National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for n2 purged minimal

  1. Purge Lock Server

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-08-21

    The software provides a simple web api to allow users to request a time window where a file will not be removed from cache. HPSS provides the concept of a "purge lock". When a purge lock is set on a file, the file will not be removed from disk, entering tape only state. A lot of network file protocols assume a file is on disk so it is good to purge lock a file beforemore » transferring using one of those protocols. HPSS's purge lock system is very coarse grained though. A file is either purge locked or not. Nothing enforces quotas, timely unlocking of purge locks, or managing the races inherent with multiple users wanting to lock/unlock the same file. The Purge Lock Server lets you, through a simple REST API, specify a list of files to purge lock and an expire time, and the system will ensure things happen properly.« less

  2. Purged window apparatus utilizing heated purge gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ballard, Evan O.

    1984-01-01

    A purged window apparatus utilizing tangentially injected heated purge gases in the vicinity of electromagnetic radiation transmitting windows, and a tapered external mounting tube to accelerate these gases to provide a vortex flow on the window surface and a turbulent flow throughout the mounting tube. Use of this apparatus prevents backstreaming of gases under investigation which are flowing past the mouth of the mounting tube which would otherwise deposit on the windows. Lengthy spectroscopic investigations and analyses can thereby be performed without the necessity of interrupting the procedures in order to clean or replace contaminated windows.

  3. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  4. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, Joao E.; Williams, Daniel W.

    1996-01-01

    A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  5. Purge needs in absorption chillers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, J.G. )

    1993-10-01

    Absorption chillers are regaining a significant share of large tonnage chiller sales, such as they had 20 years ago. Gas-fired chillers are now available that have a base energy (ultimate fuel usage) consumption rate per ton comparable to that in electric units. Effective purging in an absorption chiller is an absolute necessity to achieve the low chilled water temperature needed for dehumidification and to fully benefit from the energy savings offered by double-effect cycles. Although the purge system is usually not shown on the typical cycle schematic, its proper functioning is a key requirement for satisfactory machine operation. This article discusses the effect of noncondensible (N/C) gases on the absorption cooling process and the basics of purge systems. In addition, the article discusses the rationale for the important design step of selecting the location of the N/C probe, and discusses purge systems applicable to the direct-fired, double-effect machines now entering the marketplace.

  6. Selective purge for hydrogenation reactor recycle loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved contaminant removal and hydrogen recovery in hydrogenation reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved contaminant removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the hydrogenation reactor recycle loop or purge stream across membranes selective in favor of the contaminant over hydrogen.

  7. Coal slurry fuel supply and purge system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDowell, Robert E. (Fairview, PA); Basic, Steven L. (Hornell, NY); Smith, Russel M. (North East, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A coal slurry fuel supply and purge system for a locomotive engines is disclosed which includes a slurry recirculation path, a stand-by path for circulating slurry during idle or states of the engine when slurry fuel in not required by the engine, and an engine header fluid path connected to the stand-by path, for supplying and purging slurry fuel to and from fuel injectors. A controller controls the actuation of valves to facilitate supply and purge of slurry to and from the fuel injectors. A method for supplying and purging coal slurry in a compression ignition engine is disclosed which includes controlling fluid flow devices and valves in a plurality of fluid paths to facilitate continuous slurry recirculation and supply and purge of or slurry based on the operating state of the engine.

  8. Combustor and method for purging a combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berry, Jonathan Dwight; Hughes, Michael John

    2015-06-09

    A combustor includes an end cap. The end cap includes a first surface and a second surface downstream from the first surface, a shroud that circumferentially surrounds at least a portion of the first and second surfaces, a plate that extends radially within the shroud, a plurality of tubes that extend through the plate and the first and second surfaces, and a first purge port that extends through one or more of the plurality of tubes, wherein the purge port is axially aligned with the plate.

  9. [FIXED] JGI data loss in /projectb/sandbox area [purge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JGI data loss in projectbsandbox area purge FIXED JGI data loss in projectbsandbox area purge August 19, 2013 by Kjiersten Fagnan We have discovered a serious bug in our...

  10. [FIXED] JGI data loss in /projectb/sandbox area [purge]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JGI data loss in /projectb/sandbox area [purge] [FIXED] JGI data loss in /projectb/sandbox area [purge] August 19, 2013 by Kjiersten Fagnan We have discovered a serious bug in our purge scripts on /global/projectb. The */global/projectb/sandbox* areas are supposed to be immune from the purge (like the project directories); however, there is a bug in the purge script that caused some files to be deleted if they had not been touched for 90+ days (like data in the scratch directories). *The sandbox

  11. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

    1995-10-24

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

  12. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, Ronald; Smith, Ronald M.; Hall, Stephen H.; Smart, John E.; Gustafson, Gregg S.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

  13. Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene purge gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zwilling, Daniel Patrick; Golden, Timothy Christoph; Weist, Jr., Edward Landis; Ludwig, Keith Alan

    2003-06-10

    A method for the separation of a gas mixture comprises (a) obtaining a feed gas mixture comprising nitrogen and at least one hydrocarbon having two to six carbon atoms; (b) introducing the feed gas mixture at a temperature of about 60.degree. F. to about 105.degree. F. into an adsorbent bed containing adsorbent material which selectively adsorbs the hydrocarbon, and withdrawing from the adsorbent bed an effluent gas enriched in nitrogen; (c) discontinuing the flow of the feed gas mixture into the adsorbent bed and depressurizing the adsorbent bed by withdrawing depressurization gas therefrom; (d) purging the adsorbent bed by introducing a purge gas into the bed and withdrawing therefrom an effluent gas comprising the hydrocarbon, wherein the purge gas contains nitrogen at a concentration higher than that of the nitrogen in the feed gas mixture; (e) pressurizing the adsorbent bed by introducing pressurization gas into the bed; and (f) repeating (b) through (e) in a cyclic manner.

  14. Purged window apparatus. [On-line spectroscopic analysis of gas flow systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ballard, E.O.

    1982-04-05

    A purged window apparatus is described which utilizes tangentially injected heated purge gases in the vicinity of electromagnetic radiation transmitting windows and a tapered external mounting tube to accelerate these gases to provide a vortex flow on the window surface and a turbulent flow throughout the mounting tube thereby preventing backstreaming of flowing gases under investigation in a chamber to which a plurality of similar purged apparatus is attached with the consequent result that spectroscopic analyses can be undertaken for lengthy periods without the necessity of interrupting the flow for cleaning or replacing the windows due to contamination.

  15. Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zafred, P.R.; Dederer, J.T.; Gillett, J.E.; Basel, R.A.; Antenucci, A.B.

    1996-11-12

    A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas and pressurized fuel gas into modules containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel, and where there is a purge gas volume between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas through the purge gas volume to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transportable when the pressure vessel is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity. 11 figs.

  16. Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zafred, Paolo R.; Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Gillett, James E.; Basel, Richard A.; Antenucci, Annette B.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas, (O) and pressurized fuel gas, (F), into fuel cell modules, (10 and 12), containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing (18), surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel (64), where there is a purge gas volume, (62), between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas, (P), through the purge gas volume, (62), to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas, (82), and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transpatable when the pressure vessel (64) is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity.

  17. Self-filling and self-purging apparatus for detecting spontaneous radiation from substances in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, I. Lauren; Chiles, Marion M.; Miller, V. Clint

    1993-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a radiation detector providing for the in situ automatic sampling of fluids containing substances emitting radiation, especially Cerenkov radiation. The detector permits sampling within well casings and is self-purging such that no additional provisions must be established for the storage and disposal of contaminated fluids.

  18. RSE Table N2.1 and N2.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N2.1 and N2.2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    N2.1 and N2.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N2.1 and N2.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

  19. Test report for calibration grooming and alignment of the LDUA purge air supply (LDUA SYSTEM 5230)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, J.D.

    1996-05-21

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) is a remotely operated manipulator used to enter into underground waste tanks through one of the tank risers. National Electric Code requirements mandate that the in-tank portions of the LDUA be maintained at a positive pressure for entrances into a flammable atmosphere. The LDUA Purge Air Supply System (PASS) uses small portable air compressors to provide a constant low flow of instrument grade air for this purpose. This document contains the results, conclusions and recommendations arrived at by the calibration grooming and alignment tests performed on the PASS in accordance with WHC-SD-WM-TC-070.

  20. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, D. X.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W.; Zhang, M. M.; Xu, D.

    2014-01-29

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H{sub 2} from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H{sub 2} in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  1. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cask and MCO Helium Purge System Design Review Completion Report Project A.5 and A.6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ARD, K.E.

    2000-04-19

    This report documents the results of the design verification performed on the Cask and Multiple Canister Over-pack (MCO) Helium Purge System. The helium purge system is part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cask Loadout System (CLS) at 100K area. The design verification employed the ''Independent Review Method'' in accordance with Administrative Procedure (AP) EN-6-027-01.

  2. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility vacuum and purge system design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-11-30

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Vacuum and Purge System (VPS) . The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-O02, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the VPS equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SDD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  3. Apparatus and method for tuned unsteady flow purging of high pulse rate spark gaps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thayer, III, William J.

    1990-01-01

    A spark gap switch apparatus is disclosed which is capable of operating at a high pulse rate which comprises an insulated housing; a pair of spaced apart electrodes each having one end thereof within a first bore formed in the housing and defining a spark gap therebetween; a pressure wave reflector in the first bore in the housing and spaced from the spark gap and capable of admitting purge flow; and a second enlarged bore contiguous with the first bore and spaced from the opposite side of the spark gap; whereby pressure waves generated during discharge of a spark across the spark gap will reflect off the wave reflector and back from the enlarged bore to the spark gap to clear from the spark gap hot gases residues generated during the discharge and simultaneously restore the gas density and pressure in the spark gap to its initial value.

  4. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a New Technology for Extraction of Insoluble Impurities from Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generators with Purge Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bud'ko, I. O.; Zhukov, A. G.

    2013-11-15

    An experimental technology for the removal of insoluble impurities from a horizontal steam generator with purge water during planned shutdowns of the power generating unit is improved through a more representative determination of the concentration of impurities in the purge water ahead of the water cleanup facility and a more precise effective time for the duration of the purge process. Tests with the improved technique at power generating unit No. 1 of the Rostov Nuclear Power Plant show that the efficiency with which insoluble impurities are removed from the steam generator volume was more than two orders of magnitude greater than under the standard regulations.

  5. Minimize Boiler Blowdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01

    This revised ITP tip sheet on minimizing boiler blowdown provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  6. Measurement of Hydrogen Purge Rates in Parabolic Trough Receiver Tubes: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G. C.

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate and develop methods to remove hydrogen centrally from commercial parabolic trough power plants. A mathematical model was developed that tracks the generation and transport of hydrogen within an operating plant. Modeling results predicted the steady-state partial pressure of hydrogen within the receiver annuli to be ~1 torr. This result agrees with measured values for the hydrogen partial pressure. The model also predicted the rate at which hydrogen must be actively removed from the expansion tank to reduce the partial pressure of hydrogen within the receiver annuli to less than 0.001 torr. Based on these results, mitigation strategies implemented at operating parabolic trough power plants can reduce hydrogen partial pressure to acceptable levels. Transient modeling predicted the time required to reduce the hydrogen partial pressures within receiver annuli to acceptable levels. The times were estimated as a function of bellows temperature, getter quantity, and getter temperature. This work also includes an experimental effort that will determine the time required to purge hydrogen from a receiver annulus with no getter.

  7. Potential Flammable Gas Explosion in the TRU Vent and Purge Machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincent, A

    2006-04-05

    The objective of the analysis was to determine the failure of the Vent and Purge (V&P) Machine due to potential explosion in the Transuranic (TRU) drum during its venting and/or subsequent explosion in the V&P machine from the flammable gases (e.g., hydrogen and Volatile Organic Compounds [VOCs]) vented into the V&P machine from the TRU drum. The analysis considers: (a) increase in the pressure in the V&P cabinet from the original deflagration in the TRU drum including lid ejection, (b) pressure wave impact from TRU drum failure, and (c) secondary burns or deflagrations resulting from excess, unburned gases in the cabinet area. A variety of cases were considered that maximized the pressure produced in the V&P cabinet. Also, cases were analyzed that maximized the shock wave pressure in the cabinet from TRU drum failure. The calculations were performed for various initial drum pressures (e.g., 1.5 and 6 psig) for 55 gallon TRU drum. The calculated peak cabinet pressures ranged from 16 psig to 50 psig for various flammable gas compositions. The blast on top of cabinet and in outlet duct ranged from 50 psig to 63 psig and 12 psig to 16 psig, respectively, for various flammable gas compositions. The failure pressures of the cabinet and the ducts calculated by structural analysis were higher than the pressure calculated from potential flammable gas deflagrations, thus, assuring that V&P cabinet would not fail during this event. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 68 calculations showed that for a failure pressure of 20 psig, the available vent area in the V&P cabinet is 1.7 to 2.6 times the required vent area depending on whether hydrogen or VOCs burn in the V&P cabinet. This analysis methodology could be used to design the process equipment needed for venting TRU waste containers at other sites across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex.

  8. Lean NOx Trap Regeneration Selectivity Towards N2O -- Similarities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lean NOx Trap Regeneration Selectivity Towards N2O -- Similarities and Differences Between ... More Documents & Publications Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx Storage: a Factor ...

  9. Waste minimization assessment procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kellythorne, L.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Perry Nuclear Power Plant began developing a waste minimization plan early in 1991. In March of 1991 the plan was documented following a similar format to that described in the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. Initial implementation involved obtaining management's commitment to support a waste minimization effort. The primary assessment goal was to identify all hazardous waste streams and to evaluate those streams for minimization opportunities. As implementation of the plan proceeded, non-hazardous waste streams routinely generated in large volumes were also evaluated for minimization opportunities. The next step included collection of process and facility data which would be useful in helping the facility accomplish its assessment goals. This paper describes the resources that were used and which were most valuable in identifying both the hazardous and non-hazardous waste streams that existed on site. For each material identified as a waste stream, additional information regarding the materials use, manufacturer, EPA hazardous waste number and DOT hazard class was also gathered. Once waste streams were evaluated for potential source reduction, recycling, re-use, re-sale, or burning for heat recovery, with disposal as the last viable alternative.

  10. N2O Emissions From 2010 SCR Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews potential contribution to N2O formation of typical diesel exhaust aftertreatment system based on selective catalytic reduction depending on catalyst properties, and exhaust temperature and gas composition

  11. Minimally refined biomass fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pearson, Richard K.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1984-01-01

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  12. K-311-1/K-310-3 Purge Cascade Process Description, Oak Ridge Environmental Management Accelerated Cleanup Project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoemaker J.E.

    2009-05-13

    K-311-1 was constructed along with the rest of the K-25 Building in the 1943-1945 timeframe. K-311-1 was equipped with Size 3 converters and Size 38 Allis Chalmers{trademark} single-stage centrifugal compressors driven by 3600 rpm electric motors, and the unit operated as the 'bottom' unit flow-wise in K-25. The depleted flow from the bottom stage in K-311-1 passed through booster compressors and flowed to the K-601 Building where the depleted or 'tails' material was removed. In 1948, after the K-27 Building was completed, the decision was made to operate K-27 and K-25 in series rather than operate the two buildings as separate entities. To facilitate this operation, concrete bases were poured and two sets of booster compressors were installed in the extreme West end of the K-311-1 cell floor. These compressors were enclosed in heated housings and consisted of Size 38 compressors. One pair was to boost the 'B' flow between K-25 and K-27, and one pair was to boost the 'A' flow between the buildings. Each station operated with one compressor on-stream and the other in standby. (Reference 9) Each station also was equipped with a Size 2 after-cooler located in the discharge stream downstream of the junction of the onstream and standby compressors. Additional gaseous diffusion capacity was added at Oak Ridge as K-29, K-31, and K-33 were constructed and placed in service in the early 1950s. As a result of the additional process equipment added by these buildings, in-leakage of light gases to the cascade including light gases introduced into the cascade as a result of purging operations threatened to exceed the capacity of the existing K-312 Purge Cascade facilities in the K-25 Building. As a result, in 1954 K-311-1 was converted to a side purge cascade to remove light gases from the process gas stream as the stream entered K-25 from K-27. Low molecular weight gas in-leakage in K-33, K-31, K-29, and K-27 was removed by the K-311-1 Side Purge Facility and a relatively pure stream of UF6 then passed from K-311-1 into the upstream cells in K-25. In-leakage of light gases in the K-25 Building continued to be removed by the K-312 Purge Facilities. K-311-1 operated as a Side Purge Cascade from 1954 until the K-25 Building was shut down in 1964; at that time K-311-1 became the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) Top (and only) Purge Cascade. The adjacent K-310-3 Unit was operated along with K-311-1 as the top purge cascade and K-310-2 was also operated at times to supplement cells in the K311-1/K-310-3 Purge Cascade. K-311-1 was shut down on February 14, 1977, after the newer, larger capacity K-402-9 Purge Cascade was placed in operation. K-310-3 continued to operate until the K-402-8 Coolant Removal Unit was placed in service, and K-310-3 was shut down on March 14, 1978. Since the K-311-1 and K-310-3 units continued to operate after K-25 shutdown, removal of equipment such as valves and piping for other projects did not occur in this area. As a result, these two units have not been exposed to atmospheric wet air over the years as much of the remainder of K-25 has been exposed. Any deposits or residual gases contained in K-311-1 or K-310-3 are not likely to be fully hydrolyzed.

  13. Large N phase transitions in massive N = 2 gauge theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, J. G.

    2014-07-23

    Using exact results obtained from localization on S{sup 4}, we explore the large N limit of N = 2 super Yang-Mills theories with massive matter multiplets. In this talk we discuss two cases: N = 2* theory, describing a massive hypermultiplet in the adjoint representation, and super QCD with massive quarks. When the radius of the four-sphere is sent to infinity these theories are described by solvable matrix models, which exhibit a number of interesting phenomena including quantum phase transitions at finite 't Hooft coupling.

  14. WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOV 2 3 2015 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transm ittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project 2015 Waste Minimization Report, Permit Number NM4890139088-TSDF Dear Mr. Kieling: The purpose of this letter is to provide you with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project 2015 Waste Minimization Report. This report, required by and prepared in accordance with the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Part 2,

  15. WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carlsbad, New Mexico 8822 1 NOV 2 3 2011 Mr. John Kieling , Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environme nt Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter provides the submittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report. This report is required by and has bee n prepared in accordance with the WIPP

  16. Gas centrifuge purge method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theurich, Gordon R.

    1976-01-01

    1. In a method of separating isotopes in a high speed gas centrifuge wherein a vertically oriented cylindrical rotor bowl is adapted to rotate about its axis within an evacuated chamber, and wherein an annular molecular pump having an intake end and a discharge end encircles the uppermost portion of said rotor bowl, said molecular pump being attached along its periphery in a leak-tight manner to said evacuated chamber, and wherein end cap closure means are affixed to the upper end of said rotor bowl, and a process gas withdrawal and insertion system enters said bowl through said end cap closure means, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and end cap defining an upper zone at the discharge end of said molecular pump, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and rotor bowl defining a lower annular zone at the intake end of said molecular pump, a method for removing gases from said upper and lower zones during centrifuge operation with a minimum loss of process gas from said rotor bowl, comprising, in combination: continuously measuring the pressure in said upper zone, pumping gas from said lower zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a first preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a second preselected value, said first preselected value being greater than said second preselected value, and continuously pumping gas from said upper zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a third preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a fourth preselected value, said third preselected value being greater than said first, second and fourth preselected values.

  17. Transpiration purged optical probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2004-01-06

    An optical apparatus for clearly viewing the interior of a containment vessel by applying a transpiration fluid to a volume directly in front of the external surface of the optical element of the optical apparatus. The fluid is provided by an external source and transported by means of an annular tube to a capped end region where the inner tube is perforated. The perforation allows the fluid to stream axially towards the center of the inner tube and then axially away from an optical element which is positioned in the inner tube just prior to the porous sleeve. This arrangement draws any contaminants away from the optical element keeping it free of contaminants. In one of several embodiments, the optical element can be a lens, a viewing port or a laser, and the external source can provide a transpiration fluid having either steady properties or time varying properties.

  18. LLNL Waste Minimization Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-14

    This document is the February 14, 1990 version of the LLNL Waste Minimization Program Plan (WMPP). The Waste Minimization Policy field has undergone continuous changes since its formal inception in the 1984 HSWA legislation. The first LLNL WMPP, Revision A, is dated March 1985. A series of informal revision were made on approximately a semi-annual basis. This Revision 2 is the third formal issuance of the WMPP document. EPA has issued a proposed new policy statement on source reduction and recycling. This policy reflects a preventative strategy to reduce or eliminate the generation of environmentally-harmful pollutants which may be released to the air, land surface, water, or ground water. In accordance with this new policy new guidance to hazardous waste generators on the elements of a Waste Minimization Program was issued. In response to these policies, DOE has revised and issued implementation guidance for DOE Order 5400.1, Waste Minimization Plan and Waste Reduction reporting of DOE Hazardous, Radioactive, and Radioactive Mixed Wastes, final draft January 1990. This WMPP is formatted to meet the current DOE guidance outlines. The current WMPP will be revised to reflect all of these proposed changes when guidelines are established. Updates, changes and revisions to the overall LLNL WMPP will be made as appropriate to reflect ever-changing regulatory requirements. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. SAPO-34 Membranes for N-2/CH4 separation: Preparation, characterization, separation performance and economic evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, SG; Zong, ZW; Zhou, SJ; Huang, Y; Song, ZN; Feng, XH; Zhou, RF; Meyer, HS; Yu, M; Carreon, MA

    2015-08-01

    SAPO-34 membranes were synthesized by several routes towards N-2/CH4 separation. Membrane synthesis parameters including water content in the gel, crystallization time, support pore size, and aluminum source were investigated. High performance N-2-selective membranes were obtained on 100-nm-pore alumina tubes by using Al(i-C3H7O)(3) as aluminum source with a crystallization time of 6 h. These membranes separated N-2 from CH, with N-2 permeance as high as 500 GPU with separation selectivity of 8 at 24 degrees C. for a 50/50 N-2/CH4 mixture. Nitrogen and CH, adsorption isotherms were measured on SAPO-34 crystals. The N-2 and CH, heats of adsorption were 11 and 15 kJ/mol, respectively, which lead to a preferential adsorption of CE-H-4 over N-2 in the N-2/CH4 mixture. Despite this, the SAPO-34 membranes were selective for N-2 over CH4 in the mixture because N-2 diffuses much faster than CH4 and differences in diffusivity played a more critical role than the competitive adsorption. Preliminary economic evaluation indicates that the required N-2/CH4 selectivity would be 15 in order to maintain a CH4 loss below 10%. For small nitrogen-contaminated gas wells, our current SAPO-34 membranes have potential to compete with the benchmark technology cryogenic distillation for N-2 rejection. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved,

  20. Minimal Doubling and Point Splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creutz, M.

    2010-06-14

    Minimally-doubled chiral fermions have the unusual property of a single local field creating two fermionic species. Spreading the field over hypercubes allows construction of combinations that isolate specific modes. Combining these fields into bilinears produces meson fields of specific quantum numbers. Minimally-doubled fermion actions present the possibility of fast simulations while maintaining one exact chiral symmetry. They do, however, introduce some peculiar aspects. An explicit breaking of hyper-cubic symmetry allows additional counter-terms to appear in the renormalization. While a single field creates two different species, spreading this field over nearby sites allows isolation of specific states and the construction of physical meson operators. Finally, lattice artifacts break isospin and give two of the three pseudoscalar mesons an additional contribution to their mass. Depending on the sign of this mass splitting, one can either have a traditional Goldstone pseudoscalar meson or a parity breaking Aoki-like phase.

  1. Material Management and Minimization | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Management and Minimization | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

  2. First-principles binary diffusion coefficients for H, H2 and four normal alkanes + N2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jasper, Ahren W.; Kamarchik, Eugene; Miller, James A.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2014-09-30

    Collision integrals related to binary (dilute gas) diffusion are calculated classically for six species colliding with N2. The most detailed calculations make no assumptions regarding the complexity of the potential energy surface, and the resulting classical collision integrals are in excellent agreement with previous semiclassical results for H + N2 and H2 + N2 and with recent experimental results for C n H2n+2 + N2, n = 2–4. The detailed classical results are used to test the accuracy of three simplifying assumptions typically made when calculating collision integrals: (1) approximating the intermolecular potential as isotropic, (2) neglecting the internal structuremore » of the colliders (i.e., neglecting inelasticity), and (3) employing unphysical R–12 repulsive interactions. The effect of anisotropy is found to be negligible for H + N2 and H2 + N2 (in agreement with previous quantum mechanical and semiclassical results for systems involving atomic and diatomic species) but is more significant for larger species at low temperatures. For example, the neglect of anisotropy decreases the diffusion coefficient for butane + N2 by 15% at 300 K. The neglect of inelasticity, in contrast, introduces only very small errors. Approximating the repulsive wall as an unphysical R–12 interaction is a significant source of error at all temperatures for the weakly interacting systems H + N2 and H2 + N2, with errors as large as 40%. For the normal alkanes in N2, which feature stronger interactions, the 12/6 Lennard–Jones approximation is found to be accurate, particularly at temperatures above –700 K where it predicts the full-dimensional result to within 5% (although with somewhat different temperature dependence). Overall, the typical practical approach of assuming isotropic 12/6 Lennard–Jones interactions is confirmed to be suitable for combustion applications except for weakly interacting systems, such as H + N2. For these systems, anisotropy and inelasticity can safely be neglected but a more detailed description of the repulsive wall is required for quantitative predictions. Moreover, a straightforward approach for calculating effective isotropic potentials with realistic repulsive walls is described. An analytic expression for the calculated diffusion coefficient for H + N2 is presented and is estimated to have a 2-sigma error bar of only 0.7%.« less

  3. Molecular Simulation Studies of Separation of CO2/N2, CO2/CH4...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    do this, we first identified a suitable force field for describing CO2, N2, and CH4 adsorption in ZIFs. On the basis of the validated force field, adsorption selectivities of the...

  4. Minimize Boiler Blowdown - Steam Tip Sheet #9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-31

    This revised AMO tip sheet on minimizing boiler blowdown provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  5. Structural proteomics of minimal organisms: conservation ofprotein...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We alsocompare patterns in the conservation off olds among minimal organisms andthose ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: BMC Structural Biology; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: ...

  6. SUBMERGED GRAVEL SCRUBBER DEMONSTRATION AS A PASSIVE AIR CLEANER FOR CONTAINMENT VENTING AND PURGING WITH SODIUM AEROSOLS -- CSTF TESTS AC7 - AC10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HILLIARD, R K.; MCCORMACK, J D.; POSTMA, A K.

    1981-11-01

    Four large-scale air cleaning tests (AC7 - AC10) were performed in the Containment Systems Test Facility (CS'lF) to demonstrate the performance of a Submerged Gravel Scrubber for cleaning the effluent gas from a vented and purged breeder reactor containment vessel. The test article, comprised of a Submerged Gravel Scrubber (SGS) followed by a high efficiency fiber demister, had a design gas flow rate of 0.47 m{sup 3}/s (1000 ft{sup 3}/min) at a pressure drop of 9.0 kPa (36 in. H{sub 2}O). The test aerosol was sodium oxide, sodium hydroxide, or sodium carbonate generated in the 850-m{sup 3} CSTF vessel by continuously spraying sodium into the air-filled vessel while adding steam or carbon dioxide. Approximately 4500 kg (10,000 lb) of sodium was sprayed over a total period of 100 h during the tests. The SGS/Demister system was shown to be highly efficient (removing ~99.98% of the entering sodium aerosol mass), had a high mass loading capacity, and operated in a passive manner, with no electrical requirement. Models for predicting aerosol capture, gas cooling, and pressure drop are developed and compared with experimental results.

  7. Minimize Compressed Air Leaks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compressed Air Leaks Minimize Compressed Air Leaks This tip sheet outlines a strategy for compressed air leak detection and provides a formula for cost savings calculations. COMPRESSED AIR TIP SHEET #3 PDF icon Minimize Compressed Air Leaks (August 2004) More Documents & Publications Eliminate Inappropriate Uses of Compressed Air Determine the Cost of Compressed Air for Your Plant Analyzing Your Compressed Air System

  8. Minimizing electrode contamination in an electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Yu Seung; Zelenay, Piotr; Johnston, Christina

    2014-12-09

    An electrochemical cell assembly that is expected to prevent or at least minimize electrode contamination includes one or more getters that trap a component or components leached from a first electrode and prevents or at least minimizes them from contaminating a second electrode.

  9. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses This tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial...

  10. Measurement and Modeling of the n=2-3 Emission of O VIII near 102Å

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Measurement and Modeling of the n=2-3 Emission of O VIII near 102Å Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement and Modeling of the n=2-3 Emission of O VIII near 102Å Authors: Trabert, E ; Beiersdorfer, P Publication Date: 2012-10-03 OSTI Identifier: 1053645 Report Number(s): LLNL-PROC-587362 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: Highly Charged Physics, Heidelberg,

  11. Native point defects and doping in ZnGeN 2 (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Native point defects and doping in ZnGeN 2 This content will become publicly available on April 11, 2017 « Prev Next » Title: Native point defects and doping in ZnGeN 2 Authors: Skachkov, Dmitry ; Punya Jaroenjittichai, Atchara ; Huang, Ling-yi ; Lambrecht, Walter R. L. Publication Date: 2016-04-11 OSTI Identifier: 1246761 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 93; Journal Issue: 15; Journal ID: ISSN 2469-9950

  12. Native point defects and doping in ZnGeN 2 (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Native point defects and doping in ZnGeN 2 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on April 11, 2017 Title: Native point defects and doping in ZnGeN 2 Authors: Skachkov, Dmitry ; Punya Jaroenjittichai, Atchara ; Huang, Ling-yi ; Lambrecht, Walter R. L. Publication Date: 2016-04-11 OSTI Identifier: 1246761 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal

  13. Average and effective Q-values for fission product average (n,2n) and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (n,3n) reaction cross sections (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Average and effective Q-values for fission product average (n,2n) and (n,3n) reaction cross sections Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Average and effective Q-values for fission product average (n,2n) and (n,3n) reaction cross sections Authors: Kawano, Toshihiko [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States) Publication Date: 2015-10-01 OSTI

  14. General N=2 supersymmetric quantum mechanical model: Supervariable approach to its off-shell nilpotent symmetries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, S.; Shukla, A.; Malik, R.P.

    2014-12-15

    Using the supersymmetric (SUSY) invariant restrictions on the (anti-)chiral supervariables, we derive the off-shell nilpotent symmetries of the general one (0+1)-dimensional N=2 SUSY quantum mechanical (QM) model which is considered on a (1, 2)-dimensional supermanifold (parametrized by a bosonic variable t and a pair of Grassmannian variables θ and θ-bar with θ{sup 2}=(θ-bar){sup 2}=0,θ(θ-bar)+(θ-bar)θ=0). We provide the geometrical meanings to the two SUSY transformations of our present theory which are valid for any arbitrary type of superpotential. We express the conserved charges and Lagrangian of the theory in terms of the supervariables (that are obtained after the application of SUSY invariant restrictions) and provide the geometrical interpretation for the nilpotency property and SUSY invariance of the Lagrangian for the general N=2 SUSY quantum theory. We also comment on the mathematical interpretation of the above symmetry transformations. - Highlights: • A novel method has been proposed for the derivation of N=2 SUSY transformations. • General N=2 SUSY quantum mechanical (QM) model with a general superpotential, is considered. • The above SUSY QM model is generalized onto a (1, 2)-dimensional supermanifold. • SUSY invariant restrictions are imposed on the (anti-)chiral supervariables. • Geometrical meaning of the nilpotency property is provided.

  15. O2Purge.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time ( 4/21/2015 t o 4 /24/2015) O 2 C ontamina4on o f G aseous A rgon D uring P urge 100--- 90--- 80--- 70--- 60--- 50--- 40--- 30--- 20--- 10--- O 2 C ontamina4on [ ppm]

  16. Approximate error conjugation gradient minimization methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallman, Jeffrey S

    2013-05-21

    In one embodiment, a method includes selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In another embodiment, a system includes a processor for executing logic, logic for selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, logic for calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and logic for calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In other embodiments, computer program products, methods, and systems are described capable of using approximate error in constrained conjugate gradient minimization problems.

  17. New operation strategy for driving the selectivity of NOx reduction to N2, NH3 or N2O during lean/rich cycling of a lean NOx trap catalyst

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mráček, David; Koci, Petr; Choi, Jae -Soon; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2015-09-08

    Periodical regeneration of NOx storage catalyst (also known as lean NOx trap) by short rich pulses of CO, H2 and hydrocarbons is necessary for the reduction of nitrogen oxides adsorbed on the catalyst surface. Ideally, the stored NOx is converted into N2, but N2O and NH3 by-products can be formed as well, particularly at low-intermediate temperatures. The N2 and N2O products are formed concurrently in two peaks. The primary peaks appear immediately after the rich-phase inception, and tail off with the breakthrough of the reductant front accompanied by NH3 product. In addition, the secondary N2 and N2O peaks then appearmore » at the rich-to-lean transition as a result of reactions between surface-deposited reductants/intermediates (CO, HC, NH3, — NCO) and residual stored NOx under increasingly lean conditions.« less

  18. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cockroft, Nigel J.

    1998-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal.

  19. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, D.W.; Bennett, B.L.; Cockroft, N.J.

    1998-09-08

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal. 5 figs.

  20. Enhanced O2 selectivity versus N2 by partial metal substitution in Cu-BTC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sava Gallis, Dorina F.; Parkes, Marie V.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-03-05

    Here we describe the homogeneous substitution of Mn, Fe and Co at various levels into a prototypical metal-organic framework (MOF), namely Cu-BTC (HKUST-1), and the effect of that substitution on preferential gas sorption. Using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, postsynthetic metal substitutions, materials characterization, and gas sorption testing, we demonstrate that the identity of the metal ion has a quantifiable effect on their oxygen and nitrogen sorption properties at cryogenic temperatures. An excellent correlation is found between O2/N2 selectivities determined experimentally at 77 K and the difference in O2 and N2 binding energies calculated from DFT modelingmore » data: Mn > Fe > Co > Cu. Room temperature gas sorption studies were also performed and correlated with metal substitution. The Fe-exchanged sample shows a significantly higher nitrogen isosteric heat of adsorption at temperatures close to ambient conditions (273 K - 298 K) as compared to all other metals studied, indicative of favorable interactions between N2 and coordinatively unsaturated Fe metal centers. Furthermore, differences in gas adsorption results at cryogenic and room temperatures are evident; they are explained by comparing experimental results with DFT binding energies (0 K) and room temperature Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations.« less

  1. Raman Thermometry of Microdevices: Comparing Methods to Minimize...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Raman Thermometry of Microdevices: Comparing Methods to Minimize Error. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Raman Thermometry of Microdevices: Comparing Methods to Minimize...

  2. Raman Thermometry: Comparing Methods to Minimize Error. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Raman Thermometry: Comparing Methods to Minimize Error. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Raman Thermometry: Comparing Methods to Minimize Error. Abstract not provided....

  3. New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmenta...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish August ...

  4. Minimized Space Conditioning Distribution Strategy for Low-load...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimized Space Conditioning Distribution Strategy for Low-load Homes Minimized Space Conditioning Distribution Strategy for Low-load Homes This presentation was given at the...

  5. Minimize Boiler Blowdown, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam Tip Sheet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Examine operating practices for boiler feedwater and blowdown rates developed by ... Minimize Boiler Blowdown Minimizing your blowdown rate can substantially reduce energy ...

  6. Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Waste Diversion.png Mission The team supports efforts that promote a more sustainable ...

  7. Waste minimization in an autobody repair shop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baria, D.N.; Dorland, D.; Bergeron, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    This work was done to document the waste minimization incorporated in a new autobody repair facility in Hermantown, Minnesota. Humes Collision Center incorporated new waste reduction techniques when it expanded its old facilities in 1992 and it was able to achieve the benefits of cost reduction and waste reduction. Humes Collision Center repairs an average of 500 cars annually and is a very small quantity generator (VSQG) of hazardous waste, as defined by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA). The hazardous waste consists of antifreeze, batteries, paint sludge, refrigerants, and used oil, while the nonhazardous waste consists of cardboard, glass, paint filters, plastic, sanding dust, scrap metal, and wastewater. The hazardous and nonhazardous waste output were decreased by 72%. In addition, there was a 63% reduction in the operating costs. The waste minimization includes antifreeze recovery and recycling, reduction in unused waste paint, reduction, recovery and recycle of waste lacquer thinner for cleaning spray guns and paint cups, elimination of used plastic car bags, recovery and recycle of refrigerant, reduction in waste sandpaper and elimination of sanding dust, and elimination of waste paint filters. The rate of return on the investment in waste minimization equipment is estimated from 37% per year for the distillation unit, 80% for vacuum sanding, 146% for computerized paint mixing, 211% for the refrigerant recycler, to 588% per year for the gun washer. The corresponding payback time varies from 3 years to 2 months.

  8. Reversible CO Binding Enables Tunable CO/H2 and CO/N2 Separations in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal-Organic Frameworks with Exposed Divalent Metal Cations | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Reversible CO Binding Enables Tunable CO/H2 and CO/N2 Separations in Metal-Organic Frameworks with Exposed Divalent Metal Cations Previous Next List Eric D. Bloch, Matthew R. Hudson, Jarad A. Mason, Sachin Chavan, Valentina Crocellà, Joshua D. Howe, Kyuho Lee, Allison L. Dzubak, Wendy L. Queen, Joseph M. Zadrozny, Stephen J. Geier, Li-Chiang Lin,

  9. GNEP Element:Minimize Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Minimize Nuclear Waste GNEP Element:Minimize Nuclear Waste An article describing the ways in which the GNEP plans to minimize nuclear waste. PDF icon GNEP Element:Minimize Nuclear Waste More Documents & Publications GNEP Element:Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards GNEP Element:Demonstrate More Proliferation-Resistant Recycling

  10. The minimal curvaton-higgs model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enqvist, Kari; Lerner, Rose N.; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: rose.lerner@desy.de

    2014-01-01

    We present the first full study of the minimal curvaton-higgs (MCH) model, which is a minimal interpretation of the curvaton scenario with one real scalar coupled to the standard model Higgs boson. The standard model coupling allows the dynamics of the model to be determined in detail, including effects from the thermal background and from radiative corrections to the potential. The relevant mechanisms for curvaton decay are incomplete non-perturbative decay (delayed by thermal blocking), followed by decay via a dimension-5 non-renormalisable operator. To avoid spoiling the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis, we find the ''bare'' curvaton mass to be m{sub ?} ? 8 10{sup 4}GeV. To match observational data from Planck there is an upper limit on the curvaton-higgs coupling g, between 10{sup ?3} and 10{sup ?2}, depending on the mass. This is due to interactions with the thermal background. We find that typically non-Gaussianities are small but that if f{sub NL} is observed in the near future then m{sub ?}?<5 10{sup 9}GeV, depending on Hubble scale during inflation. In a thermal dark matter model, the lower bound on m{sub ?} can increase substantially. The parameter space may also be affected once the baryogenesis mechanism is specified.

  11. Gamma ray tests of Minimal Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cirelli, Marco; Hambye, Thomas; Panci, Paolo; Sala, Filippo; Taoso, Marco

    2015-10-12

    We reconsider the model of Minimal Dark Matter (a fermionic, hypercharge-less quintuplet of the EW interactions) and compute its gamma ray signatures. We compare them with a number of gamma ray probes: the galactic halo diffuse measurements, the galactic center line searches and recent dwarf galaxies observations. We find that the original minimal model, whose mass is fixed at 9.4 TeV by the relic abundance requirement, is constrained by the line searches from the Galactic Center: it is ruled out if the Milky Way possesses a cuspy profile such as NFW but it is still allowed if it has a cored one. Observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies are also relevant (in particular searches for lines), and ongoing astrophysical progresses on these systems have the potential to eventually rule out the model. We also explore a wider mass range, which applies to the case in which the relic abundance requirement is relaxed. Most of our results can be safely extended to the larger class of multi-TeV WIMP DM annihilating into massive gauge bosons.

  12. Power Minimization techniques for Networked Data Centers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, Steven; Tang, Kevin

    2011-09-28

    Our objective is to develop a mathematical model to optimize energy consumption at multiple levels in networked data centers, and develop abstract algorithms to optimize not only individual servers, but also coordinate the energy consumption of clusters of servers within a data center and across geographically distributed data centers to minimize the overall energy cost and consumption of brown energy of an enterprise. In this project, we have formulated a variety of optimization models, some stochastic others deterministic, and have obtained a variety of qualitative results on the structural properties, robustness, and scalability of the optimal policies. We have also systematically derived from these models decentralized algorithms to optimize energy efficiency, analyzed their optimality and stability properties. Finally, we have conducted preliminary numerical simulations to illustrate the behavior of these algorithms. We draw the following conclusion. First, there is a substantial opportunity to minimize both the amount and the cost of electricity consumption in a network of datacenters, by exploiting the fact that traffic load, electricity cost, and availability of renewable generation fluctuate over time and across geographical locations. Judiciously matching these stochastic processes can optimize the tradeoff between brown energy consumption, electricity cost, and response time. Second, given the stochastic nature of these three processes, real-time dynamic feedback should form the core of any optimization strategy. The key is to develop decentralized algorithms that can be implemented at different parts of the network as simple, local algorithms that coordinate through asynchronous message passing.

