANIZATION/CONTACT INFORMATION. Contact: ... Manufacturing and Markets ... Energy, Modeling and Simulation, Titanium. Environmental Effects

112

TMS Meeting Submission Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary Sponsor(s): Secondary Sponsor(s): Sponsor Contact: Sponsor E-Mail: Sponsor Mailing Address: City: State/Province: Zip/Postal Code: Country:.

113

VIA ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rules for retrospective analysis, agencies should also be mindful of timing. "While regulation often stimulates technological development, technological change takes time."...

114

MICROGRAPH ART - Submissions!  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission / Univ of Idaho .... Lead Ent, The micrograph is of penetrating corrosion of a lead battery grid.

115

PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT SUBMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Mark primary with "P" and all others that apply with "X") a. Individuals or households d. Farms b. Business or other for-profit e. Federal Government c. ...

116

Energy Implications of Alternative Water Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Implications of Alternative Water Futures First Western Forum on Energy & Water water, energy, and GHG emissions. Water-related energy use is expected to rise. Conservation canWaterUse(MAF) Historical Use More Resource Intensive Less Resource Intensive Current Trends #12;Water and Energy Link

Keller, Arturo A.

117

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk September 19, 2012 Presenter: Jeffrey Kimball, Technical Specialist (Seismologist) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Topics Covered: Department of Energy Approach to Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design (Seismic) Design Basis and Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events Seismic Risk Implications - Key Parameters and Insights Conclusions Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk More Documents & Publications DOE's Approach to Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis and Management Results from Beyond Design Basis Event Pilots Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk

118

Implications of Theoretical Ideas Regarding Cold Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lot of theoretical ideas have been floated to explain the so called cold fusion phenomenon. I look at a large subset of these and study further physical implications of the concepts involved. I suggest that these can be tested by other independent physical means. Because of the significance of these the experimentalists are urged to look for these signatures. The results in turn will be important for a better understanding and hence control of the cold fusion phenomenon.

Afsar Abbas

1995-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

119

Baryogenesis and its implications to fundamental physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this talk I shall explain some basic concepts of baryogenesis and leptogenesis theory, and a new idea of experimental method of verification of fundamental ingredients of leptogenesis theory; the Majorana nature and the absolute magnitude of neutrino masses. Both of these are important to the quest of physics beyond the standard theory, and have far reaching implications irrespective of any particular medel of leptogenesis. If this new method works ideally, there is even a further possibility of detecting relic neutrinos.

Yoshimura, M. [Center of Quantum Universe and Department of Physics, Okayama University Tsushima-naka 3-1-1 Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

120

CDKN-Green Growth: Implications for Development Planning | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CDKN-Green Growth: Implications for Development Planning CDKN-Green Growth: Implications for Development Planning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CDKN-Green Growth: Implications for Development Planning Agency/Company /Organization: Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Sector: Energy Topics: Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications User Interface: Other Website: cdkn.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/CDKN-Guide-to-Green-Growth.pdf Cost: Free Language: English CDKN-Green Growth: Implications for Development Planning Screenshot References: CDKN-Green Growth: Implications for Development Planning[1] Logo: CDKN-Green Growth: Implications for Development Planning "This guide by CDKN aims to support national planners and policy makers in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

esource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

adequacy implications of these rules under conservative assumptions. Specifically, this report focuses on whether, under the Stringent Test Case, there would be sufficient...

122

Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

adequacy implications of these rules under conservative assumptions. Specifically, this report focuses on whether, under the Stringent Test Case, there would be sufficient...

123

Electric Wholesale Market Regimes in the United States: Implications...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regimes in the United States: Implications for Investment PowerPoint presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee by Charles Whitmore, Senior Market Advisor at the Federal...

124

Physics of arcing, and implications to sputter deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Series II. Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry vol. 88, I.Physics of arcing, and implications to sputter depositionleading to arcs and the physics of the arcing events

Anders, Andre

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper:...

126

A synopsis of collective alpha effects and implications for ITER  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the following: Alpha Interaction with Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes; Alpha Interaction with Ballooning Modes; Alpha Interaction with Fishbone Oscillations; and Implications for ITER.

Sigmar, D.J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Implications of Cost Effectiveness Screening Practices in a Low...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Cost Effectiveness Screening Practices in a Low Natural Gas Price Environment: Case Study of a Midwestern Residential Energy Upgrade Program NOTICE Due to the...

128

Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Adequacy Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations December 2011 RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS iii Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................................................... V CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 1 CHAPTER 2. ALIGNMENT OF POTENTIAL COMPLIANCE PATHWAYS WITH REGULATORY DEADLINES ......... 5 CHAPTER 3. RESOURCE ADEQUACY.......................................................................................................... 15 APPENDIX A: NERC REGIONS ................................................................................................................... 26

129

Climate Threat to the Planet:* Implications for Energy Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Threat to the Planet:* Implications for Energy Policy and Intergenerational Justice Jim Policy-Related Statements are Personal Opinion I changed the title of my talk. Global warming has implications for energy policy and intergenerational justice. The propriety of a scientist discussing

Hansen, James E.

130

The Public Health Implications of Marcellus Shale Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INCIDENT #12;#12;#12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale Activities - EnvironmentalThe Public Health Implications of Marcellus Shale Activities Bernard D. Goldstein, MD Department using Data.FracTracker.org. #12;Drilling Rig in Rural Upshur County, WV Source: WVSORO, Modern Shale Gas

Sibille, Etienne

131

Energy Implications of Meeting ASHRAE 62.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Implications of Meeting ASHRAE 62.2 Iain S. Walker and Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;1 Energy Implications of Meeting ASHRAE Standard 62.2 ABSTRACT The first and only nation-wide standard for residential ventilation in the United States is ASHRAE

132

Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL/TM-200015 ORNL/TM-200015 MANAGED BY UT-BATTELLE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY A Vector Approach to Regression Analysis and Its Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions November 2000 Prepared by H. 1. McAdams AccaMath Services Carrolton, Illinois R. W. Crawford R.W. Crawford Energy Systems Tucson, Arizona G. R. Hadder Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee - UT-BATTELLE -. ORNL-27 (4.00) II ORNL/TM-200015 A VECTOR APPROACH TO REGRESSION ANALYSIS AND ITS APPLICATION TO HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EMISSIONS H. T. McAdams AccaMath Services Carrollton, Illinois R. W. Crawford RWCrawford Energy Systems Tucson, Arizona G. R. Hadder Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee November 2000 Prepared for Office of Energy Effkiency and Renewable Energy

133

Energy harvesting sensor nodes: Survey and implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sensor networks with battery-powered nodes can seldom simultaneously meet the design goals of lifetime, cost, sensing reliability and sensing and transmission coverage. Energy-harvesting, converting ambient energy to electrical energy, has emerged as an alternative to power sensor nodes. By exploiting recharge opportunities and tuning performance parameters based on current and expected energy levels, energy harvesting sensor nodes have the potential to address the conflicting design goals of lifetime and performance. This paper surveys various aspects of energy harvesting sensor systems architecture, energy sources and storage technologies and examples of harvesting-based nodes and applications. The study also discusses the implications of recharge opportunities on sensor node operation and design of sensor network solutions. 1

Sujesha Sudevalayam; Purushottam Kulkarni

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Mexicos Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy Options for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Immigration: Patterns, Issues, and Outlook, 2008. No.Mexicos Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyMexicos Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy

Shields, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Implications of Increasing U.S. Crude Oil Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Implications of Increasing U.S. Crude Implications of Increasing U.S. Crude Oil Production By John Powell June 18, 2013 U.S. crude oil production is up dramatically since 2010 and will continue to grow rapidly; this has implications for: John Powell June 18, 2013 2 * Refinery operations * Refinery investment * Logistics infrastructure investment * Exports of petroleum products * Exports of crude oil Increased U.S. crude oil production has resulted in: John Powell June 18, 2013 3 * Declines in U.S. crude imports * Changes to refinery operations * Logistical constraints in moving crude from production areas to refining areas * Discounted prices for domestic "landlocked" crude vs. international seaborne crude

136

Policy implications of technologies for cognitive enhancement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Concepts Group at Sandia National Laboratory and the Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes at Arizona State University convened a workshop in May 2006 to explore the potential policy implications of technologies that might enhance human cognitive abilities. The group's deliberations sought to identify core values and concerns raised by the prospect of cognitive enhancement. The workshop focused on the policy implications of various prospective cognitive enhancements and on the technologies/nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and cognitive science--that enable them. The prospect of rapidly emerging technological capabilities to enhance human cognition makes urgent a daunting array of questions, tensions, ambitions, and concerns. The workshop elicited dilemmas and concerns in ten overlapping areas: science and democracy; equity and justice; freedom and control; intergenerational issues; ethics and competition; individual and community rights; speed and deliberations; ethical uncertainty; humanness; and sociocultural risk. We identified four different perspectives to encompass the diverse issues related to emergence of cognitive enhancement technologies: (1) Laissez-faire--emphasizes freedom of individuals to seek and employ enhancement technologies based on their own judgment; (2) Managed technological optimism--believes that while these technologies promise great benefits, such benefits cannot emerge without an active government role; (3) Managed technological skepticism--views that the quality of life arises more out of society's institutions than its technologies; and (4) Human Essentialism--starts with the notion of a human essence (whether God-given or evolutionary in origin) that should not be modified. While the perspectives differ significantly about both human nature and the role of government, each encompasses a belief in the value of transparency and reliable information that can allow public discussion and decisions about cognitive enhancement. The practical question is how to foster productive discussions in a society whose attention is notably fragmented and priorities notably diverse. The question of what to talk about remains central, as each of the four perspectives is concerned about different things. Perhaps the key issue for initial clarification as a condition for productive democratic discussion has to do with the intended goals of cognitive enhancement, and the mechanisms for allowing productive deliberation about these goals.

Sarewitz, Daniel R. (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ); Karas, Thomas H.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Analysis of Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybridization and Implications for Energy Storage Devices (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents an analysis of hybridization and implications energy storage devices concerning fuel cell vehicles.

Zolot, M.; Markel, T.; Pesaran, A.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments and Initiatives Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments and Initiatives Project scope: Comparative analysis of recent resource plans filed by 14 utilities in the Western U.S. and Canada. Analyze treatment of conventional & emerging resource options-including energy efficiency (EE)-Assess risk analysis & portfolio management -Develop more standardized methods and conventions for resource assessment-Summarize how issues are handled in resource plans; identify "best practices" and offer recommendations-Create information tools for CREPC that facilitate work on related projects (e.g. regional transmission planning) Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for

139

Temperature and Violent Crime: Implications of Climate Change?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature and Violent Crime: Implications of Climate Change? Print E-mail Temperature and Violent Crime: Implications of Climate Change? Print E-mail Temperature and Violent Crime: Implications of Climate Change? Friday, September 20, 2013 Featured by EPA, a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program Is there a link between climate change and violent crimes? Scientists at EPA and the Emory University School of Medicine are investigating whether hotter temperatures affect violent crimes, such as assault, robbery, rape, and murder. In a recent paper published in the Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, Temperature and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and Implications of Climate Change, researchers examined the relationship between daily temperature and daily incidence of violent crime in Dallas from 1993 to 1999.

140

IMBALANCED RADIATION ENTROPY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR REMOTE SENSING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMBALANCED RADIATION ENTROPY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR REMOTE SENSING Yangang Liu, Wei Wu and Warren and radiation entropy is needed to close the system. A new remote sensing approach is presented

Johnson, Peter D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Financial market imperfections and their asset pricing implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of two studies on financial market imperfections. The first study (Chapters 2 and 3) investigates illiquidity, which is a reflection of different imperfections, and its pricing implications in the ...

Rayanakorn, Surapap

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

TY JOUR T1 Efficiency Improvement Opportunities in TVs Implications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Improvement Opportunities in TVs Implications for Market Transformation Programs JF Energy Policy A1 Won Young Park A1 Amol Phadke A1 Nihar Shah A1 Virginie E Letschert...

143

An assessment of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exploration of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations is made by assessing the results of a study of aviation's effects on United States air quality mandated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The ...

Sequeira, Christopher J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

IMPLICATIONS OF THEORETICAL IDEAS REGARDING COLD FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lot of theoretical ideas have been floated to explain the so called cold fusion phenomenon. I look at a large subset of these and study further physical implications of the concepts involved. I suggest that these can be tested by other independent physical means. Because of the significance of these the experimentalists are urged to look for these signatures. The results in turn will be important for a better understanding and hence control of the cold fusion phenomenon. 1 Since the initial claims, counterclaims and confusion of 1989 the field of cold fusion has settled down as a reasonably well pursued field all over the world as evidenced by several recent conferences and publications [1-7]. Perhaps not surprisingly it has turned out to be a tough field experimentally as much as the results viewed globally are quite sporadic and the optimum conditions are still unknown. However the bottomline is that whether conventional cold fusion or not excess heat and/or neutron and/or He 4 etc are

unknown authors

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Environmental implications of increased biomass energy use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study reviews the environmental implications of continued and increased use of biomass for energy to determine what concerns have been and need to be addressed and to establish some guidelines for developing future resources and technologies. Although renewable biomass energy is perceived as environmentally desirable compared with fossil fuels, the environmental impact of increased biomass use needs to be identified and recognized. Industries and utilities evaluating the potential to convert biomass to heat, electricity, and transportation fuels must consider whether the resource is reliable and abundant, and whether biomass production and conversion is environmentally preferred. A broad range of studies and events in the United States were reviewed to assess the inventory of forest, agricultural, and urban biomass fuels; characterize biomass fuel types, their occurrence, and their suitability; describe regulatory and environmental effects on the availability and use of biomass for energy; and identify areas for further study. The following sections address resource, environmental, and policy needs. Several specific actions are recommended for utilities, nonutility power generators, and public agencies.

Miles, T.R. Sr.; Miles, T.R. Jr. (Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio  

SciTech Connect

Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 (burners) do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 (breeders) have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is attractive for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR<1, the heat, gamma, and neutron emission increase as material is recycled. The uranium utilization is at or below 1%, just as it is in thermal reactors as both types of reactors require continuing fissile support. For CR>1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field is a large, high temperature system located in eastern California on the western edge of the Basin and Range province. The East Flank of this field is currently under study as a DOE-funded Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) project. This paper summarizes petrologic and geologic investigations on two East Flank wells, 34A-9 and 34-9RD2 conducted as part of a continuing effort to better understand how the rocks will behave during hydraulic and thermal stimulation. Well 34A-9

148

Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Carbon Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Holt Ed Holt & Associates Inc. Ghita Carroll, Research Participant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41076 April 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Holt Ed Holt & Associates Inc. Ghita Carroll, Research Participant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. ASG6.1005 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41076 April 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

149

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Water Implications of Biofuels Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Implications of Biofuels Production Water Implications of Biofuels Production Project Summary Full Title: Water Implications of Biofuels Production in the United States Project ID: 227 Principal Investigator: William S. Logan Brief Description: The National Research Council conducted a workshop and wrote a report examining the potential effects of biofuels production in the U.S. on water and related land resources. Purpose Examine the possible effects of biofuel development on water and related land resources. The central questions are how water use and water quality are expected to change as the U.S. agricultural portfolio shifts to include more energy crops and as overall agricultural production potentially increases. Such questions are considered within the context of U.S. policy and also the expected advances in technology and agricultural practices

150

Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Implications of Carbon Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Holt Ed Holt & Associates Inc. Ghita Carroll, Research Participant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41076 April 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Holt Ed Holt & Associates Inc. Ghita Carroll, Research Participant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. ASG6.1005 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41076 April 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

151

Real Time Monitoring of Self Assembled Monolayers Using ATR: Implications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real Time Monitoring of Self Assembled Monolayers Using ATR: Implications Real Time Monitoring of Self Assembled Monolayers Using ATR: Implications to Atmospheric Organic Surfaces Speaker(s): Yael Dubowski Date: December 10, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Hugo Destaillats Most studies of heterogeneous reactions on aerosols have focused on their implications for gas phase species. Less attention, however, has been given to the modification of aerosol surfaces during such reactions. Alteration of aerosol surface species may affect their hygroscopic and radiative properties as well as their reactivity toward other atmospheric trace species. In the present study, we use self-assembled organic monolayers (SAM) as proxies for atmospheric organic aerosols. Detection of even very short carbon chains (i.e., C3) as well as continuous monitoring of the SAMs

152

Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Lithium/magnesium, lithium/sodium, and to a lesser extent, potassium/magnesium ratios in calcium carbonate tufa columns provide a fingerprint for distinguishing tufa columns formed from thermal spring waters versus those formed from non-thermal spring waters. These ratios form the basis of the Mg/Li, Na/Li, and K/Mg fluid geothermometers commonly used in geothermal exploration, which are based on the fact that at elevated temperatures, due to mineral-fluid equilibria, lithium

153

London Congestion Pricing: Implications for Other Cities | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

London Congestion Pricing: Implications for Other Cities London Congestion Pricing: Implications for Other Cities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: London Congestion Pricing: Implications for Other Cities Agency/Company /Organization: Victoria Transport Policy Institute Focus Area: Standards - Incentives - Policies - Regulations Topics: Best Practices Website: www.vtpi.org/london.pdf Congestion charging has reduced traffic congestion, improved bus and taxi service, and generated substantial revenues. There is now support to expand the program to other parts of London and other cities in the United Kingdom. This is the first congestion pricing program in a major European city, and its success suggests that congestion pricing may become more politically feasible elsewhere. How to Use This Tool

154

AE-Lu2011-submission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EXAMINATION OF MICROPHYSICAL RELATIONSHIPS AND EXAMINATION OF MICROPHYSICAL RELATIONSHIPS AND CORRESPONDING MICROPHYSICAL PROCESSES IN WARM FOGS Chunsong Lu a, b , Yangang Liu b , Shengjie Niu a , Lijuan Zhao a a School of Atmospheric Physics, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology (NUIST), Jiangsu, China 210044 b Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY 11973 Corresponding author: Chunsong Lu, Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973; Tel: 631-344-2458; Fax: 1-631-344-2887; luchunsong110@gmail.com Submitted to Atmospheric Environment October 2011 Atmospheric Sciences Division/Environmental Sciences Dept. Brookhaven National Laboratory

155

ERL_Lu2012_submission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HOMOGENEOUS INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HOMOGENEOUS MIXING DEGREE AND TRANSITION SCALE NUMBER WITH THE EXPLICIT MIXING PARCEL MODEL C. Lu 1, 2 , Y. Liu 2 , S. Niu 1 , S. Krueger 3 , and T. Wagner 4 1 School of Atmospheric Physics, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology (NUIST), Jiangsu, China 210044 2 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), NY, US 11973 3 Department of Meteorology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, US 84112 4 Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE, US, 68178 Corresponding author: Chunsong Lu, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Atmospheric Sciences Division, Building 815E, Upton, NY, USA 11973; luchunsong110@gmail.com

156

FORMATTING GUIDELINES FOR SUBMISSIONS OF  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0: Computational Physics-Computer Science and Methods 0: Computational Physics-Computer Science and Methods A Phenomenological Model of Solid Fracture Kinetics under Pulsed Loading S. S. Sokolov Russian Federal Nuclear Center - All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF), 607190 Sarov, Mira- 37, Russia Summary: This paper describes a phenomenological model of dynamic fracture kinetics including plastic pore growth and plastic fracture damage. Introduction The problem of fracture is critical for the development of structures that undergo intense pulsed loading during operation. Dynamic strain of elastoplastic materials may cause a large number of microdefects of different types. Separate numerical description of each microdefect when considering pulsed loading of a real full-size structure is quite a complex problem. The complexity of the problem is that fracture

157

Employment Registry/Resume Submission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

employment opportunities are becoming available with APS Collaborative Access Teams (CATs). To assist both potential employees and employers, the APS Users Organization has...

158

AE-Lu2011-submission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Furthermore, Wang et al. (2009) examined the marine clouds observed off the coast of Monterey and Point Reyes, northern California with data reflecting ship exhaust plumes...

159

Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Executive Summary Executive Summary December 2011 Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Executive Summary This report presents the results of an independent assessment by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) of the adequacy of U.S. electric generation resources under air pollution regulations being finalized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This report does not estimate the economic impacts of EPA regulations, nor does it provide detailed reliability assessments that planning authorities and other stakeholders will need to conduct to ensure deliverability of power and grid reliability during implementation of EPA rules.

160

Mexicos Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy Options for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexicos Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyMexicos Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyA ccelerates Mexicos crude oil production, which reached a

Shields, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

General combinatorical structure of truth tables of bracketed formulae connected by implication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the general combinatorical structure of the truth tables of all bracketed formulae with n distinct variables connected by the binary connective of implication, an m-implication.

Yildiz, Volkan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: New doses, risks, and their implications  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes the recent re-evaluations of the dose and risk of cancer among survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It addresses briefly their limitations, and describes some of their implications for the lifetime projection of the risk of a fatal cancer following exposure to ionizing radiation.

Schull, W.J.; Shimizu, Y.; Kato, H. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Gravity Waves in Shear and Implications for Organized Convection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravity Waves in Shear and Implications for Organized Convection Samuel N. Stechmann Department, Los Angeles, CA 90095­1555. E-mail: stechmann@math.ucla.edu #12;ABSTRACT It is known that gravity, the gravity waves can create a more favorable environment on one side of preexisting convection than the other

Stechmann, Samuel N.

164

Climate Threat to the Planet * Implications for Energy Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Threat to the Planet * Implications for Energy Policy Jim Hansen 3 June 2008 PACON International Honolulu, Hawaii *Any statements relating to policy are personal opinion #12;Global Warming Status Definitions 1. Tipping Level - Climate forcing (greenhouse gas amount) reaches a point such that no additional

Hansen, James E.

165

The Economic Value of Biomass Implications for policy and practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Economic Value of Biomass Implications for policy and practice David Clubb and Ben Tansey Rural England and Yorkshire #12;The research ·No previous study of biomass value ·Important to demonstrate ·Carbon ·Externalities #12;Largescale biomass ·Electricity generation inefficient (

166

Arctic Sea Ice Decline: Observations, Projections, Mechanisms, and Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or phase space. In this work we con- sider the trajectory of sea ice in the ice thickness phase space. We175 Arctic Sea Ice Decline: Observations, Projections, Mechanisms, and Implications Geophysical Is the Trajectory of Arctic Sea Ice? Harry L. Stern and Ronald W. Lindsay Polar Science Center, Applied Physics

Lindsay, Ron

167

Enterprises as systems: Context, boundaries, and practical implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this paper is to describe the domain of enterprise analysis. This is accomplished through an exploration of relevant definitions, a discussion on boundaries, and a summary of practical implications for researchers and practitioners. Specifically, ... Keywords: Enterprise boundaries, enterprise analysis, enterprise architecting, enterprise integration, enterprise transformation, lean

Ricardo Valerdi; Deborah Nightingale; Craig Blackburn

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Edible Oleogels: Structure and Health Implications Chapter 13 Ethylcellulose Oleogels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edible Oleogels: Structure and Health Implications Chapter 13 Ethylcellulose Oleogels Food Science eChapters Food Science & Technology E90583405E8C0F0257AD78FC2FE4C285 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1

169

The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure Print The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure Print Phosphatases, enzymes that remove a phosphate group from amino-acid substrates, can be subdivided according to their substrate specificity. Myriad evidence has demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a family of serine/threonine-specific (Ser/Thr) phosphatases, regulates many, if not most, aspects of cellular activities and is a critical tumor suppressor. A team at the University of Washington recently determined the first crystal structure of a PP2A holoenzyme (a form sufficient for full catalytic activity) composed of three different subunits (i.e., a heterotrimer). Their structure provides a foundation for understanding PP2A regulation, satisfactory mechanistic explanations for human tumorigenic mutations, and the structural basis for understanding PP2A substrate recruitment and specificity, a critical issue, given the high number of PP2A substrates.

170

The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure Print The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure Print Phosphatases, enzymes that remove a phosphate group from amino-acid substrates, can be subdivided according to their substrate specificity. Myriad evidence has demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a family of serine/threonine-specific (Ser/Thr) phosphatases, regulates many, if not most, aspects of cellular activities and is a critical tumor suppressor. A team at the University of Washington recently determined the first crystal structure of a PP2A holoenzyme (a form sufficient for full catalytic activity) composed of three different subunits (i.e., a heterotrimer). Their structure provides a foundation for understanding PP2A regulation, satisfactory mechanistic explanations for human tumorigenic mutations, and the structural basis for understanding PP2A substrate recruitment and specificity, a critical issue, given the high number of PP2A substrates.

171

Mitigating Climate Change through Energy Efficiency: Implications of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigating Climate Change through Energy Efficiency: Implications of Mitigating Climate Change through Energy Efficiency: Implications of China's 20 % Energy Intensity Reduction Target Speaker(s): Jiang Lin Date: March 13, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 China's rapid economic growth in the last few years has spurred a construction boom for power plants on an unprecedented scale. In 2006 alone, 102 GW of generating capacity was brought online, 90 GW of which are from coal-fired power plants. Further, energy has grown faster than GDP since 2001, reversing a two-decade trend of declining energy intensity from 19080 to 2000. The ramifications of this reversal are far-reaching for global energy market and environment. China has since set an ambitious target of reducing its energy intensity by 20% by the year 2010, with a first-year goal of 4% reduction for 2006. This presentation will discuss

172

Evaluation of Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications to EBS Design Optimization Evaluation of Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications to EBS Design Optimization The assessment of generic Engineered Barrier System (EBS) concepts and design optimization to harbor various disposal configurations and waste types needs advanced approaches and methods to analyze barrier performance. The report addresses: 1) Overview of the importance of Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) processes to barrier performance, and international collaborations; 2) THMC processes in clay barriers; 3) experimental studies of clay stability and clay-metal interactions at high temperatures and pressures; 4) thermodynamic modeling and database development; 5) Molecular Dynamics (MD) study of clay

173

Measurement and Modeling Implications of Transfer and Transformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement and Modeling Implications of Transfer and Transformation Measurement and Modeling Implications of Transfer and Transformation Processes at the Plant/Air Interface Speaker(s): Randy Maddalena Date: October 13, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro To understand the chemodynamic role of vegetation in a multimedia system, the rate and extent of chemical partitioning from adjacent environmental media and the rate of chemical transformation associated with vegetation need to be determined. An exposure system was used to isolate and expose above ground vegetation to semi-volatile air contaminants. Measurements of phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene in the chamber air and the plant tissue were collected during both the uptake and clearance phase of exposure events. The measurements were fitted to the mass balance of the

174

esource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Executive Summary This report presents the results of an independent assessment by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) of the adequacy of U.S. electric generation resources under air pollution regulations being finalized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This report does not estimate the economic impacts of EPA regulations, nor does it provide detailed reliability assessments that planning authorities and other stakeholders will need to conduct to ensure deliverability of power and grid reliability during implementation of EPA rules. This report considers two EPA regulations, the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR) and the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), that are widely expected to have the greatest impact on

175

Implications of Regional Transmission Organization Design for Renewable Energy Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the development of Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) and assesses the potential implications of market rules for renewable energy technologies. The report focuses on scheduling provisions, as these have proved problematic in some cases for intermittent renewable energy technologies. Market rules of four RTOs-the Pennsylvania-Maryland-New Jersey ISO, the ERCOT ISO, the Midwest ISO and the New York ISO (NYISO)-were examined to determine the impact on intermittent renewable energy projects such as wind energy generators. Also, a more general look was taken at how biomass power may fare in RTOs, specifically whether these technologies can participate in ancillary service markets. Lastly, an assessment was made regarding the implications for renewable energy technologies of a Northeast-wide RTO that would combine the three existing Northeast ISOs (the aforementioned PJM and NYISOs, as well as ISO New England).

Porter, K.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Outlook for Energy and Implications for Irrigated Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture uses large quantities of energy to pump groundwater for irrigation. This means the cost of energy has important implications for the industry in terms of costs and profitability. Increases in the prices of energy sources such as natural gas, electricity, liquid petroleum gas and diesel can cause economic hardship for irrigators, particularly if those increases are unanticipated. The purpose of this paper is to briefly summarize important trends in the current domestic energy situation that could have significant impacts on the future cost and availability of energy, and to show what the implications of those trends are for irrigated agriculture. The primary focus of this study will be on trends in natural gas, since natural gas is the major fuel used for irrigation in the Great Plains states.

