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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Myakka River Wild and Scenic Designation and Preservation Act (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Myakka was designated as the state's only "Florida Wild and Scenic River" by the Florida State Legislature in 1985. The act provides for preservation and management of the 34-mile portion of...

2

New Savannah River Site Deputy Manager Named  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AIKEN, S.C. – DOE’s Savannah River Operations Office selected Terrel “Terry” J. Spears as the deputy manager of the Savannah River Site (SRS) this month.

3

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

4

CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD,...

5

Case Studies in River Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Site Description and Background --History of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Aggradation of Abandoned Channels Cheongmi Stream and Mangyeong River Cheongmi Stream South Korea In Collaboration

Julien, Pierre Y.

6

MEMORANDUM FOR DAVID C. MOODY MANAGER SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Washington, DC 20585 February 25, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR DAVID C. MOODY MANAGER SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: INES R. TRIAY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR (J SUBJECT:...

7

Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

N /A

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

River Protection Project (RPP) Project Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of River Protection (ORP) Project Management Plan (PMP) for the River Protection Project (RPP) describes the process for developing and operating a Waste Treatment Complex (WTC) to clean up Hanford Site tank waste. The Plan describes the scope of the project, the institutional setting within which the project must be completed, and the management processes and structure planned for implementation. The Plan is written from the perspective of the ORP as the taxpayers' representative. The Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State, has one of the largest concentrations of radioactive waste in the world, as a result of producing plutonium for national defense for more than 40 years. Approximately 53 million gallons of waste stored in 177 aging underground tanks represent major environmental, social, and political challenges for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These challenges require numerous interfaces with state and federal environmental officials, Tribal Nations, stakeholders, Congress, and the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ). The cleanup of the Site's tank waste is a national issue with the potential for environmental and economic impacts to the region and the nation.

NAVARRO, J.E.

2001-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

9

Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Site's H Canyon Work Ensures Future Missions for Facility Restoration of a 90-acre powerhouse ash basin at the Savannah River Site, pictured here, is under way as workers remove...

10

Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins Francisco Cabo Katrin cause environmental damage in the donor basin. The recipient faces a trade-off between paying the price of the irrigated soil, or demand for water for highly productive activities like tourism), then the existence

Boyer, Edmond

11

Demonstration Sites of Best Management Practices: A Manual for the Upper Etowah River Alliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demonstration Sites of Best Management Practices: A Manual for the Upper Etowah River Alliance and the Institute of Ecology #12;UERA BMPs Demonstation Sites Manual 2 of 2 Demonstration Sites of Best Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 iii. Best Management Practices

Rosemond, Amy Daum

12

Managing the Yellowstone River System with Place-based Cultural Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resource management (NRM) and planning (e.g., community-based planning, watershed-based and collaborative management, others). By examining one decentralized riparian management planning effort along the Yellowstone River (Montana), this study finds...

Hall, Damon M.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

13

THOMASSIN et al.: IDENTIFICATION OF A RIVER REACH BY A BAYESIAN APPROACH 1 Identification of a Managed River Reach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-delay estimation, of a river reach managed to produce hydroelectric power. Difficulties lie in the obligation risks or fall-off in hydroelectric power production, the implementation of experimental protocols

Boyer, Edmond

14

Information technology and decision support tools for stakeholder-driven river basin salinity management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Innovative strategies for effective basin-scale salinity management have been developed in the Hunter River Basin of Australia and more recently in the San Joaquin River Basin of California. In both instances web-based stakeholder information dissemination has been a key to achieving a high level of stakeholder involvement and the formulation of effective decision support salinity management tools. A common element to implementation of salinity management strategies in both river basins has been the concept of river assimilative capacity for controlling export salt loading and the potential for trading of the right to discharge salt load to the river - the Hunter River in Australia and the San Joaquin River in California. Both rivers provide basin drainage and the means of exporting salt to the ocean. The paper compares and contrasts the use of monitoring, modeling and information dissemination in the two basins to achieve environmental compliance and sustain irrigated agriculture in an equitable and socially and politically acceptable manner.

Quinn, N.W.T; Cozad, D.B.; Lee, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Conditional Reliability Modeling of Short-term River Basin Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONDITIONAL RELIABILITY MODELING OF SHORT-TERM RIVER BASIN MANAGEMENT ASCE Texas Section Spring Meeting 2003 By: A.Andr?s Salazar, Ph.D. Freese and Nichols, Inc. and Ralph A. Wurbs, P.E., Ph.D. Texas A&M University 2 TEXAS WATER AVAILABITY MODEL...-88Year Storage (x 1000 ac-ft) Periods without shortage = 657 out of 672 (97.8%) What is the probability of satisfying demand when reservoir falls below 100,000 ac-ft? 9 CONDITIONAL RELIABILITY Statistical analysis of small sequences. Simulation 1...

Salazar, A.; Wurbs, R. A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Improving Managed Environmental Water Use: Shasta River Flow and Temperature Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Improving Managed Environmental Water Use: Shasta River Flow and Temperature Modeling By SARAH and perhaps reduce some water management conflicts. Additional research for managing environmental water use manage water supplies and demands to increase water use efficiency through conservation, water markets

Lund, Jay R.

17

A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental and economic impacts associated with water managementfor environmental, water resources, and economic managementRiver basin water management, by establishing environmental

Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

PIA - Savannah River Site Management and Operating Contractor...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Management System (HRMS) Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility...

19

Lower Snake River Subbasin Management Plan WDFW March 2004 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lower Granite pool and the Palouse and Tucannon Rivers join near the midpoint of Lower Monumental Ecoregion. Subbasin Land Ownership Palouse Lower Snake Tucannon Asotin Walla Walla Total Federal Lands 1 68

20

Natural resource management activities at the Savannah River Site. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This environmental assessment (EA) reviews the environmental consequences of ongoing natural resource management activities on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Appendix A contains the Natural Resources Management Plant (NRMP). While several SRS organizations have primary responsibilities for different elements of the plan, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Savannah River Forest Station (SRFS) is responsible for most elements. Of the river scenarios defined in 1985, the High-Intensity Management alternative established the upper bound of environmental consequences; it represents a more intense level of resource management than that being performed under current resource management activities. This alternative established compliance mechanisms for several natural resource-related requirements and maximum practical timber harvesting. Similarly, the Low-Intensity Management alternative established the lower bound of environmental consequences and represents a less intense level of resource management than that being performed under current resource management activities. This alternative also established compliance mechanisms, but defined a passively managed natural area. The Proposed Action of this EA describes the current level of multiple-natural resource management. This EA reviews the proposed action, and the high and low intensity alternative scenarios.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Avian Research at the Savannah River Site: A Model For Integrating Basic Research and Long-Term Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

... Savannah River Site: implications for habitat management and nuclear waste site remediation ... I. Lehr Brisbin, Jr., and Robert A. ... The resulting discus- sions improved our collective understanding of the research/management interaction, and even- tually ...

22

Savannah River Site Waste Management Program Plan, FY 1993. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of the Waste Management Program Plan is to provide an annual report on facilities being used to manage wastes, forces acting to change current waste management (WM) systems, and how operations are conducted. This document also reports on plans for the coming fiscal year and projects activities for several years beyond the coming fiscal year to adequately plan for safe handling and disposal of radioactive wastes generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for developing technology for improved management of wastes.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

DOE Selects Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC to Manage and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

activities. Environmental cleanup activities include management of spent nuclear fuel, nuclear materials, and non high-level radioactive waste; deactivation and decommissioning...

24

EIS-0120: Waste Management Activities for Groundwater Protection, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, SC  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy has prepared this environmental impact statement to assess the environmental consequences of the implementation of modified waste management activities for hazardous, low-level radioactive, and mixed wastes for the protection of groundwater, human health, and the environment at its Savannah River Plant in Aiken, South Carolina.

25

Cedar River, Cedar Rapids, Iowa Flood Risk Management Feasibility Study Report with Integrated Environmental Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Engineers (USACE) has developed a plan for the flood risk management for the Cedar River, Cedar Rapids, Iowa all 12 comments. 1. IEPR Comment - High Significance: The analysis of existing cultural resources Resources was revised to explain why the resolution of the cultural resources will not exceed the budgeted

US Army Corps of Engineers

26

Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains appendices 3 through 6 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, lab. permeability, in-situ permeability, and compaction characteristics, representative of kaolin clays from the Aiken, South Carolina vicinity. (KJD)

Not Available

1988-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

27

EIS-0120: Waste Management Activities for Groundwater Protection, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy has prepared this environmental impact statement to assess the environmental consequences of the implementation of modified waste management activities for hazardous, low-level radioactive, and mixed wastes for the protection of groundwater, human health, and the environment at its Savannah River Plant in Aiken, South Carolina.

28

A Tale of Two Rivers: Implications of Water Management Practices for Mussel Biodiversity Outcomes During Droughts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT A Tale of Two Rivers: Implications of Water Management Practices for Mussel Biodiversity Outcomes During Droughts Daniel C. Allen, Heather S. Galbraith, Caryn C. Vaughn, Daniel E. Spooner Received Abstract Droughts often pose situations where stream water levels are lowest while human demand for water

Allen, Daniel C.