  13. Flavored dark matter beyond minimal flavor violation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Blanke, Monika; Gemmler, Katrin

    2014-10-13

    We study the interplay of flavor and dark matter phenomenology for models of flavored dark matter interacting with quarks. We allow an arbitrary flavor structure in the coupling of dark matter with quarks. This coupling is assumed to be the only new source of violation of the Standard Model flavor symmetry extended by a U(3)x associated with the dark matter. We call this ansatz Dark Minimal Flavor Violation (DMFV) and highlight its various implications, including an unbroken discrete symmetry that can stabilize the dark matter. As an illustration we study a Dirac fermionic dark matter ? which transforms asmoretriplet under U(3)x , and is a singlet under the Standard Model. The dark matter couples to right-handed down-type quarks via a colored scalar mediator ? with a coupling ?. We identify a number of flavor-safe scenarios for the structure of ? which are beyond Minimal Flavor Violation. For dark matter and collider phenomenology we focus on the well-motivated case of b-flavored dark matter. The combined flavor and dark matter constraints on the parameter space of ? turn out to be interesting intersections of the individual ones. LHC constraints on simplified models of squarks and sbottoms can be adapted to our case, and monojet searches can be relevant if the spectrum is compressed.less

  14. Flavored dark matter beyond Minimal Flavor Violation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Blanke, Monika; Gemmler, Katrin

    2014-10-13

    We study the interplay of flavor and dark matter phenomenology for models of flavored dark matter interacting with quarks. We allow an arbitrary flavor structure in the coupling of dark matter with quarks. This coupling is assumed to be the only new source of violation of the Standard Model flavor symmetry extended by a U(3) χ associated with the dark matter. We call this ansatz Dark Minimal Flavor Violation (DMFV) and highlight its various implications, including an unbroken discrete symmetry that can stabilize the dark matter. As an illustration we study a Dirac fermionic dark matter χ which transforms asmore » triplet under U(3) χ , and is a singlet under the Standard Model. The dark matter couples to right-handed down-type quarks via a colored scalar mediator Φ with a coupling λ. We identify a number of “flavor-safe” scenarios for the structure of λ which are beyond Minimal Flavor Violation. Also, for dark matter and collider phenomenology we focus on the well-motivated case of b-flavored dark matter. Furthermore, the combined flavor and dark matter constraints on the parameter space of λ turn out to be interesting intersections of the individual ones. LHC constraints on simplified models of squarks and sbottoms can be adapted to our case, and monojet searches can be relevant if the spectrum is compressed.« less

  15. updated_supplemental_lists_1n-2n-3m_07-06-2012.xlsx | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    n-2n-3m_07-06-2012.xlsx updated_supplemental_lists_1n-2n-3m_07-06-2012.xlsx File updated_supplemental_lists_1n-2n-3m_07-06-2012.xlsx More Documents & Publications updated_supplemental_lists_1m-2m-3l-04-05-2012.xlsx updated_supplemental_lists_1p_2p_3o_04302013.xlsx updated_supplemental_lists_1i-2i-3h_12-06

  16. Minimal five dimensional supergravities and complex geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.

    2010-07-28

    We discuss the relation between solutions admitting Killing spinors of minimal super-gravities in five dimensions, both timelike and null, and complex geometries. For the timelike solutions the results may be summarised as follows. In the ungauged case (vanishing cosmological constant {Lambda} 0) the solutions are determined in terms of a hyper-Kaehler base space; in the gauged case ({Lambda}<0) the complex geometry is Kaehler; in the de Sitter case ({Lambda}>0) the complex geometry is hyper-Kaehler with torsion (HKT). For the null solutions we shall focus on the de Sitter case, for which the solutions are determined by a constrained Einstein-Weyl 3-geometry called Gauduchon-Tod space. The method for constructing explicit solutions is discussed in each case.

  17. Study Determines Wind-Induced Cycling Impacts are Minimal | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study Determines Wind-Induced Cycling Impacts are Minimal Study Determines Wind-Induced Cycling Impacts are Minimal January 10, 2013 - 2:34pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the ...

  18. Minimal semi-annihilating ℤ{sub N} scalar dark matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bélanger, Geneviève; Kannike, Kristjan; Pukhov, Alexander; Raidal, Martti

    2014-06-10

    We study the dark matter from an inert doublet and a complex scalar singlet stabilized by ℤ{sub N} symmetries. This field content is the minimal one that allows dimensionless semi-annihilation couplings for N>2. We consider explicitly the ℤ{sub 3} and ℤ{sub 4} cases and take into account constraints from perturbativity, unitarity, vacuum stability, necessity for the electroweak ℤ{sub N} preserving vacuum to be the global minimum, electroweak precision tests, upper limits from direct detection and properties of the Higgs boson. Co-annihilation and semi-annihilation of dark sector particles as well as dark matter conversion significantly modify the cosmic abundance and direct detection phenomenology.

  19. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Webinar Transcript Webinar transcript. Microsoft Office document icon sustainability...

  20. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry Minimizing Risks...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Sustainability for the Global ... More Documents & Publications Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: ...

  1. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry Minimizing Risks and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maximizing Opportunities | Department of Energy Industry Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Conservation International presentation for the May 17, 2011 webinar. PDF icon conservation_international_presentation.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Webinar Transcript Sustainability for the

  2. Minimizing Glovebox Glove Breaches: PART II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, M. E.; Andrade, R.M.; Taylor, D. J.; Stimmel, J. J.; Zaelke, R. L.; Balkey, J. J.

    2005-01-01

    As a matter of good business practices, a team of glovebox experts from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been assembled to proactively investigate processes and procedures that minimize unplanned breaches in the glovebox, e.g., glove failures. A major part of this effort involves the review of glovebox glove failures that have occurred at the Plutonium Facility and at the Chemical and Metallurgy Research Facility. Information dating back to 1993 has been compiled from formal records. This data has been combined with information obtained from a baseline inventory of about 9,000 glovebox gloves. The key attributes tracked include those related to location, the glovebox glove, type and location of breaches, the worker, and the consequences resulting from breaches. This glovebox glove failure analysis yielded results in the areas of the ease of collecting this type of data, the causes of most glove failures that have occurred, the effectiveness of current controls, and recommendations to improve hazard control systems. As expected, a significant number of breaches involve high-risk operations such as grinding, hammering, using sharps (especially screwdrivers), and assembling equipment. Surprisingly, tasks such as the movement of equipment and material between gloveboxes and the opening of cans are also major contributions of breaches. Almost half the gloves fail within a year of their install date. The greatest consequence for over 90% of glovebox glove failures is alpha contamination of protective clothing. Personnel self-monitoring at the gloveboxes continues to be the most effective way of detecting glovebox glove failures. Glove failures from these tasks can be reduced through changes in procedures and the design of remote-handling apparatus. The Nuclear Materials Technology Division management uses this information to improve hazard control systems to reduce the number of unplanned breaches in the glovebox further. As a result, excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone and excess exposure to the radiological sources associated with unplanned breaches in the glovebox have been minimized. In conclusion, investigations of control failures, near misses, and accidents contribute to an organization's scientific and technological excellence by providing information that can be used to increase its operational safety.

  3. Revisiting N2 fixation in Guerrero Negro intertidal microbial mats with a functional single-cell approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Woebken, Dagmar; Burow, Luke C.; Behnam, Faris; Mayali, Xavier; Schintlmeister, Arno; Fleming, Erich D.; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Singer, Steven W.; Cortes, Alehandro Lopez; Hoehler, Tori M.; et al

    2014-10-10

    Photosynthetic microbial mats are complex, stratified ecosystems in which high rates of primary production create a demand for nitrogen, met partially by N2 fixation. Dinitrogenase reductase (nifH) genes and transcripts from Cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria (for example, Deltaproteobacteria) were detected in these mats, yet their contribution to N2 fixation is poorly understood. We used a combined approach of manipulation experiments with inhibitors, nifH sequencing and single-cell isotope analysis to investigate the active diazotrophic community in intertidal microbial mats at Laguna Ojo de Liebre near Guerrero Negro, Mexico. Acetylene reduction assays with specific metabolic inhibitors suggested that both sulfate reducers andmore » members of the Cyanobacteria contributed to N2 fixation, whereas 15N2 tracer experiments at the bulk level only supported a contribution of Cyanobacteria. Cyanobacterial and nifH Cluster III (including deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers) sequences dominated the nifH gene pool, whereas the nifH transcript pool was dominated by sequences related to Lyngbya spp. Single-cell isotope analysis of 15N2-incubated mat samples via high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) revealed that Cyanobacteria were enriched in 15N, with the highest enrichment being detected in Lyngbya spp. filaments (on average 4.4 at% 15N), whereas the Deltaproteobacteria (identified by CARD-FISH) were not significantly enriched. We investigated the potential dilution effect from CARD-FISH on the isotopic composition and concluded that the dilution bias was not substantial enough to influence our conclusions. As a result, our combined data provide evidence that members of the Cyanobacteria, especially Lyngbya spp., actively contributed to N2 fixation in the intertidal mats, whereas support for significant N2 fixation activity of the targeted deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers could not be found.« less

  4. Minimizing or eliminating refueling of nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doncals, Richard A.; Paik, Nam-Chin; Andre, Sandra V.; Porter, Charles A.; Rathbun, Roy W.; Schwallie, Ambrose L.; Petras, Diane S.

    1989-01-01

    Demand for refueling of a liquid metal fast nuclear reactor having a life of 30 years is eliminated or reduced to intervals of at least 10 years by operating the reactor at a low linear-power density, typically 2.5 kw/ft of fuel rod, rather than 7.5 or 15 kw/ft, which is the prior art practice. So that power of the same magnitude as for prior art reactors is produced, the volume of the core is increased. In addition, the height of the core and it diameter are dimensioned so that the ratio of the height to the diameter approximates 1 to the extent practicable considering the requirement of control and that the pressure drop in the coolant shall not be excessive. The surface area of a cylinder of given volume is a minimum if the ratio of the height to the diameter is 1. By minimizing the surface area, the leakage of neutrons is reduced. By reducing the linear-power density, increasing core volume, reducing fissile enrichment and optimizing core geometry, internal-core breeding of fissionable fuel is substantially enhanced. As a result, core operational life, limited by control worth requirements and fuel burnup capability, is extended up to 30 years of continuous power operation.

  5. Wormholes minimally violating the null energy condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Lobo, Francisco S N; Martín-Moruno, Prado E-mail: fslobo@fc.ul.pt

    2014-11-01

    We consider novel wormhole solutions supported by a matter content that minimally violates the null energy condition. More specifically, we consider an equation of state in which the sum of the energy density and radial pressure is proportional to a constant with a value smaller than that of the inverse area characterising the system, i.e., the area of the wormhole mouth. This approach is motivated by a recently proposed cosmological event, denoted {sup t}he little sibling of the big rip{sup ,} where the Hubble rate and the scale factor blow up but the cosmic derivative of the Hubble rate does not [1]. By using the cut-and-paste approach, we match interior spherically symmetric wormhole solutions to an exterior Schwarzschild geometry, and analyse the stability of the thin-shell to linearized spherically symmetric perturbations around static solutions, by choosing suitable properties for the exotic material residing on the junction interface radius. Furthermore, we also consider an inhomogeneous generalization of the equation of state considered above and analyse the respective stability regions. In particular, we obtain a specific wormhole solution with an asymptotic behaviour corresponding to a global monopole.

  6. Hazardous waste minimization. Part 3. Waste minimization in the paint and allied products industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorton, G.A.

    1988-04-01

    This paper looks at waste minimization practices available to the paint and coatings industry. The paper begins with an introduction to the industry and a description of the products. The steps involved in the manufacture of paints and coatings are then described. The paper then identifies the wastes generated. Source reduction and recycling techniques are the predominant means of minimizing waste in this industry. Equipment cleaning wastes are the largest category of wastes, and the paper concentrates on equipment and techniques available to reduce or eliminate these wastes. Techniques are described to reduce the other wastes from manufacturing operations. The paper concludes with a discussion of changing industry product trends and the effect that these trends will have on the generation of waste.

  7. The impact of carbon coating on the synthesis and properties of α"–Fe16N2 powders

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bridges, Craig A.; Brady, Michael P.; Rios, Orlando; Allard, Lawrence F.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Huq, Ashfia; Jiang, Yanfeng; Wang, Jian -Ping

    2016-04-18

    This study presents the preparation of carbon composite Fe16N2 powders, and the influence of a protective carbon coating on the yield and magnetic properties of Fe16N2. Nanoparticle precursors with and without carbon were reacted under ammonia gas flow to produce Fe16N2. X-ray diffraction indicates that the powders contain typically 50-60% Fe16N2, with the remaining phases being unreacted iron, Fe4N or Fe3N. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the carbon coating is effective atnd reducing the level of sintering of Fe nanoparticles during the reduction stage prior to ammonolysis to form Fe nanoparticles. In situ TEM was used to observe loss ofmore » ordering in the nitrogen sublattice of carbon composite Fe16N2 powders in the range of 168 °C to 200 °C. Magnetic susceptibility measurements show maximum values for saturation magnetization in the range of 232 emu/g-1, and for coercivity near 930 Oe, for samples measured up to 2T applied field at 300K.« less

  8. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Minimize Nuclear Waste Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste GNEP will increase the efficiency in the management of used nuclear fuel, also known as spent fuel, and defer the need for additional geologic nuclear waste repositories until the next century. PDF icon Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste More Documents & Publications GNEP Element:Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy

  9. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Short Cycling Losses Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses This tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies. STEAM TIP SHEET #16 PDF icon Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses (January 2012) More Documents & Publications 2015-02-13 Issuance: Test Procedure for Furnaces and Boilers; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Upgrade Boilers with Energy-Efficient Burners Building America

  10. Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refineries | Department of Energy Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of Refineries Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of Refineries This factsheet details a project to improve operating procedures, including physical and chemical methods and the use of high-temperature coatings, to allow refineries to operate equipment below threshold fouling conditions and use the most effective minimization techniques. PDF icon

  11. Remove Condensate with Minimal Air Loss | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Remove Condensate with Minimal Air Loss This tip sheet outlines several condensate removal methods as part of maintaining compressed air system air quality. COMPRESSED AIR TIP ...

  12. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses Boiler "short cycling" occurs when an oversized boiler quickly satisfes process or space heating demands, and then shuts down until heat is ...

  13. Innovative Concepts Phase I: Inorganic Membranes for CO2/N2 Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Desisto

    2003-09-23

    Silica membranes were prepared using a novel technique of catalyzed-atomic layer deposition of silica within a mesoporous matrix. Pyridine was used to catalyze the silicon chloride attachment to the hydroxylated silica surface at room temperature. This half-reaction was followed by the hydration of the surface with water regenerating surface hydroxyls and completing one reaction cycle. The technique resulted in the self-limited pore size reduction of the mesoporous matrix to pore sizes near 1 nm. The self-limited reaction was presumed to be the exclusion of the large catalyst molecule from the pore entrance. In addition to pore size reduction, viscous flow defects were repaired without significantly reducing overall porosity of the membrane. In addition, we investigated the ability of amine-functionalization to enhance the CO{sub 2} transport in silica membranes. Specifically, we examined three synthesis techniques for functionalizing silica membranes with amino groups that resulted in different surface chemistries of the silica membranes. These differences were correlated with changes in the CO{sub 2} facilitation characteristics. It was found that high loadings of amino groups where interaction with the silica surface was minimized promoted the highest CO{sub 2} transport.

  14. Structure, phase transitions, and isotope effects in [(CH3)4N]2PuCl6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Richard E.

    2015-11-02

    The single crystal X-ray diffraction structure of [(CH3)4N]2PuCl6 is presented for the first time, resolving long standing confusion and speculation regarding the structure of this compound in the literature. A temperature dependent study of this compound shows that the structure of [(CH3)4N]2PuCl6 undergoes no fewer than two phase transitions between 100 and 360 K. The phase of [(CH3)4N]2PuCl6 at room temperature is Fd-3c a = 26.012(3) Å. At 360 K, the structure is in space group Fm-3m with a = 13.088(1) Å. The plutonium octahedra and tetramethylammonium cations undergo a rotative displacement and the degree of rotation varies with temperature, giving rise to the phase transition from Fm-3m to Fd-3c as the crystal is cooled. Synthesis and structural studies of the deuterated salt [(CD3)4N]2PuCl6 suggest that there is an isotopic effect associated with this phase transition as revealed by a changing transition temperature in the deuterated versus protonated compound indicating that the donor-acceptor interactions between the tetramethylammonium cations and the hexachloroplutonate anions are driving the phase transformation.

  15. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maximizing Opportunities Webinar Transcript | Department of Energy Opportunities Webinar Transcript Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Webinar Transcript Webinar transcript. Microsoft Office document icon sustainability_global_biofuels_webinar.doc More Documents & Publications Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study -

  16. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maximizing Opportunities | Department of Energy Opportunities Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Introduction slides for the webinar describing bioenergy and sustainability. PDF icon sustainability_biofuels_webinar_intro.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Webinar Transcript Market Drivers for Biofuels Biomass Program Perspectives on

  17. High-Permeance Room-Temperature Ionic-Liquid-Based Membranes for CO2/N-2 Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, JS; Mok, MM; Cowan, MG; McDanel, WM; Carlisle, TK; Gin, DL; Noble, RD

    2014-12-24

    We have developed and fabricated thin-film composite (TFC) membranes with an active layer consisting of a room-temperature ionic liquid/polymerized (room-temperature ionic liquid) [i.e., (RTIL)/poly(RTIL)] composite material. The resulting membrane has a CO2 permeance of 6100 +/- 400 GPU (where 1 GPU = 10(-6) cm(3)/(cm(2) s cmHg)) and an ideal CO2/N-2 selectivity of 22 +/- 2. This represents a new membrane with state-of-the-art CO2 permeance and good CO2/N-2 selectivity. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a TFC gas separation membrane composed of an RTIL-containing active layer.

  18. Impact of air-exposure on the chemical and electronic structure ofZnO:Zn3N2 thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bar, M.; Ahn, K.-S.; Shet, S.; Yan, Y.; Weinhardt, L.; Fuchs, O.; Blum, M.; Pookpanratana, S.; George, K.; Yang, W.; Denlinger, J.D.; Al-Jassim, M.; Heske, C.

    2008-09-08

    The chemical and electronic surface structure of ZnO:Zn3N2 ("ZnO:N") thin films with different N contents was investigated by soft x-ray emission spectroscopy. Upon exposure to ambient air (in contrast to storage in vacuum), the chemical and electronic surface structure of the ZnO:N films changes substantially. In particular, we find that the Zn3N2/(Zn3N2+ZnO) ratio decreases with exposure time and that this change depends on the initial N content. We suggest a degradation mechanism based on the reaction of the Zn3N2 content with atmospheric humidity.

  19. Crystal growth and annealing for minimized residual stress

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gianoulakis, Steven E.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for producing crystals that minimizes birefringence even at large crystal sizes, and is suitable for production of CaF.sub.2 crystals. The method of the present invention comprises annealing a crystal by maintaining a minimal temperature gradient in the crystal while slowly reducing the bulk temperature of the crystal. An apparatus according to the present invention includes a thermal control system added to a crystal growth and annealing apparatus, wherein the thermal control system allows a temperature gradient during crystal growth but minimizes the temperature gradient during crystal annealing.

  20. Drilling and coring methods that minimize the disturbance of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Drilling and coring methods that minimize the disturbance of cuttings, core, and rock formation in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada Hammermeister, D.P.; Blout, D.O.;...

  1. Geothermal Power Plants — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For energy production and development, geothermal power plants don't use much land compared to coal and nuclear power plants. And the environmental impact upon the land they use is minimal.

  2. Non-minimal derivative couplings of the composite metric (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In the context of massive gravity, bi-gravity and multi-gravity non-minimal matter ... limit and the matter quantum loop corrections do not detune the potential interactions. ...

  3. Flat minimal quantizations of Stckel systems and quantum separability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B?aszak, Maciej; Doma?ski, Ziemowit; Silindir, Burcu

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we consider the problem of quantization of classical Stckel systems and the problem of separability of related quantum Hamiltonians. First, using the concept of Stckel transform, natural Hamiltonian systems from a given Riemann space are expressed by some flat coordinates of related Euclidean configuration space. Then, the so-called flat minimal quantization procedure is applied in order to construct an appropriate Hermitian operator in the respective Hilbert space. Finally, we distinguish a class of Stckel systems which remains separable after any of admissible flat minimal quantizations. - Highlights: Using Stckel transform, separable Hamiltonians are expressed by flat coordinates. The concept of admissible flat minimal quantizations is developed. The class of Stckel systems, separable after minimal flat quantization is established. Separability of related stationary Schrdinger equations is presented in explicit form.

  4. Local Risk-Minimization for Defaultable Claims with Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biagini, Francesca; Cretarola, Alessandra

    2012-06-15

    We study the local risk-minimization approach for defaultable claims with random recovery at default time, seen as payment streams on the random interval [0,{tau} Logical-And T], where T denotes the fixed time-horizon. We find the pseudo-locally risk-minimizing strategy in the case when the agent information takes into account the possibility of a default event (local risk-minimization with G-strategies) and we provide an application in the case of a corporate bond. We also discuss the problem of finding a pseudo-locally risk-minimizing strategy if we suppose the agent obtains her information only by observing the non-defaultable assets.

  5. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses - Steam Tip Sheet #16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    This revised AMO tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  6. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses - Steam Tip Sheet #16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-01-01

    This revised AMO tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  7. Providing Runtime Clock Synchronization With Minimal Node-to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Node-to-Node Time Deviation on XT4s and XT5s Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Providing Runtime Clock Synchronization With Minimal Node-to-Node Time Deviation on ...

  8. Minimization of Impact from Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment to the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electric Grid Using a Dynamically Controlled Battery Bank for Peak Load Shaving (Conference) | SciTech Connect Minimization of Impact from Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment to the Electric Grid Using a Dynamically Controlled Battery Bank for Peak Load Shaving Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Minimization of Impact from Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment to the Electric Grid Using a Dynamically Controlled Battery Bank for Peak Load Shaving This research presents a comparison of two

  9. Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Waste Diversion.png Mission The team supports efforts that promote a more sustainable environment and implements pollution prevention activities, as deemed appropriate for LM operations and approved by LM, as defined in: Executive Order (EO) 13693, Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade, and DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability The team advocates environmentally sound waste

  10. Process development accomplishments: Waste and hazard minimization, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homan, D.A.

    1991-11-04

    This report summarizes significant technical accomplishments of the Mound Waste and Hazard Minimization Program for FY 1991. The accomplishments are in one of eight major areas: environmentally responsive cleaning program; nonhalogenated solvent trials; substitutes for volatile organic compounds; hazardous material exposure minimization; nonhazardous plating development; explosive processing waste reduction; tritium capture without conversion to water; and robotic assembly. Program costs have been higher than planned.

  11. Minimizing User Burden in Building Energy Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimizing User Burden in Building Energy Analysis Minimizing User Burden in Building Energy Analysis Lead Performer: ThermoAnalytics Inc. - Calumet, MI DOE Funding: $145,684 Cost Share: N/A Project Term: June 2014 - March 2015 Funding Opportunity: Small Business Innovation Research FY 2014 Phase 1 Release 2 Awards Project Objective ThermoAnalytics Inc. (TAI), in partnership with Skidmore, Owings, & amp; Merrill LLP (SOM), will develop an integrated workflow for constructing energy models of

  12. Structural proteomics of minimal organisms: conservation ofprotein fold

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    usage and evolutionary implications (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Structural proteomics of minimal organisms: conservation ofprotein fold usage and evolutionary implications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural proteomics of minimal organisms: conservation ofprotein fold usage and evolutionary implications Background: Determining the complete repertoire of proteinstructures for all soluble, globular proteins in a single organism hasbeen one of the major goals of

  13. A Clock Synchronization Strategy for Minimizing Clock Variance at Runtime

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in High-end Computing Environments (Conference) | SciTech Connect A Clock Synchronization Strategy for Minimizing Clock Variance at Runtime in High-end Computing Environments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Clock Synchronization Strategy for Minimizing Clock Variance at Runtime in High-end Computing Environments We present a new software-based clock synchronization scheme designed to provide high precision time agreement among distributed memory nodes. The technique is designed

  14. Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Description

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Evaluation in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Description and Evaluation in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Description and Evaluation in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5 A modal aerosol module (MAM) has been developed for the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), the

  15. SYNTHESIS OF THE FULLY PROTECTED PHOSPHORAMIDITE OF THE BENZENE-DNA ADDUCT, N2- (4-HYDROXYPHENYL)-2'-DEOXYGUANOSINE AND INCORPORATION OF THE LATER INTO DNA OLIGOMERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chenna, Ahmed; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Bonala, Radha R.; Johnson, Francis; Huang, Bo

    2008-06-09

    N2-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-O-DMT-3'-phosphoramidite has been synthesized and used to incorporate the N2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2'-dG (N2-4-HOPh-dG) into DNA, using solid-state synthesis technology. The key step to obtaining the xenonucleoside is a palladium (Xantphos-chelated) catalyzed N2-arylation (Buchwald-Hartwig reaction) of a fully protected 2'-deoxyguanosine derivative by 4-isobutyryloxybromobenzene. The reaction proceeded in good yield and the adduct was converted to the required 5'-O-DMT-3'-O-phosphoramidite by standard methods. The latter was used to synthesize oligodeoxynucleotides in which the N2-4-HOPh-dG adduct was incorporated site-specifically. The oligomers were purified by reverse-phase HPLC. Enzymatic hydrolysis and HPLC analysis confirmed the presence of this adduct in the oligomers.

  16. Selective Binding of O2 over N2 in a Redox-Active Metal-Organic Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Open Iron(II) Coordination Sites | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Selective Binding of O2 over N2 in a Redox-Active Metal-Organic Framework with Open Iron(II) Coordination Sites Previous Next List E. D. Bloch, L. J. Murray, W. L. Queen, S. Chavan, S. N. Maximoff, J. P. Bigi, R. Krishna, V. K. Peterson, F. Grandjean, G. J. Long, B. Smit, S. Bordiga, C. M. Brown, and J. R. Long, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133 (37), 14814 (2011) DOI:

  17. On N = 2 compactifications of M-theory to AdS{sub 3} using geometric algebra techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babalic, E. M.; Coman, I. A.; Condeescu, C.; Micu, A.; Lazaroiu, C. I.

    2013-11-13

    We investigate the most general warped compactification of eleven-dimensional supergravity on eight-dimensional manifolds to AdS{sub 3} spaces (in the presence of non-vanishing four-form flux) which preserves N = 2 supersymmetry in three dimensions. Without imposing any restrictions on the chirality of the internal part of the supersymmetry generators, we use geometric algebra techniques to study some implications of the supersymmetry constraints. In particular, we discuss the Lie bracket of certain vector fields constructed as pinor bilinears on the compactification manifold.

  18. Coupling of alcohols to ethers: The dominance of the surface S{sub N}2 reaction pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klier, K.; Feeley, O.C.; Johansson, M.; Herman, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    Coupling of alcohols to ethers, important high value oxygenates, proceeds on acid catalysts via general pathways that uniquely control product composition, oxygen retention, chirality inversion, and kinetics. The dominant pathway is the S{sub N}2 reaction with competition of the alcohols for the surface acid sites. This is exemplified by formation of methyl(ethyl) isobutylether (M(E)IBE) from methanol(ethanol)/isobutanol mixtures, retention of oxygen ({sup 18}O) of the heavier alcohol, and optimum rate as a function of concentration of either reactant alcohol. The S{sub N}2 pathway in the confinement of zeolite pores exhibits additional features of a near-100% selectivity to dimethylether (DME) in H-mordenite and a near-100% selectivity to chiral inversion in 2-pentanol/ethanol coupling to 2-ethoxypentane in HZSM-5. A minor reaction pathway entails olefin or carbenium intermediates, as exemplified by the formation of methyl tertiarybutyl ether (MTBE) from methanol/isobutanol mixtures with oxygen retention of the lighter alcohol. Calculations of transition state and molecular modeling of the oxonium-involving pathways dramatically demonstrate how the reaction path selects the products.

  19. Non-minimal derivative couplings of the composite metric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-11-04

    In the context of massive gravity, bi-gravity and multi-gravity non-minimal matter couplings via a specific composite effective metric were investigated recently. Even if these couplings generically reintroduce the Boulware-Deser ghost, this composite metric is unique in the sense that the ghost reemerges only beyond the decoupling limit and the matter quantum loop corrections do not detune the potential interactions. We consider non-minimal derivative couplings of the composite metric to matter fields for a specific subclass of Horndeski scalar-tensor interactions. We first explore these couplings in the mini-superspace and investigate in which scenario the ghost remains absent. We further study these non-minimal derivative couplings in the decoupling-limit of the theory and show that the equation of motion for the helicity-0 mode remains second order in derivatives. Finally, we discuss preliminary implications for cosmology.

  20. Minimizing damage to a propped fracture by controlled flowback procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, B.M.; Holditch, S.A.; Whitehead, W.S.

    1988-06-01

    Severe fracture-conductivity damage can result from proppant crushing and/or proppant flowback into the wellbore. Such damage is often concentrated near the wellbore and can directly affect postfracture performance. Most of the time severe fracture-conductivity damage can be minimized by choosing the correct type of proppant for a particular well. In many cases, however, this is not enough. To minimize excessive crushing or to prevent proppant flowback, it is also necessary to control carefully the flowback of the well after the treatment. Specific procedures can be followed to minimize severe fracture-conductivity damage. These procedures involve controlling the rates at which load fluids are recovered and maximizing backpressure against the formation. These procedures require much more time and effort than is normally spent on postfracture cleanup; however, the efforts could result in better performance.

  1. Black hole temperature: Minimal coupling vs conformal coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fazel, Mohamadreza; Mirza, Behrouz; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini

    2014-05-15

    In this article, we discuss the propagation of scalar fields in conformally transformed spacetimes with either minimal or conformal coupling. The conformally coupled equation of motion is transformed into a one-dimensional Schrdinger-like equation with an invariant potential under conformal transformation. In a second stage, we argue that calculations based on conformal coupling yield the same Hawking temperature as those based on minimal coupling. Finally, it is conjectured that the quasi normal modes of black holes are invariant under conformal transformation.

  2. Method of minimizing the effects of parasitic currents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chi, Michael C.; Carr, Peter

    1983-02-01

    A method of minimizing the effect of parasitic currents in secondary batteries having a plurality of cells connected electrically in series and a common electrolyte in communication with the cells is described. Specifically, the parasitic currents flowing through the battery cause a cell imbalance over the charge/discharge cycle. This cell imbalance is minimized by first separating the cells of the battery into two equal groups. Then the battery is charged with the two groups of cells connected electrically in series, and subsequently discharged with the two groups of cells reconnected electrically in series in an inverted sequence.

  3. Minimal flavor violation, seesaw mechanism, and R parity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolidakis, Emanuel; Smith, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The minimal flavor violation hypothesis (MFV) is extended to the R-parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model, supplemented with a simple seesaw mechanism. The requirement of MFV is shown to suppress lepton- and baryon-number violating couplings sufficiently to pass all experimental bounds, in particular, those for proton decay, and is thus a viable alternative to R parity. The phenomenological consequences for flavor-changing neutral currents, lepton flavor violation, and colliders are briefly discussed. Typically, MFV predicts sizable baryon-number violation in some characteristic channels, like single stop resonant production.

  4. 2013 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Minimization Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salzman, Sonja L.; English, Charles J.

    2015-08-24

    Waste minimization and pollution prevention are inherent goals within the operating procedures of Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). The US Department of Energy (DOE) and LANS are required to submit an annual hazardous waste minimization report to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in accordance with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. The report was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Section 2.9 of the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. This report describes the hazardous waste minimization program (a component of the overall Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention [WMin/PP] Program) administered by the Environmental Stewardship Group (ENV-ES). This report also supports the waste minimization and pollution prevention goals of the Environmental Programs Directorate (EP) organizations that are responsible for implementing remediation activities and describes its programs to incorporate waste reduction practices into remediation activities and procedures. LANS was very successful in fiscal year (FY) 2013 (October 1-September 30) in WMin/PP efforts. Staff funded four projects specifically related to reduction of waste with hazardous constituents, and LANS won four national awards for pollution prevention efforts from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In FY13, there was no hazardous, mixedtransuranic (MTRU), or mixed low-level (MLLW) remediation waste generated at the Laboratory. More hazardous waste, MTRU waste, and MLLW was generated in FY13 than in FY12, and the majority of the increase was related to MTRU processing or lab cleanouts. These accomplishments and analysis of the waste streams are discussed in much more detail within this report.

  5. Lean NOx Trap Regeneration Selectivity Towards N2O-- Similarities and Differences Between H2, CO and C3H6 Reductants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At lower-intermediate exhaust temperatures, N2O is emitted in two peaks. This presentation uses a global model for the primary and secondary peaks to explain the chemical reactions.

  6. Cosmological Ohm's law and dynamics of non-minimal electromagnetism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollenstein, Lukas; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R. E-mail: jain@cp3.dias.sdu.dk

    2013-01-01

    The origin of large-scale magnetic fields in cosmic structures and the intergalactic medium is still poorly understood. We explore the effects of non-minimal couplings of electromagnetism on the cosmological evolution of currents and magnetic fields. In this context, we revisit the mildly non-linear plasma dynamics around recombination that are known to generate weak magnetic fields. We use the covariant approach to obtain a fully general and non-linear evolution equation for the plasma currents and derive a generalised Ohm law valid on large scales as well as in the presence of non-minimal couplings to cosmological (pseudo-)scalar fields. Due to the sizeable conductivity of the plasma and the stringent observational bounds on such couplings, we conclude that modifications of the standard (adiabatic) evolution of magnetic fields are severely limited in these scenarios. Even at scales well beyond a Mpc, any departure from flux freezing behaviour is inhibited.

  7. 360 Degree Photography to Decrease Exposure, Increase Safety & Minimize Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LEBARON, G.J.

    2002-01-31

    High-resolution digital cameras, in conjunction with software techniques. make possible 360{sup o} photos that allow a person to look all around, up and dawn, and zoom in or out. The software provides the opportunity to attach other information to a 360{sup o} photo such as sound tiles, flat photos (providing additional detail about what is behind a panel or around a corner) and text (Information which can be used to show radiological conditions or identify other hazards not readily visible). The software also allows other 360{sup o} photos to be attached creating a virtual tour where the user can move from area to area, and stop, study and zoom in on areas of interest. A virtual tour of a building or room can be used for facility documentation, informing management and others, work planning and orientation, and training, thus minimizing the need to re-enter hazardous radioactive areas. Reducing entries decreases exposure, increases safety and minimizes waste.

  8. Pollution prevention and waste minimization tools workshops: Proceedings. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of the second workshop was to bring together representatives of DOE and DOE contractor organizations to discuss four topics: process waste assessments (PWAs), a continuation of one of the sessions held at the first workshop in Clearwater; waste minimization reporting requirements; procurement systems for waste minimization; and heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) and replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The topics were discussed in four concurrent group sessions. Participants in each group were encouraged to work toward achieving two main objectives: establish a ``clear vision`` of the overall target for their session`s program, focusing not just on where the program is now but on where it should go in the long term; and determine steps to be followed to carry out the target program.

  9. Hanford site waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkendall, J.R.

    1996-09-23

    This plan documents the requirements of the Hanford Site Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention (WMin/P2) Program. The plan specifies requirements for Hanford contractors to prevent pollution from entering the environment, to conserve resources and energy, and to reduce the quantity and toxicity of hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and sanitary waste generated at Hanford. The Pollution Prevention Awareness Program required by DOE 5400.1 (DOE 1988A) is included in the Hanford WMin/P2 Program.

  10. GTRI's Convert Program: Minimizing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration GTRI's Convert Program: Minimizing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium May 29, 2014 Mission In 2004 NNSA established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) in the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation to, as quickly as possible, identify, secure, remove and/or facilitate the disposition of high risk vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials around the world that pose a threat to the United States and the international community. GTRI's

  11. HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Summit: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes Nuclear Security Summit: Fact Sheet March 26, 2012 Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) is used to produce technetium-99m (Tc-99m), a medical isotope that is used in about 100,000 diagnostic medical procedures globally every day. Today, Mo-99 is produced at aging facilities in Europe, Canada and South Africa primarily using highly-enriched uranium (HEU) - a weapons-usable

  12. Non-minimal Higgs inflation and frame dependence in cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinwachs, Christian F.; Kamenshchik, Alexander Yu.

    2013-02-21

    We investigate a very general class of cosmological models with scalar fields non-minimally coupled to gravity. A particular representative in this class is given by the non-minimal Higgs inflation model in which the Standard Model Higgs boson and the inflaton are described by one and the same scalar particle. While the predictions of the non-minimal Higgs inflation scenario come numerically remarkably close to the recently discovered mass of the Higgs boson, there remains a conceptual problem in this model that is associated with the choice of the cosmological frame. While the classical theory is independent of this choice, we find by an explicit calculation that already the first quantum corrections induce a frame dependence. We give a geometrical explanation of this frame dependence by embedding it into a more general field theoretical context. From this analysis, some conceptional points in the long lasting cosmological debate: 'Jordan frame vs. Einstein frame' become more transparent and in principle can be resolved in a natural way.

  13. General non-minimal kinetic coupling to gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granda, L.N.; Cardona, W. E-mail: wilalbca@univalle.edu.co

    2010-07-01

    We study a model of scalar field with a general non-minimal kinetic coupling to itself and to the curvature, as a source of dark energy, and analyze the cosmological dynamics of this model and the issue of accelerated expansion. Solutions giving rise to power-law expansion have been found. The dynamical equation of state is studied for the two cases, without and with free kinetic term . In the first case, a behavior very close to that of the cosmological constant was found. In the second case, a solution was found, which match the current phenomenology of the dark energy. The model shows a rich variety of dynamical scenarios.

  14. Passive magnetic bearing element with minimal power losses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.

    1998-12-08

    Systems employing passive magnetic bearing elements having minimal power losses are provided. Improved stabilizing elements are shown, employing periodic magnet arrays and inductively loaded circuits, but with improved characteristics compared to the elements disclosed in US Patent No. 5,495,221 entitled ``Dynamically Stable Magnetic Suspension/Bearing System.`` The improvements relate to increasing the magnitude of the force derivative, while at the same time reducing the power dissipated during the normal operation of the bearing system, to provide a passive bearing system that has virtually no losses under equilibrium conditions, that is, when the supported system is not subject to any accelerations except those of gravity. 8 figs.

  15. Process for minimizing solids contamination of liquids from coal pyrolysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickstrom, Gary H.; Knell, Everett W.; Shaw, Benjamin W.; Wang, Yue G.

    1981-04-21

    In a continuous process for recovery of liquid hydrocarbons from a solid carbonaceous material by pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material in the presence of a particulate source of heat, particulate contamination of the liquid hydrocarbons is minimized. This is accomplished by removing fines from the solid carbonaceous material feed stream before pyrolysis, removing fines from the particulate source of heat before combining it with the carbonaceous material to effect pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material, and providing a coarse fraction of reduced fines content of the carbon containing solid residue resulting from the pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material before oxidizing carbon in the carbon containing solid residue to form the particulate source of heat.

  16. Five Dimensional Minimal Supergravities and Four Dimensional Complex Geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, Jai; Gutowski, Jan B.; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Sabra, Wafic

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the relation between solutions admitting Killing spinors of minimal supergravities in five dimensions and four dimensional complex geometries. In the ungauged case (vanishing cosmological constant {lambda} 0) the solutions are determined in terms of a hyper-Kaehler base space; in the gauged case ({lambda}<0) the complex geometry is Kaehler; in the de Sitter case ({lambda}>0) the complex geometry is hyper-Kaehler with torsion (HKT). In the latter case some details of the derivation are given. The method for constructing explicit solutions is discussed in each case.

  17. Passive magnetic bearing element with minimal power losses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    1998-01-01

    Systems employing passive magnetic bearing elements having minimal power losses are provided. Improved stabilizing elements are shown, employing periodic magnet arrays and inductively loaded circuits, but with improved characteristics compared to the elements disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 5,495,221 entitled "Dynamically Stable Magnetic Suspension/Bearing System." The improvements relate to increasing the magnitude of the force derivative, while at the same time reducing the power dissipated during the normal operation of the bearing system, to provide a passive bearing system that has virtually no losses under equilibrium conditions, that is, when the supported system is not subject to any accelerations except those of gravity.

  18. Hanford Site waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Place, B.G.

    1998-09-24

    This plan, which is required by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400. 1, provides waste minimization and pollution prevention guidance for all Hanford Site contractors. The plan is primary in a hierarchical series that includes the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan, Prime contractor implementation plans, and the Hanford Site Guide for Preparing and Maintaining Generator Group Pollution Prevention Program Documentation (DOE-RL, 1997a) describing programs required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) 3002(b) and 3005(h) (RCRA and EPA, 1994). Items discussed include the pollution prevention policy and regulatory background, organizational structure, the major objectives and goals of Hanford Site`s pollution prevention program, and an itemized description of the Hanford Site pollution prevention program. The document also includes US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office`s (RL`s) statement of policy on pollution prevention as well as a listing of regulatory drivers that require a pollution prevention program.

  19. Z' boson detection in the minimal quiver standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berenstein, D.; Martinez, R.; Ochoa, F.; Pinansky, S.

    2009-05-01

    We undertake a phenomenological study of the extra neutral Z' boson in the minimal quiver standard model and discuss limits on the model's parameters from previous precision electroweak experiments, as well as detection prospects at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. We find that masses lower than around 700 GeV are excluded by the Z-pole data from the CERN LEP collider, and below 620 GeV by experimental data from di-electron events at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We also find that at a mass of 1 TeV the LHC cross section would show a small peak in the di-lepton and top pair channel.

  20. Proceedings of pollution prevention and waste minimization tools workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    Pollution Prevention (P2) has evolved into one of DOE`s sprime strategies to meet environmental, fiscal, and worker safety obligations. P2 program planning, opportunity identification, and implementation tools were developed under the direction of the Waste Minimization Division (EM-334). Forty experts from EM, DP, ER and DOE subcontractors attended this 2-day workshop to formulate the incentives to drive utilization of these tools. Plenary and small working group sessions were held both days. Working Group 1 identified incentives to overcoming barriers in the area of P2 program planning and resource allocation. Working Group 2 identified mechanisms to drive the completion of P2 assessments and generation of opportunities. Working Group 3 compiled and documented a broad range of potential P2 incentives that address fundamental barriers to implementation of cost effective opportunities.