Patton, W. P.; Lacewell, R. D.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

IEEE Std 929-2000 - Background, implications and requirements  

SciTech Connect

The newly revised standard, IEEE Std 929-2000, has significant positive implications for those designing inverters for utility-interconnected PV systems and for designers and installers of such systems. A working group of roughly 20 people, including PV systems designers/installers, PV inverter manufacturers and utility engineers spent close to 3 years developing a standard that would be useful and beneficial to all.

STEVENS III,JOHN W.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hypothetical Gravity Control and Implications for Spacecraft Propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A scientific analysis of the conditions under which gravity could be controlled and the implications that an hypothetical manipulation of gravity would have for known schemes of space propulsion have been the scope of a recent study carried out for the European Space Agency. The underlying fundamental physical principles of known theories of gravity were analysed and shown that even if gravity could be modified it would bring somewhat modest gains in terms of launching of spacecraft and no breakthrough for space propulsion.

O. Bertolami; M. Tajmar

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Water Resource Trends and Implications for the Electric Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water resources, both surface and groundwater, are subject to significant variation and change with respect to volume, flow, and quality. This report evaluates observed water resource trends within the United States and their implications for electric power generation. The report also addresses how individual companies have responded to these changes. The report will be of value to environment, generation, and planning managers within power companies, government agencies, and water resource stakeholders ...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Biological Implications of The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure Print Wednesday, 30 January 2008 00:00 Phosphatases, enzymes that remove a phosphate group from amino-acid substrates, can be subdivided according to their substrate specificity. Myriad evidence has demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a family of serine/threonine-specific (Ser/Thr) phosphatases, regulates many, if not most, aspects of cellular activities and is a critical tumor suppressor. A team at the University of Washington recently determined the first crystal structure of a PP2A holoenzyme (a form sufficient for full catalytic activity) composed of three different subunits (i.e., a heterotrimer). Their structure provides a foundation for understanding PP2A regulation, satisfactory mechanistic explanations for human tumorigenic mutations, and the structural basis for understanding PP2A substrate recruitment and specificity, a critical issue, given the high number of PP2A substrates.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Title Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Shehabi, Arman, Jennifer R. Stokes, and Arpad Horvath Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 7 Issue 2 Abstract Both centralized and decentralized wastewater systems have distinct engineering, financial and societal benefits. This paper presents a framework for analyzing the environmental effects of decentralized wastewater systems and an evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with two currently operating systems in California, one centralized and one decentralized. A comparison of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and criteria air pollutants from the systems shows that the scale economies of the centralized plant help lower the environmental burden to less than a fifth of that of the decentralized utility for the same volume treated. The energy and emission burdens of the decentralized plant are reduced when accounting for high-yield wastewater reuse if it supplants an energy-intensive water supply like a desalination one. The centralized facility also reduces greenhouse gases by flaring methane generated during the treatment process, while methane is directly emitted from the decentralized system. The results are compelling enough to indicate that the life-cycle environmental impacts of decentralized designs should be carefully evaluated as part of the design process.

182

Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Thermal Data And Deep Electrical Sounding Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal...

183

From CVaR to Uncertainty Set: Implications in Joint Chance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 12, 2007 ... From CVaR to Uncertainty Set: Implications in Joint Chance Constrained Optimization. Melvyn Sim (dscsimm ***at*** nus.edu.sg) Chung Piaw...

184

Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for Personal Computer Monitors: Implications for Market Transformation Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EU-ENERGY STAR (2007). ENERGY STAR Market http://www.eu-2010). ENERGY STAR Unit Shipment and Market Penetrationtwo implications for energy efficiency market transformation

Park, Won Young

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Economic implications for the generation of electricity from biomass fuel sources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the economic theory, geographical implications, and relevant legislative history impacting the use of biomass fuel sources within the electric utility industry. Research (more)

Curtis, Thomas Wayne

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Greenhouse effect: Implications for economic development. Discussion paper  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents a scientific perspective on the global climate change issue and establishes a comprehensive framework for efficient response to the implications for natural resource conservation and economic development. It has benefitted from extensive comment and review within the international scientific community, as well as within the World Bank. It comprises an extensive summary and critique, from a development viewpoint, of the sometimes conflicting scientific literature and opinion on the greenhouse effect, the related theoretical and empirical evidence, and prospects for global climate change. Finally, it presents a set of conclusions which are worthy of serious consideration by everyone concerned with the enlightened stewardship of the global environment.

Arrhenius, E.; Waltz, T.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Implications of beam phase and RFSUM measured near transition  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the transition-crossing process is crucial for improving Booster performance at high intensity. The synchronous phase appears to drop toward 90{sup o} right after transition regardless of beam intensity, more so at higher beam intensity. The implication is that the effective rf voltage (RFSUM) will run into a limit right after transition when the synchronous phase reaches 90{sup o} for high intensity beam. A reduction in RFSUM is also observed at the same time. Solutions, such as raising the rf voltage during the transition period or controlling the RFSUM reduction by increasing longitudinal emittance before transition, are potentially important for high intensity operation.

Xi Yang; James MacLachlan

2004-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

188

Food-web assembly and collapse: mathematical models and implications for conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food-web assembly and collapse: mathematical models and implications for conservation Papers Contents Introduction Food-web assembly and collapse: mathematical models and implications for conservation Alaska: a food-web perspective 1647 J. A. Estes, D. F. Doak, A. M. Springer and T. M. Williams Parasites

Pascual, Mercedes

189

Implications of ``peak oil'' for atmospheric CO2 and climate Pushker A. Kharecha1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications of ``peak oil'' for atmospheric CO2 and climate Pushker A. Kharecha1 and James E environments. If conventional oil production peaks within the next few decades, it may have a large effect., and J. E. Hansen (2008), Implications of ``peak oil'' for atmospheric CO2 and climate, Global Biogeochem

190

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation-switching model for the risk adjusted natural gas spot price and study the implications of the model on the valuation and optimal operation of natural gas storage facilities. We calibrate the model parameters to both

Forsyth, Peter A.

191

Motor Gasoline Market Spring 2007 and Implications for Spring 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Market Spring 2007 Motor Gasoline Market Spring 2007 and Implications for Spring 2008 April 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requestor. Preface and Contacts

192

Global climate change: Implications, challenges and mitigation measures  

SciTech Connect

The present volume discusses topics in the fields of natural climatic fluctuations, the greenhouse effect, climate modeling, the biophysical and socioeconomic impacts of climate change, climate-change effect mitigation and adaptation strategies, and domestic (US) and international perspectives on regulation of climate-affecting activities. Attention is given to past climates as a guide to the future, the certainty of contemporary global warming, the physics of the greenhouse effect, the global carbon cycle, general circulation model studies of global warming, the implications of sea-level rise, forests' role in global climate change, the ecological effects of rapid climate change, predicted effects of climate change on agriculture, the impact of global warming on human health, energy supply technologies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the U.N.'s 1992 Earth Summit Conference.

Majumdar, S.K.; Kalkstein, L.S.; Yarnal, B.M.; Miller, E.W.; Rosenfeld, L.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

A Computational Grid is a collection of heterogeneous computers and resources spread across multiple administrative domains with the intent of providing users uniform access to these resources. There are many ways to access the resources of a Computational Grid, each with unique security requirements and implications for both the resource user and the resource provider. A comprehensive set of Grid usage scenarios are presented and analyzed with regard to security requirements such as authentication, authorization, integrity, and confidentiality. The main value of these scenarios and the associated security discussions are to provide a library of situations against which an application designer can match, thereby facilitating security-aware application use and development from the initial stages of the application design and invocation. A broader goal of these scenarios are to increase the awareness of security issues in Grid Computing.

Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.

2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Fukushima Nuclear Event and its Implications for Nuclear Power  

SciTech Connect

The combined strong earthquake and super tsunami of 12 March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant imposed the most severe challenges ever experienced at such a facility. Information regarding the plant response and status remains uncertain, but it is clear that severe damage has been sustained, that the plant staff have responded creatively and that the offsite implications are unlikely to be seriously threatening to the health, if not the prosperity, of the surrounding population. Re-examination of the regulatory constraints of nuclear power will occur worldwide, and some changes are likely, particularly concerning reliance upon active systems for achieving critical safety functions and concerning treatments of used reactor fuel. Whether worldwide expansion of the nuclear power economy will be slowed in the long run is perhaps unlikely and worth discussion.

Golay, Michael (MIT)

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

195

Astrophysical implications of the Asymptotic Safety Scenario in Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years it has emerged that the high energy behavior of gravity could be governed by an ultraviolet non-Gaussian fixed point of the (dimensionless) Newton's constant, whose behavior at high energy is thus {\\it antiscreened}. This phenomenon has several astrophysical implications. In particular in this article recent works on renormalization group improved cosmologies based upon a renormalization group trajectory of Quantum Einstein Gravity with realistic parameter values will be reviewed. It will be argued that quantum effects can account for the entire entropy of the present Universe in the massless sector and give rise to a phase of inflationary expansion. Moreover the prediction for the final state of the black hole evaporation is a Planck size remnant which is formed in an infinite time.

Bonanno, Alfio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Implications of high efficiency power cycles for fusion reactor design  

SciTech Connect

The implications of the High Efficiency Power Cycle for fusion reactors are examined. The proposed cycle converts most all of the high grade CTR heat input to electricity. A low grade thermal input (T approximately 100$sup 0$C) is also required, and this can be supplied at low cost geothermal energy at many locations in the U. S. Approximately 3 KW of low grade heat is required per KW of electrical output. The thermodynamics and process features of the proposed cycle are discussed. Its advantages for CTR's are that low Q machines (e.g. driven Tokamaks, mirrors) can operate with a high (approximately 80 percent) conversion of CTR fusion energy to electricity, where with conventional power cycles no plant output could be achieved with such low Q operation. (auth)

Powell, J.R.; Usher, J.; Salzano, F.J.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Photodissociation dynamics of tryptophan and the implication of asymmetric photolysis  

SciTech Connect

Photodissociation of amino acid tryptophan in a molecular beam at wavelengths of 212.8 and 193 nm, corresponding to excitation to the second and third absorption bands, was investigated using multimass ion imaging techniques. The respective wavelengths also represent excitation to the edge of a positive circular dichroism band and the center of a negative circular dichroism band of L-tryptophan. Only one dissociation channel was observed at both photolysis wavelengths: C{sub 8}NH{sub 6}CH{sub 2}CHNH{sub 2}COOH{yields}C{sub 8}NH{sub 6}CH{sub 2}+CHNH{sub 2}COOH. Dissociation rates were found to be 1.3x10{sup 6} and 5x10{sup 6} s{sup -1} at the respective wavelengths. Comparison to theoretical calculation indicates that dissociation occurs on the ground state after internal conversion. Implication of asymmetric photolysis is discussed.

Tseng, Chien-Ming; Dyakov, Yuri A.; Huang, Huai Ching; Huang, Kuan Yu; Lee, Yuan T.; Ni, Chi-Kung [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Su-Yu [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

2010-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

198

rIc. IL1 Dorsalvicw ofskulls of(A) round-earcd elephant-shrew (Maloslides proboscdeus) and (B) castern rock elephant-shrew (Elephantulus myuns)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (7986) listed nvo subspecies: M p' proboscideøs (Shaw, 1800) from the Nama-Karoo and Succulent Karoo part of the south-western subregion in the Nama-Karoo and Succulent Karoo biomes. Southern African

199

Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for crop production  

SciTech Connect

Changes in temperature, CO2, and precipitation under the scenarios of climate change for the next 30 years present a challenge to crop production. This review focuses on the impact of temperature, CO2, and ozone on agronomic crops and the implications for crop production. Understanding these implications for agricultural crops is critical for developing cropping systems resilient to stresses induced by climate change. There is variation among crops in their response to CO2, temperature, and precipitation changes and, with the regional differences in predicted climate, a situation is created in which the responses will be further complicated. For example, the temperature effects on soybean could potentially cause yield reductions of 2.4% in the South but an increase of 1.7% in the Midwest. The frequency of years when temperatures exceed thresholds for damage during critical growth stages is likely to increase for some crops and regions. The increase in CO2 contributes significantly to enhanced plant growth and improved water use efficiency; however, there may be a downscaling of these positive impacts due to higher temperatures plants will experience during their growth cycle. A challenge is to understand the interactions of the changing climatic parameters because of the interactions among temperature, CO2, and precipitation on plant growth and development and also on the biotic stresses of weeds, insects, and diseases. Agronomists will have to consider the variations in temperature and precipitation as part of the production system if they are to ensure the food security required by an ever increasing population.

Hatfield, Jerry L.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Kimball, B. A.; Ziska, Lewis A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Ort, Don; Thomson, Allison M.; Wolfe, David W.

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

200

ZooKeys 143:47-81 (201 I) doi: I0.3897/zookeys.l43.2075  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(19.7% of collecting sites); Southern Africa bushveld (13.1% of collecting sites); Nama Karoo (11: Succulent Karoo (48.3% of collecting sites); Nama Karoo (25.9% of collecting sites); Lowland Fynbos.5% of collecting sites); Nama Karoo (14.9% of collecting sites); Zambezian and Mopane Woodlands (10

Mathis, Wayne N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Phylogeny and Taxonomy of the Round-Eared Sengis or Elephant-Shrews, Genus Macroscelides (Mammalia,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. pilicaudus from the Nama-Karoo in South Africa; [7]). However, genetic analyses have not yet been applied at Wlotzkasbaken, Namibia, on 25 May 2000 (photo by GBR). B (bottom). M. p. proboscideus captured in the Nama-Karoo the Nama-Karoo. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0032410.g001 Taxonomic Revision of Macroscelides PLoS ONE | www

202

Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 164, 2007, pp. 477479. Printed in Great Britain. Discussion on structure and evolution of hydrothermal vent complexes in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gradients of flower visitation on a mesa in the Nama Karoo, South Africa Philip Kirk & Francis Gilbert of inselbergs/mesas of the Nama Karoo of South Africa and Namibia being conservation islands for the indigenous for revegetating and repopulating the degraded landscape of the Nama Karoo. Plant species diversity is higher

Svensen, Henrik

203

The Outcome of the Climate Conference in Copehagen and its Implications for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Outcome of the Climate Conference in Copehagen and its Implications for The Outcome of the Climate Conference in Copehagen and its Implications for the Land Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Outcome of the Climate Conference in Copehagen and its Implications for the Land Transport Sector Agency/Company /Organization: Bridging the Gap Focus Area: Standards - Incentives - Policies - Regulations Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.transport2012.org/bridging/ressources/documents/1/556,Copenhagen_r This paper provides a brief overview of the outcome of the UN conference and a discussion of the implications of decisions made there in respect to the transport sector, and how transport can play a more defining role in addressing climate change. The aim of this paper is to identify opportunities and challenges arising from the outcomes of COP15 to better

204

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and Communications Speaker(s): Jonathan Koomey Date: November 14, 2012 - 4:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar...

205

Finding growth in a maturing market : strategic implications for the software industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the changes occurring in the software industry and the strategic implications thereof. The software industry has historically benefited from the rapid introduction of new platforms and applications, ...

Crenshaw, Scott H. (Scott Harding), 1965-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Do More Batteries Make A Plug-in Hybrid Better? Implications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Do More Batteries Make A Plug-in Hybrid Better? Implications from Optimal Vehicle Design and Allocation Speaker(s): Chin-Shin Shiau Date: June 18, 2010 - 2:00pm Location: 90-3122...

207

A review of building energy standards and implications for Hong Kong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the development of energy e#ciency programmes and standards for buildings in Hong Kong and other countries, and discusses the implications for the energy-e#ciency standards for commercial buildings in Hong Kong

Joseph Lam; S.C.M. Hui

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sherman, M.H. (2008). Energy Implications of Meeting ASHRAE62.2, ASHRAE Transactions, June 2008, Vol. 114, Pt. 2, pp.and Sustainable Buildings, ASHRAE. Orme, M. 1998. "Energy

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Lifecycle Cost and GHG Implications of a Hydrogen Energy Storage Scenario (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overview of life cycle cost and green house gas implications of a hydrogen energy storage scenario presented at the National Hydrogen Association Conference & Expo, Long Beach, CA, May 3-6, 2010

Steward, D. M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The economic and ethical considerations and implications of the stratification of future oncology therapeutics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the economic impact of stratified medicine on industry and the subsequent ethical implications for patients. Stratified medicine involves the use of clinical biomarkers to indicate differential ...

Sabir, Sameer A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Flight-Level Thermodynamic Instrument Wetting Errors in Hurricanes. Part II: Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The implications of flight-level instrument wetting error removal upon the mean thermodynamic structure across the eyewall, buoyancy of rainband vertical motions, and vertical energy fluxes near the top of the inflow layer are studied. ...

Matthew D. Eastin; Peter G. Black; William M. Gray

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Implications of the Form of the Ensemble Transformation in the Ensemble Square Root Filters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers implications of different forms of the ensemble transformation in the ensemble square root filters (ESRFs) for the performance of ESRF-based data assimilation systems. It highlights the importance of using mean-preserving ...

Pavel Sakov; Peter R. Oke

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Effects of Moisture Released during Forest Burning on Fog Formation and Implications for Visibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smoke from wildland burning in association with fog has been implicated as a visibility hazard over roadways in the United States. Visibilities at accident sites have been estimated in the range from 1 to 3 m (extinction coefficients between 1000 ...

Gary L. Achtemeier

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Does growth subsume the implications of accruals for future firm performance?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maxwell, and A. Siddique, 2004. Does the stock market under-Li, D. , and L. Zhang, 2000. Does q-theory with investmentDoes growth subsume the implications of accruals for future

Chu, Jenny

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

10. China's Emergence, Real Exchange Rates, and Implications for East Asian Regional Trade and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10. China's Emergence, Real Exchange Rates, and Implications for East Asian Regional Trade arena is China, whose economic reforms have led it to record growth rates, dramatically accelerating export expansion and sharply improving material living standards. China's global economic emergence

Kammen, Daniel M.

216

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 2 Implications of Soap Structure for Formulation and User Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 2 Implications of Soap Structure for Formulation and User Properties Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 2 Implica

217

Dissolving brittle stars hint at implications of ocean acidification |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sea urchins and brittle starfish on the seabed at Explorers Cove in Antarctica. The rate the starfish decay offers clues to ocean acidification. Photo courtesy of Shawn Harper. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Sea urchins and brittle starfish on the seabed at Explorers Cove in Antarctica. The rate the starfish decay offers clues to ocean acidification. Photo courtesy of Shawn Harper. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Sea urchins and brittle starfish on the seabed at Explorers Cove in Antarctica. The rate the starfish decay offers clues to ocean acidification. Photo courtesy of Shawn Harper. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Dissolving brittle stars hint at implications of ocean acidification By Chelsea Leu * August 15, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Under the sea ice of Explorers Cove, Antarctica, is a startling array of life. Brittle stars, sea urchins and scallops grow in profusion on the seafloor, a stark contrast to the icy moonscape on the continent's

218

Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the potential effects that emerging mandatory carbon markets have for voluntary markets for renewable energy, or green power markets. In an era of carbon regulation, green power markets will continue to play an important role because many consumers may be interested in supporting renewable energy development beyond what is supported through mandates or other types of policy support. The paper examines the extent to which GHG benefits motivate consumers to make voluntary renewable energy purchases and summarizes key issues emerging as a result of these overlapping markets, such as the implications of carbon regulation for renewable energy marketing claims, the demand for and price of renewable energy certificates (RECs), and the use of RECs in multiple markets (disaggregation of attributes). It describes carbon regulation programs under development in the Northeast and California, and how these might affect renewable energy markets in these regions, as well as the potential interaction between voluntary renewable energy markets and voluntary carbon markets, such as the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX). It also briefly summarizes the experience in the European Union, where carbon is already regulated. Finally, the paper presents policy options for policymakers and regulators to consider in designing carbon policies to enable carbon markets and voluntary renewable energy markets to work together.

Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Carroll, G.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Implications of NSTX Lithium Results for Magnetic Fusion Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on NSTX for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ~ 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium reloadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, ELM control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

M. Ono, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, R. Kaita, H.W. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, J.M. Canik, S. Diem, S.P.. Gerhardt, J. Hosea, S. Kaye, D. Mansfield, R. Maingi, J. Menard, S. F. Paul, R. Raman, S.A. Sabbagh, C.H. Skinner, V. Soukhanovskii, G. Taylor, and the NSTX Research Team

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

220

ASHRAE Standard 62-1989: Energy, Cost, and Program Implications.  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 (Standard 62-89) Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality'' is the new heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry consensus for ventilation air in commercial buildings. Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) references ASHRAE Standard 62-81 (the predecessor to Standard 62-89) in their current environmental documents for required ventilation rates. Through its use, it had become evident to Bonneville that Standard 62-81 needed interpretation. Now that the revised Standard (Standard 62-89) is available, its usefulness needs to be evaluated. Based on current information and public comment, the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) revised Standard 62-1981 to Standard 62-89. Bonneville's study estimated the energy and cost implications of ASHRAE Standard 62-89 using simulations based on DOE-2.1D, a computer simulation program which estimates building use hourly as a function of building characteristics and climatic location. Ten types of prototypical commercial buildings used by Bonneville for load forecasting purposes were examined: Large and Small Office, Large and Small Retail, Restaurant, Warehouse, Hospital, Hotel, School, and Grocery. These building characterizations are based on survey and energy metering data and represent average or typical construction and operation practices and mechanical system types. Prototypical building ventilation rates were varied in five steps to estimate the impacts of outside air on building energy use. 11 refs., 14 tabs.

Steele, Tim R.; Brown, Marilyn A.

1990-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ASHRAE Standard 62-1989: Energy, Cost, and Program Implications.  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 (Standard 62-89) Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality'' is the new heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry consensus for ventilation air in commercial buildings. Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) references ASHRAE Standard 62-81 (the predecessor to Standard 62-89) in their current environmental documents for required ventilation rates. Through its use, it had become evident to Bonneville that Standard 62-81 needed interpretation. Now that the revised Standard (Standard 62-89) is available, its usefulness needs to be evaluated. Based on current information and public comment, the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) revised Standard 62-1981 to Standard 62-89. Bonneville's study estimated the energy and cost implications of ASHRAE Standard 62-89 using simulations based on DOE-2.1D, a computer simulation program which estimates building use hourly as a function of building characteristics and climatic location. Ten types of prototypical commercial buildings used by Bonneville for load forecasting purposes were examined: Large and Small Office, Large and Small Retail, Restaurant, Warehouse, Hospital, Hotel, School, and Grocery. These building characterizations are based on survey and energy metering data and represent average or typical construction and operation practices and mechanical system types. Prototypical building ventilation rates were varied in five steps to estimate the impacts of outside air on building energy use. 11 refs., 14 tabs.

Steele, Tim R.; Brown, Marilyn A.

1990-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Environmental implications of increased biomass energy use. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study reviews the environmental implications of continued and increased use of biomass for energy to determine what concerns have been and need to be addressed and to establish some guidelines for developing future resources and technologies. Although renewable biomass energy is perceived as environmentally desirable compared with fossil fuels, the environmental impact of increased biomass use needs to be identified and recognized. Industries and utilities evaluating the potential to convert biomass to heat, electricity, and transportation fuels must consider whether the resource is reliable and abundant, and whether biomass production and conversion is environmentally preferred. A broad range of studies and events in the United States were reviewed to assess the inventory of forest, agricultural, and urban biomass fuels; characterize biomass fuel types, their occurrence, and their suitability; describe regulatory and environmental effects on the availability and use of biomass for energy; and identify areas for further study. The following sections address resource, environmental, and policy needs. Several specific actions are recommended for utilities, nonutility power generators, and public agencies.

Miles, T.R. Sr.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Economic and environmental implications of a U. S. nuclear moratorium, 1985--2010  

SciTech Connect

This study assesses some economic and environmental implications of a nuclear moratorium in the United States. The moratorium is assumed to prohibit new construction starts of reactors after 1980, but to allow continued operation of reactors on line by 1985. Though the main focus is the period between 1980 and 2010, some consideration is given to the implications of a permanent loss of the nuclear option.

Whittle, C.E.; Allen, E.L.; Cooper, C.L.; MacPherson, H.G.; Phung, D.L.; Poole, A.D.; Pollard, W.G.; Rotty, R.M.; Treat, N.L.; Weinberg, A.M.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Energy implications of integrated solid waste management systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study develops estimates of energy use and recovery from managing municipal solid waste (MSW) under various collection, processing, and disposal scenarios. We estimate use and recovery -- or energy balance -- resulting from MSW management activities such as waste collection, transport, processing, and disposal, as well as indirect use and recovery linked to secondary materials manufacturing using recycled materials. In our analysis, secondary materials manufacturing displaces virgin materials manufacturing for 13 representative products. Energy implications are expressed as coefficients that measure the net energy saving (or use) of displacing products made from virgin versus recycled materials. Using data developed for the 1992 New York City Master Plan as a starting point, we apply our method to an analysis of various collection systems and 30 types of facilities to illustrate bow energy balances shift as management systems are modified. In sum, all four scenarios show a positive energy balance indicating the energy and advantage of integrated systems versus reliance on one or few technology options. That is, energy produced or saved exceeds the energy used to operate the solid waste system. The largest energy use impacts are attributable to processing, including materials separation and composting. Collection and transportation energy are relatively minor contributors. The largest two contributors to net energy savings are waste combustion and energy saved by processing recycled versus virgin materials. An accompanying spatial analysis methodology allocates energy use and recovery to New York City, New York State outside the city, the U.S., and outside the U.S. Our analytical approach is embodied in a spreadsheet model that can be used by energy and solid waste analysts to estimate impacts of management scenarios at the state and substate level.

Little, R.E.; McClain, G.; Becker, M.; Ligon, P.; Shapiro, K.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Mercury and autoimmunity: implications for occupational and environmental health  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) has long been recognized as a neurotoxicant; however, recent work in animal models has implicated Hg as an immunotoxicant. In particular, Hg has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in susceptible animals with effects including overproduction of specific autoantibodies and pathophysiologic signs of lupus-like disease. However, these effects are only observed at high doses of Hg that are above the levels to which humans would be exposed through contaminated fish consumption. While there is presently no evidence to suggest that Hg induces frank autoimmune disease in humans, a recent epidemiological study has demonstrated a link between occupational Hg exposure and lupus. In our studies, we have tested the hypothesis that Hg does not cause autoimmune disease directly, but rather that it may interact with triggering events, such as genetic predisposition, exposure to antigens, or infection, to exacerbate disease. Treatment of mice that are not susceptible to Hg-induced autoimmune disease with very low doses and short term exposures of inorganic Hg (20-200 {mu}g/kg) exacerbates disease and accelerates mortality in the graft versus host disease model of chronic lupus in C57Bl/6 x DBA/2 mice. Furthermore, low dose Hg exposure increases the severity and prevalence of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (induced by immunization with cardiac myosin peptide in adjuvant) in A/J mice. To test our hypothesis further, we examined sera from Amazonian populations exposed to Hg through small-scale gold mining, with and without current or past malaria infection. We found significantly increased prevalence of antinuclear and antinucleolar antibodies and a positive interaction between Hg and malaria. These results suggest a new model for Hg immunotoxicity, as a co-factor in autoimmune disease, increasing the risks and severity of clinical disease in the presence of other triggering events, either genetic or acquired.

Silbergeld, Ellen K. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)]. E-mail: esilberg@jhsph.edu; Silva, Ines A. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Nyland, Jennifer F. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Showering behavior: implications for water and energy conservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three groups of subjects were selected to determine the amount and temperature of the water used when showering. The control group of 120 subjects (60 men and 60 women) was divided into four groups (15 men and 15 women) who, after showering, dressed in rooms whose temperatures were 18.3/sup 0/C (65 F) 21.1/sup 0/C (70 F) 23.9/sup 0/C (75 F) and 26.7/sup 0/C (80 F). The greatest amount of comfort after showering was experienced in the 26.7/sup 0/C (80 F) room. This group, who did not wash their hair while showering used a mean of 36 liters (9.2 gal) of water for their showers. A second group of subjects (12 men and 12 women), who did wash their hair, used 62 liters (16.4 gal); this represented an increase in water used by 78%. A third group (12 men and 12 women), who had their showers fitted with a shower head that restricted the flow-rate of water, used 24 liters (6.4 gal) or 30% less water. However, they set their water temperature at 41.1/sup 0/C (106 F) vs the 38.9/sup 0/C (102 F) setting of the other two groups. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to both water and energy conservation and the amount of water used at different latitudes in the continental U.S. where the temperature of the water supply is different.

Rohles, F.H.; Konz, S.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Safety implications of a large LNG tanker spill over water.  

