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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood NAICS Total Onsite and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 4,563 4,249 * 313 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 2,845 2,819 0 27 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2,396 2,370 0 27 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 951 951 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 268 268 0 * 3115 Dairy Products 44 31 * Q 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17 0 0 17 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 659 623 Q * 3121 Beverages 587 551 Q * 3122 Tobacco 72

2

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" 1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases"," In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

3

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" 1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,,"Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

4

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",73242,309,4563,111,78003

5

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",75652,21,5666,347,80993

6

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002;" 1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" ,,"of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment","Row"

7

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 1998;" 2.1. Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" ,,"of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment","Row"

8

DOE O 461.2, Onsite Packaging and Transfer of Materials of National Security Interest  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order prescribes requirements and responsibilities for identifying and mitigating undue risk of onsite transfers that are non compliant with U.S. ...

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2002; " " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit:...

10

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square...

11

Table 11.3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy",," " " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,0.8,1.1,1.3

12

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SBOT NAICS Series 213112 Support Activities for Oil and Gas Operations NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NATIONAL ENERGY...

13

NAICS Search | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAICS Search NAICS Search NAICS Search The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is the standard used by Federal statistical agencies in classifying businesses. 10000 21000 22000 23000 31000 32000 33000 42000 44000 45000 48000 49000 51000 53000 54000 56000 61000 62000 81000 92000 NAICS uses six-digit codes at the most detailed level, with the first two digits representing the largest business sector, the third designating a subsector, the fourth designating the industry group, and the fifth showing the particular industry. Use the documents below, which are labeled by series, to see Department of Energy facilities that have historically procured goods/services in that

14

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; 9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings; Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts. Approximate Approximate Average Enclosed Floorspace Average Number Number of All Buildings Enclosed Floorspace of All Buildings of Buildings Onsite NAICS Onsite Establishments(b) per Establishment Onsite per Establishment Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million sq ft) (counts) (sq ft) (counts) (counts) Total United States 311 Food 1,115 13,271 107,293.7 32,953 3.1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 126 602 443,178.6 5,207 24.8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 59 270,262.7 982 18.3 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

15

NAICS Codes Description:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes Codes Description: Filters: Date Signed only show values between '10/01/2006' and '09/30/2007', Contracting Agency ID show only ('8900'), Contracting Office ID show only ('00001') Contracting Agency ID: 8900, Contracting Office ID: 00001 NAICS Code NAICS Description Actions Action Obligation 541519 OTHER COMPUTER RELATED SERVICES 251 $164,546,671 541611 ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT AND GENERAL MANAGEMENT CONSULTING SERVICES 236 $52,396,806 514210 DATA PROCESSING SERVICES 195 $28,941,727 531210 OFFICES OF REAL ESTATE AGENTS AND BROKERS 190 $6,460,652 541330 ENGINEERING SERVICES 165 $33,006,079 163 $11,515,387 541690 OTHER SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL CONSULTING SERVICES 92 $40,527,088 531390 OTHER ACTIVITIES RELATED TO REAL ESTATE 79 -$659,654 337214 OFFICE FURNITURE (EXCEPT WOOD) MANUFACTURING 78 $1,651,732

16

Table N13.2. Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 1998;" 2. Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy",," " " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1,0.8,1.5,0.9

17

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

sold and" "transferred out. It does not include electricity inputs from onsite" "cogeneration or generation from combustible fuels because that energy has" "already been...

18

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 73,242 309 4,563 111 78,003 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 15,283 253 2,845 72 18,310 311221 Wet Corn Milling 6,753 48 2,396 55 9,142 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 920 54 951 7 1,919 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foo 9,720 1 268 13 9,976 3115 Dairy Products 10,079 0 44 0 10,123 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17,545 0 17 0 17,562 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

19

Transfer Cask Assembly Onsite Transfer of K-Basin Fuel at Hanford  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Packaging Technology, Inc. was awarded a contract for the design and fabrication of a unique 18.5-ton transportation system to be used on-site at Hanford, WA. Unique aspects include rectangular cask geometry, solid 7 inch-thick stainless steel construction, hinged lid with remotely operable quick release locking mechanism. The lid maintains shielding and material confinement integrity after hypothetical accident conditions, and is equipped with a hydrogen venting system. This paper presents how the project requirements were translated into a successful design, and includes a brief discussion of a confirmation test program.

BRUBAKER, M.L.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Good-Bye, SIC - Hello, NAICS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > Industrial > Manufacturing > Good-Bye, SIC - Hello, NAICS Good-Bye, SIC - Hello, NAICS The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) of the United States, Canada, and Mexico Featured topics are: What is NAICS? Why replace the SIC system? How is NAICS better than SIC? How can data series be adjusted from SIC to NAICS? How is NAICS structured? Is there a source for more information about NAICS? What is NAICS? A new classification system has arrived for manufacturing establishments, and the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has incorporated this new

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Metalworking Machinery Manufacturing (NAICS 3335)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. metalworking machinery manufacturing industry (NAICS 3335) consists of about 7,900 firms with combined annual revenues of about $29 billion. Many (75%) of these firms are small, having fewer than 20 employees. This industry consumes a large amount of electricity, with about half of their usage going to drives that are used for machine tools; therefore, it is with motors and drives that the greatest opportunities for energy savings lie. Several electric technology options are available and identi...

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Plastic Product Manufacturing (NAICS 3261)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. plastics product manufacturing industry (NAICS 3261), which consists of more than 12,000 firms with combined annual revenues of about $170 billion, is one of the ten largest manufacturing industries in the country in terms of sales. A large amount of electricity is consumed by the plastics products industry, with more than half of their usage going to machine drives; therefore, it is with motors and drives that the greatest opportunities for energy savings lie. Several electric technology option...

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Table 11.3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood NAICS Total Onsite and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 5,666 5,414 81 171 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3,494 3,491 Q 2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 3,213 3,211 0 2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1,382 1,319 64 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 336 325 Q * 3115 Dairy Products 38 36 1 1 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 19 Q Q 14 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 342 238 Q 7 3121 Beverages 308 204 Q 7 3122 Tobacco 34

24

Onsite Tours  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

science & research Onsite tour info (pdf) | Map of onsite tours (jpg) 1 Aqua Tour, Smart Grid House and Solar Power More info: Los Alamos Smart Grid 2 Yellow Tour, MagViz...

25

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Search Tool |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Search Tool North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Search Tool North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Search Tool The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is the standard used by Federal statistical agencies in classifying business establishments for the purpose of collecting, analyzing, and publishing statistical data related to the U.S. business economy. NAICS was developed under the auspices of the Office of Management and Budget, and adopted in 1997 to replace the Standard Industrial Classification system. Through our website, you can search for procurement opportunities using your company's NAICS code, and you can learn more about the history of purchasing for your NAICS code at the Department. Visit our Industry Information page to learn more about our procurements by

26

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 1998;" 2. Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Establishments" " "," ",,"with Any"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Either","Conventional","Combustion","Turbines"," "," "," ","Internal","Combustion","Engines"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Heat"," ",," "

27

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Establishments" ,,,"with Any"," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," "

28

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and...

29

NAICS Codes @ Headquarters Description: NAICS Codes used at Headquarters Procurement Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes @ Headquarters Codes @ Headquarters Description: NAICS Codes used at Headquarters Procurement Services Filters: Signed Date only show values between , Contracting Agency ID show only ('8900'), Contracting Office ID show only ('00001'), Date Signed only show values between '05/01/2011' and '04/30/2012', Last Modified Date only show values between Contracting Agency ID: 8900, Contracting Office ID: 00001 NAICS Code NAICS Description Action Obligation 541519 OTHER COMPUTER RELATED SERVICES 341 $141,587,250.76 531210 OFFICES OF REAL ESTATE AGENTS AND BROKERS 286 $2,204,687.38 541330 ENGINEERING SERVICES 245 $80,827,391.54 611430 PROFESSIONAL AND MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT TRAINING 216 -$1,452,480.09 541611 ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT AND GENERAL MANAGEMENT CONSULTING SERVICES 206 $67,689,373.27 562910 REMEDIATION

30

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

31

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)"

32

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

33

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

34

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

35

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

36

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

37

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

38

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",,,," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

39

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 111 86 25 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 72 51 21 311221 Wet Corn Milling 55 42 13 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7 3 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 13 13 0 3115 Dairy Products 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * * 0 3121 Beverages

40

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; 1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,475 11,399 2,947 67 15 1,210 W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 183 449 269 35 0 148 W 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 18 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 45 61 35 26 15 45 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; 1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 151 2,494 10,376 4,061 64 7 1,668 W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 201 490 286 30 0 165 W 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 26 50 36 15 0 29 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 13 11 7 15 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987

42

" Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy"...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

" Purchases",2.1 " Transfers In",4.6 " Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy",2.6 " Sales and Transfers Offsite",0.3 "Coke and Breeze",0.6 "Residual Fuel...

43

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

44

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

45

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors"

46

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors"

47

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

48

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

49

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

50

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)"," Gas(c)","NGL(d)","(million","(million ","Other(e)","Row"

51

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

52

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" 3. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

53

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Row"

54

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

55

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

56

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

57

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

58

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"

59

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

60

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

62

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Row"

63

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Row"

64

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

65

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

66

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1113,258,12,22,579,5,182,2,54 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",346,57,"*",1,121,"*",126,0,41

67

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1124,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,45 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",316,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,28

68

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

69

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million kWh)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

70

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1186,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,107 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",317,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,30

71

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE"

72

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Onsite Research Publications Computed Tomography and Statistical Analysis of Bubble Size Distributions in Atmospheric-Generated Foamed Cement (August 9, 2013) Comparison...

73

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,416 10,373 4,039 64 7 1,538 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 204 489 268 30 0 140 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 28 50 36 15 0 29 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 12 W 7 14 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987 17 207 839 503 W 0 210 3115 Dairy Products 998 998 12 217 908

74

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 * 89 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 6,851 * * 59 * 5 0 11 0 31131 Sugar 112 725 * * 22 * 2 * 46 0 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,960 * * 35 * 0 0 1 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 105 7,639 * * 45 * 1 0 11 0 3121 Beverages 85 6,426 * * 41 * * 0 10 0 3122 Tobacco 20 1,213 * * 4 * * 0 1 0 313 Textile Mills 207 25,271 1 * 73 * 1 0 15 0 314

75

311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for"...

76

How important are NAICS and PSC to wining federal contracts? | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

important are NAICS and PSC to wining federal contracts? important are NAICS and PSC to wining federal contracts? BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Forums How important are NAICS and PSC to wining federal contracts? Submitted by Gregory James on Tue, 04/17/2012 - 12:39pm Log in to vote 3 Small business owners can improve their ability to get federal contracts if they understand the nature and use of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and Product and Service Codes. The purposes of these codes are to collect, analyze and publish statistical data on economic activity in the United States, Mexico and Canada. The Federal Procurement Data System (FPDS) uses these codes to track federal procurement historyNAICS is a two through six-digit hierarchical

77

Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 330.6 3.6 2.0 20-49 550.0 4.5 2.2 50-99 830.1 5.9 2.7 100-249 1,130.0 6.7 3.1 250-499 1,961.4 7.6 3.6 500 and Over 3,861.9 9.0 3.6 Total 1,278.4 6.9 3.1 311 FOOD Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 979.3 10.3

78

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,413 10,373 4,039 64 W 1,496 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 201 489 268 30 0 137 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 26 50 36 15 0 28 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 12 11 W 11 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987 17 207 839 503 W 0 207 3115 Dairy Products 998 998 12 217 908 161 W 0 79 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

79

Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Employment Size Under 50 562.6 4.7 2.4 50-99 673.1 5.1 2.4 100-249 1,072.8 6.5 3.0 250-499 1,564.3 7.7 3.6 500-999 2,328.9 10.6 4.5 1000 and Over 1,415.5 5.7 2.5 Total 1,278.4 6.9 3.1 311 FOOD Employment Size Under 50 1,266.8 8.3 3.2 50-99 1,587.4 9.3 3.6 100-249 931.9 3.6 1.5 250-499 1,313.1 6.3

80

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006; 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,240 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 148 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 18 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 43 61 35 26 13 45 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125 1,125 13 112 961 325 W 0 127 3115 Dairy Product 1,044 1,044 25 88 941 147 W 0 104 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 405.4 4.0 2.1 20-49 631.3 4.7 2.2 50-99 832.0 4.9 2.3 100-249 1,313.4 6.2 2.8 250-499 1,905.2 7.4 3.6 500 and Over 4,225.4 7.5 3.1 Total 1,449.6 6.4 2.8 311 FOOD Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 576.6 5.9

82

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of...

83

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of...

84

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 11 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)"

85

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Electricity Receipts(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Receipts(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"," "

86

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" 2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million short tons." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Coal Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, "

87

" Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 2002;" 1 Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and Source of Financial Support for Activity;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,,," " " "," ",,," Source of Financial Support for Activity",,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","In-house","Other","Don't Know","Factors"

88

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

89

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" .1. Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

90

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

91

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)","Row"

92

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

93

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

94

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"

95

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)","Factors"

96

NETL: Onsite Research- Materials Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Performance Onsite Research Materials Performance Emerging energy-production technologies such as gasification, solid oxide fuel cells, and ultra supercritical, fluidized...

97

NETL: Onsite Research - University Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Onsite Research University Projects The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is helping to overcome a growing national problem of a diminishing number of new energy...

98

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Experimental Laboratory Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Experimental Laboratory The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Experimental Laboratory (SOFCEL) characterizes the performance and operation of single cells and small stacks. The laboratory is equipped with several test stands capable of evaluating solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) at pressurized conditions and temperatures up to 1000°C. NETL's onsite researchers support the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Program with advanced models and simulations that can predict detailed thermal, fluid, solid-mechanic, and electrochemical phenomena for fuel cell analysis and design. The research portfolio includes basic and applied research to assess the effects of contaminants on SOFC cell degradation and performance, and to developing durable high temperature and sulfur-tolerant anode materials. This type of research is important in order to apply SECA-developed technology to future coal-based power systems.

99

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" 4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million barrels." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Distillate Fuel Oil","Unswitchable Distillate","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, "

100

" Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C9.1. Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 1998;" C9.1. Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and General Amounts of Establishment-Paid Activity Cost;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"General","Amount of ","Establishment-Paid","Activity Cost","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","All","Some","None","Don't Know","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Natural Gas(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

102

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

103

" Row: Industry-Specific Technologies within Selected NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Number of Establishments by Usage of Energy-Saving Technologies for Specific Industries, 1998;" 3. Number of Establishments by Usage of Energy-Saving Technologies for Specific Industries, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Industry-Specific Technologies within Selected NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry-Specific Technology","In Use(b)","Not in Use","Don't Know","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1.3,0.5,1.5 , 311,"FOOD" ," Infrared Heating",762,13727,2064,1.8 ," Microwave Drying",270,14143,2140,2.5

104

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

105

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

106

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

107

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",879.8,5,2.2 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",6416.6,17.5,5.7

108

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

109

" Row: General Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments by Participation in General Energy-Management Activities, 2006;" 1 Number of Establishments by Participation in General Energy-Management Activities, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: General Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and Source of Assistance;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,," Source of Assistance" "NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","In-house","Utlity/Energy Suppler","Product/Service Provider","Federal Program","State/Local Program","Don't Know" ,,"Total United States"

110

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

111

Table 40. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code 0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 40. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 NAICS Code June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 311 Food Manufacturing 875 926 1,015 -13.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 26 17 19 35.8 313 Textile Mills 22 22 25 -13.9 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w w 322 Paper Manufacturing 570 583

112

Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 2,256 2,561 1,864 4,817 4,343 10.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 38 50 48 88 95 -7.7 313 Textile Mills 31 29 21 60 59 2.2 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w

113

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," ",,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Row"

114

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

115

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

116

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 871.7 4.3 1.8 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,239.5 10.5 3.6 311221 Wet Corn Milling 28,965.0 27.1 12.6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7,755.9 32.6 13.4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 861.3 4.8 2.2 3115 Dairy Products 854.8 3.5 1.1 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 442.9 3.5 1.2 312

117

Development of Onsite Transportation Safety Documents for Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Department of Energy (DOE) Orders require each DOE site to develop onsite transportation safety documents (OTSDs). The Nevada Test Site approach divided all onsite transfers into two groups with each group covered by a standalone OTSD identified as Non-Nuclear and Nuclear. The Non-Nuclear transfers involve all radioactive hazardous material in less than Hazard Category (HC)-3 quantities and all chemically hazardous materials. The Nuclear transfers involve all radioactive material equal to or greater than HC-3 quantities and radioactive material mated with high explosives regardless of quantity. Both OTSDs comply with DOE O 460.1B requirements. The Nuclear OTSD also complies with DOE O 461.1A requirements and includes a DOE-STD-3009 approach to hazard analysis (HA) and accident analysis as needed. All Nuclear OTSD proposed transfers were determined to be non-equivalent and a methodology was developed to determine if equivalent safety to a fully compliant Department of Transportation (DOT) transfer was achieved. For each HA scenario, three hypothetical transfers were evaluated: a DOT-compliant, uncontrolled, and controlled transfer. Equivalent safety is demonstrated when the risk level for each controlled transfer is equal to or less than the corresponding DOT-compliant transfer risk level. In this comparison the typical DOE-STD-3009 risk matrix was modified to reflect transportation requirements. Design basis conditions (DBCs) were developed for each non-equivalent transfer. Initial DBCs were based solely upon the amount of material present. Route-, transfer-, and site-specific conditions were evaluated and the initial DBCs revised as needed. Final DBCs were evaluated for each transfers packaging and its contents.

Frank Hand, Willard Thomas, Frank Sciacca, Manny Negrete, Susan Kelley

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

118

ONSITE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORIZATION CHALLENGES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Prior to 2008, transfers of radioactive material within the Savannah River Site (SRS) boundary, referred to as onsite transfers, were authorized by Transportation Safety Basis (TSB) documents that only required approval by the SRS contractor. This practice was in accordance with the existing SRS Transportation Safety Document (TSD). In 2008 the Department of Energy Savannah River Field Office (DOE-SR) requested that the SRS TSD be revised to require DOE-SR approval of all Transportation Safety Basis (TSB) documents. As a result, the primary SRS contractor embarked on a multi-year campaign to consolidate old or generate new TSB documents and obtain DOE-SR approval for each. This paper focuses on the challenges incurred during the rewriting or writing of and obtaining DOE-SR approval of all Savannah River Site Onsite Transportation Safety Basis documents.

Watkins, R.; Loftin, B.; Hoang, D.; Maxted, M.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace Coke Oven (excluding or LPG and Natural Gas

120

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; 3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. Establishments with Any Cogeneration NAICS Technology Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) in Use(c) In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 297 99 11,338 2,691 51 11,217 2,860 10 11,333 2,786 164 11,129 2,836 9 11,235 2,884 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 53 Q 499 38 5 532 42 W 533 W Q 533 44 5 530 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 11 W 35 W W 43 W W 39 W 0 44 3 0 41 6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

122

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 1,632 9,940 2,556 3,509 8,048 2,571 1,590 9,609 2,929 6,260 5,014 2,854 422 9,945 3,762 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 59 475 46 300 236 Q 154 398 28 446 95 Q 45 442 92 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 9 34 4 36 W W 27 15 6 38 3 6 8 24 16 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 77

123

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 879.8 5.0 2.2 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,416.6 17.5 5.7 311221 Wet Corn Milling 21,552.1 43.6 18.2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 6,629.2 31.3 12.2 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1,075.3 5.5 2.8 3115 Dairy Products 956.3 4.3 1.3 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 493.8 4.4 1.6 312

124

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,109 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,149 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 144 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 17 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 43 61 35 26 13 35 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125 1,125 13 112 961 325 W 0 127 3115 Dairy Product 1,044 1,044 25 88 941 147 W 0 95

125

Materials Science and Engineering Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science and Engineering Onsite Research As the lead field center for the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's research and development program, the National Energy Technology Laboratory...

126

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Liquid Chlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains the process, components, legal requirements, factors affecting performance, and maintenance needs of liquid chlorination systems for onsite wastewater treatment.

Weaver, Richard; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

127

Table 28. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 28. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 2,214 2,356 1,994 4,570 4,353 5.0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 48 37 53 85 90 -5.6 313 Textile Mills 31 29 22 59 63 -6.1 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w w w w 322 Paper Manufacturing

128

Interconnection Agreements for Onsite Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interconnection Agreements Interconnection Agreements for Onsite Generation Office of Real Property Asset Management Office of General Counsel Real Property Division Richard R. Butterworth Senior Assistant General Counsel (202) 501-4436 richard.butterworth@gsa.gov The Problem: * Most agreements require indemnity clauses - usually either by tariff or by the submission of standard contracts to PSCs * Federal Government precluded from providing indemnity by: * Anti-deficiency Act - 31 U.S.C. 665(a) * Adequacy of Appropriations Act - 41 U.S.C. 11 GSA - Utility Interconnection Agreements GSA - Utility Interconnection Agreements * Exception: Utility Contracts * GAO decision sets the foundation for exception for utility contracts - 59 Comp. Gen. 705 * But it's a narrow exception

129

Microgrids: distributed on-site generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microgrids: distributed on-site generation Suleiman Abu-Sharkh, Rachel Li, Tom Markvart, Neil Ross for Climate Change Research Technical Report 22 #12;1 Microgrids: distributed on-site generation Tyndall production by small scale generators in close proximity to the energy users, integrated into microgrids

Watson, Andrew

130

On-site Housing | Staff Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-site Housing On-site Housing Note: All guests wishing to stay on-site must be registered and approved in the BNL Guest Information System (GIS). Welcome to Brookhaven National Laboratory. BNL attracts more than 4,500 visiting scientists from all over the world each year to perform scientific research and work with our staff. To support our guests, there are 333 on-site housing units. These units are comprised of 66 family-style apartments, 39 efficiency apartments, 213 dormitory rooms, 13 Guest House rooms, and 2 year round private houses. Location: Hours of Operation: Research Support Building (400A), 20 Brookhaven Avenue Monday - Friday: 8:00 am to Midnight Reservations: (631) 344-2541 or 344-2551 Saturday: Closed* Fax: (631) 344-3098 Sunday: 4:00 pm to Midnight

131

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,,," " "NAICS" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

132

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

133

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

134

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" 1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,"Computer","Control of","Processes"," "," "," ",,,," ",," " " "," ","Computer Control","of Building-Wide","Environment(b)","or Major","Energy-Using","Equipment(c)","Waste","Heat","Recovery","Adjustable -","Speed","Motors","RSE"

135

Federal Energy Management Program: On-Site Renewable Power Purchase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-Site Renewable On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements on AddThis.com... Energy Savings Performance Contracts ENABLE Utility Energy Service Contracts On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements

136

Onsite fuel cell program-- a status report  

SciTech Connect

The Onsite Fuel Cell Program is designed to produce data for the pioneering of fuel cell use. A fuel cell is an electrochemical device designed to transform the chemical energy of a hydrorich fuel, such as natural gas, into electricity. Under an Energy Service concept, onsite delivery and sale to consumers is promoted. Field test efforts are surveyed--a commercial laundry in Portland, Oregon, for example. Participating utilities in 40 kW cell field tests are mapped out. A project which will define a fuel cell power plant to meet cost requirements is underway.

Flore, V.B.; Cuttica, J.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Impact of Heat Transfer Media on Materials for Concentrated Solar ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Impact of Heat Transfer Media on Materials for Concentrated Solar Power. Author(s), Dane Wilson. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Dane Wilson.