  1. Photovoltaic array with minimally penetrating rooftop support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lenox, Carl J.S.

    2012-10-23

    A photovoltaic array including a plurality of photovoltaic assemblies and a plurality of mounting units. The mounting units each include an elongate rail and a plurality of leg assemblies. The rail is sized and configured to maintain a portion of at least two of the photovoltaic assemblies, with the leg assemblies extending from the rail in a spaced-apart fashion and terminating in a foot for placement against a rooftop structure for minimally penetration installation. Further, at least one of the leg assemblies can include a retractable leg. When the photovoltaic array is installed to a rooftop structure including a membrane intermittently secured to a rooftop deck, the retractable leg accommodates upward billowing of the membrane under windy conditions.

  2. Siting Samplers to Minimize Expected Time to Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, Travis; Lorenzetti, David M.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2012-05-02

    We present a probabilistic approach to designing an indoor sampler network for detecting an accidental or intentional chemical or biological release, and demonstrate it for a real building. In an earlier paper, Sohn and Lorenzetti(1) developed a proof of concept algorithm that assumed samplers could return measurements only slowly (on the order of hours). This led to optimal detect to treat architectures, which maximize the probability of detecting a release. This paper develops a more general approach, and applies it to samplers that can return measurements relatively quickly (in minutes). This leads to optimal detect to warn architectures, which minimize the expected time to detection. Using a model of a real, large, commercial building, we demonstrate the approach by optimizing networks against uncertain release locations, source terms, and sampler characteristics. Finally, we speculate on rules of thumb for general sampler placement.

  3. Gamma-rays from Heavy Minimal Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Cely, Camilo; Ibarra, Alejandro; Lamperstorfer, Anna S.; Tytgat, Michel H.G.

    2015-10-27

    Motivated by the Minimal Dark Matter scenario, we consider the annihilation into gamma rays of candidates in the fermionic 5-plet and scalar 7-plet representations of SU(2){sub L}, taking into account both the Sommerfeld effect and the internal bremsstrahlung. Assuming the Einasto profile, we show that present measurements of the Galactic Center by the H.E.S.S. instrument exclude the 5-plet and 7-plet as the dominant form of dark matter for masses between 1 TeV and 20 TeV, in particular, the 5-plet mass leading to the observed dark matter density via thermal freeze-out. We also discuss prospects for the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array, which will be able to probe even heavier dark matter masses, including the scenario where the scalar 7-plet is thermally produced.

  4. Minimizing glovebox glove breaches, Part 4: control charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, M.E.; Lee, M.B.; Schreiber, S.

    2007-07-01

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Plutonium Facility, plutonium isotopes and other actinides are handled in a glovebox environment. The spread of radiological contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the worker's breathing zone, are minimized and/or prevented through the use of glovebox technology. Evaluating the glovebox configuration, the glovebox gloves are the most vulnerable part of this engineering control. Recognizing this vulnerability, the Glovebox Glove Integrity Program was developed to minimize and/or prevent unplanned openings in the glovebox environment, e.g., glove failures and breaches. In addition, LANL implement the 'Lean Six Sigma (LSS)' program that incorporates the practices of Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma technologies and tools to effectively improve administrative and engineering controls and work processes. One tool used in LSS is the use of control charts, which is an effective way to characterize data collected from unplanned openings in the glovebox environment. The benefit management receives from using this tool is two-fold. First, control charts signal the absence or presence of systematic variations that result in process instability, in relation to glovebox glove breaches and failures. Second, these graphical representations of process variation determine whether an improved process is under control. Further, control charts are used to identify statistically significant variations (trends) that can be used in decision making to improve processes. This paper discusses performance indicators assessed by the use control charts, provides examples of control charts, and shows how managers use the results to make decisions. This effort contributes to LANL Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations. (authors)

  5. MINIMIZING GLOVEBOX GLOVE BREACHES, PART IV: CONTROL CHARTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COURNOYER, MICHAEL E.; LEE, MICHELLE B.; SCHREIBER, STEPHEN B.

    2007-02-05

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Plutonium Facility, plutonium. isotopes and other actinides are handled in a glovebox environment. The spread of radiological contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the worker's breathing zone, are minimized and/or prevented through the use of glovebox technology. Evaluating the glovebox configuration, the glovebo gloves are the most vulnerable part of this engineering control. Recognizing this vulnerability, the Glovebox Glove Integrity Program (GGIP) was developed to minimize and/or prevent unplanned openings in the glovebox environment, i.e., glove failures and breaches. In addition, LANL implement the 'Lean Six Sigma (LSS)' program that incorporates the practices of Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma technologies and tools to effectively improve administrative and engineering controls and work processes. One tool used in LSS is the use of control charts, which is an effective way to characterize data collected from unplanned openings in the glovebox environment. The benefit management receives from using this tool is two-fold. First, control charts signal the absence or presence of systematic variations that result in process instability, in relation to glovebox glove breaches and failures. Second, these graphical representations of process variation detennine whether an improved process is under control. Further, control charts are used to identify statistically significant variations (trends) that can be used in decision making to improve processes. This paper discusses performance indicators assessed by the use control charts, provides examples of control charts, and shows how managers use the results to make decisions. This effort contributes to LANL Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations.

  6. Tested method to minimize plutonium assay discrepancies between laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiler, R.J.; Goss, R.L.; Rodenburg, W.W.; Rogers, D.R.

    1982-01-29

    Plutonium assay differences are frequently observed between laboratories exchanging plutonium dioxide powders. These differences are commonly the result of chemical changes and/or nonhomogeneities in sampled materials. The irregularities are often caused by moisture absorption during sampling, packaging, shipment, and storage of the materials. A method is proposed which eliminates the effects of chemical change in samples, particularly moisture absorption, and minimizes sampling error. A nondestructive thermal watts/gram test on every preweighed sampled and total dissolution of these samples for chemical assay are the primary features which make this method effective. Because this method minimizes the error related to exchange material, it is possible to design an interlaboratory exchange program which demonstrates the assay capabiliies of the participants. In an experiment performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, three PuO/sub 2/ batches of varying isotopic composition were synthesized at Mound to be used in the exchange tess. Powder sample aliquots from each batch were weighed directly into their vials under controlled atmospheric conditions. Calorimetric heat measurements were made on each vial to test homogeneity and verify sample weight. Six vials of each batch were chemically assayed at Mound and six at NBL (New Brunswick Laboratory). Both laboratories chose controlled-potential coulometry as the chemical assay technique because of its demonstrated precision and accuracy. Total dissolution of preweighed exchange samples eliminated the need for laborious and usually futile heating to return the material to its original condition. The mean chemical assay values obtained by Mound and NBL agree to within 0.01% for each of the compositions tested. Testing of both chemical assay and calorimetric data revealed no sampling error throughout the experiment.

  7. Determination of bulk and surface superconducting properties of N2-doped cold worked, heat treated and electro-polished SRF grade niobium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chetri, Santosh; Larbalestier, David C.; Lee, Peter J.; Dhakal, Pashupati; Sung, Zu -Hawn

    2015-12-01

    In this study, nitrogen-doped cavities show significant performance improvement in the medium accelerating field regime due to a lowered RF surface resistivity. However, the mechanism of enhancement has not been clearly explained. Our experiments explore how N2-doping influences Nb bulk and surface superconducting properties, and compare the N2-doped properties with those obtained previously with conventionally treated samples. High purity Nb-rod was mechanically deformed and post treated based on a typical SRF cavity treatment recipe. The onset of flux penetration at Hc1, and the upper and the surface critical fields, Hc2 and Hc3, were characterized by magnetic hysteresis and AC susceptibilitymore » techniques. The surface depth profile responsible for superconductivity was examined by changing AC amplitude in AC susceptibility, and the microstructure was directly observed with EBSD-OIM. We are also investigating surface chemistry for detailed composition using XPS. We have found that N2-doping at 800 °C significantly reduces the Hc3/Hc2 ratio towards the ideal value of ~1.7, and conclude that AC susceptibility is capable of following changes to the surface properties induced by N2-doping.« less

  8. A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis of Survival Outcome Following Postoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With N2 Nodal Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou Bingwen; Xu Yong; Li Tao; Li Wenhui; Tang Bangxian; Zhou Lin; Li Lu; Liu Yongmei; Zhu Jiang; Huang Meijuan; Wang Jin; Ren Li; Gong Youlin; Che Guowei; Liu Lunxu; Hou Mei; Lu You

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the role of postoperative chemoradiotherapy (POCRT) in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with N2 lymph node involvement. Methods and Materials: This study included 183 patients from four centers in southwest China who underwent radical section of Stage III-N2 NSCLC without any preoperative therapy. One hundred and four were treated with POCRT and 79 with postoperative chemotherapy (POCT) alone. The median radiation dose to clinical target volume (CTV) was 50 Gy (varying between 48 and 54 Gy), whereas the cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy ranged from two to six with a median of four. Results: The median duration of follow-up was 72 months. The 5-year overall survival rate (OS) was 30.5% in the POCRT group, and 14.4% in the POCT group (p = 0.007). The 5-year disease-free survival rate (DFS) was 22.2% in POCRT group and 9.3% in POCT group (p = 0.003). In a multivariate analysis, N1 nodal involvement (N1+/N2+) was associated with significantly worse OS (HR = 1.454, 95% CI, 1.012-2.087, p = 0.043) and DFS (HR = 1.685, 95% CI, 1.196-2.372, p = 0.003). Absence of radiotherapy and treatment with fewer than three cycles of chemotherapy both were poor prognostic factors for both OS and DFS. Conclusions: As compared with chemotherapy alone, adjuvant treatment with both radiotherapy and chemotherapy improves survival in patients with completely resected Stage III-N2 nodal disease in NSCLC. Future study of treatment modality with radiotherapy and chemotherapy is warranted, especially focusing on both N1 and N2 nodal status.

  9. Global Fits of the Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions Scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Kong, Kyoungchul; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz; Trotta, Roberto; /Imperial Coll., London

    2012-06-22

    In theories with Universal Extra-Dimensions (UED), the {gamma}{sub 1} particle, first excited state of the hypercharge gauge boson, provides an excellent Dark Matter (DM) candidate. Here we use a modified version of the SuperBayeS code to perform a Bayesian analysis of the minimal UED scenario, in order to assess its detectability at accelerators and with DM experiments. We derive in particular the most probable range of mass and scattering cross sections off nucleons, keeping into account cosmological and electroweak precision constraints. The consequences for the detectability of the {gamma}{sub 1} with direct and indirect experiments are dramatic. The spin-independent cross section probability distribution peaks at {approx} 10{sup -11} pb, i.e. below the sensitivity of ton-scale experiments. The spin-dependent cross-section drives the predicted neutrino flux from the center of the Sun below the reach of present and upcoming experiments. The only strategy that remains open appears to be direct detection with ton-scale experiments sensitive to spin-dependent cross-sections. On the other hand, the LHC with 1 fb{sup -1} of data should be able to probe the current best-fit UED parameters.

  10. Chelating water-soluble polymers for waste minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, B.; Cournoyer, M.; Duran, B.; Ford, D.; Gibson, R.; Lin, M.; Meck, A.; Robinson, P.; Robison, T.

    1996-11-01

    Within the DOE complex and in industry there is a tremendous need for advanced metal ion recovery and waste minimization techniques. This project sought to employ capabilities for ligand-design and separations chemistry in which one can develop and evaluate water- soluble chelating polymers for recovering actinides and toxic metals from various process streams. Focus of this work was (1) to develop and select a set of water-soluble polymers suitable for a selected waste stream and (2) demonstrate this technology in 2 areas: removal of (a) actinides and toxic RCRA metals from waste water and (b) recovery of Cu and other precious metals from industrial process streams including from solid catalysts and aqueous waste streams. The R&D was done in 4 phases for each of the 2 target areas: polymer synthesis for scaleup, equipment assembly, process demonstration at a DOE or industrial site, and advanced ligand/polymer synthesis. The TA- 50 site at Los Alamos was thought to be appropriate due to logistics and to its being representative of similar problems throughout the DOE complex.

  11. The contour method cutting assumption: error minimization and correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prime, Michael B; Kastengren, Alan L

    2010-01-01

    The recently developed contour method can measure 2-D, cross-sectional residual-stress map. A part is cut in two using a precise and low-stress cutting technique such as electric discharge machining. The contours of the new surfaces created by the cut, which will not be flat if residual stresses are relaxed by the cutting, are then measured and used to calculate the original residual stresses. The precise nature of the assumption about the cut is presented theoretically and is evaluated experimentally. Simply assuming a flat cut is overly restrictive and misleading. The critical assumption is that the width of the cut, when measured in the original, undeformed configuration of the body is constant. Stresses at the cut tip during cutting cause the material to deform, which causes errors. The effect of such cutting errors on the measured stresses is presented. The important parameters are quantified. Experimental procedures for minimizing these errors are presented. An iterative finite element procedure to correct for the errors is also presented. The correction procedure is demonstrated on experimental data from a steel beam that was plastically bent to put in a known profile of residual stresses.

  12. Minimizing Glovebox Glove Breaches, Part III: Deriving Service Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, M.E.; Wilson, K.V.; Maestas, M.M.; Schreiber, S.

    2006-07-01

    At the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility, various isotopes of plutonium along with other actinides are handled in a glove box environment. Weapons-grade plutonium consists mainly in Pu-239. Pu-238 is another isotope used for heat sources. The Pu-238 is more aggressive regarding gloves due to its higher alpha-emitting characteristic ({approx}300 times more active than Pu-239), which modifies the change-out intervals for gloves. Optimization of the change-out intervals for gloves is fundamental since Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT) Division generates approximately 4 m{sup 3}/yr of TRU waste from the disposal of glovebox gloves. To reduce the number of glovebox glove failures, the NMT Division pro-actively investigates processes and procedures that minimize glove failures. Aging studies have been conducted that correlate changes in mechanical (physical) properties with degradation chemistry. This present work derives glovebox glove change intervals based on mechanical data of thermally aged Hypalon{sup R}, and Butasol{sup R} glove samples. Information from this study represent an important baseline in gauging the acceptable standards for polymeric gloves used in a laboratory glovebox environment and will be used later to account for possible presence of dose-rate or synergistic effects in 'combined-environment'. In addition, excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone and excess exposure to the radiological sources associated with unplanned breaches in the glovebox are reduced. (authors)

  13. Higher order corrections in minimal supergravity models of inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrara, Sergio; Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei; Porrati, Massimo E-mail: kallosh@stanford.edu E-mail: massimo.porrati@nyu.edu

    2013-11-01

    We study higher order corrections in new minimal supergravity models of a single scalar field inflation. The gauging in these models leads to a massive vector multiplet and the D-term potential for the inflaton field with a coupling g{sup 2} ? 10{sup ?10}. In the de-Higgsed phase with vanishing g{sup 2}, the chiral and vector multiplets are non-interacting, and the potential vanishes. We present generic manifestly supersymmetric higher order corrections for these models. In particular, for a supersymmetric gravity model ?R+R{sup 2} we derive manifestly supersymmetric corrections corresponding to R{sup n}. The dual version corresponds to a standard supergravity model with a single scalar and a massive vector. It includes, in addition, higher Maxwell curvature/scalar interaction terms of the Born-Infeld type and a modified D-term scalar field potential. We use the dual version of the model to argue that higher order corrections do not affect the last 60 e-foldings of inflation; for example the ?R{sup 4} correction is irrelevant as long as ? < 10{sup 24}.

  14. A versatile technique to minimize electrical losses in distribution feeders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyaruzi, A.L.

    1994-12-31

    This dissertation presents a method of minimizing electrical losses in radial distribution feeders by the use of shunt capacitors. The engineering benefits of reducing peak electrical power and energy losses are compared to the costs associated with the current engineering practice of buying, installing and servicing capacitor banks in the distribution feeders. The present analysis defines this cost-benefit problem and the formulation of the problem of nonuniform feeders with different wire gauges at various feeder sections. Standard utility capacitor bank sizes are used to give a more realistic model. An original computer solution methodology based on techniques developed for this study determines: (i) Whether it is economical to install compensating capacitor banks on a particular radial distribution feeder or not. (ii) The locations at which capacitor banks should be installed. (iii) The types and sizes of capacitor banks to be installed. (iv) The time setting of switched capacitor banks. The techniques have been applied to a typical radial distribution feeder in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. The results and the engineering implications of this work are discussed and recommendations for the engineering community made.

  15. Molecular Dynamics and Energy Minimization Based on Embedded Atom Method

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    This program performs atomic scale computer simulations of the structure and dynamics of metallic system using energetices based on the Embedded Atom Method. The program performs two types of calculations. First, it performs local energy minimization of all atomic positions to determine ground state and saddle point energies and structures. Second, it performs molecular dynamics simulations to determine thermodynamics or miscroscopic dynamics of the system. In both cases, various constraints can be applied to themore » system. The volume of the system can be varied automatically to achieve any desired external pressure. The temperature in molecular dynamics simulations can be controlled by a variety of methods. Further, the temperature control can be applied either to the entire system or just a subset of the atoms that would act as a thermal source/sink. The motion of one or more of the atoms can be constrained to either simulate the effects of bulk boundary conditions or to facilitate the determination of saddle point configurations. The simulations are performed with periodic boundary conditions.« less

  16. Photodiode arrays having minimized cross-talk between diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guckel, Henry; McNamara, Shamus P.

    2000-10-17

    Photodiode arrays are formed with close diode-to-diode spacing and minimized cross-talk between diodes in the array by isolating the diodes from one another with trenches that are formed between the photodiodes in the array. The photodiodes are formed of spaced regions in a base layer, each spaced region having an impurity type opposite to that of the base layer to define a p-n junction between the spaced regions and the base layer. The base layer meets a substrate at a boundary, with the substrate being much more heavily doped than the base layer with the same impurity type. The trenches extend through the base layer and preferably into the substrate. Minority carriers generated by absorption of light photons in the base layer can only migrate to an adjacent photodiode through the substrate. The lifetime and the corresponding diffusion length of the minority carriers in the substrate is very short so that all minority carriers recombine in the substrate before reaching an adjacent photodiode.

  17. 15N2 formation and fast oxygen isotope exchange during pulsed 15N18O exposure of MnOx/CeO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos

    2014-12-23

    Pulsing 15N18O onto an annealed 1% Mn16Ox/Ce16O2 catalyst resulted in very fast oxygen isotope exchange and 15N2 formation at 295 K. In the 1st 15N18O pulse, due to the presence of large number of surface oxygen defects, extensive 15N218O and 15N2 formations were observed. In subsequent pulses oxygen isotope exchange dominated as a result of highly labile oxygen in the oxide. We gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Vehicle Technologies Program for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOEs Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  18. Gravity waves from non-minimal quadratic inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallis, Constantinos; Shafi, Qaisar

    2015-03-12

    We discuss non-minimal quadratic inflation in supersymmetric (SUSY) and non-SUSY models which entails a linear coupling of the inflaton to gravity. Imposing a lower bound on the parameter c{sub R}, involved in the coupling between the inflaton and the Ricci scalar curvature, inflation can be attained even for subplanckian values of the inflaton while the corresponding effective theory respects the perturbative unitarity up to the Planck scale. Working in the non-SUSY context we also consider radiative corrections to the inflationary potential due to a possible coupling of the inflaton to bosons or fermions. We find ranges of the parameters, depending mildly on the renormalization scale, with adjustable values of the spectral index n{sub s}, tensor-to-scalar ratio r≃(2−4)⋅10{sup −3}, and an inflaton mass close to 3⋅10{sup 13} GeV. In the SUSY framework we employ two gauge singlet chiral superfields, a logarithmic Kähler potential including all the allowed terms up to fourth order in powers of the various fields, and determine uniquely the superpotential by applying a continuous R and a global U(1) symmetry. When the Kähler manifold exhibits a no-scale-type symmetry, the model predicts n{sub s}≃0.963 and r≃0.004. Beyond no-scale SUGRA, n{sub s} and r depend crucially on the coefficient involved in the fourth order term, which mixes the inflaton with the accompanying non-inflaton field in the Kähler potential, and the prefactor encountered in it. Increasing slightly the latter above (−3), an efficient enhancement of the resulting r can be achieved putting it in the observable range. The inflaton mass in the last case is confined in the range (5−9)⋅10{sup 13} GeV.

  19. Good Practice Guide Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Dorsey

    1999-10-14

    This Good Practice Guide provides tools, information, and examples for promoting the implementation of pollution prevention during the design phases of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) projects. It is one of several Guides for implementing DOE Order 430.1, Life-cycle Asset Management. DOE Order 430.1 provides requirements for DOE, in partnership with its contractors, to plan, acquire, operate, maintain, and dispose of physical assets. The goals of designing for pollution prevention are to minimize raw material consumption, energy consumption, waste generation, health and safety impacts, and ecological degradation over the entire life of the facility (EPA 1993a). Users of this Guide will learn to translate national policy and regulatory requirements for pollution prevention into action at the project level. The Guide was written to be applicable to all DOE projects, regardless of project size or design phase. Users are expected to interpret the Guide for their individual project's circumstances, applying a graded approach so that the effort is consistent with the anticipated waste generation and resource consumption of the physical asset. This Guide employs a combination of pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) methods and design for environment (DfE) philosophies. The PPOA process was primarily developed for existing products, processes, and facilities. The PPOA process has been modified in this Guide to address the circumstances of the DOE design process as delineated in DOE Order 430.1 and its associated Good Practice Guides. This modified form of the PPOA is termed the Pollution Prevention Design Assessment (P2DA). Information on current nationwide methods and successes in designing for the environment also have been reviewed and are integrated into this guidance.

  20. Minimal sufficient positive-operator valued measure on a separable Hilbert

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    space (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Minimal sufficient positive-operator valued measure on a separable Hilbert space Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Minimal sufficient positive-operator valued measure on a separable Hilbert space We introduce a concept of a minimal sufficient positive-operator valued measure (POVM), which is the least redundant POVM among the POVMs that have the equivalent information about the measured quantum system. Assuming the system Hilbert space to be

  1. Zone Freezing Study for Pyrochemical Process Waste Minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammon Williams

    2012-05-01

    Pyroprocessing technology is a non-aqueous separation process for treatment of used nuclear fuel. At the heart of pyroprocessing lies the electrorefiner, which electrochemically dissolves uranium from the used fuel at the anode and deposits it onto a cathode. During this operation, sodium, transuranics, and fission product chlorides accumulate in the electrolyte salt (LiCl-KCl). These contaminates change the characteristics of the salt overtime and as a result, large volumes of contaminated salt are being removed, reprocessed and stored as radioactive waste. To reduce the storage volumes and improve recycling process for cost minimization, a salt purification method called zone freezing has been proposed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Zone freezing is melt crystallization process similar to the vertical Bridgeman method. In this process, the eutectic salt is slowly cooled axially from top to bottom. As solidification occurs, the fission products are rejected from the solid interface and forced into the liquid phase. The resulting product is a grown crystal with the bulk of the fission products near the bottom of the salt ingot, where they can be easily be sectioned and removed. Despite successful feasibility report from KAERI on this process, there were many unexplored parameters to help understanding and improving its operational routines. Thus, this becomes the main motivation of this proposed study. The majority of this work has been focused on the CsCl-LiCl-KCl ternary salt. CeCl3-LiCl-KCl was also investigated to check whether or not this process is feasible for the trivalent speciessurrogate for rare-earths and transuranics. For the main part of the work, several parameters were varied, they are: (1) the retort advancement rate1.8, 3.2, and 5.0 mm/hr, (2) the crucible lid configurationslid versus no-lid, (3) the amount or size of mixture50 and 400 g, (4) the composition of CsCl in the salt1, 3, and 5 wt%, and (5) the temperature differences between the high and low furnace zones200 and 300 ?C. During each experiment, the temperatures at selected locations around the crucible were measured and recorded to provide temperature profiles. Following each experiment, samples were collected and elemental analysis was done to determine the composition of iii the salt. Several modelsnon-mixed, well-mixed, Favier, and hybridwere explored to describe the zone freezing process. For CsCl-LiCl-KCl system, experimental results indicate that through this process up to 90% of the used salt can be recycled, effectively reducing waste volume by a factor of ten. The optimal configuration was found to be a 5.0 mm/hr rate with a lid configuration and a ?T of 200C. The larger 400 g mixtures had recycle percentages similar to the 50 g mixtures; however, the throughput per time was greater for the 400 g case. As a result, the 400 g case is recommended. For the CeCl3-LiCl-KCl system, the result implies that it is possible to use this process to separate the rare-earth and transuranics chlorides. Different models were applied to only CsCl ternary system. The best fit model was the hybrid model as a result of a solute transport transition from non- mixed to well-mixed throughout the growing process.

  2. Upcoming Funding Opportunity to Develop and Field Test Wind Energy Bat Impact Minimization Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE's Wind Program announced a Notice of Intent to issue a funding opportunity entitled "Wind Energy Bat Impact Minimization Technologies and Field Testing Opportunities."

  3. WRF-Chem model predictions of the regional impacts of N2O5 heterogeneous processes on night-time chemistry over north-western Europe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lowe, Douglas; Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Morgan, Will; Allan, James D.; Utembe, Steve; Ouyang, Bin; Aruffo, Eleonora; Le Breton, Michael; Zaveri, Rahul A.; di Carlo, Piero; et al

    2015-02-09

    Chemical modelling studies have been conducted over north-western Europe in summer conditions, showing that night-time dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) heterogeneous reactive uptake is important regionally in modulating particulate nitrate and has a~modest influence on oxidative chemistry. Results from Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model simulations, run with a detailed volatile organic compound (VOC) gas-phase chemistry scheme and the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC) sectional aerosol scheme, were compared with a series of airborne gas and particulate measurements made over the UK in July 2010. Modelled mixing ratios of key gas-phase species were reasonably accurate (correlationsmore » with measurements of 0.7–0.9 for NO2 and O3). However modelled loadings of particulate species were less accurate (correlation with measurements for particulate sulfate and ammonium were between 0.0 and 0.6). Sulfate mass loadings were particularly low (modelled means of 0.5–0.7 μg kg−1air, compared with measurements of 1.0–1.5 μg kg−1air). Two flights from the campaign were used as test cases – one with low relative humidity (RH) (60–70%), the other with high RH (80–90%). N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry was found to not be important in the low-RH test case; but in the high-RH test case it had a strong effect and significantly improved the agreement between modelled and measured NO3 and N2O5. When the model failed to capture atmospheric RH correctly, the modelled NO3 and N2O5 mixing ratios for these flights differed significantly from the measurements. This demonstrates that, for regional modelling which involves heterogeneous processes, it is essential to capture the ambient temperature and water vapour profiles. The night-time NO3 oxidation of VOCs across the whole region was found to be 100–300 times slower than the daytime OH oxidation of these compounds. The difference in contribution was less for alkenes (× 80) and comparable for dimethylsulfide (DMS). However the suppression of NO3 mixing ratios across the domain by N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has only a very slight, negative, influence on this oxidative capacity. The influence on regional particulate nitrate mass loadings is stronger. Night-time N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry maintains the production of particulate nitrate within polluted regions: when this process is taken into consideration, the daytime peak (for the 95th percentile) of PM10 nitrate mass loadings remains around 5.6 μg kg−1air, but the night-time minimum increases from 3.5 to 4.6 μg kg−1air. The sustaining of higher particulate mass loadings through the night by this process improves model skill at matching measured aerosol nitrate diurnal cycles and will negatively impact on regional air quality, requiring this process to be included in regional models.« less

  4. Multispectrum analysis of the v9 band of 12C2H6: Positions, intensities, self- and N2-broadened half-width coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Benner, D. C.; Sams, Robert L.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2010-06-01

    Line positions, intensities, Lorentz self- and N2-broadened half-width coefficients have been measured for PQ3, PQ2, PQ1, RQ0,RQ1, RQ2, and RQ3 sub-band transitions in the 9 fundamental band of 12C2H6. A multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique was used to fit up to 17 high-resolution (~0.00156 cm-1), room temperature absorption spectra of pure (99.99% chemical purity) natural sample of ethane and lean mixtures of the high-purity ethane diluted with N2. A Bruker IFS 120HR Fourier transform spectrometer located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in Richland, Washington was used to record the data. A standard Voigt line shape was assumed to fit all the data since no line mixing or other non Voigt line shapes were required to fit any of the spectra used in the analysis. Short spectral intervals (~2 to 2.5 cm-1) of all 17 spectra covering a specific PQ or RQ sub band were fit simultaneously. For the first time in an ethane band, pressure-broadened half-width coefficients were determined for each of the torsional-split components. Constraints were used such that the half-width coefficients of both torsional-split components were identical for a specific broadening gas. No pressure-induced shift coefficients were necessary to fit the spectra to their noise level. The present study revealed for the first time the dependence of self- and N2-broadened half-width coefficients upon the J, K quantum numbers of the transitions in ethane. A number of transitions belonging to the 9+ 4- 4 and the 9+2 4-2 4 hot bands were also observed in the fitted regions and measurements were made when possible.

  5. Environmental Restoration Progam Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grumski, J. T.; Swindle, D. W.; Bates, L. D.; DeLozier, M. F.P.; Frye, C. E.; Mitchell, M. E.

    1991-09-30

    In response to DOE Order 5400.1 this plan outlines the requirements for a Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Martin Marietta Energy System, Inc. Statements of the national, Department of Energy, Energy Systems, and Energy Systems ER Program policies on waste minimization are included and reflect the attitudes of these organizations and their commitment to the waste minimization effort. Organizational responsibilities for the waste minimization effort are clearly defined and discussed, and the program objectives and goals are set forth. Waste assessment is addressed as being a key element in developing the waste generation baseline. There are discussions on the scope of ER-specific waste minimization techniques and approaches to employee awareness and training. There is also a discussion on the process for continual evaluation of the Waste Minimization Program. Appendixes present an implementation schedule for the Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Program, the program budget, an organization chart, and the ER waste minimization policy.

  6. Environmental Restoration Program waste minimization and pollution prevention self-assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Program within Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. is currently developing a more active waste minimization and pollution prevention program. To determine areas of programmatic improvements within the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program, the ER Program required an evaluation of the program across the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Environmental Restoration and Waste Minimization Site, and the Portsmouth Environmental Restoration and Waste Minimization Site. This document presents the status of the overall program as of fourth quarter FY 1994, presents pollution prevention cost avoidance data associated with FY 1994 activities, and identifies areas for improvement. Results of this assessment indicate that the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program is firmly established and is developing rapidly. Several procedural goals were met in FY 1994 and many of the sites implemented ER waste minimization options. Additional growth is needed, however, for the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program.

  7. Assessment of pre-competitive research and development needs for industrial waste minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.K.; Fassbender, L.L.; Sen, R.K.

    1992-02-01

    This report summarizes the findings of the first phase of a study undertaken to define a role for the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Division of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) in developing waste minimization technologies for the industrial sector. The report describes the results of an industrial waste characterization based mainly on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) 1989 Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) database. IN addition, it contains the results of interviews with personnel from trade associations, environmental advocacy groups, federal agencies, and industrial firms regarding pre-competitive research and development needs for industrial waste minimization. Recommendations for future AIC waste minimization activities are provided.

  8. Assessment of pre-competitive research and development needs for industrial waste minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.K.; Fassbender, L.L. ); Sen, R.K. and Associates, Washington, DC )

    1992-02-01

    This report summarizes the findings of the first phase of a study undertaken to define a role for the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Division of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) in developing waste minimization technologies for the industrial sector. The report describes the results of an industrial waste characterization based mainly on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) 1989 Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) database. IN addition, it contains the results of interviews with personnel from trade associations, environmental advocacy groups, federal agencies, and industrial firms regarding pre-competitive research and development needs for industrial waste minimization. Recommendations for future AIC waste minimization activities are provided.

  9. Development and pilot demonstration program of a waste minimization plan at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, R.W.; Wentz, C.A.; Thuot, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    In response to US Department of Energy directives, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed a waste minimization plan aimed at reducing the amount of wastes at this national research and development laboratory. Activities at ANL are primarily research- oriented and as such affect the amount and type of source reduction that can be achieved at this facility. The objective of ANL's waste minimization program is to cost-effectively reduce all types of wastes, including hazardous, mixed, radioactive, and nonhazardous wastes. The ANL Waste Minimization Plan uses a waste minimization audit as a systematic procedure to determine opportunities to reduce or eliminate waste. To facilitate these audits, a computerized bar-coding procedure is being implemented at ANL to track hazardous wastes from where they are generated to their ultimate disposal. This paper describes the development of the ANL Waste Minimization Plan and a pilot demonstration of the how the ANL Plan audited the hazardous waste generated within a selected divisions of ANL. It includes quantitative data on the generation and disposal of hazardous waste at ANL and describes potential ways to minimize hazardous wastes. 2 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Temporal Nodal Regression and Regional Control After Primary Radiation Therapy for N2-N3 Head-and-Neck Cancer Stratified by HPV Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shao Hui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Ringash, Jolie; Hope, Andrew; Gilbert, Ralph; Irish, Jonathan; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Weinreb, Ilan; Waldron, John

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the temporal lymph node (LN) regression and regional control (RC) after primary chemoradiation therapy/radiation therapy in human papillomavirus-related [HPV(+)] versus human papillomavirus-unrelated [HPV(?)] head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: All cases of N2-N3 HNC treated with radiation therapy/chemoradiation therapy between 2003 and 2009 were reviewed. Human papillomavirus status was ascertained by p16 staining on all available oropharyngeal cancers. Larynx/hypopharynx cancers were considered HPV(?). Initial radiologic complete nodal response (CR) (?1.0 cm 8-12 weeks after treatment), ultimate LN resolution, and RC were compared between HPV(+) and HPV(?) HNC. Multivariate analysis identified outcome predictors. Results: A total of 257 HPV(+) and 236 HPV(?) HNCs were identified. The initial LN size was larger (mean, 2.9 cm vs 2.5 cm; P<.01) with a higher proportion of cystic LNs (38% vs 6%, P<.01) in HPV(+) versus HPV(?) HNC. CR was achieved is 125 HPV(+) HNCs (49%) and 129 HPV(?) HNCs (55%) (P=.18). The mean post treatment largest LN was 36% of the original size in the HPV(+) group and 41% in the HPV(?) group (P<.01). The actuarial LN resolution was similar in the HPV(+) and HPV(?) groups at 12 weeks (42% and 43%, respectively), but it was higher in the HPV(+) group than in the HPV(?) group at 36 weeks (90% vs 77%, P<.01). The median follow-up period was 3.6 years. The 3-year RC rate was higher in the HPV(?) CR cases versus non-CR cases (92% vs 63%, P<.01) but was not different in the HPV(+) CR cases versus non-CR cases (98% vs 92%, P=.14). On multivariate analysis, HPV(+) status predicted ultimate LN resolution (odds ratio, 1.4 [95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.7]; P<.01) and RC (hazard ratio, 0.3 [95% confidence interval 0.2-0.6]; P<.01). Conclusions: HPV(+) LNs involute more quickly than HPV(?) LNs but undergo a more prolonged process to eventual CR beyond the time of initial assessment at 8 to 12 weeks after treatment. Post radiation neck dissection is advisable for all non-CR HPV(?)/non-CR N3 HPV(+) cases, but it may be avoided for selected non-CR N2 HPV(+) cases with a significant LN involution if they can undergo continued imaging surveillance. The role of positron emission tomography for response assessment should be investigated.

  11. Solar panel driven air purging apparatus for motor vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobier, J.A.; Brown, G.E.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes improvement in a motor vehicle having an enclosable cabin an internal combustion engine, a battery, an ignition switch having an on position for enabling the internal combustion engine and an off position, an electric motor coupled in driving relationship with an air circulating fan for circulating air through the cabin. The improvement comprises: a solar panel mounted upon the vehicle having a panel output exhibiting variable voltage levels including a peak voltage level and substantially constant current; a power transfer regulator for transferring power form the panel to the motor when enabled, including: energy storage means connectable across the panel output and chargeable by the current to variable charge levels; solid-state switch means connected in energy transfer relationship with the energy storage means and actuable between conducting and non-conducting states when the power transfer regulator is enabled; inductor means connected with the solid-state switch means and connectable with the electric motor for conveying current thereto from the panel and the energy storage means when the solid-state switch means is in the conducting state.

  12. Transpiring purging access probe for particulate laden or hazardous environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    VanOsdol, John G

    2013-12-03

    An access probe for remote-sensing access through a viewing port, viewing volume, and access port into a vessel. The physical boundary around the viewing volume is partially formed by a porous sleeve lying between the viewing volume and a fluid conduit. In a first mode of operation, a fluid supplied to the fluid conduit encounters the porous sleeve and flows through the porous material to maintain the viewing volume free of ash or other matter. When additional fluid force is needed to clear the viewing volume, the pressure of the fluid flow is increased sufficiently to slidably translate the porous sleeve, greatly increasing the flow into the viewing volume. The porous sleeve is returned to position by an actuating spring. The access probe thereby provides for alternate modes of operation based on the pressure of an actuating fluid.

  13. Auxiliary Ligand-Dependent Assembly of Several Ni/Ni-Cd Compounds with N2O2 Donor Tetradentate Symmetrical Schiff Base Ligand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ge, Ying Ying; Li, Guo-Bi; Fang, Hua-Cai; Zhan, Xu Lin; Gu, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Jin Hao; Sun, Feng; Cai, Yue-Peng; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2010-09-18

    Several low-dimensional Ni/Ni-Cd complexes containing N2O2 donor tetradentate symmetrical Schiff base ligand bis(acetylacetone)ethylene-diamine (sy-H2L2), namely, [Ni(sy-L2)]2?HLa?ClO4 (2), (HLa)2?(ClO4)?(NO3) (3), [Ni(sy-L2)X]2](4,4-bipy) (where La = 5,7-dimethyl-3,6-dihydro-2H-1,4-diazepine, X = ClO4 (4), X=NO3 (5), [Ni(sy-L2)Cd(SCN)2]n (6) and [Ni(sy-L2)?Cd(N3)2]n (7) have been synthesized from [Ni(sy-L2)]2?H2O (1). Complex 2, is three component discrete assembly generated from (HLa)+ moiety bridged with [Ni(sy-L2)] unit and ClO4- anion. A solution containing complex 2 and Cd(NO3)2 results in a mixture of 1 and 3. Further re-crystallization of 1 and 3 with various auxiliary ligands, provides coordination complexes 4 7 stabilized by weak hydrogen bonds in which 6 and 7 represent the first 1D heteronuclear complexes based on symmetric acacen-base Schiff base ligand.

  14. Solvent-mediated internal conversion in diphenoxyethane-(H{sub 2}O){sub n}clusters, n = 2-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, Patrick S.; Buchanan, Evan G.; Gord, Joseph R.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2015-04-21

    1,2-diphenoxyethane (DPOE) is a flexible bichromophore whose excited states come in close-lying pairs whose splitting and vibronic coupling can be modulated by solvent. Building on the ground state infrared spectroscopy of DPOE-(H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters with n = 2-4 from the adjoining paper [Walsh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 154303 (2015)], the present work focuses on the vibronic and excited state infrared spectroscopies of the clusters. The type and degree of asymmetry of the water cluster binding to DPOE is reflected in the variation in the magnitude of the S{sub 1}/S{sub 2} splitting with cluster size. Excited state resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy was performed at the electronic origins of the first two excited states in order to explore how the water clusters OH stretch spectra report on the nature of the two excited states, and the interaction of the S{sub 2} state with nearby S{sub 1} vibronic levels mediated by the water clusters. The data set, when taken as a whole, provides a state-to-state view of internal conversion and the role of solvent in mediating conversion of electronic excitation between two chromophores, providing a molecular-scale view of Kashas rule.

  15. Using benchmarking to minimize common DOE waste streams. Volume 1, Methodology and liquid photographic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, V.

    1994-04-01

    Finding innovative ways to reduce waste streams generated at Department of Energy (DOE) sites by 50% by the year 2000 is a challenge for DOE`s waste minimization efforts. This report examines the usefulness of benchmarking as a waste minimization tool, specifically regarding common waste streams at DOE sites. A team of process experts from a variety of sites, a project leader, and benchmarking consultants completed the project with management support provided by the Waste Minimization Division EM-352. Using a 12-step benchmarking process, the team examined current waste minimization processes for liquid photographic waste used at their sites and used telephone and written questionnaires to find ``best-in-class`` industrv partners willing to share information about their best waste minimization techniques and technologies through a site visit. Eastman Kodak Co., and Johnson Space Center/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) agreed to be partners. The site visits yielded strategies for source reduction, recycle/recovery of components, regeneration/reuse of solutions, and treatment of residuals, as well as best management practices. An additional benefit of the work was the opportunity for DOE process experts to network and exchange ideas with their peers at similar sites.

  16. Hanford Site waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Hanford Site WMin/P2 program is an organized, comprehensive, and continual effort to systematically reduce the quantity and toxicity of hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and sanitary wastes; conserve resources; and prevent or minimize pollutant releases to all environmental media from all Site activities. The Hanford Site WMin/P2 program plan reflects national and DOE waste minimization and pollution prevention goals and policies, and represents an ongoing effort to make WMin/P2 part of the Site operating philosophy. In accordance with these policies, a hierarchical approach to environmental management has been adopted and is applied to all types of polluting and waste generating activities. Pollution prevention and waste minimization through source reduction are first priority in the Hanford WMin/P2 program, followed by environmentally safe recycling. Treatment to reduce the quantity, toxicity, and/or mobility will be considered only when prevention or recycling are not possible or practical. Environmentally safe disposal is the last option.

  17. Methods for minimizing plastic flow of oil shale during in situ retorting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Arthur E.; Mallon, Richard G.