SciTech Connect

The increasing demand for natural gas in the United States could significantly increase the number and frequency of marine LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports. Although many studies have been conducted to assess the consequences and risks of potential LNG spills, the increasing importance of LNG imports suggests that consistent methods and approaches be identified and implemented to help ensure protection of public safety and property from a potential LNG spill. For that reason the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, requested that Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) develop guidance on a risk-based analysis approach to assess and quantify potential threats to an LNG ship, the potential hazards and consequences of a large spill from an LNG ship, and review prevention and mitigation strategies that could be implemented to reduce both the potential and the risks of an LNG spill over water. Specifically, DOE requested: (1) An in-depth literature search of the experimental and technical studies associated with evaluating the safety and hazards of an LNG spill from an LNG ship; (2) A detailed review of four recent spill modeling studies related to the safety implications of a large-scale LNG spill over water; (3) Evaluation of the potential for breaching an LNG ship cargo tank, both accidentally and intentionally, identification of the potential for such breaches and the potential size of an LNG spill for each breach scenario, and an assessment of the potential range of hazards involved in an LNG spill; (4) Development of guidance on the use of modern, performance-based, risk management approaches to analyze and manage the threats, hazards, and consequences of an LNG spill over water to reduce the overall risks of an LNG spill to levels that are protective of public safety and property.

Hightower, Marion Michael; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Paperwork Reduction Act Submission (OMB 83-I)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PA PA PERW ORK REDUCTION A CT SUBM ISSION to: . 1. Agency/Subagency originating request b. None - a. a. a. Regular b. b. / / c. c. Delegated d. e. Yes N o f. a. b. / Yes N o 7. Title (Mark primary with "P" and all others that apply with "X") (Mark primary with "P" and all others that apply with "X") a. d. a. Voluntary b. e. b. c. f. c. % a. b. a. e. c. Reporting b. f. Research 1. 2. 3. c. General purpose statistics g. Regulatory or compliance 4. Quarterly 5. 6. d. 7. Biennially 8. Yes N o Phone: Please read the instructions before completing this form. For additional forms or assistance in completing this form, contact your agency's Paperwork Clearance Officer. Send two copies of this form, the collection instrument to be reviewed, the Supporting Statement, and any additional documentation

229

PAPER PREPARATION GUIDE AND SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6E 6E SIMMODEL: A DOMAIN DATA MODEL FOR WHOLE BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION Author(s), James O'Donnell, Richard See, Cody Rose, Tobias Maile, Vladimir Bazjanac and Philip Haves Environmental Energy and Technologies Division July 2012 Presented at the SimBuild 2011 IBPSA Conference DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes

230

PAPER PREPARATION GUIDE AND SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

461E 461E Acceleration of the matrix multiplication of Radiance three phase daylighting simulations with parallel computing on heterogeneous hardware of personal computer Wangda Zuo University of Miami Andrew McNeil Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Michael Wetter Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Eleanor S. Lee Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Windows and Envelope Materials Group Building Technology and Urban Systems Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division April 2013 Published in Journal of Building Performance Simulation DOI: 10.1080/19401493.2013.795193 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the

231

PAPER PREPARATION GUIDE AND SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SENSITIVITY STUDY OF BUILDING PERFORMANCE USING 30-YEAR SENSITIVITY STUDY OF BUILDING PERFORMANCE USING 30-YEAR ACTUAL WEATHER DATA Tianzhen Hong 1, *, Wen-Kuei Chang 2 , Hung-Wen Lin 2 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA 2 Green Energy and Environment Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Taiwan, R.O.C. ABSTRACT Traditional energy performance calculated using building simulation with the typical meteorological year (TMY) weather data represents the energy performance in a typical year but not necessarily the average or typical energy performance of a building in long term. Furthermore, the simulated results do not provide the range of variations due to the change of weather, which is important in building energy management and risk assessment of energy

232

PAPER PREPARATION GUIDE AND SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

564E 564E Modeling and simulation of HVAC Results in EnergyPlus Mangesh Basarkar, Xiufeng Pang, Liping Wang, Philip Haves, Tianzhen Hong November 2011 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

233

Company Company Code Fiscal Year Submission Date  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 2010 2010 EIA-28 Financial Reporting System Sch 5100 -- Page 1 of 1 #N/A Your are not required to respond to any Federally sponsored collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB number The Report is Mandatory Under Public Laws 95-91 and 93-275 Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law (See Section E of the General Instructions). For the provisions concerning the confidentiality of information submitted on this form, see Section D of the General Instructions. Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average approximately 500 hours per response, including the time of reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send

234

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - January 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aleksandar Donev, Phillip Duxbury. Applications Science and Engineering Handling Nonnegative Constraints in Spectral Estimation Brien Alkire, Lieven...

235

Optimization Online - Network Optimization Submissions - 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aleksandar Donev, Phillip Duxbury. February 2001. On the min-cut max-flow ratio for multicommodity flows. Oktay Gunluk. April 2001. A study of preconditioners...

236

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - January 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications Science and Engineering On the Optimal On-Line Management of Photovoltaic-Hydrogen Hybrid Energy Systems Victor Zavala, Mihai Anitescu,...

237

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - July 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POST-PARETO ANALYSIS FOR MULTIOBJECTIVE PARABOLIC CONTROL SYSTEMS Henri Bonnel ... Optimal management and sizing of energy storage under dynamic pricing for the efficient integration of renewable energy. Pavithra...

238

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - November 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Unified Approach for Cycle Service Levels Miguel Lejeune ... Incremental-like Bundle Methods with Application to Energy Planning Grgory Emiel, Claudia...

239

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - April 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stochastic Programming ... Stochastic Programming ... MODEL IN THE PRESENCE OF A NONLINEAR FRICTION AND A BOUNDED FUEL EXPENDITURE

240

Optimization Online - Robust Optimization Submissions - 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Exact Algorithm for Power Grid Interdiction Problem with Line Switching Long Zhao, Bo Zeng. An Exact Algorithm for Two-stage Robust Optimization with...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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241

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - April 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications OR and Management Sciences Scheduling Flexible Maintenance Activities subject to Job-Dependent Machine Deterioration Stefan Bock, Dirk...

242

Optimization Online - Robust Optimization Submissions - 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sanjay Mehrotra, He Zhang. Robust Energy Cost Optimization of Water Distribution System with Uncertain Demand Alexander Goryashko, Arkadi Nemirovski.

243

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - January 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Second-Order Variational Analysis in Conic Programming with Applications to ... A two-step optimization approach for job shop scheduling problem using a...

244

Ieee Pes Proceedings Paper Submission Cover Sheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The automated circuit breaker diagnostic system described in this paper is an extension of the widely used portable circuit breaker testing device concept. The testing devices can be connected to the circuit breaker's control circuit to record analog and digital signals. The automated system consists of a signal processing module and an expert system module. The two modules process the voltage and current signals recorded by the testing device, diagnose and report any abnormalities that are discovered. The paper describes the system requirements, the implementation of the two system modules, and provides an example that demonstrates the entire process. Real data recorded in a substation has been used to test the system.

Notes The Paper; Powersystemanalysis Powersystemrelaying

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - June 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hybrid genetic algorithm for the weight setting problem in OSPF/IS-IS ... A hybrid heuristic for the P-median problem ... Shunting Minimal Rail Car Allocation

246

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - August 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of running strategies based on anaerobic energy and variations of ... Convergence Analysis of DC Algorithm for DC programming with subanalytic...

247

Optimization Online - Nonlinear Optimization Submissions - 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of running strategies based on anaerobic energy and variations of velocity. Amandine Aftalion, J. Frdric Bonnans. Convergence Analysis of DC...

248

Optimization Online - Global Optimization Submissions - 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization and homotopy methods for the Gibbs free energy of magmatic mixtures ... On DC. optimization algorithms for solving minmax flow problems

249

Optimization Online - Stochastic Programming Submissions - 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... Problems with Joint Chance Constraints via CVaR/DC Approximations ... Dual- level scenario trees - Scenario generation and applications in energy planning

250

Optimization Online - Nonlinear Optimization Submissions - 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arvind U. Raghunathan, Lorenz T. Biegler. Genetic Algorithm for Solving ... Hande Y Benson, Arun Sen, David F. Shanno, Robert J. Vanderbei. A limited memory...

251

E-Submission (File Reference: 423155)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cambridge University Press, 1993. 14 Kazunari Shibata. New observational facts about solar flares from Yohkoh studies-evidence of magnetic reconnection and a unifield model of...

252

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - January 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existence and stability results based on asymptotic analysis for semidefinite linear complementarity problems ... Julio L pez, Rub n L pez, Hector Ram rez C.

253

Optimization Online - Combinatorial Optimization Submissions - 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design and analysis of an approximation algorithm for Stackelberg network pricing. Sebastien Roch, Patrice ... E. Alper Yildirim, Xiaofei Fan. Meta Heuristics

254

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - May 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Network Design Arc Set with Variable Upper Bounds Alper Atamturk, Oktay ... Fan Lu, Sunduz Keles, Stephen J. Wright, Grace Wahba. Integer Programming

255

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - October 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The value of rolling horizon policies for risk-averse hydro-thermal planning ... Two-Stage Robust Power Grid Optimization Problem Ruiwei Jiang, Muhong Zhang...

256

PAPER PREPARATION GUIDE AND SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA 2 Green Energy and Environment Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute,...

257

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - October 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equilibria on the Day-Ahead Electricity Market Margarida Carvalho ... Minimax Robust Unit Commitment Problem with Demand and Market Price uncertainty

258

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - November 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robust Unit Commitment Problem with Demand Response and Wind Energy Long Zhao, Bo Zeng. Global Optimization A modified DIRECT algorithm for a...

259

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - July 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving G. Zakeri, D. Craigie, A. Philpott, M. Todd. Convex and Nonsmooth Optimization On Equilibrium...

260

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using EPECs to model bilevel games in restructured electricity markets ... The Rate of Convergence of the Augmented Lagrangian Method for Nonlinear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - May 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... robust workforce scheduling in call centers with uncertain arrival rates ... A stochastic multiscale model for electricity generation capacity expansion

262

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - February 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Constructive Proof of the Existence of a Utility in Revealed Preference Theory ... A Stochastic Gradient Method with an Exponential Convergence Rate for...

263

Optimization Online - Nonlinear Optimization Submissions - 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mariano Beguerisse-Daz, Baojun Wang, Radhika Desikan, Mauricio Barahona. Unconstrained Optimization Globally Convergent Evolution Strategies and...

264

Optimization Online - Integer Programming Submissions - 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Friedrich Eisenbrand, Gennady Shmonin. May 2007. (Mixed) Integer Linear Programming An Integer Programming Approach to Equitable Coloring Problems

265

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - November 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Friedrich Eisenbrand, Gianpaolo Oriolo, Gautier Stauffer, Paolo Ventura. Applications OR and Management Sciences Formulations and Valid Inequalities for...

266

Optimization Online - Combinatorial Optimization Submissions - 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polyhedra Circular Ones Matrices and the Stable Set Polytope of Quasi-Line Graphs Friedrich Eisenbrand, Gianpaolo Oriolo, Gautier Stauffer, Paolo Ventura.

267

Optimization Online - Stochastic Programming Submissions - 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The value of multi-stage stochastic programming in capacity planning under ... Laws of Large Numbers for Set-Valued Mappings and Subdifferentials of Random...

268

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - December 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prox-Regularity and Stability of the Proximal Mapping ... Optimization of Flexural capacity of Reinforced fibrous Concrete Beams Using Genetic Algorithm D Suji...

269

2009 Great Places Awards -- Call for Submissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009 Great Places Awards Places, the Environmental Designannounce the twelfth annual awards program for Place Design,ipation of Metropolis, the awards program has a new name in

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - July 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global optimization of Morse clusters by potential energy transformations ... Mathematical optimization for the inverse problem of intensity modulated...

271

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - February 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A NOTE ON THE EXTENSION COMPLEXITY OF THE KNAPSACK POLYTOPE Sebastian Pokutta, Mathieu Van Vyve. Other Topics Optimal Power Grid...

272

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - September 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Short Proof that the Extension Complexity of the Correlation Polytope Grows Exponentially Volker Kaibel ... Rounding on the standard simplex: regular grids for global optimization ... Convex Quadratic Relaxations of Power Flows Hassan ...

273

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - February 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... Optimization for Power System Configuration with Renewable Energy in Remote Areas ... Robust Energy Cost Optimization of Water Distribution System with...

274

Optimization Online - Other Topics Submissions - 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equilibria on the Day-Ahead Electricity Market Margarida Carvalho, Joo Pedro Pedroso. Optimization of Simulated Systems Simulation Optimization for the...

275

Draft Submission; Social Cost of Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide a general understanding of the social costs associated with electric power generation. Based on a thorough review of recent literature on the subject, the report describes how these social costs can be most fully and accurately evaluated, and discusses important considerations in applying this information within the competitive bidding process. [DJE 2005

1990-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

276

Paperwork Reduction Act Submission (OMB 83-I)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Keywords 10. Abstract 11. Affected public 12. Obligation to respond Individuals or households F a rm s Bus iness or othe r for-pro fit Federal Government Required to obtain or...

277

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - September 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Convergence Analysis of Inexact Infeasible Interior Point Method for Linear ... A Sequential Convex Semidefinite Programming Algorithm for Multiple-Load Free ... Computational Experience with a Software Framework for Parallel Integer...

278

JOM: Author Tools - Manuscript Submission Checklist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For vector graphics, the preferred format is EPS. 1200 dpi is the minimum resolution accepted for line drawings; halftones require a minimum resolution of 300...

279

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - October 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Differentiable exact penalty functions for nonlinear second-order cone programs. Ellen H. Fukuda, Paulo J. S. Silva, Masao Fukushima. Stochastic Programming

280

NERSC Electronic Computer User Agreement Submission form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kanpur India: Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi India: Institute for Plasma Research India: Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar India India: Inter-University Centre for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

9th Annual DOE LSOW - Abstract Submission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... flashlamps), very high pulse energy (>10s of ... making Class 1 products, interlock systems. ... training and program management, safety configuration ...

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

282

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - March 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications OR and Management Sciences Economic and Environmental Analysis of Photovoltaic Energy Systems via Robust Optimization Shimpei Okido

283

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - March 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Mathematical-Programming Framework for Facility-Layout Design Miguel F. Anjos, Anthony ... DSDP4 Software User Guide Steven Benson, Yinyu Ye.

284

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - August 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Machine Learning for Global Optimization Andrea Cassioli, David Di Lorenzo, ... Curve Search, Part II: Convex Quadratic Program Yaguang Yang. Linear, Cone...

285

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - April 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling and Simulation of Metabolic Networks for Estimation of Biomass ... A Robust Branch-Cut-and-Price Algorithm for the Heterogeneous Fleet Vehicle...

286

Announcement Notice Only Submissions | Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Print page Print page Email page Email page In some cases the Announcement Notices 241.1, 241.3, and 241.4 are submitted to OSTI without an STI product attached or a URL...

287

Company Company Code Fiscal Year Submission Date  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

#N/A #N/A 2010 2010 EIA-28 Financial Reporting System Sch 5100 -- Page 1 of 1 Your are not required to respond to any Federally sponsored collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB number The Report is Mandatory Under Public Laws 95-91 and 93-275 Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law (See Section E of the General Instructions). For the provisions concerning the confidentiality of information submitted on this form, see Section D of the General Instructions. Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average approximately 500 hours per response, including the time of reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send

288

Local Implications of Globally Restricted Mobility: A study of Queenstowns vulnerability to peak oil and climate change.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis employs a case study approach to investigate local implications of globally restricted mobility by examining Queenstowns vulnerability to peak oil and climate change. (more)

Walsh, Tim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The Implications of Carbon Taxation on Microgrid Adoption of Small-Scale On-Site Power Generation Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-49309 The Implications of Carbon Taxation on Microgrid Adoption of Small-Scale On-Site Power .................................................................................................................1 1.1 Microgrid Concept

290

Economic implications of anaerobic digesters on dairy farms in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, air and water have been considered common property resources and, therefore, over utilized as waste receptors. Dairy waste is a leading environmental concern in the North Bosque River watershed in Texas. Changing societal attitudes are forcing dairies and policymakers to balance environmental concerns with farm profitability. Dairies are entering a realm filled with technologies to combat waste concerns. Anaerobic digester technology may play a role in helping dairies balance profit and the environment. Digesters capture methane from livestock waste and transform it into electricity which can be sold to utilities or used on-farm. Because a digester facility is confined, air and water pollution can be reduced. Technological advancement and institutional factor changes allowing the sale of on-farm produced electricity and green power requirements have increased the economic feasibility of digesters. The study of the economic implications of anaerobic digesters for Texas dairies provides producers and policymakers with information to make good decisions concerning adoption and subsidization of this technology. At the beginning of this study, no digesters were operating in Texas. Dairies operating digesters in four states, therefore, were interviewed on-site to provide necessary data. The expected net present value, E(NPV), of a plug-flow digester is negative with and without selling electricity, indicating it should not be constructed based strictly on its financial contribution. At the current electricity-selling price, digesters are less economically feasible than current waste management strategies, lagoons, even after considering potential environmental penalties. However, selling electricity and capturing by-product heat for cost savings makes the digester's E(NPV) less negative than lagoons. The E(NPV) of a covered lagoon digester is positive. This indicates digesters are a potentially feasible waste management strategy. For plug-flow digesters to show a positive E(NPV), the selling price needs to be approximately 82.38% higher than the current price. The breakeven selling price is 12% higher than the current price. Below the breakeven price, lagoons have a larger E(NPV) than plug-flow digesters, therefore making lagoons the preferred waste management strategy. Results suggest changes in rules and technology efficiency make digesters economically competitive with current waste management systems.

Jackson, Randy Scott, Jr.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Metal fires and their implications for advanced reactors.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the primary results of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project (LDRD 08-0857) Metal Fires and Their Implications for Advance Reactors. Advanced reactors may employ liquid metal coolants, typically sodium, because of their many desirable qualities. This project addressed some of the significant challenges associated with the use of liquid metal coolants, primary among these being the extremely rapid oxidation (combustion) that occurs at the high operating temperatures in reactors. The project has identified a number of areas for which gaps existed in knowledge pertinent to reactor safety analyses. Experimental and analysis capabilities were developed in these areas to varying degrees. In conjunction with team participation in a DOE gap analysis panel, focus was on the oxidation of spilled sodium on thermally massive surfaces. These are spills onto surfaces that substantially cool the sodium during the oxidation process, and they are relevant because standard risk mitigation procedures seek to move spill environments into this regime through rapid draining of spilled sodium. While the spilled sodium is not quenched, the burning mode is different in that there is a transition to a smoldering mode that has not been comprehensively described previously. Prior work has described spilled sodium as a pool fire, but there is a crucial, experimentally-observed transition to a smoldering mode of oxidation. A series of experimental measurements have comprehensively described the thermal evolution of this type of sodium fire for the first time. A new physics-based model has been developed that also predicts the thermal evolution of this type of sodium fire for the first time. The model introduces smoldering oxidation through porous oxide layers to go beyond traditional pool fire analyses that have been carried out previously in order to predict experimentally observed trends. Combined, these developments add significantly to the safety analysis capabilities of the advanced-reactor community for directly relevant scenarios. Beyond the focus on the thermally-interacting and smoldering sodium pool fires, experimental and analysis capabilities for sodium spray fires have also been developed in this project.

Nowlen, Steven Patrick; Figueroa, Victor G.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Hewson, John C.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Project Galaxy - Sustianable Resource Supply and Environmental Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding what it takes to move from a corn-based liquid fuels industry to one that is cellulosic-based requires a complex transition over time. This transition implies, among other things, a shift from annual cropping systems considered under United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) policy as commodity crops, to perennial lignocellulosic crops that are herbaceous and wood-based. Because of changes in land use as well as biomass and other crop supplies, land-based environmental amenities such as water quality, soil health and tilth, air quality, and animal and avian species populations and their diversity change also. Environmental effects are measured as magnitudes (how much they are impacted), and direction of the impact (either positive or negative). By developing a series of quantitative and qualitative metrics, the larger issue of defining relative sustainability may be addressed, and this can be done at a finer detail of regional (scale) and environmental amenity-specific impacts. Although much literature exists about research relevant to specific environmental variables, there is no published, documented, nor research literature on direct application of environmental over-compliance with regards a 'biorefinery.' Our three goals were to (1) understand and quantify bioenergy sustainability and some key environmental effects in a generic set of examples; (2) explain the effort and means to define and quantify specific qualitative environmental measures, and to determine a way to understand changes in these measures over time and what their implications might be; and (3) use these outcomes to evaluate potential sites in any geographic area. This would permit assessment of candidate locations, combined with an understanding of co-production of fuels, chemicals, and electric power, to interpret sustainability measures and the relationship between environmental sustainability and economic sustainability. The process of determining environmental sustainability effects as a result of providing renewable energy is complex. We have only included in this report environmental effects as a result of producing biomass for the biorefinery, and the area represented by the footprint of the biorefinery itself. In doing this, we have defined critical environmental variables (water, soil, air, and flora and fauna) and discussed some measurable indicators used to quantify effects such as nitrate content, soil organic matter, air particulates, and avian species diversity, respectively. We also point out the need to perform specific sustainability risk assessments, and the need to continually evaluate the life cycle inventory with an accompanying life-cycle assessment. Only in this dynamic framework can environmental sustainability be determined, evaluated and assessed, and contrasted with economic sustainability goals of a firm or an industry.

Downing, Mark [ORNL; Wimmer, Robert [Toyota Motor Corp.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Thermal Data And Deep Electrical Sounding Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Thermal Data And Deep Electrical Sounding Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Temperatures of 100°C are measured at 3 km depth in a well located on the resurgent dome in the center of Long Valley Caldera, California, despite an assumed >800°C magma chamber at 6-8 km depth. Local downflow of cold meteoric water as a process for cooling the resurgent dome is ruled out by a Peclet-number analysis of temperature logs. These analyses reveal zones with fluid circulation at the upper and lower

294

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and Communications Speaker(s): Jonathan Koomey Date: November 14, 2012 - 4:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Alan Meier Long-standing trends in the energy efficiency of computing promise an explosion in data collected from mobile sensors, controls, and portable computing devices. This talk will describe the research that revealed those efficiency trends and the implications of those trends for our ability to understand and respond to the world around us. The talk will also summarize work in progress characterizing related trends in mobile communications, sensors, batteries, and energy harvesting. A recording of this talk will be available on the UCB Energy and Resources

295

California geothermal resource development environmental implications for ERCDC Environmental Analysis Office. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an analysis of the environmental implications for ERCDC Environmental Analysis Office (EAO) in relation to the development of California's geothermal resources are reported. While focusing primarily on environmental implications, particularly the natural, social, and economic elements, the report includes some ERCDC-wide policy and program considerations. The primary thrusts of the work have been in the development of an understanding of the interagency and intergovernmental environmental data and data-management roles and responsibilities and in the formulation of recommendations related thereto. Five appendices are included, one of which is a tax credit agreement between a power company and Skagit County, Washington. (JGB)

Roberts, J.A.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Policy implications of greenhouse warming: Mitigation, adaptation, and the science base  

SciTech Connect

This book discusses the policy implications of greenhouse warming by examining three major areas: general summary of information about the greenhouse effect leading to a framework for policy; the science basis for the greenhouse effect; mitigation of greenhouse warming. Each section contains 9-13 chapters on specific subjects including the following: overview of greenhouse gases; policy implications; internations considerations; climate records and models; sea levels; temperature rise estimation; energy management at several levels; nonenergy emission reduction; human populations; deforestation. Conclusions are summarized at the end of each section.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Automakers' Short-Run Responses to Changing Gasoline Prices and the Implications for Energy Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automakers' Short-Run Responses to Changing Gasoline Prices and the Implications for Energy Policy Policy, 735 S. State St. #5224, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. Miller: Economic Analysis Group, U.S. Department of intervention, the market is likely to produce efficient outcomes.1 We examine the empirical relationship

Edwards, Paul N.

298

Gravity anomalies of the Northern Hawaiian Islands: Implications on the shield evolutions of Kauai and Niihau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravity anomalies of the Northern Hawaiian Islands: Implications on the shield evolutions of Kauai January 2010; accepted 16 March 2010; published 31 August 2010. [1] New land and marine gravity data reveal two positive residual gravity anomalies in the Northern Hawaiian Islands: one over Kaua

Ito, Garrett

299

Implications of a Carbon Based Energy Tax for U.S. Agriculture Uwe A. Schneider*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Washington DC, 1994 #12;U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration. Annual Energy ReviewImplications of a Carbon Based Energy Tax for U.S. Agriculture Uwe A. Schneider* Assistant.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C supported this work. * Corresponding Author Journal of Economic

McCarl, Bruce A.

300

NATURAL GAS FOR TRANSPORTATION OR ELECTRICITY? CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS Date: 27-Oct-11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethanol. Given that future natural gas supply is limited, despite forecasts of increased domestic. If the objective of a policy were the reduction of GHG emissions using a limited supply of natural gas, the bestNATURAL GAS FOR TRANSPORTATION OR ELECTRICITY? CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS Date: 27-Oct-11 Natural

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Station blackout at nuclear power plants: Radiological implications for nuclear war  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work on station blackout is reviewed its radiological implications for a nuclear war scenario is explored. The major conclusion is that the effects of radiation from many nuclear weapon detonations in a nuclear war would swamp those from possible reactor accidents that result from station blackout.

Shapiro, C.S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Exotic Solutions to the Solar Neutrino Problem and Some Implications for Low Energy Solar Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk, I review, from the phenomenological point of view, solutions to the solar neutrino problem, which are not provided by the conventional neutrino oscillation induced by mass and flavor mixing, and show that they can provide a good fit to the observed data. I also consider some simple implications for low energy solar neutrino experiments.

H. Nunokawa

2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

303

HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR EMULATION VIA DOPPLER CLOUD RADAR SPECTRUM PROCESSING AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

targeting the liquid, and radar, the ice. Depolarization measurements can assist in resolving phase to identify liquid, ice, and mixed-phase clouds. __________ NOTICE: This manuscript has been authored IMPLICATIONS FOR CLOUD PHASE IDENTIFICATION E. Luke, P. Kollias, and M. Shupe Presented at the American

304

Energy Policy 36 (2008) 15381544 Promoting biofuels: Implications for developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Policy 36 (2008) 1538­1544 Promoting biofuels: Implications for developing countries Jo¨ rg 2008 Abstract Interest in biofuels is growing worldwide as concerns about the security of energy supply, however, production costs of biofuels are typically much higher than those of fossil fuels. As a result

305

Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural landscapes and generalist natural enemies in three model biofuel crops: corn, switch- grass, and mixed prairie, we tested

Landis, Doug

306

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approximate the seasonality trend in the futures price data. Meanwhile, the table reveals a strong annual-switching model for the risk adjusted natural gas spot price and study the implications of the model) to solve the gas storage pricing problem, essentially a stochastic control problem, and conduct

Forsyth, Peter A.

307

China's coal price disturbances: Observations, explanations, and implications for global energy economies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's coal price disturbances: Observations, explanations, and implications for global energy I G H T S c Since China decontrolled its coal prices, the price of coal has risen steadily in China, accompanied by unusual volatility. c Relatively high and volatile coal prices have triggered widespread power

Jackson, Robert B.

308

Regional carbon dynamics in monsoon Asia and its implications for the global carbon cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional carbon dynamics in monsoon Asia and its implications for the global carbon cycle Hanqin on the exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and monsoon Asian ecosystems. During 1860­1990, modeled results suggest that monsoon Asia as a whole released 29.0 Pg C, which represents 50% of the global carbon release

309

Contrasting the Indian and East Asian monsoons: implications on geologic timescales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contrasting the Indian and East Asian monsoons: implications on geologic timescales Bin Wang a for the strength of the Indian monsoon and East Asian monsoon, respectively. Paleo-monsoon variability has been studied through analysis of sediment records from these two monsoon regions. To facilitate interpretation

Wang, Bin

310

Identification of chiller model in HVAC system using fuzzy inference rules with Zadeh's implication operator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, chiller is the central part and one of the primary energy consumers. For the purpose of saving energy, the identification of the chiller model is of great significance. In this paper, based ... Keywords: chiller, fuzzy inference system, implication operator, improved genetic algorithm

Yukui Zhang; Shiji Song; Cheng Wu; Kang Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Measuring Molecular Motor Forces In Vivo: Implications for Tug-of-War Models of Bidirectional Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measuring Molecular Motor Forces In Vivo: Implications for Tug-of-War Models of Bidirectional, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Molecular motor proteins use the energy released from the force motors generate amounts to directly probing their function. We report on optical trapping

Texas at Austin. University of

312

Counting false entries in truth tables of bracketed formulae connected by m-implication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we count the number of rows yn with the value "false" in the truth tables of all bracketed formulae with n distinct variables connected by the binary connective of 2modi?ed-implication". We ?find a recurrence and an asymptotic formulae for yn. We also determine the parity of yn.

