Sample records for n-15 nitrate rates

  1. Effect of Phosphate, Fluoride, and Nitrate on Gibbsite Dissolution Rate and Solubility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herting, Daniel L. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory tests have been completed with simulated tank waste samples to investigate the effects of phosphate, fluoride, and nitrate on the dissolution rate and equilibrium solubility of gibbsite in sodium hydroxide solution at 22 and 40{degrees}C. Results are compared to relevant literature data and to computer model predictions. The presence of sodium nitrate (3 M) caused a reduction in the rate of gibbsite dissolution in NaOH, but a modest increase in the equilibrium solubility of aluminum. The increase in solubility was not as large, though, as the increase predicted by the computer model. The presence of phosphate, either as sodium phosphate or sodium fluoride phosphate, had a negligible effect on the rate of gibbsite dissolution, but caused a slight increase in aluminum solubility. The magnitude of the increased solubility, relative to the increase caused by sodium nitrate, suggests that the increase is due to ionic strength (or water activity) effects, rather than being associated with the specific ion involved. The computer model predicted that phosphate would cause a slight decrease in aluminum solubility, suggesting some Al-PO4 interaction. No evidence was found of such an interaction.

  2. The Effect of Time and Rate of Application of Nitrate of Soda on the Yield of Cotton. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner); Langley, B. C. (Bryon Caldwell); Johnson, P. R. (Paul Rufus)

    1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIHENT STATIDJ A. R. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY. TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 490 MARCH, 1934 .--' --7 , The Effect of Time and Rate of Application of Nitrate of Soda on the Yield of Cotton - AGRICULTURAL... bolls and not by increasing the length of lint or percentage of lint, as shown in experiments at Nacogdoches and Troup, during four years ending 1930, to determine the best time and rate of applica- tion of nitrate of soda for cotton...

  3. The Effect of Time and Rate of Application of Nitrate of Soda on the Yield of Cotton.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner); Langley, B. C. (Bryon Caldwell); Johnson, P. R. (Paul Rufus)

    1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIHENT STATIDJ A. R. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY. TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 490 MARCH, 1934 .--' --7 , The Effect of Time and Rate of Application of Nitrate of Soda on the Yield of Cotton - AGRICULTURAL... of nitrate of soda on yield, length and percentage of lint, size of boll, shedding, and other characters of the cotton plant on the sandy soils of eastern Texas, as a basis for developing a more intelligent and profitable fertilizer practice for cotton...

  4. Nitrate accumulation in soils and in plant parts of sorghum and oats as influenced by sources and rates of nitrogen fertilizers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Cassimiro Vaz

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NITRATE A CUNLU. ATION IN SOILS AND IN PLANT PARTS OF SORGHUM AND OATS AS INFLUENCED BY SOURCES AND RATES Or NITROGEN FERTILIZERS A Thee. "s CASSIMIRO VPw COSTA Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1970 Ma~or Subiect: Soil Chemistry i"'ITRATE ACCUMULATION IN SOILS AVD IN PLAVv. T PARTS OF SORGHUM AND OATS AS INFLUENCED BY SOURCES AND 'RATES OF N1TROGEN FERTILIZERS A Thesis...

  5. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High levels of nitrates in drinking water can be harmful for very young infants and susceptible adults. This publication explains how people are exposed to nitrates, what health effects are caused by them in drinking water and how to remove them....

  6. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High levels of nitrates in drinking water can be harmful for very young infants and susceptible adults. This publication explains how people are exposed to nitrates, what health effects are caused by them in drinking water and how to remove them....

  7. Degradation of perchloroethylene and nitrate by high-activity modified green rusts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jeong Yun

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    produce high-activity modified green rusts (HMGRs) that demonstrate higher degradation rates. Methods of modifying GRs to obtain high reactivity for degradation of PCE and nitrate were developed and reduction kinetics of PCE and nitrate by HMGRs were...

  8. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

    1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  9. Aluminum nitrate recrystallization and recovery from liquid extraction raffinates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Huxtable, W.P.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid sludges resulting form biodenitrification of discarded aluminum nitrate are the largest Y-12 Plant process solid waste. Aluminum nitrate feedstocks also represent a major plant materials cost. The chemical constraints on aluminum nitrate recycle were investigated to determine the feasibility of increasing recycle while maintaining acceptable aluminum nitrate purity. Reported phase behavior of analogous systems, together with bench research, indicated that it would be possible to raise the recycle rate from 35% to between 70 and 90% by successive concentration and recrystallization of the mother liquor. A full scale pilot test successfully confirmed the ability to obtain 70% recycle in existing process equipment.

  10. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > Power Marketing > RATES Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current Rates FY 15 PRR worksheet (PDF - 31K) FY...

  11. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RATES Rates Document Library SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on...

  12. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marketing > RATES RATES Current Rates Past Rates 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Rates Schedules Power CV-F13 CPP-2 Transmissions CV-T3 CV-NWT5 PACI-T3 COTP-T3 CV-TPT7 CV-UUP1...

  13. 7, 55535593, 2007 Nitrate aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 5553­5593, 2007 Nitrate aerosols today and in 2030 S. E. Bauer et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Nitrate aerosols today and in 2030: importance relative to other aerosol species and tropospheric, 5553­5593, 2007 Nitrate aerosols today and in 2030 S. E. Bauer et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  14. Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water California Nitrate Project,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Control Board Report to the Legislature With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley: Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water with a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley

  15. Immobilization of sodium nitrate waste with polymers: Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development of solidification systems for sodium nitrate waste. Sodium nitrate waste was solidified in the polymers polyethylene, polyester-styrene (PES), and water-extendible polyester-styrene (WEP). Evaluations were made of the properties of waste forms containing various amounts of sodium nitrate by leaching immersion in water, measuring compressive strengths and by the EPA Extraction Procedure. Results of the leaching test are presented as cumulative fraction leached (CFL), incremental leaching rate, and average leaching indices (LI). For waste forms containing 30 to 70 wt% sodium nitrate, the CFL ranged from 9.0 x 10/sup -3/ to 7.3 x 10/sup -1/ and the LI from 11 to 7.8. After ninety days immersion in water, the compressive strengths ranged from 720 psi to 2550 psi. The nitrate releases from these samples using the EPA Extraction Procedure were below 500 ppM. The nitrate releases from PES waste forms were similar to those from polyethylene waste forms at the same waste loadings. The compressive yield strengths, measured after ninety-day immersion in water, ranged between 2070 and 7710 psi. In the case of WEP waste forms, only 30 wt% loaded samples passed the immersion test. 23 refs., 24 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. Nitrate and Prussic Acid Poisoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stichler, Charles; Reagor, John C.

    2001-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrate and prussic acid poisoning in cattle are noninfectious conditions that can kill livestock. This publication explains the causes and symptoms of these conditions as well as preventive measures and sampling and testing steps....

  17. Nitrate and Prussic Acid Poisoning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stichler, Charles; Reagor, John C.

    2001-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrate and prussic acid poisoning in cattle are noninfectious conditions that can kill livestock. This publication explains the causes and symptoms of these conditions as well as preventive measures and sampling and testing steps....

  18. Degradation of perchloroethylene and nitrate by high-activity modified green rusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jeong Yun

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    , nitrate reduction by GR-F(Cu) and GR-F(Pt) was further studied to determine the effects on degradation rates of pH, Cu(II) addition, and initial nitrate concentration. A reaction model with four sequential steps was proposed to describe the process...

  19. Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water California Nitrate Project,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Control Board Report to the Legislature With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater Report 6 Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas and Salinas Valley Groundwater. Report for the State Water Resources Control Board Report to the Legislature

  20. Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattus, Alfred J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product.

  1. Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattus, A.J.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product. 3 figures.

  2. Assessment of the potential for ammonium nitrate formation and reaction in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two principal scenarios by which ammonium nitrate may be formed were considered: (a) precipitation of ammonium nitrate in the waste, and (b) ammonium nitrate formation via the gas phase reaction of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The first of these can be dismissed because ammonium ions, which are necessary for ammonium nitrate precipitation, can exist only in negligibly small concentrations in strongly alkaline solutions. Gas phase reactions between ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor in the gas phase represent the most likely means by which ammonium nitrate aerosols could be formed in Tank 241-SY-101. Predicted ammonium nitrate formation rates are largely controlled by the concentration of nitrogen dioxide. This gas has not been detected among those gases vented from the wastes using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) or mass spectrometry. While detection limits for nitrogen dioxide have not been established experimentally, the maximum concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the gas phase in Tank 241-SY-101 was estimated at 0.1 ppm based on calculations using the HITRAN data base and on FTIR spectra of gases vented from the wastes. At 50 C and with 100 ppm ammonia also present, less than one gram of ammonium nitrate per year is estimated to be formed in the tank. To date, ammonium nitrate has not been detected on HEPA filters in the ventilation system, so any quantity that has been formed in the tank must be quite small, in good agreement with rate calculations. The potential for runaway exothermic reactions involving ammonium nitrate in Tank 241-SY-101 is minimal. Dilution by non-reacting waste components, particularly water, would prevent hazardous exothermic reactions from occurring within the waste slurry, even if ammonium nitrate were present. 41 refs.

  3. Nitrates and Prussic Acid in Forages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    When nitrates and prussic acid accumulate in forage, the feed may not be safe for livestock consumption. Learn the symptoms of nitrate and prussic acid poisoning and which plants are most likely to pose a risk to livestock. Also learn sampling...

  4. Nitrates and Prussic Acid in Forages 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    When nitrates and prussic acid accumulate in forage, the feed may not be safe for livestock consumption. Learn the symptoms of nitrate and prussic acid poisoning and which plants are most likely to pose a risk to livestock. Also learn sampling...

  5. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in...

  6. aqueous nitrate flowsheet: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the...

  7. Atomic structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic productivity. Atomic structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic productivity. Abstract:...

  8. Radiative neutron capture on 9be, 14c, 14n, 15n and 16o at thermal and astrophysical energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Dubovichenko; Albert Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov; Nadezhda Afanasyeva

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The total cross sections of the radiative neutron capture processes on 9Be, 14C, 14N, 15N, and 16O are described in the framework of the modified potential cluster model with the classification of orbital states according to Young tableaux. The continued interest in the study of these reactions is due, on the one hand, to the important role played by this process in the analysis of many fundamental properties of nuclei and nuclear reactions, and, on the other hand, to the wide use of the capture cross section data in the various applications of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics, and, also, to the importance of the analysis of primordial nucleosynthesis in the Universe. This article is devoted to the description of results for the processes of the radiative neutron capture on certain light atomic nuclei at thermal and astrophysical energies. The considered capture reactions are not part of stellar thermonuclear cycles, but involve in the reaction chains of inhomogeneous Big Bang models.

  9. Process for the preparation of an energetic nitrate ester

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chavez, David E; Naud, Darren L; Hiskey, Michael A

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of an energetic nitrate ester compound and related intermediates is provided.

  10. Nitrates and detinning in canned carrots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florine, Thomas Edward

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NITRATES AND DETINNING IN CANNED CARROTS A Thesis by Thomas Edward Florine Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1968 Major... Subject: Food Technology NITRATES AND DETINNING IN CANNED CARROTS A Thesis by Thomas Edward Florine Approved as to style and content by: / C-~ (Chairman of Cemi. tee) Head of Department Member) (Member) :-'i ~ (Member) (Member) (Member...

  11. Nitrates and detinning in canned carrots 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florine, Thomas Edward

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Steel Producers-Can Manufacturers Institute-National Canners Association Research Founda- tion on Internal Can Corrosion to encourage the investi- gation of nitrates as a possible causative agent in the rapid detinning of plain tinned containers... accelerated the internal corrosion of the tin plate. He also reported that high levels of nitrates in green beans produced accelerated corrosion of the container. A vari- able response to fertilizer treatments was found in toma- toes; although those...

  12. Process for decomposing nitrates in aqueous solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a process for decomposing ammonium nitrate and/or selected metal nitrates in an aqueous solution at an elevated temperature and pressure. Where the compound to be decomposed is a metal nitrate (e.g., a nuclear-fuel metal nitrate), a hydroxylated organic reducing agent therefor is provided in the solution. In accordance with the invention, an effective proportion of both nitromethane and nitric acid is incorporated in the solution to accelerate decomposition of the ammonium nitrate and/or selected metal nitrate. As a result, decomposition can be effected at significantly lower temperatures and pressures, permitting the use of system components composed of off-the-shelf materials, such as stainless steel, rather than more costly materials of construction. Preferably, the process is conducted on a continuous basis. Fluid can be automatically vented from the reaction zone as required to maintain the operating temperature at a moderate value--e.g., at a value in the range of from about 130.degree.-200.degree. C.

  13. Applicability of hydroxylamine nitrate reductant in pulse-column contactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reif, D.J.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium and plutonium separations were made from simulated breeder reactor spent fuel dissolver solution with laboratory-sized pulse column contactors. Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) was used for reduction of plutonium (1V). An integrated extraction-partition system, simulating a breeder fuel reprocessing flowsheet, carried out a partial partition of uranium and plutonium in the second contactor. Tests have shown that acceptable coprocessing can be ontained using HAN as a plutonium reductant. Pulse column performance was stable even though gaseous HAN oxidation products were present in the column. Gas evolution rates up to 0.27 cfm/ft/sup 2/ of column cross section were tested and found acceptable.

  14. The nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process -- a newly developed low-temperature technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bench-top feasibility studies with Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants, using a new low-temperature (50-60C) process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), showed that between 90 and 99% of the nitrate at Hanford can be readily converted to ammonia. Aluminum powders or shot can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an alumina-silica-based ceramic solid. The process may utilize already contaminated aluminum scrap metal from various DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final nitrate-free ceramic product can be calcined, pressed, and sintered like any other ceramic. Based on starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution (probable supernate concentrations resulting from salt-cake/sludge removal from Hanford SSTs), volume reductions as high as 70% are currently obtained, compared with an expected 40 to 50% volume increase if the Hanford supernate were grouted. Engineering data indicate that the process will be very economical. Data were used to cost a batch facility with a production rate of 1200 kilograms of nitrate per hour for processing all the Hanford SST waste over 20 years. Process cost analysis indicates that between $2.01 and 2.66 will be required to convert each kilogram of nitrate. These costs are one-third to one-half of the processing costs for electrolytic and thermal processes. The ceramic waste form offers other cost savings associated with a smaller volume of waste as well as eliminates other process steps such as grouting. Silica added to the reactor, based upon the total sodium in the waste, permits us to actually bind the sodium in a nepheline phase of the final ceramic structure as well as bind most metals and nonmetals in the ceramic.

  15. alkaline nitrate solutions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or...

  16. Denitration of High Nitrate Salts Using Reductants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HD Smith; EO Jones; AJ Schmidt; AH Zacher; MD Brown; MR Elmore; SR Gano

    1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in conjunction with Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), to remove nitrates in simulated low-activity waste (LAW). The major objective of this work was to provide data for identifying and demonstrating a technically viable and cost-effective approach to condition LAW for immobilization (grout).

  17. Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    for the California State Water Resources Control Board With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley #12;Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater. Report for the State Water Resources Control Board Report

  18. Spatial Inference of Nitrate Concentrations in Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Mike

    Spatial Inference of Nitrate Concentrations in Groundwater DAWN B. WOODARD, ROBERT L. WOLPERT in groundwater over the mid-Atlantic states, using measurements gathered during a pe- riod of ten years. A map- trations in air, pesticide concentrations in groundwater, or any other quantity that varies over

  19. NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves literature survey of technologies to perform the nitrate to hydroxide conversion, selection of the most promising technologies, preparation of a flowsheet and design of a system. The most promising technologies are electrochemical reduction of nitrates and chemical reduction with hydrogen or ammonia. The primary reviewed technologies are listed and they aredescribed in more detail later in the report: (1) Electrochemical destruction; (2) Chemical reduction with agents such as ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen; (3) Hydrothermal reduction process; and (4) Calcination. Only three of the technologies on the list have been demonstrated to generate usable amounts of caustic; electrochemical reduction and chemical reduction with ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen and hydrothermal reduction. Chemical reduction with an organic reactant such as formic acid generates carbon dioxide which reacts with caustic and is thus counterproductive. Treatment of nitrate with aluminum or other active metals generates a solid product. High temperature calcination has the potential to generate sodium oxide which may be hydrated to sodium hydroxide, but this is unproven. The following criteria were developed to evaluate the most suitable option. The numbers in brackets after the criteria are relative weighting factors to account for importance: (1) Personnel exposure to radiation for installation, routine operation and maintenance; (2) Non-radioactive safety issues; (3) Whether the technology generates caustic and how many moles of caustic are generated per mole of nitrate plus nitrite decomposed; (4) Whether the technology can handle nitrate and nitrite at the concentrations encountered in waste; (5) Maturity of technology; (6) Estimated annual cost of operation (labor, depreciation, materials, utilities); (7) Capital cost; (8) Selectivity to nitrogen as decomposition product (other products are flammable and/or toxic); (9) Impact of introduced species; (10) Selectivity for destruction of nitrate vs. nitrite; and (11) Cost of deactivation and demolition. Each technology was given a score from one

  20. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  1. Stainless steel corrosion by molten nitrates : analysis and lessons learned.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A secondary containment vessel, made of stainless 316, failed due to severe nitrate salt corrosion. Corrosion was in the form of pitting was observed during high temperature, chemical stability experiments. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were all used to diagnose the cause of the failure. Failure was caused by potassium oxide that crept into the gap between the primary vessel (alumina) and the stainless steel vessel. Molten nitrate solar salt (89% KNO{sub 3}, 11% NaNO{sub 3} by weight) was used during chemical stability experiments, with an oxygen cover gas, at a salt temperature of 350-700 C. Nitrate salt was primarily contained in an alumina vessel; however salt crept into the gap between the alumina and 316 stainless steel. Corrosion occurred over a period of approximately 2000 hours, with the end result of full wall penetration through the stainless steel vessel; see Figures 1 and 2 for images of the corrosion damage to the vessel. Wall thickness was 0.0625 inches, which, based on previous data, should have been adequate to avoid corrosion-induced failure while in direct contact with salt temperature at 677 C (0.081-inch/year). Salt temperatures exceeding 650 C lasted for approximately 14 days. However, previous corrosion data was performed with air as the cover gas. High temperature combined with an oxygen cover gas obviously drove corrosion rates to a much higher value. Corrosion resulted in the form of uniform pitting. Based on SEM and EDS data, pits contained primarily potassium oxide and potassium chromate, reinforcing the link between oxides and severe corrosion. In addition to the pitting corrosion, a large blister formed on the side wall, which was mainly composed of potassium, chromium and oxygen. All data indicated that corrosion initiated internally and moved outward. There was no evidence of intergranular corrosion nor were there any indication of fast pathways along grain boundaries. Much of the pitting occurred near welds; however this was the hottest region in the chamber. Pitting was observed up to two inches above the weld, indicating independence from weld effects.

  2. ammonium nitrate solution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

  3. americium nitrates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

  4. acute uranyl nitrate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

  5. ammonium nitrates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

  6. ammonium nitrate pills: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

  7. ammonium nitrate solutions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

  8. Sampling precautions for the measurement of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Sampling precautions for the measurement of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and of their oxidation products, such as nitrated and oxygenated PAHs hydrocarbons; Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Sampling

  9. Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two aromatic hydrocarbons, 17 nitrated PAHs (NPAHs) and 8 oxygenated PAHs (OPAHs) were carried out during hydrocarbons; Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

  10. NO2 Adsorption on BaO/Al2O3: The Nature of Nitrate Species. ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NO2 Adsorption on BaOAl2O3: The Nature of Nitrate Species. NO2 Adsorption on BaOAl2O3: The Nature of Nitrate Species. Abstract: The nature of nitrate species formed in the...

  11. Thermal Decomposition of Nitrated Tributyl Phosphate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paddleford, D.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Institute of Technology, GA (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contact between tributyl phosphate and aqueous solutions of nitric acid and/or heavy metal nitrate salts at elevated temperatures can lead to exothermic reactions of explosive violence. Even though such operations have been routinely performed safely for decades as an intrinsic part of the Purex separation processes, several so-called ``red oil`` explosions are known to have occurred in the United States, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. The most recent red oil explosion occurred at the Tomsk-7 separations facility in Siberia, in April 1993. That explosion destroyed part of the unreinforced masonry walls of the canyon-type building in which the process was housed, and allowed the release of a significant quantity of radioactive material.

  12. ARRAYS OF BOTTLES OF PLUTONIUM NITRATE SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October and November of 1981 thirteen approaches-to-critical were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas® reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were sponsored by Rockwell Hanford Operations because of the lack of experimental data on the criticality of arrays of bottles of Pu solution such as might be found in storage and handling at the Purex Facility at Hanford. The results of these experiments were used “to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in criticality safety assessments of [the] plant configurations” (Ref. 1). Data for this evaluation were collected from the published report (Ref. 1), the approach to critical logbook, the experimenter’s logbook, and communication with the primary experimenter, B. Michael Durst. Of the 13 experiments preformed 10 were evaluated. One of the experiments was not evaluated because it had been thrown out by the experimenter, one was not evaluated because it was a repeat of another experiment and the third was not evaluated because it reported the critical number of bottles as being greater than 25. Seven of the thirteen evaluated experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments. A similar experiment using uranyl nitrate was benchmarked as U233-SOL-THERM-014.

  13. Carbon-rich presolar grains from massive stars. Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios and the mystery of 15N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pignatari, M; Hoppe, P; Jordan, C J; Gibson, B K; Trappitsch, R; Herwig, F; Fryer, C; Hirschi, R; Timmes, F X

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C, and low-density graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the SN shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the pu...

  14. Michigan Technological University FRESHMAN-COHORT GRADUATION RATES All Students Student-Athletes #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Athletes # 2005-06 Graduation Rate 65% 76% Four-Class Average 65% 67% Student-Athlete Academic Success Rate 83% 1. Graduation-Rates Data a. All Students Freshman Rate Men 2005-06 4-Class N % N % Am. Ind./AN *** *** 31 45 Freshman Rate Women 2005-06 4-Class N % N % *** *** 15 53 4 50 12 50 *** *** 21 57 4 75 8 75

  15. Groundwater nitrates in the Seymour Aquifer: problem or resource? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arreola-Triana, Alejandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    24 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Alejandra Arreola-Triana In the Rolling Plains of Texas, the Seymour Aquifer is the major source of water for Haskell, Jones and Knox counties. #31;e water from the Seymour Aquifer, however, contains nitrate levels... are working on ways to manage the nitrate levels in this aquifer. Tracking the source Nitrates in groundwater can come from runo#27;, fertilizer use, leaks from septic tanks, sewage and erosion of natural deposits, according to the U.S. Environmental...

  16. Groundwater nitrates in the Seymour Aquifer: problem or resource?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arreola-Triana, Alejandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Groundwater nitrates in the Seymour Aquifer: problem or resource? Texas High Plains and Rolling Plain project. #31;e aim of this project is to understand how nitrates move through the soil and how they can be managed to improve water quality in underlying... it is a slow process and it may take several years before we see improvement.? Putting nitrates to work AgriLife Research environmental soil scientist Dr. Paul DeLaune is exploring one of these best management practices. Last July, Ale and De...

  17. Degradation of the molecular weight and nitrate ester content of cellulose nitrate on thermal aging. [PBX-9404

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leider, H R

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in molecular weight and nitrate ester content for cellulose nitrate (NC), either pure or as a constituent of PBX-9404, were determined as a function of time and temperature. Changes in the number-averaged molecular weight, M/sub n/, are described by the simple theory of random chain scission, and M/sub n/ is found to correlate well with nitrate ester loss. Significant differences are seen between NC aged in the isolated condition and aged as the binder in PBX-9404.

  18. Nitrate contamination of domestic potable water supplies: a social problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, T.; Jensen, E.L.; Conway, J.B.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrate contamination of potable water supplies is a recognized health hazard. Potentially, the contamination of private drinking water supplies could be a problem in the rural Palouse area of Idaho and Washington. Studies have shown that 12% of the rural population of Whitman County, Washington, may be drinking water containing nitrates in excess of the national standard. Yet there is no organized concern about this potential health hazard among local citizens. After reviewing the literature on nitrate contamination of ground water and discussing nitrate contamination of private potable water supplies in the Palouse, we use a social movement theory of social problems to explain why this situation has not been defined as a public health problem.

  19. The STICS model to predict nitrate leaching following agricultural practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    scaling approach was used to assess the effectiveness of "Good Agricultural Practice" established within of Good Agricultural Practice" and other additional measures, with the objective of reducing water pollution from nitrogen compounds in "Nitrate Vulnerable Zones" (NVZs). Good agricultural practices

  20. Decontamination of water using nitrate selective ion exchange resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lockridge, J.E.; Fritz, J.S.

    1990-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for nitrate decontamination of water which involves passing the water through a bed of alkyl phosphonium anion exchange resin which has pendant alkyl groups of C[sub 3] or larger.

  1. Thermal decomposition study of hydroxylamine nitrate during storage and handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chuanji

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN), an important agent for the nuclear industry and the U.S. Army, has been involved in several costly incidents. To prevent similar incidents, the study of HAN safe storage and handling boundary has become extremely...

  2. Decontamination of water using nitrate selective ion exchange resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lockridge, James E. (Ames, IA); Fritz, James S. (Ames, IA)

    1990-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for nitrate decontamination of water which involves passing the water through a bed of alkyl phosphonium anion exchange resin which has pendant alkyl groups of C.sub.3 or larger.

  3. acid uranyl nitrate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Websites Summary: ) 575.7317 www.uark.edudeptsawrc 12;Nutrients Ammonia-N POLY 100 Sulfuric Acid 0.1 mL100mL 28 DAYS EPA 351.2Salicylate Nitrate...

  4. Nonaqueous purification of mixed nitrate heat transfer media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Morgan, Michael J. (Guilford, CT)

    1983-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonaqueous, in-line method for removing carbonate and hydroxide contamination from a molten mixed sodium nitrate/potassium nitrate heat transfer salt. The method comprises dissolving a stoichiometric quantity of anhydrous Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2 in the melt whereby an insoluble CaCO.sub.3 and Ca(OH).sub.2 precipitate is formed. The precipitate can be removed by settling, filtration or floatation techniques.

  5. Rates & Repayment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Review-NEPA Financial Data Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates Rate Adjustments Transmission Ancillary Services Rates WAPA-137 Rate Order Rates and...

  6. THE SENSITIVITY OF CARBON STEELS' SUSCEPTIBILITY TO LOCALIZED CORROSION TO THE PH OF NITRATE BASED NUCLEAR WASTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOOMER KD

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford tank reservation contains approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war weapons production, which is stored in 177 underground storage tanks. The tanks will be in use until waste processing operations are completed. The wastes tend to be high pH (over 10) and nitrate based. Under these alkaline conditions carbon steels tend to be passive and undergo relatively slow uniform corrosion. However, the presence of nitrate and other aggressive species, can lead to pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This work is a continuation of previous work that investigated the propensity of steels to suffer pitting and stress corrosion cracking in various waste simulants. The focus of this work is an investigation of the sensitivity of the steels' pitting and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility tosimulant pH. Previous work demonstrated that wastes that are high in aggressive nitrate and low in inhibitory nitrite are susceptible to localized corrosion. However, the previous work involved wastes with pH 12 or higher. The current work involves wastes with lower pH of 10 or 11. It is expected that at these lower pHs that a higher nitrite-to-nitrate ratio will be necessary to ensure tank integrity. This experimental work involved both electrochemical testing, and slow strain rate testing at either the free corrosion potential or under anodic polarization. The results of the current work will be discussed, and compared to work previously presented.