    1978-01-01

    In an in situ oil shale retorting process, plastic flow of hot rubblized oil shale is minimized by injecting carbon dioxide and water into spent shale above the retorting zone. These gases react chemically with the mineral constituents of the spent shale to form a cement-like material which binds the individual shale particles together and bonds the consolidated mass to the wall of the retort. This relieves the weight burden borne by the hot shale below the retorting zone and thereby minimizes plastic flow in the hot shale. At least a portion of the required carbon dioxide and water can be supplied by recycled product gases.

  18. Providing Runtime Clock Synchronization With Minimal Node-to-Node Time

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Deviation on XT4s and XT5s (Conference) | SciTech Connect Providing Runtime Clock Synchronization With Minimal Node-to-Node Time Deviation on XT4s and XT5s Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Providing Runtime Clock Synchronization With Minimal Node-to-Node Time Deviation on XT4s and XT5s We present a new high precision clock synchronization algorithm designed for large XT4 and XT5 leadership-class machines. The algorithm, which is designed to support OS noise reduction through

  19. Minimizing System Noise Effects For Extreme-Scale Scientific Simulation Through Function Delegation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dongarra, Jack J.; Bosilca, George

    2013-06-11

    The primary goal of the Minimizing System Noise Effects For Extreme-Scale Scientific Simulation through Function Delegation project is to eliminate or at best strongly minimize the impact of the noise introduced by the operating system, during large scale parallel applications runs. Collective communication operations are a basic building block for parallel programing models and scientific applications. These operations often dominate execution time of applications and tend to limit their scalability. In order to address this challenge, we evaluated different strategies to adapt the collective communications underlying topologies to the hardware architecture in order to provide increased levels of performance to the parallel applications.

  20. Oxygen-consuming chlor alkali cell configured to minimize peroxide formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chlistunoff, Jerzy B.; Lipp, Ludwig; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2006-08-01

    Oxygen-consuming zero gap chlor-alkali cell was configured to minimize peroxide formation. The cell included an ion-exchange membrane that divided the cell into an anode chamber including an anode and a cathode chamber including an oxygen gas diffusion cathode. The cathode included a single-piece of electrically conducting graphitized carbon cloth. Catalyst and polytetrafluoroethylene were attached to only one side of the cloth. When the cathode was positioned against the cation exchange membrane with the catalyst side away from the membrane, electrolysis of sodium chloride to chlorine and caustic (sodium hydroxide) proceeded with minimal peroxide formation.

  1. Inflation driven by scalar field with non-minimal kinetic coupling with Higgs and quadratic potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granda, L.N.

    2011-04-01

    We study a scalar field with non-minimal kinetic coupling to itself and to the curvature. The slow rolling conditions allowing an inflationary background have been found. The quadratic and Higgs type potentials have been considered, and the corresponding values for the scalar fields at the end of inflation allows to recover the connection with particle physics.

  2. FY 1993 Projection Capability Assurance Program waste and hazard minimization. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haws, L.D.; Homan, D.A.

    1993-01-15

    Waste and hazard minimization efforts in the following areas are described: (1) environmentally responsive cleaning, (2) hazardous material exposure, (3) explosive processing, (4) flex circuit manufacturing, (5) tritium capture w/o conversion to water, (6) ES&H compatible pyrotechnic materials, and (7) remote explosive component assembly.

  3. Minimal 3-3-1 model with only two Higgs triplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, J. G. Jr.; Pinheiro, P. R. D.; Pires, C. A. de S; Rodrigues da Silva, P. S.

    2011-11-01

    The simplest non-Abelian gauge extension of the electroweak standard model, the SU(3){sub c} x SU(3){sub L} x U(1){sub N}, known as the 3-3-1 model, has a minimal version which demands the least possible fermionic content to account for the whole established phenomenology for the well-known particles and interactions. Nevertheless, in its original form the minimal 3-3-1 model was proposed with a set of three scalar triplets and one sextet in order to yield the spontaneous breaking of the gauge symmetry and generate the observed fermion masses. Such a huge scalar sector turns the task of clearly identifying the physical scalar spectrum into a clumsy labor. It not only adds an obstacle for the development of its phenomenology, but implies a scalar potential plagued with new free coupling constants. In this work, we show that the framework of the minimal 3-3-1 model can be built with only two scalar triplets, but still triggering the desired pattern of spontaneous symmetry breaking and generating the correct fermion masses. We present the exact physical spectrum and also show all the interactions involving the scalars, obtaining a neat minimal 3-3-1 model far more suited for phenomenological studies at the current Large Hadron Collider.

  4. The Layzer-Irvine equation in theories with non-minimal coupling between matter and curvature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertolami, O.; Gomes, C. E-mail: claudio.gomes@fc.up.pt

    2014-09-01

    We derive the Layzer-Irvine equation for alternative gravitational theories with non-minimal coupling between curvature and matter for an homogeneous and isotropic Universe. As an application, we study the case of Abell 586, a relaxed and spherically symmetric galaxy cluster, assuming some matter density profiles.

  5. Residuals in steel products -- Impacts on properties and measures to minimize them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emi, Toshihiko; Wijk, O.

    1996-12-31

    The effect of major residual elements on the properties of steel products is summarized. Measures to minimize these elements are discussed including the pretreatment of raw materials, innovative refining processes and environmental issues. This paper addresses (1) scrap situation, (2) upper limit of residual concentrations acceptable for processing and product quality, (3) possible means to reduce the residuals, and (4) consideration on the practicable measures to solve the residuals problem in a systematic way. 52 refs.

  6. EMGeo: Risk Minimizing Software for Finding Offshore Fossil Fuels by Fluid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Identification - Energy Innovation Portal Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Find More Like This Return to Search EMGeo: Risk Minimizing Software for Finding Offshore Fossil Fuels by Fluid Identification Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Plots of electrical conductivity over the Troll Field in the North Sea produced by analyzing 3D electromagnetic field data. Plots of electrical conductivity over the Troll Field in the North Sea produced by analyzing 3D

  7. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Program Webinar Series Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities May 17, 2011 Ranyee Chiang, AAAS Fellow, hosted by the DOE Biomass Program Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 Bioenergy - Multiple feedstocks and multiple products ethanol diesel gasoline jet fuel biopower bioproducts Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 3 Bioenergy systems and impacts Soil Land use Water Air/GHGs Biodiversity

  8. Minimal-memory realization of pearl-necklace encoders of general quantum convolutional codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houshmand, Monireh; Hosseini-Khayat, Saied

    2011-02-15

    Quantum convolutional codes, like their classical counterparts, promise to offer higher error correction performance than block codes of equivalent encoding complexity, and are expected to find important applications in reliable quantum communication where a continuous stream of qubits is transmitted. Grassl and Roetteler devised an algorithm to encode a quantum convolutional code with a ''pearl-necklace'' encoder. Despite their algorithm's theoretical significance as a neat way of representing quantum convolutional codes, it is not well suited to practical realization. In fact, there is no straightforward way to implement any given pearl-necklace structure. This paper closes the gap between theoretical representation and practical implementation. In our previous work, we presented an efficient algorithm to find a minimal-memory realization of a pearl-necklace encoder for Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) convolutional codes. This work is an extension of our previous work and presents an algorithm for turning a pearl-necklace encoder for a general (non-CSS) quantum convolutional code into a realizable quantum convolutional encoder. We show that a minimal-memory realization depends on the commutativity relations between the gate strings in the pearl-necklace encoder. We find a realization by means of a weighted graph which details the noncommutative paths through the pearl necklace. The weight of the longest path in this graph is equal to the minimal amount of memory needed to implement the encoder. The algorithm has a polynomial-time complexity in the number of gate strings in the pearl-necklace encoder.

  9. Minimal position-velocity uncertainty wave packets in relativistic and non-relativistic quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Hashimi, M.H. Wiese, U.-J.

    2009-12-15

    We consider wave packets of free particles with a general energy-momentum dispersion relation E(p). The spreading of the wave packet is determined by the velocity v={partial_derivative}{sub p}E. The position-velocity uncertainty relation {delta}x{delta}v{>=}1/2 |<{partial_derivative}{sub p}{sup 2}E>| is saturated by minimal uncertainty wave packets {phi}(p)=Aexp(-{alpha}E(p)+{beta}p). In addition to the standard minimal Gaussian wave packets corresponding to the non-relativistic dispersion relation E(p)=p{sup 2}/2m, analytic calculations are presented for the spreading of wave packets with minimal position-velocity uncertainty product for the lattice dispersion relation E(p)=-cos(pa)/ma{sup 2} as well as for the relativistic dispersion relation E(p)={radical}(p{sup 2}+m{sup 2}). The boost properties of moving relativistic wave packets as well as the propagation of wave packets in an expanding Universe are also discussed.

  10. Annual Report on Waste Generation and Waste Minimization Progress, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is DOE`s first annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress. Data presented in this report were collected from all DOE sites which met minimum threshold criteria established for this report. The fifty-seven site submittals contained herein represent data from over 100 reporting sites within 25 states. Radioactive, hazardous and sanitary waste quantities and the efforts to minimize these wastes are highlighted within the fifty-seven site submittals. In general, sites have made progress in moving beyond the planning phase of their waste minimization programs. This is evident by the overall 28 percent increase in the total amount of materials recycled from 1991 to 1992, as well as individual site initiatives. During 1991 and 1992, DOE generated a total of 279,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste and 243,000 metric tons of non-radioactive waste. These waste amounts include significant portions of process wastewater required to be reported to regulatory agencies in the state of Texas and the state of Tennessee. Specifically, the Pantex Plant in Texas treats an industrial wastewater that is considered by the Texas Water Commission to be a hazardous waste. In 1992, State regulated wastewater from the Pantex Plant represented 3,620 metric tons, 10 percent of the total hazardous waste generated by DOE. Similarly, mixed low-level wastewater from the TSCA Incinerator Facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site in Tennessee represented 55 percent of the total radioactive waste generated by DOE in 1992.

  11. Using benchmarking to minimize common DOE waste streams: Volume 5. Office paper waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, V.

    1995-10-01

    Finding innovative ways to reduce waste streams generated at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites by 50% by the year 2000 is a challenge for DOE`s waste minimization efforts. A team composed of members from several DOE facilities used the quality tool known as benchmarking to improve waste minimization efforts. First the team examined office waste generation and handling processes at their sites. Then team members developed telephone and written questionnaires to help identify potential ``best-in-class`` industry partners willing to share information about their best waste minimization techniques and technologies. The team identified two benchmarking partners, NIKE, Inc., in Beaverton, Oregon, and Microsoft, Inc., in Redmond, Washington. Both companies have proactive, employee-driven environmental issues programs. Both companies report strong employee involvement, management commitment, and readily available markets for recyclable materials such as white paper and nonwhite assorted paper. The availability of markets, the initiative and cooperation of employees, and management support are the main enablers for their programs. At both companies, recycling and waste reduction programs often cut across traditional corporate divisions such as procurement, janitorial services, environmental compliance, grounds maintenance, cafeteria operations, surplus sales, and shipping and receiving. These companies exhibited good cooperation between these functions to design and implement recycling and waste reduction programs.

  12. Waste minimization assessment for a manufacturer of iron castings and fabricated sheet metal parts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleischman, M.; Harris, J.J.; Handmaker, A.; Looby, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. That document has been superseded by the Facility Pollution Prevention Guide. The WMAC team at the University of Louisville performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures iron castings and fabricated sheet metal parts. Foundry operations include mixing and mold formation, core making, metal pouring, shakeout, finishing, and painting. Cutting, shaping, and welding are the principal metal fabrication operations. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations indicated that paint-related wastes are generated in large quantities, and that significant waste reduction and cost savings could be realized by installing a dry powder coating system or by replacing conventional air spray paint guns with high-volume low-pressure spray guns. This research brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

  13. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masala, Salvatore; Tarantino, Umberto; Nano, Giovanni; Iundusi, Riccardo; Fiori, Roberto Da Ros, Valerio Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  14. Beamline 5.4.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations FTIR bench and IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution;...

  15. Beamline 1.4.4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    800 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Thermo Nicolet Nexus 870 FTIR, Continuum XL IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample...

  16. Static jaw collimation settings to minimize radiation dose to normal brain tissue during stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Eun Young; Zhang Xin; Yan Yulong; Sharma, Sunil; Penagaricano, Jose; Moros, Eduardo; Corry, Peter

    2012-01-01

    At University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is performed by using a linear accelerator with an add-on micromultileaf collimator (mMLC). In our clinical setting, static jaws are automatically adapted to the furthest edge of the mMLC-defined segments with 2-mm (X jaw) and 5-mm (Y jaw) margin and the same jaw values are applied for all beam angles in the treatment planning system. This additional field gap between the static jaws and the mMLC allows additional radiation dose to normal brain tissue. Because a radiosurgery procedure consists of a single high dose to the planning target volume (PTV), reduction of unnecessary dose to normal brain tissue near the PTV is important, particularly for pediatric patients whose brains are still developing or when a critical organ, such as the optic chiasm, is near the PTV. The purpose of this study was to minimize dose to normal brain tissue by allowing minimal static jaw margin around the mMLC-defined fields and different static jaw values for each beam angle or arc. Dose output factors were measured with various static jaw margins and the results were compared with calculated doses in the treatment planning system. Ten patient plans were randomly selected and recalculated with zero static jaw margins without changing other parameters. Changes of PTV coverage, mean dose to predefined normal brain tissue volume adjacent to PTV, and monitor units were compared. It was found that the dose output percentage difference varied from 4.9-1.3% for the maximum static jaw opening vs. static jaw with zero margins. The mean dose to normal brain tissue at risk adjacent to the PTV was reduced by an average of 1.9%, with negligible PTV coverage loss. This dose reduction strategy may be meaningful in terms of late effects of radiation, particularly in pediatric patients. This study generated clinical knowledge and tools to consistently minimize dose to normal brain tissue.

  17. Waste-minimization assessment for a paint-manufacturing plant. Environmental research brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirsch, F.W.; Looby, G.P.

    1991-07-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of hazardous waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual (EPA/625/7-88/003, July 1988). The WMAC team at Colorado State University inspected a plant blending and mixing raw materials into paints, coatings, stains, and surface-treating products. For water-based paints, water, latex, resins, extenders, and pigments are mixed and blended. For oil-based paints, solvents replace water and latex, and plasticizers, tints, and thinners are also added. These batches are then transferred to let-down tanks where additional ingredients are incorporated. After testing, the paints meeting specifications are filtered, canned, labelled, and packaged for shipping. Hazardous wastes result when the mixing vessels, let-down tanks, and lines are cleaned. For example, cleaning a let-down tank after a water-based paint has been blended requires about 35 gal water; after a 400-gal tank for a solvent-based paint, about 5 gal mineral spirits. Because the spirits are sent off-site for recovery, most of the waste results from cleaning up after mixing water-based paint. This waste is hazardous because it contains mercury used as the bactericide. Although the plant reuses rinse water, recovers solvent, and has adopted other measures to reduce waste, the team report, detailing findings and recommendations, suggested that additional savings could result from installing a pipe cleaning system, using a solvent-recovery system based on distillation, and substituting an organic material for the mercury bactericide.

  18. Minimizing resputtering of Pt-coated microspheres in a batch magnetron sputtering process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plake, A.L.

    1981-07-10

    Preventing DT loss from glass microspheres being smoothly coated with PT is needed during fabrication of laser fusion targets. Evidence indicates that the increase of substrate temperature due to resputtering will cause DT loss. Resputtering will prevent a smooth and uniform coating on these glass microspheres (140 ..mu..m in diameter). This paper reviews the method that was developed to find a set of coating conditions to minimize the DT loss, and still be able to produce thick smooth Pt coated glass microspheres.

  19. A Minimal Two-band Model for the Superconducting Fe-pnictides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghu, S.

    2010-03-25

    Following the discovery of the Fe-pnictide superconductors, LDA band structure calculations showed that the dominant contributions to the spectral weight near the Fermi energy came from the Fe 3d orbitals. The Fermi surface is characterized by two hole surfaces around the {Lambda} point and two electron surfaces around the M point of the 2 Fe/cell Brillouin zone. Here, we describe a 2-band model that reproduces the topology of the LDA Fermi surface and exhibits both ferromagnetic and q = ({pi}, 0) spin density wave (SDW) fluctuations. We argue that this minimal model contains the essential low energy physics of these materials.

  20. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photo 2 5.51" x 10.31" Position x: 8.53", y: .18" Photo 1 4.2" x 10.31" Position x: 4.36", y: .18" Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities May 17, 2011 Ranyee Chiang Alison Goss Eng Chris Dragisic Lucio Bede Jenny Hewson Tim Killeen Manuel Oliva Photo 1 4.2" x 10.31" Position x: 8.74", y: .18" vision We imagine a healthy prosperous world in which societies are forever committed to

  1. Gravitational waves from domain walls in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadota, Kenji; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken’ichi

    2015-10-16

    The next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model predicts the formation of domain walls due to the spontaneous breaking of the discrete Z{sub 3}-symmetry at the electroweak phase transition, and they collapse before the epoch of big bang nucleosynthesis if there exists a small bias term in the potential which explicitly breaks the discrete symmetry. Signatures of gravitational waves produced from these unstable domain walls are estimated and their parameter dependence is investigated. It is shown that the amplitude of gravitational waves becomes generically large in the decoupling limit, and that their frequency is low enough to be probed in future pulsar timing observations.

  2. Scattering Amplitudes, the AdS/CFT Correspondence, Minimal Surfaces, and Integrability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alday, Luis F.

    2010-01-01

    We focus on the computation of scattering amplitudes of planar maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mill in four dimensions at strong coupling by means of the AdS/CFT correspondence and explain how the problem boils down to the computation of minimal surfaces in AdS in the first part of this paper. In the second part of this review we explain how integrability allows to give a solution to the problem in terms of a set of integral equations. The intention of the review is to give a pedagogical, rather than very detailed, exposition.

  3. Hidden conformal symmetry of rotating black holes in minimal five-dimensional gauged supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setare, M. R.; Kamali, V.

    2010-10-15

    In the present paper we show that for a low frequency limit the wave equation of a massless scalar field in the background of nonextremal charged rotating black holes in five-dimensional minimal gauged and ungauged supergravity can be written as the Casimir of an SL(2,R) symmetry. Our result shows that the entropy of the black hole is reproduced by the Cardy formula. Also the absorption cross section is consistent with the finite temperature absorption cross section for a two-dimensional conformal field theory.

  4. General Nonextremal Rotating Black Holes in Minimal Five-Dimensional Gauged Supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chong, Z.-W.; Lue, H.; Pope, C.N.; Cvetic, M.

    2005-10-14

    We construct the general solution for nonextremal charged rotating black holes in five-dimensional minimal gauged supergravity. They are characterized by four nontrivial parameters: namely, the mass, the charge, and the two independent rotation parameters. The metrics in general describe regular rotating black holes, providing the parameters lie in appropriate ranges so that naked singularities and closed timelike curves (CTCs) are avoided. We calculate the conserved energy, angular momenta, and charge for the solutions, and show how supersymmetric solutions arise in a Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield limit. These have naked CTCs in general, but for special choices of the parameters we obtain new regular supersymmetric black holes or smooth topological solitons.

  5. Identifying industrial best practices for the waste minimization of low-level radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, V.

    1996-04-01

    In US DOE, changing circumstances are affecting the management and disposal of solid, low-level radioactive waste (LLW). From 1977 to 1991, the nuclear power industry achieved major reductions in solid waste disposal, and DOE is interested in applying those practices to reduce solid waste at DOE facilities. Project focus was to identify and document commercial nuclear industry best practices for radiological control programs supporting routine operations, outages, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The project team (DOE facility and nuclear power industry representatives) defined a Work Control Process Model, collected nuclear power industry Best Practices, and made recommendations to minimize LLW at DOE facilities.

  6. Superradiance and black hole bomb in five-dimensional minimal ungauged supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliev, Alikram N.

    2014-11-01

    We examine the black hole bomb model which consists of a rotating black hole of five-dimenensional minimal ungauged supergravity and a reflecting mirror around it. For low-frequency scalar perturbations, we find solutions to the Klein-Gordon equation in the near-horizon and far regions of the black hole spacetime. To avoid solutions with logarithmic terms, we assume that the orbital quantum number l takes on nearly, but not exactly, integer values and perform the matching of these solutions in an intermediate region. This allows us to calculate analytically the frequency spectrum of quasinormal modes, taking the limits as l approaches even or odd integers separately. We find that all l modes of scalar perturbations undergo negative damping in the regime of superradiance, resulting in exponential growth of their amplitudes. Thus, the model under consideration would exhibit the superradiant instability, eventually behaving as a black hole bomb in five dimensions.

  7. Elimination or Minimization of Oscillation Marks: A Path To Improved Cast Surface Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Alan W. Cramb

    2007-12-17

    Oscillation marks are the most recognizable feature of continuous casting and can be related to the subsurface defects that can be found on product rolled from continuous cast slabs. The purpose of this work was to develop strategies that can be used on industrial continuous casters to reduce oscillation mark depth and, in particular, to minimize the formation of hook type defects that are prevalent on ultra low carbon grades. The major focus of the work was on developing a technique to allow heat transfer in the meniscus region of the continuous caster to be measured and the effect of mold slag chemistry and chrystallization to be documented. A new experimental technique was developed that allowed the effect of mold flux chemistry and chrystallization on the radiation heat transfer rate to be measured dynamically.

  8. Unconventional minimal subtraction and Bogoliubov-Parasyuk-Hepp-Zimmermann method: Massive scalar theory and critical exponents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvalho, Paulo R. S.; Leite, Marcelo M.

    2013-09-15

    We introduce a simpler although unconventional minimal subtraction renormalization procedure in the case of a massive scalar ??{sup 4} theory in Euclidean space using dimensional regularization. We show that this method is very similar to its counterpart in massless field theory. In particular, the choice of using the bare mass at higher perturbative order instead of employing its tree-level counterpart eliminates all tadpole insertions at that order. As an application, we compute diagrammatically the critical exponents ? and ? at least up to two loops. We perform an explicit comparison with the Bogoliubov-Parasyuk-Hepp-Zimmermann (BPHZ) method at the same loop order, show that the proposed method requires fewer diagrams and establish a connection between the two approaches.

  9. Minimally buffered data transfers between nodes in a data communications network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Douglas R.

    2015-06-23

    Methods, apparatus, and products for minimally buffered data transfers between nodes in a data communications network are disclosed that include: receiving, by a messaging module on an origin node, a storage identifier, a origin data type, and a target data type, the storage identifier specifying application storage containing data, the origin data type describing a data subset contained in the origin application storage, the target data type describing an arrangement of the data subset in application storage on a target node; creating, by the messaging module, origin metadata describing the origin data type; selecting, by the messaging module from the origin application storage in dependence upon the origin metadata and the storage identifier, the data subset; and transmitting, by the messaging module to the target node, the selected data subset for storing in the target application storage in dependence upon the target data type without temporarily buffering the data subset.

  10. Variational method for the minimization of entropy generation in solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smit, Sjoerd; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2015-04-07

    In this work, a method is presented to extend traditional solar cell simulation tools to make it possible to calculate the most efficient design of practical solar cells. The method is based on the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, which is used to derive an expression for the local entropy generation rate in the solar cell, making it possible to quantify all free energy losses on the same scale. The framework of non-equilibrium thermodynamics can therefore be combined with the calculus of variations and existing solar cell models to minimize the total entropy generation rate in the cell to find the most optimal design. The variational method is illustrated by applying it to a homojunction solar cell. The optimization results in a set of differential algebraic equations, which determine the optimal shape of the doping profile for given recombination and transport models.

  11. Global optimization of multicomponent distillation configurations: 2. Enumeration based global minimization algorithm

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nallasivam, Ulaganathan; Shah, Vishesh H.; Shenvi, Anirudh A.; Huff, Joshua; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2016-02-10

    We present a general Global Minimization Algorithm (GMA) to identify basic or thermally coupled distillation configurations that require the least vapor duty under minimum reflux conditions for separating any ideal or near-ideal multicomponent mixture into a desired number of product streams. In this algorithm, global optimality is guaranteed by modeling the system using Underwood equations and reformulating the resulting constraints to bilinear inequalities. The speed of convergence to the globally optimal solution is increased by using appropriate feasibility and optimality based variable-range reduction techniques and by developing valid inequalities. As a result, the GMA can be coupled with already developedmore » techniques that enumerate basic and thermally coupled distillation configurations, to provide for the first time, a global optimization based rank-list of distillation configurations.« less

  12. Application of a High-Throughput Analyzer in Evaluating Solid Adsorbents for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture via Multicomponent Adsorption of CO2, N-2, and H2O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, JA; McDonald, TM; Bae, TH; Bachman, JE; Sumida, K; Dutton, JJ; Kaye, SS; Long, JR

    2015-04-15

    Despite the large number of metal-organic frameworks that have been studied in the context of post-combustion carbon capture, adsorption equilibria of gas mixtures including CO2, N-2, and H2O, which are the three biggest components of the flue gas emanating from a coal- or natural gas-fired power plant, have never been reported. Here, we disclose the design and validation of a high-throughput multicomponent adsorption instrument that can measure equilibrium adsorption isotherms for mixtures of gases at conditions that are representative of an actual flue gas from a power plant. This instrument is used to study 15 different metal-organic frameworks, zeolites, mesoporous silicas, and activated carbons representative of the broad range of solid adsorbents that have received attention for CO2 capture. While the multicomponent results presented in this work provide many interesting fundamental insights, only adsorbents functionalized with alkylamines are shown to have any significant CO2 capacity in the presence of N-2 and H2O at equilibrium partial pressures similar to those expected in a carbon capture process. Most significantly, the amine-appended metal organic framework mmen-Mg-2(dobpdc) (mmen = N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine, dobpdc (4-) = 4,4'-dioxido-3,3'-biphenyldicarboxylate) exhibits a record CO2 capacity of 4.2 +/- 0.2 mmol/g (16 wt %) at 0.1 bar and 40 degrees C in the presence of a high partial pressure of H2O.

  13. Minimizing Waste from the Oil Industry: Scale Treatment and Scrap Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, M.

    2002-02-26

    Naturally occurring radioactive material is technologically concentrated in the piping in systems in the oil and gas industry, especially in the offshore facilities. The activity, mainly Ra-226, in the scales in the systems are often at levels classified as low level radioactive waste (LSA) in the industry. When the components and pipes are descaled for maintenance or recycling purposes, usually by high-pressure water jetting, the LSA scales arising constitute a significant quantity of radioactive waste for disposal. A new process is under development for the treatment of scales, where the radioactive solids are separated from the inactive. This would result in a much smaller fraction to be deposited as radioactive waste. The radioactive part recovered from the scales will be reduced to a stable non-metallic salt and because the volume is significantly smaller then the original material, will minimize the cost for disposal. The pipes, that have been cleaned by high pressure water jetting can either be reused or free released by scrapping and melting for recycling.

  14. Application of geographic information systems to waste minimization efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyttle, T.W.; Smith, D.M.; Burns, M.; Weinrach, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), facility waste streams tend to be small but highly diverse. Initial characterization of such waste streams is often difficult in part due to a lack of tools to assist the generators themselves in completing such assessments. A methodology has been developed at LANL to allow process knowledgeable field personnel to develop baseline waste generation assessments and to evaluate potential waste minimization technology. This Process Waste Assessment (PWA) system is an application constructed within the Process Modeling System and currently being integrated with the InFoCAD Geographic Information System (GIS) . The Process Modeling System (PMS) is an object-oriented, mass balance-based, discrete-event simulation framework written using the Common Lisp Object System (CLOS) . Analytical capabilities supported within the PWA system include: complete mass balance specifications, historical characterization of selected waste streams and generation of facility profiles for materials consumption, resource utilization and worker exposure. Development activities include integration with the LANL facilities management Geographic Information System (GIS) and provisions for a Best Available Technologies (BAT) database. The environments used to develop these assessment tools will be discussed in addition to a review of initial implementation results.

  15. A description of the Galactic Center excess in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achterberg, Abraham; Amoroso, Simone; Caron, Sascha; Hendriks, Luc; Austri, Roberto Ruiz de

    2015-08-03

    Observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) indicate an excess in gamma rays originating from the center of our Galaxy. A possible explanation for this excess is the annihilation of Dark Matter particles. We have investigated the annihilation of neutralinos as Dark Matter candidates within the phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (pMSSM). An iterative particle filter approach was used to search for solutions within the pMSSM. We found solutions that are consistent with astroparticle physics and collider experiments, and provide a fit to the energy spectrum of the excess. The neutralino is a Bino/Higgsino or Bino/Wino/Higgsino mixture with a mass in the range 84–92 GeV or 87–97 GeV annihilating into W bosons. A third solutions is found for a neutralino of mass 174–187 GeV annihilating into top quarks. The best solutions yield a Dark Matter relic density 0.06<Ωh{sup 2}<0.13. These pMSSM solutions make clear forecasts for LHC, direct and indirect DM detection experiments. If the pMSSM explanation of the excess seen by Fermi-LAT is correct, a DM signal might be discovered soon.

  16. Spatial light modulator array with heat minimization and image enhancement features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jain, Kanti (Briarcliff Manor, NY); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Zemel, Marc (New Rochelle, NY)

    2007-01-30

    An enhanced spatial light modulator (ESLM) array, a microelectronics patterning system and a projection display system using such an ESLM for heat-minimization and resolution enhancement during imaging, and the method for fabricating such an ESLM array. The ESLM array includes, in each individual pixel element, a small pixel mirror (reflective region) and a much larger pixel surround. Each pixel surround includes diffraction-grating regions and resolution-enhancement regions. During imaging, a selected pixel mirror reflects a selected-pixel beamlet into the capture angle of a projection lens, while the diffraction grating of the pixel surround redirects heat-producing unused radiation away from the projection lens. The resolution-enhancement regions of selected pixels provide phase shifts that increase effective modulation-transfer function in imaging. All of the non-selected pixel surrounds redirect all radiation energy away from the projection lens. All elements of the ESLM are fabricated by deposition, patterning, etching and other microelectronic process technologies.

  17. Minimally allowed neutrinoless double beta decay rates from approximate flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, James [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States) and Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay ({beta}{beta}0{nu}) is among the only realistic probes of Majorana neutrinos. In the standard scenario, dominated by light neutrino exchange, the process amplitude is proportional to m{sub ee}, the e-e element of the Majorana mass matrix. Naively, current data allow for vanishing m{sub ee}, but this should be protected by an appropriate flavor symmetry. All such symmetries lead to mass matrices inconsistent with oscillation phenomenology. I perform a spurion analysis to break all possible Abelian symmetries that guarantee vanishing {beta}{beta}0{nu} rates and search for minimally allowed values. I survey 230 broken structures to yield m{sub ee} values and current phenomenological constraints under a variety of scenarios. This analysis also extracts predictions for both neutrino oscillation parameters and kinematic quantities. Assuming reasonable tuning levels, I find that m{sub ee}>4x10{sup -6} eV at 99% confidence. Bounds below this value might indicate the Dirac neutrino nature or the existence of new light (eV-MeV scale) degrees of freedom that can potentially be probed elsewhere.

  18. Minimally allowed neutrinoless double beta decay rates within an anarchical framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, James [Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay ({beta}{beta}0{nu}) is the only realistic probe of the Majorana nature of the neutrino. In the standard picture, its rate is proportional to m{sub ee}, the e-e element of the Majorana neutrino mass matrix in the flavor basis. I explore minimally allowed m{sub ee} values within the framework of mass matrix anarchy where neutrino parameters are defined statistically at low energies. Distributions of mixing angles are well defined by the Haar integration measure, but masses are dependent on arbitrary weighting functions and boundary conditions. I survey the integration measure parameter space and find that for sufficiently convergent weightings, m{sub ee} is constrained between (0.01-0.4) eV at 90% confidence. Constraints from neutrino mixing data lower these bounds. Singular integration measures allow for arbitrarily small m{sub ee} values with the remaining elements ill-defined, but this condition constrains the flavor structure of the model's ultraviolet completion. {beta}{beta}0{nu} bounds below m{sub ee}{approx}5x10{sup -3} eV should indicate symmetry in the lepton sector, new light degrees of freedom, or the Dirac nature of the neutrino.

  19. Effect of quark sector minimal flavor violation on neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, Brian; Kolda, Christopher [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The question of whether neutrino masses are Dirac or Majorana is one of the most important, and most difficult, questions remaining in the neutrino sector. Searches for neutrinoless double {beta} decay may help to resolve this question, but are also sensitive to new, higher-dimension {delta}L=2 operators. In this paper we place two phenomenological constraints on these operators at dimension d{<=}11. First, we require that the operators obey the quark flavor symmetries of the standard model, with any violation of the symmetries being due to Yukawa interactions, a scheme known as minimal flavor violation. Second, we require that the operators which generate neutrinoless double {beta} decay, and any operators related by the flavor symmetries, do not induce neutrino masses above the experimental and astrophysical limits. We find that these requirements severely constrain the operators which can violate lepton number, such that most can no longer contribute to neutrinoless double {beta} decay at observable rates. It is noteworthy that quark flavor symmetries can play such a strong role in constraining new leptonic physics, even when that physics is not quark flavor changing. Those few operators that can mimic a Majorana neutrino mass then appear with cutoffs below a TeV, and represent new physics which could be directly probed at the LHC or a future linear collider.

  20. How well will ton-scale dark matter direct detection experiments constrain minimal supersymmetry?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akrami, Yashar; Savage, Christopher; Scott, Pat; Conrad, Jan; Edsj, Joakim E-mail: savage@fysik.su.se E-mail: conrad@fysik.su.se

    2011-04-01

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are amongst the most interesting dark matter (DM) candidates. Many DM candidates naturally arise in theories beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics, like weak-scale supersymmetry (SUSY). Experiments aim to detect WIMPs by scattering, annihilation or direct production, and thereby determine the underlying theory to which they belong, along with its parameters. Here we examine the prospects for further constraining the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) with future ton-scale direct detection experiments. We consider ton-scale extrapolations of three current experiments: CDMS, XENON and COUPP, with 1000 kg-years of raw exposure each. We assume energy resolutions, energy ranges and efficiencies similar to the current versions of the experiments, and include backgrounds at target levels. Our analysis is based on full likelihood constructions for the experiments. We also take into account present uncertainties on hadronic matrix elements for neutralino-quark couplings, and on halo model parameters. We generate synthetic data based on four benchmark points and scan over the CMSSM parameter space using nested sampling. We construct both Bayesian posterior PDFs and frequentist profile likelihoods for the model parameters, as well as the mass and various cross-sections of the lightest neutralino. Future ton-scale experiments will help substantially in constraining supersymmetry, especially when results of experiments primarily targeting spin-dependent nuclear scattering are combined with those directed more toward spin-independent interactions.

  1. Direct constraints on minimal supersymmetry from Fermi-LAT observations of the dwarf galaxy Segue 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Pat; Conrad, Jan; Edsj, Joakim; Bergstrm, Lars; Akrami, Yashar; Farnier, Christian E-mail: conrad@fysik.su.se E-mail: lbe@fysik.su.se E-mail: yashar@fysik.su.se

    2010-01-01

    The dwarf galaxy Segue 1 is one of the most promising targets for the indirect detection of dark matter. Here we examine what constraints 9 months of Fermi-LAT gamma-ray observations of Segue 1 place upon the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM), with the lightest neutralino as the dark matter particle. We use nested sampling to explore the CMSSM parameter space, simultaneously fitting other relevant constraints from accelerator bounds, the relic density, electroweak precision observables, the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon and B-physics. We include spectral and spatial fits to the Fermi observations, a full treatment of the instrumental response and its related uncertainty, and detailed background models. We also perform an extrapolation to 5 years of observations, assuming no signal is observed from Segue 1 in that time. Results marginally disfavour models with low neutralino masses and high annihilation cross-sections. Virtually all of these models are however already disfavoured by existing experimental or relic density constraints.

  2. Non-thermal production of minimal dark matter via right-handed neutrino decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoki, Mayumi; Toma, Takashi; Vicente, Avelino

    2015-09-29

    Minimal Dark Matter (MDM) stands as one of the simplest dark matter scenarios. In MDM models, annihilation and co-annihilation processes among the members of the MDM multiplet are usually very efficient, pushing the dark matter mass above O(10) TeV in order to reproduce the observed dark matter relic density. Motivated by this little drawback, in this paper we consider an extension of the MDM scenario by three right-handed neutrinos. Two specific choices for the MDM multiplet are studied: a fermionic SU(2){sub L} quintuplet and a scalar SU(2){sub L} septuplet. The lightest right-handed neutrino, with tiny Yukawa couplings, never reaches thermal equilibrium in the early universe and is produced by freeze-in. This creates a link between dark matter and neutrino physics: dark matter can be non-thermally produced by the decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino after freeze-out, allowing to lower significantly the dark matter mass. We discuss the phenomenology of the non-thermally produced MDM and, taking into account significant Sommerfeld corrections, we find that the dark matter mass must have some specific values in order not to be in conflict with the current bounds from gamma-ray observations.

  3. Minimizing I/O Costs of Multi-Dimensional Queries with BitmapIndices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotem, Doron; Stockinger, Kurt; Wu, Kesheng

    2006-03-30

    Bitmap indices have been widely used in scientific applications and commercial systems for processing complex,multi-dimensional queries where traditional tree-based indices would not work efficiently. A common approach for reducing the size of a bitmap index for high cardinality attributes is to group ranges of values of an attribute into bins and then build a bitmap for each bin rather than a bitmap for each value of the attribute. Binning reduces storage costs,however, results of queries based on bins often require additional filtering for discarding it false positives, i.e., records in the result that do not satisfy the query constraints. This additional filtering,also known as ''candidate checking,'' requires access to the base data on disk and involves significant I/O costs. This paper studies strategies for minimizing the I/O costs for ''candidate checking'' for multi-dimensional queries. This is done by determining the number of bins allocated for each dimension and then placing bin boundaries in optimal locations. Our algorithms use knowledge of data distribution and query workload. We derive several analytical results concerning optimal bin allocation for a probabilistic query model. Our experimental evaluation with real life data shows an average I/O cost improvement of at least a factor of 10 for multi-dimensional queries on datasets from two different applications. Our experiments also indicate that the speedup increases with the number of query dimensions.

  4. A minimal sub-Planckian axion inflation model with large tensor-to-scalar ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, John

    2015-01-01

    We present a minimal axion inflation model which can generate a large tensor-to-scalar ratio while remaining sub-Planckian. The modulus of a complex scalar field ? with a ?|?|{sup 4} potential couples directly to the gauge field of a strongly-coupled sector via a term of the form (|?|/M{sub Pl}){sup m}F F-tilde . This generates a minimum of the potential which is aperiodic in the phase. The resulting inflation model is equivalent to a ?{sup 4/(m+1)} chaotic inflation model. For the natural case of a leading-order portal-like interaction of the form ?{sup }?F F-tilde , the model is equivalent to a ?{sup 4/3} chaotic inflation model and predicts a tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 16/3N = 0.097 and a scalar spectral index n{sub s} = 1 - 5/3N = 0.970. The value of |?| remains sub-Planckian throughout the observable era of inflation, with |?| ?< 0.01M{sub Pl} for N ?< 60 when ? ? 1.

  5. Method for minimizing decarburization and other high temperature oxygen reactions in a plasma sprayed material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lenling, William J.; Henfling, Joseph A.; Smith, Mark F.

    1993-06-08

    A method is disclosed for spray coating material which employs a plasma gun that has a cathode, an anode, an arc gas inlet, a first powder injection port, and a second powder injection port. A suitable arc gas is introduced through the arc gas inlet, and ionization of the arc gas between the cathode and the anode forms a plasma. The plasma is directed to emenate from an open-ended chamber defined by the boundary of the anode. A coating is deposited upon a base metal part by suspending a binder powder within a carrier gas that is fed into the plasma through the first powder injection port; a material subject to degradation by high temperature oxygen reactions is suspended within a carrier gas that is fed into the plasma through the second injection port. The material fed through the second injection port experiences a cooler portion of the plasma and has a shorter dwell time within the plasma to minimize high temperature oxygen reactions. The material of the first port and the material of the second port intermingle within the plasma to form a uniform coating having constituent percentages related to the powder-feed rates of the materials through the respective ports.

  6. The Coming Nuclear Renaissance for Next Generation Safeguards Specialists--Maximizing Potential and Minimizing the Risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eipeldauer, Mary D

    2009-01-01

    This document is intended to provide an overview of the workshop entitled 'The Coming Nuclear Renaissance for the Next Generation Safeguards Experts-Maximizing Benefits While Minimizing Proliferation Risks', conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in partnership with the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This document presents workshop objectives; lists the numerous participant universities and individuals, the nuclear nonproliferation lecture topics covered, and the facilities tours taken as part of the workshop; and discusses the university partnership sessions and proposed areas for collaboration between the universities and ORNL for 2009. Appendix A contains the agenda for the workshop; Appendix B lists the workshop attendees and presenters with contact information; Appendix C contains graphics of the evaluation form results and survey areas; and Appendix D summarizes the responses to the workshop evaluation form. The workshop was an opportunity for ORNL, Y-12, and SRNL staff with more than 30 years combined experience in nuclear nonproliferation to provide a comprehensive overview of their expertise for the university professors and their students. The overall goal of the workshop was to emphasize nonproliferation aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and to identify specific areas where the universities and experts from operations and national laboratories could collaborate.

  7. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility, Permit Number NEV HW0101, Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Patrick

    2014-02-14

    This report summarizes the EPA identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

  8. Multispectrum measurements of spectral line parameters including temperature dependences of N2- and self-broadened half-width coefficients in the region of the v9 band of 12C2H6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malathy Devi, V.; Benner, D. C.; Rinsland, C.P.; Smith, M.A.H.; Sams, Robert L.; Blake, Thomas A.; Flaud, Jean Marie; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, L.R.; Mantz, A. W.