Yildiz, Volkan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Economic Implications of Natural Gas Vehicle Technology in U.S. Private Automobile Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is as a result of the more expensive fuel storage tank required to store natural gas safely and effectively). Because of the relative density of natural gas and size of CNG storage containers, CNG vehicles typically1 Economic Implications of Natural Gas Vehicle Technology in U.S. Private Automobile Transportation

314

China's Environmental Issues, a Domestic Challenge with Regional and International Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China and its population are confronted with fundamental environmental challenges, as both, environmental degeneration and the impact of climate change exhibit critical social, economic and political implications for their future development. Among the ... Keywords: Chinese Politics, Climate Change, Environment, Global, International Relations, Regional

Christian Ploberger

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Metric concepts and implications in describing compositional changes for world river's water chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper is designed to give the reader an outline that is useful for understanding the importance of distance, as a metric concept, and its implications when compositional (geochemical) data are managed from a statistical point of view in a given sample ... Keywords: Compositions, Distance, River geochemistry, Simplex space

A. Buccianti; R. Magli

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Economic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary and Motor Vehicle Fuel Cell Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

); and · Similarly, use of PEM fuel cell waste heat for hot water heating would require careful integration with hot consider cogeneration of hot water to be a potential competitive advantage of stationary fuel cellsPWP-092 Economic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary and Motor Vehicle Fuel Cell Systems

Kammen, Daniel M.

317

Multistage evolution of the Jijal ultramaficmafic complex (Kohistan, N Pakistan): Implications for building the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multistage evolution of the Jijal ultramafic­mafic complex (Kohistan, N Pakistan): Implications, Cc 57, 34095 Montpellier cedex 05, France d Pakistan Museum of Natural History, Garden Avenue, Shakarparian, 44000 Islamabad, Pakistan Received 12 February 2007; received in revised form 15 June 2007

Demouchy, Sylvie

318

Futuring e-government: governance and policy implications for designing an ICT-enabled knowledge society  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relation between Governance and Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) and its implications for policy design in a period of global turbulence and uncertainty. After briefly introducing some of ... Keywords: ICTs, e-government, foresight, governance, knowledge, policy

Gianluca Misuraca

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Production Speaker(s): Corinne Scown Date: January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Sohn If the goal of science is to understand the structure and behavior of the physical and natural world, and the goal of engineering is to design, build, and manage systems that serve society's needs, then the study of civil infrastructure systems acts as a link between the two. Understanding the reliance of engineered systems on constrained natural resources, as well as their impact on human well-being and the environment, is key to building and maintaining infrastructure that is sustainable in the broader sense. This talk will explore the important role of life-cycle assessment and optimization in assessing such questions as: a.)

320

Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seam Well Completion Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy and National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas September 2003 DOE/NETL-2003/1193 Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) (Strategic Center for Natural Gas) DOE/NETL-2003/1193 September 2003 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Genetic and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems G.A. Tuskan (tuskanga@ornl.gov; 865-576-8141) S.D. Wullschleger (wullschlegsd@ornl.gov; 865-574-7839) A.W. King (kingaw@ornl.gov; 865-576-3436) T.J. Tschaplinski (tschaplinstj@ornl.gov; 865-574-4597) L.E. Gunter (gunterle@ornl.gov; 865-574-4020) A.M. Silletti (sillettia@ornl.gov; 865-574-5397) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422 M. Davis (Mark_Davis@nrel.gov; 303-384-6140) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3322 Introduction Carbon sequestration in terrestrial vegetation and soils is a poorly understood process, but ultimately represents a summation of biological activities including the initial incorporation of

322

Western Region Renewable Energy Markets: Implications for the Bureau of Land Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Region Renewable Western Region Renewable Energy Markets: Implications for the Bureau of Land Management Scott Haase, Lynn Billman, and Rachel Gelman Produced under direction of the Bureau of Land Management by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement L11PG00030 and Task No WFH7.1004. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-53540 January 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Western Region Renewable Energy Markets: Implications for the Bureau of Land Management

323

The radiation chemistry of ionic liquids and its implications for their use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation chemistry of ionic liquids and its implications for their use radiation chemistry of ionic liquids and its implications for their use in nuclear fuel processing J. F. Wishart and I. A. Shkrob in "Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application" Rogers, R. D., Plechkova, N. V., and Seddon, K. R., Eds.; ACS Symp. Ser. 1030, Ch. 8, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2009, pp 119-134. (ISBN 978-0-8412-6997-2) [Find chapter at ACS Publications] Abstract: Using ionic liquids as a medium for the processing of spent nuclear fuel, where their safety and process improvement advantages could be significant, promises to substantially contribute to the development of advanced nuclear fuel cycles to improve the world's energy posture. It is therefore important to study the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids, to determine

324

Coupling Air Flow Models to Load/Energy Models and Implications for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coupling Air Flow Models to Load/Energy Models and Implications for Coupling Air Flow Models to Load/Energy Models and Implications for Envelope Component Testing and Modeling Speaker(s): Brent Griffith Date: July 30, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Dariush Arasteh Air models allow accounting for air temperature variations within a thermal zone or along the surface of an envelope component. A recently completed ASHRAE research project (RP-1222) produced a source code toolkit focused on coupling airflow models to load routines typical of whole building energy simulation. The two modeling domains are computed separately (and iteratively) with relevant temperature boundary conditions passed back and forth. One of the air models in the toolkit is a new contribution to crude/fast airflow modeling that is based on solving the Euler equation

325

Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reductions in Northeast Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets December 2011 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy

326

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME IMPLICATIONS, OPPORTUNITIES. AND CHALLENGES FOR U.S. FORESTRY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME IMPLICATIONS, OPPORTUNITIES. GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME IMPLICATIONS, OPPORTUNITIES. AND CHALLENGES FOR U.S. FORESTRY G. Marland' Ahsiract.--It is widcly agrccd that thc concentration of greenhouse gases in the earth's atmosphcrc is increasing, that this increase is a consequence of man's activities, and that there is signilicant risk that this will lead to changes in the earth's climate. T h c qucstion is now k i n g discusscd what, if anything, we should be doing to minimize and/or adapt to changes in climate. Virtually evcry statcmcnt on this matter; from the G.S. Oflice of Tcchnology Assessment. to the National Acadcmy of Science, to the Nairobi Declaration on Climatic Change. includes some recommendation for planting and protecting forests. In fact, forestry is intimately involved in the climate change

327

Section 1603 Treasury Grant Expiration: Industry Insight on Financing and Market Implications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

§1603 Treasury Grant §1603 Treasury Grant Expiration: Industry Insight on Financing and Market Implications Michael Mendelsohn National Renewable Energy Laboratory John Harper Birch Tree Capital, LLC Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-53720 June 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 §1603 Treasury Grant Expiration: Industry Insight on Financing and Market Implications Michael Mendelsohn National Renewable Energy Laboratory John Harper Birch Tree Capital, LLC

328

Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or not to BAP) Speaker(s): Larry Goldstein Date: November 7, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants with potential health consequences. Essentially all the cancer risk from exposure to coal tar, cigarette smoke and other products of incomplete combustion is thought to reflect the contributions of PAHs with 4 or more fused rings. In risk assessment as currently practiced the major contributor to overall risk is the 5-ring PAH benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P).However, recent studies using a lifetime feeding protocol indicate that B(a)P does not meet criteria for application to risk assessment since it does not induce lung tumors, the endpoint upon which risk assessments

329

Approximation of Ocean Heat Storage by OceanAtmosphere Energy Exchange: Implications for Seasonal Cycle Mixed Layer Ocean Formulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The approximation of ocean heat storage by the net surface energy flux and the implications for zonal mean SST simulation using mixed layer ocean formulation are examined. The analysis considers both constant and variable depth mixed layers. ...

Robert G. Gallimore; David D. Houghton

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Electrically Active Convection in Tropical Easterly Waves and Implications for Tropical Cyclogenesis in the Atlantic and East Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors investigated the characteristics of tropical easterly wave convection and the possible implications of convective structure on tropical cyclogenesis and intensification over the Atlantic Ocean and the east Pacific Ocean. ...

Kenneth D. Leppert II; Walter A. Petersen; Daniel J. Cecil

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A Climatology of Disdrometer Measurements of Rainfall in Finland over Five Years with Implications for Global Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve the understanding of high-latitude rain microphysics and its implications for the remote sensing of rainfall by ground-based and spaceborne radars, raindrop size measurements have been analyzed that were collected over five years with a ...

Jussi Leinonen; Dmitri Moisseev; Matti Leskinen; Walter A. Petersen

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Edible Oleogels: Structure and Health ImplicationsChapter 14 Clinical Study on 12-hydroxystearic Acid Organogel Ingestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From: Edible Oleogels: Structure and Health Implications Chapter 14 Clinical Study on 12-hydroxystearic Acid Organogel Ingestion Food Science eChapters Food Science & Technology AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of

333

Implications of carbon cap-and-trade for electricity rate design, with examples from Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The price of CO{sub 2} emissions allowances affects the structure of the utility's costs, which has implications for rate design and load management programs. Depending on the design of the program to recover these costs, utility total revenue requirements - and the rate design utilized to recover these requirements - may be impacted. A new way to think about rate design may be required. (author)

Parmesano, Hethie; Kury, Theodore J.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

A Cosmological Exact Solution of Complex Jordan-Brans-Dicke Theory and its Phenomenological Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When Brans-Dicke Theory is formulated in terms of the Jordan scalar field \\phi, dark energy is related to the mass of this field. We show that if \\phi is taken to be a complex scalar field then an exact solution of the vacuum equations shows that Friedmann equation possesses a term, proportional to the inverse sixth power of the scale factor, as well as a constant term. Possible interpretations and phenomenological implications of this result are discussed.

Metin Ar?k; Mehmet Cal?k; N. Katirci

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

335

Policy implications of the GRI Baseline Projection of US Energy Supply and Demand to 2010; 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1991 edition of the GRI Baseline Projection of U.S. Energy Supply and Demand is summarized. Three broad implications for the future of the natural gas industry are highlighted: the impact of the Middle East turmoil on the expected price of crude oil and the potentional for increased interfuel price competition between natural gas and petroleum in the mid-1990s if world oil prices return to lower levels.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Counting false entries in truth tables of bracketed formulae connected by implication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we count the number of rows f_n with the value "false" in the truth tables of all bracketed formulae with n distinct variables connected by the binary connective of implication. We find a recurrence and an asymptotic formulae for f_n. We also show that the ratio of f_n to the total number of rows converges to \\frac{3-\\sqrt{3}}{6}.

Cameron, Peter J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Implication of a large ?_13 for the Tokai to Kamioka and Korea setup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, I present the implications of the large value of \\theta_13 on the Tokai to Kamioka and Korea setup (T2KK). I study the sensitivity of T2KK when using a 750 kW beam (the design luminosity of T2K planned to be achieved by 2017) and a potential 1.66 MW upgraded beam. In addition I compare the capability of the T2KK setup with the T2HK letter of intent.

Fanny Dufour

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

338

Continuity and internal properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and their implications for geopressured fluid production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intrinsic properties of the genetic sandstone units that typify many geopressured geothermal aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Gulf Coast region were systematically investigated classified, and differentiated. The following topics are coverd: structural and stratigraphic limits of sandstone reservoirs, characteristics and dimensions of Gulf Coast sandstones; fault-compartment areas; comparison of production and geologic estimates of aquifer fluid volume; geologic setting and reservoir characteristics, Wells of Opportunity; internal properties of sandstones; and implications for geopressured fluid production. (MHR)

Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Tyler, N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays from Gamma Ray Bursts: Implications of the Recent Observational Results by Milagro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been speculated earlier that Gamma Ray Bursts are sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. Recently, the search for high energy photons from Gamma Ray Bursts by Milagro group has put limits on the isotropic luminosity of these transient sources in very high energy photons. The implications of the results obtained by Milagro to our understanding of the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray spectrum from these sources have been discussed in the present work.

Nayantara Gupta

2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

340

Geochemical Investigation of Pyrite Codisposal with Sluiced Fly Ash and Implications for Selecting Remedial Actions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidation of pyrite results in acid generation as well as the release of sulfate, iron, and other metals to solution. When pyritic coal mill rejects are codisposed with coal ash, pyrite oxidation and the subsequent interaction of oxidation products with the ash primarily control leachate quality. The geochemistry of the pyrite/ash system has implications for management and remediation actions at codisposal facilities. Utilities can use the results of this research to make decisions regarding such facilit...

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EIA-Revisions to Gross Domestic product and Implications for the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2008) Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons The concept of GDP is a commonly used measure of economic activity. It can be expressed in nominal dollars or, with the use of a matched price index to remove inflation, in "real" terms. Movements in nominal GDP show how the value of goods and services produced by the United States changes over time, while real GDP is a measure of how the physical production of the economy has grown. While simple in concept, the projecting of nominal and real GDP and the interpretation of these projected measures relative to "history" is not simple or straightforward. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) within the U.S. Department of Commerce continually adjusts the National Income and Product Accounts data, with comprehensive revisions completed every 4 or 5 years. The last four major revisions (1985, 1991, 1995, and 1999) incorporated definitional and statistical changes, as well as emphasizing new ways of presenting the data. Also, prior to AEO1993 aggregate economic activity was measured and projected on the basis of Gross National Product (GNP) as opposed to Gross Domestic Product (GDP). For the period from 1984 through 2004, nominal GNP is on average approximately 0.45 percent above nominal GDP.

342

Integrating Sub-national Actors into National Mitigation Strategies Through  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrating Sub-national Actors into National Mitigation Strategies Through Integrating Sub-national Actors into National Mitigation Strategies Through Vertically Integrated NAMAs (V-NAMAs) Jump to: navigation, search Name Integrating Sub-national Actors into National Mitigation Strategies Through Vertically Integrated NAMAs (V-NAMAs) Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country Indonesia, South Africa South-Eastern Asia, Southern Africa References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview Many future NAMAs will only be successful to the extent that the sub-national players who also carry responsibility - such as provinces

343

South Africa-Integrating Sub-national Actors into National Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » South Africa-Integrating Sub-national Actors into National Mitigation Strategies Through Vertically Integrated NAMAs (V-NAMAs) Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa-Integrating Sub-national Actors into National Mitigation Strategies Through Vertically Integrated NAMAs (V-NAMAs) Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country South Africa Southern Africa References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview Many future NAMAs will only be successful to the extent that the

344

Ecosystem and Wildlife Implications of Brush: Management System Designed to Improve Water Runoff and Percolation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the settlement of Texas and establishment of ranchers to produce cattle, there was an effort to maximize beef production. This caused serious overgrazing. In addition, there was a reduced incidence of fires across the landscape to clear out brush. These factors led to deterioration of the grazing lands and provided an opportunity for invasive intrusion by brush and other species onto the land and riparian zones. There has been a large-scale conversion from grasslands and savannahs to wildlands over the last 150 years (Scholes and Archer, 1997). The overall impacts are significantly impaired uplands and reduced percolation and surface flow of water from rainfall which caused changes and loss in basic aquatic and terrestrial habitat. The State of Texas adopted a program to study and implement brush management systems across the state to improve the water availability in streams, rivers, reservoirs and aquifers, as well as to improve the rangelands. The feasibility studies have shown great promise for improving ranchland and improving the water situation. However, there is less known about the aquatic and wildlife species response implications of brush management. Certainly, there are opportunities for improving the viability of an ecosystem through brush management strategies and continuing management practices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in hydrology and biological diversity associated with brush management in two watersheds where significant data was already available. This study focused on assessing the aquatic and terrestrial species implications related to specified brush management strategies over time. This involved an integrated analysis including modeling of the landscape, assessing biological diversity and developing economic implications for the two watersheds (Twin Buttes and Edwards regions). Thus, this study is comprised of three parts: modeling of brush management strategies temporally, assessing biological diversity (aquatic and terrestrial) and estimating economic implications. This represents a complex analysis involving variable units and multiple disciplines. Previous feasibility studies of brush removal have been targeted at maximizing water runoff. This analysis is an extension that is designed to examine the implications of brush management under a more restrictive set of brush removal criteria that were chosen based upon wildlife considerations. To achieve the integration of hydrologic modeling, range ecology, and economic implications, there were three team meetings bringing together all components to review status and set priorities for the remainder of the work. In addition, scientists in the three basic groups of specialization interacted daily along with representatives of the Corps of Engineers to assure that each decision was reflected in other parts of the analyses. The major addition of this analysis to brush management feasibility studies being conducted as part of the Texas brush management plan is the consideration of wildlife and aquatic biota and assessing changes in biological diversity likely to result from alternative brush management scenarios.

Arrington, D. Albrey; Conner, Richard; Dugas, William; Hejl, Sallie; Magness, Dawn; Muttiah, Ranjan; Olenick, Keith; Rosenthal, Wes; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Winemiller, Kirk O.; Zinn, Michele; Wilkins, Neal; Amonett, Carl; Bednarz, Steve; Dybala, Tim; Griffith, Rebecca; Jarboe, Hank

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work Performance, Energy, and Associated Economics Title Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work Performance, Energy, and Associated Economics Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5035E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Fisk, William J., Douglas R. Black, and Gregory Brunner Journal Building and Environment Volume 47 Pagination 368-372 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords cost-benefit analysis, economizer, health, office, ventilation rate, work performance Abstract This paper provides quantitative estimates of benefits and costs of providing different amounts of outdoor air ventilation in U.S. offices. For four scenarios that modify ventilation rates, we estimated changes in sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, work performance, short-term absence, and building energy consumption. The estimated annual economic benefits were $13 billion from increasing minimum ventilation rates (VRs) from 8 to 10 L/s per person, $38 billion from increasing minimum VRs from 8 to 15 L/s per person, and $33 billion from increasing VRs by adding outdoor air economizers for the 50% of the office floor area that currently lacks economizers. The estimated $0.04 billion in annual energy-related benefits of decreasing minimum VRs from 8 to 6.5 L/s per person are very small compared to the projected annual costs of $12 billion. Benefits of increasing minimum VRs far exceeded energy costs while adding economizers yielded health, performance, and absence benefits with energy savings.

346

Recent Experience of and Prospects for High-Speed Rail in Korea: Implications of a Transport System and Regional Development from a Global Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for High-Speed Rail in Korea: Implications of a TransportMinistry of Transport Seoul, Korea and Visiting ScholarDevelopment in Korea 13 III.1.

Shin, Dong-Chun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implications of Recent Changes to the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implications of Recent Changes to the Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implications of Recent Changes to the ITC Title Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implications of Recent Changes to the ITC Publication Type Case Study Year of Publication 2008 Authors Bolinger, Mark, Galen L. Barbose, and Ryan H. Wiser Secondary Title Case Studies of State Support for Renewable Energy Publisher LBNL Place Published Berkeley Pagination 12 Date Published 11/2008 Abstract In early 2006, Berkeley Lab published an LBNL/CESA case study that examined the financial impact of EPAct 2005's solar tax credits on PV system owners, in light of the $2,000 cap on the residential credit, as well as the fact that most PV systems in the U.S. also receive cash incentives from state-, local-, or utility-administered PV programs, and that these cash incentives may reduce the value of federal tax credits in certain situations. That case study was subsequently revised in February 2007 to reflect new Internal Revenue Service (IRS) guidance. The findings of that case study, which are briefly recapped in the next section, remained relevant up until October 2008, when the Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 extended both solar credits for an unprecedented eight years, removed the $2,000 cap on the residential credit, and eliminated restrictions on the use of both credits in conjunction with the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT). These significant changes, which apply to systems placed in service on or after January 1, 2009, will increase the value of the solar credits for residential system owners in particular, and are likely to spur significant growth in residential, commercial, and utility-scale PV installations in the years ahead. In light of these substantial changes to the solar ITC, this report takes a fresh look at the value of these revised credits, focusing specifically on the Section 25D residential credit. After first setting the stage by briefly reviewing our previous findings, the document proceeds to cover four specific areas in which the removal of the $2,000 cap on the residential ITC will have significant implications for PV program administrators, PV system owners, and the PV industry that go beyond the obvious market growth potential created by these more-lucrative federal incentives. These four areas include:

348

Implications of NiMH Hysteresis on HEV Battery Testing and Performance  

SciTech Connect

Nickel Metal-Hydride (NiMH) is an advanced high-power battery technology that is presently employed in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) and is one of several technologies undergoing continuing research and development by FreedomCAR. Unlike some other HEV battery technologies, NiMH exhibits a strong hysteresis effect upon charge and discharge. This hysteresis has a profound impact on the ability to monitor state-of-charge and battery performance. Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) have been investigating the implications of NiMH hysteresis on HEV battery testing and performance. Experimental results, insights, and recommendations are presented.

Motloch, Chester George; Belt, Jeffrey R; Hunt, Gary Lynn; Ashton, Clair Kirkendall; Murphy, Timothy Collins; Miller, Ted J.; Coates, Calvin; Tataria, H. S.; Lucas, Glenn E.; Duong, T.Q.; Barnes, J.A.; Sutula, Raymond

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Welfare Implications of Oil Privatisation: A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Norway's Statoil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.electricitypolicy.org.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract The Welfare Implications of Oil Privatisation: A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Norway's Statoil EPRG Working Paper EPRG0905 Cambridge Working Paper in Economics... , and that privatisation can be structured with state involvement at several levels, aiming to maximise the public share of benefits. Keywords Privatisation, Cost-Benefit, Welfare, Oil and Gas, Norway JEL Classification D61, H43, L33, L71, Q48 Contact christian...

Wolf, C; Pollitt, Michael G.

350

Policy implications of the GRI baseline projection of US energy supply and demand to 2015, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The summary of the 1997 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection of U.S. Energy Supply and Demand discusses the implications of the projection that are important for GRI strategic planning and scenario development, and for the gas industry. The projection indicates that with adequate technology advances, natural gas will play a major role in an increasingly competitive energy mix well into the next century. It is expected that the expansion in gas markets experienced over the last decade will continue over the long term.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Implications of office building thermal mass and multi-day temperature profiles for cooling strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a study of the cooling energy requirements that result from thermal storage in building mass, and suggests methods for predicting and controlling its energy cost implications. The study relies on computer simulations of energy use for a large office building prototype in El Paso, TX using the DOE-2 building energy analysis program. Increased Monday cooling energy requirements resulting from the weekend shut-down of HVAC systems are documented. Predictors of energy use and peak demands, which account for thermal storage in building mass, are described. Load-shifting, sub-cooling and pre-cooling equipment operating strategies are evaluated with explicit reference to utility rate schedules.

Eto, J.H.; Powell, G.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The Implications of the New Rules of the Game for DR: Retail and Wires Companies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are ongoing shifts in the distributed resources (DR) market that impact both the retail side of the equation and the application of DR to the distribution grid. This brief paper examines some of these recent shifts and attempt to interpret the reasons for these shifts and the implications that these shifts have for the near term future of DR technologies. This review focuses on three states that appear to be the leaders in the evolution of the role of DR technologies in the wires company: Californi...

2000-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

353

Magnet reliability in the Fermilab Main Injector and implications for the ILC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Linear Collider reference design requires over 13000 magnets, of approximately 135 styles, which must operate with very high reliability. The Fermilab Main Injector represents a modern machine with many conventional magnet styles, each of significant quantity, that has now accumulated many hundreds of magnet-years of operation. We review here the performance of the magnets built for this machine, assess their reliability and categorize the failure modes, and discuss implications for reliability of similar magnet styles expected to be used at the ILC.

Tartaglia, M.A.; Blowers, J.; Capista, D.; Harding, D.J.; Kiemschies, O.; Rahimzadeh-Kalaleh, S.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Electroluminescence from Strained Ge membranes and Implications for an Efficient Si-Compatible Laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate room-temperature electroluminescence (EL) from light-emitting diodes (LED) on highly strained germanium (Ge) membranes. An external stressor technique was employed to introduce a 0.76% bi-axial tensile strain in the active region of a vertical PN junction. Electrical measurements show an on-off ratio increase of one order of magnitude in membrane LEDs compared to bulk. The EL spectrum from the 0.76% strained Ge LED shows a 100nm redshift of the center wavelength because of the strain-induced direct band gap reduction. Finally, using tight-binding and FDTD simulations, we discuss the implications for highly efficient Ge lasers.

Nam, Donguk; Cheng, Szu-Lin; Roy, Arunanshu; Huang, Kevin Chih-Yao; Brongersma, Mark; Nishi, Yoshio; Saraswat, Krishna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Neutrino Mass Models and the Implications of a Non-Zero Reactor Angle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk we survey some of the recent promising developments in the search for the theory behind neutrino mass and mixing, and indeed all fermion masses and mixing. The talk is organized in terms of a neutrino mass models decision tree according to which the answers to experimental questions provide sign posts to guide us through the maze of theoretical models eventually towards a complete theory of flavour and unification. We also discuss the theoretical implications of the measurement of a non-zero reactor angle, as hinted at by recent experimental measurements.

S. F. King

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

356

Neutrino Mass Models and the Implications of a Non-Zero Reactor Angle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk we survey some of the recent promising developments in the search for the theory behind neutrino mass and mixing, and indeed all fermion masses and mixing. The talk is organized in terms of a neutrino mass models decision tree according to which the answers to experimental questions provide sign posts to guide us through the maze of theoretical models eventually towards a complete theory of flavour and unification. We also discuss the theoretical implications of the measurement of a non-zero reactor angle, as hinted at by recent experimental measurements.

King, S F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Highly Relativistic Binary Pulsar PSR J0737-3039A: Discovery and Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PSR J0737-3039A is a millisecond pulsar with a spin period of 22.7 ms included in a double-neutron star system with an orbital period of 2.4 hrs. Its companion has also been detected as a radio pulsar, making this binary the first known double-pulsar system. Its discovery has important implications for relativistic gravity tests, gravitational wave detection and plasma physics. Here we will shortly describe the discovery of the first pulsar in this unique system and present the first results obtained by follow-up studies.

M. Burgay; N. D'Amico; A. Possenti; R. N. Manchester; A. G. Lyne; B. C. Joshi; M. A. McLaughlin; M. Kramer; J. M. Sarkissian; F. Camilo; V. Kalogera; C. Kim; D. R. Lorimer

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

358

Supply Implications  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The answer to the question on the prior slide is no. In summary, our assessment of European import availability to date is: Gasoline volumes are likely to remain ...

359

CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission Planning Webinar- TNAs, NAMAs, LEDS and Roadmaps Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CLEAN-Linking...

360

TABLE OF CONTENTS, PART I Introduction 1 How to Use the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on a tree]; nama( (no)) = raw, uncooked, live; ki( (no)) = pure, raw, crude 0 (namabiiru ... unreliable, 53 abura = fat, grease, lard, 67 abura = oil, 67 ada ...

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

South Africa-Integrating Sub-national Actors into National Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with national decision-makers in selected emerging countries (South Africa and Indonesia) and sectors (pilot v-NAMAs), and will use the experience gained to operationalise...

362

Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Measuring, Reporting, and...

363

Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

practical support to developing countries on participating in technology transfer and developing nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) in the transport sector. A...

364

ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of thermonuclear-fusion energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of "points" highlighting the strategic-political and military-technical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and fo...

Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The implications of future building scenarios for long-term building energy research and development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a discussion of alternative future scenarios of the building environment to the year 2010 and assesses the implications these scenarios present for long-term building energy R and D. The scenarios and energy R and D implications derived from them are intended to serve as the basis from which a strategic plan can be developed for the management of R and D programs conducted by the Office of Buildings and Community Systems, US Department of Energy. The scenarios and analysis presented here have relevance not only for government R and D programs; on the contrary, it is hoped that the results of this effort will be of interest and useful to researchers in both private and public sector organizations that deal with building energy R and D. Making R and D decisions today based on an analysis that attempts to delineate the nexus of events 25 years in the future are clearly decisions made in the face of uncertainty. Yet, the effective management of R and D programs requires a future-directed understanding of markets, technological developments, and environmental factors, as well as their interactions. The analysis presented in this report is designed to serve that need. Although the probability of any particular scenario actually occurring is uncertain, the scenarios to be presented are sufficiently robust to set bounds within which to examine the interaction of forces that will shape the future building environment.