29

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Savannah River Swamp - SC 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborneSavannah River Swamp - SC 01 FUSRAP

30

SPENT FUEL MANAGEMENT AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuels are received from reactor sites around the world and are being stored in the L-Basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The predominant fuel types are research reactor fuel with aluminum-alloy cladding and aluminum-based fuel. Other fuel materials include stainless steel and Zircaloy cladding with uranium oxide fuel. Chemistry control and corrosion surveillance programs have been established and upgraded since the early 1990's to minimize corrosion degradation of the aluminum cladding materials, so as to maintain fuel integrity and minimize personnel exposure from radioactivity in the basin water. Recent activities have been initiated to support additional decades of wet storage which include fuel inspection and corrosion testing to evaluate the effects of specific water impurity species on corrosion attack.

Vormelker, P; Robert Sindelar, R; Richard Deible, R

2007-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

31

Concept Paper for Real-Time Temperature and Water QualityManagement for San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration Program (SJRRP) has recognized the potential importance of real-time monitoring and management to the success of the San Joaquin River (SJR) restoration endeavor. The first step to realizing making real-time management a reality on the middle San Joaquin River between Friant Dam and the Merced River will be the installation and operation of a network of permanent telemetered gauging stations that will allow optimization of reservoir releases made specifically for fish water temperature management. Given the limited reservoir storage volume available to the SJJRP, this functionality will allow the development of an adaptive management program, similar in concept to the VAMP though with different objectives. The virtue of this approach is that as management of the middle SJR becomes more routine, additional sensors can be added to the sensor network, initially deployed, to continue to improve conditions for anadromous fish.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

32

Site specific plan. [Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) covers the period for FY 1989 through FY 1995. The plan establishes a Department of Energy -- Headquarters (DOE-HQ) agenda for cleanup and compliance against which overall progress can be measured. The FYP covers three areas: Corrective Activities, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Operations. Corrective Activities are those activities necessary to bring active or standby facilities into compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Environmental restoration activities include the assessment and cleanup of surplus facilities and inactive waste sites. Waste management operations includes the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes which are generated as a result of ongoing operations. This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show how environmental restoration and waste management activities that were identified during the preparation of the FYP will be implemented, tracked, and reported. The SSP describes DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), organizations that are responsible, for undertaking the activities identified in this plan. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. 8 refs., 46 figs., 23 tabs.

Hutchison, J.; Jernigan, G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Challenges in assessment, management and development of coalbed methane resources in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane development in the Powder River Basin has accelerated rapidly since the mid-1990's. forecasts of coalbed methane (CBM) production and development made during the late 1980's and early 1990's have proven to be distinctly unreliable. Estimates of gas in place and recoverable reserves have also varied widely. This lack of reliable data creates challenges in resource assessment, management and development for public resource management agencies and the CBM operators. These challenges include a variety of complex technical, legal and resource management-related issues. The Bureau of Land Management's Wyoming Reservoir Management Group (WRMG) and US Geological Survey (USGS), with the cooperation and assistance of CBM operators and other interested parties have initiated cooperative studies to address some of these issues. This paper presents results of those studies to date and outlines the agencies' goals and accomplishments expected at the studies' conclusion.

McGarry, D.E.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

EIS-0220: Interim Management of Nuclear Materials at the Savannah River Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This environmental impact statement assesses the potential environmental impacts of actions necessary to manage nuclear materials at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina, until decisions on their ultimate disposition are made and implemented. The Department of Energy has decided to initiate actions which will stabilize certain of the SRS materials that represent environment, safety and health vulnerabilities in their current storage condition or which may represent a vulnerability within the next 10 years.

35

Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

Stovall, Stacey H.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Deployment of Performance Management Methodology as part of Liquid Waste Program at Savannah River Site - 12178  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR) assumed the management lead of the Liquid Waste (LW) Program at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The four SRR partners and AREVA, as an integrated subcontractor are performing the ongoing effort to safely and reliably: - Close High Level Waste (HLW) storage tanks; - Maximize waste throughput at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF); - Process salt waste into stable final waste form; - Manage the HLW liquid waste material stored at SRS. As part of these initiatives, SRR and AREVA deployed a performance management methodology based on Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) at the DWPF in order to support the required production increase. This project took advantage of lessons learned by AREVA through the deployment of Total Productive Maintenance and Visual Management methodologies at the La Hague reprocessing facility in France. The project also took advantage of measurement data collected from different steps of the DWPF process by the SRR team (Melter Engineering, Chemical Process Engineering, Laboratory Operations, Plant Operations). Today the SRR team has a standard method for measuring processing time throughout the facility, a reliable source of objective data for use in decision-making at all levels, and a better balance between engineering department goals and operational goals. Preliminary results show that the deployment of this performance management methodology to the LW program at SRS has already significantly contributed to the DWPF throughput increases and is being deployed in the Saltstone facility. As part of the liquid waste program on Savannah River Site, SRR committed to enhance production throughput of DWPF. Beyond technical modifications implemented at different location of the facility, SRR deployed performance management methodology based on OEE metrics. The implementation benefited from the experience gained by AREVA in its own facilities in France. OEE proved to be a valuable tool in order to support the enhancement program in DWPF by providing unified metrics to measure plant performances, identify bottleneck location, and rank the most time consuming causes from objective data shared between the different groups belonging to the organization. Beyond OEE, the Visual Management tool adapted from the one used at La Hague were also provided in order to further enhance communication within the operating teams. As a result of all the initiatives implemented on DWPF, achieved production has been increased to record rates from FY10 to FY11. It is expected that thanks to the performance management tools now available within DWPF, these results will be sustained and even improved in the future to meet system plan targets. (authors)

Prod'homme, A.; Drouvot, O.; Gregory, J. [AREVA, Paris (France); Barnes, B.; Hodges, B.; Hart, M. [SRR, Aiken, SC (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Savannah River Site`s Site Specific Plan. Environmental restoration and waste management, fiscal year 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act establishes statewide regulations for the management, protection, enhancement and control of land use and development in river areas on all designated wild, scenic and recreational rivers...

39

Certification process of safety analysis and risk management computer codes at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commitment by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to bring safety analysis and risk management codes into compliance with national and sitewide quality assurance requirements necessitated a systematic, structured approach. As a part of this effort, WSRC, in cooperation with the Westinghouse Hanford Company, has developed and implemented a certification process for the development and control of computer software. Safety analysis and risk management computer codes pertinent to reactor analyses were selected for inclusion in the certification process. As a first step, documented plans were developed for implementing verification and validation of the codes, and establishing configuration control. User qualification guidelines were determined. The plans were followed with an extensive assessment of the codes with respect to certification status. Detailed schedules and work plans were thus determined for completing certification of the codes considered. Although the software certification process discussed is specific to the application described, it is sufficiently general to provide useful insights and guidance for certification of other software.

Ades, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toffer, H.; Lewis, C.J.; Crowe, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Certification process of safety analysis and risk management computer codes at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commitment by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to bring safety analysis and risk management codes into compliance with national and sitewide quality assurance requirements necessitated a systematic, structured approach. As a part of this effort, WSRC, in cooperation with the Westinghouse Hanford Company, has developed and implemented a certification process for the development and control of computer software. Safety analysis and risk management computer codes pertinent to reactor analyses were selected for inclusion in the certification process. As a first step, documented plans were developed for implementing verification and validation of the codes, and establishing configuration control. User qualification guidelines were determined. The plans were followed with an extensive assessment of the codes with respect to certification status. Detailed schedules and work plans were thus determined for completing certification of the codes considered. Although the software certification process discussed is specific to the application described, it is sufficiently general to provide useful insights and guidance for certification of other software.

Ades, M.J. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Toffer, H.; Lewis, C.J.; Crowe, R.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed DOE action considered in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is to implement appropriate processes for the safe and efficient management of spent nuclear fuel and targets at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken County, South Carolina, including placing these materials in forms suitable for ultimate disposition. Options to treat, package, and store this material are discussed. The material included in this EIS consists of approximately 68 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of spent nuclear fuel 20 MTHM of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at SRS, as much as 28 MTHM of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel from foreign and domestic research reactors to be shipped to SRS through 2035, and 20 MTHM of stainless-steel or zirconium-clad spent nuclear fuel and some Americium/Curium Targets stored at SRS. Alternatives considered in this EIS encompass a range of new packaging, new processing, and conventional processing technologies, as well as the No Action Alternative. A preferred alternative is identified in which DOE would prepare about 97% by volume (about 60% by mass) of the aluminum-based fuel for disposition using a melt and dilute treatment process. The remaining 3% by volume (about 40% by mass) would be managed using chemical separation. Impacts are assessed primarily in the areas of water resources, air resources, public and worker health, waste management, socioeconomic, and cumulative impacts.

N /A

2000-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

42

Savannah River Site, Spent Nuclear Fuel Management, Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed DOE action described in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is to implement appropriate processes for the safe and efficient management of spent nuclear fuel and targets assigned to the Savannah River Site (SRS), including placing these materials in forms suitable for ultimate disposition. Options to treat, package, and store this material are discussed. The material included in this EIS consists of approximately 68 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of spent nuclear fuel (20 MTHM of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at SRS, as much as 28 MTHM of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel from foreign and domestic research reactors to be shipped to SRS through 2035, and 20 MTHM of stainless-steel or zirconium-clad spent nuclear fuel and some programmatic material stored at SRS for repackaging and dry storage pending shipment offsite).

N /A

1998-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

43

Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

Ashley, Paul

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Large River Food Webs: Influence of Nutrients, Turbidity, and Flow, and Implications for Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supporting consumers in rivers with different physicochemical characteristics, and hypotheses of how these factors affect instream productivity (R = respiration, NPP = net primary production). ........................................ 44 Figure 2... CHAPTER I GENERAL INTRODUCTION Humans have historically constructed civilizations along the banks of rivers. In addition to providing vital supplies of water and easy access to nutrient-rich, alluvial soils, rivers filter and remove nutrients...