    2010-11-01

    Ethane is a prominent contributor to the spectrum of Titan, particularly in the region of the v9 band at 12?m. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting program was applied to laboratory spectra of ethane to measure accurate positions, absolute intensities, N2- and selfbroadened half- width coefficients and their temperature dependences for a large number transitions. These measurements include several pQ and rQ sub-bands (and other sub-bands such as pP, rR) in the v9 fundamental band of 12C2H6 centered near 822 cm-1. Positions were measured for 2958 transitions and intensities for 3771 transitions. N2- and self-broadened half-width coefficients were determined for over 1700 transitions while temperature dependence exponents were retrieved for over 1350 of those transitions. Of these, many measurements (mostly line positions and intensities) belong to the v9+v4-v4 hot band, v9+2v4-2v4 hot band, 13C12CH6 v9 band and unidentified transitions. Forty-three high resolution (0.0016-0.005 cm-1) infrared laboratory absorption spectra recorded at temperatures between 148 and 298 K were fitted simultaneously to retrieve these parameters. Forty-one of these spectra were obtained in the temperature range of 211-298 K using the Bruker IFS 120HR interferometer located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington. Two additional spectra at 148 K were recorded using a new temperature stabilized cryogenic cell designed to work inside the sample compartment of the high resolution Bruker IFS 125HR interferometer of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena California. The specialized cooling cell developed at Connecticut College and capable of achieving gas sample temperatures down to 70 K with a temperature stability and uniformity of better than 0.05 K was employed to record the 148 K spectra. Constraints to intensity ratios, doublet separations, half-width coefficients and their temperature dependence exponents were required to determine these parameters for each of the two torsional split components. Similar to N2- and self-broadened half-width coefficients, their temperature dependence exponents were also found to follow distinctively different patterns. The variations of the observed half-width coefficients and their temperature dependences with respect to J, K quantum numbers are discussed. Because of the high density of torsionally split spectral lines, hot-band ransitions as well as blends, it was not possible to retrieve any information on the small pressure-induced shift coefficients. Present results are compared to other available measurements.

  9. N2Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utah Zip: 84093 Region: Rockies Area Sector: Solar Product: HOE Solar performance optics for PV, CSP, Desal and UV water treatment Year Founded: 2003 Phone Number: 801 608...

  10. Complex functionality with minimal computation. Promise and pitfalls of reduced-tracer ocean biogeochemistry models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Galbraith, Eric D.; Dunne, John P.; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Slater, Richard D.; Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Dufour, Carolina O.; de Souza, Gregory F.; Bianchi, Daniele; Claret, Mariona; Rodgers, Keith B.; et al

    2015-12-21

    Earth System Models increasingly include ocean biogeochemistry models in order to predict changes in ocean carbon storage, hypoxia, and biological productivity under climate change. However, state-of-the-art ocean biogeochemical models include many advected tracers, that significantly increase the computational resources required, forcing a trade-off with spatial resolution. Here, we compare a state-of the art model with 30 prognostic tracers (TOPAZ) with two reduced-tracer models, one with 6 tracers (BLING), and the other with 3 tracers (miniBLING). The reduced-tracer models employ parameterized, implicit biological functions, which nonetheless capture many of the most important processes resolved by TOPAZ. All three are embedded inmore » the same coupled climate model. Despite the large difference in tracer number, the absence of tracers for living organic matter is shown to have a minimal impact on the transport of nutrient elements, and the three models produce similar mean annual preindustrial distributions of macronutrients, oxygen, and carbon. Significant differences do exist among the models, in particular the seasonal cycle of biomass and export production, but it does not appear that these are necessary consequences of the reduced tracer number. With increasing CO2, changes in dissolved oxygen and anthropogenic carbon uptake are very similar across the different models. Thus, while the reduced-tracer models do not explicitly resolve the diversity and internal dynamics of marine ecosystems, we demonstrate that such models are applicable to a broad suite of major biogeochemical concerns, including anthropogenic change. Lastly, these results are very promising for the further development and application of reduced-tracer biogeochemical models that incorporate ‘‘sub-ecosystem-scale’’ parameterizations.« less

  11. Charge transfer excitations from excited state Hartree-Fock subsequent minimization scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theophilou, Iris; Tassi, M.; Thanos, S.

    2014-04-28

    Photoinduced charge-transfer processes play a key role for novel photovoltaic phenomena and devices. Thus, the development of ab initio methods that allow for an accurate and computationally inexpensive treatment of charge-transfer excitations is a topic that nowadays attracts a lot of scientific attention. In this paper we extend an approach recently introduced for the description of single and double excitations [M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 113, 690 (2013); M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124107 (2013)] to allow for the description of intermolecular charge-transfer excitations. We describe an excitation where an electron is transferred from a donor system to an acceptor one, keeping the excited state orthogonal to the ground state and avoiding variational collapse. These conditions are achieved by decomposing the space spanned by the Hartree-Fock (HF) ground state orbitals into four subspaces: The subspace spanned by the occupied orbitals that are localized in the region of the donor molecule, the corresponding for the acceptor ones and two more subspaces containing the virtual orbitals that are localized in the neighborhood of the donor and the acceptor, respectively. Next, we create a Slater determinant with a hole in the subspace of occupied orbitals of the donor and a particle in the virtual subspace of the acceptor. Subsequently we optimize both the hole and the particle by minimizing the HF energy functional in the corresponding subspaces. Finally, we test our approach by calculating the lowest charge-transfer excitation energies for a set of tetracyanoethylene-hydrocarbon complexes that have been used earlier as a test set for such kind of excitations.

  12. Complex functionality with minimal computation. Promise and pitfalls of reduced-tracer ocean biogeochemistry models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbraith, Eric D.; Dunne, John P.; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Slater, Richard D.; Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Dufour, Carolina O.; de Souza, Gregory F.; Bianchi, Daniele; Claret, Mariona; Rodgers, Keith B.; Marvasti, Seyedehsafoura Sedigh

    2015-12-21

    Earth System Models increasingly include ocean biogeochemistry models in order to predict changes in ocean carbon storage, hypoxia, and biological productivity under climate change. However, state-of-the-art ocean biogeochemical models include many advected tracers, that significantly increase the computational resources required, forcing a trade-off with spatial resolution. Here, we compare a state-of the art model with 30 prognostic tracers (TOPAZ) with two reduced-tracer models, one with 6 tracers (BLING), and the other with 3 tracers (miniBLING). The reduced-tracer models employ parameterized, implicit biological functions, which nonetheless capture many of the most important processes resolved by TOPAZ. All three are embedded in the same coupled climate model. Despite the large difference in tracer number, the absence of tracers for living organic matter is shown to have a minimal impact on the transport of nutrient elements, and the three models produce similar mean annual preindustrial distributions of macronutrients, oxygen, and carbon. Significant differences do exist among the models, in particular the seasonal cycle of biomass and export production, but it does not appear that these are necessary consequences of the reduced tracer number. With increasing CO2, changes in dissolved oxygen and anthropogenic carbon uptake are very similar across the different models. Thus, while the reduced-tracer models do not explicitly resolve the diversity and internal dynamics of marine ecosystems, we demonstrate that such models are applicable to a broad suite of major biogeochemical concerns, including anthropogenic change. Lastly, these results are very promising for the further development and application of reduced-tracer biogeochemical models that incorporate ‘‘sub-ecosystem-scale’’ parameterizations.

  13. Removal of Contaminants from Equipment and Debris and Waste Minimization Using the TECHXTRACT(TM) Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorg Schwitzgebel; Klaus Schwitzgebel; Michael W. Bonem; Ronald E. Borah

    1998-12-09

    From September, 1996 through July, 1997, EET, Inc. conducted a series of experiments under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Program Research and Development Agreement (PRDA). This project, entitled "Removal of Contaminants from Equipment and Debris and Waste Minimization Using the TECHXTRACT Technology" was conducted under DOE Contract DE-AC21- 96MC33138, administered by the Federal Energy Technology Center. The contract is divided into two phases - a base phase during which bench scale testing was conducted; and an optional phase for a field demonstration of a full-scale system. This report documents the results from the base phase of the contract. The base phase included the following major elements: - Evaluation of the effectiveness of various decontamination options, using both surrogate and radioactively contaminated samples. - Evaluation of various methods for the treatment of the secondary waste streams from the preferred decontamination system(s). - Evaluation of decontamination effectiveness for concrete rubble. - Preliminary engineering design and cost estimation for a full-scale system. - Preliminary economic analysis of the proposed system versus other currently available options for disposition of the materials. Results from the base phase, which are described in the following report, are very positive. Testing has shown that free release requirements and extremely high decontamination factors can be achieved for a variety of materials and radionuclides. Results for concrete rubble decontamination were less conclusive. The bench scale testing has led to the design of two different systems, both based on the TECHXTRACT chemistry, for potential full-scale demonstration. Based on the preliminary economic analysis, this system compares favorably with currently available commercial options, including disposal.

  14. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Giant Haemangiomas of the Liver: Embolisation With Bleomycin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozkaya, Halil Cinar, Celal; Besir, Fahri Halit; Par?ldar, Mustafa Oran, Ismail

    2013-04-12

    PurposeThe management of patients with giant haemangioma of the liver remains controversial. Although the usual treatment method for symptomatic giant haemangioma is surgery, the classical paradigm of operative resection remains. In this study, we evaluated the symptomatic improvement and size-reduction effect of embolisation with bleomycin mixed with lipiodol for the treatment of symptomatic giant hepatic haemangioma.MethodsThis study included 26 patients [21 female, five male; age 4165years (mean 49.831.53)] with symptomatic giant haemangioma unfit for surgery and treated with selective embolisation by bleomycin mixed with lipiodol. The patients were followed-up (mean 7.40.81months) clinically and using imaging methods. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0, and p<0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance.ResultsEmbolisation of 32 lesions in 26 patients was performed. The mean volume of the haemangiomas was 446.2888cm{sup 3} (range 3.391559cm{sup 3}) before intervention and 244.4354.38cm{sup 3} (range 94967cm{sup 3}) after intervention. No mortality or morbidity related to the treatment was identified. Symptomatic improvement was observed in all patients, and significant volume reduction was achieved (p=0.001).ConclusionThe morbidity of surgical treatment in patients with giant liver hemangioma were similar to those obtained in patients followed-up without treatment. Therefore, follow-up without treatment is preferred in most patients. Thus, minimally invasive embolisation is an alternative and effective treatment for giant symptomatic haemangioma of the liver.

  15. Minimally allowed beta beata 0_nu rates from approximate flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay ({beta}{beta}0{nu}) is the only realistic probe of Majorana neutrinos. In the standard scenario, dominated by light neutrino exchange, the process amplitude is proportional to m{sub ee} , the e - e element of the Majorana mass matrix. This is expected to hold true for small {beta}{beta}{nu} rates ({Gamma}{sub {beta}{beta}0{nu}}), even in the presence of new physics. Naively, current data allows for vanishing m{sub ee} , but this should be protected by an appropriate flavor symmetry. All such symmetries lead to mass matrices inconsistent with oscillation phenomenology. Hence, Majorana neutrinos imply nonzero {Gamma}{sub {beta}{beta}0{nu}}. I perform a spurion analysis to break all possible abelian symmetries that guarantee {Gamma}{sub {beta}{beta}0{nu}} = 0 and search for minimally allowed m{sub ee} values. Specifically, I survey 259 broken structures to yield m{sub ee} values and current phenomenological constraints under a variety of scenarios. This analysis also extracts predictions for both neutrino oscillation parameters and kinematic quantities. Assuming reasonable tuning levels, I find that m{sub ee} > 4 x 10{sup -6} eV at 99% confidence. Bounds below this value would indicate the Dirac neutrino nature or the existence of new light (eV-MeV scale) degrees of freedom that can potentially be probed elsewhere. This limit can be raised by improvements in neutrino parameter measurements, particularly of the reactor mixing angle, depending on the best fit parameter values. Such improvements will also significantly constrain the available model space and aid in future constructions.

  16. A Hydrogen-Evolving Ni(P2N2)2 Electrocatalyst Covalently Attached to a Glassy Carbon Electrode: Preparation, Characterization, and Catalysis. Comparisons With the Homogeneous Analog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Atanu K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bullock, R. Morris; Roberts, John A.

    2014-07-07

    A hydrogen-evolving homogeneous Ni(P2N2)2 electrocatalyst with peripheral ester groups has been covalently attached to a 1,2,3-triazolyllithium-terminated glassy carbon electrode. The surface-confined complex is an electroctalyst for hydrogen evolution, showing onset of catalytic current at the same potential as the soluble parent complex. X-ray photoemission spectra show excellent agreement between the coupled and homogeneous species. Coverage approaches a dense monolayer. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. The XPS measurements were performed at EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  17. A Holistic Look at Minimizing Adverse Environmental Impact Under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Veil, John A.; Puder, Markus G.; Littleton, Debra J.; Johnson, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires that “the location, design, construction, and capacity of cooling water intake structures reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact.” As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) develops new regulations to implement Section 316(b), much of the debate has centered on adverse impingement and entrainment impacts of cooling-water intake structures. Depending on the specific location and intake layout, once-through cooling systems withdrawing many millions of gallons of water per day can, to a varying degree, harm fish and other aquatic organisms in the water bodies from which the coolingmore » water is withdrawn. Therefore, opponents of once-through cooling systems have encouraged the EPA to require wet or dry cooling tower systems as the best technology available (BTA), without considering site-specific conditions. However, within the context of the broader scope of the CWA mandate, this focus seems too narrow. Therefore, this article examines the phrase “minimizing adverse environmental impact” in a holistic light. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the terms “environmental” and “minimizing.” Congress chose “environmental” in lieu of other more narrowly focused terms like “impingement and entrainment,” “water quality,” or “aquatic life.” In this light, BTA for cooling-water intake structures must minimize the entire suite of environmental impacts, as opposed to just those associated with impingement and entrainment. Wet and dry cooling tower systems work well to minimize entrainment and impingement, but they introduce other equally important impacts because they impose an energy penalty on the power output of the generating unit. The energy penalty results from a reduction in plant operating efficiency and an increase in internal power consumption. As a consequence of the energy penalty, power companies must generate additional electricity to achieve the same net output. This added production leads to additional environmental impacts associated with extraction and processing of the fuel, air emissions from burning the fuel, and additional evaporation of freshwater supplies during the cooling process. Wet towers also require the use of toxic biocides that are subsequently discharged or disposed. The other term under consideration, “minimizing,” does not equal “eliminating.” Technologies may be available to minimize but not totally eliminate adverse environmental impacts.« less

  18. Radiation Exposure During Uterine Artery Embolization: Effective Measures to Minimize Dose to the Patient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheurig-Muenkler, Christian; Powerski, Maciej J.; Mueller, Johann-Christoph; Kroencke, Thomas J.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeEvaluation of patient radiation exposure during uterine artery embolization (UAE) and literature review to identify techniques minimizing required dose.MethodsA total of 224 of all included 286 (78 %) women underwent UAE according to a standard UAE-protocol (bilateral UAE from unilateral approach using a Rösch inferior mesenteric and a microcatheter, no aortography, no ovarian artery catheterization or embolization) and were analyzed for radiation exposure. Treatment was performed on three different generations of angiography systems: (I) new generation flat-panel detector (N = 108/151); (II) classical image amplifier and pulsed fluoroscopy (N = 79/98); (III) classical image amplifier and continuous fluoroscopy (N = 37/37). Fluoroscopy time (FT) and dose-area product (DAP) were documented. Whenever possible, the following dose-saving measures were applied: optimized source-object, source-image, and object-image distances, pulsed fluoroscopy, angiographic runs in posterior-anterior direction with 0.5 frames per second, no magnification, tight collimation, no additional aortography.ResultsIn a standard bilateral UAE, the use of the new generation flat-panel detector in group I led to a significantly lower DAP of 3,156 cGy × cm{sup 2} (544–45,980) compared with 4,000 cGy × cm{sup 2} (1,400–13,000) in group II (P = 0.033). Both doses were significantly lower than those of group III with 8,547 cGy × cm{sup 2} (3,324–35,729; P < 0.001). Other reasons for dose escalation were longer FT due to difficult anatomy or a large leiomyoma load, additional angiographic runs, supplementary ovarian artery embolization, and obesity.ConclusionsThe use of modern angiographic units with flat panel detectors and strict application of methods of radiation reduction lead to a significantly lower radiation exposure. Target DAP for UAE should be kept below 5,000 cGy × cm{sup 2}.

  19. MINIMIZATION OF NO EMISSIONS FROM MULTI-BURNER COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.G. Eddings; A. Molina; D.W. Pershing; A.F. Sarofim; T.H. Fletcher; H. Zhang; K.A. Davis; M. Denison; H. Shim

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this program is to provide insight into the formation and minimization of NO{sub x} in multi-burner arrays, such as those that would be found in a typical utility boiler. Most detailed studies are performed in single-burner test facilities, and may not capture significant burner-to-burner interactions that could influence NO{sub x} emissions. Thus, investigations of such interactions were made by performing a combination of single and multiple burner experiments in a pilot-scale coal-fired test facility at the University of Utah, and by the use of computational combustion simulations to evaluate full-scale utility boilers. In addition, fundamental studies on nitrogen release from coal were performed to develop greater understanding of the physical processes that control NO formation in pulverized coal flames--particularly under low NO{sub x} conditions. A CO/H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} flame was operated under fuel-rich conditions in a flat flame reactor to provide a high temperature, oxygen-free post-flame environment to study secondary reactions of coal volatiles. Effects of temperature, residence time and coal rank on nitrogen evolution and soot formation were examined. Elemental compositions of the char, tar and soot were determined by elemental analysis, gas species distributions were determined using FTIR, and the chemical structure of the tar and soot was analyzed by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. A laminar flow drop tube furnace was used to study char nitrogen conversion to NO. The experimental evidence and simulation results indicated that some of the nitrogen present in the char is converted to nitric oxide after direct attack of oxygen on the particle, while another portion of the nitrogen, present in more labile functionalities, is released as HCN and further reacts in the bulk gas. The reaction of HCN with NO in the bulk gas has a strong influence on the overall conversion of char-nitrogen to nitric oxide; therefore, any model that aims to predict the conversion of char-nitrogen to nitric oxide should allow for the conversion of char-nitrogen to HCN. The extent of the HCN conversion to NO or N{sub 2} will depend on the composition of the atmosphere surrounding the particle. A pilot-scale testing campaign was carried out to evaluate the impact of multiburner firing on NO{sub x} emissions using a three-burner vertical array. In general, the results indicated that multiburner firing yielded higher NO{sub x} emissions than single burner firing at the same fuel rate and excess air. Mismatched burner operation, due to increases in the firing rate of the middle burner, generally demonstrated an increase in NO{sub x} over uniform firing. Biased firing, operating the middle burner fuel rich with the upper and lower burners fuel lean, demonstrated an overall reduction in NO{sub x} emissions; particularly when the middle burner was operated highly fuel rich. Computational modeling indicated that operating the three burner array with the center burner swirl in a direction opposite to the other two resulted in a slight reduction in NO{sub x}.

  20. Emerging technologies and approaches to minimize discharges into Lake Michigan Phase 2, Module 3 report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negri, M. C.; Gillenwater, P.; Urgun Demirtas, M.

    2011-05-11

    Purdue University Calumet (Purdue) and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) have conducted an independent study to identify deployable technologies that could help the BP Whiting Refinery, and other petroleum refineries, meet future wastewater discharge limits. This study has been funded by BP. Each organization tested a subset of the target technologies and retains sole responsibility for its respective test design and implementation, quality assurance and control, test results obtained from each of the technologies, and corresponding conclusions and recommendations. This project was divided in two phases and modules. This report summarizes the work conducted by Argonne in Phase II Module 3 (Bench Scale Testing). Other Modules are discussed elsewhere (Emerging Technologies and Approaches to Minimize Discharges into Lake Michigan, Phase 2, Modules 1-3 Report, April 2011, prepared for BP Americas by the Argonne - Purdue Task Force). The goal of this project was to identify and assess available and emerging wastewater treatment technologies for removing mercury and vanadium from the Whiting Refinery wastewater and to conduct bench-scale tests to provide comparable, transparent, and uniform results across the broad range of technologies tested. After the bench-scale testing phase, a previously developed decision matrix was refined and applied by Argonne to process and review test data to estimate and compare the preliminary performance, engineering configuration, preliminary cost, energy usage, and waste generation of technologies that were shown to be able to remove Hg and/or V to below the target limit at the bench scale. The data were used as the basis to identify the best candidates for further testing at the bench or pilot scale on a slip stream of effluent to lake (ETL) or clarifier effluent (CE) at the Whiting Refinery to determine whether future limits could be met and to generate other pertinent data for scale-up and sustainability evaluation. As a result of this technology assessment, Argonne identified several technologies that, at the bench-scale, could achieve the targeted performance for the removal of mercury and vanadium. A subset of those technologies were recommended for further testing either at the bench scale or at the pilot scale to determine whether future discharge limits could be met at the pilot-scale. The objectives of this project module are to: (1) Test at the bench-scale a subset of the technologies previously identified in Module 1 for the removal of target heavy metals down to 1.3 ppt Hg and 280 ppb V; (2) Review and process bench-scale test results on the basis of the end-point performance measures matrix to determine preliminary comparative performance, cost-effectiveness, and potential engineering configuration of tested technologies; (3) Assess the technological feasibility and readiness of the identified technologies for implementation at the Whiting Refinery; and (4) Select technically and economically feasible mercury- and vanadium-removal technologies and vendors to be recommended for pilot-scale testing at the Whiting Refinery.

  1. Emissions of dioxins and furans from garbage-burning incinerators can be minimized by good combustion practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) have stated that emissions of dioxin and furan from garbage-burning incinerators can be minimized by good combustion practices. They have found that maintaining the heat of combustion above 815 degrees centigrade and reducing the carbon monoxide level to below 100 ppm will reduce the emissions of furan and dioxin. The combustion research that lead to these conclusions was sponsored by ASME and the New York energy authority

  2. RAMATION V=W Ot TOTS= t sAy VnoffZW COMM1 AV 10i90 2M3 AM=W V A CLSI~LL331M A1N2UW

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    t9, S. nTCmI RAMATION V=W Ot TOTS= t sAy VnoffZW COMM1 AV 10i90 2M3 AM=W V A CLSI~LL331M A1N2UW OMA1ID9 V3 WMM I~UMMIM UU &!% W 2W WT AM 0? ?Ml U&O(1 LW pAM Mr MMW31 T!WOLVSD A GUS =-o &L MCMA I h MMK ON PLUPCMTtft GJ DR P -M~ CAM~ 07 W ULOW~ M *!Ti ~~mum 0sflOY iftJ A SLXQT OUT (Wi M I M ra IJJW MarB~ *~ W? $MOM.~ HMP~ IT V=h MMOTM RW1& 07W O RAttcMUU w~A0AO wAf~ K 43)AN wA BE tluywxwD (b(6 l~U %I S~)6 ASSA~ r 6 AM MWOim~~ SUM v~ DM 'VAT M OM1 IN * M S W IMIEf To MIK Row.

  3. Two-Loop QCD Amplitude for gg{yields}h, H in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Beerli, Stefan; Daleo, Alejandro

    2008-06-20

    We present the two-loop QCD amplitude for the interaction of two gluons and a CP-even Higgs boson in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). We apply a novel numerical method for the evaluation of Feynman diagrams with infrared, ultraviolet, and threshold singularities. We discuss subtleties in the ultraviolet renormalization of the amplitude with conventional dimensional regularization, dimensional reduction, and the four dimensional helicity scheme. Finally, we show numerical results for scenarios of supersymmetry breaking with a rather challenging phenomenology in which the Higgs signal in the MSSM is suppressed in comparison to the standard model.

  4. A computational method for the Helmholtz equation in unbounded domains based on the minimization of an integral functional

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciraolo, Giulio Gargano, Francesco Sciacca, Vincenzo

    2013-08-01

    We study a new approach to the problem of transparent boundary conditions for the Helmholtz equation in unbounded domains. Our approach is based on the minimization of an integral functional arising from a volume integral formulation of the radiation condition. The index of refraction does not need to be constant at infinity and may have some angular dependency as well as perturbations. We prove analytical results on the convergence of the approximate solution. Numerical examples for different shapes of the artificial boundary and for non-constant indexes of refraction will be presented.

  5. Uncertainty minimization in NMR measurements of dynamic nuclear polarization of a proton target for nuclear physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Dustin M.

    2013-11-01

    A comprehensive investigation into the measurement uncertainty in polarization produced by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization is outlined. The polarization data taken during Jefferson Lab experiment E08-007 is used to obtain error estimates and to develop an algorithm to minimize uncertainty of the measurement of polarization in irradiated View the ^14NH_3 targets, which is readily applied to other materials. The target polarization and corresponding uncertainties for E08-007 are reported. The resulting relative uncertainty found in the target polarization is determined to be less than or equal to 3.9%.

  6. Measuring the chargino mixing parameters of the minimal SUSY extension of the standard model at e sup + e sup minus colliders in the TeV region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leike, A. )

    1989-01-01

    In this paper it is proposed to measure the parameters of the chargino mixing of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model by chargino pair production at e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} colliders with TeV energies. Some information about the lightest SUSY particle and its mass can be gained. With a polarized beam the minimal SUSY extension of the Standard model could be ruled out.

  7. Decays Z{yields}gg{gamma} and Z{sup '}{yields}gg{gamma} in the minimal 331 model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores-Tlalpa, A.; Montano, J.; Ramirez-Zavaleta, F.; Toscano, J. J.

    2009-10-01

    The one-loop induced Z{yields}gg{gamma} and Z{sup '}{yields}gg{gamma} decays are studied within the context of the minimal 331 model, which predicts the existence of new gauge bosons and three exotic quarks. It is found that the Z{yields}gg{gamma} decay is insensitive to the presence of the exotic quarks, as it is essentially governed by the first two families of known quarks. As to the Z{sup '}{yields}gg{gamma} decay, it is found that the exotic quark contribution dominates and that for a heavy Z{sup '} boson it leads to a {gamma}(Z{sup '}{yields}gg{gamma}) that is more than 1 order of magnitude larger than that associated with {gamma}(Z{sup '}{yields}ggg). This result may be used to distinguish a new neutral Z{sup '} boson from those models that do not introduce exotic quarks.

  8. New insights gained on mechanisms of low-energy proton-induced SEUs by minimizing energy straggle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Dodd, Paul E.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino J.; Black, Jeffrey D.; Marshall, P. W.; Reed, R. A.; McCurdy, M. W.; Weller, R. A.; et al

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present low-energy proton single-event upset (SEU) data on a 65 nm SOI SRAM whose substrate has been completely removed. Since the protons only had to penetrate a very thin buried oxide layer, these measurements were affected by far less energy loss, energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering than previous datasets. The minimization of these common sources of experimental interference allows more direct interpretation of the data and deeper insight into SEU mechanisms. The results show a strong angular dependence, demonstrate that energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering affect the measured SEU cross sections, andmore » prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for low-energy proton-induced SEUs in these circuits.« less

  9. Real Time Selective Harmonic Minimization for Multilevel Inverters Connected to Solar Panels Using Artificial Neural Network Angle Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolbert, Leon M; Ozpineci, Burak; Filho, Faete; Cao, Yue

    2011-01-01

    This work approximates the selective harmonic elimination problem using artificial neural networks (ANNs) to generate the switching angles in an 11-level full-bridge cascade inverter powered by five varying dc input sources. Each of the five full bridges of the cascade inverter was connected to a separate 195-W solar panel. The angles were chosen such that the fundamental was kept constant and the low-order harmonics were minimized or eliminated. A nondeterministic method is used to solve the system for the angles and to obtain the data set for the ANN training. The method also provides a set of acceptable solutions in the space where solutions do not exist by analytical methods. The trained ANN is a suitable tool that brings a small generalization effect on the angles' precision and is able to perform in real time (50-/60-Hz time window).

  10. New insights gained on mechanisms of low-energy proton-induced SEUs by minimizing energy straggle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Dodd, Paul E.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino J.; Black, Jeffrey D.; Marshall, P. W.; Reed, R. A.; McCurdy, M. W.; Weller, R. A.; Pellish, J. A.; Rodbell, K. P.; Gordon, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present low-energy proton single-event upset (SEU) data on a 65 nm SOI SRAM whose substrate has been completely removed. Since the protons only had to penetrate a very thin buried oxide layer, these measurements were affected by far less energy loss, energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering than previous datasets. The minimization of these common sources of experimental interference allows more direct interpretation of the data and deeper insight into SEU mechanisms. The results show a strong angular dependence, demonstrate that energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering affect the measured SEU cross sections, and prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for low-energy proton-induced SEUs in these circuits.

  11. Nitrogen and Sulfur Requirements for Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii on Cellulosic Substrates in Minimal Nutrient Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kridelbaugh, Donna M; Nelson, Josh C; Engle, Nancy L; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Graham, David E

    2013-01-01

    Growth media for cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii bacteria usually contain excess nutrients that would increase costs for consolidated bioprocessing for biofuel production and create a waste stream with nitrogen, sulfur and phosphate. C. thermocellum was grown on crystalline cellulose with varying concentrations of nitrogen and sulfur compounds, and growth rate and alcohol production response curves were determined. Both bacteria assimilated sulfate in the presence of ascorbate reductant, increasing the ratio of oxidized to reduced fermentation products. From these results, a low ionic strength, defined minimal nutrient medium with decreased nitrogen, sulfur, phosphate and vitamin supplements was developed for the fermentation of cellobiose, cellulose and acid-pretreated Populus. Carbon and electron balance calculations indicate the unidentified residual fermentation products must include highly reduced molecules. Both bacterial populations were maintained in co-cultures with substrates containing xylan or hemicellulose in defined medium with sulfate and basal vitamin supplements.

  12. Operating characteristics of a cartridge collector utilizing medium-pressure purge air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, J. )

    1993-11-01

    For over 20 years, dust collectors equipped with cleanable paper cartridge pulse-jet cleaning mechanisms. Applications have been limited primarily to light inlet dust loads of 2 grains/dscf (4.6g/m[sup 3] or less). One manufacturer has successfully tested and operated a dust collector utilizing a full-scale, medium-pressure (6 to 8 psig, 4.0 to 5.5 MPa), utilizing 6-in. (150-mm) diameter by 50-in. (1,270-mm) cellulose cartridge filter elements, under high inlet dust load conditions.

  13. A line source in Minkowski for the de Sitter spacetime scalar Green's function: Massless minimally coupled case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Yi-Zen

    2014-09-15

    Motivated by the desire to understand the causal structure of physical signals produced in curved spacetimes particularly around black holes we show how, for certain classes of geometries, one might obtain its retarded or advanced minimally coupled massless scalar Green's function by using the corresponding Green's functions in the higher dimensional Minkowski spacetime where it is embedded. Analogous statements hold for certain classes of curved Riemannian spaces, with positive definite metrics, which may be embedded in higher dimensional Euclidean spaces. The general formula is applied to (d ? 2)-dimensional de Sitter spacetime, and the scalar Green's function is demonstrated to be sourced by a line emanating infinitesimally close to the origin of the ambient (d + 1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime and piercing orthogonally through the de Sitter hyperboloids of all finite sizes. This method does not require solving the de Sitter wave equation directly. Only the zero mode solution to an ordinary differential equation, the wave equation perpendicular to the hyperboloid followed by a one-dimensional integral needs to be evaluated. A topological obstruction to the general construction is also discussed by utilizing it to derive a generalized Green's function of the Laplacian on the (d ? 2)-dimensional sphere.

  14. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2012, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, P. M.

    2013-02-21

    This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101, issued 10/17/10.

  15. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-16

    This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream; a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility; the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream; a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken; a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received; any unusual occurrences; and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

  16. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report - Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Patrick

    2015-02-17

    This report summarizes the EPA identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

  17. The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy and Minimize Emission in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2011-12-31

    This report summarizes activities conducted for the project The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimized Fuel Economy and Minimize Emissions in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel under COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-07NT43271, which are as outlined in the STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated March 2007 and in the supplemental SOPO dated October 2010. The project objective was to develop and demonstrate an internal combustion engine that is optimized for E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline) fuel operation to achieve substantially improved fuel economy while operating with E85 fuel and that is also production viable in the near- to medium-term. The key engine technology selected for research and development was turbocharging, which is known to improve fuel economy thru downsizing and is in particular capable of exploiting ethanol fuels characteristics of high octane number and high latent heat of vaporization. The engine further integrated synergistic efficiency improving technologies of cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), direct fuel injection and dual continuously variable intake and exhaust cam phasers. On the vehicle level, fuel economy was furthered thru powertrain system optimization by mating a state-of-the-art six-speed automatic transmission to the engine. In order to achieve the projects objective of near- to medium-term production viability, it was essential to develop the engine to be flex-fuel capable of operating with fuels ranging from E0 (0% ethanol and 100% gasoline) to E85 and to use three-way type of catalyst technology for exhaust aftertreatment. Within these scopes, various technologies were developed through systems approach to focus on ways to help accelerate catalyst light-off. Significant amount of development took place during the course of the project within General Motors, LLC. Many prototype flex-fuel engines were designed, built and developed with various hardware configurations selected to achieve the project goals. Several flex-fuel demonstration vehicles were designed and built for carrying out calibration development and final testing to quantify the technology merits. Based on the extensive test results collected from dynamometer and vehicle testing, the fuel economy benefits of cooled EGR from the intended level of turbocharger technology were quantified. When combined with turbo downsizing, the FE benefits are considered large enough for E0 fuel as well as for E85 fuel to warrant further development of the technology beyond the current proof-of-concept level to a level that can meet production driveability quality and durability requirements in order to meet customers expectations. Cold-start cart test results from the emissions segment of the project were positive, confirming the assumption of faster thermal response of turbo exhaust system for emissions reductions for both E0 and E85 fuels. Vehicle emissions test results directionally correlated to the cold-start cart findings. The limited number of test runs did demonstrate the potentials of meeting stringent emission standards, however, they did not comprehend the factors such as hardware variability and long-term durability, 3 which are essential for mass production to satisfy customers expectations. It is therefore recommended, moving forward, durability concerns over turbocharger, EGR system and aftertreatment system, which would likely impact production viability, should be addressed. The data moreover suggested that further FE increase is likely with turbocharger technology advancement.

  18. Minimal unitary representation of 5d superconformal algebra F(4) and AdS6/CFT5 higher spin (super)-algebras

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fernando, Sudarshan; Gnaydin, Murat

    2014-11-28

    We study the minimal unitary representation (minrep) of SO(5, 2), obtained by quantization of its geometric quasiconformal action, its deformations and supersymmetric extensions. The minrep of SO(5, 2) describes a massless conformal scalar field in five dimensions and admits a unique deformation which describes a massless conformal spinor. Scalar and spinor minreps of SO(5, 2) are the 5d analogs of Diracs singletons of SO(3, 2). We then construct the minimal unitary representation of the unique 5d supercon-formal algebra F(4) with the even subalgebra SO(5, 2) SU(2). The minrep of F(4) describes a massless conformal supermultiplet consisting of two scalar andmoreone spinor fields. We then extend our results to the construction of higher spin AdS6/CFT5 (super)-algebras. The Joseph ideal of the minrep of SO(5, 2) vanishes identically as operators and hence its enveloping algebra yields the AdS6/CFT5 bosonic higher spin algebra directly. The enveloping algebra of the spinor minrep defines a deformed higher spin algebra for which a deformed Joseph ideal vanishes identically as operators. These results are then extended to the construction of the unique higher spin AdS6/CFT5 superalgebra as the enveloping algebra of the minimal unitary realization of F(4) obtained by the quasiconformal methods.less

  19. filemN2tV1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  20. SSQ V3 N2_Final_13aug13.indd

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... 6 Los Alamos co-design web site, codesign.lanl.gov. 7 Lawrence Livermore co-design web site , codesign.llnl.gov. 8 Sandia Mantevo proxy application site , mantevo.org. ...

  1. SSQ V1 N2_6june11_FINAL

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 2011 Comments Questions or comments regarding the Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly should be directed to Terri.Batuyong@nnsa.doe.gov Technical Editor: Douglas Drake, Publication Editor: Millicent Mischo Inside This Issue Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 1, Number 2 What do physicists and paparazzi have in common? They know that a picture is worth a thousand words! For this issue of the Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly, the theme is advances

  2. SSQ V3 N2_Final_13aug13.indd

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 * August 2013 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 3, Number 2 Inside this Issue 2 Roadrunner-On the Road to Trinity 3 The Cielo Petascale Capability Supercomputer: Providing Large-Scale Computing for Stockpile Stewardship 7 Sequoia, NNSA's Most Powerful Computer, Prepares for Classified Work 8 Toward Exascale with Co-design and Proxy Applications U p to

  3. Can the minimal SUSY extension of the standard model be ruled out by chargino production at e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leike, A. )

    1988-01-01

    It is discussed how the parameters of gaugino mixing in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model may be determined in future experiments, for example at LEP or SLC. If charginos are produced at LEP the gaugino mixing parameters can be measured for the case that the sneutrinos are very heavy or for the case that at least one sneutrino is lighter than the light chargino and the ratio of the vacuum expectation values of the two Higgs doublets is closed to 1. In this case the model could be ruled out.

  4. Experimental study of laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers under conditions of minimal roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golyshev, A A; Malikov, A G; Orishich, A M; Shulyatyev, V B

    2014-10-31

    The results of an experimental study of laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers are generalised. The dependence of roughness of the cut surface on the cutting parameters is investigated, and the conditions under which the surface roughness is minimal are formulated. It is shown that for both types of lasers these conditions can be expressed in the same way in terms of the dimensionless variables – the Péclet number Pe and the output power Q of laser radiation per unit thickness of the cut sheet – and take the form of the similarity laws: Pe = const, Q = const. The optimal values of Pe and Q are found. We have derived empirical expressions that relate the laser power and cutting speed with the thickness of the cut sheet under the condition of minimal roughness in the case of cutting by means of radiation from fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers. (laser technologies)

  5. REGULATORY STRATEGIES TO MINIMIZE GENERATION OF REGULATED WASTES FROM CLEANUP, CONTINUED USE OR DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR FACILITIES CONTAMINATED WITH POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) - 11198

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowry, N.

    2010-11-05

    Disposal costs for liquid PCB radioactive waste are among the highest of any category of regulated waste. The high cost is driven by the fact that disposal options are extremely limited. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) regulations require most liquids with PCBs at concentration of {ge} 50 parts-per-million to be disposed by incineration or equivalent destructive treatment. Disposal fees can be as high as $200 per gallon. This figure does not include packaging and the cost to transport the waste to the disposal facility, or the waste generator's labor costs for managing the waste prior to shipment. Minimizing the generation of liquid radioactive PCB waste is therefore a significant waste management challenge. PCB spill cleanups often generate large volumes of waste. That is because the removal of PCBs typically requires the liberal use of industrial solvents followed by a thorough rinsing process. In a nuclear facility, the cleanup process may be complicated by the presence of radiation and other occupational hazards. Building design and construction features, e.g., the presence of open grating or trenches, may also complicate cleanup. In addition to the technical challenges associated with spill cleanup, selection of the appropriate regulatory requirements and approach may be challenging. The TSCA regulations include three different sections relating to the cleanup of PCB contamination or spills. EPA has also promulgated a separate guidance policy for fresh PCB spills that is published as Subpart G of 40 CFR 761 although it is not an actual regulation. Applicability is based on the circumstances of each contamination event or situation. Other laws or regulations may also apply. Identification of the allowable regulatory options is important. Effective communication with stakeholders, particularly regulators, is just as important. Depending on the regulatory path that is taken, cleanup may necessitate the generation of large quantities of regulated waste. Allowable options must be evaluated carefully in order to reduce compliance risks, protect personnel, limit potential negative impacts on facility operations, and minimize the generation of wastes subject to TSCA. This paper will identify critical factors in selecting the appropriate TSCA regulatory path in order to minimize the generation of radioactive PCB waste and reduce negative impacts to facilities. The importance of communicating pertinent technical issues with facility staff, regulatory personnel, and subsequently, the public, will be discussed. Key points will be illustrated by examples from five former production reactors at the DOE Savannah River Site. In these reactors a polyurethane sealant was used to seal piping penetrations in the biological shield walls. During the intense neutron bombardment that occurred during reactor operation, the sealant broke down into a thick, viscous material that seeped out of the piping penetrations over adjacent equipment and walls. Some of the walls were painted with a PCB product. PCBs from the paint migrated into the degraded sealant, creating PCB 'spill areas' in some of these facilities. The regulatory cleanup approach selected for each facility was based on its operational status, e.g., active, inactive or undergoing decommissioning. The selected strategies served to greatly minimize the generation of radioactive liquid PCB waste. It is expected that this information would be useful to other DOE sites, DOD facilities, and commercial nuclear facilities constructed prior to the 1979 TSCA ban on most manufacturing and uses of PCBs.

  6. Search for Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric standard model in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jaminn D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; Lopes de Sa R.; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

    2012-04-20

    We report results from searches for neutral Higgs bosons produced in p{bar p} collisions recorded by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We study the production of inclusive neutral Higgs boson in the {tau}{tau} final state and in association with a b quark in the b{tau}{tau} and bbb final states. These results are combined to improve the sensitivity to the production of neutral Higgs bosons in the context of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). The data are found to be consistent with expectation from background processes. Upper limits on MSSM Higgs boson production are set for Higgs boson masses ranging from 90 to 300 GeV. We exclude tan {beta} > 20-30 for Higgs boson masses below 180 GeV. These are the most stringent constraints on MSSM Higgs boson production in p{bar p} collisions.