Flynn, W.T.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Terracentric Nuclear Fission Reactor: Background, Basis, Feasibility, Structure, Evidence, and Geophysical Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The background, basis, feasibility, structure, evidence, and geophysical implications of a naturally occurring Terracentric nuclear fission georeactor are reviewed. For a nuclear fission reactor to exist at the center of the Earth, all of the following conditions must be met: (1) There must originally have been a substantial quantity of uranium within Earth's core; (2) There must be a natural mechanism for concentrating the uranium; (3) The isotopic composition of the uranium at the onset of fission must be appropriate to sustain a nuclear fission chain reaction; (4) The reactor must be able to breed a sufficient quantity of fissile nuclides to permit operation over the lifetime of Earth to the present; (5) There must be a natural mechanism for the removal of fission products; (6) There must be a natural mechanism for removing heat from the reactor; (7) There must be a natural mechanism to regulate reactor power level, and; (8) The location of the reactor or must be such as to provide containment and prevent meltdown. Herndon's georeactor alone is shown to meet those conditions. Georeactor existence evidence based upon helium measurements and upon antineutrino measurements is described. Geophysical implications discussed include georeactor origin of the geomagnetic field, geomagnetic reversals from intense solar outbursts and severe Earth trauma, as well as georeactor heat contributions to global dynamics.

J. Marvin Herndon

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

367

Response to W. W. Kellogg carbon dioxide and climatic change: implications for mankind's future  

SciTech Connect

The writer objects to the consensus that doubled CO/sub 2/ levels will lead to a global temperature increase of 3/sup 0/C and the associated implications for mankind. In this paper he presents his reasons for doubting the majority view on two climatic feedback processes: (1) the ice-albedo feedback, and (2) the water vapor feedback. (ACR)

Ellsaesser, H.W.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

China's Energy Situation and Its Implications in the New by Hengyun Ma, Les Oxley and John Gibson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the energy economy, in particular. Keywords: China; Energy; Fossil fuels; Renewable Energy JEL by an investigation and analysis of China's energy resources, including renewable energy. In the third section we1 China's Energy Situation and Its Implications in the New Millennium by Hengyun Ma, Les Oxley

Hickman, Mark

369

Characterization of a NifS-Like Chloroplast Protein from Arabidopsis. Implications for Its Role in Sulfur and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterization of a NifS-Like Chloroplast Protein from Arabidopsis. Implications for Its Role 611­0011, Japan (S.-I.K., H.M., N.E., T.K.) NifS-like proteins catalyze the formation of elemental and characterize chloroplast NifS-like proteins. Using seleno-Cys as a substrate, it was found that 25% to 30

370

Toward a national plan for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy: the implications of a national commitment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the expected benefits, costs, and implications of three levels of federal commitment and subsidy for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy. It includes estimates of potential solar use representing 16 to 23 percent of the nation's energy supply in the year 2000. Projections are based on data available as of early 1979.

Bennington, G.; Bohannon, M.; Gerstein, R.; Hartzler, R.; Kannan, N.; Miller, G.; Rebibo, K.; Shulman, M.; Spewak, P.; Taul, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Thinness of the Ocean in S?p Space and the Implications for Mean Diapycnal Advection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the oceans hydrography occupies little volume in the three-dimensional space defined by salinitytemperaturepressure (S?p), and the implications of this observation for the mean vertical transport across density surfaces are ...

Trevor J. McDougall; David R. Jackett

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Shock and post-shock temperatures in an icequartz mixture: implications for melting during planetary impact events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock and post-shock temperatures in an ice­quartz mixture: implications for melting during November 2009 Edited by: T. Spohn Keywords: shock temperature impact cratering melting water ice equation mixtures where pressure and temperature equilibrate immediately behind the shock front; (2) intermediate

Stewart, Sarah T.

373

Growth of geologic fractures into large-strain populations: review of nomenclature, subcritical crack growth, and some implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. An array of initially mixed-mode (I±II) cracks will evolve under remote tensile least principal stress±network evolution. An increase in the stress corrosion index promotes joint clustering and signi®cant changes crack growth, and some implications for rock engineering R.A. Schultz* Geomechanics-Rock Fracture Group

374

Geochemical records in the South China Sea: implications for East Asian summer monsoon evolution over the last 20 Ma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical records in the South China Sea: implications for East Asian summer monsoon evolution past changes in the East Asian summer monsoon over the last 20 Ma using samples from Ocean Drilling and combined review suggests that the long-term evolution of the East Asian summer monsoon is similar

Clift, Peter

375

Experimental Particle Physics in the LHC Era and Possible Implications for Development in Africa (467th Brookhaven Lecture)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assamagan presented a talk titled Experimental Particle Physics in the LHC Era and Possible Implications for Development in Africa, in which he discussed the latest happenings at the LHC and ATLAS, and how African institutes participation in research at the LHC relates to the goals of the African School of Physics.

Assamagan, Ketevi (BNL Physics Dept)

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

376

Uranium-series and radiocarbon geochronology of deep-sea corals: implications for Southern Ocean ventilation rates and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uranium-series and radiocarbon geochronology of deep-sea corals: implications for Southern Ocean Received 25 September 2000; accepted 5 September 2001 Abstract We present new uranium apply an improved two-component mixing approach to correct uranium-series dates for contaminant thorium

Lea, David

377

Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observations Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects Sylwester Arabas 1 , Joanna Slawinska 1 , Wojciech Grabowski 2 , Hugh Morrison 2 , Hanna Pawlowska 1 1 : Institute of Geophysics, University of Warsaw, Poland 2 : National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA 348 constants for reference state and lateral boundary conditions 349 ibcx=icyx 350 ibcy=icyy*j3 351 ibcz=icyz 352 irlx=irelx 353 irly=irely*j3 354 irdbc=0 355 fcr0=fcr0*icorio 356 itdl=0 357 tdt=40.*3600. 358 u0tdl=u00 359 360 361 constants for thermodynamics 362 c bv=sqrt(st*g) 363 bv=st 364 st=bv**2/g 365 cp=3.5*rg 366 cap=rg/cp 367 pr00=rg*rh00*tt00

378

Waste Cleanup: Status and Implications of Compliance Agreements Between DOE and Its Regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses compliance agreements that affect the Department of Energy's (DOE) cleanup program. Compliance agreements are legally enforceable documents between DOE and its regulators, specifying cleanup activities and milestones that DOE has agreed to achieve. Over the years, these compliance agreements have been used to implement much of the cleanup activity at DOE sites, which is carried our primarily under two federal laws - the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 0f 1976, as amended (RCRA). Our objectives were to determine the types of compliance agreements in effect at DOE cleanup sites, DOE's progress in achieving the milestones contained in the agreements, whether the agreements allowed DOE to prioritize work across sites according to relative risk, and possible implications the agreements have on DOE's efforts to improve the cleanup program.

Jones, G. L.; Swick, W. R.; Perry, T. C.; Kintner-Meyer, N.K.; Abraham, C. R.; Pollack, I. M.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

379

On the economic analysis of problems in energy efficiency: Market barriers, market failures, and policy implications  

SciTech Connect

In his recent paper in The Energy Journal, Ronald Sutherland argues that several so-called market barriers'' to energy efficiency frequently cited in the literature are not market failures in the conventional sense and are thus irrelevant for energy policy. We argue that Sutherland has inadequately analyzed the idea of market barrier and misrepresented the policy implications of microeconomics. We find that economic theory, correctly interpreted, does not provide for the categorical dismissal of market barriers. We explore important methodological issues underlying the debate over market barriers, and discuss the importance of reconciling the findings of non-economic social sciences with the economic analysis of energy demand and consumer decision-making. We also scrutinize Sutherland's attempt to apply finance theory to rationalize high implicit discount rates observed in energy-related choices, and find this use of finance theory to be inappropriate.

Sanstad, A.H.; Koomey, J.G.; Levine, M.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

On the economic analysis of problems in energy efficiency: Market barriers, market failures, and policy implications  

SciTech Connect

In his recent paper in The Energy Journal, Ronald Sutherland argues that several so-called ``market barriers`` to energy efficiency frequently cited in the literature are not market failures in the conventional sense and are thus irrelevant for energy policy. We argue that Sutherland has inadequately analyzed the idea of market barrier and misrepresented the policy implications of microeconomics. We find that economic theory, correctly interpreted, does not provide for the categorical dismissal of market barriers. We explore important methodological issues underlying the debate over market barriers, and discuss the importance of reconciling the findings of non-economic social sciences with the economic analysis of energy demand and consumer decision-making. We also scrutinize Sutherland`s attempt to apply finance theory to rationalize high implicit discount rates observed in energy-related choices, and find this use of finance theory to be inappropriate.

Sanstad, A.H.; Koomey, J.G.; Levine, M.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Asymptotically safe gravity as a scalar-tensor theory and its cosmological implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study asymptotically safe gravity with Einstein-Hilbert truncation taking into account the renormalization group running of both gravitational and cosmological constants. We show the classical behavior of the theory is equivalent to a specific class of Jordan-Brans-Dicke theories with vanishing Brans-Dicke parameter, and potential determined by the renormalization group equation. The theory may be reformulated as an $f(R)$ theory. In the simplest cosmological scenario, we find large--field inflationary solutions near the Planck scale where the effective field theory description breaks down. Finally, we discuss the implications of a running gravitational constant to background dynamics via cosmological perturbation theory. We show that compatibility with General Relativity requires contributions from the running gravitational constant to the stress energy tensor to be taken into account in the perturbation analysis.

Yi-Fu Cai; Damien A. Easson

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

382

REPORT DISTRIBUTION OF CARBON EMISSIONS IN THE UK: IMPLICATIONS FOR DOMESTIC ENERGY POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The report looks at the distribution of carbon emissions and abatement opportunities of households in England, and the implications for energy and climate change policy impacts. The UK government has a target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 % on 1990 levels by 2050. In addition there are statutory targets to ensure that no household is in fuel poverty by 2016. An understanding of how current and proposed policy approaches to meeting these targets are likely to impact differentially on domestic energy consumers is fundamental to ensuring policies are both fair and effective. This research project uses advanced modelling techniques to develop and analyse the datasets needed to support and further understanding of: the distribution of carbon emissions from energy consumed in the home and through personal travel by car, public transport and aviation across households in Great Britain;

Ian Preston; Vicki White; Joshua Thumim; Toby Bridgeman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Inconsistencies of Neutrino and Quark Conjectures and their Negative Environmental Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By using a language as accessible to a broad audience as possible, in this note we present evidence suggesting scientific caution prior to final claims that neutrinos and quarks are actual physical particles existing in our spacetime. We review historical and recent evidence dismissing the existence of neutrinos and quarks as physical particles, and outline recent theories representing experimental data without their existence. We also identify the negative implications for environmental issues of the neutrino and quark conjectures since they imply the suppression of due scientific process on new clean energies predicted by new structure models of hadrons with massive physical constituents produced free in spontaneous or stimulated decays. The note ends with the need of continuing theoretical and experimental research on neutrino and quark conjectures, but complemented, for evident scientific democracy, accountability and societal needs, with theoretical and experimental studies on alternative theories without the neutrino and quark conjectures and their prediction of new clean energies.

Ruggero Maria Santilli

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

Geohydrologic data and models of Rainier Mesa and their implications to Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geohydrologic data collected at Rainier Mesa provide the only extensive observations in tunnels presently available on flow and transport in tuff units similar to those of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This information can, therefore, be of great value in planning the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) testing in underground drifts at Yucca Mountain. In this paper, we compare the geohydrologic characteristics of tuff units of these two sites and summarize the hydrochemical data indicating the presence of nearly meteoric water in Rainier Mesa tunnels. A simple analytic model is used to evaluate the possibility of propagating transient pulses of water along fractures or faults through the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff unit to reach the tunnel beds below. The results suggest that fast flow could occur without significant mixing between meteoric fracture water and matrix pore water. The implications of these findings on planning for the ESF Calico Hills study at Yucca Mountain are discussed.

Wang, J.S.Y.; Cook, N.G.W.; Wollenberg, H.A.; Carnahan, C.L.; Javandel, I.; Tsang, C.F.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Emerging Technologioes in Instrumentation and Controls and Their Potential Regulatory Implications for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a summary of eight instrumentation and control (&C) technology areas, with applications in nuclear power plants (NPPs), that were the focus of a recent study performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC.) The state of the technology s application in NPPs, along with potential regulatory impact(s), are discussed. The technology focus areas are: (1) sensors and measurement systems, (2) communications media and networking, (3) microprocessors and other integrated circuits, (4) computational platforms, (5) surveillance, diagnostics, and prognostics, (6) human-system interactions, (7) high-integrity software, and (8) I&C architectures in new plants. The regulatory implications of these focus areas with regard to their application in NPPs are also discussed.

Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Bobrek, Miljko [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Ewing, Paul D [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Howlader, Mostofa [ORNL; Killough, Stephen M [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Loebl, Andy [ORNL; Moore, Michael Roy [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL; Shourbaji, Ayman A [ORNL; Wilson, Thomas L [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Energy, economic and environmental implications of production of grasses as biomass feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Perennial prairie grasses offer many advantages to the developing biofuels industry. High yielding varieties of native prairie grasses such as switchgrass, which combine lower levels of nutrient demand, diverse geographical growing range, high net energy yields and high soil and water conservation potential indicate that these grasses could and should supplement annual row crops such as corn in developing alternative fuels markets. Favorable net energy returns, increased soil erosion prevention, and a geographically diverse land base that can incorporate energy grasses into conventional farm practices will provide direct benefits to local and regional farm economies and lead to accelerated commercialization of conversion technologies. Displacement of row crops with perennial grasses will have major agricultural, economic, sociologic and cross-market implications. Thus, perennial grass production for biofuels offers significant economic advantages to a national energy strategy which considers both agricultural and environmental issues.

Downing, M.; McLaughlin, S.; Walsh, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Salt effects on stable isotope partitioning and their geochemical implications for geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has long been recognized that dissolved salts in water can change oxygen and hydrogen isotope partitioning between water and other phases (i.e., vapor, minerals) due to the hydration of ions upon the dissolution of salts in water. However, their effects have not been well determined at elevated temperatures. We are currently conducting a series of hydrothermal experiments of the system brine-vapor or minerals to 350{degrees}C, in order to determine precisely the effects of dissolved salts abundant in brines on isotope partitioning at temperatures encountered in geothermal systems. The so-called ``isotope salt effect`` has important implications for the interpretation and modeling of isotopic data of brines and rocks obtained from geothermal fields. We will show how to use our new results of isotopic partitioning to help better evaluate energy resources of many geothermal fields.

Horita, J.; Cole, D.R.; Wesolowski, D.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a one-factor regime-switching model for the risk adjusted natural gas spot price and study the implications of the model on the valuation and optimal operation of natural gas storage facilities. We calibrate the model parameters to both market futures and options on futures. Calibration results indicate that the regime-switching model is a better fit to market data compared to a one-factor mean-reverting model similar to those used by other authors to value gas storage. We extend a semi-Lagrangian timestepping scheme from Chen and Forsyth (2007) to solve the gas storage pricing problem, essentially a stochastic control problem, and conduct a convergence analysis of the scheme. Numerical results also indicate that the regime-switching model can generate operational strategies for gas storage facilities that reflect the existence of multiple regimes in the market as well as the regime shifts due to various exogenous events.

Zhuliang Chen; Peter A. Forsyth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Select Economic Implications for the Biological Control of Arundo donax along the Rio Grande  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arundo donax, or giant reed, is a large, bamboo-like plant native to Spain that has invaded several thousand acres of the Rio Grande riparian in Texas. The plant grows to 18-24 feet, consuming large quantities of water per acre per year. With concern of increased water demands in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley region, the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA)ARS) is investigating four herbivorous insects as potential biological control agents for Arundo donax to facilitate increased water supply. This study examines select economic implications for agricultural water users in the United States of applying these biological control agents along the Rio Grande. The research includes (a) estimating the value of the water saved due to the reduction of Arundo donax, (b) a benefit-cost analysis, (c) regional economic impact analysis, and (d) an estimate of the per-unit cost of water saved over a 50-year planning horizon (2009 through 2058). The model ArundoEcon is used to perform a deterministic analyses using low- and high-marginal-composite acre values. Regional results indicate present values of farmlevel benefits ranging from $97.80 to $159.87 million. Benefit-cost ratios are calculated with normalized prices and range from 4.38 to 8.81. Sensitivity analyses provide a robust set of results for Arundo water use, replacement species water use, Arundo expansion rate after control, value of water, and the cost of the program. The pre-production processes and farm-gate economic impact analysis is estimated using multipliers from the IMPLAN model. Regional results reveal a range of $8.90 to $17.94 million annually in economic output and 197 to 351 new jobs for the year 2025. Further results show the cost per acre-foot of water saved is $44.08. This amount is comparable to other projects designed to conserve water in the region. The USDA)ARS, Weslaco, Texas Arundo donax biological control project realizes positive results for the benefit-cost ratios, economic impact analyses, and competitive results for the per-unit cost of saving water. These positive results indicate this project will have positive economic implications for the U.S. and the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley.

Seawright, Emily Kaye

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical ApplicationsChapter 23 Options for Reducing/Eliminating trans Fatty Acids in Deep Fat Frying and Labeling Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications Chapter 23 Options for Reducing/Eliminating trans Fatty Acids in Deep Fat Frying and Labeling Implications Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science

391

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 19 Conjugated Linoleic Acids in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Implications and Potential Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 19 Conjugated Linoleic Acids in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Implications and Potential Mechanisms Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS

392

Nutrition and Biochemistry of PhospholipidsChapter 6 Nutritional Implications of Sphingolipids: Occurrence and Roles in Cell Regulationpids: Occurrence and Roles in Cell Regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrition and Biochemistry of Phospholipids Chapter 6 Nutritional Implications of Sphingolipids: Occurrence and Roles in Cell Regulation pids: Occurrence and Roles in Cell Regulation Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrit

393

Recent Experience of and Prospects for High-Speed Rail in Korea: Implications of a Transport System and Regional Development from a Global Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Prospects for High-Speed Rail in Korea: Implications of6 I.3. High-Speed RailOperating High-Speed Rail .. 22 VI. Impact on Regional

Shin, Dong-Chun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

395

Geochemical Implications of Gas Leakage Associated with Geologic CO2 Storage - A Qualitative Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is considered the major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of CO2. Different schools of thought exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. We reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of overlying potable aquifers. Results from experimental and modeling studies point to the potential for both beneficial (e.g. contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g. contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion into potable groundwater. However, there are significant discrepancies between studies particularly concerning, what contaminants are of concern and the geochemical processes involved. These discrepancies reflected the lack of a consensus on CO2-induced changes in subsurface geochemical processes and subsequent effects on groundwater chemistry. The development of consistent experimental protocols and the identification of pertinent factors driving CO2-induced geochemical changes in the subsurface were identified as key research needs. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why a standardization of experimental protocols and the consideration of experimental factors such as gas leakage rates, redox status and the influence of co-transported gases are pertinent. The role of analog studies, reactions occurring in the vadose zone, and the influence of organic contaminants are also discussed.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Lee, Gie Hyeon; Amonette, James E.; Brown, Christopher F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Structure of (23)Al from the one-proton breakup reaction and astrophysical implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ground state of the proton-rich nucleus (23)Al has been studied by one-proton removal on a carbon target at about 50 MeV/nucleon using the EXOGAM + SPEG experimental setup at GANIL. Longitudinal momentum distributions of the (22)Mg breakup fragments, inclusive and in coincidence with gamma rays de-exciting the residues, were measured. The ground-state structure of 23Al is found to be a configuration mixing of a d-orbital valence proton coupled to four core states-0(gs)(+), 2(1)(+), 4(1)(+), 4(2)(+). We confirm the ground state spin and parity of (23)Al as J(pi) = 5/2(+). The measured exclusive momentum distributions are compared with extended Glauber model calculations to extract spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs). The spectroscopic factors are presented in comparison with those obtained from large-scale shell model calculations. We determined the asymptotic normalization coefficient of the nuclear system (23)Al(gs) -> (22)Mg(0(+)) + p to be C(d5/2)(2) ((23)Al(gs)) = (3.90 +/- 0.44) x 10(3) fm(-1), and used it to infer the stellar reaction rate of the direct radiative proton capture (22)Mg(p,gamma)(23)Al. Astrophysical implications related to (22)Na nucleosynthesis in ONe novae and the use of one-nucleon breakup at intermediate energies as an indirect method in nuclear astrophysics are discussed.

Banu, A.; Trache, L.; Carstoiu, F.; Achouri, N. L.; Bonaccorso, A.; Catford, W. N.; Chartier, M.; Dimmock, M.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Freer, M.; Gaudefroy, L.; Horoi, M.; Labiche, M.; Laurent, B.; Lemmon, R. C.; Negoita, F.; Orr, N. A.; Paschalis, S.; Patterson, N.; Paul, E. S.; Petri, M.; Pietras, B.; Roeder, B. T.; Rotaru, F.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Simmons, E.; Thomas, J. S.; Tribble, Robert E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Evolution of predator-prey interactions in ancient lakes: implications for coevolution in marine environments  

SciTech Connect

Highly generalized predator-prey interrelationships are a hallmark of most lacustrine ecosystems where accommodation to the physical environment plays the major role in determining organismal distributions. Since the vast majority of lakes are ephemeral on a geological and evolutionary times scale, dispersal, rather than organism interaction, appears to be the dominant selective theme in lacustrine species evolution. In a few, very long lasting lakes, notably modern Lakes Tanganyika (Africa) and Baikal (USSR) and ancient lakes of the Brazilian Rift (Cretaceous) and Snake River Plain (Tertiary), invertebrates and fish occur which demonstrate the development of intense biological accommodation in coevolving predator-prey interactions. Shell crushing experiments on 2 endemic Tanganyikan gastropods, Lavigeria nassa and Spekia zonata show them to be comparable to warm temperature marine species in terms of grow load strength: 1-2 orders of magnitude stronger than confamilial cosmopolitan species from more ephemeral lakes in the same region of Africa. Shell repair is commonly observed in these and other Tanganyikan endemic snails although it is exceedingly rare inmost other lakes. The study of these early stages of evolutionary processes and rates in coevolving predator-prey systems in isolated lacustrine microcosms has important implications for those paleontologists concerned with marine invertebrates. It may shed considerable light on the interpretation of such events as the marine Mesozoic Revolution.

Cohen, A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Maximum Neutral Buoyancy Depth of Juvenile Chinook Salmon: Implications for Survival during Hydroturbine Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the maximum depth at which juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha can acclimate by attaining neutral buoyancy. Depth of neutral buoyancy is dependent upon the volume of gas within the swim bladder, which greatly influences the occurrence of injuries to fish passing through hydroturbines. We used two methods to obtain maximum swim bladder volumes that were transformed into depth estimations - the increased excess mass test (IEMT) and the swim bladder rupture test (SBRT). In the IEMT, weights were surgically added to the fishes exterior, requiring the fish to increase swim bladder volume in order to remain neutrally buoyant. SBRT entailed removing and artificially increasing swim bladder volume through decompression. From these tests, we estimate the maximum acclimation depth for juvenile Chinook salmon is a median of 6.7m (range = 4.6-11.6 m). These findings have important implications to survival estimates, studies using tags, hydropower operations, and survival of juvenile salmon that pass through large Kaplan turbines typical of those found within the Columbia and Snake River hydropower system.

Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

GAS METHANE HYDRATES-RESEARCH STATUS, ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY, AND ENERGY IMPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this task as originally conceived was to compile an assessment of methane hydrate deposits in Alaska from available sources and to make a very preliminary evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of producing methane from these deposits for remote power generation. Gas hydrates have recently become a target of increased scientific investigation both from the standpoint of their resource potential to the natural gas and oil industries and of their positive and negative implications for the global environment After we performed an extensive literature review and consulted with representatives of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Canadian Geological Survey, and several oil companies, it became evident that, at the current stage of gas hydrate research, the available information on methane hydrates in Alaska does not provide sufficient grounds for reaching conclusions concerning their use for energy production. Hence, the original goals of this task could not be met, and the focus was changed to the compilation and review of published documents to serve as a baseline for possible future research at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). An extensive annotated bibliography of gas hydrate publications has been completed. The EERC will reassess its future research opportunities on methane hydrates to determine where significant initial contributions could be made within the scope of limited available resources.

James Sorensen; Jaroslav Solc; Bethany Bolles

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Implications of the LHC two-photon signal for two-Higgs-doublet models  

SciTech Connect

We study the implications for Two Higgs Doublet Models of the recent announcement at the LHC giving a tantalizing hint for a Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV decaying into two photons. We require that the experimental result be within a factor of two of the theoretical Standard Model prediction, and analyze the type I and type II models as well as the lepton-specific and flipped models, subject to this requirement. It is assumed that there is no new physics other than two Higgs doublets. In all of the models, we display the allowed region of parameter space taking the recent LHC announcement at face value, and we analyze the W{sup +}W{sup -}, ZZ, {bar b}b and {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} expectations in these allowed regions. Throughout the entire range of parameter space allowed by the {gamma}{gamma} constraint, the number of events for Higgs decays into WW, ZZ and b{bar b} are not changed from the Standard Model by more than a factor of two. In contrast, in the Lepton Specific model, decays to {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} are very sensitive across the entire {gamma}{gamma}-allowed region.

P. M. Ferreira, Rui Santos, Marc Sher, Joao P. Silva

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Shell Structure from 100Sn to 78Ni: Implications for Nuclear Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The single-particle structure and shell gap of {sup 100}Sn is inferred from prompt in-beam and delayed {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of seniority and spin-gap isomers. Recent results in {sup 94, 95}Ag and {sup 98}Cd stress the importance of large-scale shell model calculations employing realistic interactions for the isomerism, np-nh excitations and E2 polarization of the {sup 100}Sn core. The strong monopole interaction of the {Delta}l = 0 spin-flip partners {pi}g{sub 9/2-} {nu}g{sub 7/2} in N = 51 isotones below {sup 100}Sn is echoed in the {Delta}l = 1 pf5/2- ?g9/2 pair of nucleons, which is decisive for the persistence of the N = 50 shell gap in {sup 78}Ni. This is corroborated by recent experimental data on {sup 70, 76}Ni, {sup 78}Zn. The importance of monopole driven shell evolution for the appearance of new shell closures in neutron-rich nuclei and implications for r-process abundances near the N = 82 shell is discussed.

Grawe, Hubert H [ORNL; Blazhev, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Gorska, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mukha, I. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Plettner, C. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Roeckl, E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Nowacki, F. [IReS, Strasbourg, Cedex, France; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz [ORNL; Sawicka, M. [University of Warsaw

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Solvation Phenomena in Dilute Solutions: Formal, Experimental Evidence, and Modeling Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review the fundamentals underlying a general molecular-based formalism for the microscopic interpretation of the solvation phenomena involving sparingly soluble solutes in compressible media, an approach that hinges around the unambiguous splitting of the species correlation function integrals into short-(finite) and long-ranged (diverging) contributions at infinite dilution, where this condition is taken as the reference system for the derivation of composition expansions. Then, we invoke the formalism (a) to illustrate the well-behaved nature of the solvation contributions to the mechanical partial molecular properties of solutes at infinite dilution, (b) to guide the development of, and provide molecular-based support to, the macroscopic modeling of high-temperature dilute aqueous-electrolyte solutions, (c) to study solvation effects on the kinetic rate constants of reactions in near-critical solvents in an attempt to understand from a microscopic perspective the macroscopic evidence regarding the thermodynamic pressure effects, and (d) to interpret the microscopic mechanism behind synergistic solvation effects involving either co-solutes or co-solvents, and provide a molecular argument on the unsuitability of the van der Waals one-fluid (vdW-1f) mixing rules for the 2 description of weakly attractive solutes in compressible solvents. Finally, we develop thermodynamically consistent perturbation expansions, around the infinite dilution reference, for the species residual properties in binary and ternary mixtures, and discuss the theoretical and modeling implications behind ad hoc first-order truncated expansions.