  7. Crystal chemistry of thorium nitrates and chromates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigmon, Ginger E. [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Burns, Peter C., E-mail: pburns@nd.ed [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures and infrared spectra of six novel thorium compounds are reported. Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (1) crystallizes in space group C2/c, a=14.050(1), b=8.992(7), c=5.954(5) A, {beta}=101.014(2){sup o}. K{sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (2), P-3, a=13.606(1), c=6.641(6) A. (C{sub 12}H{sub 28}N){sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (3), P2{sub 1}/c, a=14.643(4), b=15.772(5), c=22.316(5) A, {beta}=131.01(1){sup o}. KTh(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (4), P2{sub 1}/c, a=10.070(8), b=12.731(9), c=13.231(8) A, {beta}=128.647(4){sup o}. Th(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (5), P2{sub 1}/n, a=12.731(1), b=9.469(8), c=12.972(1) A, {beta}=91.793(2){sup o}. K{sub 2}Th{sub 3}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 7}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} (6), Ama2, a=19.302(8), b=15.580(6), c=11.318(6) A. The coordination polyhedra about Th in these structures are diverse. Th is coordinated by 9 O atoms in 5 and 6, seven of which are from monodentate (CrO{sub 4}) tetrahedra and two are (H{sub 2}O). The Th in compound 1 is coordinated by ten O atoms, four of which are O atoms of two bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and six of which are (OH) and (H{sub 2}O). In compounds 2, 3 and 4 the Th is coordinate by 12 O atoms. In 2 and 3 there are six bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles, and in 4 ten of the O atoms are part of five bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and the others are (H{sub 2}O) groups. The structural units of these compounds consist of a chain of thorium and nitrate polyhedra (1), isolated thorium hexanitrate clusters (2, 3), an isolated thorium pentanitrate dihydrate cluster (4), and a sheet (6) and framework (5) of thorium and chromate polyhedra. These structures illustrate the complexity inherent in the crystal chemistry of Th. - Graphical Abstract: The structures and infrared spectra of four new Th nitrates and two Th chromates are reported. The coordination numbers of the Th cations range from nine to 12 in these compounds. Structural units consist of isolated clusters, chains, sheets and frameworks.

  8. Benchmark Evaluation of Plutonium Nitrate Solution Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. A. Marshall; J. D. Bess

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October and November of 1981 thirteen approach-to-critical experiments were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington, using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas{reg_sign} reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were performed to fill a gap in experimental data regarding criticality limits for storing and handling arrays of Pu solution in reprocessing facilities. Of the thirteen approach-to-critical experiments eleven resulted in extrapolations to critical configurations. Four of the approaches were extrapolated to the critical number of bottles; these were not evaluated further due to the large uncertainty associated with the modeling of a fraction of a bottle. The remaining seven approaches were extrapolated to critical array spacing of 3-4 and 4-4 arrays; these seven critical configurations were evaluation for inclusion as acceptable benchmark experiments in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook. Detailed and simple models of these configurations were created and the associated bias of these simplifications was determined to range from 0.00116 and 0.00162 {+-} 0.00006 ?keff. Monte Carlo analysis of all models was completed using MCNP5 with ENDF/BVII.0 neutron cross section libraries. A thorough uncertainty analysis of all critical, geometric, and material parameters was performed using parameter perturbation methods. It was found that uncertainty in the impurities in the polyethylene bottles, reflector position, bottle outer diameter, and critical array spacing had the largest effect. The total uncertainty ranged from 0.00651 to 0.00920 ?keff. Evaluation methods and results will be presented and discussed in greater detail in the full paper.

  9. Response of rice to ammonium and nitrate nitrogen applied at various stages of plant growth on limed and unlimed Beaumont and Lake Charles clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, William Blalock, III

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Patna1k (1 ) partially support th1s explanation. They found that lime at ths rate of one percent of the weight of the so11 increased mineralisat1on of nitrogen, but most of the n1trogen in their tests accumulated as ammonia rather than nitrate under...RESPONSE OF RICE TO AMMONIUM AND NITRATE NITROGEN APPLIED AT VARIOUS STAGES OF PLANT GROWTH ON LIMED AND UNLINED BEAUNONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By William B. Gay, III Submitted to the Graduate Sohool of the Agricultural...

  10. Handling of Ammonium Nitrate Mother-Liquid Radiochemical Production - 13089

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zherebtsov, Alexander; Dvoeglazov, Konstantine; Volk, Vladimir; Zagumenov, Vladimir; Zverev, Dmitriy [JSC VNIINM, 123060, Moscow, Rogova st., 5a (Russian Federation)] [JSC VNIINM, 123060, Moscow, Rogova st., 5a (Russian Federation); Tinin, Vasiliy; Kozyrev, Anatoly; Shamin, Dladimir; Tvilenev, Konstantin [JSC SCC, 636039,Tomsk oblast, Seversk, Kurchatova street 1 (Russian Federation)] [JSC SCC, 636039,Tomsk oblast, Seversk, Kurchatova street 1 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the work is to develop a basic technology of decomposition of ammonium nitrate stock solutions produced in radiochemical enterprises engaged in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel and fabrication of fresh fuel. It was necessary to work out how to conduct a one-step thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, select and test the catalysts for this process and to prepare proposals for recycling condensation. Necessary accessories were added to a laboratory equipment installation decomposition of ammonium nitrate. It is tested several types of reducing agents and two types of catalyst to neutralize the nitrogen oxides. It is conducted testing of modes of the process to produce condensation, suitable for use in the conversion of a new technological scheme of production. It is studied the structure of the catalysts before and after their use in a laboratory setting. It is tested the selected catalyst in the optimal range for 48 hours of continuous operation. (authors)

  11. Simultaneous analysis of oxygenated and nitrated polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons on standard reference material 1649a (urban dust) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Simultaneous analysis of oxygenated and nitrated polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons on standard nitrated polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) and 9 oxygenated polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (OPAHs aromatic hydrocarbons; Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic

  12. Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two;2 Abstract The size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PAH derivatives of compounds. Keywords: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Oxygenated

  13. Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state transport; 1866 Hydrology: Soil moisture; 1875 Hydrology: Unsaturated zone; 9900 Corrections; KEYWORDS), Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably

  14. Characterization of Surface and Bulk Nitrates of ?-Al2O3...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface and Bulk Nitrates of ?-Al2O3-Supported Alkaline Earth Oxides using Density Functional Theory. Characterization of Surface and Bulk Nitrates of ?-Al2O3-Supported...

  15. THE SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES OF THORIUM NITRATE Re-direct Destination: times redirected to final destination ShortURL Code Published Current...

  16. Technical Area (TA)-54 Area G Nitrate-Salt Waste Container Response...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technical Area (TA)-54 Area G Nitrate-Salt Waste Container Response Instructions Technical Area (TA)-54 Area G Nitrate-Salt Waste Container Response Instructions This document was...

  17. Evaluation of Composite Alumina Nanoparticle and Nitrate Eutectic Materials for use in Concentrating Solar Power Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malik, Darren R.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this research was to create and characterize high temperature alumina and nitrate salt eutectic nanofluids for use in thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The nitrate eutectic was originally used in the TES system demonstrated as part...

  18. A High-Performance Micromachined Amperometric Nitrate Sensor for Environmental Monitoring (SEN 8)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dohyun Kim; Ira B. Goldberg; Michael Glickman; Jack W. Judy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0.038× 10 -3 cm 2 ) • polyimide insulation layer Nitratespecies when nitrate is Polyimide not present - PO 43- , Ca

  19. Turning a negative into a positive: Researchers find promising use for excessive nitrate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for excessive nitrate For 30 years, farmers in northwest central Texas have known that high level of nitrates in irrigation water from the Seymour Aquifer is a problem. Now, with research conducted by Texas AgriLife Research scientists, that problem may... turn into a benefit. Nitrate is the most common chemical con- taminant in groundwater. For the Seymour, a shallow aquifer underlying about 300,000 acres in 20 counties, more than 50 percent of groundwater nitrate measurements exceed the federal...

  20. GROUNDWATER NITRATE REMOVAL CAPACITY OF RIPARIAN ZONES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    , and 3 in Urban watersheds to study denitrification capacity. Mini-piezometers were installed at eachGROUNDWATER NITRATE REMOVAL CAPACITY OF RIPARIAN ZONES IN URBANIZING WATERSHEDS BY TARA KIMBERLY and geomorphology of riparian zones, potentially changing riparian groundwater denitrification capacity. Little work

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Impact of elevated nitrate on sulfate-reducing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    , The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA; 2 Center for Environmental Biotechnology, The UniversityORIGINAL ARTICLE Impact of elevated nitrate on sulfate-reducing bacteria: a comparative Study Hazen4,5 , Judy D Wall4,8 and Jizhong Zhou3,4 1 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

  2. VOCs, Pesticides, Nitrate, and Their Mixtures in Groundwater Used for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    areas. For each sample, as many as 60 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), 83 pesticides, and nitrate were of food and water, and dermal contact). Everyone has hundreds of measurable contami- nants in their bodies, especially volatile organic compounds (VOCs), are not known. Defining human exposure to mixtures

  3. Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began- duction and extraction procedures used from 1944 to 1988 at the Hanford Site. After irradiation of U fuel rods, various solvent extraction techniques were used to separate the Pu from U and other components

  4. Regulation by nitrate of protein synthesis and translation of RNA in maize roots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClure, P.R.; Bouthyette, P.Y.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roots of maize seedlings were exposed to /sup 35/S-methionine in the presence or absence of nitrate. Using SDS-PAGE, nitrate-induced changes in labeled polypeptides were noted in the soluble (at 92, 63 and 21kD) and organellar(at 14kD) fractions, as well as in a membrane fraction of putative tonoplast origin (at 31kD). No nitrate-induced changes were noted in a plasmamembrane-enriched fraction or in a membrane fraction of mixed origin. Total RNA from nitrate-treated and control roots was translated in a rabbit reticulocyte system. Five translation products (94, 63, 41, 39 and 21kD) were identified as nitrate-inducible by comparative gel electrophoresis. Changes in protein synthesis and translation of mRNA were apparent within 2-3 h after introduction of nitrate. Within 4-6 h after removal of nitrate, the level of nitrate-inducible translation products diminished to that of control roots. In contrast, the 31kD tonoplast polypeptide was still labeled 26 h after removal of external nitrate and /sup 35/S-methionine. The results will be discussed in relation to the nitrate induction of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the nitrate uptake system.

  5. MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB Michigan State University Extension Crop and Soil Sciences Department Michigan State University WHY TEST SOIL FOR NITRATES Nitrate testing of soil is an excellent and inexpensive way of evaluating the available nitrogen (N) status

  6. The Self-Ignition Temperatures of Bitumen Mixtures Containing Transition Metal Nitrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okada, Ken; Nomura, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is provided on the self-ignition temperature (SIT) of blown bitumen asphalt mixed with sodium nitrate and some chemicals that are added in the bituminization process to adjust pH and to immobilize the radioactive isotopes of Cs, Sr, and I. In each ignition temperature test, the prepared bitumen sample was heated at a constant rate of temperature increase, and the ignition point was measured. Among the tested chemicals added to the bitumen, Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} shows a relatively large SIT decrease, and furthermore, the mixture of Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and AgNO{sub 3} has been shown to greatly lower the SIT of blown bitumen. It is suggested that, in general, segregation of these nitrates should be avoided in bituminization, and care should be taken in handling Ag in a Purex reprocessing plant from the viewpoint of waste treatment. Furthermore, the oxidation effects of Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} were tested by measuring torque of the bitumen sample. It was confirmed that the addition of Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} to bitumen rapidly oxidizes the bitumen and increases the viscosity of the bitumen mixture.

  7. Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. Stolz

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

  8. Safe conditions for contacting nitric acid or nitrates with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyder, M.L

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from DOE-SR, the current state of knowledge of the reactions between TBP and aqueous nitrate solutions is critically reviewed, and recommendations are made for the safe operation of SRS separations equipment in which this combination of chemicals may be present. The existing limits for evaporation are validated. Guidelines are presented for cases in which general limits do not apply. The rate of reaction between nitric acid and TBP appears to be controlled by the rate of TBP hydrolysis. The hydrolysis reaction produces dibutyl phosphate and n-butanol. The hydrolysis rate is a strong function of temperature, and becomes very fast at temperatures in the range 130{degrees} to 150{degrees}C. The resulting n-butanol is volatile at high temperatures, boiling at 117.5{degrees}C, but is also subject to exothermic oxidation by nitric acid or nitrates. If oxidation occurs before the n-butanol evaporates, the heat of oxidation may exceed local cooling by convection. The resulting heating will further accelerate the reaction, leading to an energetic runaway and possibly (in confined systems) an explosion. Extensive experiments and practice have shown that in a well-mixed and well-vented aqueous system such as an evaporator, at moderate acidities and temperatures below 130{degrees}C, the heat of reaction is adequately removed by vaporization of steam. In general, the heating will be so slow that natural processes provide adequate cooling at temperatures below 80{degrees}C. Above this temperature, care should be taken to ensure that adequate cooling is available for the amount of TBP that may be present. Experiments suggest that in well-ventilated systems n-butanol evaporation and convective cooling are sufficient to control the reaction at temperatures up to 120{degrees}C.

  9. The Aerobic Oxidation of Bromide to Dibromine Catalyzed by Homogeneous Oxidation Catalysts and Initiated by Nitrate in Acetic Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partenheimer, Walt; Fulton, John L.; Sorensen, Christina M.; Pham, Van Thai; Chen, Yongsheng

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A small amount of nitrate, ~0.002 molal, initiates the Co/Mn catalyzed aerobic oxidation of bromide compounds (HBr,NaBr,LiBr) to dibromine in acetic acid at room temperature. At temperatures 40oC or less , the reaction is autocatalytic. Co(II) and Mn(II) themselves and mixed with ionic bromide are known homogeneous oxidation catalysts. The reaction was discovered serendipitously when a Co/Br and Co/Mn/Br catalyst solution was prepared for the aerobic oxidation of methyaromatic compounds and the Co acetate contained a small amount of impurity i.e. nitrate. The reaction was characterized by IR, UV-VIS, MALDI and EXAFS spectroscopies and the coordination chemistry is described. The reaction is inhibited by water and its rate changed by pH. The change in these variables, as well as others, are identical to those observed during homogeneous, aerobic oxidation of akylaromatics. A mechanism is proposed. Accidental addition of a small amount of nitrate compound into a Co/Mn/Br/acetic acid mixture in a large, commercial feedtank is potentially dangerous.

  10. Rate Schedules

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

  11. Baseload Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Design Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilley, Drake; Kelly, Bruce; Burkholder, Frank

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the work were to demonstrate that a 100 MWe central receiver plant, using nitrate salt as the receiver coolant, thermal storage medium, and heat transport fluid in the steam generator, can 1) operate, at full load, for 6,400 hours each year using only solar energy, and 2) satisfy the DOE levelized energy cost goal of $0.09/kWhe (real 2009 $). To achieve these objectives the work incorporated a large range of tasks relating to many different aspects of a molten salt tower plant. The first Phase of the project focused on developing a baseline design for a Molten Salt Tower and validating areas for improvement. Tasks included a market study, receiver design, heat exchanger design, preliminary heliostat design, solar field optimization, baseline system design including PFDs and P&IDs and detailed cost estimate. The baseline plant met the initial goal of less than $0.14/kWhe, and reinforced the need to reduce costs in several key areas to reach the overall $0.09/kWhe goal. The major improvements identified from Phase I were: 1) higher temperature salt to improve cycle efficiency and reduce storage requirements, 2) an improved receiver coating to increase the efficiency of the receiver, 3) a large receiver design to maximize storage and meet the baseload hours objective, and 4) lower cost heliostat field. The second Phase of the project looked at advancing the baseline tower with the identified improvements and included key prototypes. To validate increasing the standard solar salt temperature to 600 °C a dynamic test was conducted at Sandia. The results ultimately proved the hypothesis incorrect and showed high oxide production and corrosion rates. The results lead to further testing of systems to mitigate the oxide production to be able to increase the salt temperature for a commercial plant. Foster Wheeler worked on the receiver design in both Phase I and Phase II looking at both design and lowering costs utilizing commercial fossil boiler manufacturing. The cost and design goals for the project were met with this task, but the most interesting results had to do with defining the failure modes and looking at a “shakedown analysis” of the combined creep-fatigue failure. A separate task also looked at improving the absorber coatings on the receiver tubes that would improve the efficiency of the receiver. Significant progress was made on developing a novel paint with a high absorptivity that was on par with the current Pyromark, but shows additional potential to be optimized further. Although the coating did not meet the emissivity goals, preliminary testing the new paint shows potential to be much more durable, and potential to improve the receiver efficiency through a higher average absorptivity over the lifetime. Additional coatings were also designed and modeled results meet the project goals, but were not tested. Testing for low cycle fatigue of the full length receiver tubes was designed and constructed, but is still currently undergoing testing. A novel small heliostat was developed through an extensive brainstorming and down select. The concept was then detailed further with inputs from component testing and eventually a full prototype was built and tested. This task met or exceeded the accuracy and structure goals and also beat the cost goal. This provides a significant solar field costs savings for Abengoa that will be developed further to be used in future commercial plants. Ultimately the $0.09/kWhe (real 2009 $) and 6,400 hours goals of the project were met.

  12. Real time in situ detection of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rollins, Andrew W.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A new field instrument is described that quantifies total particle phase organic nitrates. The instrument is based on the thermal dissociation laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF) method that thermally converts nitrates to NO2 which is then detected by LIF. This instrument is unique in its ability to provide fast sensitive measurements of particle phase organic nitrates, without interference from inorganic nitrate. Here we use it to quantify organic nitrates in SOA generated from high-NOx photooxidation of limonene, a-pinene, D-3-carene, and tridecane. In these experiments the organic nitrate moiety is observed to be 6-15percent of the total SOA mass, depending on the organic precursor.

  13. Turning a negative into a positive: Researchers find promising use for excessive nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Cristine Morgan, Texas AgriLife Research soil scientist, takes soil cores for nitrate analysis before the drip irrigation system was installed. Story by Kathy Wythe Turning a negative into a positive Researchers fi nd promising use... for excessive nitrate For 30 years, farmers in northwest central Texas have known that high level of nitrates in irrigation water from the Seymour Aquifer is a problem. Now, with research conducted by Texas AgriLife Research scientists, that problem may...

  14. Impact of elevated nitrate on sulfate-reducing bacteria: A comparative study of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Q.; He, Z.; Joyner, D.C.; Joachimiak, M.; Price, M.N.; Yang, Z.K.; Yen, H.-C. B.; Hemme, C. L.; Chen, W.; Fields, M.; Stahl, D. A.; Keasling, J. D.; Keller, M.; Arkin, A. P.; Hazen, T. C.; Wall, J. D.; Zhou, J.

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been extensively studied for their potential in heavy-metal bioremediation. However, the occurrence of elevated nitrate in contaminated environments has been shown to inhibit sulfate reduction activity. Although the inhibition has been suggested to result from the competition with nitrate-reducing bacteria, the possibility of direct inhibition of sulfate reducers by elevated nitrate needs to be explored. Using Desulfovibrio vulgaris as a model sulfate-reducing bacterium, functional genomics analysis reveals that osmotic stress contributed to growth inhibition by nitrate as shown by the upregulation of the glycine/betaine transporter genes and the relief of nitrate inhibition by osmoprotectants. The observation that significant growth inhibition was effected by 70 mM NaNO{sub 3} but not by 70 mM NaCl suggests the presence of inhibitory mechanisms in addition to osmotic stress. The differential expression of genes characteristic of nitrite stress responses, such as the hybrid cluster protein gene, under nitrate stress condition further indicates that nitrate stress response by D. vulgaris was linked to components of both osmotic and nitrite stress responses. The involvement of the oxidative stress response pathway, however, might be the result of a more general stress response. Given the low similarities between the response profiles to nitrate and other stresses, less-defined stress response pathways could also be important in nitrate stress, which might involve the shift in energy metabolism. The involvement of nitrite stress response upon exposure to nitrate may provide detoxification mechanisms for nitrite, which is inhibitory to sulfate-reducing bacteria, produced by microbial nitrate reduction as a metabolic intermediate and may enhance the survival of sulfate-reducing bacteria in environments with elevated nitrate level.

  15. Micro- and Mini-nitrate Sensors for Monitoring of Soils, Groundwater and Aquatic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrate Mini-Sensor with PVC membrane containing liquidmin) Mini-sensors with PVC maintain their sensitivity duringfabricated mini- sensors with PVC membranes showed better

  16. Investigating In Situ Bioremediation Approaches for Sustained Uranium Immobilization Independent of Nitrate Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, Tommy; Balkwill, David

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal at DOE sites, such as the ERSP Oak Ridge Field Research Center (FRC), provides strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that will allow for uranium bioreduction and long-term stabilization in the presence of nitrate. The cost and effort required for complete nitrate removal from the FRC and similar DOE-contaminated sites may prove to be unworkable. For example, field tests of uranium bioreduction at the FRC have shown that nitrate levels rebound quickly and completely after cessation of active biostimulation.

  17. Effect of K loadings on nitrate formation/decomposition and on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NO2 adsorption at room temperature, ionic and bidentate nitrates were observed by fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy. The ratio of the former to the latter...

  18. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopic study of ammonium nitrate plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanif, M., E-mail: drhanif-mcs@nust.edu.pk [MCS, National University of Sciences and Technology (Pakistan); Salik, M. [Beijing Jiaotong University, Institute of Optoelectronics (China); Baig, M. A. [Quaid-E-Azam University Campus, National Center for Physics (Pakistan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the optical emission studies of the ammonium nitrate plasma produced by the fundamental (1064 nm) and second (532 nm) harmonics of a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. The target material was placed in front of the laser beam in an open atmospheric air. The spectrum reveals numerous transitions of neutral nitrogen. We have studied the spatial behavior of the plasma temperature (T{sub e}) and electron number density (N{sub e}) determined using the Boltzmann plot method and Stark broadened line profiles, respectively. Besides, we have studied the variation of the plasma parameters as a function of the laser irradiance.

  19. Ureides in active and nitrate-repressed soybean nodules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bundy, Timothy K.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) detected ureides in his final preparations of two acid soluble peptides which seemed to be associated with nitrogen fixation. He presented evidence that these crude preparations were able to: A) bind and release NH ; and 8) reduce the triple bond... (----1 of nitrate, were analyzed on a Beckman 120B automatic amino acid analyzer. The post arginine peaks (I, II, III) were measured. 38 Table 4. The Effect of N03 on Acid-Soluble Peptide(s) from Soybean Nodules. Acid-soluble ex- tracts were...

  20. Low-melting point inorganic nitrate salt heat transfer fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Brosseau, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of four inorganic nitrate salts: 9-18 wt % NaNO.sub.3, 40-52 wt % KNO.sub.3, 13-21 wt % LiNO.sub.3, and 20-27 wt % Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures less than 100 C; thermal stability limits greater than 500 C; and viscosity in the range of 5-6 cP at 300 C; and 2-3 cP at 400 C.

  1. Preparation of nanodispersed titania using stabilized ammonium nitrate melts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raciulete, Monica; Kachina, Anna; Puzenat, Eric [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l'environnement de Lyon UMR5256, CNRS-Universite de Lyon 1, 2 avenue Albert Einstein 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Afanasiev, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.afanasiev@ircelyon.univ-lyon1.f [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l'environnement de Lyon UMR5256, CNRS-Universite de Lyon 1, 2 avenue Albert Einstein 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An expedite one-step approach using simple precursors has been proposed to obtain metallic oxide compounds and exemplified by preparation of highly dispersed TiO{sub 2}. The technique consists in heating to 400-500 {sup o}C of molten ammonium nitrate stabilized with an organic nitrogen-containing compound (urea, melamine, ammonium oxalate) and containing dissolved metal salt precursor (TiOCl{sub 2}). The crystallites of the resulting TiO{sub 2} demonstrated variable size and shape as a function of stabilizer used. Their activity in photocatalytic oxidation of formic acid also depends on the nature of the stabilizer. The catalysts as-prepared showed high photocatalytic performance, superior to that of the Degussa P25 reference. Nitrogen containing stabilizers play a double role of increasing the process safety and modifying the properties of the solid products. - Graphical abstract: Ammonium nitrate melts stabilized by nitrogen-containing organic molecules can be applied for expedite one-step preparation of highly dispersed oxides, as exemplified by synthesis of titania photocatalysts.

  2. Infrared Spectroscopy of the Microhydrated Nitrate Ions NO3 Daniel J. Goebbert,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    Infrared Spectroscopy of the Microhydrated Nitrate Ions NO3 - (H2O)1-6 Daniel J. Goebbert ReceiVed: April 15, 2009 We present infrared photodissociation spectra of the microhydrated nitrate ions the infrared spectroscopy of NO3 - (H2O)n clusters, n ) 1-6. The gas-phase vibrational spectroscopy of NO3

  3. Reducing Agricultural Nitrate Losses in the Embarras River Watershed through Bioreactors, Constructed Wetlands, and Outreach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    Reducing Agricultural Nitrate Losses in the Embarras River Watershed through Bioreactors chip tile bioreactors to reduce nitrate losses in the upper Embarras River watershed in east. Three tile bioreactors will be installed in various locations in the watershed, again for determining

  4. Strontium sorption and precipitation behaviour during bioreduction in nitrate impacted sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    radionuclides (e.g. U and Tc) from groundwaters at these sites is a key challenge for nuclear decommissioning D. Bryan a , Katherine Morris a, a Research Centre for Radwaste and Decommissioning and Williamson Nitrate Nuclear The behaviour of strontium (Sr2+ ) during microbial reduction in nitrate impacted

  5. Physical pathways and utilization of nitrate supply to the giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Hannah Louise

    Physical pathways and utilization of nitrate supply to the giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera kelp Macrocystis pyrifera, we measured ambient nitrate concentrations at a kelp forest for 13 months uptake. This shortfall indicates that the kelp forest received over half its nitrogen from sources other

  6. Effects of Nitrate on Decomposition in Salt Marsh Peats Arianna Goodman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Effects of Nitrate on Decomposition in Salt Marsh Peats Arianna Goodman Oberlin College `13 Advisor and loss. Rapid nitrate addition to salt marshes may stimulate bacterial decomposition of existing peat, and the decomposition may contribute to creek bank destabilization and collapse. Alternately, peat deposited in high

  7. The fate and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in northwestern Mississippi, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modeling . USA Introduction Nitrate is the primary form of dissolved nitrogen in natural waters (MuellerThe fate and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in northwestern Mississippi, USA Heather L. Welch & Christopher T. Green & Richard H. Coupe Abstract Agricultural contamination of groundwater

  8. The Effects of Nanoparticle Augmentation of Nitrate Thermal Storage Materials for Use in Concentrating Solar Power Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betts, Matthew

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic, commercially called Hitec Solar Salt. Two nanoparticle types were chosen, alumina and silica. The nanoparticle composite materials were fabricated by mixing the components in an aqueous solution, mixing...