Roach, Katherine

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

minimize the environmental costs) of water management, andspecifically on water management, with environmental issuespossible new water and environmental management initiatives

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Sediment Problems and Sediment Management in Asian River Basins (Proceedings of the ICCE Workshop held at Hyderabad, India, September 2009). IAHS Publ. 349, 2011.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment Problems and Sediment Management in Asian River Basins (Proceedings of the ICCE Workshop Sedimentation of reservoirs in Uzbekistan: a case study of the Akdarya Reservoir, Zerafshan River Basin SHAVKAT-made water reservoirs are affected by high sedimentation rates. It is of strategic importance to rationally

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

47

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General report on inspection of Westinghouse Savannah River Company fees for managing and operating the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the first five years of its contract with the Department of Energy, Westinghouse Savannah River Company was paid over $130 million in fees to manage and operate the Savannah River Site. Fees paid to Westinghouse steadily increased over the five year period. For example, fees paid for the last six months of this five year period were over three times as large as fees paid for the first six months. The purpose of this inspection was to review the Department`s annual negotiation of total available fees with Westinghouse, and to examine the reasons for the growth in fees over this five year period. The review disclosed that, after Fiscal Year 1989, the Department used an increasing number of fee bases in calculating Westinghouse Savannah River Company`s fixed-fee-equivalents from the maximum fee schedules within the Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation. The authors found that the Department had significantly increased the percentage of the dollar value of subcontracts being placed in Westinghouse`s fee bases for fee calculation purposes. They found that the Department had effectively increased Westinghouse`s fixed-fee-equivalents by approximately $3 million in both Fiscal Year 1993 and 1994 to, in large part, fund an unallowable employee incentive compensation program. They found that Westinghouse`s total paid fees for the five year period increased significantly over what they would have been had the terms resulting from the original competitive negotiations been maintained. The authors recommended that the Deputy Assist Secretary for Procurement and Assistance Management require that changes in either the number or composition of fee bases used in calculating fees from the maximum fee schedules be submitted to the Department`s Procurement Executive for approval.

NONE

1995-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

48

Factors influencing landowner willingness to enroll in a cost-share brush management program in the Pedernales River watershed, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACTORS INFLUENCING LANDOWNER WILLINGNESS TO ENROLL IN A COST-SHARE BRUSH MANAGEMENT PROGRAM IN THE PEDERNALES RIVER WATERSHED, TEXAS A Thesis by MARK ROBERT TAYS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial... WATERSHED, TEXAS A Thesis by MARK ROBERT TAYS Submitted to the Oftice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Urs P. Kreuter...

Tays, Mark Robert

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possible new water and environmental management initiativesminimize the environmental costs) of water management, andenvironmental issues, the focus of the proposed body would be specifically on water management,

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Nonproliferation impacts assessment for the management of the Savannah River Site aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On May 13, 1996, the US established a new, 10-year policy to accept and manage foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the US. The goal of this policy is to reduce civilian commerce in weapons-usable highly enriched uranium (HEU), thereby reducing the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation. Two key disposition options under consideration for managing this fuel include conventional reprocessing and new treatment and packaging technologies. The Record of Decision specified that, while evaluating the reprocessing option, ``DOE will commission or conduct an independent study of the nonproliferation and other (e.g., cost and timing) implications of chemical separation of spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors.`` DOE`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation conducted this study consistent with the aforementioned Record of Decision. This report addresses the nonproliferation implications of the technologies under consideration for managing aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site. Because the same technology options are being considered for the foreign research reactor and the other aluminum-based spent nuclear fuels discussed in Section ES.1, this report addresses the nonproliferation implications of managing all the Savannah River Site aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel, not just the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. The combination of the environmental impact information contained in the draft EIS, public comment in response to the draft EIS, and the nonproliferation information contained in this report will enable the Department to make a sound decision regarding how to manage all aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site, Summary Report- February 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management and Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site

52

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management...

53

Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Saltcedar management strategies and effects on water quality and quantity of the Pecos River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerial herbicide treatments initiated in August 1999 on the Pecos River near Orla, Texas, were evaluated for saltcedar density, vegetation cover and soil salinity pre-treatment and one and two years post-treatment. Saltcedar density was used...

Clayton, Lindi Ann

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Integrated Project Management Planning for the Deactivation of the Savannah River Site F-Canyon Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper explains the planning process that is being utilized by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company to take the F-Canyon Complex facilities from operations to a deactivated condition awaiting final decommissioning.

Clark, T.G.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The future of the Salton Sea under proposed lower Colorado River basin water management scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Salton Sea, situated in the Lower Colorado River Basin (LCRB), is under duress due to, among other things, increased water demands of cities like San Diego, California and Mexicali, Mexico. This research developed a tool to investigate...

Kjelland, Michael Edward

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of the Three Rivers Solid Waste Authority regional waste management center at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a landfill and technology center for regionally-generated municipal solid waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The facility would serve the municipal solid waste disposal needs for SRS and at least nine of the surrounding counties who currently comprise the Three Rivers Solid Waste Authority (TRSWA). Additional counties could become included in the proposed action at some future date. Current Federal and state requirements do not afford individual counties and municipalities within the region encompassing SRS the ability to efficiently or economically operate modern waste management facilities. In addition, consolidation of regional municipal solid waste at one location would have the benefit of reducing the duplicity of environmental consequences associated with the construction and operation of county-level facilities. The option to seek a combined disposal and technology development facility based on a regionally-cooperative effort was selected as a viable alternative to the existing individual SRS or county disposal activities. This document was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CFR Part 1021). NEPA requires the assessment of environmental consequences of Federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. Based on the potential for impacts described for impacts described herein, DOE will either publish a Finding of No Significant Impact or prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS).

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Fluvial responses to management along the Sacramento River, California, USA: Transience v. persistence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in industrialized nations are managed carefully to maximize their benefits (e.g., water supply, hydroelectricity

Singer, Michael

59

Comparative Water Law and Management: The Yellow River Basin In Western China and the State of Kansas In the Western United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these canal systems ranges between 0.38 to 0.45 and 0.35 to 0.51, respectively. 42 In other words, between 50-60% of Yellow River water is lost TRANSFER MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CONSTRUCTION 32-38 (Yellow River Conservancy Press 2008) (P.R.C.) [hereinafter YRCC...-supply problems in the Basin and in Kansas. Part III surveys their respective water laws and water management and allocation programs, with particular attention to water rights transfers, to show how the Chinese and Kansas systems have sought to address...

Griggs, Burke W.; Peck, John C.; Yupeng, Xue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Malheur River Subbasin Assessment and Management Plan For Fish and Wildlife Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.H. Stute. 2001. Evaluation of Idaho Power hatchery mitigation program. In: Technical appendices for Hells Canyon Complex Hydroelectric project. Idaho Power, Boise, ID. Technical Report E.3.1-4. Agee, J. K. 1981. Armour, C. 1990. Options for reintroducing salmon and steelhead above mid-Snake River dams. U.S. Fish

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear...

62

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relating to hydroelectricity generation, irrigation water,resources to generate hydroelectricity Managing watershedsFor example, micro-hydroelectricity generation may be an

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification report, volumes I and II - 8/19/99  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy policy (DOE P 450.4) is that safety is integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. In simple and straightforward terms, the Department will ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of this River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes are implemented within RFP to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The goal of an implemented ISMS is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The ISMS is comprised of the (1) described functions, components, processes, and interfaces (system map or blueprint) and (2) personnel who are executing those assigned roles and responsibilities to manage and control the ISMS. Therefore, this review evaluated both the ''paper'' and ''people'' aspects of the ISMS to ensure that the system is implemented within RPP. Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted an ISMS Phase I Verification of the TWRS from September 28-October 9, 1998. The resulting verification report recommended that TWRS-RL and the contractor proceed with Phase II of ISMS verification given that the concerns identified from the Phase I verification review are incorporated into the Phase II implementation plan.

SHOOP, D.S.

1999-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

64

Management of Legacy Spent Nuclear Fuel Wastes at the Chalk River Laboratories: The Challenges and Innovative Solutions Implemented - 13301  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AECL's Fuel Packaging and Storage (FPS) Project was initiated in 2004 to retrieve, transfer, and stabilize an identified inventory of degraded research reactor fuel that had been emplaced within in-ground 'Tile Hole' structures in Chalk River Laboratories' Waste Management Area in the 1950's and 60's. Ongoing monitoring of the legacy fuel storage conditions had identified that moisture present in the storage structures had contributed to corrosion of both the fuel and the storage containers. This prompted the initiation of the FPS Project which has as its objective to design, construct, and commission equipment and systems that would allow for the ongoing safe storage of this fuel until a final long-term management, or disposition, pathway was available. The FPS Project provides systems and technologies to retrieve and transfer the fuel from the Waste Management Area to a new facility that will repackage, dry, safely store and monitor the fuel for a period of 50 years. All equipment and the new storage facility are designed and constructed to meet the requirements for Class 1 Nuclear Facilities in Canada. (authors)

Schruder, Kristan [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Goodwin, Derek [Rolls-Royce Civil Nuclear Canada Limited, 678 Neal Dr., Peterborough, Ontario (Canada)] [Rolls-Royce Civil Nuclear Canada Limited, 678 Neal Dr., Peterborough, Ontario (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Sediment Problems and Sediment Management in Asian River Basins (Proceedings of the ICCE Workshop held at Hyderabad, India, September 2009). IAHS Publ. 349, 2011.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment Problems and Sediment Management in Asian River Basins (Proceedings of the ICCE Workshop held at Hyderabad, India, September 2009). IAHS Publ. 349, 2011. 1 Sedimentation of reservoirs sedimentation rates. It is of strategic importance to rationally quantify available water resources in existing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

66

Giant Sequoia Management Strategies on the Tule River Indian Reservation1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

while maintaining cultural and esthetic values. Strategies for managing giant sequoia forests have been resources has provided the Reservation community with recreational opportunities, cultural values, and economic benefits for many years. Forest management activities are planned in response to Tribal Council

Standiford, Richard B.