138

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Ultraviolet Light Disinfection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some onsite wastewater treatment systems include a disinfection component. This publication explains how homeowners can disinfect wastewater with ultraviolet light, what the components of such a system are, what factors affect the performance of a UV light disinfection system, and how to maintain such a system.

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

139

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.1;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",3.8,4.3,4.1 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",8.2,5.8,5.6 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0 31131," Sugar Manufacturing",0,0,0 3114," Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods ",7.3,6.7,6.2

140

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" 8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,"Electricity","Electricity",,,"Natural Gas","Natural Gas",,,"Steam","Steam" " "," ",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both"," ",," "

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" 4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " ",,,"Renewable Energy" ,,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "Economic","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.1,1.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

142

Table 29. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 29. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 51.17 49.59 50.96 50.35 50.94 -1.2 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 111.56 115.95 113.47 113.49 117.55 -3.5 313 Textile Mills 115.95 118.96 127.41 117.40 128.07 -8.3 315 Apparel Manufacturing

143

Federal Energy Management Program: On-Site Renewable Power Purchase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements Graphic of the eTraining logo Training Available Federal On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements: Learn how to develop an on-site renewable Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) by taking this FEMP eTraining course. At a Glance Power purchase agreements feature a variety of benefits and considerations for Federal agencies, including: Benefits: No up-front capital costs Ability to monetize tax incentives Typically a known, long-term energy price No operations and maintenance responsibilities Minimal risk to the agency Considerations: Federal sector experience with PPAs is still growing Contract term limitations Inherent transaction costs Challenges with site access contracts and concerns On-site renewable power purchase agreements (PPAs) allow Federal agencies to fund on-site renewable energy projects with no up-front capital costs incurred.

144

The Onsite Fuel Cell Cogeneration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the experiences and results of the major field test of forty-six 40kW onsite fuel cell power plants in the U.S. and Japan through 1985. The field test is a cooperative effort between the Gas Research Institute, gas and electric utility companies, private sector companies, and the U.S. Department of Energy and Department of Defense. The field test is conducted in parallel with technology development efforts sponsored by the Gas Research Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy. Operation of the field test units began in December 1983 with the initial start-up of two units at a racquetball club sponsored by the Southern California Gas Corporation. As of May 1985, over 300,000 hours of operating experience was achieved on the fleet of 40kW units. This experience has demonstrated the onsite fuel cell's superior technical specification, ease of installation, operation and maintenance, and economic benefits over conventional energy service. In addition, this effort identified operating deficiencies in the 40kW units which were either corrected through field retrofits or provided guidance to the parallel technology development efforts.

Woods, R. R.; Cuttica, J. J.; Trimble, K. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Funding » On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements Project Funding » On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements October 7, 2013 - 3:35pm Addthis On-site renewable power purchase agreements (PPAs) allow Federal agencies to fund on-site renewable energy projects with no up-front capital costs incurred. With a PPA, a developer installs a renewable energy system on agency property under an agreement that the agency will purchase the power generated by the system. The agency pays for the system through these power payments over the life of the contract. After installation, the developer owns, operates, and maintains the system for the life of the contract. For more information, read the Federal Energy Mangement Program's (FEMP) introductory guide to PPAs and sample documents.

146

Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funding » On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements » Funding » On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements » Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements October 7, 2013 - 3:37pm Addthis The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) works with Federal agencies and partners to assemble sample documents from past on-site renewable power purchase agreement (PPA) projects to help streamline the PPA process. Requests for Proposal and Contracts Sample documents are available for the following requests for proposal: Photovoltaics at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory: PPA request for proposal issued by DLA Energy on behalf of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaics Opportunity

147

On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements October 16, 2013 - 5:09pm Addthis An on-site renewable power purchase agreement (PPA) enables Federal agencies to fund a renewable energy project by contracting to purchase the power generated by the system. The renewable energy equipment is installed and owned by a developer but located on-site at the agency facility. As noted in the renewable energy project funding overview, PPAs provide a range of attractive benefits to Federal agencies trying to access renewable energy. These include no up-front capital costs; the ability to monetize tax incentives; typically a known, long-term energy price; no operations and maintenance (O&M) responsibilities; and minimal risk to the agency.

148

UTILITY INVESTMENT IN ON-SITE SOLAR: RISK AND RETURN ANALYSIS FOR CAPITALIZATION AND FINANCING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of S for On-Site Solar Heating -iv- List of Figures Fig. 1.penetration of on-site solar heating and cooling systems.investment in on-site solar heating cannot easily quantify

Kahn, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8947.1 8947.1 09/13 On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report September 2013 6319-D6242 8947.2 09/13 East Face Cell 1 West Face Cell 1 6319D-6208 6319D-6231 8947.3 09/13 North Face Cell 1 North Drainage (looking west) 6319D-6206 6319D-6205 8947.4 09/13 East Face Cell 2 West Face Cell 2 6319D-6230 6319D-6209 8947.5 09/13 East Face Cell 3 West Face Cell 3 6319D-6229 6319D-6210 8947.6 09/13 East Face Cell 4 West Face Cell 4 6319D-6227 6319D-62111 8947.7 09/13 East Face Cell 5 West Face Cell 5 6319D-6226 6319D-6213 8947.8 09/13 East Face Cell 6 6319D-6214 6319D-6225 West Face Cell 6 8947.9 09/13 East Face Cell 7 6319D-6215 6319D-6223 West Face Cell 7 8947.10 09/13 East Face Cell 8 6319D-6217 6319D-6220 West Face Cell 8 8947.11 09/13 South Face Cell 8 6319D-6219 6319D-6218 South Drainage (looking west) 8947.12 09/13

150

On-site cogeneration for office buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of alternative means of enhancing the economic attractiveness of cogeneration for use in office buildings. One course of action designed to achieve this end involves directing the exhaust heat of a cogeneration unit through an absorption chiller to produce cooling energy. Thus, the units could be operated more continuously, particularly if thermal storage is incorporated. A second course of action for improving the economics of cogeneration in office buildings involves the sale of the excess cogenerated waste heat. A potential market for this waste heat is a district heating grid, prevalent in the downtown sections of most urban areas in the US. This project defines a realistic means to guide the integration of cogeneration and district heating. The approach adopted to achieve this end involved researching the issues surrounding the integration of on-site cogeneration in downtown commercial office buildings, and performing an energy and economic feasibility analysis for a representative building. The technical, economic and legal issues involved in this type of application were identified and addressed. The research was also intended as a first step toward implementing a pilot project to demonstrate the feasibility of office building cogeneration in San Francisco. 13 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Black Hills Energy - On-Site Solar PV Rebate Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- On-Site Solar PV Rebate Program Black Hills Energy - On-Site Solar PV Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government General PublicConsumer Industrial Local Government...

152

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" 1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Any",,,,,,,,,"Shipments" "NAICS",,"Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",0.4,0.4,19.4,8.9,2,6.9,5.4,0,10.1,9.1 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",0,0,21.1,14.7,8.4,13.3,7.9,"X",17.9,9.1

153

Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site generation with HVAC Speaker(s): Ram Narayanamurthy Date: October 29, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 As the...

154

Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wood Economic Total Onsite and Characteristic(a) Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars)...

155

Field-portable mass spectrometers for onsite analytics: What's next?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for rapid, onsite chemical analyses is as apparent as it has ever been, especially for compounds detrimental to health or to the environment, such as toxic industrial species, explosives, chemical warfare agents, and environmental toxins. Field-po

156

On-Site Small Wind Incentive Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On-Site Small Wind Incentive Program On-Site Small Wind Incentive Program On-Site Small Wind Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Lesser of $400,000 per site/customer or 50% of installed cost of system Program Info Funding Source RPS surcharge Start Date 01/01/2012 Expiration Date 12/31/2015 State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount First 10,000 kWh of expected annual energy production: $3.50/annual kWh Next 115,000 kWh of expected annual energy production: $1.00/annual kWh Energy production greater than 125,000 kWh: $0.30/annual kWh Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority

157

Green Power Network: On-site Renewable Energy Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-site Renewable Energy Systems On-site Renewable Energy Systems For consumers or organizations wishing to install on-site renewable energy systems, there are a variety of options available, including electricity generating systems and thermal systems that can displace electricity or fossil fuel use. Solar photovoltaics convert sunlight directly into electricity. Solar hot water systems use the sun's energy to heat water. Wind turbines convert the kinetic energy in wind into mechanical power that runs a generator to produce electricity. Geothermal heat pumps use the constant temperature of the upper 10 feet of the Earth to heat and cool buildings. Fuel cells produce electricity from hydrogen and oxygen and can be powered by a number of sources, including renewables. Biomass power systems use biomass feedstocks such as wood waste or methane from animal waste or other sources to generate electricity. Biomass resources can also be used in direct heat and combined heat and power applications.

158

Modeling On-Site Utility Systems Using "APLUS"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most energy saving schemes on industrial sites lead to reductions in the steam and/or power demands on an on-site utility system. Accurate knowledge of the marginal and incremental costs of the available levels of steam and shaft power from such systems is, therefore, essential for the correct economic evaluation of proposed retrofit schemes. Knowledge of marginal costs is also essential for continuous optimal operation of on-site utility systems. "APLUS" is an IBM-PC based software package developed for evaluation of marginal and incremental costs of on-site utilities. "APLUS" allows the user to configure steam/power systems using sets of predefined icons. Once a flowsheet has been configured, the program can be used to solve the heat and mass balance and to generate accurate marginal costs. An overview of the package and examples illustrating its applications are presented in this paper.

Ranade, S. M.; Jones, D. H.; Shrec, S. C.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Intruder dose pathway analysis for the onsite disposal of radioactive wastes: The ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes initial efforts to develop human-intrusion scenarios and a modified version of the MAXI computer program for potential use by the NRC in reviewing applications for onsite radioactive waste disposal. Supplement 1 of NUREG/CR-3620 (1986) summarized modifications and improvements to the ONSITE/MAXI1 software package. This document summarizes a modified version of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program. This modified version of the computer program operates on a personal computer and permits the user to optionally select radiation dose conversion factors published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in their Publication No. 30 (ICRP 1979-1982) in place of those published by the ICRP in their Publication No. 2 (ICRP 1959) (as implemented in the previous versions of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program). The pathway-to-human models used in the computer program have not been changed from those described previously. Computer listings of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program and supporting data bases are included in the appendices of this document.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.; Napier, B.A.; Neuder, S.M.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Homeowner's Guide to Evaluating Service Contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This guide helps homeowners who are seeking maintenance services for their onsite wastewater treatment systems (such as septic systems). Included are definitions of common terms used in service contracts, types of service contracts available, and factors to consider when choosing a service provider.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; O'Neill, Courtney; Deal, Nancy; Loomis, George; Gustafson, David; Lindbo, David

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

GRR/Elements/18-CA-b.2 - Onsite Treatment Process | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 - Onsite Treatment Process < GRR | Elements Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGRRElements18-CA-b.2-OnsiteTreatmentProces...

162

Interim On-Site Storage of Low Level Waste: Volume 1: Licensing and Regulatory Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an all-inclusive resource guide for evaluating a utility's on-site storage licensing requirements. Specifically, the report offers an extensive review of licensing and regulatory documents related to on-site storage of low level waste as well as a methodology for evaluating on-site storage licensing issues.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

ECONOMICS OF ON-SITE WASTE GASIFICATION ALFRED C. W. EGGEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

procedure for estimating costs for industrial, on-site, waste gasification processes. However, gen eralizingECONOMICS OF ON-SITE WASTE GASIFICATION ALFRED C. W. EGGEN K. T. Lear Associates. Inc. Manchester, Charles R Velzy Associates, Inc., Elmsford, N.Y. On-site waste gasification may well be an at tractive

Columbia University

164

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11110 11110 Newspaper Publishers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov 511120 Periodical Publishers AMES LAB Lisa Rodgers (515) 294-4191 rodgers@ameslab.gov ARGONNE LAB Karl Duke (630) 252-8842 sblo@anl.gov BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov BROOKHAVEN LAB Jill Clough-Johnston (631) 344-3173 clough@bnl.gov CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov FEMI LAB Joe Collins (630) 840-4169 jcollins@fnal.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE

165

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23110 23110 Automobile and Other Motor Vehicle Merchant Wholesalers BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671 gary.bridges@swpa.gov WESTERN POWER ADMIN Cheryl Drake (720) 962-7154 drake@wapa.gov 423120 Motor Vehicle Supplies and New Parts Merchant Wholesalers

166

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31112 31112 Electrometallurgical Ferroalloy Product Manufacturing EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com 331210 Iron and Steel Pipe and Tube Manufacturing from Purchased Steel EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov 331221 Rolled Steel Shape Manufacturing

167

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61110 61110 Office Administrative Services BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OHIO FIELD OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PORTSMOUTH PADUCAH OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov ROCKY FLATS ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER Jenny Krom (307) 233-4818 jenny.krom@rmotc.doe.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN

168

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31110 31110 Lessors of Residential Buildings and Dwellings CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov IDAHO LAB Stacey Francis (208) 526-8564 stacey.francis@inl.gov IDAHO OPERATIONS Maria Mitchell (208) 526-8600 mitchemm@id.doe.gov LOS ALAMOS LAB Dennis Roybal (505) 667-4419 dr@lanl.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER

169

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

113110 Timber tract operations 113110 Timber tract operations BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671 gary.bridges@swpa.gov WESTERN POWER ADMIN Cheryl Drake (720) 962-7154 drake@wapa.gov 113310 Cutting and transporting timber BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN

170

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83111 83111 Deep Sea Freight Transportation EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov 483211 Inland Water Freight Transportation EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov 484110 General Freight Trucking, Local BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER

171

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

922120 922120 Police Protection CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov LOS ALAMOS LAB Dennis Roybal (505) 667-4419 dr@lanl.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OAK RIDGE LAB Cassandra McGee Stu (865) 576-3560 mcgeecm@ornl.gov OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS Freda Hopper (856) 576-9430

172

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41222 41222 Boat Dealers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE Sally Leingang (504) 734-4362 sally.leingang@spr.doe.gov 441229 All Other Motor Vehicle Dealers CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com LOS ALAMOS LAB

173

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

53210 53210 Office Supplies and Stationery Stores BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov NEW BRUNSWICK LAB NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OHIO FIELD OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com PORTSMOUTH PADUCAH OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PRINCETON PLASMA LAB Arlene White (609) 243-2080

174

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41219 41219 Other Accounting Services BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OHIO FIELD OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PORTSMOUTH PADUCAH OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER Jenny Krom (307) 233-4818 jenny.krom@rmotc.doe.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671

175

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11410 11410 Business and Secretarial Schools EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov 611420 Computer Training ARGONNE LAB Karl Duke (630) 252-8842 sblo@anl.gov BROOKHAVEN LAB Jill Clough-Johnston (631) 344-3173 clough@bnl.gov CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov FEMI LAB Joe Collins (630) 840-4169 jcollins@fnal.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov

176

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

621420 621420 Outpatient Mental Health and Substance Abuse Centers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com 621493 Freestanding Ambulatory Surgical and Emergency Centers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov

177

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13312 13312 Textile and Fabric Finishing (except Broadwoven Fabric) Mills EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov Y-12 SITE Gloria Mencer (865) 576-2090 mencergd@y12.doe.gov 314991 Rope, Cordage, and Twine Mills EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov Y-12 SITE Gloria Mencer (865) 576-2090 mencergd@y12.doe.gov 314999 All Other Miscellaneous Textile Product Mills EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov

178

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21213 21213 Engineered Wood Member (except Truss) Manufacturing BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671 gary.bridges@swpa.gov WESTERN POWER ADMIN Cheryl Drake (720) 962-7154 drake@wapa.gov 321920 Wood Container and Pallet manufacturing BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512

179

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21119 21119 Other Electric Power Generation Y-12 SITE Gloria Mencer (865) 576-2090 mencergd@y12.doe.gov 221121 Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671 gary.bridges@swpa.gov WESTERN POWER ADMIN Cheryl Drake (720) 962-7154 drake@wapa.gov 221122 Electric Power Distribution BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN

180

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91110 91110 Postal Service EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE Sally Leingang (504) 734-4362 sally.leingang@spr.doe.gov 492110 Couriers and Express Delivery Services EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Only","Other than","and","Any","from Only","Other than","and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Electricity(b)","Local Utility(c)","Local Utility(d)","Other Sources","Natural...

182

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

than","and","Any","from Only","Other than","and","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Electricity(b)","Local Utility(c)","Local Utility(d)","Other Sources","Natural...

183

Federal On-Site Renewable Power Purchasing Issues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On-Site Renewable On-Site Renewable Power Purchasing Issues Tracy Logan, FEMP (202) 586-9973 tracy.logan@ee.doe.gov Chandra Shah, NREL (303) 384-7557 chandra.shah@nrel.gov Overview * OMB Memo Summary * Issue Paper Development * Termination * ESPC PPA Update CEQ/OMB Memo Summary * 8/16/11: Supporting Energy and Sustainability Goal Achievement Through Efficiency and Deployment of Clean Energy Technology * Encourages Agencies to use ESPCs and UESCs and requests Agencies report ESPCs and UESCs to FEMP * Requests review of all types of PPAs Issue Paper Development * FEMP is drafting papers on deployment issues * Purpose: to provide a central point of information * Proposed papers: interconnection, rebates & incentives, termination, others? * Please email suggested topics to Tracy & Chandra

184

On-site Housing Unit Types | Staff Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-site Housing Unit Types On-site Housing Unit Types Registration is required for all computers, wireless notebooks or other network devices used on the BNL Network. Devices that are not registered will be disconnected from the network. Apartments Apartments are available in 1, 2, 3 and 4 bedrooms. They are fully furnished and supplied with linens, kitchen utensils and cookware. Utilities are included in the rental price. *Note: These units do NOT have air conditioning. Each unit is equipped with DSL connection, satellite television and a microwave. Cisco Wireless Access Points (WAPs) connections are also available in Buildings 2-10. More Photos (PDF) Cavendish House The Cavendish house is a male dormitory consisting of 83 private single occupancy rooms equipped with air conditioning, Ethernet connection and

185

Green Power Network: On-site Renewable Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News TVA Seeks 126 MW of Renewables in 2014 December 2013 More News More News Subscribe to E-Mail Update Subscribe to e-mail update Events EPA Webinar - The Power of Aggregated Purchasing: How to Green Your Electricity Supply & Save Money January 15, 2014 1:00-2:00 p.m. ET Previous Webinars More News Features Green Power Market Status Report (2011 Data) Featured Green Power Reports On-site Renewable Energy Third-Party Solar Financing For consumers or organizations wishing to install on-site renewable energy systems, there are a variety of options available, including electricity generating systems and thermal systems that can displace electricity or fossil fuel use. Solar photovoltaics convert sunlight directly into electricity. Solar hot water systems use the sun's energy to heat water.

186

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) nitrogen trailers propane tanks  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is the evaluation and authorization of the onsite transport of propane tanks that are mounted on the Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation Characterization Project`s nitrogen trailers. This SEP authorizes onsite transport of the nitrogen trailers, including the propane tanks, until May 31, 1998. The three nitrogen trailers (HO-64-4966, HO-64-4968, and HO-64-5170) are rated for 1,361 kg (30,000 lb) and are equipped with tandem axles and pintel hitches. Permanently mounted on each trailer is a 5,678 L (1,500 gal) cryogenic dewar that is filled with nitrogen, and a propane fired water bath vaporizer system, and a 454 L (1 20 gal) propane tank. The nitrogen trailer system is operated only when it is disconnected from the tow vehicle and is leveled and stabilized. When the trailers are transported, the propane tanks are isolated via closed supply valves.

Ferrell, P.C.

1998-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

187

Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) steel drum  

SciTech Connect

This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) provides the analyses and evaluations necessary to demonstrate that the steel drum packaging system meets the transportation safety requirements of HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments, for an onsite packaging containing Type B quantities of solid and liquid radioactive materials. The basic component of the steel drum packaging system is the 208 L (55-gal) steel drum.

McCormick, W.A.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) sample pig transport system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) provides a technical evaluation of the Sample Pig Transport System as compared to the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Order 5480.1, Change 1, Chapter III. The evaluation concludes that the package is acceptable for the onsite transport of Type B, fissile excepted radioactive materials when used in accordance with this document.

MCCOY, J.C.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

189

Combining Energy Efficiency Building Retrofits and Onsite Generation: An  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combining Energy Efficiency Building Retrofits and Onsite Generation: An Combining Energy Efficiency Building Retrofits and Onsite Generation: An Emerging Business Model from the ESCO Industry Title Combining Energy Efficiency Building Retrofits and Onsite Generation: An Emerging Business Model from the ESCO Industry Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2011 Authors Satchwell, Andrew, Peter H. Larsen, and Charles A. Goldman Conference Name 2011 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 2011 Publisher ACEEE Conference Location Niagara Falls, New York Abstract The U.S. energy service company (ESCO) industry is an example of a private-sector business model where energy efficiency savings are delivered to customers primarily through the use of performance-based contracts. Despite the onset of a severe economic recession, we estimate that the U.S. ESCO industry grew about 7% per year from 2006 to 2008 with annual revenues of about $4.1 billion in 2008. About 75% of industry revenues are directly related to the installation of energy efficiency measures at existing buildings in the institutional, commercial, and industrial sectors.

190

Federal Energy Management Program: Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample Documents Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements on AddThis.com...

191

On-site worker-risk calculations using MACCS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have revised the latest version of MACCS for use with the calculation of doses and health risks to on-site workers for postulated accidents at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Colorado. The modifications fall into two areas: (1) an improved estimate of shielding offered by buildings to workers that remain indoors; and, (2) an improved treatment of building-wake effects, which affects both indoor and outdoor workers. Because the postulated accident can be anywhere on plant site, user-friendly software has been developed to create those portions of the (revised) MACCS input data files that are specific to the accident site.

Peterson, V.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

On-site generated nitrogen cuts cost of underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of on-site generated nitrogen, instead of liquid nitrogen, has reduced the cost of drilling underbalanced horizontal wells in Canada and the western US. Because nitrogen is inert and inflammable, it is the preferred gas for underbalanced drilling. Nitrogen can be supplied for oil field use by three different methods: cryogenic liquid separation, pressure swing adsorption, and hollow fiber membranes. The selection of nitrogen supply from one of these methods depends on the cost of delivered nitrogen, the required flow rates and pressure, the required nitrogen purity, and the availability and reliability of the equipment for nitrogen generation. These three methods are described, as well as the required equipment.

Downey, R.A. [Energy Ingenuity Co., Englewood, CO (United States)

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

193

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - On-Site Production of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-Site Production of Mercury Sorbent with Low Concrete Impact On-Site Production of Mercury Sorbent with Low Concrete Impact The detrimental health effects of mercury are well documented. Furthermore, it has been reported that U.S. coal-fired plants emit approximately 48 tons of mercury a year. To remedy this, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) on March 15, 2005. A promising method to achieve the mandated mercury reductions is activated carbon injection (ACI). While promising, the current cost of ACI for mercury capture is expensive, and ACI adversely impacts the use of the by-product fly-ash for concrete. Published prices for activated carbon are generally 0.5-1 $/lb and capital costs estimates are 2-55 $/KW. Because of the high costs of ACI, Praxair started feasibility studies on an alternative process to reduce the cost of mercury capture. The proposed process is composed of three steps. First, a hot oxidant mixture is created by using a proprietary Praxair burner. Next, the hot oxidant is allowed to react with pulverized coal and additives. The resulting sorbent product is separated from the resulting syngas. In a commercial installation, the resulting sorbent product would be injected between the air-preheater and the particulate control device.