  7. Vertical and adiabatic excitations in anthracene from quantum Monte Carlo: Constrained energy minimization for structural and electronic excited-state properties in the JAGP ansatz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupuy, Nicolas; Bouaouli, Samira; Mauri, Francesco Casula, Michele; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-06-07

    We study the ionization energy, electron affinity, and the ? ? ?{sup ?} ({sup 1}L{sub a}) excitation energy of the anthracene molecule, by means of variational quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods based on a Jastrow correlated antisymmetrized geminal power (JAGP) wave function, developed on molecular orbitals (MOs). The MO-based JAGP ansatz allows one to rigorously treat electron transitions, such as the HOMO ? LUMO one, which underlies the {sup 1}L{sub a} excited state. We present a QMC optimization scheme able to preserve the rank of the antisymmetrized geminal power matrix, thanks to a constrained minimization with projectors built upon symmetry selected MOs. We show that this approach leads to stable energy minimization and geometry relaxation of both ground and excited states, performed consistently within the correlated QMC framework. Geometry optimization of excited states is needed to make a reliable and direct comparison with experimental adiabatic excitation energies. This is particularly important in ?-conjugated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, where there is a strong interplay between low-lying energy excitations and structural modifications, playing a functional role in many photochemical processes. Anthracene is an ideal benchmark to test these effects. Its geometry relaxation energies upon electron excitation are of up to 0.3 eV in the neutral {sup 1}L{sub a} excited state, while they are of the order of 0.1 eV in electron addition and removal processes. Significant modifications of the ground state bond length alternation are revealed in the QMC excited state geometry optimizations. Our QMC study yields benchmark results for both geometries and energies, with values below chemical accuracy if compared to experiments, once zero point energy effects are taken into account.

  8. Minimizing Energy Losses in Ducts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Insulating, air sealing, and placing ducts within the conditioned space of your home will reduce energy losses.

  9. WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    salt * Paper * Plastic * Tires * Toner cartridges * Used oil and oil filters * Wood pallets * Wood waste (spools, timbers, and crating materials) In FY 2015, 170 metric tons of...

  10. WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Mexico 8822 1 NOV 2 3 2011 Mr. John Kieling , Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environme nt Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa...

  11. Minimize oil field power consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, B.; Ennis, P.

    1999-08-01

    Though electric power is a major operating cost of oil production, few producers have systematically evaluated their power consumption for ways to be more efficient. There is significant money to be saved by doing so, and now is a good time to make an evaluation because new power options are at hand. They range from small turbo generators that can run on casing head gas and power one or two lift pumps, to rebuilt major turbines and ram-jet powered generators that can be set in a multi-well field and deliver power at bargain prices. Power industry deregulation is also underway. Opportunities for more advantageous power contracts from competitive sources are not far off. This two-part series covers power efficiency and power options. This article reviews steps you can take to evaluate the efficiency of your power use and go about improving it. Part 2 will discuss opportunities for use of distributed power and changes you can expect from decentralized power.

  12. Sr{sub 9}Ni{sub 6.64}O{sub 21}: A new member (n = 2) of the perovskite-related A{sub 3n+3}A{sub n}{prime}B{sub 3+n}O{sub 9+6n} family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campa, J.; Gutierrez-Puebla, E.; Monge, A.

    1996-10-01

    Crystals of a new phase Sr{sub 9}Ni{sub 6.64}O{sub 21} were grown. This compound in the n = 2 member of the A{sub 3n+3}A{sub n}{prime}B{sub n+3}O{sub 6n+9} series. The composition and the crystal structure have been established form X-ray single crystal diffraction data. The structure contains face-shared chains of NiO{sub 6} polyhedra parallel to the c axis and is related with hexagonal 2H polytype perovskite. Sr{sub 9}Ni{sub 6.64}O{sub 21} crystallizes in the space group R3c (No. 167) with a = 9.467(2) {angstrom}, c = 35.87(5) {angstrom}, V = 2784.(4) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 6. A comparison is made between the structure of the title compound and the other members of the series.

  13. The role of orbital order in the stabilization of the (?, 0) ordered magnetic state in a minimal two-band model for iron pnictides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Sayandip Singh, Avinash

    2014-03-14

    Spin wave excitations and stability of the (?, 0) ordered magnetic state are investigated in a minimal two-band itinerant-electron model for iron pnictides. Presence of hopping anisotropy generates a strong ferro-orbital order in the d{sub xz} and d{sub yz} Fe orbitals in the (?, 0) state. The orbital order sign is as observed in experiments. The induced ferro-orbital order strongly enhances the spin wave energy scale and stabilizes the magnetic state by optimizing the strength of the emergent antiferromagnetically and ferromagnetically spin couplings through optimal band fillings in the two orbitals. The calculated spin-wave dispersion is in quantitative agreement with neutron scattering measurements. Finite inter-orbital Hund's coupling is shown to further enhance the spin wave energies state by coupling the two magnetic sub-systems. A more realistic two-band model with less hopping anisotropy is also considered, which yields not only the circular hole pockets but also correct ferro-orbital order and emergent F spin coupling.

  14. Dilaton field minimally coupled to 2+1 gravity; uniqueness of the static Chan-Mann black hole and new dilaton stationary metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    García-Diaz, Alberto A.

    2014-01-14

    Using the Schwarzschild coordinate frame for a static cyclic symmetric metric in 2+1 gravity coupled minimally to a dilaton logarithmically depending on the radial coordinate in the presence of an exponential potential, by solving first order linear Einstein equations, the general solution is derived and it is identified with the Chan–Mann dilaton solution. In these coordinates, a new stationary dilaton solution is obtained; it does not allow for a de Sitter–Anti-de Sitter limit at spatial infinity, where its structural functions increase indefinitely. On the other hand, it is horizonless and allows for a naked singularity at the origin of coordinates; moreover, one can identify at a large radial coordinate a (quasi-local) mass parameter and in the whole space a constant angular momentum. Via a general SL(2,R)–transformation, applied on the static cyclic symmetric metric, a family of stationary dilaton solutions has been generated. A particular SL(2,R)–transformation is identified, which gives rise to the rotating Chan–Mann dilaton solution. All the exhibited solutions have been characterized by their quasi-local energy, mass, and momentum through their series expansions at spatial infinity. The algebraic structure of the Ricci–energy-momentum, and Cotton tensors is given explicitly.

  15. I-NERI-2007-004-K, DEVELOPMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NEW HIGH-LEVEL WASTE FORMS FOR ACHIEVING WASTE MINIMIZATION FROM PYROPROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.M. Frank

    2011-09-01

    Work describe in this report represents the final year activities for the 3-year International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) project: Development and Characterization of New High-Level Waste Forms for Achieving Waste Minimization from Pyroprocessing. Used electrorefiner salt that contained actinide chlorides and was highly loaded with surrogate fission products was processed into three candidate waste forms. The first waste form, a high-loaded ceramic waste form is a variant to the CWF produced during the treatment of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II used fuel at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The two other waste forms were developed by researchers at the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). These materials are based on a silica-alumina-phosphate matrix and a zinc/titanium oxide matrix. The proposed waste forms, and the processes to fabricate them, were designed to immobilize spent electrorefiner chloride salts containing alkali, alkaline earth, lanthanide, and halide fission products that accumulate in the salt during the processing of used nuclear fuel. This aspect of the I-NERI project was to demonstrate 'hot cell' fabrication and characterization of the proposed waste forms. The outline of the report includes the processing of the spent electrorefiner salt and the fabrication of each of the three waste forms. Also described is the characterization of the waste forms, and chemical durability testing of the material. While waste form fabrication and sample preparation for characterization must be accomplished in a radiological hot cell facility due to hazardous radioactivity levels, smaller quantities of each waste form were removed from the hot cell to perform various analyses. Characterization included density measurement, elemental analysis, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and the Product Consistency Test, which is a leaching method to measure chemical durability. Favorable results from this demonstration project will provide additional options for fission product immobilization and waste management associated the electrochemical/pyrometallurgical processing of used nuclear fuel.

  16. Passive SCR for lean gasoline NOX control: Engine-based strategies to minimize fuel penalty associated with catalytic NH3 generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y.; Parks, James E.; Pihl, Josh A.; Toops, Todd J.

    2016-02-18

    Lean gasoline engines offer greater fuel economy than common stoichiometric gasoline engines. However, excess oxygen prevents the use of the current three-way catalyst (TWC) to control nitrogen oxide (NOX) emissions in lean exhaust. A passive SCR concept, introduced by General Motors Global R&D, makes use of a TWC that is already onboard to generate NH3 under slightly rich conditions, which is stored on the downstream SCR. The stored NH3 is then used to reduce NOX emissions when the engine switches to lean operation. In this work, the effect of engine parameters, such as air-fuel equivalence ratio and spark timing, onmore » NH3 generation over a commercial Pd-only TWC with no dedicated oxygen storage component was evaluated on a 2.0-liter BMW lean burn gasoline direct injection engine. NOX reduction, NH3 formation, and reductant utilization processes were evaluated, and fuel efficiency was assessed and compared to the stoichiometric engine operation case. We found air-fuel equivalence ratio to be one of the most important parameters in controlling the NH3 production; however, the rich operation necessary for NH3 production results in a fuel consumption penalty. The fuel penalty can be minimized by adjusting spark timing to increase rich-phase engine out NOX emissions and, thereby, NH3 levels. Additionally, higher engine out NOX during engine load increase to simulate acceleration resulted in additional fuel savings. Ultimately, a 10% fuel consumption benefit was achieved with the passive SCR approach by optimizing rich air-fuel equivalence ratio and spark timing while also utilizing acceleration load conditions.« less

  17. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution, reflection,

  18. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution, reflection,

  19. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  20. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  1. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  2. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution, reflection,

  3. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  4. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  5. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  6. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  7. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution,

  8. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution, reflection,

  9. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Print FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution, reflection,

  10. Beamline 1.4.4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.5 eV Frequency range 800 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Thermo Nicolet Nexus 870 FTIR, Continuum XL IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution;

  11. Beamline 1.4.4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.5 eV Frequency range 800 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Thermo Nicolet Nexus 870 FTIR, Continuum XL IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution;

  12. Beamline 1.4.4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.4 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.5 eV Frequency range 800 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Thermo Nicolet Nexus 870 FTIR, Continuum XL IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron

  13. Beamline 1.4.4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.4 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.5 eV Frequency range 800 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Thermo Nicolet Nexus 870 FTIR, Continuum XL IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron

  14. Beamline 1.4.4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.4 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.5 eV Frequency range 800 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Thermo Nicolet Nexus 870 FTIR, Continuum XL IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron

  15. Beamline 1.4.4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.5 eV Frequency range 800 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Thermo Nicolet Nexus 870 FTIR, Continuum XL IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution;

  16. Beamline 5.4.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5.4.1 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.00 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations FTIR bench and IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution; reflection, transmission, and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) modes; polarizing and UV fluorescence optics Spatial resolution Diffraction limited

  17. Beamline 5.4.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.4.1 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.00 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations FTIR bench and IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution; reflection, transmission, and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) modes; polarizing and UV fluorescence optics Spatial resolution Diffraction limited

  18. Beamline 5.4.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.4.1 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.00 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations FTIR bench and IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution; reflection, transmission, and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) modes; polarizing and UV fluorescence optics Spatial resolution Diffraction limited

  19. Beamline 5.4.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.4.1 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.00 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations FTIR bench and IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution; reflection, transmission, and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) modes; polarizing and UV fluorescence optics Spatial resolution Diffraction limited

  20. Beamline 5.4.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5.4.1 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.00 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations FTIR bench and IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution; reflection, transmission, and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) modes; polarizing and UV fluorescence optics Spatial resolution Diffraction limited

  1. Beamline 5.4.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.00 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations FTIR bench and IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution; reflection, transmission, and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) modes; polarizing and UV fluorescence optics Spatial resolution Diffraction limited (~wavelength)

  2. Beamline 5.4.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.00 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations FTIR bench and IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution; reflection, transmission, and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) modes; polarizing and UV fluorescence optics Spatial resolution Diffraction limited (~wavelength)

  3. Beamline 1.4.4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.5 eV Frequency range 800 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Thermo Nicolet Nexus 870 FTIR, Continuum XL IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution;

  4. Beamline 5.4.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Infrared spectromicroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.00 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations FTIR bench and IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution; reflection, transmission, and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) modes; polarizing and UV fluorescence optics Spatial resolution Diffraction limited (~wavelength)

  5. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Salinity Evaluation and Minimization Plan for Cooling Towers and Mechanical Equipment Discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily III, W D

    2010-02-24

    This document was created to comply with the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (CVRWQCB) Waste Discharge Requirement (Order No. 98-148). This order established new requirements to assess the effect of and effort required to reduce salts in process water discharged to the subsurface. This includes the review of technical, operational, and management options available to reduce total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations in cooling tower and mechanical equipment water discharges at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) facility. It was observed that for the six cooling towers currently in operation, the total volume of groundwater used as make up water is about 27 gallons per minute and the discharge to the subsurface via percolation pits is 13 gallons per minute. The extracted groundwater has a TDS concentration of 700 mg/L. The cooling tower discharge concentrations range from 700 to 1,400 mg/L. There is also a small volume of mechanical equipment effluent being discharged to percolation pits, with a TDS range from 400 to 3,300 mg/L. The cooling towers and mechanical equipment are maintained and operated in a satisfactory manner. No major leaks were identified. Currently, there are no re-use options being employed. Several approaches known to reduce the blow down flow rate and/or TDS concentration being discharged to the percolation pits and septic systems were reviewed for technical feasibility and cost efficiency. These options range from efforts as simple as eliminating leaks to implementing advanced and innovative treatment methods. The various options considered, and their anticipated effect on water consumption, discharge volumes, and reduced concentrations are listed and compared in this report. Based on the assessment, it was recommended that there is enough variability in equipment usage, chemistry, flow rate, and discharge configurations that each discharge location at Site 300 should be considered separately when deciding on an approach for reducing the salt discharge to the subsurface. The smaller units may justify moderate changes to equipment, and may benefit from increased cleaning frequencies, more accurate and suitable chemical treatment, and sources of make up water and discharge re-use. The larger cooling towers would be more suitable for automated systems where they don't already exist, re-circulation and treatment of blow down water, and enhanced chemical dosing strategies. It may be more technically feasible and cost efficient for the smaller cooling towers to be replaced by closed loop dry coolers or hybrid towers. There are several potential steps that could be taken at each location to reduce the TDS concentration and/or water use. These include: sump water filtration, minimization of drift, accurate chemical dosing, and use of scale and corrosion coupons for chemical calibration. The implementation of some of these options could be achieved by a step-wise approach taken at two representative facilities. Once viable prototype systems have been proven in the field, systematic implementation should proceed for the remaining systems, with cost, desired reduction, and general feasibility taken into consideration for such systems.

  6. Minimally Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Free-Hand Aspiration of Symptomatic Nerve Route Compressing Lumbosacral Cysts Using a 1.0-Tesla Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucourt, Maximilian de, E-mail: mdb@charite.de; Streitparth, Florian, E-mail: florian.streitparth@charite.de; Collettini, Federico [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Radiology (Germany); Guettler, Felix [Jena University, Department of Radiology (Germany); Rathke, Hendrik; Lorenz, Britta; Rump, Jens; Hamm, Bernd [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Radiology (Germany); Teichgraeber, U. K. [Jena University, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of minimally invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided free-hand aspiration of symptomatic nerve route compressing lumbosacral cysts in a 1.0-Tesla (T) open MRI system using a tailored interactive sequence. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients with MRI-evident symptomatic cysts in the lumbosacral region and possible nerve route compressing character were referred to a 1.0-T open MRI system. For MRI interventional cyst aspiration, an interactive sequence was used, allowing for near real-time position validation of the needle in any desired three-dimensional plane. Results: Seven of 11 cysts in the lumbosacral region were successfully aspirated (average 10.1 mm [SD {+-} 1.9]). After successful cyst aspiration, each patient reported speedy relief of initial symptoms. Average cyst size was 9.6 mm ({+-}2.6 mm). Four cysts (8.8 {+-} 3.8 mm) could not be aspirated. Conclusion: Open MRI systems with tailored interactive sequences have great potential for cyst aspiration in the lumbosacral region. The authors perceive major advantages of the MR-guided cyst aspiration in its minimally invasive character compared to direct and open surgical options along with consecutive less trauma, less stress, and also less side-effects for the patient.

  7. Yukawa radiative corrections to the triple self-couplings of neutral CP-even Higgs bosons and to the H {sup {yields}} hh decay rate within the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philippov, Yu. P.

    2007-07-15

    Within the minimal supersymmetric standard model, four self-couplings, {lambda}{sub hhh}, {lambda}{sub hhH}, {lambda}{sub hHH}, and {lambda}{sub HHH}, and the decay rate {gamma}(H {sup {yields}} hh) are calculated with allowance for one-loop corrections induced by the contribution of the t, b, and c quarks, the {tau} lepton, and the corresponding superpartners and with the aid of the on-shell renormalization scheme. An analysis of the dependences of these features on tan{beta} and the mass of the A Higgs boson, M{sub A}, shows that, in a specific region of the model-parameter space, the calculated corrections can make a significant contribution to the couplings and decay rate in the one-loop approximation. The inclusion of the radiative corrections in question is mandatory in reconstructing the Higgs potential.

  8. Characterization, minimization and disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes during cleanup and rransition of the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) at Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

    1996-12-01

    This document provides an outline of waste handling practices used during the Sandia National Laboratory/California (SNL/CA), Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Cleanup and Transition project. Here we provide background information concerning the history of the TRL and the types of operations that generated the waste. Listed are applicable SNL/CA site-wide and TRL local waste handling related procedures. We describe personnel training practices and outline methods of handling and disposal of compactible and non-compactible low level waste, solidified waste water, hazardous wastes and mixed wastes. Waste minimization, reapplication and recycling practices are discussed. Finally, we provide a description of the process followed to remove the highly contaminated decontamination systems. This document is intended as both a historical record and as a reference to other facilities who may be involved in similar work.

  9. Selection of Sampling Pumps Used for Groundwater Monitoring at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2001-11-05

    The variable frequency drive centrifugal submersible pump, Redi-Flo2a made by Grundfosa, was selected for universal application for Hanford Site groundwater monitoring. Specifications for the selected pump and five other pumps were evaluated against current and future Hanford groundwater monitoring performance requirements, and the Redi-Flo2 was selected as the most versatile and applicable for the range of monitoring conditions. The Redi-Flo2 pump distinguished itself from the other pumps considered because of its wide range in output flow rate and its comparatively moderate maintenance and low capital costs. The Redi-Flo2 pump is able to purge a well at a high flow rate and then supply water for sampling at a low flow rate. Groundwater sampling using a low-volume-purging technique (e.g., low flow, minimal purge, no purge, or micropurgea) is planned in the future, eliminating the need for the pump to supply a high-output flow rate. Under those conditions, the Well Wizard bladder pump, manufactured by QED Environmental Systems, Inc., may be the preferred pump because of the lower capital cost.

  10. Titanium nitride thin films for minimizing multipactoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welch, Kimo M.

    1979-01-01

    Applying a thin film coating to the surface of a workpiece, in particular, applying a coating of titanium nitride to a klystron window by means of a crossed-field diode sputtering array. The array is comprised of a cohesive group of numerous small hollow electrically conducting cylinders and is mounted so that the open ends of the cylinders on one side of the group are adjacent a titanium cathode plate. The workpiece is mounted so as to face the open ends of the other side of the group. A magnetic field is applied to the array so as to be coaxial with the cylinders and a potential is applied across the cylinders and the cathode plate, the cylinders as an anode being positive with respect to the cathode plate. The cylinders, the cathode plate and the workpiece are situated in an atmosphere of nitrogen which becomes ionized such as by field emission because of the electric field between the cylinders and cathode plate, thereby establishing an anode-cathode discharge that results in sputtering of the titanium plate. The sputtered titanium coats the workpiece and chemically combines with the nitrogen to form a titanium nitride coating on the workpiece. Gas pressure, gas mixtures, cathode material composition, voltages applied to the cathode and anode, the magnetic field, cathode, anode and workpiece spacing, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to inner diameter) of the anode cylinders, all may be controlled to provide consistent optimum thin film coatings of various compositions and thicknesses. Another facet of the disclosure is the coating of microwave components per se with titanium nitride to reduce multipactoring under operating conditions of the components.

  11. Minimize Boiler Blowdown | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven ... More Documents & Publications Install an Automatic Blowdown-Control System Recover Heat ...

  12. Minimize Compressed Air Leaks; Industrial Technologies Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... IOF focuses on the following eight energy and resource intensive industries: * Aluminum * Forest Products * Metal Casting * Petroleum * Chemicals * Glass * Mining * Steel The ...

  13. Guide to Minimizing Compressor-Based Cooling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guide describes best practices for reducing energy use and total cost of ownership for data center cooling systems.

  14. Minimizing corrosion in coal liquid distillation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumert, Kenneth L.; Sagues, Alberto A.; Davis, Burtron H.

    1985-01-01

    In an atmospheric distillation tower of a coal liquefaction process, tower materials corrosion is reduced or eliminated by introduction of boiling point differentiated streams to boiling point differentiated tower regions.

  15. Minimal Composite Higgs Models at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carena, Marcela; Da Rold, Leandro; Pontón, Eduardo

    2014-06-26

    We consider composite Higgs models where the Higgs is a pseudo-Nambu Goldstone boson arising from the spontaneous breaking of an approximate global symmetry by some underlying strong dynamics. We focus on the SO(5) → SO(4) symmetry breaking pattern, assuming the “partial compositeness” paradigm. We study the consequences on Higgs physics of the fermionic representations produced by the strong dynamics, that mix with the Standard Model (SM) degrees of freedom. We consider models based on the lowest-dimensional representations of SO(5) that allow for the custodial protection of the Z b ¯ b coupling, i.e. the 5, 10 and 14. We findmore » a generic suppression of the gluon fusion process, while the Higgs branching fractions can be enhanced or suppressed compared to the SM. Interestingly, a precise measurement of the Higgs boson couplings can distinguish between different realizations in the fermionic sector, thus providing crucial information about the nature of the UV dynamics.« less

  16. Evaluation of a biosolids minimization system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bizier, P.A.

    1999-07-01

    The Micronair{trademark} residuals management system has been described by its manufacturer as a zero biosolids system. The system consists of three main parts--RAS screening, inerts removal, and an extremely fine bubble aeration system for the digester. The system's design assumes that trash and other non-biodegradable materials make up the bulk of residuals which would normally be digested. If these materials are removed, then the remaining biological material is assumed to biodegrade to either inerts or dissolved materials. This paper presents additional background on the design and operation of the residuals handling system. In addition, actual data from the facility detailing the operation of the residuals handling system. In addition, actual data from the facility detailing the operation of the Micronair{trademark} system since its initial start-up is provided. Finally, the benefits and drawbacks of the existing system are discussed and points for consideration in future installations identified.

  17. Guide to Minimizing Compress-based Cooling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operations Center reached LEED Silver rating through sustainable design and operations that decrease energy consumption by 20% and water consumption by 36% beyond standard codes. ...

  18. High temperature, minimally invasive optical sensing modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riza, Nabeel Agha; Perez, Frank

    2008-02-05

    A remote temperature sensing system includes a light source selectively producing light at two different wavelengths and a sensor device having an optical path length that varies as a function of temperature. The sensor receives light emitted by the light source and redirects the light along the optical path length. The system also includes a detector receiving redirected light from the sensor device and generating respective signals indicative of respective intensities of received redirected light corresponding to respective wavelengths of light emitted by the light source. The system also includes a processor processing the signals generated by the detector to calculate a temperature of the device.

  19. The effect of head size/shape, miscentering, and bowtie filter on peak patient tissue doses from modern brain perfusion 256-slice CT: How can we minimize the risk for deterministic effects?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E.; Damilakis, John

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine patient-specific absorbed peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain parenchyma, and cranial red bone marrow (RBM) of adult individuals subjected to low-dose brain perfusion CT studies on a 256-slice CT scanner, and investigate the effect of patient head size/shape, head position during the examination and bowtie filter used on peak tissue doses. Methods: The peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were measured in 106 individual-specific adult head phantoms subjected to the standard low-dose brain perfusion CT on a 256-slice CT scanner using a novel Monte Carlo simulation software dedicated for patient CT dosimetry. Peak tissue doses were compared to corresponding thresholds for induction of cataract, erythema, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively. The effects of patient head size/shape, head position during acquisition and bowtie filter used on resulting peak patient tissue doses were investigated. The effect of eye-lens position in the scanned head region was also investigated. The effect of miscentering and use of narrow bowtie filter on image quality was assessed. Results: The mean peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were found to be 124, 120, 95, and 163 mGy, respectively. The effect of patient head size and shape on peak tissue doses was found to be minimal since maximum differences were less than 7%. Patient head miscentering and bowtie filter selection were found to have a considerable effect on peak tissue doses. The peak eye-lens dose saving achieved by elevating head by 4 cm with respect to isocenter and using a narrow wedge filter was found to approach 50%. When the eye lies outside of the primarily irradiated head region, the dose to eye lens was found to drop to less than 20% of the corresponding dose measured when the eye lens was located in the middle of the x-ray beam. Positioning head phantom off-isocenter by 4 cm and employing a narrow wedge filter results in a moderate reduction of signal-to-noise ratio mainly to the peripheral region of the phantom. Conclusions: Despite typical peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain, and RBM from the standard low-dose brain perfusion 256-slice CT protocol are well below the corresponding thresholds for the induction of erythema, cataract, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively, every effort should be made toward optimization of the procedure and minimization of dose received by these tissues. The current study provides evidence that the use of the narrower bowtie filter available may considerably reduce peak absorbed dose to all above radiosensitive tissues with minimal deterioration in image quality. Considerable reduction in peak eye-lens dose may also be achieved by positioning patient head center a few centimeters above isocenter during the exposure.

  20. Materials Data on C2S9N2 (SG:4) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. H{sup −} formation by neutral resonant ionization of H(n=2) atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, John S.

    2015-04-08

    A mechanism for producing hydrogen anions in a low density, low energy hydrogen plasma is proposed. The observation in a plasma ion source that the anion output is quadratically related to the Lyman-α radiation suggests that anions could be formed in collisions between atoms in the first excited state. A potential energy plot for the hydrogen molecule is developed that includes a high energy ionic state, comprising a proton and the weakly bound H{sup −}(2p{sup 2} {sup 3}P{sup e}) ion, revealing a path to stable anion formation.

  2. Materials Data on MnSiN2 (SG:33) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Zr4N2O5 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on CsTaN2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Ca7Tl3N2 (SG:65) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Pr4Se3N2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on BaZrN2 (SG:129) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on MgSiN2 (SG:33) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Li2ZrN2 (SG:164) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on U2AsN2 (SG:164) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on U2SeN2 (SG:164) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on TiNbN2 (SG:141) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Selective Catalytic Oxidation (SCO) of NH3 to N2 for Hot Exhaust Treatment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Investigation of a series of transition metal oxides and precious metal based catalysts for ammonia selective oxidation at low temperatures

  14. Materials Data on H3I3N2 (SG:11) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Li2ThN2 (SG:0) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Th2BiN2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Mn3N2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Transported PDF Modeling of Nonpremixed Turbulent CO/H-2/N-2 Jet Flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, xinyu; Haworth, D. C.; Huckaby, E. David

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} (syngas) flames are simulated using a transported composition probability density function (PDF) method. A consistent hybrid Lagrangian particle/Eulerian mesh algorithm is used to solve the modeled PDF transport equation. The model includes standard k? turbulence, gradient transport for scalars, and Euclidean minimum spanning tree (EMST) mixing. Sensitivities of model results to variations in the turbulence model, the treatment of radiation heat transfer, the choice of chemical mechanism, and the PDF mixing model are explored. A baseline model reproduces the measured mean and rms temperature, major species, and minor species profiles reasonably well, and captures the scaling that is observed in the experiments. Both our results and the literature suggest that further improvements can be realized with adjustments in the turbulence model, the radiation heat transfer model, and the chemical mechanism. Although radiation effects are relatively small in these flames, consideration of radiation is important for accurate NO prediction. Chemical mechanisms that have been developed specifically for fuels with high concentrations of CO and H{sub 2} perform better than a methane mechanism that was not designed for this purpose. It is important to account explicitly for turbulencechemistry interactions, although the details of the mixing model do not make a large difference in the results, within reasonable limits.

  19. Materials Data on PH10N2O4F (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on PH8N2O3F (SG:33) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on OsN2 (SG:58) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Pd(S3N)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Th2N2(NH) Isomorphous to Th2N3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, G W Chinthaka M; Yeamans, Charles B.; Hunn, John D; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Czerwinski, Ken R.; Weck, Dr. Phil F

    2012-01-01

    Using a new, low-temperature, fluoride-based process, thorium nitride imide of the chemical formula Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) was synthesized from thorium dioxide via an ammonium thorium fluoride intermediate. The resulting product phase was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and was found to be crystallographically similar to Th{sub 2}N{sub 3}. Its unit cell was hexagonal with a space group of P3m{bar 1} and lattice parameters of a = b = 3.886(1) and c = 6.185(2) {angstrom}. The presence of -NH in the nitride phase was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Total energy calculations performed using all-electron scalar relativistic density functional theory (DFT) showed that the hydrogen atom in the Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) prefers to bond with nitrogen atoms occupying 1a Wyckoff positions of the unit cell. Lattice fringe disruptions observed in nanoparticle areas of the nitride species by high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) images also displayed some evidence for the presence of -NH group. As ThO{sub 2} was identified as an impurity, possible reaction mechanisms involving its formation are discussed.

  4. Materials Data on Sm4S3N2 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Sr(BeN)2 (SG:140) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on U2BiN2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Measurement and Modeling of the n=2-3 Emission of O VIII near...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: Highly Charged Physics, Heidelberg, Germany, Sep 02 - Sep 07, 2012 Research Org: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), ...

  8. Materials Data on H4N2O3 (SG:56) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on IrN2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Selective Catalytic Oxidation (SCO) of NH3 to N2 for Hot Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Deactivation Mechanisms of Base MetalZeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber ...

  11. Materials Data on Ni(H2N)2 (SG:200) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Ba3(GeN)2 (SG:11) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Sr3(GeN)2 (SG:11) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Separability of massive field equations for spin-0 and spin-1/2 charged particles in the general nonextremal rotating charged black hole spacetimes in minimal five-dimensional gauged supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Shuangqing

    2009-10-15

    We continue to investigate the separability of massive field equations for spin-0 and spin-1/2 charged particles in the general, nonextremal, rotating, charged, Chong-Cvetic-Lue-Pope black holes with two independent angular momenta and a nonzero cosmological constant in minimal D=5 gauged supergravity theory. We show that the complex Klein-Gordon equation and the modified Dirac equation with the inclusion of an extra counterterm can be separated by variables into purely radial and purely angular parts in this general Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons background spacetime. A second-order symmetry operator that commutes with the complex Laplacian operator is constructed from the separated solutions and expressed compactly in terms of a rank-2 Staeckel-Killing tensor which admits a simple diagonal form in the chosen pentad one-forms so that it can be understood as the square of a rank-3 totally antisymmetric tensor. A first-order symmetry operator that commutes with the modified Dirac operator is expressed in terms of a rank-3 generalized Killing-Yano tensor and its covariant derivative. The Hodge dual of this generalized Killing-Yano tensor is a generalized principal conformal Killing-Yano tensor of rank-2, which can generate a 'tower' of generalized (conformal) Killing-Yano and Staeckel-Killing tensors that are responsible for the whole hidden symmetries of this general, rotating, charged, Kerr-anti-de Sitter black hole geometry. In addition, the first laws of black hole thermodynamics have been generalized to the case that the cosmological constant can be viewed as a thermodynamical variable.

  15. Beamline 1.4.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 1.4.3 Beamline 1.4.3 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:08 FTIR spectromicroscopy Scientific disciplines: Biology, correlated electron systems, environmental science, geology, chemistry, polymers, soft materials GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.2 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations Nicolet Magna 760 FTIR, Nic-Plan IR Microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Motorized

  16. Beamline 5.4.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.4.1 Beamline 5.4.1 Print Wednesday, 16 June 2010 16:03 Infrared spectromicroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range 0.05-1.00 eV Frequency range 650 - 10,000 cm-1 Interferometer resolution Up to 0.125 cm-1 Endstations FTIR bench and IR microscope (N2 purged) Characteristics Computerized sample stage, 0.1-micron resolution; reflection, transmission, and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) modes; polarizing and UV fluorescence

  17. Materials Data on TbAg3H6C6(N2O)3 (SG:193) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. The European land and inland water CO2, CO, CH4 and N2O balance between 2001 and 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luyassaert, S; Abril, G; Andres, Robert Joseph; Bastviken, D; Bellassen, V; Bergamaschi, P; Bousquet, P; Chevallier, F; Ciais, P.; Dechow, R; Erb, K-H; Etiope, G; Fortems-Cheiney, A; Grassi, G; Hartmann, J; Jung, M.; Lathiere, J; Lohila, A; Mayorga, E; Moosdorf, N; Njakou, D; Otto, J; Papale, D.; Peters, W; Peylin, P; Raymond, Peter A; Rodenbeck, C; Saarnio, S; Schulze, E.-D.; Szopa, S; Thompson, R; Verkerk, P; Vuichard, N; Wang, R; Wattenbach, M; Zaehle, S

    2012-01-01

    Globally, terrestrial ecosystems have absorbed about 30% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions over the period 2000-2007 and inter-hemispheric gradients indicate that a significant fraction of terrestrial carbon sequestration must be north of the Equator. We present a compilation of the CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O balances of Europe following a dual constraint approach in which (1) a land-based balance derived mainly from ecosystem carbon inventories and (2) a land-based balance derived from flux measurements are compared to (3) the atmospheric data-based balance derived from inversions constrained by measurements of atmospheric GHG (greenhouse gas) concentrations. Good agreement between the GHG balances based on fluxes (1294 {+-} 545 Tg C in CO{sub 2}-eq yr{sup -1}), inventories (1299 {+-} 200 Tg C in CO{sub 2}-eq yr{sup -1}) and inversions (1210 {+-} 405 Tg C in CO{sub 2}-eq yr{sup -1}) increases our confidence that the processes underlying the European GHG budget are well understood and reasonably sampled. However, the uncertainty remains large and largely lacks formal estimates. Given that European net land to atmosphere exchanges are determined by a few dominant fluxes, the uncertainty of these key components needs to be formally estimated before efforts could be made to reduce the overall uncertainty. The net land-to-atmosphere flux is a net source for CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, because the anthropogenic emissions by far exceed the biogenic sink strength. The dual-constraint approach confirmed that the European biogenic sink removes as much as 205 {+-} 72 Tg C yr{sup -1} from fossil fuel burning from the atmosphere. However, This C is being sequestered in both terrestrial and inland aquatic ecosystems. If the C-cost for ecosystem management is taken into account, the net uptake of ecosystems is estimated to decrease by 45% but still indicates substantial C-sequestration. However, when the balance is extended from CO{sub 2} towards the main GHGs, C-uptake by terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems is offset by emissions of non-CO{sub 2} GHGs. As such, the European ecosystems are unlikely to contribute to mitigating the effects of climate change.

  19. The effect of strain induced by Ag underlayer on saturation magnetization of partially ordered Fe16N2 thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Meiyin; Allard, Lawrence F.; Ji, Nian; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Guang-Hua; Wang, Jian -Ping

    2013-12-12

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were used to study film formation by magnesium alloys AZ31B (Mg-3Al-1Zn base) and ZE10A (Elektron®717, E717: Mg-1Zn + Nd, Zr) in H2O and D2O with and without 1 or 5 wt.% NaCl. No SANS scattering changes were observed after 24 h D2O or H2O exposures compared with as received (unreacted) alloy, consistent with relatively dense MgO-base film formation. However, exposure to 5 wt.% NaCl resulted in accelerated corrosion, with resultant SANS scattering changes detected. The SANS data indicated both particle and rough surface (internal and external) scattering, but withmore » no preferential size features. The films formed in 5 wt.% NaCl consisted of a thin, inner MgO-base layer, and a nano-porous and filamentous Mg(OH)2 outer region tens of microns thick. Chlorine was detected extending to the inner MgO-base film region, with segregation of select alloying elements also observed in the inner MgO, but not the outer Mg(OH)2. Modeling of the SANS data suggested that the outer Mg(OH)2 films had very high surface areas, consistent with loss of film protectiveness. Here, implications for the NaCl corrosion mechanism, and the potential utility of SANS for Mg corrosion, are discussed.« less

  20. Remove Condensate with Minimal Air Loss; Industrial Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... level point, or a float activates a pneumatic signal to an air cylinder to open a ball ... For additional information on industrial energy efficiency measures, contact the EERE ...

  1. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Webinar Transcript Market Drivers for Biofuels Biomass Program Perspectives on Anaerobic Digestion and Fuel Cell Integration at Biorefineries

  2. Minimizing the cost of subsea developments through technological innovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eyre, G.; Loth, B.

    1994-12-31

    The paper summarizes the results of an extensive study carried out for the UK Government. This assessed the cost and economic impact of technological innovation on subsea and floating developments in the UKCS. The study covered, innovations that could be applied to subsea developments to significantly reduce cost, including multiwell completions, composite pipelines, compartmented pipelines, pipeline specification breaking and autonomous control systems. Cost and economic models were used to assess the economic impact of technological innovation on marginal field developments. The results of these assessments were drawn up as a series of ranking lists designed to assist manufacturers and suppliers in establishing priorities for research and development funding. The study also explored the potential UKCS and World market for innovative subsea technologies and quantified the research and development required to bring key innovations into commercial use.

  3. Minimize Adverse Motor and Adjustable Speed Drive Interactions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electronic adjustable speed drives (ASDs) are extremely efficient and valuable assets to motor systems. They allow precise process control and provide energy savings within systems that do not need to operate continuously at full output. This tip sheet discusses design considerations to take into account when considering ASDs and offers suggested actions.

  4. Non-minimal Kinetic coupling to gravity and accelerated expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granda, L.N.

    2010-07-01

    We study a scalar field with kinetic term coupled to itself and to the curvature, as a source of dark energy, and analyze the role of this new coupling in the accelerated expansion at large times. In the case of scalar field dominance, the scalar field and potential giving rise to power-law expansion are found in some cases, and a dynamical equation of state is calculated for a given solution of the field equations. A behavior very close to that of the cosmological constant was found.

  5. GTRI's Convert Program: Minimizing the Use of Highly Enriched...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    This Site Budget IG Web Policy Privacy No Fear Act Accessibility FOIA Sitemap Federal Government The White House DOE.gov USA.gov Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA...

  6. HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    This Site Budget IG Web Policy Privacy No Fear Act Accessibility FOIA Sitemap Federal Government The White House DOE.gov USA.gov Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA...

  7. Network for minimizing current imbalances in a faradaic battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wozniak, Walter; Haskins, Harold J.

    1994-01-01

    A circuit for connecting a faradaic battery with circuitry for monitoring the condition of the battery includes a plurality of voltage divider networks providing battery voltage monitoring nodes and includes compensating resistors connected with the networks to maintain uniform discharge currents through the cells of the battery. The circuit also provides a reduced common mode voltage requirement for the monitoring circuitry by referencing the divider networks to one-half the battery voltage.

  8. Process to minimize cracking of pyrolytic carbon coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Sease, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Carbon-coated microspheroids useful as fuels in nuclear reactors are produced with a low percentage of cracked coatings and are imparted increased strength and mechanical stability characteristics by annealing immediately after the carbon coating processes.

  9. Structural Genomics of Minimal Organisms: Pipeline and Results...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    At the time of this writing, structural information of more than 93percent of all soluble ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 59; CLONING; GENES; ...

  10. Notice of Intent: Eagle Impact Minimization Technology Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to advance the readiness of technologies intended to reduce eagle mortalities at operational wind turbines or wind facilities. ...

  11. Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Acidity, Oxidation and Corrosion Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant Additive Species in the Ring Pack and Ash Emissions and Their Dependence on Crankcase Oil Properties

  12. Minimization of Impact from Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    power generation (i.e., photovoltaic array) and local energy storage (i.e., battery bank). ... sub-systems: (1) 25 EVSE; (2) 47 kW photovoltaic (PV) array; and (3) 60 kWh battery bank. ...

  13. Minimize Adverse Motor and Adjustable Speed Drive Interactions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Causes include common mode voltage problems andor phase voltage unbalance on the VFD input. Capacitive coupling, resulting from irregular current waveforms and ground-mode ...

  14. Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This factsheet details a project to improve operating procedures, including physical and chemical methods and the use of high-temperature coatings, to allow refineries to operate ...

  15. Guide to Minimizing Compressor-based Cooling in Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-05-01

    This best practice guide is one in a series created by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), a program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Geared towards architects, engineers, and data center Information Technology (IT) and facility managers, this guide provides information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating sustainable high-performance data centers.

  16. Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The mineral dust global burden differs by 10% and sea salt burden by 30-40% between MAM3 and MAM7 mainly due to the different size ranges for dust and sea salt modes and different ...

  17. A Clock Synchronization Strategy for Minimizing Clock Variance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: SBAC PAD 2010, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, 20101027, 20101030 Research Org: Oak Ridge ...

  18. Geothermal Power Plants — Minimizing Solid Waste and Recovering Minerals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although many geothermal power plants generate no appreciable solid waste, the unique characteristics of some geothermal fluids require special attention to handle entrained solid byproducts.

  19. Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Solid Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aquaculture and horticulture businesses, and other industries that use geothermal direct-use systems typically don't generate any more solid waste than those that use other energy resources.

  20. Minimization of Impact from Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: IEEE PES Innovative Smart Grid Technologies Conference (ISGT), Washington, DC, USA, ...

  1. Minimize Adverse Motor and Adjustable Speed Drive Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-07-01

    This is one in a series of tip sheets to help manufacturers optimize their industrial motor and motor-driven systems.