Chialvo, Ariel A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

THE COMPETITIVE IMPLICATIONS OF A NO-HAGGLE PRICING POLICY: THE ACCESS TOYOTA CASE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although prices in the automobile market are traditionally negotiated, recently, some manufacturers are selling their vehicles at a "no-haggle " or fixed price. In order to understand the impact of such a strategy, we investigate the case of Toyotas fixed price policy, or the Access Toyota program, which was introduced in Canada starting 2000. To date, the program has been implemented in all the provinces of the country, except, due to provincial regulations, in Ontario. This creates a natural experiment in which to examine the effect of a fixed price strategy on the prices and sales of a firm and its competitors. Our results suggest that the program had important competitive implications. We find that prices of both Toyota and Honda were higher in provinces with the program, but surprisingly Hondas price differential was comparatively higher than Toyotas. In terms of sales, Toyotas sales were not affected by the introduction of the program, but Honda had higher sales in the provinces with the program than in those without the program, as compared to their sales before the program was introduced. We conclude that this fixed price policy has benefited both firms, but the effect on consumer welfare cannot be conclusively determined.

Xiaohua Zeng; Srabana Dasgupta; Charles B. Weinberg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A Higgs Quadruplet for Type III Seesaw and Implications for $?\\to e?$ and $?- e$ Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Type III seesaw model the heavy neutrinos are contained in leptonic triplet representations. The Yukawa couplings of the triplet fermion and the left-handed neutrinos with the doublet Higgs field produce the Dirac mass terms. Together with the Majorana masses for the leptonic triplets, the light neutrinos obtain non-zero seesaw masses. We point out that it is also possible to have a quadruplet Higgs field to produce the Dirac mass terms to facilitate the seesaw mechanism. The vacuum expectation value of the quadruplet Higgs is constrained to be small by electroweak precision data. Therefore the Yukawa couplings of a quadruplet can be much larger than those for a doublet. We also find that unlike the usual Type III seesaw model where at least two copies of leptonic triplets are needed, with both doublet and quadruplet Higgs representations, just one leptonic triplet is possible to have a phenomenologically acceptable model because light neutrino masses can receive sizable contributions at both tree and one loop levels. Large Yukawa couplings of the quadruplet can induce observable effects for lepton flavor violating processes $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$ and $\\mu - e$ conversion. Implications of the recent $\\mu \\to e\\gamma$ limit from MEG and also limit on $\\mu - e $ conversion on Au are also given. Some interesting collider signatures for the doubly charged Higgs boson in the quadruplet are discussed.

Bo Ren; Koji Tsumura; Xiao-Gang He

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hydrostatic equilibrium of a porous intracluster medium: implications for mass fraction and X-ray luminosity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of dilute hot cavities in the intracluster medium (ICM) at the cores of clusters of galaxies changes the relation between gas temperature and its X-ray emission properties. Using the hydrostatic equations of a porous medium we solve for the ICM density for a given temperature as a function of the filling factor of dilute bubbles. We find that at a given temperature, the core X-ray luminosity increases with the filling factor. If the frequency of AGNs in clusters were higher in the past, then the filling factor could correspondingly be significant, with implications for the cluster scaling relations at high redshifts. This is especially important for the core properties, including the temperature-luminosity ($L_X-T$) relation and estimates of the core gas mass. The results imply an epoch-dependent sensitivity of the $L_X-T$ relation in the core to the porosity of the ICM. Detection of such an effect would give new insights into AGN feedback.

Adi Nusser; Joe Silk

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

406

NRRI90-14 GAS STORAGE: STRATEGY, REGULATION, AND SOME COMPETITIVE IMPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

funding provided by the participating member commissions of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). The views and opinions of the authors do not necessarily state or reflect the views, opinions, or policies of the NRRI, the NARUC, or NARUC member commissions. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY As a combination of increasing demand and declining gas exploration and development, the gas deliverability surplus that characterized the gas market in the 1980s is not likely to continue into the future. In a more balanced gas market, the stora~e of gas can have important gas supply and cost implications. Not surpnsingly, the use of gas storage in meeting future gas requirements received considerable renewed interest lately. Gas storage is also becoming an important variable in the restructuring of the gas industry and its evolution toward a competitive gas market. As a result of the regulatoPj reforms ipitiated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) since the early 1980s, the local distribution companies, electric utilities, and certain industrial and commercial end-users can all participate directly in the

Daniel J. Duan; Peter A. Nagler; Mohammad Harunuzzaman; Govindarajan Iyyuni

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Residential heating and cooling energy cost implications associated with window type: Revision  

SciTech Connect

We present a comparative study in which residential heating and cooling energy costs are analyzed as a function of window glazing type, with a particular emphasis on the performance of windows having low-emittance coatings. The DOE-2.1B energy analysis simulation program was used to generate a data base of the heating and cooling energy requirements of a prototypical single-family ranch-style house. Algebraic expressions derived by multiple regression techniques permitted a direct comparison of those parameters that characterize window performance: orientation, size, conductance, and solar transmission properties. We use these equations to discuss the energy implications of conventional double- and triple-pane window designs and newer designs in which number and type of substrate, low-emittance coating type and location and gas fill are varied. Results are presented for the heating-dominated climate of Madison, WI, and cooling-dominated locations of Lake Charles, LA, and Phoenix, AZ. The analysis shows the potential for substantial savings but suggests that both heating and cooling energy should be examined when evaluating the performance of different fenestration systems. Coating and substrate properties and the location of the coating in the glazing system are shown to have moderate effects as a function of orientation and climate. In addition, with the low-conductance glazing units, the window frame becomes a contributor to overall residential energy efficiency. 4 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Sullivan, R.; Selkowitz, S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Residential heating and cooling energy cost implications associated with window type  

SciTech Connect

A comparative study is presented in which residential heating and cooling energy costs are analyzed as a function of window glazing type, with a particular emphasis on the performance of windows having low-emittance coatings. The DOE-2.1B energy analysis simulation program was used to generate a data base of the heating and cooling energy requirements of a prototypical single-family ranch-style house. Algebraic expressions derived by multiple regression techniques permitted a direct comparison of those parameters that characterize window performance: orientation, size, conductance, and solar transmission properties. These equations are used to discuss the energy implications of conventional double- and triple-pane window designs and newer designs in which number and type of substrate, low-emittance coating type and location and gas fill are varied. Results are presented for the heating-dominated climate of Madison, WI, and cooling-dominated locations of Lake Charles, LA, and Phoenix, AZ. The analysis shows the potential for substantial savings but suggests that both heating and cooling energy should be examined when evaluating the performance of different fenestration systems. Coating and substrate properties and the location of the coating in the glazing system are shown to have moderate effects as a function of orientation and climate. In addition, with the low-conductance glazing units, the window frame becomes a contributor to overall residential energy efficiency.

Sullivan, R.; Selkowitz, S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Research and institutional dimensions of environmental justice: Implications for NEPA documentation  

SciTech Connect

Satisfying the environmental justice requirements imposed on the NEPA process is a challenging imperative. Among the challenges for NEPA documentation are: (1) adapting existing disciplinary methodologies that address distributional effects to the dictates of the executive order; (2) determining operational and, perhaps, threshold values for policy directives (e.g., disproportionately high and adverse effects); (3) identifying and involving representatives of minority, Native American, and low-income communities and populations in the NEPA process without jeopardizing their independence and integrity; (4) developing strategies, approaches, and methodologies that are more responsive to the consideration of multiple and cumulative exposures; and (5) developing professional standards for environmental justice assessment that are consistent with the letter and intent of the executive order, protective of the environments of minority, Native American, and low-income populations and communities, and useful to decision makers. This report will address current research and institutional activities associated with these issues, present alternative approaches available for their resolution, and identify the implications of those alternative approaches.

Carnes, S.A.; Wolfe, A.K.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Salt effects on isotope partitioning and their geochemical implications: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Essential to the use of stable isotopes as natural tracers and geothermometers is the knowledge of equilibrium isotope partitioning between different phases and species, which is usually a function of temperature only. The one exception known to date is oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation between liquid water and other phases (steam, gases, minerals), which changes upon the addition of salts to water, i.e., the isotope salt salt effect. Our knowledge of this effect, the difference between activity and composition (a-X) of isotopic water molecules in salt solutions, is very limited and controversial, especially at elevated temperatures. For the last several years, we have been conducting a detailed, systematic experimental study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the isotope salt effects from room temperature to elevated temperatures (currently to 500{degree}C). From this effort, a simple, coherent picture of the isotope salt effect is emerging, that differs markedly from the complex results reported in the literature. In this communication, we present an overview on the isotope salt effect, obtained chiefly from our study. Observed isotope salt effects in salt solutions are significant even at elevated temperatures. The importance and implications of the isotope salt effect for isotopic studies of brine-dominated systems are also discussed in general terms.

Horita, J.; Cole, D.R.; Fortier, S.M. [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The acceleration of electrons at perpendicular shocks and its implication for solar energetic particle events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a study of the acceleration of electrons at a perpendicular shock that propagates through a turbulent magnetic field. The energization process of electrons is investigated by utilizing a combination of hybrid (kinetic ions and fluid electron) simulations and test-particle electron simulations. In this method, the motions of the test-particle electrons are numerically integrated in the time-dependent electric and magnetic fields generated by two-dimensional hybrid simulations. We show that large-scale magnetic fluctuations effect electrons in a number of ways and lead to efficient and rapid energization at the shock front. Since the electrons mainly follow along magnetic lines of force, the large-scale braiding of field lines in space allows the fast-moving electrons to interact with the shock front and get accelerated multiple times. Ripples in the shock front occurring at various scales will also contribute to the acceleration by mirroring the electrons. Our calculation shows that this process favors electron acceleration at perpendicular shocks. The acceleration efficiency is critically dependent on the turbulence amplitude and coherence length. We also discuss the implication of this study for solar energetic particles (SEPs) by comparing the acceleration of electrons with that of protons. Their correlation indicates that perpendicular shocks play an important role in SEP events.

Guo Fan; Giacalone, Joe [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

412

NEAMS Software Licensing, Release, and Distribution: Implications for FY2013 Work Package Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vision of the NEAMS program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the analysis of nuclear systems. NEAMS anticipates issuing in FY 2018 a full release of its computational 'Fermi Toolkit' aimed at advanced reactor and fuel cycles. The NEAMS toolkit involves extensive software development activities, some of which have already been underway for several years, however, the Advanced Modeling and Simulation Office (AMSO), which sponsors the NEAMS program, has not yet issued any official guidance regarding software licensing, release, and distribution policies. This motivated an FY12 task in the Capability Transfer work package to develop and recommend an appropriate set of policies. The current preliminary report is intended to provide awareness of issues with implications for work package planning for FY13. We anticipate a small amount of effort associated with putting into place formal licenses and contributor agreements for NEAMS software which doesn't already have them. We do not anticipate any additional effort or costs associated with software release procedures or schedules beyond those dictated by the quality expectations for the software. The largest potential costs we anticipate would be associated with the setup and maintenance of shared code repositories for development and early access to NEAMS software products. We also anticipate an opportunity, with modest associated costs, to work with the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) to clarify export control assessment policies for software under development.

Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

China's Building Energy Demand: Long-Term Implications from a Detailed Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present here a detailed, service-based model of Chinas building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of Chinas building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how Chinas building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that Chinas building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Next-generation building energy management systems and implications for electricity markets.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. national electric grid is facing significant changes due to aggressive federal and state targets to decrease emissions while improving grid efficiency and reliability. Additional challenges include supply/demand imbalances, transmission constraints, and aging infrastructure. A significant number of technologies are emerging under this environment including renewable generation, distributed storage, and energy management systems. In this paper, we claim that predictive energy management systems can play a significant role in achieving federal and state targets. These systems can merge sensor data and predictive statistical models, thereby allowing for a more proactive modulation of building energy usage as external weather and market signals change. A key observation is that these predictive capabilities, coupled with the fast responsiveness of air handling units and storage devices, can enable participation in several markets such as the day-ahead and real-time pricing markets, demand and reserves markets, and ancillary services markets. Participation in these markets has implications for both market prices and reliability and can help balance the integration of intermittent renewable resources. In addition, these emerging predictive energy management systems are inexpensive and easy to deploy, allowing for broad building participation in utility centric programs.

Zavala, V. M.; Thomas, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Ott, A. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Citizens Utility Board); (BuildingIQ Pty Ltd, Australia); (PJM Interconnection LLC)

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

415

Modeling of geomechanical proceses during injection in amultilayered reservoir-caprock system and implications on sitecharacterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present results of a numerical simulationof the potential for fault reactivation and hydraulic fracturingassociated with CO2 injection in a multilayered reservoir-caprock system,and discuss its implications on site characterization. The numericalsimulation is performed using the coupled processes simulator TOUGH-FLAC(Rutqvist et al. 2002, Rutqvist and Tsang, 2003), and is an extension ofearlier numerical studies of a single caprock system (Rutqvist and Tsang,2002). In this study, CO2 is injected for 30 years in a 200 meter thickpermeable saline water formation located at 1600 meters depth (Figure 1).The injection formation is overlaid by several layers of caprocks, whichare intersected by a permeable fault zone allowing upward migration ofthe CO2 within the multilayered system (see Table 1 for materialproperties). The potential for fault slip or fracturing are calculated,based on the time-dependent evolution and local distribution of fluidpressure and the three-dimensional stress field, including importantporo-elastic stresses.The numerical results are discussed with respect tothe site-characterization strategy that would be recommended forevaluation of maximum sustainable injection pressure at an industrial CO2injection site.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Professor Laco Mucina Publications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Nama-karoo veld types revisited: a numerical analysis of original Acocks' field data. S. Afr. J. Bot in the southeastern Nama Karoo, South Africa. S. Afr. J. Bot. 70: 540-558. #12;138. Sieben, E.J.J., C. Boucher, C, & L. Schmiedel, U. & Mucina, L. 2006. Vegetation of quartz fields in the Little Karoo, Tanqua Karoo and eastern

Mucina, Ladislav

417

Niche-based modelling as a tool for predicting the risk of alien plant invasions at a global scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) succulent karoo, (3) Nama-karoo, (4) fynbos, (5) Albany thicket, (6) grassland and (7) savanna. Because, fynbos and succulent karoo. Temperate Europe and the south-eastern part of the USA now appear suitable (succulent karoo, Nama-karoo and dwarf savanna). Species' distribution models Native distribution of South

Schweik, Charles M.

418

IntroductIon The structure and composition of avian communities dem-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

covering a dense aloe stand (approximately 85 aloes/ha) on a north-facing slope in the Nama-Karoo biome of the area is comprised mainly of shales and some sandstones within the Cape and Karoo Supergroups (Mucina of ephemeral nectar resources in the Nama-Karoo biome when compared with other habitat types such as those

de Villiers, Marienne

419

A Dynamic Simulation of the Indirect Land Use Implications of Recent Biofuel Production and Use in the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global indirect land use change (ILUC) implications of biofuel use in the United States of America (USA) from 2001 to 2010 are evaluated with a dynamic general equilibrium model. The effects of biofuels production on agricultural land area vary by year; from a net expansion of 0.17 ha per 1000 gallons produced (2002) to a net contraction of 0.13 ha per 1000 gallons (2018) in Case 1 of our simulation. In accordance with the general narrative about the implications of biofuel policy, agricultural land area increased in many regions of the world. However, oil-export dependent economies experienced agricultural land contraction because of reductions in their revenues. Reducing crude oil imports is a major goal of biofuel policy, but the land use change implications have received little attention in the literature. Simulations evaluating the effects of doubling supply elasticities for land and fossil resources show that these parameters can significantly influence the land use change estimates. Therefore, research that provides empirically-based and spatially-detailed agricultural land-supply curves and capability to project future fossil energy prices is critical for improving estimates of the effects of biofuel policy on land use.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the Nuclear Weapons Proliferation Implications of Thermonuclear-Fusion Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of points highlighting the strategic-political and militarytechnical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and foster further nuclear proliferation throughout the world. The safety and environmental problems related to the operation of largescale fusion facilities such as ITER (which contain massive amounts of hazardous and/or radioactive materials such as tritium, lithium, and beryllium, as well as neutron-activated structural materials) are not addressed in this paper.

Andr Gsponer; Jean-pierre Hurni

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Critique of the Theory of Incentive Regulation: Implications for the Design of Performance-Based Regulation (PBR) for Electric Dis tribution Companies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is derived from a research project on incentive regulation and its implications for electric distribution companies. It is in two parts. The first summarizes the analysis findings and implications of the project. The second is a technical report that provides review and critique of the theoretical foundations of incentive regulation and provides analysis of current developments in their application to electric distribution company regulations. The report discusses price-cap regulation and per...

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

422

Agricultural Monitoring and Evaluation Systems: What can we learn for the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agricultural Monitoring and Evaluation Systems: What can we learn for the Agricultural Monitoring and Evaluation Systems: What can we learn for the MRV of agricultural NAMAs? Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agricultural Monitoring and Evaluation Systems: What can we learn for the MRV of agricultural NAMAs? Agency/Company /Organization: World Agroforestry Centre Sector: Land, Climate Focus Area: Agriculture, Land Use Topics: Implementation, GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices, Case studies/examples Website: www.worldagroforestry.org/sea/Publications/files/workingpaper/WP0144-1 Cost: Free UN Region: Eastern Asia Agricultural Monitoring and Evaluation Systems: What can we learn for the MRV of agricultural NAMAs? Screenshot References: MRV NAMAs[1] Logo: Agricultural Monitoring and Evaluation Systems: What can we learn for the MRV of agricultural NAMAs?

423

Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implications of Recent Changes to the ITC  

SciTech Connect

On August 8, 2005, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) increased the Section 48 investment tax credit (ITC) for commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems from 10% to 30% of the project's 'tax credit basis' (i.e., the dollar amount to which the ITC applies), and also created in Section 25D of the Internal Revenue Code a new 30% ITC (capped at $2,000) for residential solar systems. Both changes went into effect on January 1, 2006, for an initial period of two years, and in late 2006 both credits were extended 'as is' for an additional year (through 2008). In early 2006, Berkeley Lab published an LBNL/CESA case study that examined the financial impact of EPAct 2005's solar tax credits on PV system owners, in light of the $2,000 cap on the residential credit, as well as the fact that most PV systems in the U.S. also receive cash incentives from state-, local-, or utility-administered PV programs, and that these cash incentives may reduce the value of federal tax credits in certain situations. That case study was subsequently revised in February 2007 to reflect new Internal Revenue Service (IRS) guidance. The findings of that case study, which are briefly recapped in the next section, remained relevant up until October 2008, when the Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 extended both solar credits for an unprecedented eight years, removed the $2,000 cap on the residential credit, and eliminated restrictions on the use of both credits in conjunction with the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT). These significant changes, which apply to systems placed in service on or after January 1, 2009, will increase the value of the solar credits for residential system owners in particular, and are likely to spur significant growth in residential, commercial, and utility-scale PV installations in the years ahead. In light of these substantial changes to the solar ITC, this report takes a fresh look at the value of these revised credits, focusing specifically on the Section 25D residential credit. After first setting the stage by briefly reviewing our previous findings, the document proceeds to cover four specific areas in which the removal of the $2,000 cap on the residential ITC will have significant implications for PV program administrators, PV system owners, and the PV industry that go beyond the obvious market growth potential created by these more-lucrative federal incentives. These four areas include: (1) The financial implications of whether or not residential cash rebates are considered to be taxable income; (2) The role of low-interest loan programs and other forms of 'subsidized energy financing' under an uncapped ITC; (3) The degree to which taxable and nontaxable rebate levels might be reduced in response to the extra value provided by an uncapped ITC; and (4) The impact of an uncapped ITC on third-party financing and ownership models that are just beginning to emerge in the residential sector. The document concludes by highlighting a common thread that runs throughout: the need for PV program managers to understand whether or not their rebates are considered to be taxable income before they can react in an appropriate manner to the recent changes in federal solar policy and, if financing programs are offered, the need to understand whether the IRS considers these programs to be 'subsidized'. Finally, we note that this paper is based on current law; future legislative changes to the ITC could, of course, alter the conclusions reached here.

Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

424

Microsoft Word - APPENDIX A-Submission-3.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOVEL CONCEPT FOR REDUCING WATER USAGE NOVEL CONCEPT FOR REDUCING WATER USAGE AND INCREASING EFFICIENCY IN POWER GENERATION FINAL REPORT Reporting Period Start Date: September 2002 Reporting Period End Date: September 2003 Principal Authors: Shiao-Hung Chiang Guy Weismantel Issuing Date: March 2004 DOE Award No.: DE-FG26-02NT41544 Submitted to U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY PITTSBURGH, PA 15236-0940 Submitting Organizations: University Of Pittsburgh Weismantel International Chemical & Petroleum Engineering Dept 1826 Spruce Knob Court Pittsburgh, PA 15261 Kingwood, TX 77339 DISCLAIMER "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their

425

Innovative Corridors Initiative: Call for Submission Process and Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and on-screen text. Public-Private Partnerships in ActionTransportation Systems Public Private Partnerships Some Comments on Public-Private Partnerships. Berkeley,

Finson, Rachel S.; McCormick, Cynthia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Submission to NIST RFI for Critical Infrastructure Cyber ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 2 of 3 3. The forces that govern cyber security implementation, innovation and transformation are diffuse and widely distributed. ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

427

PART 1. RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION DATA PART 2. SUBMISSION ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Liquids (NGPL) and Liquefied Refinery Gases (LRG)*: PART 4. TOTAL U.S. CRUDE OIL IMPORTS BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN (Thousand Barrels) ...

428

PART 1. RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION DATA PART 2. SUBMISSION ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Liquids (NGPL) and Liquefied Refinery Gases (LRG)*: Reformulated, Blended with Fuel Ethanol PADD 4 PADD 5 U.S. Conventional, Blended ...

429

Submission to Human Relations Job board toolkits: Internet matchmaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advertisement: job searchers enter the keywords in a special field and the search engine scans the database to extract only the ads including the search terms. Keywords do not require a general classification and can a blind search, without knowing which terms are privileged by the advertisers. #12;14 Input fields

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

430

EFCOG Best Practice Submission - Guidance for Retro-Commissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commissioning is slowly becoming an accepted quality method for ensuring that buildings are designed, constructed, and operated as required by the building owner and as intended by the original design. Retro-commissioning is a process, using commissioning concepts, to ensure that existing buildings are operated and maintained as required by the owner to meet the buildings current mission. Retro-commissioning further seeks to incorporate new equipment and operating practices to upgrade existing facilities to obtain increased efficiency and employee comfort and productivity. Retro-commissioning practices are not universal. Best practices have been identified to assist Federal organizations with the development of retro-commissioning programs and to help DOE sites to begin this quality related process.

Ernest L. Fossum, CEM

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Submission to the EIRASS Retail brand equity: A PLS Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In large retail stores, France is characterized by market saturation and even a decline of several retail concepts such as variety stores, or even supermarkets and hypermarkets (Cliquet, 2000). This situation leads to a fierce competition and raises questions which affect marketing strategies of French retail companies. Given the legal context, the French retailers can increase sales through retail brands which appear to be henceforth among the most effective marketing tools. Indeed, product innovation, sophisticated packaging and retail brands- from generic products to premium retail brands (Kumar and Steenkamp, 2007)- could create consumer value. There are thus today real retail branding strategies consisting in creating consumer value leading to the idea of retail brand equity. This paper focuses on retail brand equity to understand where this retail brand value stems from and how to measure it in the French retail context. Adapting the brand equity literature to the retail brand opens large perspectives in the way of considering this type of brands helping managers to examine the importance of components in the shaping of their brand value and finally to develop better strategic and tactical decisions concerning retail brand positioning. Kellers contributions (Keller, 1993), qualitative methodology and confirmatory analysis are used to

Magali Jara; Grard Cliquet

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

NIST TIP White Paper Submission Critical National Need Idea ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Submitting organization: Montclair State University Contact: Eileen Fitzpatrick Linguistics Department Montclair State University Montclair NJ 07043 ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

433

PART 1. RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION DATA PART 2. SUBMISSION ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Zip:-Secure File Transfer: Electronic Transmission: City: State: Zip:-Contact Name: Phone No.: Ext: Fax No.: Email address: Questions? Call: 202-586-3307.

434

NREL: Education Programs - Last Call for Submissions: NREL Student...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel cell hybrid advanced vehicles (FCHV-adv) that NREL recently received on loan from Toyota. Students currently enrolled in a graphic design program at a university, community...

435

EDRA / Places Awards -- Seventh Annual Call for Submissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual EDRA/Places Awards Places and the Environmentalannual EDRA/Places Awards for Place Design, Planning, andor related discipline. Awards will be presented at the EDRA

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

EDRA / Places Awards -- Third Annual Call for Submissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

third annual EDRA/PI aces Awards for Place Design, PlanningResearch. Place D e s i g n awards r e c o g n i z e c o m ps . Place P l a n n i n g awards r e c o g n i z e projects

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Call for Submissions: Ninth Annual EDRA/Places Awards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ninth Annual EDRA/Places Awards Places and the Environmentalninth annual EDRA/Places Awards for Place Design, Planningfor the 2006 EDRA/Places Awards is February 7, 2006. The

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

EDRA / Places Awards -- Eighth Annual Call for Submissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For more information about the awards pro- gram, prospectiveand/or http:// edra.org. Past award winners have appeared ineighth annual EDRA/Places Awards for Place Design, Planning,

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Submission of comments to FDA draft guidance entitled '' ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These collections of information are subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 ...

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

440

DATES: The due dates for submission of white papers are ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oil 2010-2030 140 100 ... to increase, while nuclear and natural gas use will ... 2030, billion kilowatt hours (EIA Annual Energy Outlook, Early Release ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nama submissions implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NIST Paper Submission Abstract _CT-Google _DRAFT _Feb 6 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DigiCert-Google Abstract Certificate Transparency Submitted for NIST Workshop to be held April 10-11, 2013 Submitted February 15, 2013 ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

442

Abstract submission for consideration for a poster at HOTWC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hydrochloric acid; Hydrobromic acid; Bromomethane; Bromoethene; Chlorobenzodioxole; Benzene; Dibromoethane; Chlorobenzene ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

443

Schedule Announced for Meetings and Submissions for Competing...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

energy research, non proliferation, neurosciences and medical imaging, and structural biology. DOE's Office of Science is the steward of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Office...

444

Microsoft PowerPoint - UTSR Poster Submission Format  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Fellowship Industrial Fellowship Program 2005 Survey of National Combustor Testing Facilities and Selection of AVC Testing Conditions Adam Norberg, BSME, Virginia Tech Ramgen Power Systems, Inc. Mentor: Dr. Rob Steele Premium gas turbine performance is critical in today's competitive power generation Market Air quality standards for gas turbine emissions are becoming increasingly stringent The ever-rising cost of fuel demands maximum gas turbine efficiency Achieving single digit ppm NOx emissions is pushing the low limit of swirl stabilized combustion Current combustion technology has reached an efficiency limit based on the required flow geometry http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/gas/combust.htm Trapped Vortex technology provides significant advantages over traditional swirl stabilized

445

Alternatives to conventional diesel fuel-some potential implications of California's TAC decision on diesel particulate.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Limitations on the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to provisions of the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies. (1) Increased penetration of natural gas and greater gasoline use in the transportation fuels market, to the extent that some compression-ignition (CI) applications revert to spark-ignition (SI) engines. (2) New specifications requiring diesel fuel reformulation based on exhaust products of individual diesel fuel constituents. Each of these alternatives results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles, and gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not evaluated.

Eberhardt, J. J.; Rote, D. M.; Saricks, C. L.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

446

Cosmological implications of the MAXIMA-1 high-resolution cosmicmicrowave background anisotropy measurement  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the cosmological implications of the new constraints on the power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy derived from a new high-resolution analysis of the MAXIMA-1 measurement. The power spectrum indicates excess power at lsimilar to 860 over the average level of power at 411 less than or equal to l less than or equal to 785. This excess is statistically significant at the similar to 95 percent confidence level. Its position coincides with that of the third acoustic peak, as predicted by generic inflationary models selected to fit the first acoustic peak as observed in the data. The height of the excess power agrees with the predictions of a family of inflationary models with cosmological parameters that are fixed to fit the CMB data previously provided by BOOMERANG-LDB and MAXIMA-1 experiments. Our results therefore lend support for inflationary models and more generally for the dominance of adiabatic coherent perturbations in the structure formation of the universe. At the same time, they seem to disfavor a large variety of the nonstandard (but inflation-based) models that have been proposed to improve the quality of fits to the CMB data and the consistency with other cosmological observables. Within standard inflationary models, our results combined with the COBE/Differential Microwave Radiometer data give best-fit values and 95 percent confidence limits for the baryon density, Omega (b)h(2)similar or equal to 0.033 +/- 0.013, and the total density, Omega =0.9(-0.16)(+0.18). The primordial spectrum slope (n(s)) and the optical depth to the last scattering surface (tau (c)) are found to be degenerate and to obey the relation n(s) similar or equal to (0.99 +/- 0.14) + 0.46tau (c), for tau (c) less than or equal to 0.5 (all at 95 percent confidence levels).