67

Behaviours and attitudes in the management of nonpoint source pollution: Ping River Basin, Thailand   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural nonpoint source pollution is recognised as a major cause of water pollution. The characteristics of nonpoint source pollution suggest that an efficient approach should focus on a source control and hence land-use management. Recently...

Bumbudsanpharoke, Wimolpat

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

Quinn, N.W.T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Creating a fuels baseline and establishing fire frequency relationships to develop a landscape management strategy at the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-41. pp 351-366. Abstract—The Savannah River Site is a Department of Energy Nuclear Defense Facility and a National Environmental Research Park located in the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. Prescribed burning is conducted on 15,000 to 20,000 ac annually. We modifi ed standard forest inventory methods to incorporate a complete assessment of fuel components on 622 plots, assessing coarse woody debris, ladder fuels, and the litter and duff layers. Because of deficiencies in south-wide data on litter-duff bulk densities, which are the fuels most often consumed in prescribed fires, we developed new bulk density relationships. Total surface fuel loading across the landscape ranged from 0.8 to 48.7 tons/ac. The variables basal area, stand age, and site index were important in accounting for variability in ladder fuel, coarse woody debris, and litter-duff for pine types. For a given pine stand condition, litter-duff loading decreased in direct proportion to the number of burns in the preceding thirty years. Ladder fuels for loblolly and longleaf increased in direct proportion to the years since the last prescribed burn. The pattern of fuel loading on the SRS reflects stand dynamics, stand management and fire management. It is suggested that the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program can easily modify sampling protocols to incorporate collection of fuels data.

Parresol, Bernard R.; Shea, Dan; Ottmar, Roger.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development and Produced Water Management Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane resources throughout the entire Powder River Basin were reviewed in this analysis. The study was conducted at the township level, and as with all assessments conducted at such a broad level, readers must recognize and understand the limitations and appropriate use of the results. Raw and derived data provided in this report will not generally apply to any specific location. The coal geology in the basin is complex, which makes correlation with individual seams difficult at times. Although more than 12,000 wells have been drilled to date, large areas of the Powder River Basin remain relatively undeveloped. The lack of data obviously introduces uncertainty and increases variability. Proxies and analogs were used in the analysis out of necessity, though these were always based on sound reasoning. Future development in the basin will make new data and interpretations available, which will lead to a more complete description of the coals and their fluid flow properties, and refined estimates of natural gas and water production rates and cumulative recoveries. Throughout the course of the study, critical data assumptions and relationships regarding gas content, methane adsorption isotherms, and reservoir pressure were the topics of much discussion with reviewers. A summary of these discussion topics is provided as an appendix. Water influx was not modeled although it is acknowledged that this phenomenon may occur in some settings. As with any resource assessment, technical and economic results are the product of the assumptions and methodology used. In this study, key assumptions as well as cost and price data, and economic parameters are presented to fully inform readers. Note that many quantities shown in various tables have been subject to rounding; therefore, aggregation of basic and intermediate quantities may differ from the values shown.

Advanced Resources International

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

71

Management activities for retrieved and newly generated transuranic waste, Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to assess the potential environmental impacts of the retrieval and processing of retrieved and newly generated transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), including the transportation of the processes TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. A new TRU Waste Facility (TWF) will be constructed at SRP to retrieve and process the SRP TRU waste in interim storage to meet WIPP criteria. This EA has been prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, and the requirements of the Council of Environmental Quality Regulations for implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500--1508). The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires the assessment of environmental consequences of all major federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. This document describes the environmental impact of constructing and operating the TWF facility for processing and shipment of the TRU waste to WIPP and considers alternatives to the proposed action. 40 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs.

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Political Ecology of the Citarum River Basin: Exploring "Integrated Water Resources Management" in West Java, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water management problems as a combined environmental andwater management problems as a combined environmental and

Cavelle, Jenna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Management approaches for environmental restoration at the U.S. Department of Energy Weapons Complex, Savannah River Site: A case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces the management approaches for environmental restoration at the US Department of Energy Weapons Complex. A brief chronology of environmental restoration complex-wide is presented. This chronology, which focuses on the changing climate at DOE facilities, is then keyed to activities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina, USA. Past, present, and future environmental restoration activities at SRS are discussed, reflecting the change in emphasis at the site.

Johnson, S.V. [USDOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, SC (United States); Mayberry, J.J. [Ebasco Environmental Div., Augusta, GA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

HYDROLOGICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FLORIDA'S WEST COAST TRIBUTARIES 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isborou!lh, Alafia, Little Manatee, Manatee, Myakka, Peace, and Caloosahatchee Rivers, which Bow into west of the adjacent neritic waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Thermal differences between surface and bottomwere

75

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Expanded Staff Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Savannah River Remediation Delivering the Mission Dave Olson President and Project Manager January 27, 2012 SRS Executive Management Community Discussion 2 * Liquid Waste Funding...

76

Muddy River Restoration Project Begins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Muddy River Restoration Project Begins Page 5 #12;2 YANKEE ENGINEER February 2013 Yankee Voices of the Muddy River Restoration project. Inset photo: Flooding at the Muddy River. Materials provided by Mike Project Manager, on the passing of his father in law, Francis James (Jim) Murray, Jan. 9. ... to Laura

US Army Corps of Engineers

77

Audit Report on Management Controls over the Use of Service Contracts at the Office of River Protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (Department) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the storage, treatment, and disposal of over 53 million gallons of highly radioactive waste from over 40 years of plutonium production at the Hanford Site. Because of the diversity, complexity, and large scope of its mission, coupled with its small staff, ORP told us that it has found it necessary to engage in service contracts to obtain consulting services, technical expertise, and support staff. Federal policy generally permits contractors to perform a wide range of support service activities, including, in most situations, the drafting of Government documents subject to the review and approval of Federal employees. Federal policy issued by the Office of Management and Budget, however, prohibits contractors from drafting agency responses to Congressional inquiries and reports issued by the Office of Inspector General and Government Accountability Office (GAO) because they are so closely related to the public interest and provide the appearance of private influence. To provide a majority of its needed services, ORP issued a Blanket Purchase Agreement to Project Assistance Corporation (PAC) in 2003. Through the Blanket Purchase Agreement, ORP acquired services in the areas of project management, risk assessment, program assessment, quality assurance, safety, cost and schedule estimating, budgeting and finance, and engineering. PAC has, in turn, subcontracted with various other firms to obtain some of the services needed by ORP. From 2005 to 2008, the total annual cost for the contract with PAC had grown from $4.7 million to $9.2 million. Because of the extent of the services provided and growing costs of the contract, we conducted this review to determine whether ORP appropriately administered its contract with the Project Assistance Corporation. Our review disclosed that, in some instances, ORP had not appropriately administered all work performed under the PAC contract. Specifically, ORP allowed PAC employees to perform work that was inherently governmental and created situations where a potential conflict of interest occurred. Specifically: (1) ORP assigned PAC employees responsibility for providing information and responses to Congressional inquiries and reports issued by the GAO and the Department of Energy's Office of Inspector General (OIG); and (2) PAC employees were also allowed to perform functions that created potential conflicts of interest. ORP permitted PAC employees, for example, to develop statements of work and approve funding of work to be performed under PAC's own contract. We concluded that these problems occurred, at least in part, because ORP had not established controls necessary to effectively administer the PAC contract. Federal procurement regulations recommended that agencies provide additional management controls over contractors whose work has the potential to influence the action of government officials. ORP, however, had not implemented the controls specifically recommended in Federal policy guidance for administering contracts, including: (1) Performing conflict of interest reviews; and (2) Separating contractor and Department employees either physically or organizationally. By not effectively administering its contract with PAC, ORP increased the risk that decisions based on work performed by the contractor may not have been made in the best interests of the Department. For example, ORP increased the risk that approved work would be unnecessary or too costly. As we also recently noted in our report on 'Management Challenges at the Department of Energy' (DOE/IG-0808, December 2008), contract administration issues such as those discussed in this report remain a significant vulnerability. Continued efforts to improve this area are vitally important since the risk that contractors receive payments for unallowable costs could also increase as the Department expands its contracting activities under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. To its credit, however, ORP has recognized that there are weakn

None

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Columbia River Treaty Review #2 - April 2009.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Columbia River Treaty has provided signifi cant benefi ts to the United States and Canada through coordinated river management by the two countries. It remains the standard...

79

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System...

80

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - July 2011...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - July 2011 July 2011 Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River...