  9. Does nitrate deposition following astrophysical ionizing radiation events pose an additional threat to amphibians?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian C. Thomas; Michelle D. Honeyman

    2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that amphibians are especially susceptible to the combination of heightened UVB radiation and increased nitrate concentrations. Various astrophysical events have been suggested as sources of ionizing radiation that could pose a threat to life on Earth, through destruction of the ozone layer and subsequent increase in UVB, followed by deposition of nitrate. In this study, we investigate whether the nitrate deposition following an ionizing event is sufficiently large to cause an additional stress beyond that of the heightened UVB previously considered. We have converted predicted nitrate depositions to concentration values, utilizing data from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Acid Rain Monitoring Network web site. Our results show that the increase in nitrate concentration in bodies of water following the most intense ionization event likely in the last billion years would not be sufficient to cause a serious additional stress on amphibian populations and may actually provide some benefit by acting as fertilizer.

  10. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) or nitrate to ammonia and glass (NAG) process: Phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattus, A.J.; Walker, J.F. Jr.; Youngblood, E.L.; Farr, L.L.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuing benchtop studies using Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants and actual Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) low-level waste (LLW), employing a new denitration process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 and 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted to gaseous ammonia. In this process, aluminum powders can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid. The process may be able to use contaminated aluminum scrap metal from DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nitrate-free ceramic product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics or silica and/or fluxing agents can be added to form a glassy ceramic or a flowable glass product. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 70% were obtained for the waste form produced. Sintered pellets produced from supernate from Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) have been leached in accordance with the 16.1 leach test for the radioelements {sup 85}Sr and {sup 137}Cs. Despite lengthy counting times, {sup 85}Sr could not be detected in the leachates. {sup 137}Cs was only slightly above background and corresponded to a leach index of 12.2 to 13.7 after 8 months of leaching. Leach testing of unsintered and sintered reactor product spiked with hazardous metals proved that both sintered and unsintered product passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. Design of the equipment and flowsheet for a pilot demonstration-scale system to prove the nitrate destruction portion of the NAC process and product formation is under way.

  11. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tariff Rates FY 2015 Rates and Rate Schedules **Effective October 1, 2014** FY 2014 Rates and Rate Schedules FY 2013 Rates and Rate Schedules FY 2012 Rates and Rate Schedules FY...

  12. Nitrate contents of well, raw, treated and pipe borne water in Vom, Plateau State, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gbodi, T.A.; Atawodi, S.E.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrate content of water available to man and animals in a rural community in Plateau State, Nigeria was determined. Water samples were obtained from artesian wells, raw untreated surface water, treated raw water, and pipe borne water. The examination of the samples was over a period of 3 mo at weekly intervals. Sixty percent of the artesian wells sampled had nitrate concentration above 5-50 ppm in June and August, while samples from other sources had less than 1 ppm. The proximity of pit latrines to some of the wells may have been responsible for high nitrate content of the well water.

  13. Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600%C2%B0C with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

  14. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Customer Letter - Preliminary Review of Drought Adder Component for 2011 Firm Power Rates 2015 Rates and Rate Schedule - Current * 2010 Rates and Rate Schedule 2009 Rates and...

  15. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates and Repayment Services Consolidated Rate Schedules FY 2015 Consolidated Rate Schedules FY 2014 Rates BCP Annual Rate Process Central Arizona Project Transmission Rate Process...

  16. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Farr, L.L.; Loghry, S.L.; Pitt, W.W.; Gibson, M.R.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bench-top feasibility studies with Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants, using a new, low-temperature (50 to 60C) process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 to 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted. In this process, aluminum powders or shot can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid which might function as its own waste form. The process may actually be able to utilize already contaminated aluminum scrap metal from various DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nearly nitrate-free ceramic-like product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 55% were obtained for the waste form produced, compared to an expected 35 to 50% volume increase if the Hanford supernate were grouted. Engineering data extracted from bench-top studies indicate that the process will be very economical to operate, and data were used to cost a batch, 1,200-kg NO{sub 3}/h plant for working off Hanford SST waste over 20 years. Their total process cost analysis presented in the appendix, indicates that between $2.01 to 2.66 per kilogram of nitrate converted will be required. Additionally, data on the fate of select radioelements present in solution are presented in this report as well as kinetic, operational, and control data for a number of experiments. Additionally, if the ceramic product functions as its own waste form, it too will offer other cost savings associated with having a smaller volume of waste form as well as eliminating other process steps such as grouting.

  17. The Effect of Nanoparticle Concentration on Thermo-physical Properties of Alumina-nitrate Nanofluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qian

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to determine how Al2O3 nanoparticle concentration affected the specific heat, heat of fusion, melting point, thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of Alumina-Nitrate nanofluids. Al2O3 nanoparticles were...

  18. EMRTC Report RF 10-13: Application to LANL Evaporator Nitrate...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a non- oxidizing solid. Assumptions: 1. Bulk density of KNO3 is approximately 0.8 gcc and the crystal density about 2 gcc; accordingly, the assumed density for the nitrate...

  19. The Effect of Nanoparticle Concentration on Thermo-physical Properties of Alumina-nitrate Nanofluid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qian

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to determine how Al2O3 nanoparticle concentration affected the specific heat, heat of fusion, melting point, thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of Alumina-Nitrate nanofluids. Al2O3 nanoparticles were...

  20. Memo - Legacy Technical Area (TA)-55 Nitrate Salt Wastes at TA...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Memo - Legacy Technical Area (TA)-55 Nitrate Salt Wastes at TA-54, Potential Applicability of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) D001D002D003 Waste Codes Memo - Legacy...

  1. Utilizing Microalgae to Remediate Nitrate-Contaminated Groundwater N. Case, M. Sommerfeld, H. Qiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Utilizing Microalgae to Remediate Nitrate-Contaminated Groundwater N. Case, M. Sommerfeld, H. Qiang or domestic animals. It can also be used as a fertilizer or converted to biofuels. The photobioreactor can

  2. Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch experiments and field comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch concentrations were investigated in bioreactors, using peat samples from field sites influenced by different hydrologic regimes. In this experiment, peat samples were subjected to similar conditions to address

  3. Prenatal Exposure to Nitrates, Nitrites, Nitrosatable Drugs, and Small-For-Gestational-Age Births

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinde, Mayura

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption of nitrates and nitrites and SGA. Exposure to nitrates and nitrites can occur from diet, drinking water, certain medications, and environmental or occupational sources of which dietary consumption accounts for a significant portion of daily... as nitrosatable during the first trimester of pregnancy.25 N-nitroso compounds are known to cause adverse pregnancy outcomes such as congenital malformations and reduced fetal weight in animal models. The role of these compounds on fetal growth and risk of SGA...

  4. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates and Repayment Services Rates Loveland Area Projects Firm Power Rates Open Access Transmission Tariff Rates Chart of Loveland Area Projects Historical Transmission Rates...

  5. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate Ca(NO3)2 when nitrogen oxide and nitric acid (HNO3) species react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here, we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory generated particles composed of water soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e. NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) investigated using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates releasing gaseous HNO3 during dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase due to its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that in turn may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling, which may further affect concentrations of gas- and aerosol-phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  6. Low time resolution analysis of polar ice cores cannot detect impulsive nitrate events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smart, D F; Melott, A L; Laird, C M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice cores are archives of climate change and possibly large solar proton events (SPEs). Wolff et al. (2012) used a single event, a nitrate peak in the GISP2-H core, which McCracken et al. (2001a) time associated with the poorly quantified 1859 Carrington event, to discredit SPE-produced, impulsive nitrate deposition in polar ice. This is not the ideal test case. We critique the Wolff et al. analysis and demonstrate that the data they used cannot detect impulsive nitrate events because of resolution limitations. We suggest re-examination of the top of the Greenland ice sheet at key intervals over the last two millennia with attention to fine resolution and replicate sampling of multiple species. This will allow further insight into polar depositional processes on a sub-seasonal scale, including atmospheric sources, transport mechanisms to the ice sheet, post-depositional interactions, and a potential SPE association.

  7. A search for regulatory mutants of the nitrate utilization pathway of Neurospora Crassa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDaniel, Claude Steven

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A SEARCH FOR REGULATORI MUTANTS OF THE NITRATE UTILIZATION PATHWAl OF NEUROSPORA CRASSA A Thesis by CLAUDE STEVEN MCDANIEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fu1fillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject: Genetics A SEARCH FOR REGULATORY MUTANTS OF THE NITRATE U1'IIIZA1'ION PA1'NNAY OF ~N A Thesis by CLAUDE STEVEN MCDANIEL Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ e) (Head oi' epar...

  8. Biological Oxidation of Fe(II) in Reduced Nontronite Coupled with Nitrate Reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania sp. Strain 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Agrawal, A.; Liu, Deng; Zhang, Jing; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrate contamination in soils, sediments, and water bodies is a significant issue. Although much is known about nitrate degradation in these environments, especially via microbial pathways, a complete understanding of all degradation processes, especially in clay mineral-rich soils, is still lacking. The objective of this study was to study the potential of removing nitrate contaminant using structural Fe(II) in clay mineral nontronite. Specifically, the coupled processes of microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in microbially reduced nontronite (NAu-2) and nitrate reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania species strain 2002 was investigated. Bio-oxidation experiments were conducted in bicarbonate-buffered medium under both growth and nongrowth conditions. The extents of Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction were measured by wet chemical methods. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), and 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to observe mineralogical changes associated with Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in nontronite. The bio-oxidation extent under growth and nongrowth conditions reached 93% and 57%, respectively. Over the same time period, nitrate was completely reduced under both conditions to nitrogen gas (N2), via an intermediate product nitrite. Magnetite was a mineral product of nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, as evidenced by XRD data and TEM diffraction patterns. The results of this study highlight the importance of iron-bearing clay minerals in the global nitrogen cycle with potential applications in nitrate removal in soils.

  9. Isotopic evidence for source changes of nitrate in rain at Bermuda Meredith Galanter Hastings and Daniel M. Sigman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Daniel M.

    ), or nitrate (NO3 Ã? ), is a significant contributor to acid rain, an important species in marineIsotopic evidence for source changes of nitrate in rain at Bermuda Meredith Galanter Hastings O is 68.6% and 76.9% (versus Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water). The few cool season rain events

  10. Use and Accuracy of the Diphenylamine Field Kit for Determining the Presence of Toxic Nitrate Levels in Forage Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    a risk to livestock. The test is primarily an indi- cator of the presence of high nitrate concentration and is not quantitative. If the test indicates the presence of nitrate, samples should be sent to a lab for quantitative analysis. When using the kit, or collecting samples for lab analysis, always collect several samples from

  11. Estimating spatially-variable rate constants of denitrification in irrigated agricultural groundwater systems using an Ensemble Smoother

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bau, Domenico A.

    an irrigated agricultural river-aquifer system using measurements of (i) nitrate concen- trationEstimating spatially-variable rate constants of denitrification in irrigated agricultural groundwater systems using an Ensemble Smoother Ryan T. Bailey , Domenico A. Baù, Timothy K. Gates Department

  12. Effect of nitrate on the performance of single chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Effect of nitrate on the performance of single chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells Chontisa Accepted 26 August 2008 Published online 11 September 2008 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Denitrification microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has drawn much attention recently as a new approach of waste- water treatment

  13. Size distributions of ionic aerosols measured at Waliguan Observatory: Implication for nitrate gas-to-particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    Size distributions of ionic aerosols measured at Waliguan Observatory: Implication for nitrate gas Plateau. Size-resolved ionic aerosols (NH4 + , Na+ , K+ , Ca2+ , Mg2+ , SO4 2À , ClÀ , NO3 À CO3 2À , formate, acetate and oxalate), organic aerosols, black carbon and gaseous HNO3 and SO2 were measured

  14. Materials Chemistry and Physics 100 (2006) 3840 X-ray irradiation induced degradation of cellulose nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    Abstract Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry was previously proposed to measure energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry. For that method, a reference silver nitrate-ray energy is high enough to avoid total a

  15. Study of Nitrate Stress in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Using iTRAQ Proteomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Joyner, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Keasling, J.D.

    2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH),a sulphate-reducing bacterium, to nitrate stress was examined usingquantitative proteomic analysis. DvH was stressed with 105 m M sodiumnitrate(NaNO3), a level that caused a 50 percent inhibition in growth.The protein profile of stressed cells was compared with that of cellsgrown in the absence of nitrate using the iTRAQ peptide labellingstrategy and tandem liquid chromatography separation coupled with massspectrometry (quadrupoletime-of-flight) detection. A total of 737 uniqueproteins were identified by two or more peptides, representing 22 percentof the total DvH proteome and spanning every functional category. Theresults indicate that this was a mild stress, as proteins involved incentral metabolism and the sulphate reduction pathway were unperturbed.Proteins involved in the nitrate reduction pathway increased. Increasesseen in transport systems for proline, glycine^ betaineandglutamateindicate that the NaNO3 exposure led to both salt stress and nitratestress.Up-regulation observed in oxidative stress response proteins (Rbr,RbO, etc.) and a large number of ABC transport systems as well as in iron^ sulphur -cluster-containing proteins, however, appear to be specific tonitrate exposure. Finally, a number of hypothetical proteins were amongthe most significant changers, indicating that there may be unknownmechanisms initiated upon nitrate stress in DvH.

  16. A mechanism of abiotic immobilization of nitrate in forest ecosystems: the ferrous wheel hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    , including carbon sequestration by forests. How- ever, recent evidence from N fertilization studies soils has important implications for under- standing current and future carbon budgets. Abiotic a key role as a catalyst, with Fe(II) reducing nitrate and reduced forms of carbon then regenerating Fe

  17. Nitrogen sources and cycling in the San Francisco Bay Estuary: A nitrate dual isotopic composition approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    as 25.0%) at the Sacramento­San Joaquin River delta region give rise to a wide range of d18ONO3 valuesNitrogen sources and cycling in the San Francisco Bay Estuary: A nitrate dual isotopic composition18O) within the estuarine system of San Francisco (SF) Bay, California, to explore the utility

  18. Alternative Water Supply Options for Nitrate Contamination in California's Tulare and Salinas Groundwater Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    to harm human health. The Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley were chosen as pilot study areas to studyi Alternative Water Supply Options for Nitrate Contamination in California's Tulare and Salinas Groundwater Basins By KRISTIN LINN HONEYCUTT B.S. (University of California, Davis) 2007 M.S. (University

  19. Preferential transport of nitrate to a tile drain in an intermittent-flood-irrigated field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Binayak P.

    Preferential transport of nitrate to a tile drain in an intermittent-flood-irrigated field: Model measured NO3 flux concentrations in a subsurface tile drain, several monitoring wells and nested reasonably well. However, NO3 flux concentrations in the subsurface tile drain and piezometers at the field

  20. Water and nitrate exchange between cultivated ecosystems and groundwater in the Rolling Pampas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    model (UPFLOW) suggested that at TS groundwater supplied an importanWater and nitrate exchange between cultivated ecosystems and groundwater in the Rolling Pampas Agropecuaria Parana´, INTA, Ruta 11 km 12.5, 3101 Oro Verde, Argentina 1. Introduction Biogeochemical exchange

  1. Chlorite Dissolution Rates

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Carroll, Susan

    Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

  2. Chlorite Dissolution Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Susan

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

  3. The Interest Rate Conundrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craine, Roger; Martin, Vance L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flows and US Interest Rates,” NBER Working Paper No 12560. [Working Paper # 2008 -03 The Interest Rate Conundrum Roger

  4. Structure and Function of Metal- and Nitrate-reducing Microbial Communities in the FRC Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akob, Denise M.; Mills, Heath J.; Kerkhof, Lee; Gihring, Thomas M.; Kostk, Joel E.

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this study is to evaluate structure-function relationships of sedimentary microbial communities likely to regulate U(VI) reduction and immobilization in the subsurface of Area 2 at the Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, TN. Microcosm experiments were conducted under near in situ conditions with FRC subsurface materials cocontaminated with high levels of U(VI) and nitrate. The activity, abundance, and community composition of microorganisms was determined in microcosm samples, stimulated with ethanol or glucose, and compared to those from sediment cores and unamended controls. Activity was assessed by monitoring terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs; nitrate, sulfate, uranium, and iron reduction) as well as electron donor utilization. Microbial functional groups, nitrate- and iron(III)-reducing bacteria, were enumerated during the nitrate- and metal-reduction phases of the incubation and in sediment core samples using a most probable number (MPN) serial dilution assay. U(VI) and Fe(III) were reduced concurrently in the glucose but not the ethanol treatments. In ethanol-amended microcosms, U(VI) was reduced during a 4-day lag phase between nitrate- and Fe(III)-reduction phases. Biostimulation resulted in 3 to 5 orders of magnitude higher counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, whereas populations of nitrate-reducers were enhanced by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. One to 2 orders of magnitude more Fe(III)-reducers were observed in ethanol- as compared to glucose-amended treatments in parallel with enhanced U(VI) removal in ethanol treatments. Cultivatable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in the ethanol treatments were dominated by Geobacter sp. while those cultured on glucose were dominated by fermentative organisms, i.e., Tolumonas sp. Currently, carbon substrate utilization is being examined through HPLC analysis of microcosm porewaters. In addition, changes in the overall microbial community composition are being assessed using cultivation-independent techniques, including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) and cloning/sequencing of structural and functional genes. Our results indicate that the microbially-catalyzed mechanism of U(VI) reduction is electron donor dependent and that more effective U(VI) removal is achieved in parallel with an enrichment of Geobacter sp. upon treatment with ethanol.

  5. Nitrogen cycling in oxygen deficient zones : insights from [delta]¹?N and [delta]¹?O of nitrite and nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchwald, Carolyn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stable isotopes, [delta]¹?N and [delta]¹?O, of nitrite and nitrate can be powerful tools used to interpret nitrogen cycling in the ocean. They are particularly useful in regions of the ocean where there are multiple ...

  6. Reduction of Perchlorate and Nitrate by Aluminum Activated by pH Change and Electrochemically Induced Pitting Corrosion. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raut Desai, Aditya B.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly oxidized species like perchlorate and nitrate that are released into the environment by anthropogenic activities are a source of concern as they have been known to contaminate groundwater. These species are extremely soluble in water and can...

  7. Isothermal and shock compression of high density ammonium nitrate and ammonium perchlorate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandstrom, F.W.; Persson, P.A. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Olinger, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the widespread use of ammonium nitrate (AN) and ammonium perchlorate (AP) for energetic materials applications, relatively little data is available regarding their behavior under shock loading. We have evaluated the shock Hugoniots of AN and AP at high initial density ({ge} 94% TMD) to pressures of approximately 20 GPa. We have used sound speed measurements, isothermal compfession X-ray diffraction experiments and shock loading experiments to further explore the behavior of the two materials at elevated pressures.

  8. Isothermal and shock compression of high density ammonium nitrate and ammonium perchlorate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandstrom, F.W.; Persson, P.A. (New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)); Olinger, B. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the widespread use of ammonium nitrate (AN) and ammonium perchlorate (AP) for energetic materials applications, relatively little data is available regarding their behavior under shock loading. We have evaluated the shock Hugoniots of AN and AP at high initial density ([ge] 94% TMD) to pressures of approximately 20 GPa. We have used sound speed measurements, isothermal compfession X-ray diffraction experiments and shock loading experiments to further explore the behavior of the two materials at elevated pressures.

  9. Nitrate movement in soils and nitrogen uptake efficiency as affected by nitrogen source, time of application, and a nitrification inhibitor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, Kenneth Phanon

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NITRATE MOVEMENT IN SOILS AND NITROGEN UPTAKE EFFICIENCY AS AFFECTED BY NITROGEN SOURCEs TINE OF APPLICATIONs AIJD A NITRIFICATION INHIBITOR A Thesis by KENNETH PHAIJON BANKS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&N University..., Norwood silt loam (Typic Udifluvent) and Houston Black clay (Udic Pellustert) to determine the amount of N03-N leaching from various N fertilizer sources. Nitrate N movement, as affected by time of application, was determined for (NHq)2 Sop, urea...

  10. TREATMENT TESTS FOR EX SITU REMOVAL OF CHROMATE & NITRATE & URANIUM (VI) FROM HANFORD (100-HR-3) GROUNDWATER FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECK MA; DUNCAN JB

    1994-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes batch and ion exchange column laboratory scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and uranium (present as uranium [VI]) from contaminated Hanford site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include: chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium; and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan. The method suggested for future study is anion exchange.

  11. Aqueous nitrate waste treatment: Technology comparison, cost/benefit, and market analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the practical utility of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic or Glass (NAC/NAG/NAX) process, which is under development in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The NAC/NACx/NAX process can convert aqueous radioactive nitrate-laden waste to a glass, ceramic, or grout solid waste form. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Identify current commercial technologies to meet hazardous and radiological waste disposal requirements. The technologies may be thermal or non-thermal but must be all inclusive (i.e., must convert a radionuclide-containing nitrate waste with a pH around 12 to a stable form that can be disposed at permitted facilities); evaluate and compare DOE-sponsored vitrification, grouting, and minimum additive waste stabilization projects for life-cycle costs; compare the technologies above with respect to material costs, capital equipment costs, operating costs, and operating efficiencies. For the NAC/NAG/NAX process, assume aluminum reactant is government furnished and ammonia gas may be marketed; compare the identified technologies with respect to frequency of use within DOE for environmental management applications with appropriate rationale for use; Assess the potential size of the DOE market for the NAC/NAG/NAX process; assess and off-gas issues; and compare with international technologies, including life-cycle estimates.

  12. Impact of nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation on gaseous releases from a landfill bioreactor cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallec, G.; Bureau, C. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France); Peu, P.; Benoist, J.C. [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Lemunier, M. [Suez-Environnement, CIRADE, 38 Av. Jean Jaures, 78440 Gargenville (France); Budka, A.; Presse, D. [SITA France, 132 Rue des 3 Fontanot, 92000 Nanterre Cedex (France); Bouchez, T. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France)], E-mail: theodore.bouchez@cemagref.fr

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the impact of nitrate injection on a full scale landfill bioreactor through the monitoring of gaseous releases and particularly N{sub 2}O emissions. During several weeks, we monitored gas concentrations in the landfill gas collection system as well as surface gas releases with a series of seven static chambers. These devices were directly connected to a gas chromatograph coupled to a flame ionisation detector and an electron capture detector (GC-FID/ECD) placed directly on the field. Measurements were performed before, during and after recirculation of raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate. Raw leachate recirculation did not have a significant effect on the biogas concentrations (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O) in the gas extraction network. However, nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation induced a marked increase of the N{sub 2}O concentrations in the gas collected from the recirculation trench (100-fold increase from 0.2 ppm to 23 ppm). In the common gas collection system however, this N{sub 2}O increase was no more detectable because of dilution by gas coming from other cells or ambient air intrusion. Surface releases through the temporary cover were characterized by a large spatial and temporal variability. One automated chamber gave limited standard errors over each experimental period for N{sub 2}O releases: 8.1 {+-} 0.16 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 384), 4.2 {+-} 0.14 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 132) and 1.9 {+-} 0.10 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 49), during, after raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation, respectively. No clear correlation between N{sub 2}O gaseous surface releases and recirculation events were evidenced. Estimated N{sub 2}O fluxes remained in the lower range of what is reported in the literature for landfill covers, even after nitrate injection.

  13. Density of Gadolinium Nitrate Solutions for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In late 1992, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was planning to switch the solution contained in the poison injection tank from cadmium nitrate to gadolinium nitrate. The poison injection system is an emergency system used to shut down the reactor by adding a neutron poison to the cooling water. This system must be able to supply a minimum of 69 pounds of gadolinium to the reactor coolant system in order to guarantee that the reactor would become subcritical. A graph of the density of gadolinium nitrate solutions over a concentration range of 5 to 30 wt% and a temperature range of 15 to 40{sup o}C was prepared. Routine density measurements of the solution in the poison injection tank are made by HFIR personnel, and an adaptation of the original graph is used to determine the gadolinium nitrate concentration. In late 2008, HFIR personnel decided that the heat tracing that was present on the piping for the poison injection system could be removed without any danger of freezing the solution; however, the gadolinium nitrate solution might get as cold as 5{sup o}C. This was outside the range of the current density-concentration correlation, so the range needed to be expanded. This report supplies a new density-concentration correlation that covers the extended temperature range. The correlation is given in new units, which greatly simplifies the calculation that is required to determine the pounds of gadolinium in the tank solution. The procedure for calculating the amount of gadolinium in the HFIR poison injection system is as follows: (1) Calculate the usable volume in the system; (2) Measure the density of the solution; (3) Calculate the gadolinium concentration using the following equation: Gd(lb/ft{sup 3}) = measured density (g/mL) x 34.681 - 34.785; (4) Calculate the amount of gadolinium in the system using the following equation: Amount of Gd(lb) = Gd concentration (lb/ft{sup 3}) x usable volume (ft{sup 3}). The equation in step 3 is exact for a temperature of 5{sup o}C, and overestimates the gadolinium concentration at all higher temperatures. This guarantees that the calculation is conservative, in that the actual concentration will be at least as high as that calculated. If an additional safety factor is desired, it is recommended that an administrative control limit be set that is higher than the required minimum amount of gadolinium.

  14. BCP Annual Rate Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 BCP Annual Rate Process (FY 2016 Base Charge & Rate) Informal Process Rate Activity Schedule (doc) Informal Customer Meeting Thursday March 11, 2015 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms 3&4...

  15. Research Rate Liaison Rate for outside academic &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    as of 12/9/13 External Rate Spark Plasma Sintering ) Spark Plasma Sintering > 24 hrs 2 8 Vacuum Hot Press

  16. 2012 Transmission Rate Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 Transmission, Ancillary, and Control Area Service Rate Schedules and General Rate Schedule Provisions (FY 2014-2015) October 2013 United States Department of Energy...

  17. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10012014 - 03312015 Mid-Year Change (if applicable) 10012014 - 09302015 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement 70,091,227 CV-F13...

  18. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the FY Mid-Year Change 10012013 - 03312014 04012014 - 09302014 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement 73,441,557...

  19. 2004 Rate Adjustments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Transmission and Ancillary Services Federal Register Notice -- Rate Order WAPA-141: Notice of Extension of Formula Rates for Transmission and Ancillary Services If you have any...

  20. WAPA-169 Rate Order

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    69 Rate Order Western is proposing adjustments to the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects firm power rate and the Colorado River Storage Project Transmission and ancillary...

  1. Multiple System Rate Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DSW Multiple System Transmission Rate Process Federal Register Notice Withdrawing Rate Proposal (PDF) Formal Process Extension Federal Register Notice (PDF) Customer Savisngs Under...

  2. MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frischer, Marc E. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

    2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

  3. The influence of nitrogen rate and source on plant and soil properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Flake Leroy

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Anhydrous ammonia caused the lea s t a lteration of pH in the su r face , but it caused the greatest acid ity in the subso i l . The lev e ls of nitrates in the so il w ere exp re s sed by quadratic equa? tions with co rre la t ion coe ff ic... , and and are the annual rate of nitrogen in pounds p er a c r e app lied as ammonium nitrate and anhydrous ammonia, r e sp e c t iv e ly . P red ic ted maximum y ields com pared favorab ly with the actual m aximum y ie lds o f 1 9 , 9 9 0 and 15, 850 pounds...