194

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations,and J.L. Edwards, Distributed Energy Resources CustomerN ATIONAL L ABORATORY Distributed Energy Resources On-Site

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the burning of natural gas for on-site power generation andnatural gas absorption chiller GenL i , m , t , h , u Generated power by distributed generation

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable Energy Certificates, and On-Site Renewable Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide describes the details of purchasing green power. Discussion covers topics like renewable electricity, renewable energy certificates, and on-site renewable generation.

197

Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2008 ETR-12 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF)...

198

Rate Structures for Customers With Onsite Generation: Practice and Innovation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recognizing that innovation and good public policy do not always proclaim themselves, Synapse Energy Economics and the Regulatory Assistance Project, under a contract with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), undertook a survey of state policies on rates for partial-requirements customers with onsite distributed generation. The survey investigated a dozen or so states. These varied in geography and the structures of their electric industries. By reviewing regulatory proceedings, tariffs, publications, and interviews, the researchers identified a number of approaches to standby and associated rates--many promising but some that are perhaps not--that deserve policymakers' attention if they are to promote the deployment of cost-effective DG in their states.

Johnston, L.; Takahashi, K.; Weston, F.; Murray, C.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

"Table A17. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," 7. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Cogeneration","Renewables","Other(b)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.4,1.2

200

Advanced On-Site Wastewater Treatment and Management Market Study: Volume 2: State Reports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is comprised of summaries of the status of on-site and small community wastewater systems in each state in the United States. The summaries provide an excellent general reference for further research into the status of each state's on-site wastewater systems.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

GRR/Elements/18-CA-c.2 - Onsite Treatment Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Elements/18-CA-c.2 - Onsite Treatment Process < GRR‎ | Elements Jump to: navigation, search Edit 18-CA-b.2 - Onsite Treatment Process Non-RCRA waste treated on-site receives a California on-site treatment permit from the California DTSC. See Flowchart 18-CA-XX. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Elements/18-CA-c.2_-_Onsite_Treatment_Process&oldid=539943" What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

202

Case Studies of Onsite Energy Systems for Healthcare Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper will present two case studies of municipal utility owned and operated combined heat and power (CHP) systems. The first of these two systems is located at a new hospital development in Austin, TX, the Dell Childrens Medical Center of Central Texas. Combining the high efficiency, low emission, 4.6 MW Solar Turbines Mercury-50 combustion turbine, a 1000 Ton Trane steam absorption chiller and an 8000 Ton-hr Thermal Energy Storage tank, this onsite energy system is designed to achieve operating efficiencies in excess of 70%, while allowing the hospital to be fully operational under grid-independent scenarios. The second system is located at a new hospital development in Gainesville, FL, the Shands Cancer Hospital Campus. Similar to the Dell project, GRUs system will serve all of the hospitals electric and thermal loads, will be interconnected with the local grid, and will allow the hospital to be fully operational under grid-independent scenarios.

Schwass, R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

GRR/Section 14-OR-f - Onsite Wastewater Management | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-OR-f - Onsite Wastewater Management GRR/Section 14-OR-f - Onsite Wastewater Management < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-OR-f - Onsite Wastewater Management 14ORFOnsiteWastewaterManagementSepticSystems.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies OAR 340-071: Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems OAR 340-073: DEQ Construction Standards Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14ORFOnsiteWastewaterManagementSepticSystems.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Over 30% of Oregonians dispose of wastewater from their homes and

204

Table E13.2. Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.9,0.9,1.5,0....

205

Advances in field-portable mass spectrometers for on-site analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Learn how the combination of ambient ionization with portable mass spectroscopy can speed chemical analysis by streamlining sample preparation and throughput requirements. Advances in field-portable mass spectrometers for on-site analytics inform M

206

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heat activated absorption cooling, direct-fired naturalsince electric cooling loads can be offset by the absorptioncooling loads: utility purchases of electricity, on-site generation of electricity, absorption

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

"Table A27. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," ",," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ",," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Cogeneration","Renewables","Other(b)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.6,1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",6962,6754,90,118,11.2

208

Guide for Operating an Interim On-Site Low Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of increasing low-level waste (LLW) disposal site uncertainty, the industry expects that utilities will have to rely on their own on-site storage LLW storage programs in the near future. This report captures essential information related to the operation of an on-site LLW storage program. The report is a comprehensive reference to which utilities can routinely refer throughout the development and implementation of the storage program and operation of the storage facility.

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

209

National Research Needs Conference Proceedings: Risk-Based Decision Making for Onsite Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 19-20, 2000, the Research Needs Conference for "Risk-Based Decision Making for Onsite Wastewater Treatment" was convened in St. Louis, Missouri. The conference, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was the culmination of an eighteen-month-long effort by the National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project (NDWRCDP) to assist onsite wastewater leadership in identifying critical research gaps in the field. The five "White Papers" included in this volume of Pro...

2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Cold Demonstration of a Spent Nuclear Fuel Dry Transfer System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system (DTS) has moved from the design phase to demonstration of major components. Use of an on-site DTS allows utilities with limited crane capacities or other plant restrictions to take advantage of large efficient storage systems. This system also permits utilities to transfer spent fuel from loaded storage casks to transport casks without returning to their fuel storage pool, a circumstance that may arise during the decommissioning process.

1999-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

211

REPORT OF ON-SITE INSPECTION WORKSHOP-16  

SciTech Connect

The central issue addressed by this workshop was the task of making the on-site inspection (OSI) part of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty verification system operationally ready at entry into force of the Treaty. It is recognized, and this was emphasized by the 2008 OSI Integrated Field Exercise (IFE), that it is not possible to develop every part of the OSI regime simultaneously. Therefore, it is necessary to prioritize the approach to OSI readiness. The reviews of the IFE have pointed to many elements of OSI readiness that still need development. The objective of this workshop was to provide priorities for the path forward for Working Group B to consider. Several critical areas have been identified that are related to the development of OSI readiness: (1) Technology development: Priorities are radionuclide and noble gas sampling and analysis, visual observation, multispectral/infrared imaging methods, active seismic methods and the recognition of the importance of signatures. (2) Organizational development: Priorities are health and safety, the Operations Support Centre, the Equipment Storage and Maintenance Facility, information technology data flow and communications. (3) Resources: The expertise to develop key parts of the OSI regime is not available within the current OSI Division staff. To develop these aspects of the regime will require more staff or supplements to the staff with cost-free experts or other means. Aspects of the system that could benefit from more staff include radionuclide and noble gas detection methods, data flow and communications, visual observation, multispectral/infrared methods and health and safety. As the path forward, participants of this workshop recognized a need to optimize the development of OSI priorities. The outcome of this workshop is to suggest for consideration an operational approach to OSI readiness that utilizes results of an evaluation of the relative effectiveness of OSI elements versus their relative maturity. By integrating such an assessment with considerations of integrated operational capabilities and the anticipated level of inspection team self-sufficiency and measurable milestone criteria, a set of priorities for OSI development can be developed. Once these priorities have been established, the Policy Making Organs can decide upon the milestones, strategic plan and action plan to serve as guidance for implementation by the Provisional Technical Secretariat. The suggested operational approach is as follows: (1) Assess the relative effectiveness (importance) of OSI elements versus their relative maturity; (2) Determine the anticipated level of self-sufficiency; (3) Define measurable milestone criteria; and (4) Result: Milestones for OSI readiness.

Sweeney, J J

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

212

Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program - Part IV: Onsite review handbook  

SciTech Connect

Onsite Review Handbook contains criteria to be used in evaluating the management systems required for initial or continued participation in the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP), verifying and calculating rates of injury experience, the Onsite Review report format, and sample questions to be used during onsite interviews. This document should be used in conjunction with the first three DOE-VPP manuals (Part I: Program Elements, Part II: Procedures Manual, and Part III: Application Guidelines). This document is intended to assist Onsite Review team members and DOE contractors in evaluating safety and health programs, and to serve as guidance for DOE-VPP participants in performing their required annual evaluation. Requests for additional information or any questions may be addressed to a DOE-VPP Coordinator in the Office of Occupational Safety and Health Policy. The term contractor used throughout this document refers to an applicant to, or a participant in, the DOE-VPP. The term subcontractor refers to any organization that is contracted by the applicant or participant to do work at the site under review. The DOE-VPP Onsite Review Criteria contained in Appendix A provide guidance for evaluating a site`s implementation of the program requirements given in Part I: Program Elements. The program requirements are in bold italicized type, followed by guidance for ensuring implementation. Part I should be consulted for a complete description of the program requirements. These criteria should be used by team members whenever possible, but are not intended to be all inclusive. Determination of adequate implementation of the DOE-VPP requirements is at the team members` discretion. Guidance for calculating recordable injury and lost workday incidence rates is contained in Appendix B. The OSHA injury/illness records review and the associated calculations should be performed by Onsite Review Team members during the pre-onsite planning visit.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Onsite Plasma Welding Technology and Equipment Development: RRAC Task 88  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated plasma transfer arc welding (PTAW) with powder feed capabilities is commonly used for applying hardfacing alloys for new installations and for replacement valves. With a variety of hardfacing and corrosion resistant alloys readily available in the powder form, the PTAW process is an effective and economical process for applying hardfacing materials. The process can obtain high quality deposits with a very low dilution rate and excellent material properties with a minimum number of weld layers. ...

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Assessment of On-Site Power Opportunities in the Industrial Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to identify the potential for on-site power generation in the U.S. industrial sector with emphasis on nine industrial groups called the ''Industries of the Future'' (IOFs) by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Through its Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), the DOE has teamed with the IOFs to develop collaborative strategies for improving productivity, global competitiveness, energy usage and environmental performance. Total purchases for electricity and steam for the IOFs are in excess of $27 billion annually. Energy-related costs are very significant for these industries. The nine industrial groups are (1) Agriculture (SIC 1); (2) Forest products; (3) Lumber and wood products (SIC 24); (4) Paper and allied products (SIC 26); (5) Mining (SIC 11, 12, 14); (6) Glass (SIC 32); (7) Petroleum (SIC 29); (8) Chemicals (SIC 28); and (9) Metals (SIC 33): Steel, Aluminum, and Metal casting. Although not currently part of the IOF program, the food industry is included in this report because of its close relationship to the agricultural industry and its success with on-site power generation. On-site generation provides an alternative means to reduce energy costs, comply with environmental regulations, and ensure a reliable power supply. On-site generation can ease congestion in the local utility's electric grid. Electric market restructuring is exacerbating the price premium for peak electricity use and for reliability, creating considerable market interest in on-site generation.

Bryson, T.

2001-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

215

"NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","Don't Know","Not Applicable"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.4;" " Unit: Percents." "NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","Don't Know","Not Applicable" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Full-Time Energy Manager (c)",0.7,4.8,3.9,"--" ,"Set Goals for Improving Energy Efficiency",1.2,2.8,3,"--" ,"Measure and Monitor Steam Used (d)",0.8,4.1,3.3,8 ,"Dedicated Staff that Performs Insulation Inspections (e)",0.9,4.5,3.3,8.3 ,"Formal Steam Maintenance Program that Includes the Following:" ," Annual Testing of All Steam Traps",0.9,3.7,3.1,8

216

The Implications of Carbon Taxation on Microgrid Adoption of Small-Scale On-Site Power Generation Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-49309 The Implications of Carbon Taxation on Microgrid Adoption of Small-Scale On-Site Power .................................................................................................................1 1.1 Microgrid Concept

217

GRR/Section 10 - On-Site Evaluation Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 10 - On-Site Evaluation Process GRR/Section 10 - On-Site Evaluation Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 10 - On-Site Evaluation Process 10SiteEvaluation.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management U S Army Corps of Engineers United States Environmental Protection Agency Fish and Wildlife Service United States Department of Defense Regulations & Policies Endangered Species Act Clean Water Act Clean Air Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 10SiteEvaluation.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

218

Federal Energy Management Program: Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements Sample Documents for On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) works with Federal agencies and partners to assemble sample documents from past on-site renewable power purchase agreement (PPA) projects to help streamline the PPA process. Requests for Proposal and Contracts Sample documents are available for the following requests for proposal: Photovoltaics at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory: PPA request for proposal issued by DLA Energy on behalf of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaics Opportunity Announcement: Opportunity announcement issued for the NREL Mesa Top photovoltaics (PV) power purchase agreement.

219

Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OH OH EM Project: On-Site Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: February 2008 ETR-12 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did This Review The On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) is proposed for long-term containment of contaminated materials from the planned Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Acceptable performance of the proposed OSWDF will depend on interactions between engineered landfill features and operations methods that recognize the unique characteristics of the waste stream and site-

220

Summary - Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah, KY Paducah, KY EM Project: On-Site Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: August 2008 ETR-16 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility(OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is an active uranium enrichment facility that was placed on the National Priorities List. DOE is required to remediate the PGDP in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is evaluating alternatives to dispose of waste generated from the remedial activities at the PGDP. One option is to construct an on-site disposal facility (OSDF) meeting the CERCLA requirements.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

EA-1782: University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

82: University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy 82: University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy Project EA-1782: University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy Project SUMMARY The University of Delaware has constructed a wind turbine adjacent to its College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment campus in Lewes, Delaware. DOE proposed to provide the University a $1.43 million grant for this Wind Energy Project from funding provided in the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-8) and an additional $1 million provided in the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 2010. This EA analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the University of Delaware's Wind Energy Project at its Lewes campus and, for purposes of comparison, an alternative that assumes the wind turbine had not been

222

Table A28. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region, Cens  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and" Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,"Renewables" ,,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" " "," "," ","and"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.6,0.6,1.8,1.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",1098,868," W "," W ",22.3

223

Table A20. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region and" Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,,"RSE" " "," "," "," "," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Cogeneration","Renewables","Other(b)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.2,1.3 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",562,349,"W","W",23 " 20-49",4127,3917,79,131,20.1 " 50-99",8581,7255,955,371,10

224

Tech Transfer  

Tech Transfer The Industrial Partnerships Office is improving tech transfer processes with our very own Yellow Belt. Several of the Lab's process ...

225

Cost Effectiveness of On-Site Chlorine Generation for Chlorine Truck Attack Prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A chlorine tank truck attack could cause thousands of fatalities. As a means of preventing chlorine truck attacks, I consider the on-site generation of chlorine or hypochlorite at all U.S. facilities currently receiving chlorine by truck. I develop and ... Keywords: applications, cost-effectiveness, public policy, risk analysis, terrorism, uncertainty

Anthony M. Barrett

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Overview of the NETL Onsite Fuel Cell R&D Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Onsite fuel cell R&D at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been ongoing since the late 1990's. The objective of the onsite program is to support development efforts of the fuel cell technology-related product lines and conduct fundamental research of advanced fuel cell technology. Of special focus is NETL's new 10-yr, multimillion dollar development program call the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA). This program is aimed at developing low-cost mass manufactured solid oxide fuel cell technology for a wide variety of applications. In addition to SECA, there are a variety of other products/programs at NETL that can be supported by the onsite R&D group. Vision 21 is one such program and is the U. S. Department of Energy's initiative to deploy high efficiency, ultra-clean co-production coal conversion power plants in the twenty-first century. These plants will consist of power and coproduction modules, which are integrated to meet specific power and chemical markets. In response to these program initiatives, NETL's onsite R&D group is developing significant capability and focusing current activity on the following areas: (1) High-Temperature Fuel Cell Test & Characterization; (2) Integrated Fuel Processing; (3) Fuel Cell Component and Systems Modeling; and (4) Sensors, Controls, and Instrumentation. This report discusses plans and ongoing activities in each of these areas.

Berry, David A.; Gemmen, Randall S.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

227

Guidance for characterizing explosives contaminated soils: Sampling and selecting on-site analytical methods  

SciTech Connect

A large number of defense-related sites are contaminated with elevated levels of secondary explosives. Levels of contamination range from barely detectable to levels above 10% that need special handling due to the detonation potential. Characterization of explosives-contaminated sites is particularly difficult due to the very heterogeneous distribution of contamination in the environment and within samples. To improve site characterization, several options exist including collecting more samples, providing on-site analytical data to help direct the investigation, compositing samples, improving homogenization of samples, and extracting larger samples. On-site analytical methods are essential to more economical and improved characterization. On-site methods might suffer in terms of precision and accuracy, but this is more than offset by the increased number of samples that can be run. While verification using a standard analytical procedure should be part of any quality assurance program, reducing the number of samples analyzed by the more expensive methods can result in significantly reduced costs. Often 70 to 90% of the soil samples analyzed during an explosives site investigation do not contain detectable levels of contamination. Two basic types of on-site analytical methods are in wide use for explosives in soil, calorimetric and immunoassay. Calorimetric methods generally detect broad classes of compounds such as nitroaromatics or nitramines, while immunoassay methods are more compound specific. Since TNT or RDX is usually present in explosive-contaminated soils, the use of procedures designed to detect only these or similar compounds can be very effective.

Crockett, A.B. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Craig, H.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Portland, OR (United States). Oregon Operations Office; Jenkins, T.F. [Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab., Hanover, NH (United States); Sisk, W.E. [Army Environmental Center, Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Dynamic provisioning in next-generation data centers with on-site power production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The critical need for clean and economical sources of energy is transforming data centers that are primarily energy consumers to also energy producers. We focus on minimizing the operating costs of next-generation data centers that can jointly optimize ... Keywords: data centers, dynamic provisioning, on-site power production, online algorithm

Jinlong Tu, Lian Lu, Minghua Chen, Ramesh K. Sitaraman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

SCR Catalyst Disposal, Recycle, and On-site Washing Options and Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology becomes more widespread and the catalyst fleet ages, cost-effective and environmentally friendly approaches are need to handle the increasing volumes of spent catalyst or extend its life through simple on-site processing. This report addresses various issues related to catalyst rejuvenation, cleaning, recycling, and disposal.

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

230

DISTANT EDUCATION OF MEDICAL DOCTORS FOR DEALING WITH ON-SITE EMERGENCY SITUATIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 DISTANT EDUCATION OF MEDICAL DOCTORS FOR DEALING WITH ON-SITE EMERGENCY SITUATIONS. V. Andersen that might be unusual compared to the daily routine. In major emergencies, the medical team is moved to the site of the emergency instead of waiting for the casualties at the casualty ward. Ensuring fast

231

On-Site Diesel Generation- How You Can Reduce Your Energy Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interruptible power rates, Utility special rate negotiations, and the emergence of a spot electrical power market all can lead to lower industrial energy costs. The installation of low cost on-site diesel powered generation, or the proposed intention to install, provides the means for obtaining lower purchased power costs. The functionality of a standby power system and its inherent value in the coming free market purchase of electrical energy are added benefits. Project feasibility, conceptual design, on-site generation facility requirements, interconnection requirements, and operation and maintenance costs will be examined. Installation costs in the range of $350 to $400 per KW and operating costs of approximately $0.06 to $0.07 per kWhr compared to purchased power rates determine the feasibility of an on-site generation system. In some cases avoided demand charges offer an opportunity for savings such that special rates are not needed for a feasible project. Depending on the manufacturer, low capital cost diesel generators are available in 1000 to 2000 KW blocks. Capacity requirements determine the number of engines required. Large capacity installations are somewhat restricted by voltage and current ratings. Some variants for multiple engine generator installations will yield greater reliability or lower costs depending on objectives. Specific requirements for basic building blocks of an on-site generation system will be examined as well as an example of a 5,500 KW installation. IEA provides an alternative to installing and operating an on-site generation system. IEA owns and operates diesel standby generation systems for customers, with responsibility for all maintenance and operation as well as associated costs. This allows customers to focus on core business, not the generation of electrical energy.

Charles, D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",3,3,3

233

Transferring Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transferring Data Transferring Data to and from NERSC Yushu Yao 1 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 Overview 2 * Structure of NERSC Systems and Disks * Data Transfer Nodes * Transfer Data from/to NERSC - scp/sftp - bbcp - GridFTP * Sharing Data Within NERSC Tuesday, March 8, 2011 Systems and Disks 3 System Hopper Franklin Carver Euclid Data Transfer Node PDSF Global Home ($HOME) Global Scratch ($GSCRATCH) Project Directory Local Non-shared Scratch Data transfer nodes can access most of the disks, suggested for transferring data in/out NERSC Tuesday, March 8, 2011 Data Transfer Nodes * Two Servers Available Now: - dtn01.nersc.gov and dtn02.nersc.gov - Accessible by all NERSC users * Designed to Transfer Data: - High speed connection to HPSS and NGF (Global Home, Project, and Global Scratch) - High speed ethernet to wide area network

234

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010;" 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy" " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",5666,5414,81,171 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",3494,3491,"Q",2

235

Technology Transfer  

A new search feature has been implemented, which allows searching of technology transfer information across the Department of Energy Laboratories.

236

Recommended Changes to Guidelines for Operating an Interim On-Site Low Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility - For NRC Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The majority of commercial U.S. nuclear stations have constructed on-site low-level waste (LLW) storage facilities, and most of these same utilities are experiencing or have experienced at least one period of interim on-site storage. EPRI has issued two revisions of Guidelines for Operating an Interim On-Site Low Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility. Revision 1 of these Guidelines focused on operational considerations and incorporated many of the lessons learned while operating various types of LLW s...