82

Concept Paper for Real-Time Temperature and Water Quality Management for San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report. Real-time Water Quality Management for SJR RiparianReal-time Water Quality Management for SJR Riparian HabitatPaper Real-time Water Quality Management for SJR Riparian

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Environmental sensor networks and continuous data quality assurance to manage salinity within a highly regulated river basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Drainage System for Drainage Water Quality Management,quality management using a novel software tool, Aquarius. Commercial turn-key monitoring systems

Quinn, N.W.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Kent House Penge East Lower Sydenham Forest Hill Honor Oak Park Crofton Park Nunhead New CrossC BD A River Thames River Thames Waterloo & City Southwark Northwood Northwood Hills North Harrow Harrow- on-the-Hill Northwick Park Harrow & Wealdstone Headstone Lane Pinner Kenton Stanmore Canons Park

Delmotte, Nausicaa

85

Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer...

Wurbs, Ralph A.

86

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix C, Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Mangement Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in two related decision making processes concerning: (1) the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which will focus on the next 10 years; and (2) programmatic decisions on future spent nuclear fuel management which will emphasize the next 40 years. DOE is analyzing the environmental consequences of these spent nuclear fuel management actions in this two-volume Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Volume 1 supports broad programmatic decisions that will have applicability across the DOE complex and describes in detail the purpose and need for this DOE action. Volume 2 is specific to actions at the INEL. This document, which limits its discussion to the Savannah River Site (SRS) spent nuclear fuel management program, supports Volume 1 of the EIS. Following the introduction, Chapter 2 contains background information related to the SRS and the framework of environmental regulations pertinent to spent nuclear fuel management. Chapter 3 identifies spent nuclear fuel management alternatives that DOE could implement at the SRS, and summarizes their potential environmental consequences. Chapter 4 describes the existing environmental resources of the SRS that spent nuclear fuel activities could affect. Chapter 5 analyzes in detail the environmental consequences of each spent nuclear fuel management alternative and describes cumulative impacts. The chapter also contains information on unavoidable adverse impacts, commitment of resources, short-term use of the environment and mitigation measures.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Rainfall-River Forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2Rainfall-River Forecasting Joint Summit II NOAA Integrated Water Forecasting Program · Minimize losses due management and enhance America's coastal assets · Expand information for managing America's Water Resources, Precipitation and Water Quality Observations · USACE Reservoir Operation Information, Streamflow, Snowpack

US Army Corps of Engineers

88

Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act proscribes the management, protection, preservation and use of the waters of the lakes and rivers of Ontario and the land under them. The Act also details...

89

June 2013, FTCP Senior Technical Safety Manager (STSM) Status...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Comment Technical Degree Experience Manager, Office of River Protection Kevin Smith YES YES NO Complete STSM Certification Required Deputy Manager, Office of River...

90

White Sturgeon Management Plan in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams; Nez Perce Tribe, 1997-2005 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

White sturgeon in the Hells Canyon reach (HCR) of the Snake River are of cultural importance to the Nez Perce Tribe. However, subsistence and ceremonial fishing opportunities have been severely limited as a result of low numbers of white sturgeon in the HCR. Hydrosystem development in the Columbia River Basin has depressed numbers and productivity of white sturgeon in the HCR by isolating fish in impounded reaches of the basin, restricting access to optimal rearing habitats, reducing the anadromous forage base, and modifying early life-history habitats. Consequently, a proactive management plan is needed to mitigate for the loss of white sturgeon production in the HCR, and to identify and implement feasible measures that will restore and rebuild the white sturgeon population to a level that sustains viability and can support an annual harvest. This comprehensive and adaptive management plan describes the goals, objectives, strategies, actions, and expected evaluative timeframes for restoring the white sturgeon population in the HCR. The goal of this plan, which is to maintain a viable, persistent population that can support a sustainable fishery, is supported by the following objectives: (1) a natural, stable age structure comprising both juveniles and a broad spectrum of spawning age-classes; (2) stable or increasing numbers of both juveniles and adults; (3) consistent levels of average recruitment to ensure future contribution to reproductive potential; (4) stable genetic diversity comparable to current levels; (5) a minimum level of abundance of 2,500 adults to minimize extinction risk; and (6) provision of an annual sustainable harvest of 5 kg/ha. To achieve management objectives, potential mitigative actions were developed by a Biological Risk Assessment Team (BRAT). Identified strategies and actions included enhancing growth and survival rates by restoring anadromous fish runs and increasing passage opportunities for white sturgeon, reducing mortality rates of early life stages by modifying flows in the HCR, reducing mortality imposed by the catch and release fishery, augmenting natural production through translocation or hatchery releases, and assessing detrimental effects of contaminants on reproductive potential. These proposed actions were evaluated by assessing their relative potential to affect population growth rate and by determining the feasibility of their execution, including a realistic timeframe (short-term, mid-term, long-term) for their implementation and evaluation. A multi-pronged approach for management was decided upon whereby various actions will be implemented and evaluated under different timeframes. Priority management actions include: Action I- Produce juvenile white sturgeon in a hatchery and release into the management area; Action G- Collect juvenile white sturgeon from other populations in the Snake or Columbia rivers and release them into the management area; and Action D- Restore white sturgeon passage upriver and downriver at Lower Snake and Idaho Power dams. An integral part of this approach is the continual monitoring of performance measures to assess the progressive response of the population to implemented actions, to evaluate the actions efficacy toward achieving objectives, and to refine and redirect strategies if warranted.

Nez Perce Tribe Resources Management Staff, (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trap nets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Report C of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed in Report C. Program cooperators include the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal Damage Unit as a contractor to test Dam Angling. The PSMFC was responsible for coordination and administration of the program; PSMFC subcontracted various tasks and activities to ODFW and WDFW based on the expertise each brought to the tasks involved in implementing the program and dam angling to the USDA.

Porter, Russell [Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission].

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

92

Environmental sensor networks and continuous data quality assurance to manage salinity within a highly regulated river basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a new approach to environmental decision support for salinity management in the San Joaquin Basin of California that focuses on web-based data sharing using YSI Econet technology and continuous data quality management using a novel software tool, Aquarius.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Holm, L.

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and potential application to fire and fuels management for the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for the Savannah River Site in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. using three data sources: FCCS, LANDFIRE, and SWRA. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the U.S. using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern U.S. using satellite imagery.

Kurth, Laurie; Hollingsworth, LaWen; Shea, Dan

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

Application of Specialized Optimization Techniques in Water Quantity and Quality Management with Respect to Planning for the Trinity River Basi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the disposal of wastes. Thus, there is a clear interaction between quantity and quality of water. However, largely due to the agency structure in state and federal government, water quality management and water development activities are usually separated...

Meier Jr., W. L.; Shih, C. S.

99

Encouraging low-impact-development stormwater-management practices / Assabet River Watershed sub-basin case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory codes and ordinances create a framework that guide stormwater management decision processes. These regulations are designed to protect the health and safety of the public and to preserve the natural integrity ...

Brown, James E. (James Edward), 1969-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Using ground based geophysics to evaluate hydrogeologic effects of subsurface drip irrigation systems used to manage produced water in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory has been evaluating various geophysical methods for site characterization regarding environmental issues associated with fossil fuels including produced water management. A relatively new method of managing produced water from coal bed natural gas production is through subsurface drip irrigation. This system involves disposing the produced water near the bottom of the root zone in agricultural fields, which would provide a beneficial use of this resource. The focus of this paper is to present results from a pre-injection geophysical survey for site assessment and background data. A pre-construction survey of approximately 1.2 km2 was completed in June 2007 using a Geophex GEM-2 broadband sensor over six fields along the Powder River floodplain. Quality assurance measures included drift checks, duplicate line surveys, and repeat field surveys using the Geometrics OhmMapper instrument. Subsequent surveys will be completed once the system is installed and operational. Geophysical inversion models were completed to provide a detailed cross-section of the subsurface geoelectrical structure along each line. Preliminary interpretations reveal that the subsurface conductivity distribution correlates to geomorphologic features.

Sams, J.I.; Lipinski, B.A.; Veloski, G.A.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Flood management in a complex river basin with a real-time decision support system based on hydrological forecasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Portes du Scex,!) and in the hydropower plants "If a risk of overflowing exists, the Decision Support System MINDS proposes the optimal hydropower plants management for flood peak reduction PREDICTING FLOODS! ...taking profit of the existing hydropower schemes for reducing flood damages ...warning authorities

102

Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is state policy to manage groundwater and surface water resources from the perspective of aquifers, watersheds, and river basins to achieve protection, preservation, enhancement, and restoration...

103

Little Missouri State Scenic River Act (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation aims to preserve the Little Missouri River in its present, free-flowing natural condition. The Little Missouri River Commission is established to administer and manage these...

104

SAVANNAH RIVER TECHNOLOGY CENTER MONTHLY REPORT AUGUST 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'This monthly report summarizes Programs and Accomplishments of the Savannah River Technology Center in support of activities at the Savannah River Site. The following categories are addressed: Reactor, Tritium, Separations, Environmental, Waste Management, General, and Items of Interest.'

Ferrell, J.M.