  4. Safe handling of TBP and nitrates in the nuclear process industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyder, M.L.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory and literature study was made of the reactions of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) with nitric acid and nitrates. Its goal was to establish safe conditions for solvent extraction processes involving these chemicals. The damaging explosions at the Tomsk-7 PUREX plant in Russia graphically illustrated the potential hazard involved in such operations. The study has involved a review of prior and contemporary experiments, and new experiments to answer particular questions about these reactions. TBP extracts nitric acid and some metal nitrates from aqueous solutions. The resulting liquid contains both oxidant and reductant, and can react exothermically if heated sufficiently. Safe handling of these potentially reactive materials involves not only limiting the heat generated by the chemical reaction, but also providing adequate heat removal and venting. Specifically, the following recommendations are made to ensure safety: (1) tanks in which TBP-nitrate complexes are or may be present should be adequately vented to avoid pressurization. Data are supplied as a basis for adequacy; (2) chemically degraded TBP, or TBP that has sat a long time in the presence of acids or radiation, should be purified before use in solvent extraction; (3) evaporators in which TBP might be introduced should be operated at a controlled temperature, and their TBP content should be limited; (4) evaporator bottoms that may contain TBP should be cooled under conditions that ensure heat removal. Finally, process design should consider the potential for such reactions, and operators should be made aware of this potential, so that it is considered during training and process operation.

  5. Factors affecting total alkaloid and nitrate levels in pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum (L.) Leeke)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejsa, Beverly Blohowiak

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ('gM University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ethan C. Holt Dr. F. M. Roulette, Jr. P l 'lit (P ' t ' (L. )L k)g 'gt d drought stress in the summer of 1978 in East Texas became unpalat- able to grazing cattle. The unpalatable forage contained... as much as 460 ppm total alkaloid and. potentially toxic levels of nitrate (NO ). Several factors which may play a role in the accumula. tion of alkaloids and NO in pearl millet were investigated in these studies. The effect of drought stress, nitrogen...

  6. Predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations in the Puget Sound Basin: Implications for aquifer susceptibility and vulnerability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesoriero, A.J.; Voss, F.D. [Geological Survey, Tacoma, WA (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The occurrence and distribution of elevated nitrate concentrations in ground water in the Puget Sound Basin, Washington, were determined by examining existing data from more than 3,000 wells. Models that estimate the probability that a well has an elevated nitrate concentration were constructed by relating the occurrence of elevated nitrate concentrations to both natural and anthropogenic variables using logistic regression. The variables that best explain the occurrence of elevated nitrate concentrations were well depth, surficial geology, and the percentage of urban and agricultural land within a radius of 3.2 kilometers of the well. From these relations, logistic regression models were developed to assess aquifer susceptibility and ground-water vulnerability. Both models performed well at predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations in an independent data set. This approach to assessing aquifer susceptibility and ground-water vulnerability has the advantages of having both model variables and coefficient values determined on the basis of existing water quality information and does not depend on the assignment of variables and weighting factors based on qualitative criteria.

  7. LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BYRNES ME

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

  8. Uranyl nitrate pouring solution for producing nuclear fuel particles and a method for its preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hein, K.

    1983-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Sorbitol, or another polyalcohol such as erythritol, dulcitol or xylitol, is added to a solution containing uranyl nitrate which may also contain another heavy metal, such as thorium or plutonium, prior to preneutralization with ammonia in order to provide a highly viscous solution that can be preneutralized to a great extent without premature precipitation of uranium. The high viscosity makes possible the formation of favorably large drops when the solution is dripped into an ammonia containing bath for external gelification of the drops. According to the pouring apparatus used, the particles after washing, drying and sintering have a diameter between 0.6 and 1.5 mm. The polyalcohol is added to a hydrosol containing from 1.5 to 2 moles per liter of heavy metal, the polyalcohol being added until concentration of onethird mole of polyalcohol per mole of heavy metal is reached. In certain cases up to four moles of ammonium nitrate per liter are added. The solution so produced can be preneutralized with up to 90% of the amount of ammonia stoichiometrically necessary for T separation of uranium without the formation of any precipitate, preferably by first adding ammonia gas under strong stirring and then adding ammonium bicarbonate in excess, which decomposes to liberate ammonia to an extent determined by the temperature, which is to be precisely controlled. It is possible to obtain this way a solution of predetermined viscosity from which the excess ammonium bicarbonate can readily be separated.

  9. The influence of dose-rest cycles on the nitrate concentration of deep percolate below septic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allison, John Bryan

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in private water sup- plies in Morgan County, Missouri. J. Milk and Food Technology, 30: 224-225. 23. King, L. D. and H. D. Morris. 1972. Land disposal of liquid sewage sludge; the effect on soil nitrate. J. Environmental Quality, 1: 442-446. 34 24... septic- tank technology. J. Environmental Health, 3, 30: 250-262. 37 APPENDIX 0 ~O O I- CL IJ, I U O O O 20 16 12 8 4 20 I FEB. DOSE IO 20 ' 30 MAR. ~ OXYGEN NITRATE RESI 10 20 30 IO 20 30 10 20 APR . MAY JUNE DATE -120 100...

  10. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 9, NO. 10, PAGES 1207-1210, OCTOBEX 1982 PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF NITRATE AND SULFATE IN THE MARINE ATMOSPHERE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospero, Joseph M.

    of nitrate in the atmosphere have been conducted in continental (primarily urban) areas; data on nitrate polycarbonate sheets were used as impaction surfaces; these sheets had a "frosted" finish which minimizes to collect the smallest particles. The polycarbonate inlpaction sheets were used because of their inertness

  11. Water Structure at the Air-Aqueous Interface of Divalent Cation and Nitrate Solutions Man Xu, Rick Spinney, and Heather C. Allen*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Structure at the Air-Aqueous Interface of Divalent Cation and Nitrate Solutions Man Xu, Rick, Columbus, Ohio 43210 ReceiVed: July 24, 2008; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed: December 4, 2008 The water surface structure of aqueous magnesium, calcium, and strontium nitrate solutions with six to seven water

  12. Rate Schedule CPP-2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CPP-2 (Supersedes Schedule CPP-1) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION CENTRAL VALLEY PROJECT SCHEDULE OF RATES FOR CUSTOM PRODUCT POWER Effective:...

  13. LCC Guidance Rates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Notepad text file provides the LCC guidance rates in a numbered format for the various regions throughout the U.S.

  14. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    charges or credits associated with the creation, termination, or modification to any tariff, contract, or rate schedule accepted or approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory...

  15. Residential Solar Valuation Rates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rbago Rbago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff Fair to the utility and non-solar customers Fair compensation to...

  16. Steady state protein levels in Geobacter metallireducens grown with Iron (III) citrate or nitrate as terminal electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrendt, A. J.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Lindberg, C.; Zhu, W.; Yates, J. R., III; Nevin, K. P.; Lovley, D.; Giometti, C. S.; Biosciences Division; The Scripps Research Inst.; Univ. of Massachusetts

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geobacter species predominate in aquatic sediments and submerged soils where organic carbon sources are oxidized with the reduction of Fe(III). The natural occurrence of Geobacter in some waste sites suggests this microorganism could be useful for bioremediation if growth and metabolic activity can be regulated. 2-DE was used to monitor the steady state protein levels of Geobacter metallireducens grown with either Fe(III) citrate or nitrate to elucidate metabolic differences in response to different terminal electron acceptors present in natural environments populated by Geobacter. Forty-six protein spots varied significantly in abundance (p<0.05) between the two growth conditions; proteins were identified by tryptic peptide mass and peptide sequence determined by MS/MS. Enzymes involved in pyruvate metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were more abundant in cells grown with Fe(III) citrate, while proteins associated with nitrate metabolism and sensing cellular redox status along with several proteins of unknown function were more abundant in cells grown with nitrate. These results indicate a higher level of flux through the TCA cycle in the presence of Fe(III) compared to nitrate. The oxidative stress response observed in previous studies of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) citrate was not seen in G. metallireducens.

  17. Comparison of analytical results for chloride, sulfate and nitrate obtained from adjacent ice core samples by two ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    and sulfate but not for nitrate. 2% of the data indicate real differences in concentrations across the ice atmosphere. Ice core data are widely used to understand environmental and climate processes in the past.1 suited for the analysis of low concentrations of soluble ions in ice core samples without pretreatment.5

  18. Real time detection of soil moisture and nitrates using on-board in-situ impedance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    Real time detection of soil moisture and nitrates using on-board in-situ impedance spectroscopy across a pair of electrodes immersed in that medium. We make accurate measurements on soil impedance over multiple frequen- cies using an in-situ soil-sensor we have designed. The impedance values are then used

  19. Wood decomposition after five years in anaerobic nitrate rich groundwaters: Implications for lifetime of NitrexTM Permeable Reactive Barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    decomposition at the WB barrier. Sulfate reduction: SO4 2- + 2CH2O + 2H+ 2CO2 + H2S + 2H2O 1.2. Questions 2 Abstract Permeable reactive barriers can benefit aquatic ecosystems by using wood chips to remove carbon was more important in the wood from the barriers. Keywords Nitrate removal, Permeable Reactive

  20. DISTINCT PATTERNS OF NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN BROWN ALGAE: LIGHT AND AMMONIUM SENSITIVITY IN LAMINARIA DIGITATA IS ABSENT IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berges, John A.

    DISTINCT PATTERNS OF NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN BROWN ALGAE: LIGHT AND AMMONIUM SENSITIVITY and lowest in summer. This is the first report of NR activity in any alga that is not strongly regulated the regulation of NR by light that has been observed in other algae and higher plants. Key index words: ammonium

  1. Isothermal and shock compression of high density ammonium nitrate and ammonium perchlorate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandstrom, F.W.; Persson, P.A. (Research Center for Engergetic Materials, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Socorro, New Mexico 87801 (United States)); Olinger, B. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1994-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk sound speed measurements, isothermal volume compression/X-ray diffraction experiments and shock loading experiments (maximum pressure [approx]20 GPa) have been performed for high initial density ([ge]94% TMD) ammonium nitrate (AN) and ammonium perchlorate (AP). The experimental data, and full density Hugoniots calculated from that data, suggest the presence of low pressure, shock induced phase transitions in both the AN and AP. The AP phase transition occurs at [approx]4 GPa, and exhibits characteristics of a high density to low density phase transition, but the present data are not conclusive. The AN phase change occurs at a shock pressure of less than 3.5 GPa, but the associated volume change is relatively large, indicating the presence of a previously unidentified high pressure, high density phase. [copyright]American Institute of Physics

  2. Evaluation of a solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production operating with ammonia/lithium nitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, W.; Moreno-Quintanar, G.; Best, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 34, 62580 Temixco, Mor. (Mexico); Rivera, C.O.; Martinez, F. [Facultad de Ingenieria Campus Coatzacoalcos, Universidad Veracruzana, Av. Universidad Km 7.5, 96530 Coatzacoalcos, Ver. (Mexico)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production developed in the Centro de Investigacion en Energia of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico is presented. The system operates with the ammonia/lithium nitrate mixture. The system developed has a nominal capacity of 8 kg of ice/day. It consists of a cylindrical parabolic collector acting as generator-absorber. Evaporator temperatures as low as -11 C were obtained for several hours with solar coefficients of performance up to 0.08. It was found that the coefficient of performance increases with the increment of solar radiation and the solution concentration. A dependency of the coefficient of performance was not founded against the cooling water temperature. Also it was found that the maximum operating pressure increases meanwhile the generation temperature decreases with an increase of the solution concentration. (author)

  3. Power Rate Cases (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics Power Electronics PowerPowerRates

  4. Power Rates Announcements (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics Power Electronics PowerPowerRates

  5. 2010FirmRateAdj

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Firm Power Rates & Rate Schedules The Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program--Eastern Division: Firm Electric Service Pick Sloan Missouri River -Eastern Division Rates Effective...

  6. <RatesMiscInfo>

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates & Repayment Services Power Reporting MISCELLANEOUS REPORTING Power Supply Report October 2014 (59kb pdf) September 2014 (58kb pdf) August 2014 (47kb pdf) July 2014 (57kb pdf)...

  7. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regulation and Frequency Response DollarsKW-month 4.56 CV-RFS4 Spinning Reserve The formula rate for spinning reserve service is the price consistent with the California...

  8. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Frequency Response DollarsKW-month 3.98 4.17 CV-RFS4 Spinning Reserve The formula rate for spinning reserve service is the price consistent with the California...

  9. On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution od galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the case of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are also discussed.

  10. Effect of freshets on the flux of groundwater nitrate through streambed sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia, University of

    acceptors and high rates of metabolism may result in a sharp redox gradient within a few centimeters sediments where rates of microbial metabolism are high and pore water is isolated from exchange

  11. Treatment tests for ex situ removal of chromate, nitrate, and uranium (VI) from Hanford (100-HR-3) groundwater. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, M.A.; Duncan, J.B.

    1993-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes batch and anion exchange column laboratory-scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}), and uranium (present as uranyl (uranium [VI]) carbonato anionic species) from contaminated Hanford Site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium, and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium, and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1993). The goal of these tests was to determine the best method to remove selected contaminants to below the concentration of the project performance goals. The raw data and observations made during these tests can be found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) laboratory notebooks (Beck 1992, Herting 1993). The method recommended for future study is anion exchange with Dowex 21K resin.

  12. Preliminary Risk Analysis of Nitrate Contamination in the Salinas Valley and Tulare Lake Basin of California, Including the Implementation of POU Devices in Small Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    i Preliminary Risk Analysis of Nitrate Contamination in the Salinas Valley and Tulare Lake Basin is a drinking water contaminant prevalent in the Salinas Valley and Tulare Lake Basin (the study area), mainly

  13. Geochemical Rate/RNA Integration Study (GRIST): A Pilot Field Experiment for Inter-Calibration of Biogeochemistry and Nucleic Acid Measurements Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronk, Deborah

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geochemical Rate/RNA Integration Study (GRIST) project sought to correlate biogeochemical flux rates with measurements of gene expression and mRNA abundance to demonstrate the application of molecular approaches to estimate the presence and magnitude of a suite of biogeochemical processes. The study was headed by Lee Kerkhoff of Rutgers University. In this component of the GRIST study, we characterized ambient nutrient concentrations and measured uptake rates for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, ammonium, nitrate and nitrite) and dissolved organic nitrogen (urea and dissolved free amino acids) during two diel studies at the Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO-15) on the New Jersey continental shelf.

  14. Evidence of Reactive Aromatics As a Major Source of Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate over China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Yuhang; Gu, Dasa; Zhao, Chun; Huey, L. G.; Stickel, Robert; Liao, Jin; Shao, Min; Zhu, T.; Zeng, Limin; Liu, Shaw C.; Chang, Chih-Chung; Amoroso, Antonio; Costabile, Francesa

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the observations of near-surface peroxy acetyl nitrate (PAN) and its precursors in Beijing, China in August of 2007. The levels of PAN are remarkably high (up to 14 ppbv), surpassing those measured over other urban regions in recent years. Analyses employing a 1-D version of a chemical transport model (Regional chEmical and trAnsport Model, REAM) indicate that aromatic non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) are the dominant (55-75%) PAN source. The major oxidation product of aromatics that produces acetyl peroxy radicals is methylglyoxal (MGLY). PAN and O3 in the observations are correlated at daytime; aromatic NMHCs appear to play an important role in O3 photochemistry. Previous NMHC measurements indicate the presence of reactive aromatics at high levels over broad polluted regions of China. Aromatics are often ignored in global and (to a lesser degree) regional 3D photochemical transport models; their emissions over China as well as photochemistry are quite uncertain.Our findings suggest that critical assessments of aromatics emissions and chemistry (such as the yields of MGLY) are necessary to understand and assess ozone photochemistry and regional pollution export in China.

  15. Polyethylene encapsulatin of nitrate salt wastes: Waste form stability, process scale-up, and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polyethylene encapsulation system for treatment of low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Polyethylene has several advantages compared with conventional solidification/stabilization materials such as hydraulic cements. Waste can be encapsulated with greater efficiency and with better waste form performance than is possible with hydraulic cement. The properties of polyethylene relevant to its long-term durability in storage and disposal environments are reviewed. Response to specific potential failure mechanisms including biodegradation, radiation, chemical attack, flammability, environmental stress cracking, and photodegradation are examined. These data are supported by results from extensive waste form performance testing including compressive yield strength, water immersion, thermal cycling, leachability of radioactive and hazardous species, irradiation, biodegradation, and flammability. The bench-scale process has been successfully tested for application with a number of specific problem'' waste streams. Quality assurance and performance testing of the resulting waste form confirmed scale-up feasibility. Use of this system at Rocky Flats Plant can result in over 70% fewer drums processed and shipped for disposal, compared with optimal cement formulations. Based on the current Rocky Flats production of nitrate salt per year, polyethylene encapsulation can yield an estimated annual savings between $1.5 million and $2.7 million, compared with conventional hydraulic cement systems. 72 refs., 23 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Rotational rate sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  17. Previous Power Rates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergyEnergy InnovationRecentPreviouspower-rates

  18. Previous Transmission Rates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergyEnergytransmission-rates Sign In About |

  19. Current Power Rates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department ofDepartmentPower-Rates Sign In About |

  20. Current Transmission Rates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department ofDepartmentPower-Rates Sign

  1. [FIXED RATE GUARANTEED OBLIGATIONS]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @JoinEnergy ZEROFIXED RATE GUARANTEED

  2. Settlement PF Exchange Rates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9 SeptemberSetting the Stage for the Next SolarRate

  3. Energy Management Through Innovative Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M. L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of energy efficiency in the industrial sector and specific rate design alternatives for doing so....

  4. Highly Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Annular Tanks with Concrete Reflection: 1 x 3 Line Array of Nested Pairs of Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Cleaver; John D. Bess; Nathan Devine; Fitz Trumble

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of seven experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory beginning in August, 1980 (References 1 and 2). Highly enriched uranyl nitrate solution was introduced into a 1-3 linear array of nested stainless steel annular tanks. The tanks were inside a concrete enclosure, with various moderator and absorber materials placed inside and/or between the tanks. These moderators and absorbers included boron-free concrete, borated concrete, borated plaster, and cadmium. Two configurations included placing bottles of highly enriched uranyl nitrate between tanks externally. Another experiment involved nested hemispheres of highly enriched uranium placed between tanks externally. These three configurations are not evaluated in this report. The experiments evaluated here are part of a series of experiments, one set of which is evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-033. The experiments in this and HEU-SOL-THERM-033 were performed similarly. They took place in the same room and used the same tanks, some of the same moderators and absorbers, some of the same reflector panels, and uranyl nitrate solution from the same location. There are probably additional similarities that existed that are not identified here. Thus, many of the descriptions in this report are either the same or similar to those in the HEU-SOL-THERM-033 report. Seventeen configurations (sixteen of which were critical) were performed during seven experiments; six of those experiments are evaluated here with thirteen configurations. Two configurations were identical, except for solution height, and were conducted to test repeatability. The solution heights were averaged and the two were evaluated as one configuration, which gives a total of twelve evaluated configurations. One of the seventeen configurations was subcritical. Of the twelve critical configurations evaluated, nine were judged as acceptable as benchmarks.

  5. Effect of calcium nitrate on the vapor-liquid equilibria of ethanol + water and 2-propanol + water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polka, H.M.; Gmehling, J. (Univ. of Oldenburg (Germany). Chair of Industrial Chemistry)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of calcium nitrate on the vapor-liquid equilibria of ethanol + water and 2-propanol + water was studied using a Swietoslawski ebulliometer. The measurements were performed for two constant salt molalities (1 and 2 mol[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1]) under isobaric conditions at 50.66 kPa. Strong salting-out of the alcohol was observed in all cases, leading to a complete elimination of the azeotropic point at relatively low salt concentrations. The results were correlated using an extension of the NRTL equation for mixed solvent electrolyte systems proposed by Mock, Evans, and Chen.

  6. National Utility Rate Database: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

  7. Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of gamma energy emitted from fission products in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. It is intended to provide a method for demonstrating compliance with UF6 specifications C 787 and C 996 and uranyl nitrate specification C 788. 1.2 The lower limit of detection is 5000 MeV Bq/kg (MeV/kg per second) of uranium and is the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual reporting limits of the nuclides to be measured. The limit of detection was determined on a pure, aged natural uranium (ANU) solution. The value is dependent upon detector efficiency and background. 1.3 The nuclides to be measured are106Ru/ 106Rh, 103Ru,137Cs, 144Ce, 144Pr, 141Ce, 95Zr, 95Nb, and 125Sb. Other gamma energy-emitting fission nuclides present in the spectrum at detectable levels should be identified and quantified as required by the data quality objectives. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its us...

  8. Laboratory performance testing of an extruded bitumen containing a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based, low-level aqueous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattus, A.J.; Kaczmarsky, M.M.

    1986-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory results of a comprehensive, regulatory performance test program, utilizing an extruded bitumen and a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based waste, have been compiled at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Using a 53 millimeter, Werner and Pfleiderer extruder, operated by personnel of WasteChem Corporation of Paramus, New Jersey, laboratory-scale, molded samples of type three, air blown bitumen were prepared for laboratory performance testing. A surrogate, low-level, mixed liquid waste, formulated to represent an actual on-site waste at ORNL, containing about 30 wt % sodium nitrate, in addition to eight heavy metals, cold cesium and strontium was utilized. Samples tested contained three levels of waste loading: that is, forty, fifty and sixty wt % salt. Performance test results include the ninety day ANS 16.1 leach test, with leach indices reported for all cations and anions, in addition to the EP Toxicity test, at all levels of waste loading. Additionally, test results presented also include the unconfined compressive strength and surface morphology utilizing scanning electron microscopy. Data presented include correlations between waste form loading and test results, in addition to their relationship to regulatory performance requirements.

  9. Upper Great Plains Rates information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancillary Services Rate Data (2.4mb pdf) Transmission and Ancillary Services 2011 Rate True-up Calculation (3.4mb pdf) Power Reporting Miscellaneous Information If you have any...

  10. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules : 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.

  11. Please cite this article in press as: Schipper, L.A., et al., Denitrifying bioreactors--An approach for reducing nitrate loads to receiving waters. Ecol. Eng. (2010), doi:10.1016/j.ecoleng.2010.04.008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Please cite this article in press as: Schipper, L.A., et al., Denitrifying bioreactors--An approach Denitrifying bioreactors--An approach for reducing nitrate loads to receiving waters Louis A. Schippera 9 March 2010 Accepted 3 April 2010 Available online xxx Keywords: Denitrification Bioreactor Nitrate

  12. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels during thermal cycling in alkali nitrate molten salts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Goods, Steven Howard

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The corrosion behavior of three austenitic stainless steels was evaluated during thermal cycling in molten salt mixtures consisting of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3}. Corrosion tests were conducted with Types 316, 316L and 304 stainless steels for more than 4000 hours and 500 thermal cycles at a maximum temperature of 565 C. Corrosion rates were determined by chemically descaling coupons. Metal losses ranged from 5 to 16 microns and thermal cycling resulted in moderately higher corrosion rates compared to isothermal conditions. Type 316 SS was somewhat more corrosion resistant than Type 304 SS in these tests. The effect of carbon content on corrosion resistance was small, as 316L SS corroded only slightly slower than 316 SS. The corrosion rates increased as the dissolved chloride content of the molten salt mixtures increased. Chloride concentrations approximating 1 wt.%, coupled with thermal cycling, resulted in linear weight loss kinetics, rather than parabolic kinetics, which described corrosion rates for all other conditions. Optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis revealed that the corrosion products consisted of iron-chromium spinel, magnetite, and sodium ferrite, organized as separate layers. Microanalysis of the elemental composition of the corrosion products further demonstrated that the chromium content of the iron-chromium spinel layer was relatively high for conditions in which parabolic kinetics were observed. However, linear kinetics were observed when the spinel layer contained relatively little chromium.

  13. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 153 ARE NITRATE EXPORTS IN STREAM WATER LINKED TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPORTS IN STREAM WATER LINKED TO NITROGEN FLUXES IN DECOMPOSING FOLIAR LITTER? Kathryn B. Piatek and Mary may contribute to N exports. We tested the hypothesis that nitrate exports in stream water are positively related to the N dynamics in foliar litter, with generally low exports during N immobilization

  14. New combustion synthesis technique for the production of (InxGa1-x)2O3 powders: Hydrazine/metal nitrate method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKittrick, Joanna

    New combustion synthesis technique for the production of (InxGa1-x)2O3 powders: Hydrazine. The combustion reaction occurred when heating the precursors between 150 and 200 °C in a closed vessel filled by a more typical combustion synthesis reaction between nitrates and a carbonaceous fuel at a higher

  15. mtres d'paisseur. Un kilogramme de nitrate de tho-rium fut plac au-dessous et l'activit mesure se

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    nitrate d'uranium est pauvre en rayons y, et ceux-ci sont aisément absorbables; h = 1,4 entre 2,8 et 12,i trop oublier leurs aînées ! Les rayons de Rôntgen sont utilisés en médecine tantôt comme instrumcllt d'exploration, tantcït comme agent thérapeutique. Deux procédés d'exploration s'offrent au praticien la radioscopie et la

  16. Center for Watershed Sciences | groundwaternitrate.ucdavis.edu | University of California, Davis Maximum reported raw-level nitrate concentration in community public water systems and state-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    and Salinas Valley aquifers. Most nitrate in drinking water wells today was applied to the surface decades ago. This study focuses on the four-county Tulare Lake Basin and the Monterey County portion of the Salinas Valley 254,000 people in California's Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley who are currently at risk

  17. Estimates of sea surface nitrate concentrations from sea surface temperature and chlorophyll concentration in upwelling areas: A case study for the Benguela system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bricaud, Annick

    heating that occurs simultaneously to nitrate consumption, stimulated by the progressive acclimation or regional scales in the ocean is fundamental for the study of oceanic biogeochemical processes, particularly for the Benguela upwelling system, and algorithms are developed using in situ data provided by the World Ocean

  18. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

  19. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  20. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...

  1. Detection of Sequence-Specific Tyrosine Nitration of Manganese SOD and SERCA in Cardiovascular Disease and Aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Shanqin; Ying, Jia; Jiang, Bingbing; Guo, Wei; Adachi, Takeshi; Sharov, Victor; Lazar, Harold; Menzoian, James; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Schoneich, Christian; Cohen, Richard

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitration of protein tyrosine residues (nY) is a marker of oxidative stress and may alter the biological activity of the modified proteins. The aim of this study was to develop antibodies towards site-specific nY-modified proteins and to use histochemical and immunoblotting to demonstrate protein nitration in tissues. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies towards peptides with known nY sites in MnSOD nY-34 and of two adjacent nY in the sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA2 di-nY-294,295) were developed. Kidneys from rats infused with angiotensin II with known MnSOD nY and aorta from atherosclerotic rabbits and aging rat skeletal and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum with known SERCA di-nY were used for positive controls. Staining for MnSOD nY-34 was most intense in distal renal tubules and collecting ducts. Staining of atherosclerotic aorta for SERCA2 di-nY was most intense in atherosclerotic plaques. Aging rat skeletal muscle and atherosclerotic aorta and cardiac atrium from human diabetic patients also stained positively. Staining was decreased by sodium dithionite that chemically reduces nitrotyrosine to aminotyrosine, and the antigenic nY-peptide blocked staining for each respective nY site, but not for the other. As previously demonstrated, immunoblotting failed to detect these modified proteins in whole tissue lysates, but did when the proteins were concentrated. Immunohistochemical staining for specific nY-modified tyrosine residues offers the ability to assess the effects of oxidant stress associated with pathological conditions on individual proteins whose function may be affected in specific tissue sites.