Stompor, R.; Abroe, M.; Ade, P.; Balbi, A.; Barbosa, D.; Bock,J.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Ferreira, P.G.; Hanany,S.; Hristov, V.; Jaffe, A.H.; Lee, A.T.; Pascale, E.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Winant, C.D.; Wu, J.H.P.

2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

447

Landscape level differences in soil carbon and nitrogen: implications for soil carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to understand how land cover and topography act, independently or together, as determinants of soil carbon and nitrogen storage over a complex terrain. Such information could help to direct land management for the purpose of carbon sequestration. Soils were sampled under different land covers and at different topographic positions on the mostly forested 14,000 ha Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, USA. Most of the soil carbon stock, to a 40-cm soil depth, was found to reside in the surface 20 cm of mineral soil. Surface soil carbon and nitrogen stocks were partitioned into particulate ({ge}53 {micro}m) and mineral-associated organic matter (<53 {micro}m). Generally, soils under pasture had greater nitrogen availability, greater carbon and nitrogen stocks, and lower C:N ratios than soils under transitional vegetation and forests. The effects of topography were usually secondary to those of land cover. Because of greater soil carbon stocks, and greater allocation of soil carbon to mineral-associated organic matter (a long-term pool), we conclude that soil carbon sequestration, but not necessarily total ecosystem carbon storage, is greater under pastures than under forests. The implications of landscape-level variation in soil carbon and nitrogen for carbon sequestration are discussed at several different levels: (1) nitrogen limitations to soil carbon storage; (2) controls on soil carbon turnover as a result of litter chemistry and soil carbon partitioning; (3) residual effects of past land use history; and (4) statistical limitations to the quantification of soil carbon stocks.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Implications of Neutrino Balls as the Source of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(To appear in the Astrophysical Journal) Holdom and Malaney (1994) have suggested a mechanism for gamma-ray bursts which requires that stars be captured by a neutrino ball. Neutrino balls would be, for the most part, denser than main sequence stars, but their density would decrease as their mass increased. We show that small neutrino balls would subject stars to tidal forces sufficient to disrupt them. We thus argue that if neutrino balls existed at the centres of galaxies, only the largest would be able to act as a source of gamma-ray bursts. Such neutrino balls would have a mass of order $10^7\\Msun$. Tidal capture of stars by a neutrino ball would not be important, but dynamical friction against the neutrinos or star-disc interactions could both be important capture mechanisms. We find that a gamma-ray burst would occur in a galaxy containing such a neutrino ball roughly every $10^2\\y$, and the fraction of all galaxies contributing to the gamma-ray burst flux would be $\\sim 10^{-4}$, assuming that this was the mechanism of all gamma-ray bursts. These numbers have implications for neutrino ball models of active galaxies, assuming that all gamma-ray bursts and all AGN come from neutrino balls. Either a small fraction $\\sim 10^{-2}$ of the lifetime of such an object could be spent as an AGN, or that the probability of a neutrino ball becoming an AGN would be $10^{-2}$. It is not possible to rule out the possibility that neutrino balls might exist at the centres of galaxies through direct ground-based observation of stellar kinematics.

D. Syer; Cita

1994-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

Long-Term Biological Monitoring of an Impaired Stream: Implications for Environmental Management [Special Issue  

SciTech Connect

The long-term ecological recovery of an impaired stream in response to an industrial facility's pollution abatement actions and the implications of the biological monitoring effort to environmental management is the subject of this special issue of Environmental Management. This final article focuses on the synthesis of the biological monitoring program's components and methods, the efficacy of various biological monitoring techniques to environmental management, and the lessons learned from the program that might be applicable to the design and application of other programs. The focus of the 25-year program has been on East Fork Poplar Creek, an ecologically impaired stream in Oak Ridge, Tennessee with varied and complex stressors from a Department of Energy facility in its headwaters. Major components of the long-term program included testing and monitoring of invertebrate and fish toxicity, bioindicators of fish health, fish contaminant accumulation, and instream communities (including periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish). Key parallel components of the program include water chemistry sampling and data management. Multiple lines of evidence suggested positive ecological responses during three major pollution abatement periods. Based on this case study and the related literature, effective environmental management of impaired streams starts with program design that is consistent across space and time, but also adaptable to changing conditions. The biological monitoring approaches used for the program provided a strong basis for assessments of recovery from remedial actions, and the likely causes of impairment. This case study provides a unique application of multidisciplinary and quantitative techniques to address multiple and complex regulatory and programmatic goals, environmental stressors, and remedial actions.

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Christensen, Sigurd W [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Ham, Kenneth [ORNL; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL; Morris, Gail Wright [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL; Southworth, George R [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Long-term Biological Monitoring of an Impaired Stream: Synthesis and Environmental Management Implications  

SciTech Connect

The long-term ecological recovery of an impaired stream in response to an industrial facility's pollution abatement actions and the implications of the biological monitoring effort to environmental management is the subject of this special issue of Environmental Management. This final article focuses on the synthesis of the biological monitoring program's components and methods, the efficacy of various biological monitoring techniques to environmental management, and the lessons learned from the program that might be applicable to the design and application of other programs. The focus of the 25-year program has been on East Fork Poplar Creek, an ecologically impaired stream in Oak Ridge, Tennessee with varied and complex stressors from a Department of Energy facility in its headwaters. Major components of the long-term program included testing and monitoring of invertebrate and fish toxicity, bioindicators of fish health, fish contaminant accumulation, and instream communities (including periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish). Key parallel components of the program include water chemistry sampling and data management. Multiple lines of evidence suggested positive ecological responses during three major pollution abatement periods. Based on this case study and the related literature, effective environmental management of impaired streams starts with program design that is consistent across space and time, but also adaptable to changing conditions. The biological monitoring approaches used for the program provided a strong basis for assessments of recovery from remedial actions, and the likely causes of impairment. This case study provides a unique application of multidisciplinary and quantitative techniques to address multiple and complex regulatory and programmatic goals, environmental stressors, and remedial actions.

Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Offshore Extension of Deccan Traps in Kachchh, Central Western India: Implications for Geological Sequestration Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deccan basalts in central western India are believed to occupy large onshore-offshore area. Using geophysical and geological observations, onshore sub-surface structural information has been widely reported. On the contrary, information about offshore structural variations has been inadequate due to scarcity of marine geophysical data and lack of onshore-offshore lithological correlations. Till date, merely a few geophysical studies are reported that gauge about the offshore extent of Deccan Traps and the Mesozoic sediments (pre-Deccan). To fill this gap in knowledge, in this article, we present new geophysical evidences to demonstrate offshore continuation of the Deccan volcanics and the Mesozoic sediments. The offshore multi-channel seismic and onshore-offshore lithological correlations presented here confirm that the Mesozoic sedimentary column in this region is overlain by 0.2-1.2-km-thick basaltic cover. Two separate phases of Mesozoic sedimentation, having very distinctive physical and lithological characteristics, are observed between overlying basaltic rocks and underlying Precambrian basement. Using onshore-offshore seismic and borehole data this study provides new insight into the extent of the Deccan basalts and the sub-basalt structures. This study brings out a much clearer picture than that was hitherto available about the offshore continuation of the Deccan Traps and the Mesozoic sediments of Kachchh. Further, its implications in identifying long-term storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} within sub-basalt targets are discussed. The carbon sequestration potential has been explored through the geological assessment in terms of the thickness of the strata as well as lithology.

Pandey, D. K., E-mail: pandey@ncaor.org [National Centre for Antarctic and Ocean Research (India); Pandey, A. [IITM, Centre for Climate Change Research (India); Rajan, S. [National Centre for Antarctic and Ocean Research (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management.  

SciTech Connect

Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus deltoides Bartr. and Platanus occidentalis L.) and broad (Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Pinus taeda L.) site requirements while grown with a range of nutrient and water resources. We constructed N budgets by measuring N concentration ([N]) and N content (N{sub C}) of above- and belowground perennial and ephemeral tissues, determined N uptake (N{sub UP}), and calculated N use efficiency (NUE). Forest stands regulated [N] within species-specific operating ranges without clear temporal or treatment patterns, thus demonstrating equilibrium between tissue [N] and biomass accumulation. Forest stand N{sub C} and N{sub UP} increased with stand development and paralleled treatment patterns of biomass accumulation, suggesting productivity is tightly linked to N{sub UP}. Inclusion of above- and belowground ephemeral tissue turnover in N{sub UP} calculations demonstrated that maximum N demand for narrow-sites adapted species exceeded 200 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} while demand for broad-site adapted species was below this level. NUE was species dependent but not consistently influenced by N availability, suggesting relationships between NUE and resource availability were species dependent. Based on early stand development, species with broad site adaptability are favored for woody cropping systems because they maintain high above- and belowground productivity with minimal fertilization requirements due to higher NUE than narrow site adapted species.

Aubrey, Doug, P.; Coyle, David, R. Coleman, Mark, D.

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

453

Rhenium Solubility in Borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glass: Implications for the Processing and Immobilization of Technetium-99  

SciTech Connect

The immobilization of 99Tc in a suitable host matrix has proved to be an arduous task for the researchers in nuclear waste community around the world. At the Hanford site in Washington State, the total amount of 99Tc in low-activity waste (LAW) is ~1300 kg and the current strategy is to immobilize the 99Tc in borosilicate glass with vitrification. In this context, the present article reports on the solubility/retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc, in a LAW borosilicate glass. Due to the radioactive nature of technetium, rhenium was chosen as a simulant because of the similarity between their ionic radii and other chemical aspects. The glasses containing Re (0 10,000 ppm by mass) were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampoules in order to minimize the loss of Re by volatilization during melting at 1000 C. The rhenium was found to predominantly exist as Re (VII) in all the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be ~3000 ppm (by mass) with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). At higher rhenium concentrations, some additional material was retained in the glasses in the form of crystalline inclusions that were detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser ablation-ICP mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The implications of these results on the immobilization of 99Tc from radioactive wastes in borosilicate glasses have been discussed.

McCloy, John S.; Riley, Brian J.; Goel, Ashutosh; Liezers, Martin; Schweiger, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lukens, Wayne W.; Kruger, Albert A.

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

454

Implications of Limiting CO2 Concentrations for Land Use and Energy  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the first to simultaneously examine the implications of extending the concept of placing a value on carbon beyond fossil fuel and industrial emissions to all sources, including those associated with land use and land use change. The paper reports a variety of results that have bearing on recent discussions in the literature regarding the role of bioenergy and the indirect emission of carbon through land-use change as well as the burgeoning literature on interactions between bioenergy and crop prices. This paper goes beyond results currently in the literature by using an integrated assessment model to assess energy use and supply, atmospheric composition, land use, and terrestrial carbon in the context of limiting the concentration of atmospheric CO2. We find that when the concept of valuing carbon emissions is extended to all carbon emissions, regardless of origin, that in contrast to a mitigation scenario where only fossil fuel and industrial carbon emissions are valued, deforestation is replaced by afforestation and expanded unmanaged ecosystems; the cost of limiting CO2 concentrations falls; crop prices rise; and human diets are transformed as people shift away from consumption of beef and other carbon-intensive protein sources. The increase in crop prices flows directly from the consideration of land-use change emissions in a comprehensive emissions mitigation program and occurs even in the absence of the use of purpose-grown bioenergy. Finally, we find that the assumed rate of improvement in food and fiber crop productivity (e.g. wheat, rice, corn) has a strong influence on land-use change emissions, making the technology for growing crops potentially as important for limiting atmospheric CO2 concentrations as energy technologies such as CO2 capture and storage.

Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Sands, Ronald D.; Smith, Steven J.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Edmonds, James A.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

455

Viscosity of ?-pinene secondary organic material and implications for particle growth and reactivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particles composed of secondary organic material (SOM) are abundant in the lower troposphere and play important roles in climate, air quality, and health. The viscosity of these particles is a fundamental property that is presently poorly quantified for conditions relevant to the lower troposphere. Using two new techniques, namely a bead-mobility technique and a poke-flow technique, in conjunction with simulations of fluid flow, we measure the viscosity of the watersoluble component of SOM produced by ?-pinene ozonolysis. The viscosity is comparable to that of honey at 90% relative humidity (RH), comparable to that of peanut butter at 70% RH and greater than or comparable to that of bitumen for ? 30% RH, implying that the studied SOM ranges from liquid to semisolid/solid at ambient relative humidities. With the Stokes-Einstein relation, the measured viscosities further imply that the growth and evaporation of SOM by the exchange of organic molecules between the gas and condensed phases may be confined to the surface region when RH ? 30%, suggesting the importance of an adsorption-type mechanism for partitioning in this regime. By comparison, for RH ? 70% partitioning of organic molecules may effectively occur by an absorption mechanism throughout the bulk of the particle. Finally, the net uptake rates of semi-reactive atmospheric oxidants such as O3 are expected to decrease by two to five orders of magnitude for a change in RH from 90% to ? 30% RH, with possible implications for the rates of chemical aging of SOM particles in the atmosphere.

Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Grayson, James W.; Bateman, Adam P.; Kuwata, Mikinori; Sellier, Mathieu; Murray, Benjamin J.; Shilling, John E.; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

456

Uncertainties in climatological tropical humidity profiles: Some implications for estimating the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

The vertical profile of water vapor, the principal infrared-absorbing gas in the atmosphere, is an important factor in determining the energy balance of the climate system. This study examines uncertainties in calculating a climatological humidity profile: specifically one derived from radiosonde data representative of the moist and highly convective region over the western tropical Pacific Ocean. Uncertainties in the humidity data are large in conditions of low temperature or low humidity in the mid- and upper troposphere. Results derived from a single United States station (Koror) and from an average of four United States-operated stations (all near the equator west of the date line) yield nearly identical results. No humidity measurements are reported in fully the upper third of the troposphere. The implications of these uncertainties for determining the climatological humidity profile are quantitatively assessed by bracketing the range of plausible assumptions for unreported humidity to produce extreme estimates of the climatological profile. These profiles, together with the observed climatological temperature profile, are used as input to a radiative transfer model to ascertain the uncertainty in clear-sky outgoing infrared radiance due to water vapor uncertainties. The radiance uncertainty is shown to be comparable in magnitude to the purely radiative response of the tropical atmosphere to doubling carbon dioxide. The uncertainty associated with unmeasured upper-tropospheric humidity is approximately equal to that arising from incompletely measured midtropospheric humidity. Clear-sky radiative uncertainties, however, are modest relative to the uncertainty associated with variations of infrared absorption due to clouds, as demonstrated by introducing citrus ice particles into the radiative transfer calculations.

Gutzler, D.S. (Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Climate uncertainty and implications for U.S. state-level risk assessment through 2050.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decisions for climate policy will need to take place in advance of climate science resolving all relevant uncertainties. Further, if the concern of policy is to reduce risk, then the best-estimate of climate change impacts may not be so important as the currently understood uncertainty associated with realizable conditions having high consequence. This study focuses on one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change - precipitation - to understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and the near-term justification for interventions to mitigate the course of climate change. We show that the mean risk of damage to the economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of one trillion dollars over the next 40 years, with employment impacts of nearly 7 million labor-years. At a 1% exceedance-probability, the impact is over twice the mean-risk value. Impacts at the level of individual U.S. states are then typically in the multiple tens of billions dollar range with employment losses exceeding hundreds of thousands of labor-years. We used results of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report 4 (AR4) climate-model ensemble as the referent for climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, mapped the simulated weather hydrologically to the county level for determining the physical consequence to economic activity at the state level, and then performed a detailed, seventy-industry, analysis of economic impact among the interacting lower-48 states. We determined industry GDP and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effect on personal income, and the consequences for the U.S. trade balance.

Loose, Verne W.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Kelic, Andjelka; Backus, George A.; Warren, Drake E.; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Klise, Geoffrey T.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

High-energy gamma rays in Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Implications for risk and W{sub R}  

SciTech Connect

Based on the DS86 dosimetry system, nearly all of the dose to survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was due to unusually high-energy gamma rays, predominantly in the 2- to 5-MeV range. These high energies resulted in part from neutron capture gamma rays as the bomb neutrons penetrated large distances of air. Because of the inverse relationship between energy and biological effectiveness, these high-energy gamma rays are expected to be substantially less effective in producing biological damage than the radiations commonly used in radiobiology and risk assessment. This observation has implications for radiation protection and risk assessment.

Straume, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Climate change in the sea: the implications of increasing the carbon dioxide inputs to the surface ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oceans are estimated to be absorbing one-third of the fossil fuel carbon released into the atmosphere, a process that is expected to change ocean carbon chemistry. I will present data from the Washington coast showing ocean pH declines and changes to the shell chemistry of bivalves. I will discuss implications of carbon cycle changes for marine species, including insights from a coastal area where I have worked for more than 24 years. I will summarize what we know to date about this process of ocean acidification.

Pfister, Cathy [University of Chicago

2012-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

460

Unusual sedimentation of a Galveston Bay wetland at Pine Gully, Seabrook, Texas: implications for beach renourishment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excess sedimentation began affecting the wetland dynamics of Pine Gully in Seabrook, Texas during the first quarter of 2004. This sedimentation was sudden and became a serious problem for the dynamics of the Pine Gully wetland because the fine, well sorted, quartz rich sediments began plugging the main channel of the previously tidally dominated wetland. Progressive sedimentation has produced overbank deposits in the marine grasses, contributing to the death of wetland grasses by sediment chocking. The main purpose of this study is to determine the new source and mechanism of sedimentation in Pine Gully, document changes from sedimentation, and determine a solution to prevent future sedimentation. Sedimentation in Pine Gully and coastal areas adjacent to Pine Gully has occurred in a region that has experienced subsidence and sea level rise. The sedimentation in Pine Gully is a direct result of new and sustained sediment at the mouth of Pine Gully. These new sediments are transported into Pine Gully by displacement waves from ships moving through the Houston Ship Channel. Beach renourishment at Wright Beach, located a half mile north of Pine Gully, occurred as Pine Gully experienced sedimentation. Construction of a breakwater at the mouth of Pine Gully and subsequent removal of sediment in Pine Gully itself is ultimately the solution to revitalizing the wetland to its pre-sedimentation state. Replanting of native vegetation killed off by sedimentation is recommended and would hasten the recovery of the wetland. Documenting the effects of this unique sedimentation in Pine Gully has implications for the future. Beach renourishment or coastal projects that may contribute excess sediment to the coastline should be concerned with unintended effects they may cause. Although an historically eroding shoreline exists, the effects of excess sedimentation can be severe. A coastal study should be done before sediment is added to the shoreline to identify any areas within the sphere of influence of the project. Ecosystems determined to be within the sphere of influence by a coastal study should implement preventative measures at those locations to avoid an ecological disaster similar to that in Pine Gully.

Culver, Wesley Richard

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Critical Analysis of At-Risk Policy Discourse: Implications for Administrators and Teachers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While No Child Left Behind (NCLB) provides a mechanism for holding states, local education agencies (LEA), and schools accountable to improve academic achievement for all students, policy itself has done little to include students from dropping out of school. Rather, dropout prevention/recovery schools/programs such as alternative schools of choice are recognized and relied upon as a means to reduce the number of students dropping out of school. These schools seek to re-engage the student who is at-risk to dropping out of school through nontraditional means and strategies. As more and more students become disenfranchised and drop out of school, these schools grow in importance. To ensure that all students have equity in education, regardless of educational setting, these schools warrant further attention and consideration. Therefore, two questions become evident: (a) How do educators in alternative schools interpret and implement policy such as NCLB? and (b) How do they define their role and responsibility? This case study examined the socio-legal discourse applied when seven administrators and 15 teachers administered policy as a response to an at-risk student population in five demographically diverse alternative education settings in California and Texas. A critical discourse analysis of text, interviews, and observations was used to reveal administrator and teacher assumptions and motivations of policy and risk. The data analysis revealed three dominant discourses of risk compliance and policy knowledge that were notable forces in the policy implementation of NCLB at these schools. Themes that emerged from the data included responsibility, dissociation, success, and equity. The findings from this study have demonstrated that a moment-by-moment process shapes the construction of role, responsibility, success, and equity as defined by the teachers and administrators. Furthermore, the discourse of risk and policy converged as ideological and political conceptions that perpetuate the notion that educating disadvantaged children as a process of demonstrating a particular level of knowledge and/or acquitting what it means to be considered at-risk. The implication for these educators is that the risk discourse that was engaged influenced their sense of responsibility, practice, and thus may counter policy intent.

Hemmer, Lynn

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Implications for advanced safeguards derived from PR&PP case study results  

SciTech Connect

The proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR and PP) working group produced a case study on the Example Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR). The ESFR is a hypothetical nuclear energy system consisting of four sodium-cooled fast reactors of medium size collocated with an on-site dry fuel storage facility and a spent fuel reprocessing facility using pyroprocessing technology. This study revealed how safeguards would be applied at such site consisting of integrated multiple fuel cycle facilities and the implications of what safeguards technology and safeguards concepts would need to be adapted and developed to safeguard successfully this Generation IV nuclear energy system concept. The major safeguards concepts driving our safeguards analysis are timeliness goals and material quantity goals. Because the fresh transuranic (TRU) fuel to be produced in the ESFR fuel fabrication facility contains plutonium, the ESFR will be reprocessing, using in the reactor, and storing material on site that will have IAEA defined 'direct-use material' in it with stringent timeliness goals and material quantity goals that drive the safeguards implementation. Specifically, the TRU fresh fuel, pyroprocessing in process material, LWR spent fuel sent to the ESFR, and TRU spent fuel will contain plutonium. This material will need to be verified at interim intervals four times per year because the irradiated direct-use material, as defined previously, has three-month timeliness goals and 8 kg material quantity goals for plutonium. The TRU in-process material is, of course, irradiated direct-use material as defined by the IAEA. Keeping the plutonium and uranium together with TRu products should provide a radiation barrier. this radiation barrier slows down the ability to reprocess the fuel. Furthermore, the reprocessing technique, if it has some intrinsic proliferation resistance, will need major modifications to be able to separate plutonium from the uranium and TRU mixture. The ESFR design should have such features in it if it is seen to have intrinsic proliferation resistance. The technical difficulty in diverting material from the ESFR is at least as strongly impacted by the adversaries overall technical capabilities as it is by the effort required to overcome those barriers intrinsic to the nuclear fuel cycle. The intrinsic proliferation resistance of the ESFR will affect how extrinsic measures in the safeguards approach for the ESFR will provide overall proliferation resistance.

Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Performance implications from sizing a VM on multi-core systems: A Data analytic application s view  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we present a quantitative performance analysis of data analytics applications running on multi-core virtual machines. Such environments form the core of cloud computing. In addition, data analytics applications, such as Cassandra and Hadoop, are becoming increasingly popular on cloud computing platforms. This convergence necessitates a better understanding of the performance and cost implications of such hybrid systems. For example, the very rst step in hosting applications in virtualized environments, requires the user to con gure the number of virtual processors and the size of memory. To understand performance implications of this step, we benchmarked three Yahoo Cloud Serving Benchmark (YCSB) workloads in a virtualized multi-core environment. Our measurements indicate that the performance of Cassandra for YCSB workloads does not heavily depend on the processing capacity of a system, while the size of the data set is critical to performance relative to allocated memory. We also identi ed a strong relationship between the running time of workloads and various hardware events (last level cache loads, misses, and CPU migrations). From this analysis, we provide several suggestions to improve the performance of data analytics applications running on cloud computing environments.

Lim, Seung-Hwan [ORNL; Horey, James L [ORNL; Begoli, Edmon [ORNL; Yao, Yanjun [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Cao, Qing [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

The California greenhouse gas initiative and its implications to the automotive industry  

SciTech Connect

CAR undertook this investigation to better understand the costs and challenges of a local (state) regulation necessitating the implementation of alternative or advanced powertrain technology. CAR will attempt to add insight into the challenges that local regulations present to the automotive industry, and to contribute further to the discussion of how advanced powertrain technology may be used to meet such regulation. Any local law that (directly or indirectly) affects light duty motor vehicle fuel economy creates what in effect is a specialty market for powertrain technology. As such these small markets present significant challenges for automotive manufacturers. First, a small market with unique standards presents significant challenges to an industry that has sustained growth by relying on large volumes to achieve scale economies and deliver products at a cost acceptable to the consumer. Further, the challenges of the additional technology make it likely that any powertrain capable of meeting the stringent emissions standards will include costly additional components, and thus will be more costly to manufacture. It is likely that manufacturers would consider the following actions as steps to deliver products to meet the pending California regulatory requirements anticipated as a result of prior California legislation: (1) Substituting more fuel efficient vehicles: Bring in more efficient vehicles from global operations, while likely dropping existing domestic products. (2) Substituting powertrains: Add existing downsized engines (i.e. turbocharged versions, etc.) into California market-bound vehicles. (3) Powertrain enhancements: Add technology to current engine and transmission offerings to improve efficiency and reduce emissions. (4) Incorporating alternative powertrains into existing vehicle platforms: Develop a hybrid or other type of powertrain for an existing vehicle. (5) New powertrains and new platforms: Develop vehicles specifically intended to incorporate new powertrain technologies, materials and/or design (e.g. the General Motors EV1 or the Toyota Prius). These five actions represent the gamut from the least complicated solution to the most complex. They also generally represent the least expensive response to the most expensive. It is possible that the least expensive responses may be least likely to meet market demands while achieving required GHG emission limits. At the same time, the most expensive option may produce a vehicle that satisfies the GHG reduction requirements and meets some consumer requirements, but is far too costly to manufacture and sell profitably. The response of a manufacturer would certainly have to take market size, consumer acceptance, technology implication and cost, as well as internal capacities and constraints, into consideration. It is important to understand that individual companies may respond differently in the short term. However, it is probable that there would be a more consistent industry-wide response in the longer term. Options 1 and 2 present the simplest responses. A company may reach into its global portfolio to deliver vehicles that are more fuel-efficient. These vehicles are usually much smaller and significantly less powerful than current U.S. offerings. Industry respondents indicated that such a strategy may be possible but would likely be met with less than positive reaction from the buying public. A general estimate for the cost to homologize a vehicle--that is, to prepare an existing vehicle for entry into the United States provided all business conditions were met (reasonable product, capacity availability, etc.), would be approximately $50 million. Assuming an estimated cost for homologation to meet U.S. standards of $50 million and a 20,000 vehicle per year sales volume in California, the company would then incur a $2,500 per-vehicle cost to bring them into the market. A manufacturer may also choose to incorporate a more efficient powertrain into a vehicle already sold in the market. The costs associated with such a strategy would include reengineering

Smith, B. C.; Miller, R. T.; Center for Automotive Research

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Innovative approaches in integrated assessment modelling of European air pollution control strategies - Implications of dealing with multi-pollutant multi-effect problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, crucial aspects of the implications and the complexity of interconnected multi-pollutant multi-effect assessments of both air pollution control strategies and the closely related reduction of greenhouse gas emissions will be discussed. ... Keywords: Emission control, Integrated assessment, Optimisation

Stefan Reis; Steffen Nitter; Rainer Friedrich

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Edible Oleogels: Structure and Health ImplicationsChapter 3 Edible Oil Organogels Based on Self-assembled -sitosterol + ?-oryzanol Tubules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edible Oleogels: Structure and Health Implications Chapter 3 Edible Oil Organogels Based on Self-assembled -sitosterol + ?-oryzanol Tubules Food Science eChapters Food Science & Technology FB25C8783235174B6461688FACE6B0F4 AOCS Press

467

An Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chains and emission factors for the generation, transmission and distribution portions of the electricityAn Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios Joe Marriott Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements

468

PHYSICAL PROCESSES SHAPING GAMMA-RAY BURST X-RAY AFTERGLOW LIGHT CURVES: THEORETICAL IMPLICATIONS FROM THE SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYSICAL PROCESSES SHAPING GAMMA-RAY BURST X-RAY AFTERGLOW LIGHT CURVES: THEORETICAL IMPLICATIONS August 15; accepted 2005 December 19 ABSTRACT With the successful launch of the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst component is consistent with the tail emission of the prompt gamma-ray bursts and/or the X-ray flares

Zhang, Bing

469

Strike-slip faulting as a trigger mechanism for overpressure release through piercement structures. Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia A. Mazzini a,*, A. Nermoen a , M. Krotkiewski a , Y 2009 Accepted 12 March 2009 Available online xxx Keywords: Java, Indonesia Lusi mud volcano Faulting volcano in Indonesia (Mazzini et al., 2007). Lusi became active the 29th of May 2006 on the Java Island

Podladchikov, Yuri

470

Total Carbon Measurement in Soils Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Results from the Field and Implications for Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Carbon Measurement in Soils using Laser-Induced Breakdown Total Carbon Measurement in Soils using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Results from the Field and Implications for Carbon Sequestration Michael H. Ebinger (mhe@lanl.gov, 505-667-3147) Environmental Dynamics and Spatial Analysis Group (EES-10), MS J495 Earth and Environmental Sciences Division Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA. David A. Cremers (cremers_david@lanl.gov, 505-665-4180) Advanced Chemical Diagnostics and Instrumentation Group, MS J565 Chemistry Division Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 David D. Breshears (daveb@lanl.gov, 505-665-2803) Environmental Dynamics and Spatial Analysis Group (EES-10), MS J495 Earth and Environmental Sciences Division Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA.