  2. Next-to-minimal two Higgs Doublet Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Chien -Yi; Freid, Michael; Sher, Marc

    2014-04-07

    The simplest extension of the Two Higgs Doublet Model is the addition of a real scalar singlet, S. The effects of mixing between the singlet and the doublets can be manifested in two ways. It can modify the couplings of the 126 GeV Higgs boson, h, and it can lead to direct detection of the heavy Higgs at the LHC. In this paper, we show that in the type-I Model, for heavy Higgs masses in the 200-600 GeV range, the latter effect will be detected earlier than the former for most of parameter space. Should no such Higgs be discoveredmore » in this mass range, then the upper limit on the mixing will be sufficiently strong such that there will be no significant effects on the couplings of the h for most of parameter space. Thus, the reverse is true in the type-II model, the limits from measurements of the couplings of the h will dominate over the limits from non-observation of the heavy Higgs.« less

  3. Servo control booster system for minimizing following error

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wise, William L.

    1985-01-01

    A closed-loop feedback-controlled servo system is disclosed which reduces command-to-response error to the system's position feedback resolution least increment, .DELTA.S.sub.R, on a continuous real-time basis for all operating speeds. The servo system employs a second position feedback control loop on a by exception basis, when the command-to-response error .gtoreq..DELTA.S.sub.R, to produce precise position correction signals. When the command-to-response error is less than .DELTA.S.sub.R, control automatically reverts to conventional control means as the second position feedback control loop is disconnected, becoming transparent to conventional servo control means. By operating the second unique position feedback control loop used herein at the appropriate clocking rate, command-to-response error may be reduced to the position feedback resolution least increment. The present system may be utilized in combination with a tachometer loop for increased stability.

  4. Office of Material Management and Minimization | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    honored two NNSA Removes U.S.-Origin HEU from Jamaica, Makes the Caribbean HEU Free WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration ...

  5. Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With geothermal direct-use applications, land use issues usually only arise during exploration and development when geothermal reservoirs are located in or near urbanized areas, critical habitat...

  6. Servo control booster system for minimizing following error

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wise, W.L.

    1979-07-26

    A closed-loop feedback-controlled servo system is disclosed which reduces command-to-response error to the system's position feedback resolution least increment, ..delta..S/sub R/, on a continuous real-time basis, for all operational times of consequence and for all operating speeds. The servo system employs a second position feedback control loop on a by exception basis, when the command-to-response error greater than or equal to ..delta..S/sub R/, to produce precise position correction signals. When the command-to-response error is less than ..delta..S/sub R/, control automatically reverts to conventional control means as the second position feedback control loop is disconnected, becoming transparent to conventional servo control means. By operating the second unique position feedback control loop used herein at the appropriate clocking rate, command-to-response error may be reduced to the position feedback resolution least increment. The present system may be utilized in combination with a tachometer loop for increased stability.

  7. RECONFIGURING POWER SYSTEMS TO MINIMIZE CASCADING FAILURES: MODELS AND ALGORITHMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bienstock, Daniel

    2014-04-11

    the main goal of this project was to develop new scientific tools, based on optimization techniques, with the purpose of controlling and modeling cascading failures of electrical power transmission systems. We have developed a high-quality tool for simulating cascading failures. The problem of how to control a cascade was addressed, with the aim of stopping the cascade with a minimum of load lost. Yet another aspect of cascade is the investigation of which events would trigger a cascade, or more appropriately the computation of the most harmful initiating event given some constraint on the severity of the event. One common feature of the cascade models described (indeed, of several of the cascade models found in the literature) is that we study thermally-induced line tripping. We have produced a study that accounts for exogenous randomness (e.g. wind and ambient temperature) that could affect the thermal behavior of a line, with a focus on controlling the power flow of the line while maintaining safe probability of line overload. This was done by means of a rigorous analysis of a stochastic version of the heat equation. we incorporated a model of randomness in the behavior of wind power output; again modeling an OPF-like problem that uses chance-constraints to maintain low probability of line overloads; this work has been continued so as to account for generator dynamics as well.

  8. Minimal sufficient positive-operator valued measure on a separable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; FUZZY LOGIC; HILBERT SPACE; QUANTUM SYSTEMS; STATISTICS Word Cloud More Like This Full Text Journal Articles DOI: ...

  9. Minimizing Energy Losses in Ducts | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Efficient and well-designed duct systems distribute air properly throughout your home ... extending in opposite directions from the air source, with many smaller ducts attached at ...

  10. Minimized Space Conditioning Distribution Strategy for Low-load Homes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 26, 2012, and addressed the question What are the best HVAC solutions for low-load, high performance homes?"

  11. Linking ceragenins to water-treatment membranes to minimize biofouling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Feng, Yanshu; Savage, Paul B.; Pollard, Jacob; Branda, Steven S.; Goeres, Darla; Buckingham-Meyer, Kelli; Stafslien, Shane; Marry, Christopher; Jones, Howland D. T.; Lichtenberger, Alyssa; Kirk, Matthew F.; McGrath, Lucas K.

    2012-01-01

    Ceragenins were used to create biofouling resistant water-treatment membranes. Ceragenins are synthetically produced antimicrobial peptide mimics that display broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. While ceragenins have been used on bio-medical devices, use of ceragenins on water-treatment membranes is novel. Biofouling impacts membrane separation processes for many industrial applications such as desalination, waste-water treatment, oil and gas extraction, and power generation. Biofouling results in a loss of permeate flux and increase in energy use. Creation of biofouling resistant membranes will assist in creation of clean water with lower energy usage and energy with lower water usage. Five methods of attaching three different ceragenin molecules were conducted and tested. Biofouling reduction was observed in the majority of the tests, indicating the ceragenins are a viable solution to biofouling on water treatment membranes. Silane direct attachment appears to be the most promising attachment method if a high concentration of CSA-121a is used. Additional refinement of the attachment methods are needed in order to achieve our goal of several log-reduction in biofilm cell density without impacting the membrane flux. Concurrently, biofilm forming bacteria were isolated from source waters relevant for water treatment: wastewater, agricultural drainage, river water, seawater, and brackish groundwater. These isolates can be used for future testing of methods to control biofouling. Once isolated, the ability of the isolates to grow biofilms was tested with high-throughput multiwell methods. Based on these tests, the following species were selected for further testing in tube reactors and CDC reactors: Pseudomonas ssp. (wastewater, agricultural drainage, and Colorado River water), Nocardia coeliaca or Rhodococcus spp. (wastewater), Pseudomonas fluorescens and Hydrogenophaga palleronii (agricultural drainage), Sulfitobacter donghicola, Rhodococcus fascians, Rhodobacter katedanii, and Paracoccus marcusii (seawater), and Sphingopyxis spp. (groundwater). The testing demonstrated the ability of these isolates to be used for biofouling control testing under laboratory conditions. Biofilm forming bacteria were obtained from all the source water samples.

  12. Plan for Using Solar-Powered Jack Pumps to Sample Groundwater at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Hudson, Charles Lohrstorfer, Bruce Hurley

    2007-05-03

    Groundwater is sampled from 39 monitoring wells on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as part of the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program. Many of these wells were not designed or constructed for long-term groundwater monitoring. Some have extensive completion zones and others have obstructions such as pumps and tubing. The high-volume submersible pumps in some wells are unsuitable for long-term monitoring and result in large volumes of water that may have to be contained and characterized before subsequent disposition. The configuration of most wells requires sampling stagnant well water with a wireline bailer. Although bailer sampling allows for the collection of depth-discrete samples, the collected samples may not be representative of local groundwater because no well purging is done. Low-maintenance, solar-powered jack pumps will be deployed in nine of these onsite monitoring wells to improve sample quality. These pumps provide the lift capacity to produce groundwater from the deep aquifers encountered in the arid environment of the NTS. The water depths in these wells range from 700 to 2,340 ft below ground surface. The considerable labor and electrical power requirements of electric submersible pumps are eliminated once these pumps are installed. Access tubing will be installed concurrent with the installation of the pump string to provide downhole access for water-level measurements or other wireline instruments. Micro-purge techniques with low pump rates will be used to minimize purge volumes and reduce hydraulic gradients. The set depths of the pumps will be determined by the borehole characteristics and screened interval.

  13. May 2015 Groundwater Sampling at the Shoal, Nevada, Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... met when purging a Category I well: Was one pumptubing volume purged prior to sampling? ... NA Was one pumptubing volume removed prior to sampling? 9. Were duplicates taken at a ...

  14. January 2015 Groundwater Sampling at the Gnome-Coach, New Mexico...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... met when purging a Category I well: Was one pumptubing volume purged prior to sampling? ... NA There were no Category II wells. Was one pumptubing volume removed prior to sampling? ...

  15. Microsoft Word - 09102634_DVP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... met when purging a Category I well: Was one pumptubing volume purged prior to sampling? ... Was the flow rate less than 500 mLmin? Yes If a portable pump was used, was there a ...

  16. Microsoft Word - 11114180 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... met when purging a Category I well: Was one pumptubing volume purged prior to sampling? ... Yes Was the flow rate less than 500 mLmin? Yes If a portable pump was used, was there a ...

  17. Microsoft Word - 09062426 DVP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... met when purging a Category I well: Was one pumptubing volume purged prior to sampling? ... Yes Was the flow rate less than 500 mLmin? Yes If a portable pump was used, was there a ...

  18. Microsoft Word - 10032894 10032895 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... met when purging a Category I well: Was one pumptubing volume purged prior to sampling? ... Yes Was the flow rate less than 500 mLmin? Yes If a portable pump was used, was there a ...

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... met when purging a Category I well: Was one pumptubing volume purged prior to sampling? ... Yes Was one pumptubing volume removed prior to sampling? Yes 9. Were duplicates taken at ...

  20. Synthesis ofN-(2-chloro-5-methylthiophenyl)-N'-(3-methyl-thiophenyl)-N'-[3H3]methylguanidine, l brace [3H3]CNS-5161 r brace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, Andrew R.; Morimoto, Hiromi; VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Williams, Philip G.; Biegon, Anat

    2001-09-28

    The preparation of the title compound, [{sup 3}H{sub 3}]CNS-5161, was accomplished in three steps starting with the production of [{sup 3}H{sub 3}]iodomethane (CT{sub 3}I). The intermediate N-[{sup 3}H{sub 3}]methyl-3-(thiomethylphenyl)cyanamide was prepared in 77% yield by the addition of CT{sub 3}I to 3-(thiomethylphenyl)cyanamide, previously treated with sodium hydride. Reaction of this tritiated intermediate with 2-chloro-5-thiomethylaniline hydrochloride formed the guanidine compound [{sup 3}H{sub 3}]CNS-5161. Purification by HPLC gave the desired labeled product in an overall yield of 9% with greater than 96% radiochemical purity and a final specific activity of 66 Ci mmol{sup -1}.

  1. (n,2n) and (n,3n) cross sections of neutron-induced reactions on 150Sm for En from threshold to 35 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dashdorj, D; Mitchell, G; Kawano, T; Becker, J; Wu, C; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R; Kunieda, S

    2009-03-16

    Cross-section measurements were made of prompt discrete {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 35 MeV) on a {sup 150}Sm sample fo 1550 mg/cm{sup 2} of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} enriched to 95.6% in {sup 150}Sm. Results are compared with enhanced Hauser-Feshbach model calculations including the pre-equilibrium reactions. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Incident neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. Excitation functions for thirteen individual {gamma}-rays up to E{sub x} = 0.8 MeV in {sup 149}Sm and one {gamma}-ray transition between the first excited and ground state in {sup 148}Sm were measured. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections were calculated using GNASH, an enhanced Hauser-Feshbach statistical nuclear reaction model code, and compared with the experimental results. The particle transmission coefficients were calculated with new systematic 'global' optical model potential parameters. The coupled-channel optical model based on the soft rotor model was employed to calculate the particle transmission coefficients. The pre-equilibrium part of the spin distribution in {sup 150}Sm was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshbach, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK) and incorporated into the GNASH reaction model code. the partial cross sections for discrete {gamma}-ray cascade paths leading to the ground state in {sup 149}Sm and {sup 148}Sm have been summed (without double counting) to estimate lower limits for reaction cross sections. These lower limits are combined with Hauser-Feshbach model calculations to deduce the reaction channel cross sections. These reaction channel cross sections agree with previously measured experimental and ENDF/B-VII evaluations.

  2. Relativistic configuration-interaction calculations of electric dipole n=2−n=3 transitions for medium-charge Li-like ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Banglin; Jiang, Gang; Zhang, Chuanyu

    2014-09-15

    In this work, the multi-configuration Dirac–Fock and relativistic configuration-interaction methods have been used to calculate the transition wavelengths, electric dipole transition probabilities, line strengths, and absorption oscillator strengths for the 2s–3p, 2p–3s, and 2p–3d transitions in Li-like ions with nuclear charge Z=7–30. Our calculated values are in good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical results. We took the contributions from Breit interaction, finite nuclear mass corrections, and quantum electrodynamics corrections to the initial and final levels into account, and also found that the contributions from Breit interaction, self-energy, and vacuum polarization grow fast with increasing nuclear charge for a fixed configuration. The ratio of the velocity to length form of the transition rate (A{sub v}/A{sub l}) was used to estimate the accuracy of our calculations.

  3. Effect of metal in M3(btc)2 and M2(dobdc) MOFs for O2/N2 separations: A combined density functional theory and experimental study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Parkes, Marie V.; Sava Gallis, Dorina F.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-03-02

    Computational screening of metal-organic framework (MOF) materials for selective oxygen adsorption from air could lead to new sorbents for the oxyfuel combustion process feedstock streams. A comprehensive study on the effect of MOF metal chemistry on gas binding energies in two common but structurally disparate metal-organic frameworks has been undertaken. Dispersion-corrected density functional theory methods were used to calculate the oxygen and nitrogen binding energies with each of fourteen metals, respectively, substituted into two MOF series, M2(dobdc) and M3(btc)2. The accuracy of DFT methods was validated by comparing trends in binding energy with experimental gas sorption measurements. A periodic trendmore » in oxygen binding energies was found, with greater oxygen binding energies for early transition-metal-substituted MOFs compared to late transition metal MOFs; this was independent of MOF structural type. The larger binding energies were associated with oxygen binding in a side-on configuration to the metal, with concomitant lengthening of the O-O bond. In contrast, nitrogen binding energies were similar across the transition metal series, regardless of both MOF structural type and metal identity. Altogether, these findings suggest that early transition metal MOFs are best suited to separating oxygen from nitrogen, and that the MOF structural type is less important than the metal identity.« less

  4. Structural and Mechanistic Analysis through Electronic Spectra: Aqueous Hyponitrite Radical (N2O2-) and Nitrosyl Hyponitrite Anion (N3O3-)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valiev, Marat; Lymar, Sergei V.

    2011-11-03

    Aqueous hyponitrite radical (N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}) and nitrosyl hyponitrite anion (N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}) species are important intermediates in the reductive chemistry of NO. The structures and absorption spectra of various hydrated isomers of these compounds were investigated in this work using high-level quantum mechanical calculations combined with the explicit classical description of the aqueous environment. For N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}, comparison of the calculated spectra and energetics with the experimental data reveals that: (1) upon the one-electron oxidation of trans-hyponitrite (ON=NO{sub 2}{sup -}), the trans configuration of the resulting ON=NO{sup -} radical is preserved; (2) although cis- and trans-ON=NO{sup -} are energetically nearly equivalent, the barrier for the trans-cis isomerization is prohibitively high due to the partial double character of the NN bond; (3) the UV spectrum of ON=NO{sup -} was misinterpreted in the earlier pulse radiolysis work and its more recent revision has been justified. For the N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} ion, the symmetric isomer is the dominant observable species, and the asymmetric isomer contributes little to the experimental spectrum. Coherent analysis of the calculated and experimental data suggests a re-interpretation of the N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -} + NO reaction mechanism, according to which the reaction evenly bifurcates to yield both the symmetric and asymmetric isomers of N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}. While the latter isomer rapidly decomposes to the final NO{sub 2}{sup -} + N{sub 2}O products, the former isomer is stable toward this decomposition but its formation is reversible with the homolysis equilibrium constant Khom = 2.2 - 10{sup -7} M. Collectively, these results demonstrate that advanced theoretical modeling can be of significant benefit in structural and mechanistic analysis of UV spectra.

  5. Structural and Mechanistic Analysis through Electronic Spectra: Aqueous Hyponitrite Radical (N(2)O(2)(-)) and Nitrosyl Hyponitrite Anion (N(3)O(3)(-))

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lymar S. V.; Valiev M.

    2011-11-03

    Aqueous hyponitrite radical (N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}) and nitrosyl hyponitrite anion (N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}) are important intermediates in the reductive chemistry of NO. The structures and absorption spectra of various hydrated isomers of these compounds were investigated in this work using high-level quantum mechanical calculations combined with the explicit classical description of the aqueous environment. For N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}, comparison of the calculated spectra and energetics with the experimental data reveals that (1) upon the one-electron oxidation of trans-hyponitrite (ON{double_bond}NO{sup 2-}), the trans configuration of the resulting ON{double_bond}NO{sup -} radical is preserved; (2) although cis- and trans-ON{double_bond}NO{sup -} are energetically nearly equivalent, the barrier for the trans-cis isomerization is prohibitively high because of the partial double character of the NN bond; (3) the calculations confirm that the UV spectrum of ONNO{sup -} was misinterpreted in the earlier pulse radiolysis work, and its more recent revision has been justified. For the N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} ion, the symmetric isomer the dominant observable species, and the asymmetric isomer contributes insignificantly to the experimental spectrum. Coherent analysis of the calculated and experimental data suggests a reinterpretation of the N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -} + NO reaction mechanism according to which the reaction evenly bifurcates to yield both the symmetric and asymmetric isomers of N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}. While the latter isomer rapidly decomposes to the final NO{sub 2}{sup -} + N{sub 2}O products, the former isomer is stable toward this decomposition, but its formation is reversible with the homolysis equilibrium constant K{sub hom} = 2.2 x 10{sup -7} M. Collectively, these results demonstrate that advanced theoretical modeling can be of significant benefit in structural and mechanistic analysis on the basis of the electronic spectra of aqueous transients.

  6. Superposition of super-integrable pseudo-Euclidean potentials in N = 2 with a fundamental constant of motion of arbitrary order in the momenta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campoamor-Stursberg, R.

    2014-04-15

    It is shown that for any ?,??R and k?Z, the Hamiltonian H{sub k}=p{sub 1}p{sub 2}??q{sub 2}{sup (2k+1)}q{sub 1}{sup (?2k?3)}?(?)/2 q{sub 2}{sup k}q{sub 1}{sup (?k?2)} is super-integrable, possessing fundamental constants of motion of degrees 2 and 2k + 2 in the momenta.

  7. Method for pressure modulation of turbine sidewall cavities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leone, Sal Albert; Book, Matthew David; Banares, Christopher R.

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for controlling cooling air flow for pressure modulation of turbine components, such as the turbine outer sidewall cavities. The pressure at which cooling and purge air is supplied to the turbine outer side wall cavities is modulated, based on compressor discharge pressure (Pcd), thereby to generally maintain the back flow margin (BFM) so as to minimize excessive leakage and the consequent performance deterioration. In an exemplary embodiment, the air pressure within the third stage outer side wall cavity and the air pressure within the fourth stage outer side wall cavity are each controlled to a respective value that is a respective prescribed percentage of the concurrent compressor discharge pressure. The prescribed percentage may be determined from a ratio of the respective outer side wall pressure to compressor discharge pressure at Cold Day Turn Down (CDTD) required to provide a prescribed back flow margin.

  8. System for pressure modulation of turbine sidewall cavities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leone, Sal Albert; Book, Matthew David; Banares, Christopher R.

    2002-01-01

    A system and method are provided for controlling cooling air flow for pressure modulation of turbine components, such as the turbine outer sidewall cavities. The pressure at which cooling and purge air is supplied to the turbine outer side wall cavities is modulated, based on compressor discharge pressure (Pcd), thereby to generally maintain the back flow margin (BFM) so as to minimize excessive leakage and the consequent performance deterioration. In an exemplary embodiment, the air pressure within the third stage outer side wall cavity and the air pressure within the fourth stage outer side wall cavity are each controlled to a respective value that is a respective prescribed percentage of the concurrent compressor discharge pressure. The prescribed percentage may be determined from a ratio of the respective outer side wall pressure to compressor discharge pressure at Cold Day Turn Down (CDTD) required to provide a prescribed back flow margin.

  9. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  10. Depressurization as an accident management strategy to minimize the consequences of direct containment heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.J.; Golden, D.W.; Chambers, R.; Miller, J.D.; Hallbert, B.P.; Dobbe, C.A. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) have identified severe accidents for nuclear power plants that have the potential to cause failure of the containment through direct containment heating (DCH). Prevention of DCH or mitigation of its effects may be possible using accident management strategies that intentionally depressurize the reactor coolant system (RCS). The effectiveness of intentional depressurization during a station blackout TMLB' sequence was evaluated considering the phenomenological behavior, hardware performance, and operational performance. Phenomenological behavior was calculated using the SCDAP/RELAP5 severe accident analysis code. Two strategies to mitigate DCH by depressurization of the RCS were considered. One strategy, called early depressurization, assumed that the reactor head vent and pressurizer power-operated relief valves (PORVs) were latched open at steam generator dryout. The second strategy, called late depression, assumed that the head vent and PORVs were latched open at a core exit temperature of {approximately}922 K (1200{degree}F). Depressurization of the RCS to a low value that may mitigate DCH was predicted prior to reactor pressure vessel breach for both early and late depressurization. The strategy of late depressurization is preferred over early depressurization because there are greater opportunities to recover plant functions prior to core damage and because failure uncertainties are lessened. 22 refs., 38 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Design and installation of an ultra deepwater subsea system: How to minimize risks and costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izetti, R.G.; Moreira, J.R.F.

    1994-12-31

    The world`s deepest Subsea Tree was successfully installed offshore Brazil at a water depth of 1,027 m. The psychological barrier of 1,000 m was finally broken. Actually, subsea completion technology reached a point where the fundamental question is no longer whether fields located at water depths beyond 1,000 m can be profitably completed. The key issue now is: is there a better and safer way to do it? PETROBRAS has pursued an aggressive strategy in research and development concept evaluations and various field studies aiming at a continuous decrease in both CAPEX and OPEX. This paper primarily describes the major subsea completion achievements, resulting from this great effort, which among other topics include: implementation of a standardization program; sharp reduction of both subsea completion and drilling time; a new flowline connection method which combines the advantages of both lay-away and pull-in methods; design and future installation of the world first subsea electrical submersible pump; completion equipment simplification and resulting cost reduction. Also addressed are the key safety aspects related to deepwater completions and the equipment design improvement necessary to safely conduct those operations.

  12. Design and installation of an ultra-deepwater subsea system: How to minimize risks and costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izetti, R.G.; Moreira, J.R.F.

    1995-04-01

    The world`s deepest subsea tree was successfully installed offshore Brazil at a water depth of 1,027 m, finally breaking the psychological barrier of 1,000 m. Actually, subsea completion technology has reached a point where the fundamental question no linger is whether fields located at water depths > 1,000 m can be profitably completed; is there a better and safer way to do it is now the key issue. Petrobras has pursued an aggressive strategy in R and D concept evaluations and various field studies aiming at a continuous decrease in both capital and operational expenditures. This paper describes the major subsea completion achievements resulting from this great effort, which include implementation of a standardization program; sharp reduction of subsea completion and drilling time; a new flowline connection method that combines the advantages of lay-away and pull-in methods; design and future installation of the world`s first subsea electrical submersible pump; and completion equipment simplification and resulting cost reduction. Also addressed are the key safety aspects related to deepwater completions and the equipment design improvement necessary to conduct those operations safely.

  13. Microminiaturized minimally invasive intravascular micro-mechanical systems powered and controlled via fiber-optic cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fitch, J.P.; Hagans, K.; Clough, R.; Matthews, D.L.; Lee, A.P.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Benett, W.J.; Silva, L. Da; Celliers, P.M.

    1998-03-03

    A micro-mechanical system for medical procedures is constructed in the basic form of a catheter having a distal end for insertion into and manipulation within a body and a near end providing for a user to control the manipulation of the distal end within the body. A fiber-optic cable is disposed within the catheter and having a distal end proximate to the distal end of the catheter and a near end for external coupling of laser light energy. A microgripper is attached to the distal end of the catheter and providing for the gripping or releasing of an object within the body. A laser-light-to-mechanical-power converter is connected to receive laser light from the distal end of the fiber-optic cable and connected to mechanically actuate the microgripper. 22 figs.

  14. Constraining the mSUGRA (minimal supergravity) parameter space using the entropy of dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nunez, Dario; Zavala, Jesus; Nellen, Lukas; Sussman, Roberto A; Cabral-Rosetti, Luis G; Mondragon, Myriam E-mail: jzavala@nucleares.unam.mx E-mail: lukas@nucleares.unam.mx E-mail: lgcabral@ciidet.edu.mx; Collaboration: For the Instituto Avanzado de Cosmologia, IAC

    2008-05-15

    We derive an expression for the entropy of a dark matter halo described using a Navarro-Frenk-White model with a core. The comparison of this entropy with that of dark matter in the freeze-out era allows us to constrain the parameter space in mSUGRA models. Moreover, combining these constraints with the ones obtained from the usual abundance criterion and demanding that these criteria be consistent with the 2{sigma} bounds for the abundance of dark matter: 0.112{<=}{Omega}{sub DM}h{sup 2}{<=}0.122, we are able to clearly identify validity regions among the values of tan{beta}, which is one of the parameters of the mSUGRA model. We found that for the regions of the parameter space explored, small values of tan{beta} are not favored; only for tan {beta} Asymptotically-Equal-To 50 are the two criteria significantly consistent. In the region where the two criteria are consistent we also found a lower bound for the neutralino mass, m{sub {chi}}{>=}141 GeV.

  15. Final Technical Report - Advanced Optical Sensors to Minimize Energy Consumption in Polymer Extrusion Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan J. Foulk

    2012-07-24

    Project Objective: The objectives of this study are to develop an accurate and stable on-line sensor system to monitor color and composition on-line in polymer melts, to develop a scheme for using the output to control extruders to eliminate the energy, material and operational costs of off-specification product, and to combine or eliminate some extrusion processes. Background: Polymer extrusion processes are difficult to control because the quality achieved in the final product is complexly affected by the properties of the extruder screw, speed of extrusion, temperature, polymer composition, strength and dispersion properties of additives, and feeder system properties. Extruder systems are engineered to be highly reproducible so that when the correct settings to produce a particular product are found, that product can be reliably produced time after time. However market conditions often require changes in the final product, different products or grades may be processed in the same equipment, and feed materials vary from lot to lot. All of these changes require empirical adjustment of extruder settings to produce a product meeting specifications. Optical sensor systems that can continuously monitor the composition and color of the extruded polymer could detect process upsets, drift, blending oscillations, and changes in dispersion of additives. Development of an effective control algorithm using the output of the monitor would enable rapid corrections for changes in materials and operating conditions, thereby eliminating most of the scrap and recycle of current processing. This information could be used to identify extruder systems issues, diagnose problem sources, and suggest corrective actions in real-time to help keep extruder system settings within the optimum control region. Using these advanced optical sensor systems would give extruder operators real-time feedback from their process. They could reduce the amount of off-spec product produced and significantly reduce energy consumption. Also, because blending and dispersion of additives and components in the final product could be continuously verified, we believe that, in many cases, intermediate compounding steps could be eliminated (saving even more time and energy).

  16. Method for minimizing contaminant particle effects in gas-insulated electrical apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pace, Marshall O.; Adcock, James L.; Christophorou, Loucas G.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical breakdown of a gas insulator in high voltage apparatus is preved by placing an electrical insulative coating on contaminant particles in the gas insulator.

  17. EMGeo: Risk Minimizing Software for Finding Offshore Fossil Fuels by Fluid Identification

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2011-01-21

    Berkeley Lab researchers Greg Newman and Michael Commer have developed advanced software for discovering and mapping offshore fossil fuel deposits. When combined with established seismic methods, this software makes possible direct imaging of reservoir fluids....

  18. Fluidized-bed catalytic coal-gasification process. [US patent; pretreatment to minimize agglomeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Euker, C.A. Jr.; Wesselhoft, R.D.; Dunkleman, J.J.; Aquino, D.C.; Gouker, T.R.

    1981-09-14

    Coal or similar carbonaceous solids impregnated with gasification catalyst constituents are oxidized by contact with a gas containing between 2 vol % and 21 vol % oxygen at a temperature between 50 and 250/sup 0/C in an oxidation zone and the resultant oxidized, catalyst impregnated solids are then gasified in a fluidized bed gasification zone at an elevated pressure. The oxidation of the catalyst impregnated solids under these conditions insures that the bed density in the fluidized bed gasification zone will be relatively high even though the solids are gasified at elevated pressure and temperature.

  19. Lessons Learned from Raw Treatment in the Slovak Republic - Minimization for Final Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanusik, V.; Hladky, E.; Krajc, T.; Pekar, A.; Stubna, M.; Urbanec, M. [Milan Zatkulak, VUJE, a.s., Trnava (Slovakia); Ehn, L.; Kover, M.; Remias, V.; Slezak, M. [JAVYS, a.s., Bohunice (Slovakia)

    2008-07-01

    This paper is referring about the utilization of technologies for the treatment and conditioning of low and intermediate level RAW from operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Slovakia. This experience represents more than 116 reactor years of NPP operation, mainly of NPPs equipped with VVER 440 reactors, 30 years of decommissioning activities, 27 years of development and operation of technologies for the treatment and conditioning of RAW and 7 years of LLW and ILW final repository operation. These technologies are located in two localities: Jaslovske Bohunice and Mochovce. The complex treatment and conditioning center (cementation, bituminization, incineration, vitrification, fragmentation and compacting) for almost all types of radioactive waste is located in Jaslovske Bohunice NPP site. The treatment and conditioning center for liquid radioactive waste (cementation and bituminization) and the surface type repository for LLW and ILW final disposal are located in Mochovce area. The treated waste forms are disposed to repository in cubical Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) containers. The experience from the phase of technology development and the phase of technology modifications for various types of RAW, the experience from long term operation of technologies and the experience from transportation of original and packed wastes are described in this paper. The method of optimally combined technology utilization in order to maximize the radionuclide inventory at the same time with respect of disposal safety limitations of repository is described, too. The significant RAW volume reduction for final disposal was achieved through mediation of the combination of treatment and conditioning technologies. The disposal of treated RAW in cubic FRC containers allowed the optimal utilization of volume and radiological capacity of LLW and ILW repository in Mochovce and the fulfillment of determined safety requirements at the same time. (authors)

  20. Identification of RESNET HERS Index Values Corresponding to Minimal Complicance with the IECC Performance Path

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.

    2014-05-01

    This analysis provides a limited evaluation of the relationship between the Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index and the simulation-based performance approach used in the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Not all differences between the approaches are analyzed here; only a subset of the distinctions considered likely to result in quantifiable differences in the outcomes of the two approaches or otherwise believed to be of interest to code developers and policy makers are considered. This analysis evaluates, for a single-family residence with various characteristics, the ranges of HERS Index values that would result in compliance with the 2012 IECC.

  1. Tapered laser rods as a means of minimizing the path length of trapped barrel mode rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric C.; Payne, Stephen A.; Mercer, Ian; Perry, Michael D.

    2005-08-30

    By tapering the diameter of a flanged barrel laser rod over its length, the maximum trapped path length of a barrel mode can be dramatically reduced, thereby reducing the ability of the trapped spontaneous emission to negatively impact laser performance through amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). Laser rods with polished barrels and flanged end caps have found increasing application in diode array end-pumped laser systems. The polished barrel of the rod serves to confine diode array pump light within the rod. In systems utilizing an end-pumping geometry and such polished barrel laser rods, the pump light that is introduced into one or both ends of the laser rod, is ducted down the length of the rod via the total internal reflections (TIRs) that occur when the light strikes the rod's barrel. A disadvantage of using polished barrel laser rods is that such rods are very susceptible to barrel mode paths that can trap spontaneous emission over long path lengths. This trapped spontaneous emission can then be amplified through stimulated emission resulting in a situation where the stored energy available to the desired lasing mode is effectively depleted, which then negatively impacts the laser's performance, a result that is effectively reduced by introducing a taper onto the laser rod.

  2. Minimization of Blast Furnace Fuel Rate by Optimizing Burden and Gas Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-08-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose proposed CFD model will focus on the complex physics and chemistry found within the upper part of the blast furnace.

  3. Wind turbine reliability : understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-11-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. Cost of energy (COE) is a key project evaluation metric, both in commercial applications and in the U.S. federal wind energy program. To reflect this commercial reality, the wind energy research community has adopted COE as a decision-making and technology evaluation metric. The COE metric accounts for the effects of reliability through levelized replacement cost and unscheduled maintenance cost parameters. However, unlike the other cost contributors, such as initial capital investment and scheduled maintenance and operating expenses, costs associated with component failures are necessarily speculative. They are based on assumptions about the reliability of components that in many cases have not been operated for a complete life cycle. Due to the logistical and practical difficulty of replacing major components in a wind turbine, unanticipated failures (especially serial failures) can have a large impact on the economics of a project. The uncertainty associated with long-term component reliability has direct bearing on the confidence level associated with COE projections. In addition, wind turbine technology is evolving. New materials and designs are being incorporated in contemporary wind turbines with the ultimate goal of reducing weight, controlling loads, and improving energy capture. While the goal of these innovations is reduction in the COE, there is a potential impact on reliability whenever new technologies are introduced. While some of these innovations may ultimately improve reliability, in the short term, the technology risks and the perception of risk will increase. The COE metric used by researchers to evaluate technologies does not address this issue. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce COE.

  4. Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

    2006-03-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

  5. Optimum focusing of Gaussian laser beams: Beam waist shift in spot size minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y.; Katz, J. )

    1994-04-01

    Optimum focusing of Gaussian laser beams is first discussed by Dickson, who described the change in beam radius under the effect of focusing system parameters. The purpose of this study is to present a formulation for calculating the waist shift under various optimum conditions. Because the variations of beam waist can be measured directly, the waist shift in a focused Gaussian beam is a more practical parameter than the movement of the intensity maximum that is the subject for investigators of the well-known focal shift problem.

  6. Fume Hood Sash Stickers Increases Laboratory Safety and Efficiency at Minimal Cost

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    confused by labels placed at 18 inches that say "Place Sash here for Maximum Safety." The authors of these labels have confused "maximum" and "minimum", not realizing that a hood is least safe when fully open. A Basic Solution To address the confusion at the University of California, a lab manager and a hood safety specialist designed a bold vinyl sticker to attach on the exterior sidewall of a fume hood (Figure 1). The sticker cleverly uses the ubiquitous traffc

  7. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hattne, Hattne

    2014-03-04

    Diffraction patterns from thermolysin microcrystals and one dark run, collected in December 2011. This data was used for metrology calibration and general cctbx.xfel development.

  8. Microminiaturized minimally invasive intravascular micro-mechanical systems powered and controlled via fiber-optic cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fitch, Joseph P.; Hagans, Karla; Clough, Robert; Matthews, Dennis L.; Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.; Da Silva, Luiz; Celliers, Peter M.

    1998-01-01

    A micro-mechanical system for medical procedures is constructed in the basic form of a catheter having a distal end for insertion into and manipulation within a body and a near end providing for a user to control the manipulation of the distal end within the body. A fiberoptic cable is disposed within the catheter and having a distal end proximate to the distal end of the catheter and a near end for external coupling of laser light energy. A microgripper is attached to the distal end of the catheter and providing for the gripping or releasing of an object within the body. A laser-light-to-mechanical-power converter is connected to receive laser light from the distal end of the fiberoptic cable and connected to mechanically actuate the microgripper.

  9. FLUX ENHANCEMENT IN CROSSFLOW MEMBRANE FILTRATION: FOULING AND IT'S MINIMIZATION BY FLOW REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2004-06-14

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). In our previous report, we reported our work on UF of BSA. In this report, we report our continuing application of Flow Reversal technique in clarification of apple juice containing pectin. The presence of pectin in apple juice makes the clarification process difficult and is believed to cause membrane fouling. Of all compounds found in apple juice, pectin is most often identified as the major hindrance to filtration performance. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using pectin in apple juice as feed show that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow.

  10. Flux Enhancement in Crossflow Membrane Filtration: Fouling and It's Minimization by Flow Reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-08-04

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). Three feed solutions (Bovine serum albumin (BSA), apple juice and citrus fruit pectin) were studied in crossflow membrane filtration. These solutes are well-known in membrane filtration for their fouling and concentration polarization potentials. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using each of the feed solutes show that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. The flux enhancement is dramatic (by an order of magnitude) with increased feed concentration and operating transmembrane pressure. Thus, flow reversal technology seems an attractive alternative to mitigate fouling problem in crossflow membrane filtration.

  11. FLUX ENHANCEMENT IN CROSSFLOW MEMBRANE FILTRATION: FOULING AND IT'S MINIMIZATION BY FLOW REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-01-25

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). In this report, we report our application of Flow Reversal technique in clarification of apple juice containing pectin. The presence of pectin in apple juice makes the clarification process difficult and is believed to cause membrane fouling. Of all compounds found in apple juice, pectin is most often identified as the major hindrance to filtration performance. Based on our ultrafiltration experiments with apple juice, we conclude that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. Thus, flow reversal technology seems an attractive alternative to mitigate fouling problem in crossflow membrane filtration.

  12. Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreatment Systems via an Oil Conditioning Filter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  13. Traveling wave parametric amplifier with Josephson junctions using minimal resonator phase matching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, T. C.; Mutus, J. Y.; Hoi, I.-C.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Martinis, John M.; Megrant, A.; Chaudhuri, S.; and others

    2015-06-15

    Josephson parametric amplifiers have become a critical tool in superconducting device physics due to their high gain and quantum-limited noise. Traveling wave parametric amplifiers (TWPAs) promise similar noise performance, while allowing for significant increases in both bandwidth and dynamic range. We present a TWPA device based on an LC-ladder transmission line of Josephson junctions and parallel plate capacitors using low-loss amorphous silicon dielectric. Crucially, we have inserted ?/4 resonators at regular intervals along the transmission line in order to maintain the phase matching condition between pump, signal, and idler and increase gain. We achieve an average gain of 12?dB across a 4?GHz span, along with an average saturation power of ?92 dBm with noise approaching the quantum limit.

  14. On Inflation with Non-Minimal Coupling (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Menlo Park Stanford U., ITP Publication Date: 2013-07-08 OSTI Identifier: 1087439 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15667 arXiv:1002.2995 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource...

  15. Energy minimization of separation processes using conventional/membrane hybrid systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gottschlich, D.E.; Roberts, D.L. )

    1990-09-28

    The purpose of this study was to identify the general principles governing the choice of hybrid separation systems over straight membrane or straight nonmembrane systems and to do so by examining practical applications (process design and economics). Our focus was to examine the energy consumption characteristics and overall cost factors of the membrane and nonmembrane technologies that cause hybrid systems to be preferred over nonhybrid systems. We evaluated four cases studies, chosen on the basis of likelihood of commercial viability of a hybrid system and magnitude of energy savings: (1) propane/propylene separation; (2) removal of nitrogen from natural gas; (3) concentration of Kraft black liquor; and (4)solvent deasphalting. For propane/propylene splitting, the membrane proved to be superior to distillation in both thermodynamic efficiency and processing cost (PC) when the product was 95% pure propylene. However, to produce higher purity products, the membrane alone could not perform the separation, and a membrane/distillation hybrid was required. In these cases, there is an optimum amount of separation to be accomplished by the membrane (expressed as the fraction of the total availability change of the membrane/distillation hybrid that takes place in the membrane and defined as {phi}{sub m}, the thermodynamic extent of separation). Qualitative and quantitative guidelines are discussed with regard to choosing a hybrid system. 54 refs., 66 figs., 36 tabs.

  16. MINIMIZING NET CO2 EMISSIONS BY OXIDATIVE CO-PYROLYSIS OF COAL / BIOMASS BLENDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd Lang; Robert Hurt

    2001-12-23

    This study presents a set of thermodynamic calculations on the optimal mode of solid fuel utilization considering a wide range of fuel types and processing technologies. The technologies include stand-alone combustion, biomass/coal cofiring, oxidative pyrolysis, and straight carbonization with no energy recovery but with elemental carbon storage. The results show that the thermodynamically optimal way to process solid fuels depends strongly on the specific fuels and technologies available, the local demand for heat or for electricity, and the local baseline energy-production method. Burning renewable fuels reduces anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions as widely recognized. In certain cases, however, other processing methods are equally or more effective, including the simple carbonization or oxidative pyrolysis of biomass fuels.

  17. MINIMIZING NET CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS BY OXIDATIVE CO-PYROLYSIS OF COAL/BIOMASS BLENDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hurt; Todd Lang

    2001-06-25

    Solid fuels vary significantly with respect to the amount of CO{sub 2} directly produced per unit heating value. Elemental carbon is notably worse than other solid fuels in this regard, and since carbon (char) is an intermediate product of the combustion of almost all solid fuels, there is an opportunity to reduce specific CO{sub 2} emissions by reconfiguring processes to avoid char combustion wholly or in part. The primary goal of this one-year Innovative Concepts project is to make a fundamental thermodynamic assessment of three modes of solid fuel use: (1) combustion, (2) carbonization, and (3) oxidative pyrolysis, for a wide range of coal and alternative solid fuels. This period a large set of thermodynamic calculations were carried out to assess the potential of the three processes. The results show that the net carbon dioxide emissions and the relative ranking of the different processes depends greatly on the particular baseline fossil fuel being displaced by the new technology. As an example, in a baseline natural gas environment, it is thermodynamically more advantageous to carbonize biomass than to combust it, and even more advantageous to oxidatively pyrolyze the biomass.

  18. Structures of Minimal Catalytic Fragments of Topoisomerase V Reveals Conformational Changes Relevant for DNA Binding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajan, Rakhi; Taneja, Bhupesh; Mondragn, Alfonso

    2010-12-03

    Topoisomerase V is an archaeal type I topoisomerase that is unique among topoisomerases due to presence of both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities in the same protein. It is organized as an N-terminal topoisomerase domain followed by 24 tandem helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) motifs. Structural studies have shown that the active site is buried by the (HhH) motifs. Here we show that the N-terminal domain can relax DNA in the absence of any HhH motifs and that the HhH motifs are required for stable protein-DNA complex formation. Crystal structures of various topoisomerase V fragments show changes in the relative orientation of the domains mediated by a long bent linker helix, and these movements are essential for the DNA to enter the active site. Phosphate ions bound to the protein near the active site helped model DNA in the topoisomerase domain and show how topoisomerase V may interact with DNA.