  2. Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CRSP Transmission 9162013 WAPA-161 FRN, CRSP transmission and ancillary services rates extension Letter announcing two-year extension to CRSP transmission and ancillary...

  3. Sustainable Building Rating Systems Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Rauch, Emily M.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to offer information that could be used to compare and contrast sustainable building rating systems.

  4. Strain rate sensitive constitutive equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Charles Edward

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Computed Constants For Far'ous . Baterials 47 LIST OF FIGURFS Pace Figure I Comparison of Rate Data For Commercially Pure Aluminum Figure 2 Dynamic Loading Regimes 17 Figure 3 Yield Criteria 32 Figure 4 Uni-axial Stress-Strain Rate...

  5. RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    NATIONAL RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by: Smith, Bucklin and Associates, Inc. Market Research and Statistics Division Chicago, Illinois July 2003 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER #12;BCI RECYCLING RATE STUDY TABLE ....................................................................................................1 II. METHODOLOGY A. Total Pounds of Lead Recycled from Batteries

  6. Innovative Rates Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Title II of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) as amended by the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) provided financial assistance to state utility regulatory commissions, nonregulated electric utilities, and the Tennessee Valley Authority through the Innovative Rates Program. The financial assistance was to be used to plan or carry out electric utility regulatory rate reform initiatives relating to innovative rate structures that encourage conservation of energy, electric utility efficiency and reduced costs, and equitable rates to consumers. The Federal and local objectives of the project are described. Activities planned and accomplishments are summarized for the following: project management, data collection, utility bill evaluation, billing enclosure/mailing evaluation, media program evaluation, display evaluation, rate study sessions evaluation, speakers bureau evaluation, and individual customer contacts. A timetable/milestone chart and financial information are included. (MHR)

  7. Effect of chloride content of molten nitrate salt on corrosion of A516 carbon steel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Clift, W. Miles

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The corrosion behavior of A516 carbon steel was evaluated to determine the effect of the dissolved chloride content in molten binary Solar Salt. Corrosion tests were conducted in a molten salt consisting of a 60-40 weight ratio of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} at 400{sup o}C and 450{sup o}C for up to 800 hours. Chloride concentrations of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 wt.% were investigated to determine the effect on corrosion of this impurity, which can be present in comparable amounts in commercial grades of the constituent salts. Corrosion rates were determined by descaled weight losses, corrosion morphology was examined by metallographic sectioning, and the types of corrosion products were determined by x-ray diffraction. Corrosion proceeded by uniform surface scaling and no pitting or intergranular corrosion was observed. Corrosion rates increased significantly as the concentration of dissolved chloride in the molten salt increased. The adherence of surface scales, and thus their protective properties, was degraded by dissolved chloride, fostering more rapid corrosion. Magnetite was the only corrosion product formed on the carbon steel specimens, regardless of chloride content or temperature.

  8. WP-07 Power Rate Case (rates/ratecases)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRural PublicRates > Rate Cases > Rates

  9. Supernova rates and stellar populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Mannucci

    2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the results about the nature of type Ia Supernovae that can be derived by studying their rates in different stellar populations. While the evolution of SN photometry and spectra can constrain the explosion mechanism, the SN rate depends on the progenitor system. We review the current available data on rates as a function of parent galaxy color, morphology, star formation rate, radio luminosity and environment. By studying the variation of the rates with the color of the parent galaxy, a strong evidence was established that type Ia SNe come from both young and old stars. The dependence of the rates with the radio power of the parent galaxy is best reproduced by a bimodal distribution of delay time between the formation of the progenitor and its explosion as a SN. Cluster early-type galaxies show higher type Ia SN rate with respect to field galaxies, and this effect can be due either to traces of young stars or to differences in the delay time distribution.

  10. Asset Prices and Exchange Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlova, Anna

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper develops a simple two-country, two-good model, in which the real exchange rate, stock and bond prices are jointly determined. The model predicts that ...

  11. Asset Prices and Exchange Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlova, Anna

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper develops a simple two-country, two-good model, in which the real exchange rate, stock and bond prices are jointly determined. The model predicts that stock market prices are correlated ...

  12. Tier 2 Vintage Rate Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    period FY2015 through 2028. Customers have a diversification right to limit the amount of power they purchase at the Load Growth rate in future years with notice provided by...

  13. High repetition rate fiber lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jian, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reports work in high repetition rate femtosecond fiber lasers. Driven by the applications including optical arbitrary waveform generation, high speed optical sampling, frequency metrology, and timing and frequency ...

  14. Electric Rate Alternatives to Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandberg, K. R. Jr.

    "ELECTRIC RATE ALTERNATIVES TO COGENERATION" K. R. SANDBERG, JR. INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTS MANAGER - TEXAS GULF STATES UTILITIES COMPANY BEAUMONT, TEXAS ABSTRACT This paper discusses electric rate slternatives to cogeneration for the industrisl... PERSPECTIVE Gulf States Utilities was incorporated in 1925 and is primarily in the business of generating. transmitting and distributing electricity to 555.000 customers in southeast Texas and south Louisiana. The service area extends 350 miles westward...

  15. Response of rice to ammonium and nitrate nitrogen applied at various stages of plant growth on limed and unlimed Beaumont and Lake Charles clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, William Blalock, III

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESPONSE OF RICE TO AMMONIUM AND NITRATE NITROGEN APPLIED AT VARIOUS STAGES OF PLANT GROWTH ON LIMED AND UNLINED BEAUNONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By William B. Gay, III Submitted to the Graduate Sohool of the Agricultural... BEAUMONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By Nilliam B. Gay, III Chairman of Committee Head of the Department of Soil Sc Crop Sciences ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to express my appreciation to Dr. A. G. Caldwell for his 1nterest and guidance...

  16. Re-passivation Potential of Alloy 22 in Chloride plus Nitrate Solutions using the Potentiodynamic-Galvano-static-Potentiostatic Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Kenneth J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States); Rebak, Raul B. [Chemistry and Materials Science, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, L- 631, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to suffer crevice corrosion is measured using the Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) technique. This is a fast technique that gives rather accurate and reproducible values of re-passivation potential (ER1) in most cases. In the fringes of susceptibility, when the environment is not highly aggressive, the values of re-passivation potential using the CPP technique may not be highly reproducible, especially because the technique is fast. To circumvent this, the re-passivation potential of Alloy 22 was measured using a slower method that combines Potentiodynamic-Galvano-static-Potentiostatic steps (called here the Tsujikawa-Hisamatsu Electrochemical or THE method). The THE method applies the charge to the specimen in a more controlled way, which may give more reproducible re-passivation potential values, especially when the environment is not aggressive. The values of re-passivation potential of Alloy 22 in sodium chloride plus potassium nitrate solutions were measured using the THE and CPP methods. Results show that both methods yield similar values of re-passivation potential, especially under aggressive conditions. (authors)

  17. Direct estimation of decoherence rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimír Bužek; Peter Rapcan; Jochen Rau; Mario Ziman

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The decoherence rate is a nonlinear channel parameter that describes quantitatively the decay of the off-diagonal elements of a density operator in the decoherence basis. We address the question of how to experimentally access such a nonlinear parameter directly without the need of complete process tomography. In particular, we design a simple experiment working with two copies of the channel, in which the registered mean value of a two-valued measurement directly determines the value of the average decoherence rate. No prior knowledge of the decoherence basis is required.

  18. Incentive Rates- At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaeffer, S. C.

    's impact. In fact, I doubt that one can truly know the exact impact of a rate even after its inclusion in a tariff, assuming of course, that someone uses it. My own judgment is that there are currently examples of both effective and not so effective... tem see a positive impact on their rates from any successes with this tariff, over the expected life of the new facility. We did not count societal benefits like high tax bases for local authorities when reviewing existing ratepayer benefit - only...

  19. Rate Schedules | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO Overview OCHCODepartmentEnergy April 20138Rate Schedules Rate Schedules

  20. Instability statistics and mixing rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Artuso; Cesar Manchein

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We claim that looking at probability distributions of \\emph{finite time} largest Lyapunov exponents, and more precisely studying their large deviation properties, yields an extremely powerful technique to get quantitative estimates of polynomial decay rates of time correlations and Poincar\\'e recurrences in the -quite delicate- case of dynamical systems with weak chaotic properties.

  1. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher is described suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz. 14 figs.

  2. Intraclass Price Elasticity & Electric Rate Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gresham, K. E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric rate design relies on cost incurrance for pricing and pricing structures. However, as utilities move into a marketing mode, rate design needs to respond more to customer reactions to pricing changes. Intraclass price elasticities aid rate...

  3. October 1996 - September 2001 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA charges

  4. October 2001 - March 2002 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA charges1

  5. October 2001 - September 2006 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA charges11

  6. October 2002 - March 2003 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA2 - March

  7. October 2003 - March 2004 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA2 - March3

  8. October 2004 - March 2005 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA2 -

  9. October 2005 - March 2006 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA2 -5 -

  10. a poorer food conversion efficiency and survival rate. The lower survival rate (87~) of this

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rate. 3. Survival and growth rates and food efficien- cies were excellent for trout reared in brackish

  11. Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhe

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

  12. An analysis of international grain freight rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonnala, Sneha Latha

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the dependent variable was included in the model as an explanatory variable. The estimated econometric model was designed to explain ocean freight rates for grain. Results indicate rates increase at a decreasing rate with distance and rates decrease at a...

  13. 7, 29612989, 2007 Predicting arene rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    software or computing power. Measured gas-phase rate coefficients for the reaction of aromatic hydrocarbons

  14. Composite Fringe Benefit Rates Nancy R. Lewis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Marcelo A.

    January 1, 2015 Retirement Eligible FY 2014-15 Rate FY 2015-16 Rate FY 2016-17 Rate B Healthcomp Faculty of Research #12;New Rates · Provided by the Budget Office for use when planning proposal budgets for contract and grants · Effective for use in proposals submitted to sponsors January 1, 2015 and thereafter · Title

  15. Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Feng, Zhe

    Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

  16. WIPP Nitrate Updates 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE Awards Contract for WIPP Mobile4 WIPP

  17. WIPP Nitrate Updates 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE Awards Contract for WIPP Mobile4 WIPP5 WIPP

  18. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier6Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformation DemandReactivePowerChargeInformation Rate Jump to: navigation,

  19. Decreto Rettorale n. 15 dell' 11 gennaio 2008 Pagina 1 di 14 data: 11 gennaio 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - Politico-Sociale - Economico Settori scientifico - disciplinari: SPS/01 Filosofia Politica SPS/04 Scienza Politica SPS/07 Sociologia Generale SPS/10 Sociologia dell'ambiente e del territorio SPS/12 Criminologia/13 Diritto internazionale IUS/17 Diritto penale IUS/21 Diritto pubblico comparato SECS P/02 Politica

  20. macla n 15. septiembre 2011 revista de la sociedad espaola de mineraloga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benning, Liane G.

    -rich waters leads to the formation of carbonate deposits: Ca2+ + CO32- CaCO3 (2) This coupled process to improve the understanding of the formation of CaCO3 phases through a detailed experimental study of gypsum dissolution and CaCO3 formation in the presence of Zn, Sr, Mg, or PO4 at 25°C. The purpose

  1. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite...

  2. A Study Plan for Determining Recharge Rates at the Hanford Site Using Environmental Tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy,, E. M.; Szecsody,, J. E.; Phillips,, S. J.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a study plan tor estimating recharge at the Hanford Site using environmental tracers. Past operations at the Hanford Site have led to both soil and groundwater contamination, and recharge is one of the primary mechanisms for transporting contaminants through the vadose zone and into the groundwater. The prediction of contaminant movement or transport is one aspect of performance assessment and an important step in the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. In the past, recharge has been characterized by collecting lysimeter data. Although lysimeters can generate important and reliable data, their limitations include 1) fixed location, 2) fixed sediment contents, 3) edge effects, 4) low rates, and 5) relatively short duration of measurement. These limitations impact the ability to characterize the spatial distribution of recharge at the Hanford Site, and thus the ability to predict contaminant movement in the vadose zone. An alternative to using fixed lysimeters for determining recharge rates in the vadose zone is to use environmental tracers. Tracers that have been used to study water movement in the vadose zone include total chloride, {sup 36}CI, {sup 3}H, and {sup 2}H/{sup 18}O. Atmospheric levels of {sup 36}CI and {sup 3}H increased during nuclear bomb testing in the Pacific, and the resulting "bomb pulse" or peak concentration can be measured in the soil profile. Locally, past operations at the Hanford Site have resu~ed in the atmospheric release of numerous chemical and isotopic tracers, including nitrate, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc. The radionuclides, in particular, reached a well-defined atmospheric peak in 1945. Atmospheric releases of {sup 129}I and {sup 99}Tc were greatly reduced by mid-1946, but nitrogen oxides continued to be released from the uranium separations facilities. As a result, the nitrate concentrations probably peaked in the mid-1950s, when the greatest number of separations facilities were operating. Seven study sites on the Hanford Site have been selected, in two primary soil types that are believed to represent the extremes in recharge, the Quincy sand and the Warden silt loam. An additional background study site upwind of the Hanford facilities has been chosen at the Yakima Firing Center. Study sites at Hanford were chosen close to micrometeorology stations on downwind transects from the operational facilities. Initial testing will be done on sites that lack perennial vegetation. Six tracer techniques (total chlortde, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 3}H, nitrate, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc) will be tested on at least one site in the Quincy sand, one site in the Warden si~ loam, and the background site, to determine which combination of tracers wortks best for a given soil type. In subsequent years, additional sites will be investigated to determine the effect of vegetation on recharge estimates and on the performance of individual tracers. The use of environmental tracers is perhaps the only cost-effective method for estimating the spatial vartability of recharge at a site as large as Hanford. The tracer techniques used at Hanford have wide applicability at other and sites operated by the U.S. Department of Energy as well as at low-level radioactive waste disposal sites.

  3. 1996 Wholesale Power and Transmission Rate Schedules.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) 1996 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules, 1996 Ancillary Products and Services Rate Schedule, 1996 Transmission Rate Schedules, and General Rate Schedule Provisions, contained herein, were approved on an interim basis effective October 1, 1996. These rate schedules and provisions were approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), United States Department of Energy, in September 1996 (Docket Nos EF96-2011-000 and EF96f-2021-000). These rate schedules and General Rate Schedule Provisions were approved on a final basis by the FERC July 30, 1997, in Dept. of Energy--Bonneville Power Administration, Docket Nos. EF96-2011-000 and EF96-2021-000. Except as noted elsewhere, these 1996 rate schedules and provisions supersede BPA`s Wholesale Power Rate Schedules and General Rate Schedule Provisions, and Transmission Rate Schedules and General Transmission Rate Schedule Provisions, effective October 1, 1995. These rate schedules and general rate schedule provisions include all errata.

  4. 2012 Wholesale Power and Transmission Rate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the meaning given such term in section 3.3.5. "COU Parties' PF Rate" means any BPA wholesale power rate for service to COUs' "general requirements" (as defined in section...

  5. ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONVERGENCE RATES OF ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q-rates in terms of the di erential properties of v and in terms of the ... schemes of this kind is to assure that they converge at a provably fast rate to a point.

  6. Energy Efficiency Interest Rate Reduction Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (AHFC) offers interest rate reductions to home buyers purchasing new and existing homes with 5 Star and 5 Star Plus energy ratings. All homes constructed on...

  7. Fluorescence Assay for Polymerase Arrival Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Che, Austin

    2003-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To engineer complex synthetic biological systems will require modular design, assembly, and characterization strategies. The RNA polymerase arrival rate (PAR) is defined to be the rate that RNA polymerases arrive at a ...

  8. Fluorescence assay for polymerase arrival rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Che, Austin, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To engineer complex synthetic biological systems will require modular design, assembly, and characterization strategies. The RNA polymerase arrival rate (PAR) is defined to be the rate that RNA polymerases arrive at a ...

  9. Home Energy Ratings and Building Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, J.C.

    climate as they affect the rating score of a proposed or completed structure. The rating is used to determine the most cost effective mechanical systems, building envelope design including window and door types, effect of various roofing materials...

  10. Private Sector Rates (FY 2015) Instrument Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    Source Laser $150 $175 Nanophoton Raman 11 Raman Spectroscopy $150 $175 Newport Solar Simulator Solar Rates for the Material Research Laboratory Facilities Rates for Private Sector companies and researchers

  11. Rate Setting for Small Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowing how to set the proper rate for water service is a challenge for small water systems. They must generate enough revenue to remain solvent, but offer affordable service. This publication describes the various types of rates and explains...

  12. Optimization Online - Faster convergence rates of relaxed ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damek Davis

    2014-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 19, 2014 ... Faster convergence rates of relaxed Peaceman-Rachford and ADMM under regularity assumptions. Damek Davis (damek ***at*** ...

  13. Spontaneous Emission Rate Enhancement Using Optical Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Nikhil

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of  Spontaneous  Emission  in  a  Semiconductor  nanoLED,”  emission  rate  enhancement  using  the  Fluorescent  Emission  by  Lattice   Resonances  in  

  14. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedule and General Rate Schedule Provisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.

  15. WAGES, FLEXIBLE EXCHANGE RATES, AND MACROECONOMIC POLICY*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WAGES, FLEXIBLE EXCHANGE RATES, AND MACROECONOMIC POLICY* JEFFREY SACHS In an open economy with a floaLing exchange rate, the efficacy of fiscal and monetary policy depends fundamentally on the wage rate depreciation, while fiscal expansion has no output effect. These results hold only when real wages

  16. Kiwifruitsize influences softening rate during storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    Kiwifruitsize influences softening rate during storage Carlos H. Crisosto o David Garner D Katia)at 32*F for 16 weeks. Un- der both storage conditions,large fruit had a slower rate of softening than fruit size and the rate of softening under air and CA conditions will help cold storage managerssafely

  17. AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office #12;AGENDA Guiding Principles Rate Proposal Building Office supplies for budget manager reconciliationOffice supplies for budget manager reconciliation: Equipment Compensated Leave #12;CALCULATING A RATE Budgeted Expenses Budgeted Usage BaseBudgeted Usage Base

  18. West Virginia University -Main Campus Student Retention and Graduation Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University - Main Campus Student Retention and Graduation Rates First-Time, Full ---------------------------------------------------------------------Continuation Rates and Cumulative Graduation Rates

  19. Impact of Independently Controlling Ventilation Rate per Person and Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Impact of Independently Controlling Ventilation Rate per Person and Ventilation Rate per Floor Impact of Independently Controlling Ventilation Rate per Person and Ventilation Rate per Floor Area

  20. FY2015 Standard Recharge Rates 12-30-2014.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "***" indicates that these rates have not yet been received and approved. Organizational Unit Direct Portion of Rate Machine Power Rate Total Rate Total BNL Users...

  1. Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  2. An Examination of Harvest Rates and Brood-Take Rates as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Examination of Harvest Rates and Brood-Take Rates as Management Strategies to Assist Recovery of Resource Management Project Number: 546 Title of Project: An Examination of Harvest Rates and Brood-Take Rates as Management Strategies to Assist Recovery of Cowichan River Chinook Salmon Examining Committee

  3. HEART RATE AS A MONITOR FOR METABOLIC RATE IN CAPTIVE JUVENILE STELLER SEA LIONS (EUMETOPIAS JUBATUS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HEART RATE AS A MONITOR FOR METABOLIC RATE IN CAPTIVE JUVENILE STELLER SEA LIONS (EUMETOPIAS COLUMBIA 0Jan M. Mcl'hee, 2001 #12;ABSTRACT The potential use of heart rate to monitor energy expenditure a relationship exists between heart rate @I) and oxygen consumption ( ~ 0 ~ )in captive sea lions while swimming

  4. The Escape Rate of a Molecule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Knauf; Markus Krapf

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We show existence and give an implicit formula for the escape rate of the n-centre problem of celestial mechanics for high energies. Furthermore we give precise computable estimates of this rate. This exponential decay rate plays an important role especially in semiclassical scattering theory of n-atomic molecules. Our result shows that the diameter of a molecule is measurable in a (classical) high-energy scattering experiment.

  5. CM-1-H Wholesale Power Rate Schedule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Availability:This rate schedule shall be available to the South Mississippi Electric Power Association, Municipal Energy Agency of Mississippi, and Mississippi Delta Energy Agency (hereinafter...

  6. Photovoltaic Degradation Rates -- An Analytical Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As photovoltaic penetration of the power grid increases, accurate predictions of return on investment require accurate prediction of decreased power output over time. Degradation rates must be known in order to predict power delivery. This article reviews degradation rates of flat-plate terrestrial modules and systems reported in published literature from field testing throughout the last 40 years. Nearly 2000 degradation rates, measured on individual modules or entire systems, have been assembled from the literature, showing a median value of 0.5%/year. The review consists of three parts: a brief historical outline, an analytical summary of degradation rates, and a detailed bibliography partitioned by technology.

  7. Convergence Rates with Inexact Nonexpansive Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jingwei Liang

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 18, 2014 ... Abstract: In this paper, we present a convergence rate analysis for the inexact Krasnosel'ski{\\u{\\i}}-Mann iteration built from nonexpansive ...

  8. "EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" "Areas",38353,38384,38412,38443,38473,38504,38534,38565,38596,38626,38657,38687,38718,38749,38777,"application...

  9. Rate Schedule COTP-T3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COTP-T3 (Supersedes Schedule COTP-T2) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION CALIFORNIA-OREGON TRANSMISSION PROJECT SCHEDULE OF RATE FOR...

  10. Rate Schedule CV-NWT5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NWT5 (Supersedes Schedule CV-NWT4) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION CENTRAL VALLEY PROJECT SCHEDULE OF RATE FOR NETWORK INTEGRATION TRANSMISSION...

  11. Rate Schedule CV-SUR4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SUR4 (Supersedes Schedule CV-SUR3) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION CENTRAL VALLEY PROJECT SCHEDULE OF RATE FOR SUPPLEMENTAL RESERVE SERVICE...

  12. Rate Schedule CV-F13

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F13 (Supersedes Schedule CV-F12) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION CENTRAL VALLEY PROJECT SCHEDULE OF RATES FOR BASE RESOURCE AND FIRST...

  13. Rate Schedule PACI-T3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PACI-T3 (Supersedes Schedule PACI -T2) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION PACIFIC ALTERNATING CURRENT INTERTIE PROJECT SCHEDULE OF RATE FOR...

  14. Rate Schedule CV-RFS4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RFS4 (Supersedes Schedule CV-RFS3) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION CENTRAL VALLEY PROJECT SCHEDULE OF RATE FOR REGULATION AND FREQUENCY...

  15. Rate Schedule CV-EID4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EID4 (Supersedes Schedule CV-EID3) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION CENTRAL VALLEY PROJECT SCHEDULE OF RATE FOR ENERGY IMBALANCE SERVICE...

  16. Rate Schedule CV-SPR4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPR4 (Supersedes Schedule CV-SPR3) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION CENTRAL VALLEY PROJECT SCHEDULE OF RATE FOR SPINNING RESERVE SERVICE...

  17. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Furth, H.P.; Valeo, E.J.; Goldhaber, M.

    1983-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method of controlling the reaction rates in a nuclear fusion reactor; and more particularly, to the use of polarized nuclear fuel.

  18. Confronting the Graduation Rate Crisis in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Losen, Daniel; Orfield, Gary; Balfanz, Robert

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guide to Graduation Policy and Rates, Editorial Projects inthe Graduation Crisis. Bethesda, MD: Editorial Projects inthe Graduation Crisis. Bethesda, MD: Editorial Projects in

  19. 2006 Texas High Plains Cotton Variety Ratings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Average Incidence of Wilt Date of Wilt Rating Earth 0.0 0.0 Sept. 8 Brownfield 5.5 1.8 Aug. 28 Petersburg

  20. Home energy rating systems: Program descriptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vine, E.; Barnes, B.K.; Ritschard, R.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the descriptions of home energy rating and labelling programs (HERS) that were surveyed in January 1986 as part of a national evaluation of HERS.

  1. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulsrud, Russell M. (Princeton, NJ); Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Valeo, Ernest J. (Princeton Junction, NJ); Goldhaber, Maurice (Bayport, NY)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

  2. Theoretical cosmic Type Ia supernova rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Valiante; F. Matteucci; S. Recchi; F. Calura

    2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work is the computation of the cosmic Type Ia supernova rates at very high redshifts (z>2). We adopt various progenitor models in order to predict the number of explosions in different scenarios for galaxy formation and to check whether it is possible to select the best delay time distribution model, on the basis of the available observations of Type Ia supernovae. We also computed the Type Ia supernova rate in typical elliptical galaxies of different initial luminous masses and the total amount of iron produced by Type Ia supernovae in each case. It emerges that: it is not easy to select the best delay time distribution scenario from the observational data and this is because the cosmic star formation rate dominates over the distribution function of the delay times; the monolithic collapse scenario predicts an increasing trend of the SN Ia rate at high redshifts whereas the predicted rate in the hierarchical scheme drops dramatically at high redshift; for the elliptical galaxies we note that the predicted maximum of the Type Ia supernova rate depends on the initial galactic mass. The maximum occurs earlier (at about 0.3 Gyr) in the most massive ellipticals, as a consequence of downsizing in star formation. We find that different delay time distributions predict different relations between the Type Ia supernova rate per unit mass at the present time and the color of the parent galaxies and that bluer ellipticals present higher supernova Type Ia rates at the present time.

  3. Cadmium Biosorption Rate in Protonated Sargassum Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Cadmium Biosorption Rate in Protonated Sargassum Biomass J I N B A I Y A N G A N D B O H U M I L V Sargassum fluitans biomass was accompanied by the release of hydrogen protons from the biomass. The uptake the overall biosorption rate of cadmium ions in flat seaweed biomass particles. The overall biosorption

  4. Rate Setting for Small Water Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Jensen, Assistant Research Scientist, Texas Water Resources Institute; The Texas A&M University System K Knowing how to set the proper rate for water service is a daunting challenge for small water systems. The rates must be high enough to re- cover...

  5. Optimal Rate Allocation in Overlay Content Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Optimal Rate Allocation in Overlay Content Distribution Chuan Wu and Baochun Li Department. This paper addresses the optimal rate allocation problem in overlay content distribution for efficient, these scenarios reflect the contrast between elastic and streaming content distribution, with either per

  6. Resonances and the thermonuclear reaction rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Hussein; M. Ueda; A. J. Sargeant; M. P. Pato

    2003-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approximate analytic expression for thermonuclear reaction rate of charged particles when the cross section contains a single narrow or wide resonance described by a Breit-Wigner shape. The resulting expression is uniformly valid as the effective energy and resonance energy coalesce. We use our expressions to calculate the reaction rate for $^{12}$C(p,$\\gamma$)$^{13}$N.