1999-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

105

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Interim Measures for the Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater at the Burial Ground Complex at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed interim measures for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MW) groundwater at the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE proposes to install a small metal sheet pile dam to impound water around and over the BGC groundwater seepline. In addition, a drip irrigation system would be installed. Interim measures will also address the reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) from ''hot-spot'' regions associated with the Southwest Plume Area (SWPA). This action is taken as an interim measure for the MWMF in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to reduce the amount of tritium seeping from the BGC southwest groundwater plume. The proposed action of this EA is being planned and would be implemented concurrent with a groundwater corrective action program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). On September 30, 1999, SCDHEC issued a modification to the SRS RCRA Part B permit that adds corrective action requirements for four plumes that are currently emanating from the BGC. One of those plumes is the southwest plume. The RCRA permit requires SRS to submit a corrective action plan (CAP) for the southwest plume by March 2000. The permit requires that the initial phase of the CAP prescribe a remedy that achieves a 70-percent reduction in the annual amount of tritium being released from the southwest plume area to Fourmile Branch, a nearby stream. Approval and actual implementation of the corrective measure in that CAP may take several years. As an interim measure, the actions described in this EA would manage the release of tritium from the southwest plume area until the final actions under the CAP can be implemented. This proposed action is expected to reduce the release of tritium from the southwest plume area to Fourmile Branch between 25 to 35 percent. If this proposed action is undertaken and its effectiveness is demonstrated, it may become a component of the final action in the CAP. This document was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended; the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508); and the DOE Regulations for Implementing NEPA (10 CFR 1021). NEPA requires the assessment of environmental consequences of Federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. Based on the potential for impacts described herein, DOE will either publish a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) or prepare an environmental impact statement (EM).

N /A

1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

106

NNSA field office managers meet in Kansas City | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

River Field Office Manager; Kimberly Davis, Livermore Field Office Manager; Kevin Smith, Los Alamos Field Office Manager; and Dana Hunter, NNSA's Field Office Liaison. NNSA...

107

area management plan: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 NEW RIVER AREA OF CRITICAL ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERN MANAGEMENT PLAN CiteSeer Summary: New River is a dynamic, ever-changing system influenced by biological, climatological,...

108

Savannah River Technology Center monthly report, January 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the monthly progress report for the Savannah River Technology Center, which covers the following areas of interest, Tritium, Separation processes, Environmental Issues, and Waste Management.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the...

110

KEY ELEMENTS FOR ECOLOGICAL PLANNING: MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES, RECOMMENDATIONS, AND GUIDELINES FOR FEDERAL LANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem Management Project Columbia River Bioregion Campaign Science Working Group 41 South Palouse Street

Keeton, William S.

111

California's Russian River: A Conservation Partnership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Improve weather and river flow forecasting to maximize water captured for reservoirs and fisheries support forecast-based reservoir operations and allow for improved water management. It may also provide's Russian River Habitat Blueprint #12;Restore floodplain habitat through reclamation of abandoned gravel

112

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of waste, restoration of the environment, and the development of industry in and around the site.

Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.R. [eds.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Savannah River Technology Center, monthly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the monthly report to detail the research currently being conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center. The areas of research are in Tritium, Seperation processes, Environmental Engineering, and Waste Management.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Negotiating nature : expertise and environment in the Klamath River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Negotiating Nature" explores resource management in action and the intertwined roles of law and science in environmental conflicts in the Upper Klamath River Basin in southern Oregon. I follow disputes over the management ...

Buchanan, Nicholas Seong Chul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

EIS-0023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes (Research and Development Program for Immobilization), Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This environmental impact statement (EIS) analyzes the environmental implications of the proposed continuation of a large Federal research and development (R&D) program directed toward the immobilization of the high-level radioactive wastes resulting from chemical separations operations for defense radionuclides production at the DOE Savannah River Plant (SRP) near Aiken, South Carolina.

116

CRAD, Emergency Management Program - February 13, 2014 (HSS CRAD...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- January 3, 2013 CRAD, Emergency Management - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System...

117

Bosque River Environmental Infrastructure Improvement Plan: Phase II BMP Modeling Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bosque River Watershed is located in the Brazos River Basin in central Texas and is facing a suite of water quality issues resulting in sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. These loadings are potentially derived from improperly managed...

Tuppad, Pushpa; Srinivasan, Raghavan

118

Red River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

119

Effects of LCRA Lakes on Riparian Property Values: Recreational and Aesthetic Components of Lake Side Housing in the Colorado River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) manages the Colorado River Basin in a ten county area stretching from central Texas to the gulf coast of Texas. In its recent "Water Management Plan for the Lower Colorado River," the Lower Colorado River...

Lansford, Notie H. Jr.; Jones, Lonnie L.

120

Platte River Cooperative Agreement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Platte River Cooperative Agreement Skip Navigation Links Transmission Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Platte River Cooperative Agreement PEIS, NE, WY,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as “outstanding...

122

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

123

Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Wabash River Heritage Corridor, consisting of the Wabash River, the Little River, and the portage between the Little River and the Maumee River, is considered a protected area, where...

124

Elements of a decision support system for real-time management ofdissolved oxygen in the San Joaquin River deep water ship channel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A decision support system (DSS) has been designed and will be implemented over the next three years to assist in the control and management of episodes of low dissolved oxygen (DO) in a Deep Water Ship Channel (DWSC), located near Stockton, California. The DSS integrates three information technology functions. The first part is the collection and management of data on flow, pollution loads and water quality. The second part is the simulation model which can forecast the dissolved oxygen sag in the DWSC and determine management actions necessary to improve dissolved oxygen concentrations. The third part is the graphical user interface, which facilitates the computer simulations and posting of the forecasted dissolved oxygen and remedial measures to a stakeholder group for implementations.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Jacobs, Karl; Chen, Carl W.; Stringfellow, WilliamT.

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

White Pine in the Northern Forests: An Ecological and Management History of White Pine on the Bad River Reservation of Wisconsin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White Pine in the Northern Forests: An Ecological and Management History of White Pine on the Bad-ADAMS, NANCY LANGSTON, AND DAVID J.MLADENOFF white pine inthe northern forests: AN ECOLOGICAL AND MANAGEMENTHISTORY OF WHITE PINE ON THE BAD RIVERRESERVATIONOF WISCONSIN ABSTRACT This essay examines eastern white

Langston, Nancy

126

Savannah River Technology Center. Quarterly report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information and progress from the Savannah River Technology Center. Topics include tritium activities, separations, environmental, and waste management activities.

Ferrell, J.M.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

OkanoganRiver Summer/FallChinookSalmon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN (HGMP) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency/Operator: Watershed B.5 Tribal Incidental Take Thresholds for ESA-Listed 98 Upper Columbia River Steelhead Table B.6

128

Hydrologic and Institutional Water Availability in the Brazos River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been constructed to facilitate management of the water resources of the various river basins of the state. Effective control and utilization of the water resource supplied by a stream/reservoir system requires an understanding of the amount of water...

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Bergman, Carla E.; Carriere, Patrick E.; Walls, W. Brian

129

Savannah River Site 1991 Road Erosion Inventory.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 28 pp. Abstract - This paper explains the rationale and results of a 1991 road erosion inventory conducted by members of the USDA Forest Service – Savannah River (FS-SR) and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The inventory provided information for the Department of Energy - Savannah River (DOE-SR) to justify the need for developing an erosion and sediment control program with appropriate funding, personnel, and equipment. Federally managed since the early 1950’s, the SRS is located on 198,344 acres (80,301 hectares) in the South Carolina counties of Aiken, Barnwell, and Allendale. Located along the eastern border of the Savannah River, the SRS is located within the Upper and Lower Coastal Plains of South Carolina.

Jones, Cliff.

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

130

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

real-­?time  water  quality  management.     Environmental  real-­?time  water  quality  management.     Environmental  Management  of  Water  Quality  in  the  San   Joaquin  River.    California  Environmental  

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

WILLAMETTE RIVER AND COLUMBIA RIVER WASTE LOAD ALLOCATION Christopher J. Berger, Research Associate, Department of Civil and Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was developed to evaluate management alternatives designed to improve water quality. The Lower Willamette River Associate, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon Robert L. Annear, Jr., Research Assistant, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland

Wells, Scott A.

132

Canadian River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by the member states, the Compact was subsequently...

133

Pecos River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

134

BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN INVENTORY FOR FISH AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN INVENTORY FOR FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AUGUST 2009 A report prepared for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council #12;#12;Bitterroot Subbasin Inventory for Fish (Inventory Volume), and Part III (Management Plan Volume), its appendices, and electronically linked

135

Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

Noah, J.C.

1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

136

Savannah River Technology Center. Monthly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a monthly progress report from the Savannah River Laboratory for the month of January 1993. It has sections with work in the areas of reactor safety, tritium processes and absorption, separations programs and wastes, environmental concerns and responses, waste management practices, and general concerns.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, February 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a progress report for the Savannah River Laboratory for the month of February 1992. The progress and activities in six categories were described in the report. The categories are reactor, tritium, separations, environmental, waste management, and general. Each category described numerous and varied activities. Some examples of these activities described are such things as radiation monitoring, maintenance, modifications, and remedial action.

Ferrell, J.M. (comp.); Ice, L.W. (ed.)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project (hereafter referred to as the Columbia River Project). This is a follow-on project, funded by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, LLC (CHPRC), to the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Columbia River Protection Project. The work scope consists of a number of CHPRC funded, related projects that are managed under a master project (project number 55109). All contract releases associated with the Fluor Hanford Columbia River Project (Fluor Hanford, Inc. Contract 27647) and the CHPRC Columbia River Project (Contract 36402) will be collected under this master project. Each project within the master project is authorized by a CHPRC contract release that contains the project-specific statement of work. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Columbia River Project staff.

Fix, N. J.