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

237

Technical Conference on the Criteria for Designation of NIETCs: On-Site Final Attendee List  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ON-SITE FINAL ATTENDEE LIST ON-SITE FINAL ATTENDEE LIST Poonum Agrawal U.S. Department of Energy Email: poonum.agrawal@hq.doe.gov Parveen Baig Iowa Utilities Board Email: parveen.baig@iub.state.ia.us Derek Bandera Reliant Energy, Inc. Email: dbandera@reliant.com Diane Barney New York Dept. of Public Service Email: diane_barney@dps.state.ny.us Joel Bearden Cargill Power Markets, LLC Email: joel_bearden@cargill.com Michael Bednarz US Department of Energy - Midwest Regional Office Email: michael.bednarz@ee.doe.gov Mark Bennett Electric Power Supply Association Email: mbennett@epsa.org Bradley Bentley Sempra Energy Utility Email: bbentley@semprautilities.com Heather Bergman The Keystone Center Email: hbergman@keystone.org Ricky Bittle Arkansas Electric Cooperative

238

Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site generation Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site generation with HVAC Speaker(s): Ram Narayanamurthy Date: October 29, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 As the individual movements towards Net Zero Energy Homes (NZEH) and the SmartGrid converge on residential buildings, three major challenges need to be addressed: Flatten the highly peaked electric load profile of low energy homes Provide easy integration of energy efficiency into existing homes Provide builders and consumers with visibility into building operation, and ease of management. A Home Energy Management System (HEMS) owned by the consumer, capable of two way communications with Utility DR/SmartGrid/AMI is required to resolve these challenges. The HEMS will need to increase energy efficiency of building operations, provide consumers feedback and

239

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat andpower applications  

SciTech Connect

While demand for electricity continues to grow, expansion of the traditional electricity supply system, or macrogrid, is constrained and is unlikely to keep pace with the growing thirst western economies have for electricity. Furthermore, no compelling case has been made that perpetual improvement in the overall power quality and reliability (PQR)delivered is technically possible or economically desirable. An alternative path to providing high PQR for sensitive loads would generate close to them in microgrids, such as the Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid. Distributed generation would alleviate the pressure for endless improvement in macrogrid PQR and might allow the establishment of a sounder economically based level of universal grid service. Energy conversion from available fuels to electricity close to loads can also provide combined heat and power (CHP) opportunities that can significantly improve the economics of small-scale on-site power generation, especially in hot climates when the waste heat serves absorption cycle cooling equipment that displaces expensive on-peak electricity. An optimization model, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed at Berkeley Lab identifies the energy bill minimizing combination of on-site generation and heat recovery equipment for sites, given their electricity and heat requirements, the tariffs they face, and a menu of available equipment. DER-CAM is used to conduct a systemic energy analysis of a southern California naval base building and demonstrates atypical current economic on-site power opportunity. Results achieve cost reductions of about 15 percent with DER, depending on the tariff.Furthermore, almost all of the energy is provided on-site, indicating that modest cost savings can be achieved when the microgrid is free to select distributed generation and heat recovery equipment in order to minimize its over all costs.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; HamachiLaCommare, Kristina

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

ALTERNATIVES OF MACCS2 IN LANL DISPERSION ANALYSIS FOR ONSITE AND OFFSITE DOSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In modeling atmospheric dispersion to determine accidental release of radiological material, one of the common statistical analysis tools used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2). MACCS2, however, has some limitations and shortfalls for both onsite and offsite applications. Alternative computer codes, which could provide more realistic calculations, are being investigated for use at LANL. In the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), the suitability of MACCS2 for the calculation of onsite worker doses was a concern; therefore, ARCON96 was chosen to replace MACCS2. YMP's use of ARCON96 provided results which clearly demonstrated the program's merit for onsite worker safety analyses in a wide range of complex configurations and scenarios. For offsite public exposures, the conservatism of MACCS2 on the treatment of turbulence phenomena at LANL is examined in this paper. The results show a factor of at least two conservatism in calculated public doses. The new EPA air quality model, AERMOD, which implements advanced meteorological turbulence calculations, is a good candidate for LANL applications to provide more confidence in the accuracy of offsite public dose projections.

Wang, John HC [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories, Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide provides general information on implementing onsite distributed generation systems in laboratory environments. Specific technology applications, general performance information, and cost data are provided to educate and encourage laboratory energy managers to consider onsite power generation or combined heat and power (CHP) systems for their facilities. After conducting an initial screening, energy managers are encouraged to conduct a detailed feasibility study with actual cost and performance data for technologies that look promising. Onsite distributed generation systems are small, modular, decentralized, grid-connected, or off-grid energy systems. These systems are located at or near the place where the energy is used. These systems are also known as distributed energy or distributed power systems. DG technologies are generally considered those that produce less than 20 megawatts (MW) of power. A number of technologies can be applied as effective onsite DG systems, including: (1) Diesel, natural gas, and dual-fuel reciprocating engines; (2) Combustion turbines and steam turbines; (3) Fuel cells; (4) Biomass heating; (5) Biomass combined heat and power; (6) Photovoltaics; and (7) Wind turbines. These systems can provide a number of potential benefits to an individual laboratory facility or campus, including: (1) High-quality, reliable, and potentially dispatchable power; (2) Low-cost energy and long-term utility cost assurance, especially where electricity and/or fuel costs are high; (3) Significantly reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Typical CHP plants reduce onsite GHG by 40 to 60 percent; (4) Peak demand shaving where demand costs are high; (5) CHP where thermal energy can be used in addition to electricity; (6) The ability to meet standby power needs, especially where utility-supplied power is interrupted frequently or for long periods and where standby power is required for safety or emergencies; and (7) Use for standalone or off-grid systems where extending the grid is too expensive or impractical. Because they are installed close to the load, DG systems avoid some of the disadvantages of large, central power plants, such as transmission and distribution losses over long electric lines.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A business case for on-site generation: The BD biosciences pharmingen project  

SciTech Connect

Deregulation is haltingly changing the United States electricity markets. The resulting uncertainty and/or rising energy costs can be hedged by generating electricity on-site and other benefits, such as use of otherwise wasted heat, can be captured. The Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act (PURPA) of 1978 first invited relatively small-scale generators ({ge} 1 MW) into the electricity market. The advent of efficient and reliable small scale and renewable equipment has spurred an industry that has, in recent years, made even smaller (business scale) electricity generation an economically viable option for some consumers. On-site energy capture and/or conversion, known as distributed energy resources (DER), offers consumers many benefits, such as economic savings and price predictability, improved reliability, control over power quality, and emissions reductions. Despite these benefits, DER adoption can be a daunting move to a customer accustomed to simply paying a monthly utility bill. San Diego is in many ways an attractive location for DER development: It has high electricity prices typical of California and a moderate climate i.e. energy loads are consistent throughout the year. Additionally, the price shock to San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) customers during the summer of 2000 has interested many in alternatives to electricity price vulnerability. This report examines the business case for DER at the San Diego biotechnology supply company, BD Biosciences Pharmingen, which considered DER for a building with 200-300 kW base-load, much of which accommodates the refrigerators required to maintain chemicals. Because of the Mediterranean climate of the San Diego area and the high rate of air changes required due to on-site use of chemicals, modest space heating is required throughout the year. Employees work in the building during normal weekday business hours, and daily peak loads are typically about 500 kW.

Firestone, Ryan; Creighton, Charles; Bailey, Owen; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable Energy Certificates, and On-Site Renewable Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Purchasing Green Power Renewable Electricity, Renewable Energy Certificates, and On-Site Renewable Generation DOE/EE-0307 This guide can be downloaded from: www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/technologies/renewable_purchasingpower.html www.epa.gov/greenpower/ www.wri.org/publications www.resource-solutions.org/publications.php Office of Air (6202J) EPA430-K-04-015 www.epa.gov/greenpower March 2010 ISBN: 1-56973-577-8 Guide to Purchasing Green Power i Table of Contents Summary ........................................................................................................................................................1 Chapter 1: Introduction ....................................................................................................................................2

244

On-site demonstration procedure for solid-state fluorescent ballast  

SciTech Connect

The report was presented to plant engineers and managers who were involved in an on-site demonstration of EETech solid-state ballasts for two 40-watt T12 fluorescent lamps. The report includes a brief review of the operating principles of solid-state fluorescent ballasts and the status of development achieved during the LBL program. The remainder of the test describes the techniques of managing and instrumenting a test area for assessing the performance of solid-state fluorescent ballasts at an occupied site.

Verderber, R.; Morse, O.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Employment Size" ," Under 50",3,4,4 ," 50-99",5,5,5 ," 100-249",4,4,3

246

"NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","In-house","Utlity/Energy Suppler","Product/Service Provider","Federal Program","State/Local Program","Don't Know"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.1;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,," Source of Assistance" "NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","In-house","Utlity/Energy Suppler","Product/Service Provider","Federal Program","State/Local Program","Don't Know" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Activities",1.3,1.7,"--","--","--","--","--","--" ," Energy Audit or Assessment",0.7,2.6,3.9,4.9,6.3,16.5,12.3,6.8

247

"RSE Table N13.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",,,,"Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,1,8,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",4,0,1,0,4 313,"Textile Mills",2,8,7,0,2 313210," Broadwoven Fabric Mills",3,0,22,0,3 314,"Textile Product Mills",11,73,8,90,11

248

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials

249

Customer adoption of small-scale on-site power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electricity supply system is undergoing major regulatory and technological change with significant implications for the way in which the sector will operate (including its patterns of carbon emissions) and for the policies required to ensure socially and environmentally desirable outcomes. One such change stems from the rapid emergence of viable small-scale (i.e., smaller than 500 kW) generators that are potentially competitive with grid delivered electricity, especially in combined heat and power configurations. Such distributed energy resources (DER) may be grouped together with loads in microgrids. These clusters could operate semi-autonomously from the established power system, or macrogrid, matching power quality and reliability more closely to local end-use requirements. In order to establish a capability for analyzing the effect that microgrids may have on typical commercial customers, such as office buildings, restaurants, shopping malls, and grocery stores, an economic mod el of DER adoption is being developed at Berkeley Lab. This model endeavors to indicate the optimal quantity and type of small on-site generation technologies that customers could employ given their electricity requirements. For various regulatory schemes and general economic conditions, this analysis produces a simple operating schedule for any installed generators. Early results suggest that many commercial customers can benefit economically from on-site generation, even without considering potential combined heat and power and reliability benefits, even though they are unlikely to disconnect from the established power system.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Rubio, F. Javier

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

An accurate system for onsite calibration of electronic transformers with digital output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calibration systems with digital output are used to replace conventional calibration systems because of principle diversity and characteristics of digital output of electronic transformers. But precision and unpredictable stability limit their onsite application even development. So fully considering the factors influencing accuracy of calibration system and employing simple but reliable structure, an all-digital calibration system with digital output is proposed in this paper. In complicated calibration environments, precision and dynamic range are guaranteed by A/D converter with 24-bit resolution, synchronization error limit is nanosecond by using the novelty synchronization method. In addition, an error correction algorithm based on the differential method by using two-order Hanning convolution window has good inhibition of frequency fluctuation and inter-harmonics interference. To verify the effectiveness, error calibration was carried out in the State Grid Electric Power Research Institute of China and results show that the proposed system can reach the precision class up to 0.05. Actual onsite calibration shows that the system has high accuracy, and is easy to operate with satisfactory stability.

Zhi Zhang; Li Hongbin [CEEE of HuaZhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

ENERGY STAR Using On-site Renewable Energy as the Next Step to Improving Energy Performance and Reducing Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY AS THE NEXT STEP ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY AS THE NEXT STEP TO IMPROVING ENERGY PERFORMANCE AND REDUCING EMISSIONS jcpenney has a corporate energy management strategy that includes using energy efficient technologies in its stores and encouraging energy conservation. As part of this strategy, the company also investigated generating electricity through on-site renewable energy. jcpenney is a partner in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings Program, and has been tracking building energy use since 2006 using EPA's free benchmarking tool, Portfolio Manager. Portfolio Manager provides a 1-100 energy performance score similar to a "miles-per-gallon" metric for vehicle fuel efficiency. Those buildings that achieve an ENERGY STAR score

252

Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency & Renewable and Energy - Commercialization Energy Efficiency & Renewable and Energy - Commercialization Deployment SBIR/STTR - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer USEFUL LINKS Contract Opportunities: FBO.gov FedConnect.net Grant Opportunities DOE Organization Chart Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Feedback Contact us about Tech Transfer: Mary.McManmon@science.doe.gov Mary McManmon, 202-586-3509 link to Adobe PDF Reader link to Adobe Flash player Licensing Guide and Sample License The Technology Transfer Working Group (TTWG), made up of representatives from each DOE Laboratory and Facility, recently created a Licensing Guide and Sample License [762-KB PDF]. The Guide will serve to provide a general understanding of typical contract terms and provisions to help reduce both

253

INADVERTENT INTRUDER ANALYSIS FOR THE PORTSMOUTH ON-SITE WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

An On-Site Alternative is being evaluated as part of the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process for evaluation of alternatives for the disposal of waste generated from decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) at Portsmouth. The On-Site Alternative involves construction of an On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF). An inadvertent intruder analysis must be conducted for the OSWDF. The inadvertent intruder analysis considers the radiological impacts to hypothetical persons who are assumed to inadvertently intrude on the Portsmouth OSWDF site after institutional control ceases 100 years after site closure. The focus in development of exposure scenarios for inadvertent intruders was on selecting reasonable events that may occur, giving consideration to regional customs and construction practices. An important assumption in all scenarios is that an intruder has no prior knowledge of the existence of a waste disposal facility at the site. Therefore, after active institutional control ceases, certain exposure scenarios are assumed to be precluded only by the physical state of the disposal facility, i.e., the integrity of the engineered barriers used in facility construction or the thickness of clean material above the waste. Passive institutional controls, such as permanent marker systems at the disposal site and public records of prior land use, also could prevent inadvertent intrusion after active institutional control ceases, but the efficacy of passive institutional controls is not assumed in this analysis. Results of the analysis show that a hypothetical inadvertent intruder at the OSWDF who, in the worst case scenario, resides on the site and consumes vegetables from a garden established on the site using contaminated soil (chronic agriculture scenario) would receive a maximum chronic dose of approximately 7.0 mrem/yr during the 1000 year period of assessment. This dose falls well below the DOE chronic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr. Results of the analysis also showed that a hypothetical inadvertent intruder at the OSWDF who, in the worst case scenario, excavates a basement in the soil that reaches the waste (acute basement construction scenario) would receive a maximum acute dose of approximately 0.25 mrem/yr during the 1000 year period of assessment. This dose falls well below the DOE acute dose limit of 500 mrem/yr.

Smith, F.; Phifer, M.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure): Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

L L a b o r a t o r i e s f o r t h e 2 1 s t C e n t u r y : B e s t P r a c t i c e s This combined heat and power system at the Bristol-Myers Squibb laboratory in Wallingford, Connecticut, could meet 100% of the lab's power requirement, if necessary. Bernard Blesinger / PIX 12552 ONSITE DISTRIBUTED GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR LABORATORIES Introduction Laboratories have unique requirements for lighting, ventilation, and scientific equipment with each requiring a considerable amount of energy. The reliability of that energy is very important. Laboratories must be able to conduct research without power interruptions, which can damage both equipment and experiments. Generating power and heat on site is one good way to enhance energy reliability, improve fuel utilization efficiency, reduce utility costs,

255

Feasibility studies on the use of TRUPACT-1 for on-site transportation of DOE LLW  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the authors propose using TRUPACT-I, with modifications to its storage system, to facilitate on-site transportation of US Department of Energy (DOE) low-level waste (LLW). TRUPACT-I was designed as a type-B contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste transportation system for use in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-related operations and was subjected to the required type-B container accident tests, which it successfully passed. Thus, from a safety standpoint, TRUPACT-1 is provided with double containment, impact limitation, and fire-retardant capabilities. Furthermore, because TRUPACT-1 was developed to transport CH-TRU waste, which is characterized by a higher total activity, larger decay heat, and higher dose rate than LLW, it would be overqualified for the requirements of LLW transportation.

Hills, C.R.; Banjac, V.; Heger, A.S. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fractional domain walls from on-site softening in dipolar bosons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study dipolar bosons in a 1D optical lattice and identify a region in parameter space---strong coupling but relatively weak on-site repulsion---hosting a series of stable charge-density-wave (CDW) states whose low-energy excitations, built from "fractional domain walls," have remarkable similarities to those of non-Abelian fractional quantum Hall states. Here, a conventional domain wall between translated CDW's may be split by inserting strings of degenerate, but inequivalent, CDW states. Outside these insulating regions, we find numerous supersolids as well as a superfluid regime. The mentioned phases should be accessible experimentally and, in particular, the fractional domain walls can be created in the ground state using single-site addressing, i.e., by locally changing the chemical potential.

Emma Wikberg; Jonas Larson; Emil J. Bergholtz; Anders Karlhede

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Utility investment in on-site solar: risk and return analysis for capitalization and financing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A set of financial strategies designed to accelerate the penetration of on-site solar heating and cooling systems are studied. The approach of portfolio theory or the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) is used. The major features of the CAPM is summarized including a survey of those applications which are most relevant to the analysis. These include utility return on equity calculations and project evaluation techniques. How to apply empirical results is discussed based on CAPM methods. In particular, applications to the capitalization variant of the utility investment strategy and the financing variant are distinguished. Subsidization rationales are also discussed. Empirical results to date are summarized, including estimation problems for the various risk measures. The general problem of financial risk assessment for energy technologies is reviewed. (MHR)

Kahn, E.; Schutz, S.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

404-NOV. 1, 2000 404-NOV. 1, 2000 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 VerDate 11-MAY-2000 04:52 Nov 16, 2000 Jkt 089139 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 6579 Sfmt 6579 E:\PUBLAW\PUBL404.106 APPS27 PsN: PUBL404 114 STAT. 1742 PUBLIC LAW 106-404-NOV. 1, 2000 Public Law 106-404 106th Congress An Act To improve the ability of Federal agencies to license federally owned inventions. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the ''Technology Transfer Commer- cialization Act of 2000''. SEC. 2. FINDINGS. The Congress finds that- (1) the importance of linking our unparalleled network of over 700 Federal laboratories and our Nation's universities with United States industry continues to hold great promise

259

Electron Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Pierre Kennepohl1,2 and Edward Solomon1* 1Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Electron transfer, or the act of moving an electron from one place to another, is amongst the simplest of chemical processes, yet certainly one of the most critical. The process of efficiently and controllably moving electrons around is one of the primary regulation mechanisms in biology. Without stringent control of electrons in living organisms, life could simply not exist. For example, photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation (to name but two of the most well-known biochemical activities) are driven by electron transfer processes. It is unsurprising, therefore, that much effort has been placed on understanding the fundamental principles that control and define the simple act of adding and/or removing electrons from chemical species.

260

NETL: Technology Transfer - History of Technology Transfer  

History of Technology Transfer Technology transfer differs from providing services or products (e.g., acquisition) and financial assistance (e.g., ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

A C. elegans-based foam for rapid on-site detection of residual live virus.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the response to and recovery from a critical homeland security event involving deliberate or accidental release of biological agents, initial decontamination efforts are necessarily followed by tests for the presence of residual live virus or bacteria. Such 'clearance sampling' should be rapid and accurate, to inform decision makers as they take appropriate action to ensure the safety of the public and of operational personnel. However, the current protocol for clearance sampling is extremely time-intensive and costly, and requires significant amounts of laboratory space and capacity. Detection of residual live virus is particularly problematic and time-consuming, as it requires evaluation of replication potential within a eukaryotic host such as chicken embryos. The intention of this project was to develop a new method for clearance sampling, by leveraging Sandia's expertise in the biological and material sciences in order to create a C. elegans-based foam that could be applied directly to the entire contaminated area for quick and accurate detection of any and all residual live virus by means of a fluorescent signal. Such a novel technology for rapid, on-site detection of live virus would greatly interest the DHS, DoD, and EPA, and hold broad commercial potential, especially with regard to the transportation industry.

Negrete, Oscar A.; Branda, Catherine; Hardesty, Jasper O. E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Tucker, Mark David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kaiser, Julia N. (Global Product Management, Hilden, Germany); Kozina, Carol L.; Chirica, Gabriela S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

PORTSMOUTH ON-SITE DISPOSAL CELL HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE GEOMEMBRANE LONGEVITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is anticipated that high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembranes will be utilized within the liner and closure cap of the proposed On-Site Disposal Cell (OSDC) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The likely longevity (i.e. service life) of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service is evaluated within the following sections of this report: (1) Section 2.0 provides an overview of HDPE geomembranes, (2) Section 3.0 outlines potential HDPE geomembranes degradation mechanisms, (3) Section 4.0 evaluates the applicability of HDPE geomembrane degradation mechanisms to the Portsmouth OSDC, (4) Section 5.0 provides a discussion of the current state of knowledge relative to the longevity (service life) of HDPE geomembranes, including the relation of this knowledge to the Portsmouth OSDC, and (5) Section 6.0 provides summary and conclusions relative to the anticipated service life of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service. Based upon this evaluation it is anticipated that the service life of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service would be significantly greater than the 200 year service life assumed for the OSDC closure cap and liner HDPE geomembranes. That is, a 200 year OSDC HDPE geomembrane service life is considered a conservative assumption.

Phifer, M.

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Energy Resource Center: On-Site Technical Assistance and Training Programs for Texas School Districts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Created by the 68th Session of the Texas Legislature, the Energy Resource Center for Texas Schools (ERC) is the primary source of facility management services for Texas School districts. The purpose of the ERC is to assist school districts in controlling a major operational expense -- the cost of energy -- through tailoring and implementing services to meet "real world" needs. On-site services available from the ERC range from basic training in analyzing utility bills, tracking energy consumption and costs, and evaluating school energy performance to providing professional technical assistance in identifying and implementing lower cost energy investments. A design assistance program now available from the Center provides energy evaluations at crucial steps in the design process of new facilities to insure that energy-conscious strategies are considered by the architectural firm under contract. Audiences targeted for ERC services include board members, superintendents, directors of maintenance, plant operators, business managers, and energy managers. Assistance provided through workshop settings includes instruction in setting up board-directed energy programs and the sponsoring of network meetings for school energy managers in several areas of the state. Communication is maintained with school energy contacts through the ERC's bimonthly newsletter, Texas School Energy Notes, which is sent to all school districts in the state.

Roberts, M.; Sanders, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning '(Facility HVAC)' excludes" "steam and hot water." " NFNo applicable RSE rowcolumn factor." " * Estimate less than 0.5." "...

267

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

'2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption" "Survey,' and Office of Petroleum and Biofuels Statistics, Form EIA-810," "Monthly Refinery Report' for 2010." "Released: July 2013...

268

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

'2010 Manufacturing Energy" "Consumption Survey,' and Office of Petroleum and Biofuels Statistics," "Form EIA-810, 'Monthly Refinery Report' for 2010." "Released: July 2013...

269

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

l","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Fact...

270

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3314," Nonferrous Metals, except Aluminum",2522.1,5.7,2 331419," Primary Smelting and Refining of Nonferrous Metals, except Copper and Aluminum",8897.6,18.1,9.2 3315,"...

271

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,"*","*",5,"*",4,"*",23 327420," Gypsum",85,1845,"*","*",74,"*",0,0,2 327993," Mineral Wool",50,3978,0,"*",33,"*",0,"*","*" 331,"Primary Metals",1910,133236,3,1,610,1,17,9,133...

272

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","...

273

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

sidual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural...

274

Identifying Technology Flows and Spillovers Through NAICS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Refrigeration LNG for Vehicular Fuel ... 2 Storage Battery Manufacturing 2 ... 1 Military Armored Vehicle, Tank, and Tank Component Manufacturing 2 ...

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

275

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE...

276

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Guide for the Performance of OnSite and Vendor Shop Inspections of Electric Motors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry is experiencing a loss of expertise as its workforce ages. Compounding the problem is that many plants find that there is limited time to train new workers. Periodically, station and corporate motor specialists are asked to perform inspections of on-site motors to maintain a level of equipment reliability or to perform inspections for customers at vendor motor shops. This report should prove valuable during visual inspections of electric motors.

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

277

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for the concrete-shielded RH TRU drum for the 327 Postirradiation Testing Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes onsite transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material in the Concrete Shielded Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste (RH TRU) Drum per HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments. The drum will be used for transport of 327 Building legacy waste from the 300 Area to a solid waste storage facility on the Hanford Site.

Smith, R.J.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for concrete-shielded RHTRU waste drum for the 327 postirradiation testing laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes onsite transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material in the Concrete- Shielded Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste (RH TRU) Drum per WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping. The drum will be used for transport of 327 Building legacy waste from the 300 Area to the Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility in the 200 West Area and on to a Solid Waste Storage Facility, also in the 200 Area.

Adkins, H.E.