  7. Nuclear reaction rates and the primordial nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhishek Mishra; D. N. Basu

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical predictions of the primordial abundances of elements in the big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) are dominated by uncertainties in the input nuclear reaction rates. We investigate the effect of modifying these reaction rates on light element abundance yields in BBN by replacing the thirty-five reaction rates out of the existing eighty-eight. We have studied these yields as functions of evolution time or temperature. We find that using these new reaction rates results in only a little increase in helium mass fraction over that obtained previously in BBN calculations. This allows insights into the role of the nuclear reaction rates in the setting of the neutron-to-proton ratio during the BBN epoch. We observe that even with considerable nuclear physics uncertainties, most of these nuclear reactions have minimal effect on the standard BBN abundance yields of $^6$Li and $^7$Li.

  8. Atomic multipole relaxation rates near surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Crosse; Stefan Scheel

    2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The spontaneous relaxation rates for an atom in free space and close to an absorbing surface are calculated to various orders of the electromagnetic multipole expansion. The spontaneous decay rates for dipole, quadrupole and octupole transitions are calculated in terms of their respective primitive electric multipole moments and the magnetic relaxation rate is calculated for the dipole and quadrupole transitions in terms of their respective primitive magnetic multipole moments. The theory of electromagnetic field quantization in magnetoelectric materials is used to derive general expressions for the decay rates in terms of the dyadic Green function. We focus on the decay rates in free space and near an infinite half space. For the decay of atoms near to an absorbing dielectric surface we find a hierarchy of scaling laws depending on the atom-surface distance z.

  9. Merger Rates of Dark-Matter Haloes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyal Neistein; Avishai Dekel

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive analytic merger rates for dark-matter haloes within the framework of the Extended Press-Schechter (EPS) formalism. These rates become self-consistent within EPS once we realize that the typical merger in the limit of a small time-step involves more than two progenitors, contrary to the assumption of binary mergers adopted in earlier studies. We present a general method for computing merger rates that span the range of solutions permitted by the EPS conditional mass function, and focus on a specific solution that attempts to match the merger rates in N-body simulations. The corrected EPS merger rates are more accurate than the earlier estimates of Lacey & Cole, by ~20% for major mergers and by up to a factor of ~3 for minor mergers of mass ratio 1:10^4. Based on the revised merger rates, we provide a new algorithm for constructing Monte-Carlo EPS merger trees, that could be useful in Semi-Analytic Modeling. We provide analytic expressions and plot numerical results for several quantities that are very useful in studies of galaxy formation. This includes (a) the rate of mergers of a given mass ratio per given final halo, (b) the fraction of mass added by mergers to a halo, and (c) the rate of mergers per given main progenitor. The creation and destruction rates of haloes serve for a self-consistency check. Our method for computing merger rates can be applied to conditional mass functions beyond EPS, such as those obtained by the ellipsoidal collapse model or extracted from $N$-body simulations.

  10. Modeling of Shape Memory Alloys Considering Rate-independent and Rate-dependent Irrecoverable Strains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartl, Darren J.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation addresses new developments in the constitutive modeling and structural analysis pertaining to rate-independent and rate-dependent irrecoverable inelasticity in Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs). A new model for fully recoverable SMA...

  11. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : Section 7(b)(2) Rate Test Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section 7(b)(2) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act), 16 U.S.C. {section} 839e(b)(2), directs the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to conduct, after July 1, 1985, a comparison of the projected rates to be charged its preference and Federal agency customers for their firm power requirements, over the rate test period plus the ensuing four years, with the costs of power (hereafter called rates) to those customers for the same time period if certain assumptions are made. The effect of this rate test is to protect BPA's preference and Federal agency customers wholesale firm power rates from certain specified costs resulting from provisions of the Northwest Power Act. The rate test can result in a reallocation of costs from the general requirements loads of preference and Federal agency customers to other BPA loads. The rate test involves the projection and comparison of two sets of wholesale power rates for the general requirements loads of BPA's public body, cooperative, and Federal agency customers (7(b)(2) Customers). The two sets of rates are: (1) a set for the test period and the ensuing four years assuming that section 7(b)(2) is not in effect (known as Program Case rates); and (2) a set for the same period taking into account the five assumptions listed in section 7(b)(2), (known as 7(b)(2) Case rates). Certain specified costs allocated pursuant to section 7(g) of the Northwest Power Act are subtracted from the Program Case rates. Next, each nominal rate is discounted to the beginning of the test period of the relevant rate case. The discounted Program Case rates are averaged, as are the 7(b)(2) Case rates. Both averages are rounded to the nearest tenth of a mill for comparison. If the average Program Case rate is greater than the average 7(b)(2) Case rate, the rate test triggers. The difference between the average Program Case rate and the average 7(b)(2) Case rate determines the amount to be reallocated from the 7(b)(2) Customers to other BPA loads in the rate proposal test period.

  12. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Final Proposal : Wholesale Power Rate Development Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wholesale Power Rate Development Study (WPRDS) serves two primary purposes. It synthesizes information supplied by the other final studies that comprise the BPA rate proposal and shows the actual calculations for BPA's power rates. In addition, the WPRDS is the primary source for certain information used in establishing the power rates. Information developed in the WPRDS includes rate design (including seasonal and diurnal shapes for energy rates, demand, and load variance rates), the risk mitigation tools (Cost Recovery Adjustment Clause (CRAC), along with the [N]ational Marine Fisheries Service [F]ederal Columbia River Power System [B]iological Opinion (NFB) Adjustment, the Emergency NFB Surcharge, and Dividend Distribution Clause (DDC)), development of the Slice rate, and all discounts and other adjustments that are included in the rate schedules and the General Rate Schedule Provisions. The WPRDS also includes the description of the methodology for the Cost of Service Analysis (COSA), and the various rate design steps necessary to establish BPA's power rates. The WPRDS also shows the calculations for inter-business line revenues and expenses, the revenue forecast and, finally, includes a description of all of the rate schedules. The actual rate schedules are shown in ''Administrator's Final Record of Decision (ROD), Appendix A: 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules and General Rate Schedule Provisions, WP-07-A-02''. The WPRDS also includes the Partial Resolution of Issues, shown in Attachment 1 of the ROD. The Partial Resolution of Issues affected many of the features described in this study. These are noted where appropriate.

  13. Considerations for How to Rate CPV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.; Miller, M.; Marion, B.; Emery, K.; McConnell, R.; Surendran, S.; Kimber, A.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) industry is introducing multiple products into the marketplace, but, as yet, the; community has not embraced a unified method for assessing a nameplate rating. The choices of whether to use 850,; 900, or 1000 W/m2 for the direct-normal irradiance and whether to link the rating to ambient or cell temperature will; affect how CPV modules are rated and compared with other technologies. This paper explores the qualitative and; quantitative ramifications of these choices using data from two multi-junction CPV modules and two flat-plate; modules.

  14. Measuring Degradation Rates Without Irradiance Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulver, S.; Cormode, D.; Cronin, A.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Smith, R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to report PV system degradation rates without using irradiance data is demonstrated. First, a set of relative degradation rates are determined by comparing daily AC final yields from a group of PV systems relative to the average final yield of all the PV systems. Then, the difference between relative and absolute degradation rates is found from a statistical analysis. This approach is verified by comparing to methods that utilize irradiance data. This approach is significant because PV systems are often deployed without irradiance sensors, so the analysis method described here may enable measurements of degradation using data that were previously thought to be unsuitable for degradation studies.

  15. Multiverse rate equation including bubble collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael P. Salem

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The volume fractions of vacua in an eternally inflating multiverse are described by a coarse-grain rate equation, which accounts for volume expansion and vacuum transitions via bubble formation. We generalize the rate equation to account for bubble collisions, including the possibility of classical transitions. Classical transitions can modify the details of the hierarchical structure among the volume fractions, with potential implications for the staggering and Boltzmann-brain issues. Whether or not our vacuum is likely to have been established by a classical transition depends on the detailed relationships among transition rates in the landscape.

  16. Smokeless Control of Flare Steam Flow Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agar, J.; Balls, B. W.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the First Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 22-25, 1979 FLARE GAS FLOW RATE MEASUREMENT "Accurate measurement of the very low flow rates which are normally present is very difficult" 0, p 15-8). "It is generally considered too...-04-91 Proceedings from the First Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 22-25, 1979 to calibration conditions. Turndown is 40:1 and pressure loss is negligible. APPLICATION FLOW RATE The mass flow meter described has been applied to a wide...

  17. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility Rate > PostsUtility Rate

  18. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility Rate >Utility Rate Home

  19. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility Rate >Utility Rate

  20. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility RateGlobalUtility Rate Home

  1. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility RateGlobalUtility Rate

  2. Contractor Rating and Feedback Systems | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Contractor Rating and Feedback Systems Contractor Rating and Feedback Systems Better Buildings Residential Workforce Business Partners Peer Exchange Call Series: Contractor Rating...

  3. Transition Path Sampling of Water Exchange Rates and Mechanisms...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Path Sampling of Water Exchange Rates and Mechanisms around Aqueous Ions . Transition Path Sampling of Water Exchange Rates and Mechanisms around Aqueous Ions . Abstract: The rates...

  4. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : Wholesale Power Rate Development Study Documentation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Documentation for Wholesale Power Rate Development Study (WPRDS) shows the details of the calculation of the proposed rates. It contains the source data, the calculation, and the results. Section 1 contains an overview of the information used and developed in the various models used in the rate development process. Section 2 contains the documentation of the Rate Analysis Model (RAM2007). The RAM2007 is a group of computer applications that performs most of the computations that determine BPA's proposed rates. The output tables of RAM2007 show the source data, calculations (in sequence), and the results (rate charges) of the rate development process. Section 3 provides documentation of revenue forecasts for the 3-year rate test period FY 2007 through FY 2009 at both current and proposed rates and at current rates for the period immediately preceding the rate test period. Section 4 includes supporting data for rate calculations not performed in RAM2007 or revenue analyses. Each section draws data from difference sources and thus tables and/or charts are not always numbered in sequence. For purposes of this document, omitted tables will be listed as such in the Table of Contents.

  5. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Final Proposal : Wholesale Power Rate Development Study Documentation, Volume 2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Documentation for Wholesale Power Rate Development Study shows the details of the calculation of the proposed rates. It contains the source data, the calculation, and the results. There are 2 Volumes, the first containing Sections 1, 2, and 3; the second containing Section 4 and 3 appendices. Section 1 contains an overview of the information used and developed in the various models used in the rate development process. Section 2 contains the documentation of the Rate Analysis Model (RAM2007). The RAM2007 is a group of computer applications that performs most of the computations that determine BPA's proposed rates. The output tables of RAM2007 show the source data, calculations (in sequence), and the results (rate charges) of the rate development process. Section 3 provides documentation of revenue forecasts for the three-year rate test period FY 2007 through FY 2009 at both current and proposed rates and at current rates for the period immediately preceding the rate test period. Section 4 includes supporting data for rate calculations not performed in RAM2007 or revenue analyses.

  6. Cooling rate, heating rate, and aging effects in glassy water Nicolas Giovambattista,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciortino, Francesco

    be glassified by cooling using hyper- quenching techniques (i.e., with rates of the order of 105 K/s [8Cooling rate, heating rate, and aging effects in glassy water Nicolas Giovambattista,1 H. Eugene of water molecules during the process of generating a glass by cooling, and during the process

  7. Does Growth Rate Determine the Rate of Metabolism in Shorebird Chicks Living in the Arctic?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    primarily of greater metabolic inten- sities of heat-generating tissues. The maximum temperature gradient500 Does Growth Rate Determine the Rate of Metabolism in Shorebird Chicks Living in the Arctic/22/2007; Electronically Published 7/13/2007 ABSTRACT We measured resting and peak metabolic rates (RMR and PMR

  8. Extratropical Lapse Rates in Very Hot Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamora, Ryan Alexander

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    are neutral with respect to moist convection, and large where lapse rates are stable. Using P* allows us to examine convective motions arising from both gravitational accelerations as well as symmetric instabilities. We assess the ability of current models...

  9. Negotiating Rates and Contracts for Qualifying Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, S. E.

    The implementation of a cogeneration project or other qualifying facility (QF) requires the development of contractual relationships with one or more electric utilities. The relationships may involve the application of existing rates and contracts...

  10. Dynamic Line Rating: Research and Policy Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jake P. Gentle; Kurt S. Myers; Michael R. West

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic Line Rating (DLR) is a smart grid technology that allows the rating of electrical conductors to be increased based on local weather conditions. Overhead lines are conventionally given a conservative rating based on worst case scenarios. We demonstrate that observing the conditions in real time leads to additional capacity and safer operation. This paper provides a report of a pioneering scheme in the United States of America in which DLR has been applied. Thereby, we demonstrate that observing the local weather conditions in real time leads to additional capacity and safer operation. Secondly, we discuss limitations involved. In doing so, we arrive at novel insights which will inform and improve future DLR projects. Third, we provide a policy background and discussion to clarify the technology’s potential and identifies barriers to the imminent adoption of dynamic line rating systems. We provide suggestions for regulatory bodies about possible improvements in policy to encourage adoption of this beneficial technology.

  11. Rate Schedule CV-TPT7

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TPT7 (Supersedes Schedule CV-TPT6) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION CENTRAL VALLEY PROJECT SCHEDULE OF RATE FOR TRANSMISSION OF WESTERN POWER BY...

  12. Rainfall-induced Landslide Hazard Rating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yi-Ting, Civ. E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research develops a Landslide Hazard Rating System for the rainfall-induced landslides in the Chenyulan River basin area in central Taiwan. This system is designed to provide a simplified and quick evaluation of the ...

  13. Reducing Your Leak Rate Without Repairing Leaks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beals, C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As plant personnel know, repairing compressed air leaks can be an expensive, labor intensive and never-ending process. This article discusses ways plant personnel can reduce and maintain their leak rate at a lower level ...

  14. Extratropical Lapse Rates in Very Hot Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamora, Ryan Alexander

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    are neutral with respect to moist convection, and large where lapse rates are stable. Using P* allows us to examine convective motions arising from both gravitational accelerations as well as symmetric instabilities. We assess the ability of current models...

  15. Uncertainty Analysis for Photovoltaic Degradation Rates (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Hansen, C.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dependable and predictable energy production is the key to the long-term success of the PV industry. PV systems show over the lifetime of their exposure a gradual decline that depends on many different factors such as module technology, module type, mounting configuration, climate etc. When degradation rates are determined from continuous data the statistical uncertainty is easily calculated from the regression coefficients. However, total uncertainty that includes measurement uncertainty and instrumentation drift is far more difficult to determine. A Monte Carlo simulation approach was chosen to investigate a comprehensive uncertainty analysis. The most important effect for degradation rates is to avoid instrumentation that changes over time in the field. For instance, a drifting irradiance sensor, which can be achieved through regular calibration, can lead to a substantially erroneous degradation rates. However, the accuracy of the irradiance sensor has negligible impact on degradation rate uncertainty emphasizing that precision (relative accuracy) is more important than absolute accuracy.

  16. Historical river flow rates for dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, W.H.

    1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

  17. PSNC Energy (Gas)- Green Building Rate Discount

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This discounted rate is available to commercial customers whose building meets the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification or equivalent. To...

  18. Data Fusion for Improved Respiration Rate Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemati, Shamim

    We present an application of a modified Kalman-Filter (KF) framework for data fusion to the estimation of respiratory rate from multiple physiological sources which is robust to background noise. A novel index of the ...

  19. Rating of Solar Energy Devices (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Public Utility Commission has regulatory authority over solar energy devices installed and used in the state of Texas. The Commission can choose to adopt standards pertaining to the rating of...

  20. Rating of Mixed Split Residential Air Conditioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domanski, P. A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology is presented for rating the performance of mixed, split residential air conditioners. The method accounts for the impact on system performance of the indoor evaporator, expansion device and fan; three major components that are likely...

  1. High Rate Physics at Neutrino Factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce J. King

    1999-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Both muon colliders and non-colliding muon storage rings using muon collider technology have the potential to become the first true ``neutrino factories'', with uniquely intense and precisely characterized neutrino beams that could usher in a new era of high rate and long baseline neutrino physics studies at accelerators. This paper gives an overview of the predicted capabilities of neutrino factories for high rate neutrino physics analyses that will use huge event samples collected with novel, high performance neutrino detectors.

  2. Calibration and Rating of Photovoltaics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emery, K.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rating the performance of photovoltaic (PV) modules is critical to determining the cost per watt, and efficiency is useful to assess the relative progress among PV concepts. Procedures for determining the efficiency for PV technologies from 1-sun to low concentration to high concentration are discussed. We also discuss the state of the art in primary and secondary calibration of PV reference cells used by calibration laboratories around the world. Finally, we consider challenges to rating PV technologies and areas for improvement.

  3. Relation Between Heart Rate and Problem Behaviors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Rachel L.; Horner, Robert H.; Reichle, Joe

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    American Journal on Mental Retardation, 1999, Vol. 104, No. 4, 330-345 Relation Between Heart Rate and Problem Behaviors Rachel L. Freeman and Robert H. Horner University of Oregon Joe Reichle University of Minnesota A new... methodological approach for understanding self-injury, aggression, and property destruction exhibited by individuals with severe developmental disabilities was evaluated in this descriptive study. Measures of heart-rate changes before, during, and after...

  4. Solar Models and NACRE thermonuclear reaction rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Morel; B. Pichon; J. Provost; G. Berthomieu

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the most recent updated physics, calibrated solar models have been computed with the new thermonuclear reaction rates of NACRE, the recently available European compilation. Comparisons with models computed with the reaction rates of Caughlan & Fowler (\\cite{cf88}) and of Adelberger et al. (\\cite{a98}) are made for global structure, expected neutrinos fluxes, chemical composition and sound speed profiles, helioseismological properties of p-modes and g-modes.

  5. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Final Proposal : Section 7(b)(2) Rate Test Study and Documentation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section 7(b)(2) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act), 16 U.S.C. {section} 839e(b)(2), directs the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to conduct, after July 1, 1985, a comparison of the projected rates to be charged its preference and Federal agency customers for their firm power requirements, over the rate test period plus the ensuing 4 years, with the costs of power (hereafter called rates) to those customers for the same time period if certain assumptions are made. The effect of this rate test is to protect BPA's preference and Federal agency customers wholesale firm power rates from certain specified costs resulting from certain provisions of the Northwest Power Act. The rate test can result in a reallocation of costs from the general requirements loads of preference and Federal agency customers to other BPA loads. The rate test involves the projection and comparison of two sets of wholesale power rates for the general requirement loads of BPA's public body, cooperative, and Federal agency customers (collectively, the 7(b)(2) Customers). The two sets of rates are: (1) a set for the test period and the ensuing four years assuming that Section 7(b)(2) is not in effect (known as Program Case rates); and (2) a set for the same period taking into account the five assumptions listed in section 7(b)(2) (known as 7(b)(2) Case rates). Certain specified costs allocated pursuant to section 7(g) of the Northwest Power Act are subtracted from the Program Case rates. Next, each nominal rate is discounted to the beginning of the test period of the relevant rate case. The discounted Program Case rates are averaged, as are the 7(b)(2) Case rates. Both averages are rounded to the nearest tenth of a mill for comparison. If the average of the Program Case rates is greater than the average of the 7(b)(2) Case rates, the rate test triggers. The difference between the average of the Program Case rates and the average of the 7(b)(2) Case rates determines the amount to be reallocated from the 7(b)(2) Customers to other BPA loads in the rate test period. The purpose of this Study is to describe the application of the ''Section 7(b)(2) Implementation Methodology (Implementation Methodology)'' and the results of such application. The accompanying Section 7(b)(2) Rate Test Study Documentation, WP-07-FS-BPA-06A, contains the documentation of the computer models and data used to perform the 7(b)(2) rate test. This Study is organized into three major sections. The first section provides an introduction to the study, as well as a summary of the section ''7(b)(2) Legal Interpretation and Implementation Methodology''. The second section describes the methodology used in conducting the rate test. It provides a discussion of the calculations performed to project the two sets of power rates that are compared in the rate test. The third section presents a summary of the results of the rate test for the WP-07 Final Rate Proposal.

  6. Ratios of heavy hadron semileptonic decay rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Gronau; Jonathan L. Rosner

    2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ratios of charmed meson and baryon semileptonic decay rates appear to be satisfactorily described by considering only the lowest-lying (S-wave) hadronic final states and assuming the kinematic factor describing phase space suppression is the same as that for free quarks. For example, the rate for $D_s$ semileptonic decay is known to be $(17.0 \\pm 5.3)%$ lower than those for $D^0$ or $D^+$, and the model accounts for this difference. When applied to hadrons containing $b$ quarks, this method implies that the $B_s$ semileptonic decay rate is about 1% higher than that of the nonstrange $B$ mesons. This small difference thus suggests surprisingly good local quark-hadron duality for $B$ semileptonic decays, complementing the expectation based on inclusive quark-hadron duality that these differences in rates should not exceed a few tenths of a percent. For $\\Lambda_b$ semileptonic decay, however, the inclusive rate is predicted to be about 13% greater than that of the nonstrange $B$ mesons. This value, representing a considerable departure from a calculation using a heavy quark expansion, is close to the corresponding experimental ratio $\\Gamma(\\Lambda_b)/ \\bar \\Gamma(B) = 1.13 \\pm 0.03$ of total decay rates.

  7. Short GRBs: Rates and luminosity function implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dafne Guetta

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the luminosity function and rate inferred from the BATSE short hard bursts (SHBs) peak flux distribution with the redshift and luminosity distributions of SHBs observed by Swift/HETE II. The Swift/HETE II SHB sample is incompatible with SHB population that follows the star formation rate. However, it is compatible with a distribution of delay times after the SFR. This would be the case if SHBs are associated with the mergers of double neutron star (DNS) systems. DNS may be ``primordial'' or can form dynamically by binary exchange interaction in globular clusters during core collapse. The implied SHB rates that we find range from \\sim 8 to \\sim 30h_(70)^3 Gpc^(-3)yr^(-1). This rate is a much higher than what was previously estimated and, when beaming is taken into account, it is comparable to the rate of neutron star mergers estimated from statistics of binary pulsars. If GRBs are produced in mergers the implied rate practically guarantees detection by LIGO II and possibly even by LIGO I.

  8. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  9. Ammonium nitrate, urea, and biuret fertilizers increase volume growth of 57-year-old douglas-fir trees within a gradient of nitrogen deficiency. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.E.; Reukema, D.L.; Hazard, J.W.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a nitrogen-deficient plantation in southwest Washington, the authors (1) compared effects of 224 kg N/ha as ammonium nitrate, urea, and biuret on volume growth of dominant and codominant Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco); (2) determined how 8-year response of these trees to fertilization was related to their distance from a strip of the plantation interplanted with nitrogen-fixing red alder (alnus rubra Bong.); and (3) observed effects of biuret on understory vegetation. On both sides of the strip centerline, the authors grouped subject trees into 30 plots of 4 trees each, based on slope position and distance from alder. The authors randomly assigned three fertilizers and a control within each plot. They analyzed separately data from east and west of the mixed stand certerline. Initial volume differed greatly among the 120 trees on each side, so they used covariance analysis to adjust observed treatment means. Adjusted mean volume growth was increased (p equal to or less than 0.10) by 22 to 28 percent on the east side and by 11 to 14 percent on the west side, with no significant difference in response to the three fertilizers.

  10. FITCH RATES PORT OF MORROW (OR) TRANSMISSION FACILITIES REV BONDS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FITCH RATES PORT OF MORROW (OR) TRANSMISSION FACILITIES REV BONDS 'AA'; OUTLOOK STABLE Fitch Ratings-Austin-24 November 2014: Fitch Ratings assigns 'AA' ratings to the Port of...

  11. Relativistic QRPA calculation of muon capture rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Marketin; N. Paar; T. Niksic; D. Vretenar

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (PN-RQRPA) is applied in the calculation of total muon capture rates on a large set of nuclei from $^{12}$C to $^{244}$Pu, for which experimental values are available. The microscopic theoretical framework is based on the Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model for the nuclear ground state, and transitions to excited states are calculated using the PN-RQRPA. The calculation is fully consistent, i.e., the same interactions are used both in the RHB equations that determine the quasiparticle basis, and in the matrix equations of the PN-RQRPA. The calculated capture rates are sensitive to the in-medium quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant. By reducing this constant from its free-nucleon value $g_A = 1.262$ by 10% for all multipole transitions, the calculation reproduces the experimental muon capture rates to better than 10% accuracy.

  12. Analytical Improvements in PV Degradation Rate Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined accurately. For non-spectrally corrected data several complete seasonal cycles (typically 3-5 years) are required to obtain reasonably accurate degradation rates. In a rapidly evolving industry such a time span is often unacceptable and the need exists to determine degradation rates accurately in a shorter period of time. Occurrence of outliers and data shifts are two examples of analytical problems leading to greater uncertainty and therefore to longer observation times. In this paper we compare three methodologies of data analysis for robustness in the presence of outliers, data shifts and shorter measurement time periods.

  13. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Arthur

    2004-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports.

  14. Achievable Qubit Rates for Quantum Information Wires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulya Yadsan-Appleby; Tobias J. Osborne

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Suppose Alice and Bob have access to two separated regions, respectively, of a system of electrons moving in the presence of a regular one-dimensional lattice of binding atoms. We consider the problem of communicating as much quantum information, as measured by the qubit rate, through this quantum information wire as possible. We describe a protocol whereby Alice and Bob can achieve a qubit rate for these systems which is proportional to N^(-1/3) qubits per unit time, where N is the number of lattice sites. Our protocol also functions equally in the presence of interactions modelled via the t-J and Hubbard models.

  15. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility Rate > Posts by term

  16. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility Rate > Posts by

  17. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility Rate > Posts byUtility

  18. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility Rate > Posts

  19. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility Rate > PostsUtility

  20. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility Rate >

  1. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility Rate >Utility

  2. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility Rate >Utilitycommercial

  3. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility Rate

  4. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility RateGlobal Atlas Type Term

  5. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility RateGlobal Atlas Type

  6. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility RateGlobal Atlas

  7. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility RateGlobal AtlasUtility

  8. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility RateGlobal

  9. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility RateGlobalUtility

  10. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility RateGlobalUtilityUtility

  11. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > UtilityUtility Rate Home >

  12. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > UtilityUtility Rate Home

  13. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > UtilityUtility Rate HomeUtility

  14. Power Function Review (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical Information STIP Map DocumentRates > Rates

  15. What Is the Right Rate? Loan Rates and Demand | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Neighborhood Program Financing Peer Exchange Call: "What is the Right Rate?" call slides and discussion summary, December 1, 2011. Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents...