471

Changes in composition and sugar release across the annual rings of Populus wood and implications on recalcitrance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

composition composition and sugar release across the annual rings of Populus wood and implications on recalcitrance Jaclyn D. DeMartini, Charles E. Wyman ⇑ Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 9 July 2010 Received in revised form 30 August 2010 Accepted 31 August 2010 Available online xxxx Keywords: Pretreatment Enzymatic hydrolysis Biomass recalcitrance Age effects Populus wood a b s t r a c t Understanding structural characteristics that are responsible for biomass recalcitrance by identifying why it is more difficult for some plants, or portions of plants, to release their sugars would be extremely valuable in overcoming this barrier. With this in mind, this study investigated the recalcitrance of wood

472

Formation of Hydrates from Single-Phase Aqueous Solutions and Implications for Oceanic Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation of Hydrates from Single-Phase Aqueous Solutions Formation of Hydrates from Single-Phase Aqueous Solutions and Implications for Oceanic Sequestration of CO 2 . G. Holder (holder@engrng.pitt.edu) 412-624-9809 L. Mokka (lakshmi.mokka@netl.doe.gov) 412-386-6019 Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA 15261 R. Warzinski* (robert.warzinski@netl.doe.gov) 412-386-5863 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 Introduction a Gas hydrates are crystalline solids formed from mixtures of water and low molecular weight compounds, referred to as hydrate formers, that typically are gases at ambient conditions (1). Generally, hydrates are formed in the laboratory from two-phase systems by contacting a hydrate former or formers in the gas or liquid phase with liquid water and increasing the pressure until

473

Novel seed coat lignins in the Cactaceae: structure, distribution and implications for the evolution of lignin diversity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12 12 © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd Received Date : 08-Jul-2012 Revised Date : 30-Aug-2012 Accepted Date : 03-Sep-2012 Article type : Original Article Novel seed coat lignins in the Cactaceae: structure, distribution and implications for the evolution of lignin diversity Fang Chen, 1,3* Yuki Tobimatsu, 2, Lisa Jackson, 1 John Ralph, 2,4 and Richard A. Dixon 1,3* 1 Plant Biology Division, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, 2510 Sam Noble Parkway, Ardmore, OK 73401, USA; 2 Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Enzyme Institute, 1710 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53726, USA; 3 DOE Bioenergy Sciences Center, Oak Ridge, TN, USA; 4 DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Madison, WI, and Wisconsin Bioenergy

474

Penning trap mass measurements on (99-109)$Cd with ISOLTRAP and implications on the rp process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Penning trap mass measurements on neutron-deficient Cd isotopes (99-109)Cd have been performed with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN, all with relative mass uncertainties below 3*10^8. A new mass evaluation has been performed. The mass of 99Cd has been determined for the first time which extends the region of accurately known mass values towards the doubly magic nucleus 100Sn. The implication of the results on the reaction path of the rp process in stellar X-ray bursts is discussed. In particular, the uncertainty of the abundance and the overproduction created by the rp-process for the mass A = 99 is demonstrated by reducing the uncertainty of the proton-separation energy of 100In Sp(100In) by a factor of 2.5.

M. Breitenfeldt; G. Audi; D. Beck; K. Blaum; S. George; F. Herfurth; A. Herlert; A. Kellerbauer; H. -J. Kluge; M. Kowalska; D. Lunney; S. Naimi; D. Neidherr; H. Schatz; S. Schwarz; L. Schweikhard

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

475

Operating Reserve Implication of Alternative Implementations of an Energy Imbalance Service on Wind Integration in the Western Interconnection: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the past few years, there has been significant interest in alternative ways to manage power systems over a larger effective electrical footprint. Large regional transmission organizations in the Eastern Interconnection have effectively consolidated balancing areas, achieving significant economies of scale that result in a reduction in required reserves. Conversely, in the Western Interconnection there are many balancing areas, which will result in challenges if there is significant wind and solar energy development in the region. A recent proposal to the Western Electricity Coordinating Council suggests a regional energy imbalance service (EIS). To evaluate this EIS, a number of analyses are in process or are planned. This paper describes one part of an analysis of the EIS's implication on operating reserves under several alternative scenarios of the market footprint and participation. We improve on the operating reserves method utilized in the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study and apply this modified approach to data from the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The anti-cancer agent guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane: Ensuing energetic and oxidative stress implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guttiferone-A (GA) is a natural occurring polyisoprenylated benzophenone with cytotoxic action in vitro and anti-tumor action in rodent models. We addressed a potential involvement of mitochondria in GA toxicity (1-25 {mu}M) toward cancer cells by employing both hepatic carcinoma (HepG2) cells and succinate-energized mitochondria, isolated from rat liver. In HepG2 cells GA decreased viability, dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential, depleted ATP and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In isolated rat-liver mitochondria GA promoted membrane fluidity increase, cyclosporine A/EGTA-insensitive membrane permeabilization, uncoupling (membrane potential dissipation/state 4 respiration rate increase), Ca{sup 2+} efflux, ATP depletion, NAD(P)H depletion/oxidation and ROS levels increase. All effects in cells, except mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, as well as NADPH depletion/oxidation and permeabilization in isolated mitochondria, were partly prevented by the a NAD(P)H regenerating substrate isocitrate. The results suggest the following sequence of events: 1) GA interaction with mitochondrial membrane promoting its permeabilization; 2) mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation; 3) NAD(P)H oxidation/depletion due to inability of membrane potential-sensitive NADP{sup +} transhydrogenase of sustaining its reduced state; 4) ROS accumulation inside mitochondria and cells; 5) additional mitochondrial membrane permeabilization due to ROS; and 6) ATP depletion. These GA actions are potentially implicated in the well-documented anti-cancer property of GA/structure related compounds. - Graphical abstract: Guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane and induces cancer cell death Display Omitted Highlights: > We addressed the involvement of mitochondria in guttiferone (GA) toxicity toward cancer cells. > GA promoted membrane permeabilization, membrane potential dissipation, NAD(P)H depletion, ROS accumulation and ATP depletion. > These actions could be implicated in the well-documented anti-cancer property of GA/structure related compounds.

Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L., E-mail: gilbertopardo@infomed.sld.cu [Centro de Estudio para las Investigaciones y Evaluaciones Biologicas, Instituto de Farmacia y Alimentos, Universidad de La Habana, ave. 23 21425 e/214 and 222, La Coronela, La Lisa, CP 13600, Ciudad Habana (Cuba); Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Cafe s/n, 14040-903 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Nunez-Figueredo, Yanier [Centro para las Investigaciones y Desarrollo de Medicamentos, Ave 26, No. 1605 Boyeros y Puentes Grandes, CP 10600, Ciudad Habana (Cuba); Tudella, Valeria G. [Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Cafe s/n, 14040-903 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Cuesta-Rubio, Osmany [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Farmacia y Alimentos, Universidad de La Habana, ave. 23 21425 e/214 and 222, La Coronela, La Lisa, CP 13600, Ciudad Habana (Cuba); Rodrigues, Fernando P.; Pestana, Cezar R. [Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Cafe s/n, 14040-903 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Uyemura, Sergio A.; Leopoldino, Andreia M. [Departamento de Analises Clinicas, Toxicologicas e Bromatologicas, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Cafe s/n, 14040-903 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Alberici, Luciane C.; Curti, Carlos [Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Cafe s/n, 14040-903 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Phase II Agency/Company /Organization Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), Clean Air Asia Partner Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector Land Focus Area Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Philippines South-Eastern Asia References Phase I information[1] Overview Progress and Outcomes Capacity building activities include enhancing capacity for implementing

478

Philippines-Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Philippines-Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Phase II Agency/Company /Organization Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), Clean Air Asia Partner Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector Land Focus Area Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Philippines South-Eastern Asia References Phase I information[1] Overview Progress and Outcomes Capacity building activities include enhancing capacity for implementing

479

Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

480

Net Metering Policy Development and Distributed Solar Generation in Minnesota: Overview of Trends in Nationwide Policy Development and Implications of Increasing the Eligible System Size Cap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 December 2009 Net Metering Policy Development in Minnesota: Overview of Trends in Nationwide Policy Development and Implications of Increasing the Eligible System Size Cap Elizabeth Doris, Sarah Busche, and Stephen Hockett National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46670 December 2009 Net Metering Policy Development in Minnesota: Overview of Trends in Nationwide Policy Development and Implications of Increasing the Eligible System Size Cap

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481

Development of Energy Trading Floors - Implications for Company Operations and Regional Energy Markets: Report Series on Fuel and Po wer Market Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of different firms have established energy trading floors over the past several years, to such an extent that trading floors are increasingly being viewed as a mandatory part of the generation business. Increasing in number and scope, trading floors are undergoing rapid evolution, with inevitable -- but as yet uncertain -- impacts on alignment of fuel and power prices. This report provides a snapshot of the development and implications of energy trading floors, drawing on leading examples from ...

1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

Implications of a New Source Performance Standard for New Fossil Generation: A High-Level Bounding Analysis Based on the US-REGEN Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a bounding analysis of the impact to the electric sector of the proposed New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for new generating units, recently put forward by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.The purpose of the analysis is to look at the coal generation option, under various plausible policy and uncertainty scenarios, and not to create a singular forecast of future outcomes. The primary assumed implication of the proposed ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

483

Continuity and internal properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and their implications for geopressured energy development. Annual report, November 1, 1980-October 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Systematic investigation, classification, and differentiation of the intrinsic properties of genetic sandstone units that typify many geopressured geothermal aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs of the Gulf Coast region are provided. The following are included: structural and stratigraphic limits of sandstone reservoirs; characteristics and dimensions of Gulf Coast Sandstones; fault compartment areas; comparison of production and geologic estimates of aquifer volume; geologic setting and reservoir characteristics, wells of opportunity; internal properties of sandstones and implications for geopressured energy development. (MHR)

Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Tyler, N.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Capturing the implications of land use change in Brazil through environmental assessment: Time for a strategic approach?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brazil is experiencing a surge in planting of sugar cane crops driven by internal markets and external policy drivers for biofuels. The current expectation is for the expansion of these crops to continue. This creates concern over the extent to which the full implications of large scale land use change are currently being considered by decision-makers. Using the State of Sao Paulo as a case study (as it accounts for the majority of sugar cane grown in Brazil), a comparison was made of the impacts identified in Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) and Preliminary Environmental Reports (PERs), which have to be submitted for approval of most new sugar cane activities, with significant impacts known to be associated with sugar cane activities derived from literature review. The results from a review of 32 EISs and PERs (30% of the population) indicated that whilst some impacts were well covered by the sample (water and soil pollution, and air emissions) energy balance and Green House Gas emissions and food security had very limited consideration, and water resources, residues, labour conditions and social responsibility were only partially covered. Environmental Impact Assessment is constrained by its environmental advocacy role and its application to the project level only. This study highlights its limitations in the context of assessment of land use change which demands more strategic consideration.

Gallardo, Amarilis Lucia Casteli Figueiredo, E-mail: amacafi@ipt.b [Institute for Technological Research, Center of Environmental and Energetic Technologies, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo - SP, CEP 05508-901 (Brazil); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.u [InteREAM (Interdisciplinary Research in Environmental Assessment and Management), School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

485

X-ray Absorption in Type II Quasars: Implications for the Equatorial Paradigm of Broad Absorption Line Quasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, the hydrogen column densities derived from X-ray observations of type II (hidden) quasars and broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) are compared. These column densities represent the amount of absorbing material between the X-ray source and the observer. A sample of type II QSOs with strong narrow emission lines, weak UV continuum and no broad emission lines that also have deep X-ray observations was collected from the literature for analysis. The standard model of equatorial BAL (broad absorption line) winds predicts that the column densities of this type II QSO sample should significantly exceed BALQSO column densities. Based on the existing published deep hard X-ray observations this does not seem to be true, the BALQSO absorption columns are anomalously large. Actually, the limited existing data indicate that BALQSOs have column densities which are larger than the type II QSO column densities at a statistically significant level. The implication to BAL outflows and the fundamental physical geometry of QSOs is discussed.

Brian Punsly

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Conserved XPB Core Structure and Motifs for DNA Unwinding:Implications for Pathway Selection of Transcription or ExcisionRepair  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The human xeroderma pigmentosum group B (XPB) helicase is essential for transcription, nucleotide excision repair, and TFIIH functional assembly. Here, we determined crystal structures of an Archaeoglobus fulgidus XPB homolog (AfXPB) that characterize two RecA-like XPB helicase domains and discover a DNA damage recognition domain (DRD), a unique RED motif, a flexible thumb motif (ThM), and implied conformational changes within a conserved functional core. RED motif mutations dramatically reduce helicase activity, and the DRD and ThM, which flank the RED motif, appear structurally as well as functionally analogous to the MutS mismatch recognition and DNA polymerase thumb domains. Substrate specificity is altered by DNA damage, such that AfXPB unwinds dsDNA with 3' extensions, but not blunt-ended dsDNA, unless it contains a lesion, as shown for CPD or (6-4) photoproducts. Together, these results provide an unexpected mechanism of DNA unwinding with Implications for XPB damage verification in nucleotide excision repair.

Fan, Li; Arval, Andrew S.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Iwai, Shigenori; Hanaoka, Fumio; Tainer, John A.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Effect of PSR J0737-3039 on the DNS Merger Rate and Implications for GW Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the current estimates of the Galactic merger rate of double-neutron-star (DNS) systems. Using a statistical analysis method, we calculate the probability distribution function (PDF) of the rate estimates, which allows us to assign confidence intervals to the rate estimates. We calculate the Galactic DNS merger rate based on the three known systems B1913+16, B1534+12, and J0737-3039. The discovery of J0737-3039 increases the estimated DNS merger rate by a factor ~6 than what is previously known. The most likely values of DNS merger rate lie in the range 3-190 per Myr depending on different pulsar models. Motivated by a strong correlation between the peak rate estimates and a pulsar luminosity function, we calculate a 'global' probability distribution as a single representation of the parameter space covered by different pulsar population models. We compare the global PDF with the observed supernova Ib/c rate, which sets an upper limit on the DNS merger rate. Finally, we remark on implications of new discoveries such as of J1756-2251, the 4th DNS in the Galactic disk, and J1906+0746, a possible DNS system.

Chunglee Kim; Vicky Kalogera; Duncan R. Lorimer

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

488

Genome resequencing in Populus: Revealing large-scale genome variation and implications on specialized-trait genomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, Populus ranks among a few plant species with a complete genome sequence and other highly developed genomic resources. With the first genome sequence among all tree species, Populus has been adopted as a suitable model organism for genomic studies in trees. However, far from being just a model species, Populus is a key renewable economic resource that plays a significant role in providing raw materials for the biofuel and pulp and paper industries. Therefore, aside from leading frontiers of basic tree molecular biology and ecological research, Populus leads frontiers in addressing global economic challenges related to fuel and fiber production. The latter fact suggests that research aimed at improving quality and quantity of Populus as a raw material will likely drive the pursuit of more targeted and deeper research in order to unlock the economic potential tied in molecular biology processes that drive this tree species. Advances in genome sequence-driven technologies, such as resequencing individual genotypes, which in turn facilitates large scale SNP discovery and identification of large scale polymorphisms are key determinants of future success in these initiatives. In this treatise we discuss implications of genome sequence-enable technologies on Populus genomic and genetic studies of complex and specialized-traits.

Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Priya, Ranjan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Wastes as co-fuels: the policy framework for solid recovered fuel (SRF) in Europe, with UK implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

European Union (EU) member states are adopting the mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) of municipal solid waste (MSW) to comply with EU Landfill Directive (LD) targets on landfill diversion. We review the policy framework for MSW-derived solid recovered fuel (SRF), composed of paper, plastic, and textiles, in the energy-intensive industries. A comparatively high calorific value (15-18 MJ/kg) fuel, SRF has the potential to partially replace fossil fuel in energy-intensive industries, alongside MSW in dedicated combustion facilities. Attempts by the European standards organization (CEN) to classify fuel properties consider net calorific value (CV) and chlorine and mercury content. However, the particle size, moisture content, and fuel composition also require attention and future studies must address these parameters. We critically review the implications of using SRF as a co-fuel in thermal processes. A thermodynamic analysis provides insight into the technical and environmental feasibility of co-combusting SRF in coal-fired power plants and cement kilns. Results indicate the use of SRF as co-fuel can reduce global warming and acidification potential significantly. This policy analysis is of value to waste managers, policy specialists, regulators, and the waste management research community. 63 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Anurag Garg; Richard Smith; Daryl Hill; Nigel Simms; Simon Pollard [Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom). Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

490

Effect of personal and situational variables on noise annoyance: With special reference to implications for en route noise. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Over 680 publications from 282 social surveys of residents' reactions to environmental noise have been examined to locate 495 published findings on 26 topics concerning non-noise explanations for residents' reactions to environmental noise. This report (1) tabulates the evidence on the 26 response topics, (2) identifies the 495 findings, and (3) discusses the implications for en route noise assessment. After controlling for noise level, over half of the social survey evidence indicates that noise annoyance is not strongly affected by any of the nine demographic variables examined (age, sex, social status, income, education, homeownership, type of dwelling, length of residence, or receipt of benefits from the noise source), but is positively associated with each of the five attitudinal variables examined (a fear of danger from the noise source, a sensitivity towards noise generally, the belief that the authorities can control the noise, the awareness of non-noise impacts of the source, and the belief that the noise source is not important).

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission Planning  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission Planning CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission Planning Webinar- TNAs, NAMAs, LEDS and Roadmaps Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission Planning Webinar- TNAs, NAMAs, LEDS and Roadmaps Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Presentation, Training materials, Video, Webinar Website: en.openei.org/wiki/CLEAN References: CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission Planning Webinar- TNAs, NAMAs, LEDS and Roadmaps[1] Logo: CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission Planning Webinar- TNAs, NAMAs, LEDS and Roadmaps

492

The Ep,i - Eiso correlation in GRBs: updated observational status, re-analysis and main implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The correlation between the cosmological rest-frame nuFnu spectrum peak energy, Ep,i, and the isotropic equivalent radiated energy, Eiso, discovered by Amati et al. in 2002 and confirmed/extended by subsequent osbervations, is one of the most intriguing and debated observational evidences in Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) astrophysics. In this paper I provide an update and a re-analysis of the Ep,i - Eiso correlation basing on an updated sample consisting of 41 long GRBs/XRFs with firm estimates of z and observed peak energy, Ep,obs, 12 GRBs with uncertain valeus of z and/or Ep,obs, 2 short GRBs with firm estimates of z and Ep,obs and the peculiar sub-energetic events GRB980425/SN1998bw and GRB031203/SN2003lw. In addition to standard correlation analysis and power-law fitting, the data analysis here reported includes a modelization which accounts for sample variance. All 53 classical long GRBs and XRFs, including 11 Swift events with published spectral parameters and fluences, have Ep,i and Eiso values, or upper/lower limits, consistent with the correlation, which shows a chance probability as low as ~7x10{-15}, a slope of ~0.57 (~0.5 when fitting by accounting for sample variance) and an extra-Poissonian logarithmic dispersion of ~0.15, it extends over ~5 orders of magnitude in Eiso and ~3 orders of magnitude in Ep,i and holds from the closer to the higher z GRBs. I also discuss the main implications of the updated Ep,i - Eiso correlation for the models of the physics and geometry of GRB emission, its use for discriminating different classes and as a pseudo-z estimator, and the tests of possible selection effects with GRBs of unknown redshift.

Lorenzo Amati

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

493

Federal technology transfer requirements :a focused study of principal agencies approaches with implications for the Department of Homeland Security.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides relevant information and analysis to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that will assist DHS in determining how to meet the requirements of federal technology transfer legislation. These legal requirements are grouped into five categories: (1) establishing an Office of Research and Technology Applications, or providing the functions thereof; (2) information management; (3) enabling agreements with non-federal partners; (4) royalty sharing; and (5) invention ownership/obligations. These five categories provide the organizing framework for this study, which benchmarks other federal agencies/laboratories engaged in technology transfer/transition Four key agencies--the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense (DoD)--and several of their laboratories have been surveyed. An analysis of DHS's mission needs for commercializing R&D compared to those agencies/laboratories is presented with implications and next steps for DHS's consideration. Federal technology transfer legislation, requirements, and practices have evolved over the decades as agencies and laboratories have grown more knowledgeable and sophisticated in their efforts to conduct technology transfer and as needs and opinions in the federal sector have changed with regards to what is appropriate. The need to address requirements in a fairly thorough manner has, therefore, resulted in a lengthy paper. There are two ways to find summary information. Each chapter concludes with a summary, and there is an overall ''Summary and Next Steps'' chapter on pages 57-60. For those readers who are unable to read the entire document, we recommend referring to these pages.

Koker, Denise; Micheau, Jill M.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

The Role Of Modeling Assumptions And Policy Instruments in Evaluating The Global Implications Of U.S. Biofuel Policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of current U.S. biofuel law the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) is to reduce dependence on imported oil, but the law also requires biofuels to meet carbon emission reduction thresholds relative to petroleum fuels. EISA created a renewable fuel standard with annual targets for U.S. biofuel use that climb gradually from 9 billion gallons per year in 2008 to 36 billion gallons (or about 136 billion liters) of biofuels per year by 2022. The most controversial aspects of the biofuel policy have centered on the global social and environmental implications of its potential land use effects. In particular, there is an ongoing debate about whether indirect land use change (ILUC) make biofuels a net source, rather sink, of carbon emissions. However, estimates of ILUC induced by biofuel production and use can only be inferred through modeling. This paper evaluates how model structure, underlying assumptions, and the representation of policy instruments influence the results of U.S. biofuel policy simulations. The analysis shows that differences in these factors can lead to divergent model estimates of land use and economic effects. Estimates of the net conversion of forests and grasslands induced by U.S. biofuel policy range from 0.09 ha/1000 gallons described in this paper to 0.73 ha/1000 gallons from early studies in the ILUC change debate. We note that several important factors governing LUC change remain to be examined. Challenges that must be addressed to improve global land use change modeling are highlighted.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Nicotine dose-concentration relationship and pregnancy outcomes in rat: Biologic plausibility and implications for future research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure during pregnancy can lead to profound adverse effects on fetal development. Although CS contains several thousand chemicals, nicotine has been widely used as its surrogate as well as in its own right as a neuroteratogen. The justification for the route and dose of nicotine administration is largely based on inferential data suggesting that nicotine 6 mg/kg/day infused continuously via osmotic mini pumps (OMP) would mimic maternal CS exposure. We provide evidence that 6 mg/kg/day nicotine dose as commonly administered to pregnant rats leads to plasma nicotine concentrations that are 3-10-fold higher than those observed in moderate to heavy smokers and pregnant mothers, respectively. Furthermore, the cumulative daily nicotine dose exceeds by several hundred fold the amount consumed by human heavy smokers. Our study does not support the widely accepted notion that regardless of the nicotine dose, a linear nicotine dose-concentration relationship exists in a steady-state OMP model. We also show that total nicotine clearance increases with advancing pregnancy but no significant change is observed between the 2nd and 3rd trimester. Furthermore, nicotine infusion even at this extremely high dose has little effect on a number of maternal and fetal biologic variables and pregnancy outcome suggesting that CS constituents other than nicotine mediate the fetal growth restriction in infants born to smoking mothers. Our current study has major implications for translational research in developmental toxicology and pharmacotherapy using nicotine replacement treatment as an aid to cessation of cigarette smoking in pregnant mothers.

Hussein, Jabeen [Department of Pediatrics, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada); Farkas, Svetlana [Department of Pediatrics, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada); MacKinnon, Yolanda [Department of Pediatrics, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada); Ariano, Robert E. [Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Sitar, Daniel S. [Departments of Internal Medicine and, Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Hasan, Shabih U. [Department of Pediatrics, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada)]. E-mail: hasans@ucalgary.ca

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Thermal modeling of the Clear Lake magmatic system, California: Implications for conventional and hot dry rock geothermal development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of recent volcanism, high heat flow ({ge} HFU or 167 mW/m{sup 2}), and high conductive geothermal gradient (up to 120{degree} C/km) makes the Clear Lake region of northern California one of the best prospects for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development in the US. The lack of permeability in exploration wells and lack of evidence for widespread geothermal reservoirs north of the Collayomi fault zone are not reassuring indications for conventional geothermal development. This report summarizes results of thermal modeling of the Clear Lake magmatic system, and discusses implications for HDR site selection in the region. The thermal models incorporate a wide range of constraints including the distribution and nature of volcanism in time and space, water and gas geochemistry, well data, and geophysical surveys. The nature of upper crustal magma bodies at Clear Lake is inferred from studying sequences of related silicic lavas, which tell a story of multistage mixing of silicic and mafic magma in clusters of small upper crustal chambers. Thermobarometry on metamorphic xenoliths yield temperature and pressure estimates of {approximately}780--900 C and 4--6 kb respectively, indicating that at least a portion of the deep magma system resided at depths from 14 to 21 km (9 to 12 mi). The results of thermal modeling support previous assessments of the high HDR potential of the area, and suggest the possibility that granitic bodies similar to The Geysers felsite may underlie much of the Clear Lake region at depths as little as 3--6 km. This is significant because future HDR reservoirs could potentially be sited in relatively shallow granitoid plutons rather than in structurally complex Franciscan basement rocks.

Stimac, J.; Goff, F.; Wohletz, K.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

The Substantive Validity of Work Performance Measures: Implications for Relationships Among Work Behavior Dimensions and Construct-Related Validity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance measurement and criterion theory are critical topics in the fields of I/O psychology, yet scholars continue to note several issues with the criterion, including empirically redundant behaviors, construct and measure proliferation, and definitions that conflict. These interconnected problems hinder the advancement of criterion measurement and theory. The goal of this study was to empirically examine the issues of theory/construct clarity and measurement as they exist regarding work performance behaviors. This study's first objective was to clarify definitions of core performance behaviors, particularly to resolve issues of construct proliferation and conceptual conflict. Universal definitions of four core criterion constructs (i.e., task performance, citizenship performance, counterproductive work behavior, and withdrawal) were developed that integrated existing definitions of similar behaviors. Each definition reflects a parsimonious conceptualization of existing performance behaviors, which serves to clarify existing, and at times divergent, criterion conceptualizations. Importantly, these integrated definitions represent commonly-held definitions of the constructs and replace the largely discrepant accumulation of definitions. The second objective was to determine whether existing items assumed to measure the four core work performance behaviors were judged by raters to represent their respective constructs. The results showed that of the 851 items examined, over half were judged to not represent their respective constructs which, importantly, replicated previous research. Additionally, the results highlight items that match their respective construct definition and contain minimal overlap with non-posited constructs. Finally, the third objective was to determine the implications of using the problematic items for both the empirical relationships among work performance behaviors and evidence of construct-related validity. The results provided preliminary evidence that while nomological networks are minimally affected, relationships among some work performance dimensions are significantly affected when problematic items are removed from measures of performance constructs. This dissertation demonstrated the need for more attention to the construct labels placed on the behaviors described in work performance items, as there are potentially adverse consequences for theory and measurement. Ultimately, the results of this study showed that work performance behaviors/items have often been assigned incorrect construct labels which, subsequently, may cast considerable doubt on the theoretica