1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

279

Regional comparisons of on-site solar potential in the residential and industrial sectors  

SciTech Connect

Regional and sub-regional differences in the potential development of decentralized solar technologies are studied. Two sectors of the economy were selected for intensive analysis: the residential and industrial sectors. In both investigations, the sequence of analysis follows the same general steps: (1) selection of appropriate prototypes within each land-use sector disaggregated by census region; (2) characterization of the end-use energy demand of each prototype in order to match an appropriate decentralized solar technology to the energy demand; (3) assessment of the energy conservation potential within each prototype limited by land use patterns, technology efficiency, and variation in solar insolation; and (4) evaluation of the regional and sub-regional differences in the land use implications of decentralized energy supply technologies that result from the combination of energy demand, energy supply potential, and the subsequent addition of increasingly more restrictive policies to increase the percent contribution of on-site solar energy. Results are presented and discussed. It is concluded that determining regional variations in solar energy contribution for both the residential and industrial sectors appears to be more dependent upon a characterization of existing demand and conservation potential than regional variations in solar insolation. Local governmental decisions influencing developing land use patterns can significantly promote solar energy use and reduce reliance on non-renewable energy sources. These decisions include such measures as solar access protection through controls on vegetation and on building height and density in the residential sector, and district heating systems and industrial co-location in the manufacturing sector. (WHK)

Gatzke, A.E.; Skewes-Cox, A.O.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Advanced On-Site Wastewater Treatment and Management Market Study: Volume 1: Assessment of Short-Term Opportunities and Long-Run Pot ential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-site septic systems have traditionally been considered a temporary solution on the way to sewering. However, the elimination of federal grants for sewers and wastewater treatment plants has brought a new awareness of the high costs and the sometimes adverse environmental consequences of centralized point discharges. At the same time, advances in on-site technologies, including such systems as low-flow water conservation, watertight septic tanks with screens, sand filtration, disinfection, remote monit...

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Transferring Data at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Transferring Data Advice and Overview NERSC provides many facilities for storing data and performing analysis. However, transfering data - whether over the wide area network...

282

Jefferson Lab Technology Transfer  

What is Technology Transfer at Jefferson Lab? The transfer of technology (intellectual property) developed at JLab to the private sector is an ...

283

Accelerating the transfer in Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerating the transfer in Technology Transfer Accelerating the transfer in Technology Transfer Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Accelerating the transfer in Technology Transfer Express Licensing fast tracks commercialization. May 1, 2013 Division Leader Dave Pesiri Division Leader Dave Pesiri. Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Express Licensing program To better serve its partners, one of the first improvements the Lab's Technology Transfer Division (TT) has made is through its new Express Licensing initiative. Standardized license agreements and fee structures will remove long and complicated negotiations and decrease the time required to get patented Lab technology and software into the hands of

284

NREL: Technology Transfer - Renewable Hydrogen Bus Teaches ...  

The bus filled up at NRELs on-site hydrogen fueling station, which dispenses hydrogen made with wind and solar energy.

285

Primer on Use of Multi-Spectral and Infra Red Imaging for On-Site Inspections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of an On-Site Inspection (OSI) is to determine whether a nuclear explosion has occurred in violation of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and to gather information which might assist in identifying the violator (CTBT, Article IV, Paragraph 35) Multi-Spectral and Infra Red Imaging (MSIR) is allowed by the treaty to detect observables which might help reduce the search area and thus expedite an OSI and make it more effective. MSIR is permitted from airborne measurements, and at and below the surface to search for anomalies and artifacts (CTBT, Protocol, Part II, Paragraph 69b). The three broad types of anomalies and artifacts MSIR is expected to be capable of observing are surface disturbances (disturbed earth, plant stress or anomalous surface materials), human artifacts (man-made roads, buildings and features), and thermal anomalies. The purpose of this Primer is to provide technical information on MSIR relevant to its use for OSI. It is expected that this information may be used for general background information, to inform decisions about the selection and testing of MSIR equipment, to develop operational guidance for MSIR use during an OSI, and to support the development of a training program for OSI Inspectors. References are provided so readers can pursue a topic in more detail than the summary information provided here. The following chapters will provide more information on how MSIR can support an OSI (Section 2), a short summary what Multi-Spectral Imaging and Infra Red Imaging is (Section 3), guidance from the CTBT regarding the use of MSIR (Section 4), and a description of several nuclear explosion scenarios (Section 5) and consequent observables (Section 6). The remaining sections focus on practical aspects of using MSIR for an OSI, such as specification and selection of MSIR equipment, operational considerations for deployment of MISR equipment from an aircraft, and the conduct of field exercises to mature MSIR for an OSI. Finally, an appendix provides detail describing the magnitude and spatial extent of the surface shock expected from an underground nuclear explosion. If there is a seismic event or other data to suggest there has been a nuclear explosion in violation of the CTBT, an OSI may be conducted to determine whether a nuclear explosion has occurred and to gather information which may be useful in identifying the party responsible for conducting the explosion. The OSI must be conducted in the area where the event that triggered the inspection request occurred, and the inspected area must not exceed 1,000 square kilometers, or be more than 50 km on aside (CTBT Protocol, Part II, Paragraphs 2 and 3). One of the guiding principles for an inspection is that it be effective, minimally intrusive, timely, and cost-effective [Hawkins, Feb 1998]. In that context, MSIR is one of several technologies that can be used during an aircraft overflight to identify ground regions of high interest in a timely and cost-effective manner. This allows for an optimized inspection on the ground. The primary purpose for MSIR is to identify artifacts and anomalies that might be associated with a nuclear explosion, and to use the location of those artifacts and anomalies to reduce the search area that must be inspected from the ground. The MSIR measurements can have additional utility. The multi-spectral measurements of the ground can be used for terrain classification, which can aid in geological characterization of the Inspected Area. In conditions of where light smoke or haze is present, long-wave infrared imaging can provide better imaging of the ground than is possible with standard visible imagery.

Henderson, J R

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

286

Technology Transfer Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPF developed the concept of a mobile, on-site NORM remediation and disposal process in late 1993. Working with Conoco and receiving encouragement born the Department of Energy, Metarie Office, and the Texas Railroad Commission the corporation conducted extensive feasibility studies on an on-site disposal concept. In May 1994, the Department of Energy issued a solicitation for cooperative agreement proposal for, "Development and Testing of a Method for Treatment and Underground Disposal of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)". BPF submitted a proposal to the solicitation in July 1994, and was awarded a cooperative agreement in September 1995. BPF proposed and believed that proven equipment and technology could be incorporated in to a mobile system. The system would allow BPF to demonstrate an environmentally sound and commercially affordable method for treatment and underground disposal of NORM. The key stop in the BPF process incorporates injection of the dissolved radioactive materials into a water injection or disposal well. Disposal costs in the BPF proposal of July 1995 were projected to range from $1000 to $5000 per cubic yard. The process included four separate steps. (1) De-oiling (2) Volume Reduction (3) Chemical Dissolution of the Radium (4) Injection

None

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Microchannel Reactor System Design & Demonstration For On-Site H2O2 Production by Controlled H2/O2 Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We successfully demonstrated an innovative hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production concept which involved the development of flame- and explosion-resistant microchannel reactor system for energy efficient, cost-saving, on-site H2O2 production. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for controlled direct combination of H2 and O2 in all proportions including explosive regime, at a low pressure and a low temperature to produce about 1.5 wt% H2O2 as proposed. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we demonstrated our H2O2 production approach by numbering up the channels in a multi-channel microreactor-based pilot plant to produce 1 kg/h of H2O2 at 1.5 wt% as demanded by end-users of the developed technology. To our knowledge, we are the first group to accomplish this significant milestone. We identified the reaction pathways that comprise the process, and implemented rigorous mechanistic kinetic studies to obtain the kinetics of the three main dominant reactions. We are not aware of any such comprehensive kinetic studies for the direct combination process, either in a microreactor or any other reactor system. We showed that the mass transfer parameter in our microreactor system is several orders of magnitude higher than what obtains in the macroreactor, attesting to the superior performance of microreactor. A one-dimensional reactor model incorporating the kinetics information enabled us to clarify certain important aspects of the chemistry of the direct combination process as detailed in section 5 of this report. Also, through mathematical modeling and simulation using sophisticated and robust commercial software packages, we were able to elucidate the hydrodynamics of the complex multiphase flows that take place in the microchannel. In conjunction with the kinetics information, we were able to validate the experimental data. If fully implemented across the whole industry as a result of our technology demonstration, our production concept is expected to save >5 trillion Btu/year of steam usage and >3 trillion Btu/year in electric power consumption. Our analysis also indicates >50 % reduction in waste disposal cost and ~10% reduction in feedstock energy. These savings translate to ~30% reduction in overall production and transportation costs for the $1B annual H2O2 market.

Adeniyi Lawal

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

288

NERSC's Data Transfer Nodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Transfer Nodes Data Transfer Nodes Data Transfer Nodes Overview The data transfer nodes are NERSC servers dedicated to performing transfers between NERSC data storage resources such as HPSS and the NERSC Global Filesystem (NGF), and storage resources at other sites including the Leadership Computing Facility at ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory). These nodes are being managed (and monitored for performance) as part of a collaborative effort between ESnet, NERSC, and ORNL to enable high performance data movement over the high-bandwidth 10Gb ESnet wide-area network (WAN). Restrictions In order to keep the data transfer nodes performing optimally for data transfers, we request that users restrict interactive use of these systems to tasks that are related to preparing data for transfer or are directly

289

Project RU LlSON COPY ON-SITE RADIOLOGICAL PROGRAMS DURING REENTRY DISILLING THROUGH PRODUCTION TESTING  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RU LlSON RU LlSON COPY ON-SITE RADIOLOGICAL PROGRAMS DURING REENTRY DISILLING THROUGH PRODUCTION TESTING FINAL REPOAT EBERLlNE INSTRUMENT CORPORATION Santa Fe, New Mexico Date Published - December 1973 PREPARED FOR THE U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION N E V A D A OPERATIONS OFFICE UNDER CONTRACT NO. AT(26-11-294 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Project RULISON ON-S1l'E RADIOLOGICAL PROGRAMS D U R I N G R E E N T R Y D R I L L I N G THROUGH PRODUCTION TESTING \ F I N A L REPORT EBERLINE INSTRUMENT CORPORATION . Santa Fe, New Mexico 1 Date Published - December 1973 NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE . UNDER CONTRACT NO. AT(26-11-294 NOTICE ~~~~ This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United

290

A Discussion of Procedures and Equipment for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty On-Site Inspection Environmental Sampling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is intended to serve as a scientific basis to start discussions of the available environmental sampling techniques and equipment that have been used in the past that could be considered for use within the context of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) on-site inspections (OSI). This work contains information on the techniques, equipment, costs, and some operational procedures associated with environmental sampling that have actually been used in the past by the United States for the detection of nuclear explosions. This paper also includes a discussion of issues, recommendations, and questions needing further study within the context of the sampling and analysis of aquatic materials, atmospheric gases, atmospheric particulates, vegetation, sediments and soils, fauna, and drill-back materials.

Wogman, Ned A.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Payne, Rosara F.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Friese, Judah I.; Miley, Harry S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Onishi, Yasuo; Hayes, James C.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Wackenhut Services, Incorporated: Report from the DOE Voluntary Protection Program onsite review, August 10--14, 1998  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of Wackenhut Services, Inc. (WSI) at Savannah River Site (SRS), conducted August 10-14, 1998. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements to determine its success in implementing the five DOE-VPP tenets. The Team determined that WSI has met in varying degrees, all the tenets of the DOE-VPP. In every case, WSI programs and procedures exceed the level or degree necessary for compliance with existing standards, DOE Orders, and guidelines. In addition, WSI has systematically integrated their occupational safety and health (OSH) program into management and work practices at all levels. WSI`s efforts toward implementing the five major DOE-VPP tenets are summarized.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Measurement of 37Ar to support technology for On-site Inspection under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Site Inspection (OSI) is a key component of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Measurements of radionuclide isotopes created by an underground nuclear explosion are a valuable signature of a Treaty violation. Argon-37 is produced from neutron interaction with calcium in soil, 40Ca(n,{\\alpha})37Ar. For OSI, the 35-day half-life of 37Ar provides both high specific activity and sufficient time for completion of an inspection before decay limits sensitivity. This paper presents a low-background internal-source gas proportional counter with an 37Ar measurement sensitivity level equivalent to 45.1 mBq/SCM in whole air.

C. E. Aalseth; A. R. Day; D. A. Haas; E. W. Hoppe; B. J. Hyronimus; M. E. Keillor; E. K. Mace; J. L. Orrell; A. Seifert; V. T. Woods

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

293

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Department of Energy (DOE) ... and business development involved in successful technology transfer. 8. Government-industry interactions. ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

294

SRNL - Technology Transfer - Home  

Technology Transfer. Research and Development Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS) scientists and engineers develop technologies designed to improve ...

295

Tech Transfer Report 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Summary Report on Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer FY 2003 Activity Metrics and Outcomes 2004 Report ...

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

296

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

Not Available

1980-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Transfer Credit Approval Form For Transfer Terms and Exchange Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transfer Credit Approval Form For Transfer Terms and Exchange Programs CONTINUED Student/transfer term is not a Dartmouth-sponsored program. ______ The regulations for exchange/transfer terms of the COI will review my transfer term application and I may only receive Dartmouth credit for a transfer

Myers, Lawrence C.

299

Fuel transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool.

Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA); Barbanti, Giancarlo (Cupertino, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

NREL: Technology Transfer - About Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Technology Transfer About Technology Transfer Through technology partnerships, NREL seeks to reduce private sector risk and enable investment in the adoption of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. The transfer of these technologies to the marketplace helps displace oil, reduce carbon emissions, and increase U.S. industry competitiveness. Principles NREL develops and implements technology partnerships based on the standards established by the following principles: Balancing Public and Private Interest Form partnerships that serve the public interest and advance U.S. Department of Energy goals. Demonstrate appropriate stewardship of publicly funded assets, yielding national benefits. Provide value to the commercial partner. Focusing on Outcomes Develop mutually beneficial collaborations through processes, which are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Technology Transfer: About the Technology Transfer Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Management About the Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Management Department The Technology Transfer Department helps move technologies from the Lab to the marketplace to benefit society and the U. S. economy. We accomplish this through developing and managing an array of partnerships with the private and public sectors. What We Do We license a wide range of cutting-edge technologies to companies that have the financial, R & D, manufacturing, marketing, and managerial capabilities to successfully commercialize Lab inventions. In addition, we manage lab-industry research partnerships, ensure that inventions receive appropriate patent or copyright protection, license technology to start-up companies, distribute royalties to the Lab and to inventors and serve as

302

Memristive Transfer Matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An electrical analysis is performed for a memristor crossbar array integrated with operational amplifiers including the effects of parasitic or contact resistances. It is shown that the memristor crossbar array can act as a transfer matrix for a multiple input-multiple output signal processing system. Special cases of the transfer matrix are described related to reconfigurable analog filters, waveform generators, analog computing, and pattern similarity. Keywords: transfer matrix, memristor, analog electronics, crossbar, operational amplifier, reconfigurable electronics

Mouttet, Blaise

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Jefferson Lab Technology Transfer  

This site's design is only visible in a graphical browser that supports web standards, but its content is accessible to any browser. Concerns? Technology Transfer.

304

NETL: Technology Transfer - DOE  

Home > Technology Transfer. ... and cheaper to design future power plants. ... we welcome the opportunity to build mutually beneficial partnerships with industry, ...

305

NREL: Technology Transfer - Contacts  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Contacts. Here you'll find contact information and resources to help answer any questions you may have about ...

306

SRNL - Technology Transfer - Ombudsman  

... complete fairness in the transfer of federally funded technologies into the marketplace for the benefit of the U.S. economy.

307

Partnerships and Technology Transfer  

Economic Development Overview. ORNL's Partnerships Staff works with a number of partners in the region, State, and across the nation to help transfer ORNL-developed ...

308

MATERIALS TRANSFER AGREEMENT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MTAXX-XXX 1 MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT for Manufacturing Demonstration Facility and Carbon Fiber Technology Facility In order for the RECIPIENT to obtain materials, the RECIPIENT...

309

Convection Heat Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Heat-Transfer Equations, Fundamentals of Modeling for Metals Processing, Vol 22A, ASM Handbook, ASM International, 2009, p 625??658...

310

Heat transfer dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As heat transfer technology increases in complexity, it becomes more difficult for those without thermal dynamics engineering training to choose between competitive heat transfer systems offered to meet their drying requirements. A step back to the basics of heat transfer can help professional managers and papermakers make informed decisions on alternative equipment and methods. The primary forms of heat and mass transfer are reviewed with emphasis on the basics, so a practical understanding of each is gained. Finally, the principles and benefits of generating infrared energy by combusting a gaseous hydrocarbon fuel are explained.

Smith, T.M. (Marsden, Inc., Pennsauken, NJ (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Facility Survey & Transfer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

312

Technology Transfer: For Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Available Technologies Licensing Berkeley Lab Technologies Partnering with Berkeley Lab Contact Us Receive Customized Tech Alerts Tech Transfer Site Map Last updated: 09172009...

313

Benchmarking of RESRAD-OFFSITE : transition from RESRAD (onsite) toRESRAD-OFFSITE and comparison of the RESRAD-OFFSITE predictions with peercodes.  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of this report is to document the benchmarking results and verification of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code as part of the quality assurance requirements of the RESRAD development program. This documentation will enable the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its licensees and other stakeholders to use the quality-assured version of the code to perform dose analysis in a risk-informed and technically defensible manner to demonstrate compliance with the NRC's License Termination Rule, Title 10, Part 20, Subpart E, of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E); DOE's 10 CFR Part 834, Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment''; and other Federal and State regulatory requirements as appropriate. The other purpose of this report is to document the differences and similarities between the RESRAD (onsite) and RESRAD-OFFSITE codes so that users (dose analysts and risk assessors) can make a smooth transition from use of the RESRAD (onsite) code to use of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code for performing both onsite and offsite dose analyses. The evolution of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code from the RESRAD (onsite) code is described in Chapter 1 to help the dose analyst and risk assessor make a smooth conceptual transition from the use of one code to that of the other. Chapter 2 provides a comparison of the predictions of RESRAD (onsite) and RESRAD-OFFSITE for an onsite exposure scenario. Chapter 3 documents the results of benchmarking RESRAD-OFFSITE's atmospheric transport and dispersion submodel against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) CAP88-PC (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) and ISCLT3 (Industrial Source Complex-Long Term) models. Chapter 4 documents the comparison results of the predictions of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code and its submodels with the predictions of peer models. This report was prepared by Argonne National Laboratory's (Argonne's) Environmental Science Division. This work is jointly sponsored by the NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health and Office of Environmental Management. The approaches and or methods described in this report are provided for information only. Use of product or trade names is for identification purposes only and does not constitute endorsement either by DOE, the NRC, or Argonne.

Yu, C.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Biwer, B.

2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

314

Standard Guide for On-Site Inspection and Verification of Operation of Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide covers procedures and test methods for conducting an on-site inspection and acceptance test of an installed domestic hot water system (DHW) using flat plate, concentrating-type collectors or tank absorber systems. 1.2 It is intended as a simple and economical acceptance test to be performed by the system installer or an independent tester to verify that critical components of the system are functioning and to acquire baseline data reflecting overall short term system heat output. 1.3 This guide is not intended to generate accurate measurements of system performance (see ASHRAE standard 95-1981 for a laboratory test) or thermal efficiency. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine th...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Statistical Software as Related to the CTBTOs On-Site Inspection Procedure  

SciTech Connect

In the event of a potential nuclear weapons test the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is commissioned to conduct an on-site investigation (OSI) of the suspected test site in an effort to find confirmatory evidence of the nuclear test. The OSI activities include collecting air, surface soil, and underground samples to search for indications of a nuclear weapons test - these indicators include radionuclides and radioactive isotopes Ar and Xe. This report investigates the capability of the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) software to contribute to the sampling activities of the CTBTO during an OSI. VSP is a statistical sampling design software, constructed under data quality objectives, which has been adapted for environmental remediation and contamination detection problems for the EPA, US Army, DoD and DHS among others. This report provides discussion of a number of VSP sample designs, which may be pertinent to the work undertaken during an OSI. Examples and descriptions of such designs include hot spot sampling, combined random and judgment sampling, multiple increment sampling, radiological transect surveying, and a brief description of other potentially applicable sampling methods. Further, this work highlights a potential need for the use of statistically based sample designs in OSI activities. The use of such designs may enable canvassing a sample area without full sampling, provide a measure of confidence that radionuclides are not present, and allow investigators to refocus resources in other areas of concern.

Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Milbrath, Brian D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Knowledge transfer frameworks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While theories abound concerning knowledge transfer in organisations, little empirical work has been undertaken to assess any possible relationship between repositories of knowledge and those responsible for the use of knowledge. This paper develops ... Keywords: hybrid approach, knowledge administration, knowledge management, knowledge storage, knowledge transfer framework

Sajjad M Jasimuddin; Nigel Connell; Jonathan H Klein

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Transfers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transfers Transfers Transfers Transfer means a change of an employee, from one Federal government branch (executive, legislative, judicial) to another or from one agency to another without a break in service of 1 full work day. Below are a few tips to better assist you when you transer agencies: If you have any dependents you must complete a standard Form 2809 during new employee orientation as this information does not transfer over automatically. You will not be able to change your coverage until open season or a life changing event occurs. At the time of new employee orientation you must provide your most recent leave and earning statement (LES) so that your leave may be updated accordingly. If you do not provide us with this document it will take approximately 6 weeks before your annual and sick leave is updated.

318

Data Transfer Examples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Data Transfer Examples » Data Transfer Examples Data Transfer Examples Moving data to Projectb Projectb is where data should be written from jobs running on the cluster or Gpints. There are intermediate files or bad results from a run that didn't work out that don't need to be saved. By running these jobs in the SCRATCH areas, these files will be deleted for you by the puge. If you run in the SANDBOX, you will have to clean up after yourselves. Batch Scheduled Transfers Use any queues to schedule jobs that move data to Projectb. A basic transfer script is here: kmfagnan@genepool12 ~ $ cat data_to_projb.sh #!/bin/bash -l #$ -N data2projb /projectb/scratch// kmfagnan@genepool12 ~ $ qsub data_to_projb.sh

319

Multinucleon transfer reactions  

SciTech Connect

The development of higher energies and better resolution in heavy-ion beams has led to a resurgence of interest in transfer reactions at energies well above the Coulomb barrier. Direct reactions with heavy ions are discussed in some detail. Heavy-ion reactions open up the possibility of new methods of spectroscopy, e.g., elastic transfer. Differential cross sections for heavy-ion ' transfer reactions are often featureless; however, some data show diffractive effects. The high angular momenta associated with recoil effects in heavy-ion reactions can be exploited to perform selective spectroscopy on light nuclei. Although most heavy-iontransfer data suggest that reactions proceed in a direct fashion, recent experiments indicate the presence of second-order multistep processes. Correlated nucleon transfer and transfer of many nucleons (e.g., (12C, alpha )) are also being investigated. (20 figures, 3 tables, 93 references) (RWR)

Scott, D.K.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

USING A RISK-BASED METHODOLOGY FOR THE TRANSFER OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL WITHIN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BOUNDARY  

SciTech Connect

Shipment of radioactive materials (RAM) is discussed in the Code of Federal Regulations in parts of both 49 CFR and 10 CFR. The regulations provide the requirements and rules necessary for the safe shipment of RAM across public highways, railways, waterways, and through the air. These shipments are sometimes referred to as in-commerce shipments. Shipments of RAM entirely within the boundaries of Department of Energy sites, such as the Savannah River Site (SRS), can be made using methodology allowing provisions to maintain equivalent safety while deviating from the regulations for in-commerce shipments. These onsite shipments are known as transfers at the SRS. These transfers must follow the requirements approved in a site-specific Transportation Safety Document (TSD). The TSD defines how the site will transfer materials so that they have equivalence to the regulations. These equivalences are documented in an Onsite Safety Assessment (OSA). The OSA can show how a particular packaging used onsite is equivalent to that which would be used for an in-commerce shipment. This is known as a deterministic approach. However, when a deterministic approach is not viable, the TSD allows for a risk-based OSA to be written. These risk-based assessments show that if a packaging does not provide the necessary safety to ensure that materials are not released (during normal or accident conditions) then the worst-case release of materials does not result in a dose consequence worse than that defined for the SRS. This paper will discuss recent challenges and successes using this methodology at the SRS.