  16. Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jochen Stutz

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary Chemical processes occurring at night in the lowest part of the urban atmosphere, the so called nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), can influence the composition of the atmosphere during the night as well as the following day. They may impact the budgets of some of the most important pollutants, such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, as well as influence size and composition of particular matter. Few studies have thus far concentrated on the nocturnal chemistry of the urban NBL, most likely due to the strong influence of vertical transport and mixing, which requires the measurement of trace gas profiles instead of simple point observations. Motivated by our lack of observations and understanding of nocturnal chemistry, the focus of this project was the study of the vertical distribution of trace gases and the altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry under polluted conditions through field observations and modeling studies. The analysis of three field experiments (TEXAQS, Houston, 2000; Phoenix Sunrise Ozone Experiment, 2001; NAPOX, Boston, 2002), two of which were performed in this project, showed that ozone concentrations typically increase with height in the lowest 150m, while NO2 typically decreases. NO3, the dominant nocturnal radical species, showed much higher concentrations in the upper part of the NBL, and was often not present at the ground. With the help of a one-dimensional chemical transport model, developed in this project, we found that the interaction of ground emissions of NOx and hydrocarbons, together with their vertical transport, is responsible for the vertical profiles. The dominant chemical reactions influencing ozone, NO2 and NO3 are the reaction of ozone and NO3 with freshly emitted NO. Sensitivity studies with our model showed that the magnitude of the trace gas gradients depend both on the emission rates and the vertical stability of the NBL. Observations and model analysis clearly show that nocturnal chemistry in urban areas is altitude dependent. Measurements at one altitude, for example at the ground, where most air quality monitoring stations are located, are not representative for the rest of the NBL. Our model also revealed that radical chemistry is, in general, altitude dependent at night. We distinguish three regions: an unreactive, NO rich, ground layer; an upper, O3 and NO3 dominated layer, and a reactive mixing layer, where RO2 radicals are mixed from aloft with NO from the ground. In this reactive layer an active radical chemistry and elevated OH radical levels can be found. The downward transport of N2O5 and HO2NO2, followed by their thermal decay, was also identified as a radical source in this layer. Our observations also gave insight into the formation of HONO in the NBL. Based on our field experiments we were able to show that the NO2 to HONO conversion was relative humidity dependent. While this fact was well known, we found that it is most likely the uptake of HONO onto surfaces which is R.H. dependent, rather than the NO2 to HONO conversion. This finding led to the proposal of a new NO2 to HONO conversion mechanism, which is based on solid physical chemical principles. Noteworthy is also the observation of enhanced NO2 to HONO conversion during a dust storm event in Phoenix. The final activity in our project investigated the influence of the urban canopy, i.e. building walls and surfaces, on nocturnal chemistry. For the first time the surface area of a city was determined based on a Geographical Information System database of the city of Santa Monica. The surface to volume areas found in this study showed that, in the 2 lower part of the NBL, buildings provide a much larger surface area than the aerosol. In addition, buildings take up a considerable amount of the volume near the ground. The expansion of our model and sensitivity studies based on the Santa Monica data revealed that the surface area of buildings considerably influences HONO levels in urban areas. The volume reduction leads to a decrease of O3 and an increase of NO2 near the ground due to the stronger impact o

  17. Intergenerational transfers and the social discount rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, R.B.; Norgaard, R.B.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the relationship between intergenerational asset transfers and the choice of the discount rate for use in cost-benefit analysis in a model of a competitive overlapping generations economy constrained by a socially managed exhaustible resource. Provided that there are no distortions in capital markets and that all agents hold perfect foresight, cost-benefit techniques will result in a Pareto efficient resource allocation if the discount rate is set equal to the market rate of interest. But since the path of the interest rate depends on the level of intergenerational transfers, cost-benefit techniques do not ensure a socially desirable distribution of welfare between generations; a social optimum will result only if intergenerational transfers are properly chosen and enforced. Decentralized private altruism may result in intergenerational transfers that both present and future individuals would agree are too small if members of the present generation attach positive weight to the general welfare of future generations, not simply their personal descendants. In a world where intergenerational transfers are non-optimal, second-best policy-making may imply a constrained optimum that is inefficient. Together, these findings suggest that cost-benefit analysis is at best a partial criterion to policy formulation that should be used only in conjunction with ethical principles that define the proper distribution of welfare between present and future generations.

  18. Implications of Strong-Rate-Weakening Friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Julia R.

    Implications of Strong-Rate- Weakening Friction for the Length-Scale Dependence of the Strength · Rapid transitions between high static friction and very low dynamic friction · Leads to slip-pulse rupture · Slip pulses are extremely localized and have strong positive feedback between friction and slip

  19. Electric germs Source: scenta Rate this item

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Electric germs Source: scenta Rate this item People in remote areas could benefit from fuel cells that contain bacteria that grows prolifically on the graphite anodes of fuel cells and can conduct electricity that isolating a bacterium generated pow er in fuel cells efficiently. Geobacter sulfurreducens is bacteria

  20. RATE DECLINE ANALYSIS FOR NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    RATE DECLINE ANALYSIS FOR NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT analylsiis for constant pressure production in a naturally fractured reservoir is presented. The solution, the Warren and Root model which assumes fracturing is perfectly unifom, provides an upper bound of reservoir

  1. Heart Physiology Lab Part 1: Pulse Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loughry, Jim

    Heart Physiology Lab Part 1: Pulse Rate Measure your pulse in each of the following conditions (in in the class. You may use Table 1 in the Heart Physiology Worksheet for this, if you wish. Once you have all of the class averages for each measurement. You may use Graph 1 in the Heart Physiology Worksheet for this

  2. Prediction of Thermonuclear Reaction Rates in Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Rauscher

    1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent improvements and remaining problems in the prediction of thermonuclear rates are reviewed. The main emphasis is on statistical model calculations, but the challenge to include direct reactions close to the driplines is also briefly addressed. Further theoretical as well as experimental investigations are motivated.

  3. Experimental observations of detonation in ammonium-nitrate-fuel-oil (ANFO) surrounded by a high-sound speed, shockless, aluminum confiner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klyanda, Charles B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Short, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detonations in explosive mixtures of ammonium-nitrate-fuel-oil (ANFO) confined by aluminum allow for transport of detonation energy ahead of the detonation front due to the aluminum sound speed exceeding the detonation velocity. The net effect of this energy transport on the detonation is unclear. It could enhance the detonation by precompressing the explosive near the wall. Alternatively, it could desensitize the explosive by crushing porosity required for shock initiation or destroying confinement ahead of the detonation. As these phenomena are not well understood, most numerical explosive models are unable to account for them. But with slowly detonating, non-ideal high explosive (NIHE) systems becoming increasing prevalent, proper understanding and prediction of the performance of these metal-confined NIHE systems is desirable. Experiments are discussed that measured the effect of this ANFO detonation energy transported upstream of the front by an aluminum confining tube. Detonation velocity, detonation front curvature, and aluminum response are recorded as a function of confiner wall thickness and length. Front curvature profiles display detonation acceleration near the confining surface, which is attributed to energy transported upstream modifying the flow. Average detonation velocities were seen to increase with increasing confiner thickness due to the additional inertial confinement of the reaction zone flow. Significant radial sidewall tube motion was observed immediately ahead of the detonation. Axial motion was also detected which interfered with the front curvature measurements in some cases. It was concluded that the confiner was able to transport energy ahead of the detonation and that this transport has a definite effect on the detonation.

  4. A New Series of Rate Decline Relations Based on the Diagnosis of Rate-Time Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boulis, Anastasios

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    point for their derivation is given by the definitions of the "loss ratio" and the "derivative of the loss ratio", where the "loss ratio" is the ratio of rate data to derivative of rate data, and the "derivative of the loss ratio" is the "b...

  5. The relationship of metabolic rate to rate of gain in young beef cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Kenneth Harold

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and growt? rate, and l7-keto steriods against growth rates, but when the two were combined a very signifi- cant correlation was reported. PROCEI3UBE The first trial was conducted during the spring of 1951 on young beef bulls which were the get of sires...

  6. A Rate-Adaptive Multimedia Multicasting Mechanism. . . 23 A Rate-Adaptive Multimedia Multicasting Mechanism in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Rate-Adaptive Multimedia Multicasting Mechanism. . . 23 A Rate-Adaptive Multimedia Multicasting and Multimedia Department ENST Bretagne, 2, rue de la Chataigneraie - CS 17607 35576 Cesson Sevigne Cedex rapidly. One of the major driving factors of WLANs is multimedia services such as VOD or HDTV delivered

  7. Muon capture rates within the projected QRPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danilo Sande Santos; Arturo R. Samana; Francisco Krmpoti?; Alejandro J. Dimarco

    2012-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The conservation of the number of particles within the QRPA plays an important role in the evaluation muon capture rates in all light nuclei with A \\precsim 30 . The violation of the CVC by the Coulomb field in this mass region is of minor importance, but this effect could be quite relevant for medium and heavy nuclei studied previously. The extreme sensitivity of the muon capture rates on the 'pp' coupling strength in nuclei with large neutron excess when described within the QRPA is pointed out. We reckon that the comparison between theory and data for the inclusive muon capture is not a fully satisfactory test on the nuclear model that is used. The exclusive muon transitions are much more robust for such a purpose.

  8. Thermal dilepton rates from quenched lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. -T. Ding; A. Francis; O. Kaczmarek; F. Karsch; E. Laermann; S. Mukherjee; M. Müller; W. Soeldner

    2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new lattice results on the continuum extrapolation of the vector current correlation function. Lattice calculations have been carried out in the deconfined phase at a temperature of 1.1 Tc, extending our previous results at 1.45 Tc, utilizing quenched non-perturbatively clover-improved Wilson fermions and light quark masses. A systematic analysis on multiple lattice spacings allows to perform the continuum limit of the correlation function and to extract spectral properties in the continuum limit. Our current analysis suggests the results for the electrical conductivity are proportional to the temperature and the thermal dilepton rates in the quark gluon plasma are comparable for both temperatures. Preliminary results of the continuum extrapolated correlation function at finite momenta, which relates to thermal photon rates, are also presented.

  9. Feed rate measuring method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novak, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiczer, James J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method are provided for establishing the feed rate of a workpiece along a feed path with respect to a machine device. First and second sensors each having first and second sensing electrodes which are electrically isolated from the workpiece are positioned above, and in proximity to the desired surfaces of the workpiece along a feed path. An electric field is developed between the first and second sensing electrodes of each sensor and capacitance signals are developed which are indicative of the contour of the workpiece. First and second image signals representative of the contour of the workpiece along the feed path are developed by an image processor. The time delay between corresponding portions of the first and second image signals are then used to determine the feed rate based upon the separation of the first and second sensors and the amount of time between corresponding portions of the first and second image signals.

  10. Intraclass Price Elasticity & Electric Rate Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gresham, K. E.

    INTRACLASS PRICE ELASTICITY &ELECTRIC RATE DESIGN KEVIN E. GRESHAM Senior Research Analyst Houston Lighting & Power Company Houston, Texas ABSTRACT PRICE ELASTICITY Electric ~ate design relies on cost incur rance for pricing and pricing... industries are already affecting electric utilities. Cogeneration is one example of competition which effects electric utilities. Utilities now have a competing source of generation which often causes load and revenue losses. Competition has specifically...

  11. Decoherence rates for Galilean covariant dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Clark

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a measure of decoherence for a class of density operators. For Gaussian density operators in dimension one it coincides with an index used by Morikawa (1990). Spatial decoherence rates are derived for three large classes of the Galilean covariant quantum semigroups introduced by Holevo. We also characterize the relaxation to a Gaussian state for these dynamics and give a theorem for the convergence of the Wigner function to the probability distribution of the classical analog of the process.

  12. Subsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    John, Randy Carl; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a heater having an elongated ferromagnetic metal heater section. The heater is located in an opening in a formation. The heater section is configured to heat the hydrocarbon containing formation. The exposed ferromagnetic metal has a sulfidation rate that goes down with increasing temperature of the heater, when the heater is in a selected temperature range.

  13. Dynamic Phase Transition, Enhanced Reaction Rate, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rikvold, Per Arne

    is a CO, they react [CO + O CO2(g)] These dynamical rules fully define the model. Its properties on a crystal surface by Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism: CO(g)+S CO(a) O2 + 2S 2O(a) CO(a) + O(a) CO2(g) + 2S been observed experimentally for high enough temperatures. Add CO desorption rate k to mimic

  14. Heating Rate Profiles in Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward C. D. Pope; Georgi Pavlovski; Christian R. Kaiser; Hans Fangohr

    2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years evidence has accumulated suggesting that the gas in galaxy clusters is heated by non-gravitational processes. Here we calculate the heating rates required to maintain a physically motived mass flow rate, in a sample of seven galaxy clusters. We employ the spectroscopic mass deposition rates as an observational input along with temperature and density data for each cluster. On energetic grounds we find that thermal conduction could provide the necessary heating for A2199, Perseus, A1795 and A478. However, the suppression factor, of the clasical Spitzer value, is a different function of radius for each cluster. Based on the observations of plasma bubbles we also calculate the duty cycles for each AGN, in the absence of thermal conduction, which can provide the required energy input. With the exception of Hydra-A it appears that each of the other AGNs in our sample require duty cycles of roughly $10^{6}-10^{7}$ yrs to provide their steady-state heating requirements. If these duty cycles are unrealistic, this may imply that many galaxy clusters must be heated by very powerful Hydra-A type events interspersed between more frequent smaller-scale outbursts. The suppression factors for the thermal conductivity required for combined heating by AGN and thermal conduction are generally acceptable. However, these suppression factors still require `fine-tuning` of the thermal conductivity as a function of radius. As a consequence of this work we present the AGN duty cycle as a cooling flow diagnostic.

  15. Rates and Progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William Michael Wood-Vasey

    2005-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The remarkable uniformity of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) has allowed astronomers to use them as distance indicators to measure the properties and expansion history of the Universe. However, SNe Ia exhibit intrinsic variation in both their spectra and observed brightness. To reduce these systematic uncertainties, we need a deeper understanding of the observed variations in SNe Ia. Toward this end, the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) has been designed to discover hundreds of SNe Ia in a systematic and automated fashion and study them in detail. A prototype run of the SNfactory search pipeline conducted from 2002 to 2003 discovered 83 SNe at a final rate of 12 SNe/month. A large, homogeneous search of this scale offers an excellent opportunity to measure the rate of SNe Ia. This dissertation presents a new method for analyzing the true sensitivity of a multi-epoch supernova search and finds a SN Ia rate from $z\\sim0.01$--0.1 of $r_V = 4.26 (+1.39 -1.93) (+0.10 - 0.10)$ SNe Ia/yr/Mpc$^3$ from a preliminary analysis of a subsample of the SNfactory prototype search. Several unusual supernovae were found in the course of the SNfactory prototype search. One in particular, SN 2002ic, was the first SN Ia to exhibit convincing evidence for a circumstellar medium and offers valuable insight into the progenitors of SNe Ia.

  16. STELLAR ENCOUNTER RATE IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahramian, Arash; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gladstone, Jeanette C., E-mail: bahramia@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-183, Edmonton, AB, T5K 1V4 (Canada)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high stellar densities in the cores of globular clusters cause significant stellar interactions. These stellar interactions can produce close binary mass-transferring systems involving compact objects and their progeny, such as X-ray binaries and radio millisecond pulsars. Comparing the numbers of these systems and interaction rates in different clusters drives our understanding of how cluster parameters affect the production of close binaries. In this paper we estimate stellar encounter rates ({Gamma}) for 124 Galactic globular clusters based on observational data as opposed to the methods previously employed, which assumed 'King-model' profiles for all clusters. By deprojecting cluster surface brightness profiles to estimate luminosity density profiles, we treat 'King-model' and 'core-collapsed' clusters in the same way. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the effects of uncertainties in various observational parameters (distance, reddening, surface brightness) on {Gamma}, producing the first catalog of globular cluster stellar encounter rates with estimated errors. Comparing our results with published observations of likely products of stellar interactions (numbers of X-ray binaries, numbers of radio millisecond pulsars, and {gamma}-ray luminosity) we find both clear correlations and some differences with published results.

  17. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : Wholesale Power Rate Development Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wholesale Power Rate Development Study (WPRDS) calculates BPA proposed rates based on information either developed in the WPRDS or supplied by the other studies that comprise the BPA rate proposal. All of these studies, and accompanying documentation, provide the details of computations and assumptions. In general, information about loads and resources is provided by the Load Resource Study (LRS), WP-07-E-BPA-01, and the LRS Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-01A. Revenue requirements information, as well as the Planned Net Revenues for Risk (PNNR), is provided in the Revenue Requirement Study, WP-07-E-BPA-02, and its accompanying Revenue Requirement Study Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-02A and WP-07-E-BPA-02B. The Market Price Forecast Study (MPFS), WP-07-E-BPA-03, and the MPFS Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-03A, provide the WPRDS with information regarding seasonal and diurnal differentiation of energy rates, as well information regarding monthly market prices for Demand Rates. In addition, this study provides information for the pricing of unbundled power products. The Risk Analysis Study, WP-07-E-BPA-04, and the Risk Analysis Study Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-04A, provide short-term balancing purchases as well as secondary energy sales and revenue. The Section 7(b)(2) Rate Test Study, WP-07-E-BPA-06, and the Section 7(b)(2) Rate Test Study Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-06A, implement Section 7(b)(2) of the Northwest Power Act to ensure that BPA preference customers firm power rates applied to their general requirements are no higher than rates calculated using specific assumptions in the Northwest Power Act.

  18. NFC Academic Access and Equipment Rates valid 7/1/13 to 6/30/14 RATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    NFC Academic Access and Equipment Rates valid 7/1/13 to 6/30/14 RATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE ACCESS/USE UNITS RATE ACCESS FEE monthly fee $29.20 LAB USAGE FEE per lab session $24.44 LAB USAGE MAX PER MONTH per month $224.72 EQUIPMENT INCLUDED EQUIPMENT UNITS RATE 50% Rate Reduction After 500 min

  19. GTA TRIP GENERATION RATES, 1986 -1996 Eric J. Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    GTA TRIP GENERATION RATES, 1986 - 1996 by Eric J. Miller Department of Civil Engineering University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. CHANGES IN GTA TRIP GENERATION RATES, 1986-96 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 Time Female Labour Force Participation Rate

  20. Data Bias in Rate Transient Analysis of Shale Gas Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnia, Ammar Khalifa Mohammed

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    functions involve rate as essential constituent, the superposition time is affected greatly with rate issues. Production data of shale gas wells are usually subjected to operating issues that yield noise and outliers. Whenever the rate data is noisy...

  1. electricity rates for military bases | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    electricity rates for military bases Home > Groups > Utility Rate Hi, I was hoping to find rates for military bases, but have been unable to find anything. Are they just charged as...

  2. Santee-3-E Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Santee-3-E Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Santee-3-E Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: None System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina This rate schedule shall be available to public...

  3. Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water California Nitrate Project,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Control Board Report to the Legislature With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater and Salinas Valley Groundwater Report for the State Water Resources Control Board Report to the Legislature in California's Drinking Water with A Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater. Report

  4. Western-UGP Transmission and Ancillary Services Rates Customer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    changes noted in the following sections: Proposed Formula Rate for Scheduling, System Control and Dispatch Service, Proposed Rate for Regulation and Frequency Response Service,...

  5. Trends in Contractor Conversion Rates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contractor Conversion Rates Trends in Contractor Conversion Rates Better Buildings Residential Network Workforce Business Partners Peer Exchange Call Series: Trends in Contractor...

  6. The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related Issues That May Impede Its Expansion The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related...

  7. Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from sediments. Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from sediments. Abstract: A...

  8. DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Program Focus Groups...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Program Focus Groups with Primary Stakeholders in Seattle -- Final Report DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Program Focus Groups...

  9. DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Program Focus Groups...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rating Program Focus Groups with Primary Stakeholders in Seattle -- Final Report DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Program Focus Groups with Primary Stakeholders in...

  10. High Catalytic Rates for Hydrogen Production Using Nickel Electrocatal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Catalytic Rates for Hydrogen Production Using Nickel Electrocatalysts with Seven-Membered Diphosphine Ligands Containing High Catalytic Rates for Hydrogen Production Using...

  11. Attachment 3: Hourly Labor Rate Proposal, attachment 3, RFP RHT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hourly Labor Rate Proposal RFP RHT-5-52358 Basic Period - Execution through 12 Months Labor Category Base Rate Hourly Labor Overhead % Fringe Benefits % General & Admin. Exp. %...

  12. Auto/Steel Partnership: AHSS Stamping, Strain Rate Characterization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AHSS Stamping, Strain Rate Characterization, Sheet Steel Fatigue, AHSS Joining AutoSteel Partnership: AHSS Stamping, Strain Rate Characterization, Sheet Steel Fatigue, AHSS...

  13. Auto/Steel Partnership: Fatigue of AHSS Strain Rate Characterization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fatigue of AHSS Strain Rate Characterization AutoSteel Partnership: Fatigue of AHSS Strain Rate Characterization 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

  14. The Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements on the Economics of Photovoltaic Systems The Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements on...

  15. Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications 24-25 November 2011, Athensrd and final circular for the Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications

  16. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    ?picamente produce de 5 a 15 galones por d?a. Costo Las unidades de OI t?picamente cuestan entre 200 y 1,000 d?lares. La instalaci?n de la unidad toma de 30 a 60 minutos, asumiendo que no se deben realizar modificaciones significativas a la plomer?a. La membrana de... bas?ndose en un promedio de 10 a?os de vida ?til del sistema, el costo de la pro- ducci?n de agua var?a entre 5 y 10 centavos por gal?n. Estas cifras no incluyen los costos del agua utilizada o los costos de tratar el agua residual, si acaso existen...

  17. Hot spots in ammonium nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Nicholas

    2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    model c The speed of light in a vacuum, approx. 2.998× 108 ms?1 c0 Empirically determined parameter of Hugoniot curve cb Wave speed along a bar cl Longitudinal sound speed D Hessian matrix of ?2 at point p, see equation (2.33) d Value of ??2 at point p... , see equation (2.33) D Detonation velocity d Diameter E Energy e Engineering strain, ?ll F Force xxiii LIST OF SYMBOLS G Gauge factor of a resistive strain gauge h Planck’s constant, approx. 6.626× 10?34 J s i Index of a single data point I(?) Spectrum...

  18. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    tratar, el tratamiento quiz?s no vaya a ser efectivo y se reduzca la calidad del agua tratada. El agua tratada debe de ser examinada regularmente para verificar que el sistema est? funcionando ade- cuadamente. Las mejores ?pocas del a?o para medir la...: Los nitratos Monty C. Dozier, Profesor Asistente y Especialista de Extensi?n, Rebecca H. Melton, Asistente de Extensi?n, Extensi?n Cooperativa de Texas, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Michael F. Hare, Especialista Principal en Recursos Naturales...

  19. Utility-Based Wireless Resource Allocation for Variable Rate Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Ng, Chun Sum

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For most wireless services with variable rate transmission, both average rate and rate oscillation are important performance metrics. The traditional performance criterion, utility of average transmission rate, boosts the average rate but also results in high rate oscillations. We introduce a utility function of instantaneous transmission rates. It is capable of facilitating the resource allocation with flexible combinations of average rate and rate oscillation. Based on the new utility, we consider the time and power allocation in a time-shared wireless network. Two adaptation policies are developed, namely, time sharing (TS) and joint time sharing and power control (JTPC). An extension to quantized time sharing with limited channel feedback (QTSL) for practical systems is also discussed. Simulation results show that by controlling the concavity of the utility function, a tradeoff between the average rate and rate oscillation can be easily made.

  20. Reverse Engineering of Proteasomal Translocation Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Goldobin; M. Mishto; K. Textoris-Taube; P. M. Kloetzel; A. Zaikin

    2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the problem of proteasomal protein translocation and introduce a new stochastic model of the proteasomal digestion (cleavage) of proteins. In this model we account for the protein translocation and the positioning of cleavage sites of a proteasome from first principles. We show by test examples and by processing experimental data that our model allows reconstruction of the translocation and cleavage rates from mass spectroscopy data on digestion patterns and can be used to investigate the properties of transport in different experimental set-ups. Detailed investigation with this model will enable theoretical quantitative prediction of the proteasomal activity.

  1. Tunneling decay rate in quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mithani, Audrey T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In canonical quantum cosmology, the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence. However, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. In this paper, we apply this approach to an oscillating universe model recently introduced by Graham et al. By extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field $\\phi$ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock", we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe.

  2. Tunneling decay rate in quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audrey T. Mithani; Alexander Vilenkin

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In canonical quantum cosmology, the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence. However, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. In this paper, we apply this approach to an oscillating universe model recently introduced by Graham et al. By extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field $\\phi$ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock", we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe.

  3. Binary Capture Rates for Massive Protostars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickolas Moeckel; John Bally

    2007-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The high multiplicity of massive stars in dense, young clusters is established early in their evolution. The mechanism behind this remains unresolved. Recent results suggest that massive protostars may capture companions through disk interactions with much higher efficiency than their solar mass counterparts. However, this conclusion is based on analytic determinations of capture rates and estimates of the robustness of the resulting binaries. We present the results of coupled n-body and SPH simulations of star-disk encounters to further test the idea that disk-captured binaries contribute to the observed multiplicity of massive stars.

  4. Blazar Flaring Rates Measured with GLAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Dermer; B. L. Dingus

    2003-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the minimum observing time scales to detect a blazar at a given flux level with the LAT on GLAST in the scanning and pointing modes. Based upon Phase 1 observations with EGRET, we predict the GLAST detection rate of blazar flares at different flux levels. With some uncertainty given the poor statistics of bright blazars, we predict that a blazar flare with integral flux >~ 200e-8 ph(> 100 MeV) cm^{-2} s^{-1}, which are the best candidates for Target of Opportunity pointings and extensive temporal and spectral studies, should occur every few days.

  5. Innovations in high rate condensate polishing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Brien, M. [Graver Water Division, Union, NJ (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test work is being conducted at two major east coast utilities to evaluate flow distribution in high flow rate condensate polishing service vessels. The work includes core sample data used to map the flow distribution in vessels as originally manufactured. Underdrain modifications for improved flow distribution are discussed with data that indicates performance increases of the service vessel following the modifications. The test work is on going, with preliminary data indicating that significant improvements in cycle run length are possible with underdrain modifications. The economic benefits of the above modifications are discussed.

  6. Blazar Flaring Rates Measured with GLAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dermer, C D

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the minimum observing time scales to detect a blazar at a given flux level with the LAT on GLAST in the scanning and pointing modes. Based upon Phase 1 observations with EGRET, we predict the GLAST detection rate of blazar flares at different flux levels. With some uncertainty given the poor statistics of bright blazars, we predict that a blazar flare with integral flux >~ 200e-8 ph(> 100 MeV) cm^{-2} s^{-1}, which are the best candidates for Target of Opportunity pointings and extensive temporal and spectral studies, should occur every few days.

  7. Building Energy Rating and Disclosure Policies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Future ofHydronicBuildingDepartmentDavidDepartmentRating and

  8. Fixed Rate Agreement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Departmentof OhioFirst Annual PostSmart Grid Progress |Fixed Rate

  9. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility

  10. ARM - Lesson Plans: Rate of Coral Growth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, Alaska OutreachMakingPast SeaRate of Coral

  11. Attachments Energy Ratings Council | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource HeatEnergy2).pdfAttachments Energy Ratings

  12. BPA Power Rates (pbl/main)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historian ...BES UserDOE -BPA GenerationRates

  13. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AGUser page EditUsinasourceUtility Rate

  14. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AGUser page EditUsinasourceUtility RateUtility

  15. Property:HeatRate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to:DocketFlowGpmGrossGen JumpRating Jump

  16. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : Direct Testimony.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of our testimony is to sponsor the rate design portions of Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wholesale Power Rate Development Study (WPRDS), WP-07-E-BPA-05, and associated portions of the Wholesale Power Rate Schedules and GRSPs (WP-07-E-BPA-07). Our testimony is organized in eight sections. The first section outlines the purpose of our testimony. Section 2 describes BPA's Demand Rates, including subsections on the definition of the Demand Rate, the method for computing the Demand Rates, and differences from the currently effective WP-02 Demand Rate. Section 3 describes BPA's Load Variance Rate, with subsections on the definition and purpose of the Load Variance Rate, application of the Load Variance Rate, how the Load Variance Rate is calculated, and the differences from the WP-02 Load Variance Rate. Section 4 describes the steps involved in developing BPA's energy rates and differences from the WP-02 rate case. Section 5 discusses discontinuation of the Stepped Up Multi-Year Block Rate. Section 6 describes a minor change to the Unauthorized Increase Rates and the Excess Factoring Rates. Section 7 describes the Targeted Adjustment Charge. Section 8 addresses the Operating Reserves Credit.