  19. Campaign to minimize the transverse impedance of the DARHT-2 induction linac cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, Richard J.; Fawley, William M.

    2005-01-20

    This paper discusses the multi-year ''campaign'' to measure and reduce the transverse impedances of the original DARHT-2 accelerator cells in order to limit the beam-breakup instability (BBU) growth through the machine. A series of three prototype cells were designed, modeled, and measured. One of the most important methods for limiting the impedance was the introduction of ferrite absorbers in the oil region immediately upstream of the insulator. When properly tuned in terms of thickness, the effective Q's could be significantly reduced for both the 10 inch ''standard'' cells and the 14 inch ''injector'' cells. We also present a new experimental method (twin lead-loop) to measure the transverse impedance. This method has a number of important advantages over the well-known TSD approach, especially in the low Q regime. For the final prototype standard cell design, we found that Z-perp could be limited to <300 ohms/m with Q's ranging from 3 to 6. There was reasonable agreement between measurements and simulation results from the AMOS code (peak amplitudes within 25-30 percent) with the exception that the resonant mode around 200 MHz had a double-peaked structure that could not be reproduced by simulation.

  20. Monitoring and Control of Alkali Volatilization and Batch Carryover for Minimization of Particulates and Crown Corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-01-01

    New Technology will Allow Glass Manufacturers to Optimize Furnace Conditions. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a continuous monitoring technique that glass manufacturers can use to reduce particulate matter emissions and extend furnace life.

  1. Request for Information for Environmental Impact Minimization Technologies and Field Testing Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department’s Wind Program is seeking feedback from the wind industry, academia, research laboratories, government agencies, and other stakeholders regarding a potential funding...

  2. New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE has released a report assessing likelihood of fish injury and mortality from the operation of hydrokinetic turbines.

  3. Minimizing the life cycle costs attributed to boiler tubing in fossil-fueled plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paterson, S.R.

    1995-08-01

    During the past quarter century, much has been learned about tube degradation, the factors which lead to and influence the rate of damage, and measures to mitigate or eliminate the damage in boiler tubing. This paper will describe some of the knowledge which has been compiled regarding two of the most significant degradation modes--corrosion-fatigue of waterwall tubes and high temperature creep of superheater and reheater tubes.

  4. Informational Webinar on Bat Impact Minimization Technologies Funding Opportunity (DE-FOA-0001181)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office is hosting an informational webinar on a recently announced funding opportunity, DE-FOA-0001181: Wind Energy - Bat Impact...

  5. 3.55 keV line in minimal decaying dark matter scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Covi, Laura; Dradi, Federico

    2015-07-20

    We investigate the possibility of reproducing the recently reported 3.55 keV line in some simple decaying dark matter scenarios. In all cases a keV scale decaying DM is coupled with a scalar field charged under SM gauge interactions and thus capable of pair production at the LHC. We will investigate how the demand of a DM lifetime compatible with the observed signal, combined with the requirement of the correct DM relic density through the freeze-in mechanism, impacts the prospects of observation at the LHC of the decays of the scalar field.

  6. Minimally nonlocal nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including Δ resonances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piarulli, M.; Girlanda, L.; Schiavilla, R.; Pérez, R. Navarro; Amaro, J. E.; Arriola, E. Ruiz

    2015-02-26

    In this study, we construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including Δ-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order Q3 (Q denotes generically the low momentum scale). The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders (Q2 and Q4, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 pp and 2982 np data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0–300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$more » and $np$ data in this range, we obtain a Χ2 /datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, RL and RS respectively, ranging from (RL,RS)=(1.2,0.8) fm down to (0.8,0.6) fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.« less

  7. PEM fuel cell cost minimization using ``Design For Manufacture and Assembly`` techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomax, F.D. Jr.; James, B.D.; Mooradian, R.P.

    1997-12-31

    Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells fueled with direct hydrogen have demonstrated substantial technical potential to replace Internal Combustion Engines (ICE`s) in light duty vehicles. Such a transition to a hydrogen economy offers the potential of substantial benefits from reduced criteria and greenhouse emissions as well as reduced foreign fuel dependence. Research conducted for the Ford Motor Co. under a US Department of Energy contract suggests that hydrogen fuel, when used in a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), can achieve a cost per vehicle mile less than or equal to the gasoline cost per mile when used in an ICE vehicle. However, fuel cost parity is not sufficient to ensure overall economic success: the PEM fuel cell power system itself must be of comparable cost to the ICE. To ascertain if low cost production of PEM fuel cells is feasible, a powerful set of mechanical engineering tools collectively referred to as Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) has been applied to several representative PEM fuel cell designs. The preliminary results of this work are encouraging, as presented.

  8. Award ER25844: Minimizing System Noise Effects for Extreme-Scale Scientific Simulation Through Function Delegation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumsdaine, Andrew

    2012-11-20

    In software running on distributed computing clusters, time spent on communication between nodes in the cluster can be a significant portion of the overall computation time; background operating system tasks and other computational ?noise? on the nodes of the system can have a significant impact on the amount of time this communication takes, especially on large systems. The research completed in this period has improved understanding of when such noise will have a significant impact. Specifically, it was demonstrated that not just noise on the nodes, but also noise on the network between nodes can have a significant impact on computation time. It was also demonstrated that noise patterns matter more than noise intensity: very regular noise can cause less disruption than lighter (on average) but less regular noise. It was also demonstrated that the effect of noise is more prominent as the speed of the network between nodes is increased. Furthermore, a tracing tool, Netgauge, was improved via our work, and a system simulator, LogGOPSim, was developed; they can be used by application developers to improve performance of their program and by system designers to mitigate the effects of noise by adjusting the noise characteristics of the operating system. Both have been made freely available as open source programs. In the course of developing these tools, we demonstrated weaknesses in existing methodologies for modeling communication, and we introduced a more detailed model, LogGOPS, for simulating systems. Not only were the deleterious effects of noise explored but we have also offered solutions. Our studies of simulations of system noise have led to specific recommendations on tuning systems to mitigate noise. We have also improved existing approaches to mitigating noise. ?Non-blocking collective communication? avoids the effects of noise by letting communication continue simultaneously with computation (thus being ?non-blocking?), so that the delays in communication introduced by noise have a smaller impact on overall computation time. Potentially, noise can be reduced much further by ?offloading? communication tasks to a separate processing element than the operating system is using. We have improved our library LibNBC, which provides an implementation of non-blocking collectives, via this work. During this research, our proposal to include non-blocking collectives (which used LibNBC as a reference implementation) in the upcoming MPI-3 standard was accepted. As MPI is a ubiquitous and important standard for communication in parallel computing, this demonstrates a certain acceptance of the practicality and desirability of non-blocking collectives. Now that non-blocking collectives are a part of the standard we can expect to see optimized platform-specific implementations of non-blocking collectives. Also as part of this work we have also developed a language GOAL (Global Operation Assembly Language) that can be used as a starting point for defining languages to express optimized communication algorithms.

  9. Solar Heat Gain Through Fenestration Systems Containing Shading: Procedures for Estimating Performance from Minimal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klems, J.H.

    2000-08-01

    The computational methods for calculating the properties of glazing systems containing shading from the properties of their components have been developed, but the measurement standards and property data bases necessary to apply them have not. It is shown that with a drastic simplifying assumption these methods can be used to calculate system solar-optical properties and solar heat gain coefficients for arbitrary glazing systems, while requiring limited data about the shading. Detailed formulas are presented, and performance multipliers are defined for the approximate treatment of simple glazings with shading. As higher accuracy is demanded, the formulas become very complicated.

  10. Guidelines to achieve seals with minimal leak rates for HWR-NPR coolant system components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finn, P.A.

    1991-03-01

    Seal design practices that are acceptable in pressurized-water and boiling-water reactors in the United States are not usable for the Heavy Water Reactor-New Production Reactor (HWR-NPR) because of the stringent requirement on tritium control for the atmosphere within its containment building. To maintain an atmosphere in which workers do not need protective equipment, the components of the coolant system must have a cumulative leak rate less than 0.00026 L/s. Existing technology for seal systems was reviewed with regard to flange, elastomer, valve, and pump design. A technology data base for the designers of the HWR-NPR coolant system was derived from operating experience and seal development work on reactors in the United States, Canada, and Europe. This data base was then used to generate guidelines for the design of seals and/or joints for the HWR-NPR coolant system. Also discussed are needed additional research and development, as well as the necessary component qualification tests for an effective quality control program. 141 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  11. Search for the Trilepton Signal of the Minimal Supergravity Model in D0 Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binder, Meta; /Munich U.

    2005-06-01

    A search for associated chargino neutralino pair production is performed in the trilepton decay channel q{bar q} {yields} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}} {tilde {chi}}{sub 2}{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}} {nu} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} {mu}{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {-+}} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}, using data collected with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of {approx}300 pb{sup -1}. A dedicated event selection is applied to all samples including the data sample and the Monte Carlo simulated samples for the Standard Model background and the Supersymmetry signal. Events with two muons plus an additional isolated track, replacing the requirement of a third charged lepton in the event, are analyzed. Additionally, selected events must have a large amount of missing transverse energy due to the neutrino and the two {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}. After all selection cuts are applied, 2 data events are found, with an expected number of background events of 1.75 {+-} 0.34 (stat.) {+-} 0.46 (syst.). No evidence for Supersymmetry is found and limits on the production cross section times leptonic branching fraction are set. When the presented analysis is considered in combination with three other decay channels, no evidence for Supersymmetry is found. Limits on the production cross section times leptonic branching fraction are set. A lower chargino mass limit of 117 GeV at 95% CL is then derived for the mSUGRA model in a region of parameter space with enhanced leptonic branching fractions.

  12. Evaluation of five waste-minimization technologies at the General Dynamics Pomona Division Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apel, M.L.; Brown, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Five technology areas encompassing eight waste reduction technologies at the General Dynamics Pomona Division (Southern California) were technically and economically evaluated under the California/EPA Waste Reduction Innovative Technology Evaluation (WRITE) Program. Evaluations were made through site visits and follow-up discussions with General Dynamics staff and equipment suppliers. The technologies and the type of waste reduction represented included (1) computerized printed circuit board plating process (process substitution), (2) sulfuric acid anodizing system (process substitution), (3) robotic paint facility operations - (a) proportional paint mixing (process substitution), (b) water-based solvent replacement (process substitution), (c) electrostatic paint sprays (process substitution), (d) solvent stills (recycling), (4) bead-blast paint stripper (process substitution), and (5) Freon recovery stills (recycling). Overall, there was a decrease in hazardous waste generation and an increase in productivity or reuse of recycled materials. In most cases, the technologies could be easily transferred to other industries except for the computerized circuit board and some processes within the robotic paint operation due to prohibitive costs.

  13. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regnier, Cindy

    2012-08-31

    Historically thermal comfort in buildings has been controlled by simple dry bulb temperature settings. As we move into more sophisticated low energy building systems that make use of alternate systems such as natural ventilation, mixed mode system and radiant thermal conditioning strategies, a more complete understanding of human comfort is needed for both design and control. This guide will support building designers, owners, operators and other stakeholders in defining quantifiable thermal comfort parameters?these can be used to support design, energy analysis and the evaluation of the thermal comfort benefits of design strategies. This guide also contains information that building owners and operators will find helpful for understanding the core concepts of thermal comfort. Whether for one building, or for a portfolio of buildings, this guide will also assist owners and designers in how to identify the mechanisms of thermal comfort and space conditioning strategies most important for their building and climate, and provide guidance towards low energy design options and operations that can successfully address thermal comfort. An example of low energy design options for thermal comfort is presented in some detail for cooling, while the fundamentals to follow a similar approach for heating are presented.

  14. Minimizing Wind Power Producer's Balancing Costs Using Electrochemical Energy Storage: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miettinen, J.; Tikka, V.; Lassila, J.; Partanen, J.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-08-01

    This paper examines how electrochemical energy storage can be used to decrease the balancing costs of a wind power producer in the Nordic market. Because electrochemical energy storage is developing in both technological and financial terms, a sensitivity analysis was carried out for the most important variables in the wind-storage hybrid system. The system was studied from a wind power producer's point of view. The main result is that there are no technical limitations to using storage for reducing the balancing costs. However, in terms of economic feasibility, installing hybrid wind-storage systems such as the one studied in this paper faces challenges in both the short and long terms.

  15. Minimization of Blast furnace Fuel Rate by Optimizing Burden and Gas Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Chenn Zhou

    2012-08-15

    The goal of the research is to improve the competitive edge of steel mills by using the advanced CFD technology to optimize the gas and burden distributions inside a blast furnace for achieving the best gas utilization. A state-of-the-art 3-D CFD model has been developed for simulating the gas distribution inside a blast furnace at given burden conditions, burden distribution and blast parameters. The comprehensive 3-D CFD model has been validated by plant measurement data from an actual blast furnace. Validation of the sub-models is also achieved. The user friendly software package named Blast Furnace Shaft Simulator (BFSS) has been developed to simulate the blast furnace shaft process. The research has significant benefits to the steel industry with high productivity, low energy consumption, and improved environment.

  16. Analysis of the application of decontamination technologies to radioactive metal waste minimization using expert systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayrakal, S.

    1993-09-30

    Radioactive metal waste makes up a significant portion of the waste currently being sent for disposal. Recovery of this metal as a valuable resource is possible through the use of decontamination technologies. Through the development and use of expert systems a comparison can be made of laser decontamination, a technology currently under development at Ames Laboratory, with currently available decontamination technologies for applicability to the types of metal waste being generated and the effectiveness of these versus simply disposing of the waste. These technologies can be technically and economically evaluated by the use of expert systems techniques to provide a waste management decision making tool that generates, given an identified metal waste, waste management recommendations. The user enters waste characteristic information as input and the system then recommends decontamination technologies, determines residual contamination levels and possible waste management strategies, carries out a cost analysis and then ranks, according to cost, the possibilities for management of the waste. The expert system was developed using information from literature and personnel experienced in the use of decontamination technologies and requires validation by human experts and assignment of confidence factors to the knowledge represented within.

  17. Notice of Intent: Eagle Impact Minimization Technology Development and Field Testing Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department's Wind Program intends to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to advance the readiness of technologies intended to reduce eagle mortalities at operational wind...

  18. Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Using Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT): A Minimally Invasive Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R L; Ramirez, A L; Daily, W D

    2002-08-05

    Successful geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), will require monitoring the CO{sub 2} injection to confirm the performance of the caprock/reservoir system, assess leaks and flow paths, and understand the geophysical and geochemical interactions between the CO{sub 2} and the geologic minerals and fluids. Electrical methods are especially well suited for monitoring processes involving fluids, as electrical properties are sensitive to the presence and nature of the formation fluids. High resolution tomographs of electrical properties are now used for site characterization and to monitor subsurface migration of fluids (i.e., leaking underground tanks, infiltration events, steam floods, contaminant movement, and to assess the integrity of engineered barriers). When electrical resistance tomography (ERT) imaging can be performed using existing well casings as long electrodes, the method is nearly transparent to reservoir operators, and reduces the need for additional drilling. Using numerical simulations and laboratory experiments, we have conducted sensitivity studies to determine the potential of ERT methods to detect and monitor the migration of CO{sub 2} in the subsurface. These studies have in turn been applied to the design and implementation of the first field casing surveys conducted in an oil field undergoing a CO{sub 2} flood.

  19. Minimize Adverse Motor and Adjustable Speed Drive Interactions - Motor Tip Sheet #15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    Electronic adjustable speed drives (ASDs) are an extremely efficient and valuable asset to motor systems. They allow precise process control and provide energy savings within systems that do not need to continuously operate at full output.

  20. Minimizing the psychological effects of a wartime disaster on an individual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kentsmith, D.K.

    1980-04-01

    In this paper, the psychological reductions of individuals and groups to a wartime disaster, such as nuclear explosions, are presented. The psychological literature on disasters is discussed. The presentation attempts to emphasize viewing the victims of a disaster as individuals responding in a normal way to an overwhelming experience, rather than labeling them as psychiatric patients. The various phases of a disaster are discussed with particular emphases on the preventive measures and leadership roles which may be taken by the physician. The paper concludes by making specific recommendations regarding the establishment of disaster plans and training programs at each miliary facility.

  1. Fume Hood Sash Stickers Increases Laboratory Safety and Efficiency at Minimal Cost

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study describes two University of California campuses that increased laboratory exhaust efficiency and safety by using fume hood sash stickers.

  2. ARRA: Reconfiguring Power Systems to Minimize Cascading Failures - Models and Algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Ian; Hiskens, Ian; Linderoth, Jeffrey; Wright, Stephen

    2013-12-16

    Building on models of electrical power systems, and on powerful mathematical techniques including optimization, model predictive control, and simluation, this project investigated important issues related to the stable operation of power grids. A topic of particular focus was cascading failures of the power grid: simulation, quantification, mitigation, and control. We also analyzed the vulnerability of networks to component failures, and the design of networks that are responsive to and robust to such failures. Numerous other related topics were investigated, including energy hubs and cascading stall of induction machines

  3. Minimal time trajectories for two-level quantum systems with two bounded controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boscain, Ugo; Grnberg, Fredrik; Long, Ruixing; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-06-15

    In this paper we consider the minimum time population transfer problem for a two level quantum system driven by two external fields with bounded amplitude. The controls are modeled as real functions and we do not use the Rotating Wave Approximation. After projection on the Bloch sphere, we treat the time-optimal control problem with techniques of optimal synthesis on 2D manifolds. Based on the Pontryagin Maximum Principle, we characterize a restricted set of candidate optimal trajectories. Properties on this set, crucial for complete optimal synthesis, are illustrated by numerical simulations. Furthermore, when the two controls have the same bound and this bound is small with respect to the difference of the two energy levels, we get a complete optimal synthesis up to a small neighborhood of the antipodal point of the initial condition.

  4. APPARATUS FOR MINIMIZING ENERGY LOSSES FROM MAGNETICALLY CONFINED VOLUMES OF HOT PLASMA

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.

    1961-10-01

    An apparatus is described for controlling electron temperature in plasma confined in a Pyrotron magnetic containment field. Basically the device comprises means for directing low temperature electrons to the plasma in controlled quantities to maintain a predetermined optimum equilibrium electron temperature whereat minimum losses of plasma ions due to ambipolar effects and energy damping of the ions due to dynamical friction with the electrons occur. (AEC)

  5. Method of remediation of contaminants in porous media through minimization of bouyancy effects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shook, G. Michael; Pope, Gary A.

    1999-01-01

    A method for controlling vertical migration of contaminants in an aquifer includes introduction of a solubilizing solution having a surfactant and an alcohol or other light co-solvent. The surfactant is selected to solubilize the contaminant. The alcohol or other solvent is selected to provide the microemulsion with a substantially neutral buoyancy with respect to groundwater. The neutral buoyancy of the microemulsion prevents the normal downward movement which is typical of the solubilized dense non-aqueous phase liquid in surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation. Thus, the risk that any significant amount of the solubilized dense non-aqueous contaminants will migrate vertically can be controlled. The relative tendency for vertical migration may also be reduced by increasing the injection rate or injected fluid viscosity (by adding polymer), or by reducing the well spacing.

  6. Method for minimizing contaminant particle effects in gas-insulated electrical apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pace, M.O.; Adcock, J.L.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical breakdown of a gas insulator in high voltage apparatus is prevented by placing an electrical insulative coating on contaminant particles in the gas insulator.

  7. Analysis of micromixers and biocidal coatings on water-treatment membranes to minimize biofouling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Stephen W.; James, Darryl L.; Hibbs, Michael R.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Hart, William Eugene; Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Elimelech, Menachem; Cornelius, Christopher James; Sanchez, Andres L.; Noek, Rachael M.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Kang, Seokatae; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Adout, Atar; McGrath, Lucas K.; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Cook, Adam W.

    2009-12-01

    Biofouling, the unwanted growth of biofilms on a surface, of water-treatment membranes negatively impacts in desalination and water treatment. With biofouling there is a decrease in permeate production, degradation of permeate water quality, and an increase in energy expenditure due to increased cross-flow pressure needed. To date, a universal successful and cost-effect method for controlling biofouling has not been implemented. The overall goal of the work described in this report was to use high-performance computing to direct polymer, material, and biological research to create the next generation of water-treatment membranes. Both physical (micromixers - UV-curable epoxy traces printed on the surface of a water-treatment membrane that promote chaotic mixing) and chemical (quaternary ammonium groups) modifications of the membranes for the purpose of increasing resistance to biofouling were evaluated. Creation of low-cost, efficient water-treatment membranes helps assure the availability of fresh water for human use, a growing need in both the U. S. and the world.

  8. Sliding-gate valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Usnick, George B.; Ward, Gene T.; Blair, Henry O.; Roberts, James W.; Warner, Terry N.

    1979-01-01

    This invention is a novel valve of the slidable-gate type. The valve is designed especially for long-term use with highly abrasive slurries. The sealing surfaces of the gate are shielded by the valve seats when the valve is fully open or closed, and the gate-to-seat clearance is swept with an inflowing purge gas while the gate is in transit. A preferred form of the valve includes an annular valve body containing an annular seat assembly defining a flow channel. The seat assembly comprises a first seat ring which is slidably and sealably mounted in the body, and a second seat ring which is tightly fitted in the body. These rings cooperatively define an annular gap which, together with passages in the valve body, forms a guideway extending normal to the channel. A plate-type gate is mounted for reciprocation in the guideway between positions where a portion of the plate closes the channel and where a circular aperture in the gate is in register with the channel. The valve casing includes opposed chambers which extend outwardly from the body along the axis of the guideway to accommodate the end portions of the gate. The chambers are sealed from atmosphere; when the gate is in transit, purge gas is admitted to the chambers and flows inwardly through the gate-to-seat-ring, clearance, minimizing buildup of process solids therein. A shaft reciprocated by an external actuator extends into one of the sealed chambers through a shaft seal and is coupled to an end of the gate. Means are provided for adjusting the clearance between the first seat ring and the gate while the valve is in service.

  9. Inspection Report: INS-O-10-03 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    unclassified information, be either protected by approved encryption or tracked and controlled until purged or destroyed. After receiving an allegation that computer hard...

  10. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 2012 Purging of Hopper scratch file systems to start on Mar 14 February 28, 2012 by Helen He The purging for the Hopper scratch file systems will start from Wednesday, March 14. The files in your $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 will be deleted ("purged") if they are older (defined by last access time) than 12 weeks once the purge starts. Please take some time now to clean up contents, back up all important files (eg. to HPSS), and reduce your overall usage as much as you can

  11. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 2013 [FIXED] JGI data loss in /projectb/sandbox area [purge] August 19, 2013 by Kjiersten Fagnan We have discovered a serious bug in our purge scripts on /global/projectb. The */global/projectb/sandbox* areas are supposed to be immune from the purge (like the project directories); however, there is a bug in the purge script that caused some files to be deleted if they had not been touched for 90+ days (like data in the scratch directories). *The sandbox areas are not backed up*, so if

  12. Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... nutrients to aid its growth and surfaces on which to live. ... chamber Purge components only - periodic inspection ... backwash, once a day or on pressure drop as needed. ...

  13. SGP CART Site Affected by Ice Storm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Dry nitrogen gas purges were installed to prevent condensation from forming on instrument ... compensation for damaged or destroyed property and cleanup costs not covered by insurance. ...

  14. Lightweight cryogenic-compatible pressure vessels for vehicular...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    space, or purging the permeated fuel from the evacuated space. Inventors: Aceves; Salvador (Livermore, CA), Berry; Gene (Mt. View, CA), Weisberg; Andrew H. (San Francisco, CA)...

  15. Microsoft Word - S03741_CADD.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Samples collected using this method will be designated as having a lower reliability than those collected after purging and the stabilization of groundwater parameters. 5.6.5 ...

  16. Lisa Gerhardt NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purged - Personal vs. Shared * HPSS Archive System - What is ... Production Monitoring Power Efficiency WAN 2 x 10 Gb 1 ... are not backed up * Restoration of individual files...

  17. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19, 2013 by Kjiersten Fagnan We have discovered a serious bug in our purge scripts on globalprojectb. The *globalprojectbsandbox* areas are supposed to be immune from the...

  18. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STS Trailer Trailer Scale Purge STS Cask Flocculant Injection Skid XAGO Hydrolance XAGO Pump Skid Engineered Container IXM Water Flocculant Injection Skid Transfer Box...

  19. Machine for applying a two component resin to a roadway surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huszagh, Donald W.

    1985-01-01

    A portable machine for spraying two component resins onto a roadway, the machine having a pneumatic control system, including apparatus for purging the machine of mixed resin with air and then removing remaining resin with solvent. Interlocks prevent contamination of solvent and resin, and mixed resin can be purged in the event of a power failure.

  20. Machine for applying a two component resin to a roadway surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huszagh, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    A portable machine for spraying two component resins onto a roadway, the machine having a pneumatic control system, including means for purging the machine of mixed resin with air and then removing remaining resin with solvent. Interlocks prevent contamination of solvent and resin, and mixed resin can be purged in the event of a power failure.

  1. Use of exhaust gas as sweep flow to enhance air separation membrane performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutart, Charles H.; Choi, Cathy Y.

    2003-01-01

    An intake air separation system for an internal combustion engine is provided with purge gas or sweep flow on the permeate side of separation membranes in the air separation device. Exhaust gas from the engine is used as a purge gas flow, to increase oxygen flux in the separation device without increasing the nitrogen flux.

  2. Method and means of monitoring the effluent from nuclear facilities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lattin, Kenneth R.; Erickson, Gerald L.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive iodine is detected in the effluent cooling gas from a nuclear reactor or nuclear facility by passing the effluent gas through a continuously moving adsorbent filter material which is then purged of noble gases and conveyed continuously to a detector of radioactivity. The purging operation has little or no effect upon the concentration of radioactive iodine which is adsorbed on the filter material.

  3. Continuous aqueous tritium monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McManus, Gary J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Weesner, Forrest J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1989-05-30

    An apparatus for a selective on-line determination of aqueous tritium concentration is disclosed. A moist air stream of the liquid solution being analyzed is passed through a permeation dryer where the tritium and moisture and selectively removed to a purge air stream. The purge air stream is then analyzed for tritium concentration, humidity, and temperature, which allows computation of liquid tritium concentration.

  4. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derbidge, T. Craig; Mulholland, James A.; Foster, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  5. Carbon molecular sieve membranes on porous composite tubular supports for high performance gas separations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Pyung -Soo; Bhave, Ramesh R.; Nam, Seung -Eun; Kim, Daejin

    2016-01-11

    Thin carbon molecular sieve membranes (<500 nm) were fabricated inside of long geometry (9 inch) of stainless steel tubes with all welded construction. Alumina intermediate layer on porous stainless steel tube support was used to reduce effective support pore size and to provide a more uniform surface roughness. Novolac phenolic resin solution was then coated on the inside of porous stainless steel tube by slip casting while their viscosities were controlled from 5 centipoises to 30 centipoises. Carbonization was carried out at 700 °C in which thermal stress was minimized and high quality carbon films were prepared. The highest separationmore » performance characteristics were obtained using 20 cP phenolic resin solutions. The fabricated CMSM showed good separation factor for He/N2 462, CO2/N2 97, and O2/N2 15.4. As the viscosity of polymer precursor solution was reduced from 20 cP to 15 cP, gas permeance values almost doubled with somewhat lower separation factor He/N2 156, CO2/N2 88, and O2/N2 7.7.« less

  6. Measurement of charged-particle spectra in Pb+Pb collisions at s N N = 2.76 $$ \\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76 $$ TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. 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C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-09-01

    Charged-particle spectra obtained in Pb+Pb interactions at √sNN=2.76 and pp interactions at √sNN=2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented, using data with integrated luminosities of 0.15 nb-1 and 4.2 pb-1, respectively, in a wide transverse momentum (0.5 < p T < 150 GeV) and pseudorapidity (|η| < 2) range. For Pb+Pb collisions, the spectra are presented as a function of collision centrality, which is determined by the response of the forward calorimeters located on both sides of the interaction point. The nuclear modification factors R AA and R CP are presented in detail as a function of centrality, p T and η. They show a distinct p T-dependence with a pronounced minimum at about 7 GeV. Above 60 GeV, R AA is consistent with a plateau at a centrality-dependent value, within the uncertainties. The value is 0.55 ± 0.01(stat.) ± 0.04(syst.) in the most central collisions. The R AA distribution is consistent with flat |η| dependence over the whole transverse momentum range in all centrality classes.

  7. N-(N-[2-(3,5-Difluorophenyl)acetyl]-(S)-alanyl)-(S)-phenylglycine tert-butyl ester (DAPT): an inhibitor of γ-secretase, revealing fine electronic and hydrogen-bonding features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czerwinski, Andrzej; Valenzuela, Francisco; Afonine, Pavel; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2010-12-01

    The title compound, C{sub 23}H{sub 26}F{sub 2}N{sub 2}O{sub 4}, is a dipeptidic inhibitor of γ-secretase, one of the enzymes involved in Alzheimer’s dis@@ease. The mol@@ecule adopts a compact conformation, without intra@@molecular hydrogen bonds. In the crystal structure, one of the amide N atoms forms the only inter@@molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bond; the second amide N atom does not form hydrogen bonds. High-resolution synchrotron diffraction data permitted the unequivocal location and refinement without restraints of all H atoms, and the identification of the characteristic shift of the amide H atom engaged in the hydrogen bond from its ideal position, resulting in a more linear hydrogen bond. Significant residual densities for bonding electrons were revealed after the usual SHELXL refinement, and modeling of these features as additional inter@@atomic scatterers (IAS) using the program PHENIX led to a significant decrease in the R factor from 0.0411 to 0.0325 and diminished the r.m.s. deviation level of noise in the final difference Fourier map from 0.063 to 0.037 e Å{sup −3}.

  8. Snapshots of Proton Accommodation at a Microscopic Water Surface: Understanding the Vibrational Spectral Signatures of the Charge Defect in Cryogenically Cooled H+(H2O)n=2 28 Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, Joseph A.; Wolke, Conrad T.; Johnson, Mark A.; Odbadrakh, Tuguldur T.; Jordan, Kenneth D.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2015-07-09

    In this Article, we review the role of gas-phase, size-selected protonated water clusters, H+(H2O)n, in the analysis of the microscopic mechanics responsible for the behavior of the excess proton in bulk water. We extend upon previous studies of the smaller, two-dimensional sheet-like structures to larger (n?10) assemblies with three-dimensional cage morphologies which better mimic the bulk environment. Indeed, clusters in which a complete second solvation shell forms around a surface-embedded hydronium ion yield vibrational spectra where the signatures of the proton defect display strikingly similar positions and breadth to those observed in dilute acids. We investigate effects of the local structure and intermolecular interactions on the large red shifts observed in the proton vibrational signature upon cluster growth using various theoretical methods. We show that, in addition to sizeable anharmonic couplings, the position of the excess proton vibration can be traced to large increases in the electric field exerted on the embedded hydronium ion upon formation of the first and second solvation shells. MAJ acknowledges support from the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02- 06ER15800 as well as the facilities and staff of the Yale University Faculty of Arts and Sciences High Performance Computing Center, and by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CNS 08-21132 that partially funded acquisition of the facilities. SMK and SSX acknowledge support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. This research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  9. Critical interpretation of CH and OH stretching regions for infrared spectra of methanol clusters (CH{sub 3}OH){sub n} (n = 25) using self-consistent-charge density functional tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, Yoshifumi; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Irle, Stephan; Witek, Henryk A.

    2014-09-07

    Vibrational infrared (IR) spectra of gas-phase OH???O methanol clusters up to pentamer are simulated using self-consistent-charge density functional tight-binding method using two distinct methodologies: standard normal mode analysis and Fourier transform of the dipole time-correlation function. The twofold simulations aim at the direct critical assignment of the CH stretching region of the recently recorded experimental spectra [H.-L. Han, C. Camacho, H. A. Witek, and Y.-P. Lee, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144309 (2011)]. Both approaches confirm the previous assignment (ibid.) of the CH stretching bands based on the B3LYP/ANO1 harmonic frequencies, showing that ?{sub 3}, ?{sub 9}, and ?{sub 2} CH stretching modes of the proton-accepting (PA) and proton-donating (PD) methanol monomers experience only small splittings upon the cluster formation. This finding is in sharp discord with the assignment based on anharmonic B3LYP/VPT2/ANO1 vibrational frequencies (ibid.), suggesting that some procedural faults, likely related to the breakdown of the perturbational vibrational treatment, led the anharmonic calculations astray. The IR spectra based on the Fourier transform of the dipole time-correlation function include new, previously unaccounted for physical factors such as non-zero temperature of the system and large amplitude motions of the clusters. The elevation of temperature results in a considerable non-homogeneous broadening of the observed IR signals, while the presence of large-amplitude motions (methyl group rotations and PA-PD flipping), somewhat surprisingly, does not introduce any new features in the spectrum.

  10. Experimental Approach to Controllably Vary Protein Oxidation While Minimizing Electrode Adsorption for Boron-Doped Diamond Electrochemical Surface Mapping Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClintock, Carlee; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative protein surface mapping has become a powerful approach for measuring the solvent accessibility of folded protein structures. A variety of techniques exist for generating the key reagent hydroxyl radicals for these measurements; however, many of these approaches require use of radioactive sources or caustic oxidizing chemicals. The purpose of this research was to evaluate and optimize the use of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrochemistry as a highly accessible tool for producing hydroxyl radicals as a means to induce a controllable level of oxidation on a range of intact proteins. These experiments utilize a relatively high flow rates to reduce protein residence time inside the electrochemical flow chamber, along with a unique cell activation approach to improve control over the intact protein oxidation yield. Studies were conducted to evaluate the level of protein adsorption onto the electrode surface. This report demonstrates a robust protocol for the use of BDD electrochemistry and high performance LC-MS/MS as a high-throughput experimental pipeline for probing higher order protein structure, and illustrates how it is complementary to predictive computational modeling efforts.

  11. Minimal Determinants for Binding Activated G alpha from the Structure of a G alpha i1-Peptide Dimer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston,C.; Lobanova, E.; Shavkunov, A.; Low, J.; Ramer, J.; Blasesius, R.; Fredericks, Z.; willard, F.; Kuhlman, B.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    G-Proteins cycle between an inactive GDP-bound state and an active GTP-bound state, serving as molecular switches that coordinate cellular signaling. We recently used phage display to identify a series of peptides that bind G{alpha}subunits in a nucleotide-dependent manner [Johnston, C. A., Willard, F. S., Jezyk, M. R., Fredericks, Z., Bodor, E. T., Jones, M. B., Blaesius, R., Watts, V. J., Harden, T. K., Sondek, J., Ramer, J. K., and Siderovski, D. P. (2005) Structure 13, 1069-1080]. Here we describe the structural features and functions of KB-1753, a peptide that binds selectively to GDP{center_dot}AlF{sub 4{sup -}}- and GTP{gamma}S-bound states of G{alpha}{sup i} subunits. KB-1753 blocks interaction of G{alpha}{sub transducin} with its effector, cGMP phosphodiesterase, and inhibits transducin-mediated activation of cGMP degradation. Additionally, KB-1753 interferes with RGS protein binding and resultant GAP activity. A fluorescent KB-1753 variant was found to act as a sensor for activated G{alpha} in vitro. The crystal structure of KB-1753 bound to G{alpha}{sub i1}-GDP{center_dot}AlF{sub 4{sup -}} reveals binding to a conserved hydrophobic groove between switch II and 3 helices and, along with supporting biochemical data and previous structural analyses, supports the notion that this is the site of effector interactions for G{alpha}i subunits.

  12. Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

    2013-12-31

    The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

  13. Use of depleted uranium silicate glass to minimize release of radionuclides from spent nuclear fuel waste packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1996-01-20

    A Depleted Uranium Silicate Container Backfill System (DUSCOBS) is proposed that would use small, isotopically-depleted uranium silicate glass beads as a backfill material inside repository waste packages containing spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The uranium silicate glass beads would fill the void space inside the package including the coolant channels inside SNF assemblies. Based on preliminary analysis, the following benefits have been identified. DUSCOBS improves repository waste package performance by three mechanisms. First, it reduces the radionuclide releases from SNF when water enters the waste package by creating a local uranium silicate saturated groundwater environment that suppresses (a) the dissolution and/or transformation of uranium dioxide fuel pellets and, hence, (b) the release of radionuclides incorporated into the SNF pellets. Second, the potential for long-term nuclear criticality is reduced by isotopic exchange of enriched uranium in SNF with the depleted uranium (DU) in the glass. Third, the backfill reduces radiation interactions between SNF and the local environment (package and local geology) and thus reduces generation of hydrogen, acids, and other chemicals that degrade the waste package system. Finally, DUSCOBS provides a potential method to dispose of significant quantities of excess DU from uranium enrichment plants at potential economic savings. DUSCOBS is a new concept. Consequently, the concept has not been optimized or demonstrated in laboratory experiments.

  14. Changes in maximum and minimal temperatures at high elevation stations in the central Andes of South America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintana-Gomez, R.A.

    1997-11-01

    Temperature trends and deviations were evaluated for the central Andes portion of Bolivia. Data were collected primarily from stations located at very high altitude (3,000 m above sea level and higher) for a 73-year period from 1918 to 1990. The analysis determined maximum and minimum temperature trends and the daily temperature range (DTR) at each station. The minimum temperature series showed a rather sustained increase starting in the 1960s and continuing to the present, and a reduction of the differential rate of warming for the same interval. The high elevation, rural area data appears to reinforce evidence of a global and generalized rise of minimum temperature and decrease of the DTR. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. A decision analysis method for selection of waste minimization process options for TRU mixed material at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.E.; Dustin, D.F.

    1994-02-01

    When plutonium production operations were halted at the Rocky Flats Plant, there remained a volume of material that was retained in order that its plutonium content could be reclaimed. This material, known as residue, is transuranic and mixed transuranic material with a plutonium content above what was called the ``economic discard limit,`` or EDL. The EDL was defined in terms of each type of residue material, and each type of material is given an Item Description Code, or IDC. Residue IDCs have been grouped into general category descriptions which include plutonium (Pu) nitrate solutions, Pu chloride solutions, salts, ash, metal, filters, combustibles, graphite, crucibles, glass, resins, gloves, firebrick, and sludges. Similar material exists both below and above the EDL, with material with the (previous) economic potential for reclamation of plutonium classified as residue.

  16. The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy and Minimize Emissions in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  17. Accounting for baryonic effects in cosmic shear tomography: Determining a minimal set of nuisance parameters using PCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eifler, Tim; Krause, Elisabeth; Dodelson, Scott; Zentner, Andrew; Hearin, Andrew; Gnedin, Nickolay

    2014-05-28

    Systematic uncertainties that have been subdominant in past large-scale structure (LSS) surveys are likely to exceed statistical uncertainties of current and future LSS data sets, potentially limiting the extraction of cosmological information. Here we present a general framework (PCA marginalization) to consistently incorporate systematic effects into a likelihood analysis. This technique naturally accounts for degeneracies between nuisance parameters and can substantially reduce the dimension of the parameter space that needs to be sampled. As a practical application, we apply PCA marginalization to account for baryonic physics as an uncertainty in cosmic shear tomography. Specifically, we use CosmoLike to run simulated likelihood analyses on three independent sets of numerical simulations, each covering a wide range of baryonic scenarios differing in cooling, star formation, and feedback mechanisms. We simulate a Stage III (Dark Energy Survey) and Stage IV (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope/Euclid) survey and find a substantial bias in cosmological constraints if baryonic physics is not accounted for. We then show that PCA marginalization (employing at most 3 to 4 nuisance parameters) removes this bias. Our study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain robust, precise constraints on the dark energy equation of state even in the presence of large levels of systematic uncertainty in astrophysical processes. We conclude that the PCA marginalization technique is a powerful, general tool for addressing many of the challenges facing the precision cosmology program.

  18. The use of audibility analysis to minimize community noise impact of today's smaller generation facilities located near residential areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebich, R.E. ); Cristoforo, M.P. )

    1988-01-01

    This paper demonstrates practical applications of the Fidell-Horonjeff audibility model to the analysis of power plant noise sources, such as cooling towers, transformers, pumps, ventilation fans, mobile diesel-powered yard equipment, loudspeaker systems, and even sodium-vapor-type outdoor lighting. Because plant-design engineers currently are relatively unfamiliar with the Fidell-Horonjeff model, the first part of this paper summarizes and reviews the model.

  19. Use of audibility analysis to minimize community noise impact of today's smaller generation facilities located near residential areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leibich, R.E.; Cristoforo, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is intended to demonstrate practical applications of the Fidell-Horonjeff audibility model (2) to the analysis of power plant noise sources, such as cooling towers, transformers, pumps, ventilation fans, mobile diesel-powered yard equipment, loudspeaker systems, and even sodium-vapor-type outdoor lighting. Because plant-design engineers currently are relatively unfamiliar with the Fidell-Horonjeff model, the first part of this paper summarizes and reviews the model.

  20. Solar heat gain through fenestration systems containing shading: Summary of procedures for estimating performance from minimal data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klems, Joseph H.

    2001-03-01

    The computational methods for calculating the properties of glazing systems containing shading from the properties of their components have been developed, but the measurement standards and property data bases necessary to apply them have not. It is shown that with a drastic simplifying assumption these methods can be used to calculate system solar-optical properties and solar heat gain coefficients for arbitrary glazing systems, while requiring limited data about the shading. Detailed formulas are presented, and performance multipliers are defined for the approximate treatment of simple glazings with shading. As higher accuracy is demanded, the formulas become very complicated.