Loftin, B.; Watkins, R.; Loibl, M.

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Interim On-Site Storage of Low-Level Waste: Volume 4, Part 3: Waste Container Closures, Seals, and Gas Vents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume of the Interim On-Site Storage report series supplements Volume 4, Part 1, which includes an extensive methodology and detailed information on the types and availability of low-level waste (LLW) containers and container coatings for extended storage. Part 2, soon to be published, addresses monitoring and inspection requirements for stored LLW containers. Part 3 continues the series by providing detailed guidance on container closures, seals, and gas vents, including performance goals and key ...

1993-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

322

Interim On-Site Storage of Low-Level Waste: Volume 3, Part 2: User's Manual and Lotus Spreadsheet for Estimating LLW Volumes and Act ivities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume of the "Interim On-Site Storage" report series supplements Volume 3, Part 1, "Waste Volume Projections and Data Management." Because that volume includes an extensive methodology and a number of worksheets requiring many calculations, users requested a computer program for easily storing, managing, and manipulating applicable data. Volume 3, Part 2 consists of a user's manual and a Lotus spreadsheet macro to meet this utility need.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Technology transfer 1994  

SciTech Connect

This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The non-proliferation experiment and gas sampling as an on-site inspection activity: A progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Non-proliferation Experiment (NPE) is contributing to the development of gas sampling methods and models that may be incorporated into future on-site inspection (OSI) activities. Surface gas sampling and analysis, motivated by nuclear test containment studies, have already demonstrated the tendency for the gaseous products of an underground nuclear test to flow hundreds of meters to the surface over periods ranging from days to months. Even in the presence of a uniform sinusoidal pressure variation, there will be a net flow of cavity gas toward the surface. To test this barometric pumping effect at Rainier Mesa, gas bottles containing sulfur hexaflouride and {sup 3}He were added to the pre-detonation cavity for the 1 kt chemical explosives test. Pre-detonation measurements of the background levels of both gases were obtained at selected sites on top of the mesa. The background levels of both tracers were found to be at or below mass spectrographic/gas chromatographic sensitivity thresholds in the parts-per-trillion range. Post-detonation, gas chromatographic analyses of samples taken during barometric pressure lows from the sampling sites on the mesa indicate the presence of significant levels (300--600 ppt) of sulfur hexaflouride. However, mass spectrographic analyses of gas samples taken to date do not show the presence of {sup 3}He. To explain these observations, several possibilities are being explored through additional sampling/analysis and numerical modeling. For the NPE, the detonation point was approximately 400 m beneath the surface of Rainier Mesa and the event did not produce significant fracturing or subsidence on the surface of the mesa. Thus, the NPE may ultimately represent an extreme, but useful example for the application and tuning of cavity gas detection techniques.

Carrigan, C.R.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Technology Transfer Summit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agenda as of April 9, 2012 Agenda as of April 9, 2012 Technology Transfer Summit April 16, 2012 IMC - Trinity Ballroom 4 8:00 - 8:10 Welcome & Introduction Pete Tseronis, DOE Chief Technology Officer 8:10 - 8:50 Accelerating Transfer Within an Innovation Ecosystem Debra M. Amidon, Founder and Chief Strategist, ENTOVATION International, and Author, The Innovation SuperHighway 8:50 - 9:20 Tech Transfer - Predicaments, Perplexities, and Possible Panaceas Rex Northen, Executive Director, Cleantech Open 9:20 - 9:50 A Systems Approach to Innovation Mike Schwenk, Vice President and Director Technology Deployment and Outreach, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) 9:50 - 10:15 DOE's Online Tech Transfer Ecosystem - aka...Stop Building Moai! Robert Bectel, Senior Policy Advisor / Chief Technology Officer

326

VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM (Eligible employees are listed at the end of this narrative) Under the Voluntary Leave Transfer Program you can apply, based on a medical emergency, to receive annual leave donated by other employees. A medical emergency is generally defined as a medical condition of the employee or family member that is likely to keep you (the employee) away from work and cause a loss of pay of at least 24 hours. You are required to submit an Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Form 630, Application to Become A Leave Recipient Under the Voluntary Leave Transfer Program, through your supervisor to be considered for the program. The application must include an explanation of the reason the donation is needed (including a brief description of the

327

Technology Transfer: Success Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory masthead A-Z Index Berkeley Lab masthead U.S. Department of Energy logo Phone Book Jobs Search Tech Transfer Tech Index For Industry For...

328

Multiscale photosynthetic exciton transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photosynthetic light harvesting provides a natural blueprint for bioengineered and biomimetic solar energy and light detection technologies. Recent evidence suggests some individual light harvesting protein complexes (LHCs) and LHC subunits efficiently transfer excitons towards chemical reaction centers (RCs) via an interplay between excitonic quantum coherence, resonant protein vibrations, and thermal decoherence. The role of coherence in vivo is unclear however, where excitons are transferred through multi-LHC/RC aggregates over distances typically large compared with intra-LHC scales. Here we assess the possibility of long-range coherent transfer in a simple chromophore network with disordered site and transfer coupling energies. Through renormalization we find that, surprisingly, decoherence is diminished at larger scales, and long-range coherence is facilitated by chromophoric clustering. Conversely, static disorder in the site energies grows with length scale, forcing localization. Our results suggest s...

Ringsmuth, A K; Stace, T M; 10.1038/nphys2332

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Transfer reactions at ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transfer reactions before, and with, HELIOS Or - "...seems like an awful lot of work just to do (d,p)..." Congratulations ATLAS Happy 25 th Prologue: Long before ATLAS... 11...

330

NREL: Technology Transfer - Ombuds - National Renewable Energy ...  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Technology Transfer Ombuds. NREL's Technology Transfer Ombuds offers an informal process to ...

331

ITL Staff Members Receive Tech Transfer Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ITL Staff Members Receive Tech Transfer Award. ... Regional "Excellence in Technology Transfer" Award for ... the process of transferring a technology ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

Technology Transfer Awards 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's 2012 Technology Transfer Awards recognize the leaders and the innovators who have transferred research into applied results. The 2012 award winners have shown exceptional application of EPRI research and technology to solve a problem of size and significance, to champion a technology both within their companies and across the industry, to drive progress in the electricity sector, and to provide meaningful benefits for stakeholders and for society.

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

333

Jefferson Lab Technology Transfer - JLab  

What is Technology Transfer at Jefferson Lab? The transfer of technology (intellectual property) developed at JLab to the private sector is an important element of ...

334

Multiscale photosynthetic exciton transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photosynthetic light harvesting provides a natural blueprint for bioengineered and biomimetic solar energy and light detection technologies. Recent evidence suggests some individual light harvesting protein complexes (LHCs) and LHC subunits efficiently transfer excitons towards chemical reaction centers (RCs) via an interplay between excitonic quantum coherence, resonant protein vibrations, and thermal decoherence. The role of coherence in vivo is unclear however, where excitons are transferred through multi-LHC/RC aggregates over distances typically large compared with intra-LHC scales. Here we assess the possibility of long-range coherent transfer in a simple chromophore network with disordered site and transfer coupling energies. Through renormalization we find that, surprisingly, decoherence is diminished at larger scales, and long-range coherence is facilitated by chromophoric clustering. Conversely, static disorder in the site energies grows with length scale, forcing localization. Our results suggest sustained coherent exciton transfer may be possible over distances large compared with nearest-neighbour (n-n) chromophore separations, at physiological temperatures, in a clustered network with small static disorder. This may support findings suggesting long-range coherence in algal chloroplasts, and provides a framework for engineering large chromophore or quantum dot high-temperature exciton transfer networks.

A. K. Ringsmuth; G. J. Milburn; T. M. Stace

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

335

Table 11.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 75,652 21 5,666 347 80,993 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 16,620 0 3,494 142 19,972 311221 Wet Corn Milling 7,481 0 3,213 14 10,680 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1,264 0 1,382 109 2,537 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 9,258 0 336 66 9,528 3115 Dairy Products 9,585 2 38 22 9,602 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 20,121 15 19 0 20,155 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

336

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Performance Computer Clusters High-Performance Computer Clusters High-performance computing infrastructure and partnerships with regional science consortiums allow NETL scientists to determine a wide range of physical and chemical properties – from nanoscale molecular studies to the feasibility of commercial-scale power plants. Computer modeling provides answers where actual experimental data would be difficult and costly to obtain. For example, computer models simulating a proposed coal-based transport gasifier plant are helping to address scale-up design and performance issues before the plant becomes operational. Computational chemistry analysis allows for the screening of specific materials for specific purposes, such as future hydrogen production. Three computer clusters (256-CPU, 232-CPU and 128-CPU) at NETL compare to supercomputers listed in the top 500 in the world.

337

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reciprocating Engine Laboratory Reciprocating Engine Laboratory NETL's reciprocating engine laboratory focuses on research to enable high efficiency, cleaner burning engines for America 's future. Some of the laboratory's activities are development of laser spark ignition systems, hydrogen engine operation, partial oxidation engine operation, and diesel engine particulate studies. Researchers in NETL's Office of Science and Engineering Research investigate end-use applications for hydrogen fuel in reciprocating engines, as well as gas turbines and fuel cell technologies in support of DOE's goal to develop strategies for reduced carbon emissions. The use of hydrogen in reciprocating engines also offers the potential for substantial reductions in NO x emissions and provides a platform for power generation from future coal-derived hydrogen fuels.

338

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manometric Sorption Test Facility Manometric Sorption Test Facility One of today's pressing issues associated with fossil fuel consumption is how to curb greenhouse gas emissions, chiefly CO2. NETL research focuses on ways to capture CO2 from power plant fuel streams and flue stack emissions, and safely store (or sequester) it into geological formations such as coal bed strata , natural gas fields, or saline formations. NETL's Manometric Sorption Test Facility aids these efforts by applying elevated temperature (from 55ºC to 300ºC) and pressure (up to 3,000 psig) to coal samples. Under these conditions, researchers study changes to the CO2 or other fluids being absorbed or adsorbed by the sample, all with a precision of 0.1 psi. In this manner, the sorbent capacity of a particular coal sample can be calculated and its usefulness for future carbon sequestration can be gauged.

339

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal By-Products Laboratories Coal By-Products Laboratories As part of NETL's focus on clean fossil power systems, the Coal By-products Laboratories are dedicated to resolving environmental issues associated with residues and by-products from coal combustion. These facilities provide valuable data about Coal Utilization By-products (CUB) from both conventional and advanced power plants. Data from these laboratories are able to show improvements inherent in new combustion technologies compared to conventional plants, with respect to the nature of combustion residues and CUBs. Under current practice, power plant operators collect residues and safely dispose of them or recover them for sale and re-use. Developing more effective procedures for using and disposing of these materials requires accurate information on the potential for these materials to leach into soil after disposal, and the chemical and physical characteristics of the residues. The data NETL has collected through this research has provided important science that supports regulatory decisions related to CUB.

340

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geomechanics and Flow Laboratory Geomechanics and Flow Laboratory NETL's Geomechanics and Flow Laboratory is a multi-functional, state-of-the-art facility that performs a wide spectrum of geological studies and provides an experimental basis for modeling of various subsurface phenomena and processes. This includes, but is not limited to: long term (months or even years) exposure of geological samples to specific conditions (for example, CO2 saturation of samples at elevated pressure and temperature); and the study of various geomechanical properties and behavior of fluids in the samples, including fluid-solid and fluid-fluid physical and chemical interactions. The laboratory has a wide range of tools and instruments to ensure a complete cycle of scientific studies: from preparation of representative samples, through the preliminary measurements of basic properties, to the advanced investigation of the processes of interest under simulated subsurface conditions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory NETL's Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory uses optical diagnostic techniques to improve combustion processes including those for advanced gas turbine engines. Highly efficient combustion of fossil fuels is essential to achieving clean power generation, a national strategic goal. Since many power plants use gas turbines to generate electricity, the next generation of gas turbines must be capable of satisfying increasingly stringent emissions requirements. In addition, properties of natural gas vary based on geographical location, and fuel supplies may be piped to a facility from a number of locations. Therefore, the engine must be able to compensate for variations in fuel properties that would otherwise cause it to produce excessively high levels of regulated emissions. The use of laser diagnostics is an excellent mechanism to study fluid mechanics and combustion processes in place, while avoiding unwanted disturbances to the system being studied. Researchers seek to isolate particular phenomena that contribute to fluctuations in heat release, by studying combustion flows in simplified systems that are smaller than commercial-sized units but that have similar combustion processes and characteristics.

342

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamental Combustion Laboratory Fundamental Combustion Laboratory To help meet a national strategic commitment to clean power generation, NETL is developing a technology base for tomorrow's highly efficient, near-zero-emissions power plants. At NETL, combustion science research is helping to provide the basis for a new generation of advanced fossil fuel conversion technologies that are needed to meet future demands for efficient, clean, and cost-effective energy production. Combustion science researchers are able to study fundamental combustion processes and properties at a laboratory scale, using advanced laser-based systems. Researchers also use a natural gas combustion apparatus that has been adapted to study a variety of fuel types and power systems. Taking this fundamental research the next step, researchers find that, when applied to reciprocating engines, laser-induced spark ignition can achieve leaner air/fuel running conditions by significantly lowering combustion temperatures, which reduces the amount of pollutants produced such as NOx.

343

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Autoclave Test Facility Autoclave Test Facility To help meet a national strategic commitment to clean power generation, NETL is developing a technology base for tomorrow's highly efficient, near-zero-emissions power plants. Environmental and geosciences researchers perform laboratory-scale studies of solid, liquid, and gaseous flows and their interactions. These studies may be performed, for example, to determine the suitability of flue gases for capture and storage (sequestration) in industrial wastes after release from coal fired power plants. NETL has available a wide range of analytical and diagnostic instrumentation to support these studies. Half-liter and one-liter continuously stirred autoclave reactors are ideal for investigations involving gas/liquid or gas/slurry interactions, and are equipped with CO2, SO2, and flue gas feed lines. Each of these units is manufactured by Progressive Equipment Corporation and has a pressure rating of 6,000 psig @ 650ºF. The one-liter reactor is equipped with a high-pressure pH meter capable of measurement at pressures of up to 900 psi, and is configured with an in-situ pH meter. A simplified schematic representation of the one-liter reactor apparatus is shown below.

344

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Separation Facilities Hydrogen Separation Facilities NETL is working to help produce and deliver hydrogen from fossil fuels including coal in commercially applicable, environmentally acceptable ways. To achieve this strategic national goal, advanced hydrogen separation technologies are needed to supply tomorrow's energy and transportation systems with affordable hydrogen fuel. NETL's Hydrogen Separation Group investigates, evaluates, and develops hydrogen separation membranes and materials. Researchers are focused on developing stable and robust membranes that are suitable for the rapid, selective removal of hydrogen from mixed gas streams. These membranes also must be resistant to chemical impurities such as sulfur, an abundant component of coal and a key feedstock for producing hydrogen.

345

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluidization Research: Multiphase Flow/Gas-Solid Transport Laboratory Fluidization Research: Multiphase Flow/Gas-Solid Transport Laboratory NETL's research, development, and demonstration initiatives are leading to improved operations of coal-based power systems, and future power supplies that are environmentally clean and economically affordable. One method NETL researchers are using is advanced computational and experimental research, which is helping to develop novel technologies, including transport gasifiers, circulating fluidized-bed combustors, and hot gas desulfurization. Enhanced computational capabilities are leading to major improvements in power plant efficiency, and therefore to reduced emissions. Transport gasifier and MFIX showing particle trajectories and oxygen concentration. MFIX simulations complement testing and development at the DOE demonstration Power System Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama (shown above). Coal and recycled materials feed into the lower mixing zone of the plant's circulating fluidized-bed. The validated simulation model is currently being used to design a commercial-scale unit.

346

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbent and Catalyst Preparation Facilities Sorbent and Catalyst Preparation Facilities NETL researchers are seeking technical solutions to pressing problems related to fossil fuel extraction, processing, and utilization. To this end, laboratory-scale facilities are used to prepare, test, and analyze sorbents and catalysts used in fixed-, moving-, and fluid-bed reactors — three types of reactors often used in advanced fossil-fueled power plants. Equipment in these facilities is also available for standard American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) attrition tests, crush measurements, and particle size analysis to confirm the suitability of the sorbents and catalysts for their intended applications. NETL researchers use these facilities in conjunction with facilities for sorbent/catalyst bench-scale testing and for in-situ (in-place) reaction studies. In 2000, NETL received an R&D 100 Award for its RSV-1 Regenerable Desulfurization Sorbent. The process for preparation of this sorbent has been patented, licensed, and published.

347

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy System Dynamics Division - The Hybrid Performance Facility Energy System Dynamics Division - The Hybrid Performance Facility The Hybrid Performance Facility — called the Hyper facility — is now fully operational at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This one-of-a-kind facility, developed by NETL's Office of Science and Technology, will be used to develop control strategies for the reliable operation of fuel cell/turbine hybrids. - NETL's Fuel Cell/Turbine Hybrid Facility - The Hyper facility allows assessment of dynamic control and performance issues in fuel cell/turbine hybrid systems. Combined systems of turbines and fuel cells are expected to meet power efficiency targets that will help eliminate, at competitive costs, environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels for

348

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device Scale Modeling Device Scale Modeling Device Scale Modeling (DSM) at NETL is helping to overcome technical barriers associated with developing next-generation fossil energy technologies and processes. This research facility uses state-of-the-art, high-speed computing resources to verify computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models used to study coal gasifiers, gas turbine combustors, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems, and liquefied natural gas plumes, as well as mercury capture technologies. DSM research is helping to move advanced visualization and high-performance computing models from researchers' computer screens to actual laboratory experiments and pilot testing. The DSM group develops models that can be integrated into a wide range of simulation technology, including Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) and Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges (MFIX). These simulators are enabling researchers to model and understand the behavior of individual components within advanced power generation systems.

349

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluid-Bed Gasifier/Modular Gas Cleanup Rig Fluid-Bed Gasifier/Modular Gas Cleanup Rig NETL is developing a technology base for tomorrow's highly efficient, near-zero-emissions power plants including FutureGen. One of the promising technologies NETL is pursuing is advanced fluidized-bed combustion (FBC). Pressurized FBC (PFBC) systems use a mixture of burning coal, a sorbent such as limestone or dolomite, and jets of air to produce a high-pressure gas stream at temperatures that can drive a gas turbine. Steam generated from the heat in the fluidized bed may be sent to a steam turbine, creating a highly efficient combined-cycle system. Removing and recovering particulates and contaminants from the gas and steam are accomplished in treatment vessels once combustion has occurred. PFBC may also play a role in hydrogen fuel production.

350

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Pressure Combustion Facility High-Pressure Combustion Facility NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Facility is a unique resource within the National Laboratories system. It provides the fuel test capabilities needed to evaluate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion concepts that will be required in order to meet national goals for the FutureGen initiative. FutureGen-type power systems will require gas turbine combustion systems capable of burning hydrogen or hydrogen-rich fuels with high efficiency and with low nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions of 2 parts per million by volume (ppmv) or less. NETL's researchers are developing alternative methods, sensors, and control capabilities necessary to reach stable combustion under demanding conditions and thereby meet these emissions targets.

351

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ensures optimal power plant performance by matching physical properties and reaction rates in both types of models. APECS is playing a key role in the design of FutureGen, an...

352

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in freshwater and saltwater environments. Understanding the physical, chemical, and thermodynamic characteristics of CO2 in such environments is necessary in order to develop...

353

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Methane to Higher Hydrocarbons, U.S. Patent No. 5177294, Jan. 1993. Licenses: Sud Chemie, Inc. (formerly United Catalysts, Inc. UCI) - A license was signed with UCI to...

354

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

phase Cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer analyzes spent sorbent Operating temperature: ambient to 750F For more information, contact Evan Granite Evan Granite in Lab...

355

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to cutting edge technologies, including CO2 storage and energy-efficient fossil fuel utilization. It operates in conjunction with facilities for sorbentcatalyst bench-scale...

356

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technique also has been shown effective in enhancing oil recovery and displacing coal bed methane. The CT Scanner Laboratory provides imaging data that can be used for computer...

357

On-Site Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the Boulder Laboratories Employees Association ... a variety of health services including emergency ... emergency ambulance service; administration of ...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

358

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tomorrow's systems to perform with near-zero emissions. Highly efficient combustion of fossil fuels is essential to achieving clean power generation, a national strategic goal....

359

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

using analytical instruments to study in-situ (in-place) reactions of solid and gaseous fossil fuels such as coal and coal derivatives. These studies are important to developing...

360

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and military applications. Researchers can evaluate alternative solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technologies with respect to energy output and efficiency. A range of system-level...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

There, scientists investigate theoretical and fundamental phenomena in support of fossil fuel program requirements and advanced technology development. Researchers use these...

362

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

used to demonstrate visualization capabilities at conferences. The system consists of a passive stereo screen that is six-feet wide and four-feet high. The screen and frame are...

363

NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL's Hydrogen-Powered Bus Serves ...  

... up at NRELs on-site hydrogen fueling station, which dispenses some of the greenest hydrogen in the world made using wind and solar energy.