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Columbia River Treaty  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an understanding of the implications for post-2024 Treaty planning and Columbia River operations. The joint effort by the Entities to conduct initial post-2024 modeling and...

140

Saving a Dwindling River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information on this research is available by downloading TWRI Technical Report 291, ?Reconnaissance Survey of Salt Sources and Loading into the Pecos River,? at http://twri.tamu.edu/reports.php. The research team has also compared flow and salinity data from... Water Act, Section 319 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. ?The river?s importance?historically, biologically, hydrologically and economically?to the future of the entire Pecos River Basin and the Rio Grande is huge,? said Will Hatler, project...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

EM Supports Department's Small Business Commitment at Waste Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bahan from the Environmental Management Consolidated Business Center in Cincinnati and Kelly Brazil from the Office of River Protection at the Hanford site in Washington state....

142

CRAD, Emergency Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Training -...

143

Linear Dynamic Programs for Resource Management Marek Petrik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a river reservoir to produce hydroelectric power. Among renewable sources, hydroelectricity has the lowest management can therefore significantly reduce carbon emissions. Hydroelectric power is usually produced

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

144

Environmental Management Construction Project Review of the Savannah...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evaluations Activity Report for the Shadowing of the Environmental Management Construction Project Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility on July...

145

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Abstract In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity...

146

Sabine River Compact (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Sabine River Compact Commission administers the Sabine River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Sabine River and its tributaries as apportioned...

147

River Edge Redevelopment Zone (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the River Edge Redevelopment Program is to revive and redevelop environmentally challenged properties adjacent to rivers in Illinois.

148

EIS-0217: Savannah River Site Waste Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts and costs of storing, treating, and/or disposing of liquid high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, hazardous, mixed (radioactive and...

149

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the Savannah River Site FB-Line  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by Greg Rudy, Manager, Savannah River Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy.

150

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix J: Recreation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Appendix J of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on the recreational activities in the region. Major sections include the following: scope and processes; recreation in the Columbia River Basin today - by type, location, participation, user characteristics, factors which affect usage, and managing agencies; recreation analysis procedures and methodology; and alternatives and their impacts.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN Hatchery Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN (HGMP) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency-Arriving Summer/Fall Chinook 97 Table B.5 Tribal Incidental Take Thresholds for ESA-Listed 98 Upper Columbia River

152

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results for year twelve in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and damangling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale.

Porter, Russell G.; Winther, Eric C.; Fox, Lyle G.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Tree Community Patterns and Soil Texture Characteristics of a Meander Bend, Lower Trinity River, Southeast Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rather than examining fluvial-related and vegetation dynamics individually will benefit science and the management of river systems. Tree communities in riparian areas, although consisting mainly of bottomland hardwood species, can be very diverse...

Nyikos, Sarah Ildiko

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

Reservoir/River System Reliability Considering Water Rights and Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective management of the highly variable water resources of a river basin requires an understanding of the amount of suitable quality water that can be provided under various conditions within institutional constraints. Although much research has...

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Sanchez-Torres, Gerardo; Dunn, David D.

155

Fact Sheet - Acquisition of wildlife habitat in the St. Joe river...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ties on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to acquire and manage a 62-acre parcel (see map) situated along one mile of...

156

Food web architecture in natural and impounded rivers of the Upper Parana drainage basin, Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freshwater ecosystems are some of the most threatened on the planet. Efforts to conserve, restore, or otherwise manage large rivers and the services they provide are hindered by limited understanding of the functional dynamics of these systems...

Hoeinghaus, David Joseph

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

157

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council,...

158

Kootenai River Resident Fish Assessment, FY2008 KTOI Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overarching goal of project 1994-049-00 is to recover a productive, healthy and biologically diverse Kootenai River ecosystem, with emphasis on native fish species rehabilitation. It is especially designed to aid the recovery of important fish stocks, i.e. white sturgeon, burbot, bull trout, kokanee and several other salmonids important to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and regional sport-fisheries. The objectives of the project have been to address factors limiting key fish species within an ecosystem perspective. Major objectives include: establishment of a comprehensive and thorough biomonitoring program, investigate ecosystem--level in-river productivity, test the feasibility of a large-scale Kootenai River nutrient addition experiment (completed), to evaluate and rehabilitate key Kootenai River tributaries important to the health of the lower Kootenai River ecosystem, to provide funding for Canadian implementation of nutrient addition and monitoring in the Kootenai River ecosystem (Kootenay Lake) due to lost system productivity created by construction and operation of Libby Dam, mitigate the cost of monitoring nutrient additions in Arrow Lakes due to lost system productivity created by the Libby-Arrow water swap, provide written summaries of all research and activities of the project, and, hold a yearly workshop to convene with other agencies and institutions to discuss management, research, and monitoring strategies for this project and to provide a forum to coordinate and disseminate data with other projects involved in the Kootenai River basin.

Holderman, Charles

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

159

Management Plan Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; and 5) consistency with the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act. In addition, the management plan Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have

160

Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE's Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site's waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE`s Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site`s waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Preparation of SARs for nonreactor nuclear facilities at the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety Analysis Reports for designated nonreactor nuclear facilities at the Savannah River Plant are prepared in accordance with the DOE Savannah River Manual Chapter 52X1. The accident analysis section is based on the Integrated Risk Assessment Plan, a methodology developed by the Savannah River Laboratory for reprocessing facilities. In general, designated facilities contain radioactive, chemical, or other materials to the extent that a credible accident could have a significant detrimental effect on health and safety. The responsibility for specifying which facilities are designated rests with the manager, Savannah River Operations Office.

Durant, W.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

166

Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Yellowstone River Compact, agreed to by the States of Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming, provides for an equitable division and apportionment of the waters of the Yellowstone River, as well as...

167

P. Julien S. Ikeda River Engineering and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 P. Julien S. Ikeda River Engineering and Stream Restoration Pierre Y. Julien Hong Kong - December 2004 River Engineering and Stream Restoration I - Stream Restoration Objectives Brief overview of River Engineering and Stream Restoration with focus on : 1. River Equilibrium; 2. River Dynamics; 3. River

Julien, Pierre Y.

168

Application of the ELOHA Framework to Regulated Rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin: A Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order for habitat restoration in regulated rivers to be effective at large scales, broadly applicable frameworks are needed that provide measurable objectives and contexts for management. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework was created as a template to assess hydrologic alterations, develop relationships between altered streamflow and ecology, and establish environmental flow standards. We tested the utility of ELOHA in informing flow restoration applications for fish and riparian communities in regulated rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin (UTRB). We followed the steps of ELOHA to generate flow alteration-ecological response relationships and then determined whether those relationships could predict fish and riparian responses to flow restoration in the Cheoah River, a regulated system within the UTRB. Although ELOHA provided a robust template to construct hydrologic information and predict hydrology for ungaged locations, our results do not support the assertion that over-generalized univariate relationships between flow and ecology can produce results sufficient to guide management in regulated rivers. After constructing multivariate models, we successfully developed predictive relationships between flow alterations and fish/riparian responses. In accordance with model predictions, riparian encroachment displayed consistent decreases with increases in flow magnitude in the Cheoah River; however, fish richness did not increase as predicted four years post- restoration. Our results suggest that altered temperature and substrate and the current disturbance regime may have reduced opportunities for fish species colonization. Our case study highlights the need for interdisciplinary science in defining environmental flows for regulated rivers and the need for adaptive management approaches once flows are restored.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dolloff, Dr. Charles A [USDA Forest Service, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Tech; Mathews, David C [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Factors Governing Sustainable Groundwater Pumping near a River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treat- ment technologies include lower capital investments and operating costs due to lower energy of the estimated riverbed permeability reflects clogging and scouring mechanisms. Our results indicate that (1 system. Introduction Groundwater pumping near rivers is utilized in water resources management

Hubbard, Susan

170

Hanford Site River Protection Project (RPP) High Level Waste Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH2M HILL Hanford Group (CHG) conducts business to achieve the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection at the Hanford Site. The CHG is organized to manage and perform work to safely store, retrieve, etc.

KRISTOFZSKI, J.G.

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 10 Marine Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RETURN TO THE RIVER - 2000 Chapter 10 Marine Environment 367367 Return to Table of Contents Go to Next Chapter CHAPTER 10. THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT "Some might be tempted to attribute all changes that environment allows, management interventions are more important when the ocean environment reduces natural

172

EIS-0082: Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Defense Waste and Byproducts Management developed this EIS to provide environmental input into both the selection of an appropriate strategy for the permanent disposal of the high-level radioactive waste currently stored at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) and the subsequent decision to construct and operate a Defense Waste Processing Facility at the SRP site.

173

Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Productivity Nez Perce Tribe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Productivity Jay Hesse Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries salmon abundance and productivity have been and continue to be influenced by construction and operation related to productivity; (1) adult abundance, (2) hatchery programs, (3) management actions, and (4

174

Savannah River Technology Center monthly report, September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a monthly progress report from the Savannah River Laboratory for the month of September, 1992. It has sections dealing with work in the broad areas of reactor safety, tritium processes and absorption, separations programs and wastes, environmental concerns and responses, waste management practices, and general concerns.

Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant – Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results for year ten in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and damangling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trapnets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report under Section I, Implementation. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Section II of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed under Section II.