  17. On the Annihilation Rate of WIMPs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Baumgart; Ira Z. Rothstein; Varun Vaidya

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a formalism that allows one to systematically calculate the WIMP annihilation rate into gamma rays whose energy far exceeds the weak scale. A factorization theorem is presented which separates the radiative corrections stemming from initial state potential interactions from loops involving the final state. This separation allows us to go beyond the fixed order calculation, which is polluted by large infrared logarithms. For the case of Majorana WIMPs transforming in the adjoint representation of SU(2), we present the result for the resummed rate at leading double log accuracy in terms of two initial state partial wave matrix elements and one hard matching coefficient. For a given model, one may calculate the cross section by calculating the tree level matching coefficient and determining the value of a local four fermion operator. We find that the effects of resummation can be as large as 100% for a 20 TeV WIMP. The generalization of the formalism to other types of WIMPs is discussed.

  18. On Rate Control of Wireless Multicasting Jie Luo, Anthony Ephremides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On Rate Control of Wireless Multicasting Jie Luo, Anthony Ephremides ECE Dept. Univ. of Maryland the effective multicast communication rate is termed rate control. By modeling the channel from the transmitter only by the channel distributions. Key words multicast, rate control 1 Introduction In the layered

  19. Choosing a sample rate for prime mover digital control systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schade, J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explains the reasons and consequences of sample rate selection for gas turbine and steam turbine controls. Sample rate theory is important because there is often confusion about how to select the sample rate for different applications. Full-load rejection offspeeds, a common prime mover performance issue, will be used as an example. The effect of different sample rates will be shown.

  20. Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications 24-25 November 2011, Athens circular for the Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications, to be held of thermonuclear reaction rates. The topics of the workshop, in relation with thermonuclear reaction rates

  1. 221Cahiers de l'AARS --N 15 --Dcembre 2011 Dans son rcit de voyage, Heinrich Barth,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , nombreux étant les auteurs utilisant des appellations du type «wadi Tales- chout» (Waldock 2010), un peu 1874, il serait sans doute préférable d'écrire «l'oued Taleschout» plutôt que «le wadi Tales- chout

  2. Bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil -- A rate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, K.Y.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, T. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.] [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Three rate equations, a modified Monod equation and two mass transfer rate equations, were used to calculate the biodegradation rate, oxygen transfer rate and oil transfer rate during a bioremediation process of oil-contaminated soil. Based on experimental rate constants, these three rates were calculated and compared. It was found the bioremediation rate of oil-contaminated soil could be controlled by the mass transfer process of oil into aqueous solution (0.12 mg BOD/(1-h)). When the oil transfer rate is enhanced by at least 10 times, the oxygen transfer process (0.1--1.0 mg BOD/(1-h)) becomes the rate-controlling step. For most of the cases, the biodegradation of oil in aqueous solution is not the limiting step unless the microbial population in the aqueous solution is less than 100 mg VSS/1.

  3. Adjustable flow rate controller for polymer solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Kenneth M. (Bartlesville, OK)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An adjustable device for controlling the flow rate of polymer solutions which results in only little shearing of the polymer molecules, said device comprising an inlet manifold, an outlet manifold, a plurality of tubes capable of providing communication between said inlet and outlet manifolds, said tubes each having an internal diameter that is smaller than that of the inlet manifold and large enough to insure that viscosity of the polymer solution passing through each said tube will not be reduced more than about 25 percent, and a valve associated with each tube, said valve being capable of opening or closing communication in that tube between the inlet and outlet manifolds, each said valve when fully open having a diameter that is substantially at least as great as that of the tube with which it is associated.

  4. Implementation of home energy rating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vine, E.; Barnes, B.K.; Ritschard, R.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the findings of a national survey of home energy rating and labelling programs (HERS). We discuss the nature of different implementation problems and the kinds of strategies that have been used to deal with them to ensure the effective penetration of HERS to all HERS-users. Of further special interest to us has been the nature of different delivery systems. We examined 34 HERS, located in 28 states: 13 of these were located in the southeast, 8 in the midwest, 5 in the northeast, 4 in the Pacific/mountain region, and 3 in the southwest. Although our survey does not represent a scientific sampling of HERS, we believe that the final distribution accurately reflects the distribution of HERS through the country and the full range of likely implementation and delivery programs.

  5. NFC Industrial Access and Equipment Rates valid 7/1/13 to 6/30/14 RATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    NFC Industrial Access and Equipment Rates valid 7/1/13 to 6/30/14 RATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE ACCESS/USE UNITS RATE ACCESS FEE monthly fee $91.00 LAB USAGE FEE per lab session $67.50 LAB USAGE MAX PER MONTH per month $631.00 EQUIPMENT INCLUDED EQUIPMENT UNITS RATE ALDATOMIC LAYER DEP ALD Savannah 200 minute

  6. Rates for Color Shifted Microlensing Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Buchalter; Marc Kamionkowski; R. Michael Rich

    1995-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    If the objects responsible for gravitational microlensing (ML) of Galactic-bulge stars are faint dwarfs, then blended light from the lens will distort the shape of the ML light curve and shift the color of the observed star during the event. The resolution in current surveys is not accurate enough to observe this effect, but it should be detected with frequent and precise followup observations. We calculate the expected rates for ML events where the shape distortions will be observable by such followup observations, assuming that the lenses are ordinary main-sequence stars in a bar and in the disk. We study the dependence of the rates for color-shifted (CS) events on the frequency of followup observations and on the precision of the photometry for a variety of waveband pairings. We find that for hourly observations in $B$ and $K$ with typical photometric errors of 0.01 mag, 28\\% of the events where a main-sequence bulge star is lensed, and 7\\% of the events where the source is a bulge giant, will give rise to a measurable CS at the 95\\% confidence level. For observations in $V$ and $I$, the fractions become 18\\% and 5\\%, respectively, but may be increased to 40\\% and 13\\% by improved photometric accuracy and increased sampling frequency. We outline how the mass, distance, and transverse speed of the lens can be obtained, giving examples of typical errors. We discuss how CS events can be distinguished from events where the source is blended with a binary companion.

  7. Rate constants from the reaction path Hamiltonian. I. Reactive flux simulations for dynamically correct rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    As ab initio electronic structure calculations become more accurate, inherent sources of error, facilitate reactive flux calculations. As an example we compute the dynamically corrected rate constant on which the reaction occurs. A large number of electronic structure theo- ries are available

  8. Minimizing Variation in Outdoor CPV Power Ratings: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.; Marion, B.; Rodriguez, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CPV community has agreed to have both indoor and outdoor power ratings at the module level. The indoor rating provides a repeatable measure of module performance as it leaves the factory line while the outdoor rating provides a measure of true performance under real world conditions. The challenge with an outdoor rating is that the spectrum, temperature, wind speed, etc are constantly in flux and therefore the resulting power rating varies from day to day and month to month. This work examines different methodologies for determining the outdoor power rating with the goal of minimizing variation even if data are collected under changing meteorological conditions.

  9. Inflation targeting in emerging countries: the exchange rate issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes Altamirano, Javier Arturo

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The current discussion of Inflation Targeting (IT) in emerging economies deals with the effects that nominal exchange rate movements have on the overall inflation rate. The literature has focused in the analysis of the advantages and disadvantages...

  10. Utility Rate Design Revision - A Frisbee Full of Boomerangs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dannenmaier, J. H.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rising electricity prices have prompted investigation of utility rates and proposals for changed in their design. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the current design of electric rates, changes proposed, actual trends, and predictable results...

  11. Microsoft Word - News Release -- Rates Initial Proposal Dec ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    utilities, the Bonneville Power Administration today proposed a 6.7 percent average wholesale power rate increase for the fiscal year 2016-2017 rate period. BPA is also proposing...

  12. From: Sent: Subject: Attachments: SNR-Rates, SNR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SNR - Rates From: Sent: Subject: Attachments: SNR-Rates, SNR Friday, August 22, 2014 3:03 PM 2015 Initial Power Restoration Fund Obligation FY 2015 Initial Restoration Fund Letter...

  13. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Power Sales Rate History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Power Sales Rate History Updated: 9112013 Rate Schedule Effective Dates Energy (MillskWh) Capacity (kW-mo.) Combined (MillskWh) 1...

  14. Apply: Increase Residential Energy Code Compliance Rates (DE...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Apply: Increase Residential Energy Code Compliance Rates (DE-FOA-0000953) Apply: Increase Residential Energy Code Compliance Rates (DE-FOA-0000953) April 21, 2014 - 12:32pm Addthis...

  15. Heart rate variability in mice with coronary heart disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapanta, Laurence (Laurence F.)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat fluctuation of the heart rate, is a non-invasive test that measures the autonomic regulation of the heart. Assessment of HRV has been shown to predict the risk of mortality ...

  16. How predictable : modeling rates of change in individuals and populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krumme, Katherine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops methodologies to measure rates of change in individual human behavior, and to capture statistical regularities in change at the population level, in three pieces: i) a model of individual rate of change ...

  17. act transportation rate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rates are calculated and compared. The ortho- isomer has a very small rate of transport. 1999 Ferreira, Mrcia M. C. 89 2008 James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy...

  18. Energy Productivity Via Time-of-Day Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael, R. S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prompted by a combination of PURPA and a national concern about electricity price and supply, many utilities now have in place industrial time-of-day electric rates. When properly designed, these rates present an opportunity for energy...

  19. Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia: History, Rates, and Consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia: History, Rates, and Consequences PHILIP M. FEARNSIDE Instituto of deforestation began with the inauguration of the Transamazon Highway in 1970. Amazonian deforestation rates have that make deforestation profitable. Forest degradation results from logging, ground fires (facilitated

  20. Enhancing the Lithiation Rate of Silicon Nanowires by the Inclusion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhancing the Lithiation Rate of Silicon Nanowires by the Inclusion of Tin. Enhancing the Lithiation Rate of Silicon Nanowires by the Inclusion of Tin. Abstract: Silicon (Si) has a...

  1. Rangeland Drought Management for Texans: Stocking Rate and Grazing Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.; Carpenter, Bruce B.

    2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains how stocking rates and grazing management decisions can help a ranch survive a drought. To deal with drought, a rancher must monitor forage supply and demand; use a conservative stocking rate and keep it flexible...

  2. Strategic Rate Design: The Role of Industrial Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, J. I.; House, R.

    STRA TEGIC RA TE DESIGN: THE ROLE OF INDUSTRIAL TARIFFS Jeffrey 1. Rosenblum Rate Design Section Public Utility Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Strategic rate design refers to the use of deliberate pricing strategies... occurred in cogeneration capacity in Texas. The utilities use their rate tariffs strategically to influence the growth of self-generation. This paper will discuss several aspects of strategic rate design to influence industrial energy sales (measured...

  3. Minimizing Variation in Outdoor CPV Power Ratings (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Module data from NREL's CPV test bed is used to examine methods for calculating outdoor CPV power ratings. IEC 62670 and ASTM E2527 are used as a starting point for determining a module power rating on a monthly basis. Monthly power ratings vary by more than desired using existing methods. The presentation examines modifications to existing methods as well as spectral corrections to reduce variation in monthly module power ratings.

  4. Exports and exchange rate : a firm-level investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Exports and exchange rate : a firm-level investigation N° 2008-02 Février 2008 Sarah Guillou OFCE-DRIC hal-00973044,version1-3Apr2014 #12;Exports and exchange rate: a firm-level investigation Sarah Guillou February 2008 Abstract This paper investigates the relation between export behaviour and the exchange rate

  5. Housing Rates for Summer 2014 Anderson & Wilder Summer Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    Housing Rates for Summer 2014 Anderson & Wilder Summer Housing Revised 3/28/14 Please note: For Summer 2014 only, there will be one standard housing rate, regardless of assignment to a single or double for summer housing. For summer 2015, we will return to our standard pricing ­ separate rates for singles

  6. STATE OF CALIFORNIA MAXIMUM RATED TOTAL COOLING CAPACITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the installed space conditioning system must have a cooling capacity rating at ARI conditions that is equal Total Cooling Capacity of the installed system (Btu/hr) 3b Sum of the ARI Rated Total Cooling Capacities, then the sum of ARI Rated Cooling Capacities of the installed cooling systems must be calculated and entered

  7. EIS-0093: Bonneville Power Administration's 1982 Rate Proposal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with an increase in wholesale power rates for calendar year 1982, including the effects of rate hikes in that year, the cumulative effects of rate hikes from 1979-1985, as well as alternative revenue scenarios.

  8. EIS-0102: Bonneville Power Administration's 1983 Wholesale Power Rate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration prepared this EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with an increase in wholesale power rates that would become effective on November 1, 1983, including the effects of rate hikes in that year and the cumulative effects of previous rate hikes.

  9. Modeling of strain rate effects on clay in simple shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Byoung Chan

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of strain rate on clays in simple shear conditions. The response of clay soils is highly dependent on the rate of strain for both effective stress path and stress-strain behavior. The undrained shear strength is strongly influenced by strain rate both...

  10. Chukwuemeka I. Okoye Carbon Dioxide Solubility and Absorption Rate in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    Copyright by Chukwuemeka I. Okoye 2005 #12;Carbon Dioxide Solubility and Absorption Rate _______________________ Nicholas A. Peppas #12;Carbon Dioxide Solubility and Absorption Rate in Monoethanolamine/Piperazine/H2O for. #12;iii Carbon Dioxide Solubility and Absorption Rate in Monoethanolamine/Piperazine/H2O

  11. Rate Control Management of Atrial Fibrillation: May a Mathematical Model Suggest an Ideal Heart Rate?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anselmino, Matteo; Camporeale, Carlo; Saglietto, Andrea; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background. Despite the routine prescription of rate control therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF), clinical evidence demonstrating a heart rate target is lacking. Aim of the present study was to run a mathematical model simulating AF episodes with a different heart rate (HR) to predict hemodynamic parameters for each situation. Methods. The lumped model, representing the pumping heart together with systemic and pulmonary circuits, was run to simulate AF with HR of 50, 70, 90, 110 and 130 bpm, respectively. Results. Left ventricular pressure increased by 56.7%, from 33.92+-37.56 mmHg to 53.15+-47.56 mmHg, and mean systemic arterial pressure increased by 27.4%, from 82.66+-14.04 mmHg to 105.29+-7.63 mmHg, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. Stroke volume (from 77.45+-8.5 to 39.09+-8.08 mL), ejection fraction (from 61.1+-4.4 to 39.32+-5.42%) and stroke work (SW, from 0.88+-0.04 to 0.58+-0.09 J) decreased by 49.5, 35.6 and 34.2%, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. In addition, oxygen co...

  12. Optimization of well rates under gas coning conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urbanczyk, Christopher Henry

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    production rates under gas caning conditions. This new method applies to an oil reservoir overlain by a large gas cap containing multiple wells. The cases consider have a limit on the maximum field production rate for both oil and gas. It was found... that the optimal p~ion rates are achieved when Eq. 1 is satisfied for any pair of wells i and j: ) I = constant i = 1, . . . , n dqo This condition minimizes the f ield gas production rate when the maximum field production rate for oil is met, and maximizes...

  13. ADJECTIVE RATINGS FOR FIRE BEHAVIOR For many years now in America we have used the National Fire Danger Rating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danger Rating System (Deeming, et al, 1978) adjective ratings to describe the "fire danger" for a given of descriptive advice of the "danger" of having an ignition based on historic weather data for what kind of fire these ratings meant regarding potential fire behavior. Furthermore, they described "fire danger" which

  14. HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grudberg, Peter Matthew [XIA LLC

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many â?? you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with associated preamplifiers; these detectors surpassed the performance we expected to get from the Ketek detectors, however they are housed in a sealed module, which does not offer the ease of repair and expandability weâ??d hoped to achieve with the Ketek SDDâ??s. Our packaging efforts were quite successful, as we came up with a very compact way to mount the detector and to house the associated electronics, as well as a very effective way to reliably take out the heat (from the electronics as well as the detectorâ??s Peltier coolers) without risk of condensation and without external airflow or vibration, which could create problems for the target applications. While we were able to design compact processing electronics that fit into the detector assembly, they are still at the prototype stage, and would require a significant redesign to achieve product status. We have not yet tested this detector at a synchrotron facility; we do still plan on working with some close contacts at the nearby Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) to get some testing with the beam (using existing commercial electronics for readout, as the integrated processor is not ready for use).

  15. The heritability of daily ranges in rectal temperature, respiration rate, and pulse rate in lactating cows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vega C., Eduardo Humberto

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the data were oolleoted. K. ghly significant oorrelations of temperature with stags of lactation and of respiration with stage of lactation were found among Jerseys, among Holsteins highly significant correlations were found as follows: temperature... in rectal temperature can be expla. 'mod on '. hs basis of the regression of this variable on stage of lactation~ while 10. 5T of the variation in the daily range in respiration rate ca; be explain. d on the basis of the regress'. i n of dai&~ range...

  16. WP-96/TR-96 & TC-96 Power and Transmission Rate Case (rates/ratecases)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE Awards ContractRebuttalCase InitialRates

  17. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier6Sell | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformation DemandReactivePowerChargeInformation Rate Jump to:

  18. Integrated loading rate determination for wastewater infiltration system sizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenssen, P.D. (Norges Landbrukshoegskole, Aas (Norway). Centre for Soil and Environmental Research); Siegrist, R.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the principal parameters used in wastewater system design is the hydraulic loading rate. Historically the determination of the loading rate has been a straight forward process involving selection of a rate based on soil texture or water percolation rate. Research and experience over the past decade has provided additional insight into the complex processes occurring within wastewater-amended soil systems and has suggested the fallacy of this approach. A mean grain size vs. sorting (MESO) diagram constitutes a new basis for soil classification for wastewater infiltration system design. Crude characterization of the soil hydraulic properties is possible according to the MESO Diagram and loading rate as well as certain purification aspects can be assessed from the diagram. In this paper, an approach is described based on the MESO Diagram that integrates soil properties and wastewater pretreatment to yield a loading rate. 53 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Minimizing Variation in Outdoor CPV Power Ratings (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th International Conference on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems (CPV-7), 4-6 April 2011, Las Vegas, Nevada. The CPV community has agreed to have both indoor and outdoor power ratings at the module level. The indoor rating provides a repeatable measure of module performance as it leaves the factory line while the outdoor rating provides a measure of true performance under real world conditions. The challenge with an outdoor rating is that the spectrum, temperature, wind speed, etc are constantly in flux and therefore the resulting power rating varies from day to day and month to month. This work examines different methodologies for determining the outdoor power rating with the goal of minimizing variation even if data are collected under changing meteorological conditions.

  20. Electrochemical Corrosion Rate Sensors for Waste Incineration Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Matthes, S.A.; Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Eden, D.A. (Honeywell Intercorr)

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical corrosion rate sensors work in high temperature waste incineration applications where ash is deposited. The ash serves as the electrolyte for electrochemical measurements, such as liner polarization resistance, electrochemical noise, and harmonic distortion analyses. Results to date have shown that these types of sensors respond qualitatively to changes in temperature, gas composition, alloy composition, and type of ash. Several years of research have shown that high temperature corrosion rate probes need to be better understood before corrosion rate can be used as a process variable by power plant operators. More recent research has shown that electrochemical corrosion probes typically measure lower corrosion rates than those measured by standard mass loss techniques. While still useful for monitoring changes in corrosion rates, absolute probe corrosion rates will need a calibration factor to be useful. Ideas for research that may help resolve these issues are presented.

  1. Colorado State University Mail Services DOMESTIC & INTERNATIONAL POSTAGE RATES January 26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado State University ­ Mail Services DOMESTIC & INTERNATIONAL POSTAGE RATES January 26 th Flat Rate Envelope $5.60 Legal Flat Rate Envelope $5.75 Padded Flat Rate Envelope $5.95 Small Flat Rate Box $5.80 Medium Flat Rate Box $12.35 Large Flat Rate Box $17.45 APO/FPO Large Flat Rate Box $15

  2. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations.

  3. Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friend, P.J. [Urenco, Capenhurst (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

  4. Cost Bases for Incentive Rates Applicable to Industrial Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stover, C. N.

    great deal of attention and increased acceptance. This represents a substantial change in attitude, particularly on the part of the regulatory commissions; a few years ago any proposal related to an incentive type rate would not have been... in rate discrimination as between customer classes. Over the last few years many utilities have experienced changes that have resulted in increased interest in incentive rates by the utility, by its customer, and by the regulatory commission. In most...

  5. The instantaneous radial growth rate of stellar discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezzulli, Gabriele; Boissier, Samuel; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new and simple method to measure the instantaneous mass and radial growth rates of the stellar discs of spiral galaxies, based on their star formation rate surface density (SFRD) profiles. Under the hypothesis that discs are exponential with time-varying scalelengths, we derive a universal theoretical profile for the SFRD, with a linear dependence on two parameters: the specific mass growth rate $\

  6. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: III. Nuclear Physics Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Iliadis; Richard Longland; Art Champagne; Alain Coc

    2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear physics input used to compute the Monte Carlo reaction rates and probability density functions that are tabulated in the second paper of this series (Paper II) is presented. Specifically, we publish the input files to the Monte Carlo reaction rate code RatesMC, which is based on the formalism presented in the first paper of this series (Paper I). This data base contains overwhelmingly experimental nuclear physics information. The survey of literature for this review was concluded in November 2009.

  7. Home energy ratings systems: Actual usage may vary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Home energy ratings (HERS) attempt to predict typical energy costs for a given residence and estimate the savings potentials of various energy retrofits. This article discusses where the ratings could be improved to more accurately predict the actual energy consumption. Topics covered include the following: is HERS on target (scores, energy predictions, recommended energy improvements); why HERS aren`t perfect; improvements in HERS; the possibility that home energy ratings systems will become market driven. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Control Strategies for Centrifugal Pumps with Variable Flow Rate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This tip sheet discusses control strategies for centrifugal pumps with variable flow rate requirements in pumping systems and includes installation considerations. PUMPING SYSTEMS...

  9. Construction, Qualification, and Low Rate Production Start-up...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Facility with Capacity to Support 100,000 Electric Drive Vehicles Construction, Qualification, and Low Rate Production Start-up of a DC Bus Capacitor High Volume...

  10. Quantitative relationship of sick building syndrome symptoms with ventilation rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. Miettinen (1995). "Ventilation rate in office buildings2005). Outdoor air ventilation and work- related symptoms inand Q. H. Lei (2006). "Ventilation and performance in office

  11. Certification and Rating of Attachments for Fenestration Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    rate fenestration attachment energy performance and provide accurate and useful product comparison criteria, allowing end users in residential and commercial markets to assess...

  12. agitation rating scale: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observations by combining two concepts: the impact of cell sizes on metabolic rate and fractal-like (hierarchical) organization. The proposed model both theoretically and...

  13. Convergence of speech rate in conversation predicts cooperation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    refer to this measure as positive person perception (PPP).results incorporating PPP, separate analyses using warmthPerson Perception Higher PPP ratings were marginally

  14. Calculation of tunneling rates across a barrier with continuous potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sina Khorasani

    2011-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, approximate, but accurate expressions for calculation of wavefunctions and tunneling rates are obtained using the method of uniform asymptotic expansion.

  15. Gradient methods for convex minimization: better rates under ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui Zhang

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 20, 2013 ... Gradient methods for convex minimization: better rates under weaker conditions. Hui Zhang(hhuuii.zhang ***at*** gmail.com)

  16. Merger and Ring Galaxy Formation Rates at z<=2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. D'Onghia; M. Mapelli; B. Moore

    2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the observed merger rate of galaxies over cosmic time and the frequency of collisional ring galaxies (CRGs), with analytic models and halo merger and collision rates from a large cosmological simulation. In the Lambda cold dark matter (LCDM) model we find that the cosmic {\\it merger fraction} does not evolve strongly between 0.2rate since z~1 might not be tied to a disappearing population of major mergers. Halos hosting massive galaxies undergo on average ~2 mergers from z~2 up to present day, reflecting the late assembly time for the massive systems and the related downsizing problem. The cosmic {\\it merger rate} declines with redshift: at the present time it is a factor of 10 lower than at z~2, in reasonable agreement with the current available data. The rate of CRG formation derived from the interactions between halo progenitors up to z=2 is found to be a good tracer of the cosmic merger rate. In the LCDM model the rate of CRGs as well as the merger rate do not scale as (1+z)^m, as suggested by previous models. Our predictions of cosmic merger and CRG rates may be applied to forthcoming surveys such as GOODS and zCOSMOS.

  17. Tomography increases key rates of quantum-key-distribution protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shun Watanabe; Ryutaroh Matsumoto; Tomohiko Uyematsu

    2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a practically implementable classical processing for the BB84 protocol and the six-state protocol that fully utilizes the accurate channel estimation method, which is also known as the quantum tomography. Our proposed processing yields at least as high key rate as the standard processing by Shor and Preskill. We show two examples of quantum channels over which the key rate of our proposed processing is strictly higher than the standard processing. In the second example, the BB84 protocol with our proposed processing yields a positive key rate even though the so-called error rate is higher than the 25% limit.

  18. Rate controlling model for bioremediation of oil contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, K.Y.; Annamali, S.N.; Hopper, J.R. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mathematical model of bio-remediation of hydrocarbons in a soil matrix has been developed to predict the rate controlling step and the remediation rate during the bioremediation of a contaminated soil. The model is based on mass transfer of oxygen and oil into the aqueous solution in the soil matrix and the biodegradation of the hydrocarbons in the aqueous solution. Monod's equation was used to describe the biodegradation rate in aqueous solution while the mass transfer equations were used to describe the mass transfer rates of oxygen and oil in the soil matrix. Results from model calculations indicate that the bio-remediation rate increases and approaches a limiting value when one of the rates becomes controlling. When the parameters of the site soil samples are measured and the solubilities of oxygen and oil in aqueous solution are obtained, the bioremediation rate can be predicted by this model. The rate controlling step of the bioremediation site may be identified quickly and steps to improve the bioremediation rate can be recommended. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Scaling of the magnetic reconnection rate with symmetric shear flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassak, P. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Otto, A. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775 (United States)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The scaling of the reconnection rate during (fast) Hall magnetic reconnection in the presence of an oppositely directed bulk shear flow parallel to the reconnecting magnetic field is studied using two-dimensional numerical simulations of Hall reconnection with two different codes. Previous studies noted that the reconnection rate falls with increasing flow speed and shuts off entirely for super-Alfvenic flow, but no quantitative expression for the reconnection rate in sub-Alfvenic shear flows is known. An expression for the scaling of the reconnection rate is presented.

  20. Microsoft Word - Notice - Rate Order Signed.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ancillary Services and Transmission Service Penalty for Unreserved Use Formula Rates into effect on an interim basis on January 1, 2010. The Federal Register notice...