364

NREL: Technology Transfer - Webmaster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webmaster Webmaster To report any problems on or ask a question about the NREL Technology Transfer Web site, you may contact the Webmaster using the online form below. If you have a question or concern that's not related to this Web site, please see our list of contacts for assistance. To contact the Webmaster, please provide your name, e-mail address, and message below. When you are finished, click "Send Message." NOTE: If you enter your e-mail address incorrectly, we will be unable to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements Research Facilities Commercialization Programs Success Stories News

365

NREL: Technology Transfer - Ombuds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Ombuds Technology Transfer Ombuds NREL's Technology Transfer Ombuds offers an informal process to help resolve issues and concerns regarding the laboratory's technology partnership, patent, and licensing activities. As a designated neutral party, our ombuds provides confidential, resolution-focused services. Through the ombuds process, we encourage collaborative techniques such as mediation to facilitate the speedy and low-cost resolution of complaints and disputes, when appropriate. The NREL Ombuds does not: Handle contract negotiation or other legal issues Act as a decision maker or draw conclusions Investigate or make formal recommendations on findings of fact. The ombuds also does not replace, override, or influence formal review or appeal mechanisms, or serve as an intermediary when legal action is

366

Partnerships and Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Cooperative Research and Development Agreement visualization scientist A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is a mechanism whereby non-federal entities (industry, universities, non-profits, etc.) can collaborate with federal laboratories on research and development projects. CRADAs are specifically technology transfer agreements; technologies developed under CRADAs are expected to be transferred to the private sector for commercial exploitation, either by the non-federal partner or another licensee of such technologies. CRADAs were authorized by the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-480); the authority for government-owned, contractor-operated laboratories such as ORNL to enter into CRADAs was granted by the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989

367

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software and Information Technologies Software and Information Technologies Algorithm for Correcting Detector Nonlinearites Chatelet: More Accurate Modeling for Oil, Gas or Geothermal Well Production Collective Memory Transfers for Multi-Core Processors Energy Efficiency Software EnergyPlus:Energy Simulation Software for Buildings Tools, Guides and Software to Support the Design and Operation of Energy Efficient Buildings Flexible Bandwidth Reservations for Data Transfer Genomic and Proteomic Software LABELIT - Software for Macromolecular Diffraction Data Processing PHENIX - Software for Computational Crystallography Vista/AVID: Visualization and Allignment Software for Comparative Genomics Geophysical Software Accurate Identification, Imaging, and Monitoring of Fluid Saturated Underground Reservoirs

368

Applied heat transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat transfer principles are discussed with emphasis on the practical aspects of the problems. Correlations for heat transfer and pressure drop from several worldwide sources for flow inside and outside of tubes, including finned tubes are presented, along with design and performance calculations of heat exchangers economizers, air heaters, condensers, waste-heat boilers, fired heaters, superheaters, and boiler furnaces. Vibration analysis for tube bundles and heat exchangers are also discussed, as are estimating gas-mixture properties at atmospheric and elevated pressures and life-cycle costing techniques. (JMT)

Ganapathy, V.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Technology transfer issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testimony by Lawrence J. Brady, Commerce Assistant Secretary for Trade Administration, at Congressional hearings on the national security issues of technology transfers to the Soviet Union identified steps the US needs to take to deal effectively with the problem. These steps include an understanding of how the Soviet Union has and will benefit militarily by acquiring Western technology and efforts to work with other countries, counterintelligence agencies, and industries to stem the flow of technological information. Brady outlined changes in technology development that complicate the enforcement of transfer rules, and emphasized the importance of a close relationship between the business community and the Commerce Department. (DCK)

Jacobson, C.

1982-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Table N13.3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" 3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,," " " "," ","Total of",,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

371

SRNL - Technology Transfer - Ombudsman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ombudsman Ombudsman Ombudsman Program Policy The Department of Energy and its management and operating contractors (M & O Contractors) engaging in technology partnership activities, share a mutual objective to ensure complete fairness in the transfer of federally funded technologies into the marketplace for the benefit of the U.S. economy. This includes an interest in open lines of communication and the early identification of issues, complaints and disputes between contractors and their existing or potential partners. The Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program provides an independent point of contact for concerns about technology transfer i SRS Sign ssues, complaints and disputes. The mission of the Ombudsman Program is to elevate to the appropriate SRNS officials the information needed to identify and resolve problems thereby improving satisfaction with SRNS practices and reducing the occasion for formal disputes and litigation. The Ombudsman will not be involved in the merits of cases that are the subject of ongoing dispute resolution or litigation, or investigation incidents thereto. The Ombudsman is not established to be a super-administrator, re-doing what specialized officials have already done. Rather, the Ombudsman is to ensure that appropriate SRNS officials consider all pertinent information when deciding the company's position on a technology transfer complaint. To request forms or acquire additional information contact: Michael Wamstad, 803-725-3751 or mike.wamstad@srs.gov.

372

FACILITY SURVEY & TRANSFER Facility Survey & Transfer Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SURVEY & TRANSFER SURVEY & TRANSFER Facility Survey & Transfer Overview Transfer Activities Checklist Pre-Survey Information Request Survey Report Content Detailed Walkdown Checklist Walkdown Checklist Clipboard Aids S & M Checklist Survey Report Example - Hot Storage Garden Survey Report Example - Tritium System Test Assembly Survey Report Example - Calutron Overview As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning. Requirements and guidance for such transfers are contained in:  DOE Order 430.1B Chg. 2, REAL PROPERTY & ASSET MANAGEMENT  DOE Guide 430.1-5, TRANSITION IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE The transfer process is illustrated in the Transfer Process figure. The purpose here is to provide examples of methods and

373

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials Regulations

374

Technology Transfer: Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map About Us About Technology Transfer Contact Us Available Technologies Advanced Materials Biofuels Biotechnology and Medicine Developing World Energy Environmental Technologies Imaging and Lasers Ion Sources and Beam Technologies Nanotechnology and Microtechnology Software and Information Technology For Industry Licensing Overview Frequently Asked Questions Partnering with Berkeley Lab Licensing Interest Form Receive New Tech Alerts For Researchers What You Need to Know and Do The Tech Transfer Process Forms Record of Invention (Word doc -- please do not use earlier PDF version of the form) Software Disclosure and Abstract (PDF, use Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader 9 and up ONLY to complete the form) Policies Conflict of Interest Outside Empolyment Export Control FAQs for Researchers

375

Technology Transfer Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Oil & Gas Technology Transfer Initiatives USEFUL LINKS Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) FLC Technology Locator Feedback Contact us about Tech Transfer: Mary.McManmon@science.doe.gov Mary McManmon, 202-586-3509 link to Adobe PDF Reader link to Adobe Flash player Reports Navigate Home About Us Contact Information Hide Thumbs First Previous Pause Next Last Set Speed Slideshow speed: 5 seconds Move Autoinduction system New Image Set Autoinduction Autoinduction System The award winning Overnight Express(tm) Autoinduction System developed at BNL simplifies protein production in the widely used T7 gene expression system. Decontamination Foam-based decontamination

376

NREL: Technology Transfer - Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Events February 2014 NASEO Energy Outlook Conference February 4 - 7, 2014 Washington , DC Add to calendar Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements Research Facilities Commercialization Programs Success Stories News Contacts Did you find what you needed? Yes 1 No 0 Thank you for your feedback. Would you like to take a moment to tell us how we can improve this page? Submit We value your feedback. Thanks! We've received your feedback. Something went wrong. Please try again later. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC

377

Efficient Data Transfer Protocols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient Efficient Data Transfer Protocols for Big Data Brian Tierney ∗ , Ezra Kissel † , Martin Swany † , Eric Pouyoul ∗ ∗ Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94270 † School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 Abstract-Data set sizes are growing exponentially, so it is important to use data movement protocols that are the most efficient available. Most data movement tools today rely on TCP over sockets, which limits flows to around 20Gbps on today's hardware. RDMA over Converged Ethernet (RoCE) is a promising new technology for high-performance network data movement with minimal CPU impact over circuit-based infrastructures. We compare the performance of TCP, UDP, UDT, and RoCE over high latency 10Gbps and 40Gbps network paths, and show that RoCE-based data transfers can fill a 40Gbps path using much less CPU than other protocols.

378

Advanced Technology and Knowledge Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on a specific food and agribusiness industry project, employing new technological capabilities to better transfer expert knowledge. Knowledge transfer and technical support are key components of this project. VisIT, which stands for ...

Geetanjali Tandon; Steven T. Sonka

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

NREL: Technology Transfer - Licensing Agreements  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Licensing Agreements. Through licensing agreements, NREL provides industry with an opportunity to ...

380

Heat Transfer Fluids Containing Nanoparticles  

commercial and industrial heat-transfer applications. ... Refrigeration and other cooling systems Nuclear reactors Aerospace Defense Grinding and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Argonne TDC: Material Transfer Agreements  

Material Transfer Agreements. Materials produced by researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are often of interest to the private sector.

382

LANL | Partnering | Material Transfer Agreement  

Contacts Event Calendar Maps Organization Phonebook Policy Center Emergency. NEWS. LIBRARY. JOBS. Technology Transfer, TT . Division Home; About Us; ...

383

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 W 0 0 0 0 W 327410 Lime 4 0 W 0 4 0 0 W 327420 Gypsum 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 327993 Mineral Wool 9 0 W W 4 0 0 W 331 Primary Metals 299 W 5 59 64 35 30 153 331111 Iron and Steel Mills...

384

Microsoft Word - QA NAICS Code 15Jan09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

provides a general description of the services as follows: "The personnel security program work involves numerous and varied personnel security access authorization...

385

Technology Transfer Reporting Form | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Transfer Reporting Form Technology Transfer Reporting Form Technology Transfer Reporting Form More Documents & Publications DOE F 3230.6A Technology Partnership...

386

Tech Transfer Summit Agenda | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tech Transfer Summit Agenda Tech Transfer Summit Agenda Tech Transfer Technology Summit Agenda 4.9.12.pdf More Documents & Publications Risk Management II Summit Agenda Special...

387

HIGEE Mass Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distillation, absorption, and gas stripping have traditionally been performed in tall columns utilizing trays or packing. Columns perform satisfactorily, but have characteristics which may be disadvantages in some applications: Large size, particularly height; high weight; high cost of installation; difficulty in modularization; foaming for certain systems; must be vertical, especially for trayed towers; large liquid inventory; difficulty in modifying column internals once installed; start up time to reach steady state conditions in excessive. Many of these disadvantages can be overcome by use of HIGEE, an innovative vapor-liquid mass transfer system which utilizes a rotating bed of packing to achieve high efficiency separations, and consequent reduction in size and weight.

Mohr, R. J.; Fowler, R.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Manipulator mounted transfer platform  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a transfer platform for the conveyance of objects by a manipulator includes a bed frame and saddle clamp secured along an edge of the bed fame and adapted so as to secure the bed frame to a horizontal crosspiece of the manipulator. The platform may thus move with the manipulator in a reciprocal linear path defined by a guide rail. A bed insert may be provided for the support of conveyed objects and a lifting bail may be provided to permit the manipulator arm to install the bed frame upon the crosspiece under remote control. 5 figs.

Dobbins, J.C.; Hoover, M.A.; May, K.W.; Ross, M.J.

1988-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

389

Manipulator mounted transfer platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A transfer platform for the conveyance of objects by a manipulator includes a bed frame and saddle clamp secured along an edge of the bed frame and adapted so as to secure the bed frame to a horizontal crosspiece of the manipulator. The platform may thus move with the manipulator in a reciprocal linear path defined by a guide rail. A bed insert may be provided for the support of conveyed objects and a lifting bail may be provided to permit the manipulator arm to install the bed frame upon the crosspiece under remote control.

Dobbins, James C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hoover, Mark A. (Idaho Falls, ID); May, Kay W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ross, Maurice J. (Pocatello, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Manipulator mounted transfer platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The patent describes in a manipulator system for use in hazardous environments including a manipulator adapted for reciprocal movement upon a guide device, a transfer platform. It comprises: a bed frame defining a generally horizontal bed projecting outwardly from the manipulator; and frame mounting means securing the bed frame to the manipulator in a generally cantilevered fashion, thereby essentially minimizing the structure necessary to support the platform outwardly of the manipulator while enhancing operator visibility of the platform and the manipulator during use of the manipulator system.

Dobbins, J.C.; Hoover, M.A.; May, K.W.; Ross, M.J.

1990-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

391

Interline transfer CCD camera  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An interline CCD sensing device for use in a camera system, includes an imaging area sensitive to impinging light, for generating charges corresponding to the intensity of the impinging light. Sixteen independent registers R1 - R16 sequentially receive the interline data from the imaging area, corresponding to the generated charges. Sixteen output amplifiers S1 - S16 and sixteen ports P1 - P16 for sequentially transferring the interline data, one pixel at a time, in order to supply a desired image transfer speed. The imaging area is segmented into sixteen independent imaging segments A1 - A16, each of which corresponds to one register, on output amplifier, and one output port. Each one of the imaging segments A1 - A16 includes an array of rows and columns of pixels. Each pixel includes a photogate area, an interline CCD channel area, and an anti-blooming area. The anti-blooming area is, in turn, divided into an anti-blooming barrier and an anti-blooming drain.

Prokop, M.S.; McCurnin, T.W.; Stump, C.J.; Stradling, G.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Polarization transfer NMR imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

Sillerud, Laurel O. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

About Technology Transfer - National Renewable Energy ...  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer About Technology Transfer. Through technology partnerships, NREL seeks to reduce private sector risk and ...

394

Heat transfer. [heat transfer roller employing a heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A heat transfer roller embodying a heat pipe is disclosed. The heat pipe is mounted on a shaft, and the shaft is adapted for rotation on its axis.

Sarcia, D.S.

1978-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

Prospects for Money Transfer Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, in order to explore the mechanism behind wealth or income distribution, several models have been proposed by applying principles of statistical mechanics. These models share some characteristics, such as consisting of a group of individual agents, a pile of money and a specific trading rule. Whatever the trading rule is, the most noteworthy fact is that money is always transferred from one agent to another in the transferring process. So we call them money transfer models. Besides explaining income and wealth distributions, money transfer models can also be applied to other disciplines. In this paper we summarize these areas as statistical distribution, economic mobility, transfer rate and money creation. First, money distribution (or income distribution) can be exhibited by recording the money stock (flow). Second, the economic mobility can be shown by tracing the change in wealth or income over time for each agent. Third, the transfer rate of money and its determinants can be analyzed by tracing t...

Wang, Y; Xi, N; Wang, Yougui; Ding, Ning; Xi, Ning

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Frame Heat Transfer Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools Arild Gustavsen 1,* , Dariush Arasteh 2 , Bjørn Petter Jelle 3,4 , Charlie Curcija 5 and Christian Kohler 2 1 Department of Architectural Design, History and Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Alfred Getz vei 3, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway 2 Windows and Daylighting Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road Mail Stop 90R3111, Berkeley, CA 94720- 8134, USA 3 Department of Civil and Transport Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Høgskoleringen 7A, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway 4 Department of Building Materials and Structures, SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, Høgskoleringen 7B,NO-7465 Trondheim, Norway

397

Technology Transfer Reporting Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

form is to be completed by the TTO for individual inquiry/case activity during the quarter as required form is to be completed by the TTO for individual inquiry/case activity during the quarter as required by the Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000. Mouse over definitions and descriptions appear over text/check boxes where appropriate. After completing this form, click on the submit button. *If you have no TTO activity for the quarter, please fill in your name, FY and quarter, lab or facility and check the box "No Quarterly Activity". Initial Ombuds Contact: ____________________ Type: Inquiry Case Ombuds Name: __________________________ Time Spent: (Hours) ______________ Final Ombuds Involvement: _________________ Laboratory or Facility: AMES ANL BNL LBNL INL KCP LANL NREL LLNL NBL NETL PNNL NNSS ORNL PXSO SRNL

398

NREL: Technology Transfer - Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts Here you'll find contact information and resources to help answer any questions you may have about NREL's technology transfer and commercialization opportunities. Agreement for Commercializing Technology For more information about NREL's agreements for commercializing technology, contact Anne Miller, 303-384-7353. Financial and Funding Assistance NREL does not provide financial or funding assistance for any research projects. If you're a startup company, small business, or an inventor, visit the following Web sites: Grants.gov Small Business Administration. Industry Growth Forum Visit the NREL Industry Growth Forum website or contact Kate Cheesbrough for more information about this event. Investors and Entrepreneurs For more information about NREL's Innovation and Entrepreneurship Center,

399

Transfer and Archive Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Management Please remove ALL data from /house! Do you still have data in /house/homedirs? Do you know if you have data in /house/homedirs? Please check now and make a plan for moving that data to the archiver or one of the NERSC file systems (for more information on these filesystems go to File storage and I/O). Moving data from house to DnA The DnA file system is primarily for finished projects, data that is ready to be archived, or data that is shared between groups. It is mounted read-only on the cluster, but you can write to directories on this file system in a few ways: Data Transfer Nodes until December 1, 2013 (examples here) xfer queue on the Genepool cluster until December 1, 2013 (examples here) Moving data from house to Projectb Projectb is where compute jobs run and output both intermediate files as

400

HEAT TRANSFER METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for increasing burn-out heat fluxes under nucleate boiling conditions in heat exchanger tubes without incurring an increase in pumping power requirements. This increase is achieved by utilizing a spinning flow having a rotational velocity sufficient to produce a centrifugal acceleration of at least 10,000 g at the tube wall. At this acceleration the heat-transfer rate at burn out is nearly twice the rate which can be achieved in a similar tube utilizing axial flow at the same pumping power. At higher accelerations the improvement over axial flow is greater, and heat fluxes in excess of 50 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr/sq ft can be achieved.

Gambill, W.R.; Greene, N.D.

1960-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Technology transfer 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Jefferson Lab Technology Transfer - JLab  

Grants and cooperative agreements are entered into solely by the government with a recipient whereby money or property is transferred to the recipient to support ...

403

MOLTEN SALT HEAT TRANSFER FLUID  

thermal energy storage tanks Sandia has developed a heat transfer fluid (HTF) for use at elevated temperatures that has a lower freezing point

404

Handbook of heat transfer fundamentals  

SciTech Connect

This handbook is on the fundamentals of heat transfer. It provides coverage on conduction, convection, and radiation and on thermophysical properties of materials.

Rohsenow, W.M.; Hartnett, J.P.; Ganic, E.N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Partnerships and Technology Transfer - ORNL  

Carbon Fiber Consortium; Oak Ridge Science and Technology Park; Contact; Staff; Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Partnerships and Technology Transfer. User Facilities ...

406

NREL: Technology Transfer - Nondisclosure Agreements  

Technology Transfer ... Experience suggests that the fastest means to reach an agreement is through direct communications to create understanding and agree on actions. 1.

407

Technology Transfer | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by facilitating development, transfer, and use of federally owned or originated technology to industry for public benefit and to leverage DOE resources through partnering with...

408

Electrohydrodynamically enhanced condensation heat transfer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In a condenser the thickness of the liquid condensate film covering the cooled surface constitutes a resistance to the heat transfer. By establishing a non (more)

Wawzyniak, Markus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ombuds Services for Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To learn about other Laboratory resources for businesses, please go to: BusinessTech Transfer Small Business Office Community Outreach Procurement, Vendor Information For...

410

Fostering Technology Transfer and Entrepreneurship  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... agencies to take steps to enhance successful technology innovation networks ... is one of the partners working with NIST to foster tech transfer and its ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

411

Theory of Spin Transfer Torque  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In the phenomenon known as spin transfer torque, a current can give a jolt to thin magnetic layers sandwiched between nonmagnetic materials. ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

412

NREL: Technology Transfer Home Page  

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) works with industry and organizations to transfer renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies into the ...

413

Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights  

THE LLNL TECHNOLOGY COMPANY PRODUCTS Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights 10 Ametek-Ortec: High-precision Radiation Detectors ORTEC, a unit of AMETEK, is ...

414

Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Using the efficiency-number of transfer units method ( ), the heat-transfer efficiencies of the parallel-flow and reverse-flow TDTH forms are analyzed and the calculation formulas and characteristic are also given. The results indicate that the efficiency of the parallel-flow form is greater than that of the reverse-flow, so the TDTH system must choose the parallel-flow form. The distance-load ratio (DLR) is defined and the minimum DLR is obtained by the technical and economic feasibility analysis. The paper will provide references for heat-transfer calculation and schematic determination of urban sewage cool or heat source applied delivery heat transfer methods.

Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Cooper pair transfer in nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The second order DWBA implementation of two-particle transfer direct reactions which includes simultaneous and successive transfer, properly corrected by non-orthogonality effects is tested with the help of controlled nuclear structure and reaction inputs against data spanning the whole mass table, and showed to constitute a quantitative probe of nuclear pairing correlations.

G. Potel; A. Idini; F. Barranco; E. Vigezzi; R. A. Broglia

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

416

Argonne TDC: Material Transfer Agreements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Transfer Agreements Material Transfer Agreements Materials produced by researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are often of interest to the private sector. Depending on the circumstances under which the material was developed, such material may be transferred to industry for a number of reasons (e.g., testing, feasibility studies, etc.). This transfer is usually temporary and can initiate a more formal working arrangement. At this time, TDC, in conjunction with Argonne's Legal Department, provides such agreements on an as-needed basis. If you would like to acquire material produced by Argonne researchers during the course of a federally funded research project, please contact TDC or fill out a Material Transfer Agreement request form. Printed or electronically downloaded copies may become obsolete. Before using such a copy for work direction, employees must verify that it is current by comparing its revision number with that of the online version. Obsolete forms will be rejected.

417

Prospects for Money Transfer Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary. Recently, in order to explore the mechanism behind wealth or income distribution, several models have been proposed by applying principles of statistical mechanics. These models share some characteristics, such as consisting of a group of individual agents, a pile of money and a specific trading rule. Whatever the trading rule is, the most noteworthy fact is that money is always transferred from one agent to another in the transferring process. So we call them money transfer models. Besides explaining income and wealth distributions, money transfer models can also be applied to other disciplines. In this paper we summarize these areas as statistical distribution, economic mobility, transfer rate and money creation. First, money distribution (or income distribution) can be exhibited by recording the money stock (flow). Second, the economic mobility can be shown by tracing the change in wealth or income over time for each agent. Third, the transfer rate of money and its determinants can be analyzed by tracing the transferring process of each one unit of money. Finally, money creation process can also be investigated by permitting agents go into debts. Some future extensions to these models are anticipated to be structural improvement and generalized mathematical analysis.

Yougui Wang; Ning Ding; Ning Xi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

NREL: Technology Transfer Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Technology Transfer Search More Search Options Site Map The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) works with industry and organizations to transfer renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies into the marketplace. Working with Us We offer many opportunities and ways for you to partner with us. Learn more about our technology partnership agreements and services: Agreements for Commercializing Technology Cooperative Research and Development Agreements Technologies Available for Licensing Technology Partnerships Work for Others Research Facilities NREL follows its principles for establishing mutually beneficial technology partnerships. Through our commercialization programs, we work to stimulate the market for clean energy technologies and foster the growth of clean energy start-ups.

419

Engineering directed excitonic energy transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide an intuitive platform for engineering exciton transfer dynamics. We show that careful consideration of the spectral density, which describes the system-bath interaction, leads to opportunities to engineer the transfer of an exciton. Since excitons in nanostructures are proposed for use in quantum information processing and artificial photosynthetic designs, our approach paves the way for engineering a wide range of desired exciton dynamics. We carefully describe the validity of the model and use experimentally relevant material parameters to show counter-intuitive examples of a directed exciton transfer in a linear chain of quantum dots.

Perdomo, Alejandro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Heat and moisture transfer through clothing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. C. Eberhart (ed), Heat transfer in medicine and biology.Convective and radiative heat transfer coefficients for2008. Study of heat and moisture transfer within multi-layer

Voelker, Conrad; Hoffmann, Sabine; Kornadt, Oliver; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Huizenga, Charlie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Los Alamos Lab: Technology Transfer | Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phone 505-665-9090 Address 2237 Trinity Dr., Bldg. 1 TA-00, Bldg. 1325 Map to TT (pdf) Tech Transfer Ombuds Technology Transfer The Laboratory's Technology Transfer Division...

422

Data Transfer Nodes Yield Results!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DTN DTN Data Transfer Nodes Yield Results August 1, 2011 | Tags: Accelerator Science, Data Transfer, ESnet Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov The ability to reliably move and share data around the globe is essential to scientific collaboration, that's why three Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific Computing Centers-Argonne and Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facilities, and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)-have teamed up to focus on optimizing wide area network (WAN) transfers. This ongoing effort began several years ago when each site deployed dedicated transfer nodes (DTNs), optimized for carrying data between the DOE facilities. Today, engineers from each site continue to meet regularly with DOE's Energy Sciences Network staff (ESnet) to develop strategies

423

Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov May 2012 Significance * Applicable to subcritical and supercritical air-fired boiler designs * Eliminates the need to mimic air-fired heat transfer characteristics in order to meet existing dry steam load demands * Reduces retrofit complexity, time, and cost Applications * Retrofitting of conventional air-fired boilers Opportunity Research is active on the patent-pending technology, titled "Temperature

424

Method Of Transferring Strained Semiconductor Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Of Transferring Strained Semiconductor Structures Of Transferring Strained Semiconductor Structures Method Of Transferring Strained Semiconductor Structures The transfer of strained semiconductor layers from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a multilayer structure on a substrate having surface contaminants. June 25, 2013 Method Of Transferring Strained Semiconductor Structures The transfer of strained semiconductor layers from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a multilayer structure on a substrate having surface contaminants. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Method Of Transferring Strained Semiconductor Structures The transfer of strained semiconductor layers from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a multilayer structure on a substrate having

425

Smart Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

From Berkeley Lab to the Marketplace Smart Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Technology Transfer with Partner Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Technology Transfer at...

426

NREL: Technology Transfer - Webmaster - National Renewable ...  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Webmaster. To report any problems on or ask a question about the NREL Technology Transfer Web ...

427

Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000 Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000 PUBLIC LAW 106-404-NOV. 1, 2000 To improve the ability of Federal agencies to...

428

Heat Transfer Enhancement in Thermoelectric Power Generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Heat transfer plays an important role in thermoelectric (TE) power generation because the higher the heat-transfer rate from the hot to the cold side of (more)

Hu, Shih-yung

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Fermilab | Office of Partnerships and Technology Transfer ...  

Quantum Diaries; Office of Partnerships and Technology Transfer. Feature. Tech Transfer at Fermilab. In an effort to fuel the economy and foster ...

430

Technology_Transfer_Memo.pdf | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TechnologyTransferMemo.pdf TechnologyTransferMemo.pdf TechnologyTransferMemo.pdf More Documents & Publications PolicyStatementonTechnologyTransfer.pdf...

431

Comments on ORNL Tech transfer.txt - Notepad | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on ORNL Tech transfer.txt - Notepad Comments on ORNL Tech transfer.txt - Notepad Comments on ORNL Tech transfer.txt - Notepad More Documents & Publications TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER...

432

Canister Transfer System Description Document  

SciTech Connect

The Canister Transfer System receives transportation casks containing large and small disposable canisters, unloads the canisters from the casks, stores the canisters as required, loads them into disposal containers (DCs), and prepares the empty casks for re-shipment. Cask unloading begins with cask inspection, sampling, and lid bolt removal operations. The cask lids are removed and the canisters are unloaded. Small canisters are loaded directly into a DC, or are stored until enough canisters are available to fill a DC. Large canisters are loaded directly into a DC. Transportation casks and related components are decontaminated as required, and empty casks are prepared for re-shipment. One independent, remotely operated canister transfer line is provided in the Waste Handling Building System. The canister transfer line consists of a Cask Transport System, Cask Preparation System, Canister Handling System, Disposal Container Transport System, an off-normal canister handling cell with a transfer tunnel connecting the two cells, and Control and Tracking System. The Canister Transfer System operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area with the Cask Transport System. The Cask Preparation System prepares the cask for unloading and consists of cask preparation manipulator, cask inspection and sampling equipment, and decontamination equipment. The Canister Handling System unloads the canister(s) and places them into a DC. Handling equipment consists of a bridge crane/hoist, DC loading manipulator, lifting fixtures, and small canister staging racks. Once the cask has been unloaded, the Cask Preparation System decontaminates the cask exterior and returns it to the Carrier/Cask Handling System via the Cask Transport System. After the DC is fully loaded, the Disposal Container Transport System moves the DC to the Disposal Container Handling System for welding. To handle off-normal canisters, a separate off-normal canister handling cell is located adjacent to the canister transfer cell and is interconnected to the transfer cell by means of the off-normal canister transfer tunnel. All canister transfer operations are controlled by the Control and Tracking System. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal Waste Handling Building (WHB) support systems.

NONE

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

433

Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p (~ 0 ~ p) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

David Hamilton

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

Bio-Imaging Technology Transfer and Commercialization ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bio-Imaging Technology Transfer and Commercialization Showcase. For Immediate Release: August 25, 2009. ...

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

435

NREL: Technology Transfer - President Obama Unveils Climate ...  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer President Obama Unveils Climate Action Plan

436

Nanoscale heat transfer - from computation to experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat transfer can differ distinctly at the nanoscale from that at the macroscale. Recent advancement in

Luo, Tengfei

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

437

Reaction mechanisms of pair transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mechanisms of nuclear transfer reactions are described for the transfer of two nucleons from one nucleus to another. Two-nucleon overlap functions are defined in various coordinate systems, and their transformation coefficients given between coordinate systems. Post and prior couplings are defined for sequential transfer mechanisms, and it is demonstrated that the combination of `prior-post' couplings avoids non-orthogonality terms, but does not avoid couplings that do not have good zero-range approximations. The simultaneous and sequential mechanisms are demonstrated for the $^{124}$Sn(p,t)$^{122}$Sn reaction at 25 MeV using shell-model overlap functions. The interference between the various simultaneous and sequential amplitudes is shown.

Ian J. Thompson

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

438

"S" Glass Manufacturing Technology Transfer  

SciTech Connect

A glass-ceramic-to metal sealing technology patented by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA) was developed by MRC-Mound for use in the manufacture of weapon components. Successful implementation attracted increasingly widespread weapon use of this technology. "S-glass" manufacturing technology was transferred to commercial vendors to ensure that weapons production schedules would be met in the coming years. Such transfer also provided sources of this fledgling technology for the Department of Defense (DOD), aerospace and other commercial uses. The steps involved in the technology transfer are described, from the initial cooperative development work of Sandia and Mound scientists and technologists to the final phase of qualifying commercial vendors for component manufacture.

Buckner, Dean, A.; McCollister, Howard, L.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Technology transfer | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology transfer Technology transfer Technology available for licensing: CURLSNovember 21, 2013 Containment Unidirectional Resource Loading System expands flexibility of glove boxes and other containment systems. Read more about Technology available for licensing: CURLS Rhodobacter System for the Expression of Membrane Proteins Using photosynthetic bacteria (Rhodobacter) for the expression of heterologous membrane proteins Read more about Rhodobacter System for the Expression of Membrane Proteins Synthesizing Membrane Proteins Using In Vitro Methodology This in vitro, cell-free expression system caters to the production of protein types that are challenging to study: membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins, and soluble proteins that require complex redox cofactors.

440

NETL: Onsite Research: Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metallography Metallography NETL has a state-of-the art metallographic facility staffed with world renowned experts with experience on a wide range of alloys and materials with the tools to get the job done. Our metallography staff works with their customers to reveal the microstructure contained within the specimens using sophisticated polishing, staining, and microscopic techniques to develop new techniques and improve upon old ones. An understanding of the microstructure is a useful tool in a wide range of situations from developing processing techniques on new material to evaluating the performance of new and existing materials after exposure to aggressive conditions. The information our staff obtains is an invaluable part of a research program. For example:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NETL: Onsite Research: Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and single scratch tests. Environmentally-induced cracking system to evaluate stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion fatigue. Please contact Cynthia...

442

On-Site Assessment Checklists  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Reader software from Adobe Systems Inc ... HB 150-1 Checklist*, Energy Efficient Lighting ... Identity and Privilege Credential Management Testing, 2012 ...

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

443

NETL: Onsite Research: Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(OR) laboratory's analytical facility is completely equipped with a unique combination of classical wet laboratories combined with state-of-the-art surface physics techniques that...

444

NETL: Onsite Research: Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

furnace-based technology. 1998-2004: Developed a process to produce extremely thin wall steel castings for use in the transportation industry. Cupola furnace technology:...

445

NREL: Technology Transfer - 22nd Industry Growth Forum ...  

22nd Industry Growth Forum Presentations. ... Technology: Energy storage ... Technology Transfer Home; About Technology Transfer;

446

Resource Center Workforce SBIR/STTR Technology Transfer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Students in Today's Global Marketplace Technology Transfer Benefits to Academia from Tech Transfer Partnerships RESOURCE CENTER ...

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

447

table9.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002; 1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings; Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts. Approximate Approximate Average Enclosed Floorspace Average Number Number of All Buildings Enclosed Floorspace of All Buildings of Buildings Onsite RSE NAICS Onsite Establishments(b) per Establishment Onsite per Establishment Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million sq ft) (counts) (sq ft) (counts) (counts) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0 0 0 0 0 311 Food 751 15,089 102,589.2 26,438 3.0 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 5 49 239,993.7 428 13.0 0 31131 Sugar 17 77 418,497.0 821 15.2 0

448

Semiclassical aspects of transfer reactions  

SciTech Connect

Semiclassical analysis of heavy ion induced transfer reactions are discussed for the quasielastic region. Some unique aspects of these reactions are shown, the variety of features which can be understood semiclassically is demonstrated, and some open problems are indicated. 28 refs., 16 figs. (LEW)

Bond, P.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Submersible canned motor transfer pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transfer pump used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank.

Guardiani, Richard F. (Ohio Township, Allegheny County, PA); Pollick, Richard D. (Sarver, PA); Nyilas, Charles P. (Monroeville, PA); Denmeade, Timothy J. (Lower Burrell, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

NIH Technology Transfer Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institutes of Health U.S. Department of Health & Human Services February 2013 #12;Table of Contents 2013 Federal Laboratory Consortium | National Award | Excellence in Technology Transfer Glybera®: First Gene.......................................................................................................................... 3 2012 National Institutes of Health | Inventors on NIH Patents Issued in FY 2012 Congratulations

Bandettini, Peter A.

451

Data Transfer | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Transfer Data Transfer The Blue Gene/P connects to other research institutions using a total of 20 GBs of public network connectivity. This allows scientists to transfer datasets to and from other institutions over fast research networks such as the Energy Science Network (ESNet) and the Metropolitan Research and Education Network (MREN). Data Transfer Node Overview Two data transfer nodes are available to all Intrepid users, that provide the ability to perform wide and local area data transfers. dtn01.intrepid.alcf.anl.gov (alias for gs1.intrepid.alcf.anl.gov) dtn02.intrepid.alcf.anl.gov (alias for gs2.intrepid.alcf.anl.gov) Data Transfer Utilities HSI/HTAR HSI and HTAR allow users to transfer data to and from HPSS Using HPSS on Intrepid GridFTP GridFTP provides the ability to transfer data between trusted sites such

452

Geo energy research and development: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

Traeger, R.K.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration, new technologies enabling energy efficiencies and environment-friendly improvements are slow to develop, and have trouble obtaining a broad application. The CMC team was able to effectively and efficiently transfer the results of DOE's metalcasting R&D projects to industry by utilizing and delivering the numerous communication vehicles identified in the proposal. The three metalcasting technical associations achieved significant technology transition results under this program. In addition to reaching over 23,000 people per year through Modern Casting and 28,000 through Engineered Casting Solutions, AFS had 84 national publications and reached over 1,200 people annually through Cast Metals Institute (CMI) education courses. NADCA's education department reached over 1,000 people each year through their courses, in addition to reaching over 6,000 people annually through Die Casting Engineer, and publishing 58 papers. The SFSA also published 99 research papers and reached over 1,000 people annually through their member newsletters. In addition to these communication vehicles, the CMC team conducted numerous technical committee meetings, project reviews, and onsite visits. All of these efforts to distribute the latest metalcasting technologies contributed to the successful deployment of DOE's R&D projects into industry. The DOE/CMC partnership demonstrated significant success in the identification and review of relevant and easy-to-implement metalcasting energy-saving processes and technologies so that the results are quickly implemented and become general practice. The results achieved in this program demonstrate that sustained technology transfer efforts are a critical step in the deployment of R&D projects to industry.

Gwyn, Mike

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

454

Released: October 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006;" 5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ","Total of" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",111,86,25 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",72,51,21

455

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;" 5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ","Total of" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",347,168,179 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",142,6,136

456

"RSE Table C12.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;" 2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;" " Units: Percents." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" "NAICS"," ","of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",2,0,2,1,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",11,0,15,14,14

457

NREL: Technology Transfer - Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facilities Research Facilities Photo of Solar Energy Research Facility building at NREL. NREL's Solar Energy Research Facility is one of many world-class facilities available to public and private agencies. For developing commercially viable energy products, organizations may partner with NREL to use our state-of-the-art laboratories, and testing and user facilities. Visit NREL's Research Facilities Web site to learn more about them. We typically develop technology partnership agreements for using our facilities and/or working with our researchers. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements Research Facilities Commercialization Programs Success Stories News Contacts Did you find what you needed?

458

Submersible canned motor transfer pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transfer pump is described which is used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank. 17 figs.

Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.; Nyilas, C.P.; Denmeade, T.J.

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

459

Enhanced heat transfer using nanofluids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a method of and apparatus for enhancing heat transfer in fluids such as deionized water. ethylene glycol, or oil by dispersing nanocrystalline particles of substances such as copper, copper oxide, aluminum oxide, or the like in the fluids. Nanocrystalline particles are produced and dispersed in the fluid by heating the substance to be dispersed in a vacuum while passing a thin film of the fluid near the heated substance. The fluid is cooled to control its vapor pressure.

Choi, Stephen U. S. (Lisle, IL); Eastman, Jeffrey A. (Naperville, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Transfer Rate vs. I/O Units  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

O Units Transfer Rate vs. IO Units These plots show the transfer rate from the IO benchmarks as a function of the number of elizaio units in use for each particular eliza at the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Adaptive file transfers for diverse environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents dsync, a file transfer system that can dynamically adapt to a wide variety of environments. While many transfer systems work well in their specialized ontext, their performance comes at the cost of generality, and they perform poorly ...

Himabindu Pucha; Michael Kaminsky; David G. Andersen; Michael A. Kozuch

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Please transfer ALL data off /house  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Please transfer ALL data off house before 1212013 Please transfer ALL data off house September 3, 2013 by Kjiersten Fagnan (0 Comments) We are happy to announce that all the...

463

A Global Diagnostic of Interocean Mass Transfers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective and quantitative estimate of all mean annual interocean mass transfers together with a picture of the associated mean pathways is presented. The global ocean circulation transfers mass, heat, and salinity between the various ocean ...

B. Blanke; S. Speich; G. Madec; K. Ds

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Authorized Signature Title Asset Transfer Authorization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of CREF, simply indicate "TIAA-CREF" below. For all other transfers, please provide the company's address separate forms. (This form cannot be used for TIAA Basic RA transfers. Please contact TIAA for form F6969

McGaughey, Alan

465

N-Stream Approximations to Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Schuster's two-stream approximation is first derived from Chandrasekhar's radiative transfer equation, and then generalized to an arbitrary number of streams. The resulting technique for solving the transfer equation that is similar to the ...

Charles Acquista; Frederick House; James Jafolla

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Power transfer through strongly coupled resonances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using self-resonant coils in a strongly coupled regime, we experimentally demonstrate efficient non-radiative power transfer over distances of up to eight times the radius of the coils. We use this system to transfer 60W ...

Kurs, Andr

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Attn Technology Transfer Questions.txt - Notepad  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attn Technology Transfer Questions.txt From: eschaput esandc@prodigy.net Sent: Monday, January 26, 2009 10:31 PM To: GC-62 Subject: Attn: Technology Transfer Questions We have...

468

Transfer in Reinforcement Learning via Shared Features  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a framework for transfer in reinforcement learning based on the idea that related tasks share some common features, and that transfer can be achieved via those shared features. The framework attempts to capture ...

Konidaris, George

469

Intermodal transfer of spent fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of the international standardization of containerized cargo handling in ports around the world, maritime shipment handling is particularly uniform. Thus, handier exposure parameters will be relatively constant for ship-truck and ship-rail transfers at ports throughout the world. Inspectors' doses are expected to vary because of jurisdictional considerations. The results of this study should be applicable to truck-to-rail transfers. A study of the movement of spent fuel casks through ports, including the loading and unloading of containers from cargo vessels, afforded an opportunity to estimate the radiation doses to those individuals handling the spent fuels with doses to the public along subsequent transportation routes of the fuel. A number of states require redundant inspections and for escorts over long distances on highways; thus handlers, inspectors, escort personnel, and others who are not normally classified as radiation workers may sustain doses high enough to warrant concern about occupational safety. This paper addresses the question of radiation safety for these workers. Data were obtained during, observation of the offloading of reactor spent fuel (research reactor spent fuel, in this instance) which included estimates of exposure times and distances for handlers, inspectors and other workers during offloading and overnight storage. Exposure times and distance were also for other workers, including crane operators, scale operators, security personnel and truck drivers. RADTRAN calculational models and parameter values then facilitated estimation of the dose to workers during incident-free ship-to-truck transfer of spent fuel.

Neuhauser, K.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Weiner, R.F. (Western Washington Univ., Bellingham, WA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

NREL: Technology Transfer - Solar Policy and Program ...  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer ... Unbiased analysis of economic and market impacts related to policy changes;

471

NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL Launches Renewable Energy ...  

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) ... For more information about REopt, visit the new website. Printable Version. Technology Transfer Home;

472

Modelling Carbon with Transferable Empirical Potentials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complexities associated with hybridization and anisotropy meant that transferable potentials for carbon were slow to emerge, lagging decades behind similar...

473

Energy Innovation Portal Bridging Technology Transfer ...  

Call the Energy Innovation Portal (the Portal) a Craigslist for technology transfer, aimed at entrepreneurs, investors, and corporate technology scouts.

474

NREL: Technology Transfer - Materials Exposure Testing Market ...  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Materials Exposure Testing Market Expands with Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System

475

PNNL: Doing Business - Technology Transfer Contacts  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; PNNL's Technology Transfer team represents more than a century of ...

476

Available Technologies: Heat Transfer Interface for Thermo ...  

Refrigeration systems; Internal combustion engines; ... The components of the technology could be used to improve heat transfer in industrial, ...

477

Argonne National Laboratory - Office of Technology Transfer  

argonne national laboratory's office of technology transfer offers licensable technologies developed at the Laboratory and oversees other agreements with research ...

478

NREL: Technology Transfer - Clean Energy Investors Directory  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer NREL is no longer maintaining the Clean Energy Investors Directory due to widely accessible ...

479

Transfer function identification in power system applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an introduction to concepts and applications of transfer function identification in power systems. The paper begins with a brief introduction to transfer function identification methods using least-squares approaches and then discusses applications which include SVC's, model validation applications, and software validation. A comparison is also made between eigenvalues obtained from transfer function identification and small signal analysis. Methods for testing the validity of identified transfer functions are also discussed.

Smith, J.R.; Fatehi, F.; Woods, C.S. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)); Hauer, J.F. (Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States)); Trudnowski, D.J. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

NREL: Technology Transfer - Commercialization Assistance Program  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Commercialization Assistance Program. The NREL Commercialization Assistance Program (NCAP) helps emerging ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naics transfers onsite" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

NREL: Technology Transfer - Agreements for Commercializing ...  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Agreements for Commercializing Technology. NREL uses Agreements for Commercializing Technology (ACT) when a ...

482

NREL: Technology Transfer - Cooperative Research and ...  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Cooperative Research and Development Agreements. NREL uses a cooperative research and development agreement ...

483

Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights Reactive ...  

THE LLNL TECHNOLOGY COMPANY PRODUCT Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights Reactive NanoTechnologies Inc.: Temperature-controlled Precision Bonding

484

Los Alamos Lab: Technology Transfer | Home Page  

Contacts Event Calendar Maps Organization Phonebook Policy Center Emergency. NEWS. LIBRARY. JOBS. Technology Transfer, TT . Division Home; About Us; Organization;

485

FY 2008 Summary Federal Tech Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summary Report on Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer FY2008. For Immediate Release: April 30, 2010. Contact: Cathleen ...

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

486

Jefferson Lab Technology Transfer - Thomas Jefferson National ...  

JSA Invention Disclosure; Technology Transfer Issues (Ombudsman) Programs and Facilities. Free-Electron Laser Program (FEL) Applied Research Center ...

487

Heat Transfer & Alternative Energy Systems Group Staff ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat Transfer and Alternative Energy Systems Group Staff. Staff Listing. Dr. William M. Healy, Leader, Supervisory Mechanical ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

488

Sandia National Laboratories : Licensing/Technology Transfer  

Search; About Sandia; Mission Areas; Newsroom; Careers; Doing Business; Education; Contact Us; Licensing and Technology Transfer. IP Home; Search ...

489

NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL Electrode Innovation ...  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer NREL Electrode Innovation Poised to Shake Up the Li-ion Battery Industry

490

NETL: Technology Transfer - Available Technologies for Partnership  

Technology Transfer Available Technologies for Partnership Software and Modeling. Month Posted. Partnership Opportunity. Patent Information. 12/2011: ...

491

Policy 1305 Cost Transfers Involving Sponsored Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy 1305 Cost Transfers Involving Sponsored Projects Responsible Office Office of Grant transfer of payroll and other direct costs associated with sponsored projects. Purpose of the Policy are responsible for ensuring that transfers of costs to sponsored projects which represent corrections of errors

492

Office of Technology Transfer TES MICROBOLOMETER IMPROVED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in key areas for UW TechTransfer. UW researchers, faculty and staff reported 335 innovations, which TechTransfer programs like the Technology Gap Innovation Fund and LaunchPad continue to demonstrate and dedication of an exceptional team assembled at UW TechTransfer. This past year we have added staff in key

Kemner, Ken

493

Understanding slow BGP routing table transfers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers and network operators often say that BGP table transfers are slow. Despite this common knowledge, the reasons for slow BGP transfers are not well understood. This paper explains BGP table transfer delays by combining BGP messages collected ... Keywords: bgp, route propagation, routing convergence

Zied Ben Houidi; Mickael Meulle; Renata Teixeira

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Heat transfer via dropwise condensation on hydrophobic microstructured surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dropwise condensation has the potential to greatly increase heat transfer rates. Heat transfer coefficients by dropwise condensation and film condensation on microstructured silicon chips were compared. Heat transfer ...

Ruleman, Karlen E. (Karlen Elizabeth)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER QUESTIONS..txt - Notepad | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER QUESTIONS..txt - Notepad TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER QUESTIONS..txt - Notepad TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER QUESTIONS..txt - Notepad More Documents & Publications Attn Technology...

496

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 PDF | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 PDF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 PDF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFERCOMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER...

497

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 PDF | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 PDF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 PDF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 PDF TECHNOLOGY...

498

Attn Technology Transfer Questions.txt - Notepad | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attn Technology Transfer Questions.txt - Notepad Attn Technology Transfer Questions.txt - Notepad Attn Technology Transfer Questions.txt - Notepad More Documents & Publications...

499

HEAT TRANSFER IN UNDERGROUND HEATING EXPERIMENTS IN GRANITE, STRIPA, SWEDEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of. Nonlinear Heat Transfer Problems." Report no.Berkeley, Ca. , APPENDIX A. HEAT TRANSFER BY CONDUCTION ANDMeeting, Technical Session on Heat Transfer in Nuclear Waste

Chan, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Optimization of Phase Change Heat Transfer in Biporous Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aspectcs of Boiling Heat Transfer. PhD Thesis dissertation,Celled Foams. Numerical Heat Transfer, Vol. 54, issue 1,Dimensional Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer. Numerical Heat

Reilly, Sean

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z