Porter, Russell G.; Glaser, Bryce G.; Amren, Jennifer

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 57 million gallons 1 of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure2 of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in May 2008. ORP has made a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. ORP has contracts in place to implement the strategy for completion of the mission and establish the capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategl involves a number of interrelated activities. ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by the following: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) and delivering the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) fraction contained in the tank farms. About one-third of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction separated from the HLW fraction in the WTP will be immobilized in the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility. (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability assumed to be a second LAW vitrification facility that can safely treat about two-thirds of the LAW contained in the tank farms. (4) Developing and deploying supplemental pretreatment capability currently assumed to be an Aluminum Removal Facility (ARF) using a lithium hydrotalcite process to mitigate sodium management issues. (5) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) tank waste for possible shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. (6) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) pending determination of the final disposal pathway. (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and all associated waste management and treatment facilities. (8) Optimizing the overall mission by resolution of technical and programmatic uncertainties, configuring the tank farms to provide a steady, well-balanced feed to the WTP, and performing trade-offs of the required amount and type of supplemental treatment and of the amount of HLW glass versus LAW glass. ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks. Key elements needed to implement the strategy described above are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract (TOC). Interim stabilization of the SSTs was completed in March 2004. As of April 2009, retrieval of seven SSTs has been completed and retrieval of four additional SSTs has been completed to the limits of technology. Demonstration of supplemental LAW treatment technologies has stopped temporarily pending revision of mission need requirements. Award of a new contract for tank operations (TOC), the ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, HLW disposal issues, and uncertainties in waste feed delivery and waste treatment led to the revision of the Performance Measurement Baseline (PM B), which is currently under review prior to approval. 6 This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule, with hot commissioning beginning in 2018, and full operations beginning in late 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of these decisions will be to provide a second LAW vitrification facility. No final implementation decisions regarding supplemental technology can be made until the Tank Closure and

CERTA PJ; KIRKBRIDE RA; HOHL TM; EMPEY PA; WELLS MN

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, the ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of the approximately 57 million gallons of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in September 2003. ORP has approved a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. The ORP has established contracts to implement this strategy to establish a basic capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategy for completion of the mission uses a number of interrelated activities. The ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) for treatment and disposal; (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) and about half of the low-activity waste (LAW) contained in the tank farms, and maximizing its capability and capacity; (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability or a second WTP LAW Facility that can safely treat about half of the LAW contained in the tank farms; (4) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for transuranic (TRU) tank waste for shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); (5) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized HLW and shipping that waste to Yucca Mountain for disposal; (6) Operating the Integrated Disposal Facility for the disposal of immobilized LAW, along with the associated secondary waste, (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and al1 waste management and treatment facilities, (8) Developing and implementing technical solutions to mitigate the impact from substantial1y increased estimates of Na added during the pretreatment of the tank waste solids, This involves a combination of: (1) refining or modifying the flowsheet to reduce the required amount of additional sodium, (2) increasing the overall LAW vitrification capacity, (3) increasing the incorporation of sodium into the LAW glass, or (4) accepting an increase in mission duration, ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks, Key elements of the implementation of this strategy are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract, currently in procurement Since 2003, the ORP has conducted over 30 design oversight assessments of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The estimated cost at completion has increased and the schedule for construction and commissioning of the WTP has extended, The DOE, Office of Environmental Management (EM), sanctioned a comprehensive review of the WTP flowsheet, focusing on throughput. In 2005, the TFC completed interim stabilization of the SSTs and as of March 2007, has completed the retrieval of seven selected SSTs. Demonstration of supplemental treatment technologies continues. The ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, progress with supplemental treatment technologies, and changes in WTP schedule led to the FY 2007 TFC baseline submittal in November 2006. The TFC baseline submittal was developed before the WTP schedule was fully understood and approved by ORP, and therefore reflects an earlier start date for the WTP facilities. This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule with hot commissioning beginning in 2018 and full operations beginning in 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of

CERTA PJ

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Savannah River Site Robotics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2004 (WSRC-TR-2005-00005) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,'' and DOE Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment''. The report's purpose is to present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant programs and efforts; and assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment.

Mamatey, Albert R.

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

SAVANNAH RIVER ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2006'' (WSRC-TR-2007-00008) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and DOE Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment''. The report's purpose is to: present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant programs and efforts; and assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment.

Mamatey, A

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

182

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2007 (WSRC-STI-2008-00057) prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting', and DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; (3) highlight significant programs and efforts; (4) assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment.

Mamatey, A

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

183

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2005'' (WSRC-TR-2006-00007) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and DOE Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment''. The report's purpose is to: present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant programs and efforts; and assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment.

Mamatey, A

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

184

Environmental audit of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the environmental audit conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), principally in Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. The audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s), Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), beginning September 13, 1993, and ending September 23, 1993. The scope of the audit at SREL was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; surface water/drinking water; groundwater/soil, sediment, and biota; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; inactive Waste sites; radiation; quality assurance; and environmental management. Specifically assessed was the compliance of SREL operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; and best management practices.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Plutonium Intake between August 4, 1996, and February 10, 1997, by a Crane Operator at the Savannah River Site F-Canyon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is an independent product of an accident investigation board appointed by Dr. Mario P. Fiori, Manager, Savannah River Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy.

186

Hood River Passive House  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

Hales, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

River Protection Project (RPP) Environmental Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Program Plan was developed in support of the Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System Plan (ISMS) (RPP-MP-003), which establishes a single, defined environmental, safety, and health management system that integrates requirements into the work planning and execution processes to protect workers, the public, and the environment. The ISMS also provides mechanisms for increasing worker involvement in work planning, including hazard and environmental impact identification, analysis, and control; work execution; and feedback/improvement processes. The ISMS plan consists of six core functions. Each section of this plan describes the activities of the River Protection Project (RPP) (formerly known as the Tank Waste Remediation System) Environmental organization according to the following core functions: Establish Environmental Policy; Define the Scope of Work; Identify Hazards, Environmental Impacts, and Requirements; Analyze Hazards and Environmental Impacts and Implement Controls; Perform Work within Controls; and Provide Feedback and Continuous Improvement.

POWELL, P.A.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

Hospitality Management Hospitality Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the global hospitality industry. Academic Offerings HOSPITALITY AND FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT MINOR HOSPITALITY AND FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT MINOR Students pursuing programs in other areas of study may choose a minor Lodging Management 3 HPM 309 Sports Arena Management 3 HPM 312* Cost Control in Food Services (Prereq

McConnell, Terry

189

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,' to present summary environmental data for the purpose of: (a) characterizing site's environmental management performance; (b) summarizing environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; (c) describing compliance status with respect to environmental standards and requirements; and (d) highlighting significant site programs and efforts. This report is the principal document that demonstrates compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment,' and is a key component of DOE's effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at Savannah River Site (SRS). SRS has four primary missions: (1) Environmental Management - Cleaning up the legacy of the Cold War efforts and preparing decommissioned facilities and areas for long-term stewardship; (2) Nuclear Weapons Stockpile Support - Meeting the needs of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile through the tritium programs of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); (3) Nuclear Nonproliferation Support - Meeting the needs of the NNSA's nuclear nonproliferation programs by safely storing and dispositioning excess special nuclear materials; and (4) Research and Development - Supporting the application of science by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to meet the needs of SRS, the DOE complex, and other federal agencies During 2010, SRS worked to fulfill these missions and position the site for future operations. SRS continued to work with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to find and implement solutions and schedules for waste management and disposition. As part of its mission to clean up the Cold War legacy, SRS will continue to address the highest-risk waste management issues by safely storing and preparing liquid waste and nuclear materials for disposition, and by safely stabilizing any tank waste residues that remain on site.

Mamatey, A.; Dunaway-Ackerman, J.

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

190

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System  for  Real-­?Time  Management  of  Water  Quality  Management  of  hydrologic  systems  for  water  quality  system  development  for  seasonal  wetland  salt   management  in  a  river  basin  subjected  to  water  quality  

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

192

Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

193

Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.7 (10 cfs) 50 powerhouse discharge river mile 4.51 (20 cfs) Upper Lenz or Odell cr no info Davis water

194

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

195

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

196

Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River, Annual Report 1998.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted primarily in 1997 and 1998. This report communicates significant findings that will aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River Basin.

Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Connor, William P.; Burge, Howard L.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

South Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The goal of the Scenic Rivers Act is to protect selected rivers or river segments of the State with outstanding scenic, recreational, geologic, botanical, fish, wildlife, historic, or cultural...

198

Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Ohio River Greenway Development Commission administers the Ohio River Greenway Project, which is a park along a 7-mile stretch of the Ohio River. The Commission developed a master plan for the...

199

Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Rivers may fall under the categories of natural, scenic, or recreational. These rivers are designated, acquired, and preserved by the state, and development on or adjacent to these rivers is...

200

RIVER RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS River Res. Applic. 21: 849864 (2005)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to assimilate wastewater treatment plant effluent. Our study illustrates the types of changes that river of future climate scenarios on flow regimes and how predicted changes might affect river ecosystems. We under future climate scenarios to describe the extent and type of changes predicted to occur. Daily

Poff, N. LeRoy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper Santa Cruz River Water Issue: Introduction and Context This research project addresses a chronic water management issue in Arizona: management and allocation of water supplies in areas undergoing rapid growth and land use changes

Fay, Noah

202

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - November...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site On November 14, 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a nuclear safety Enforcement Letter to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to...

203

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 July 2013 Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the...

204

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operation - June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Self-Assessment of the Technical Qualification...

205

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Effectiveness Review The U.S. Department of...

206

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site -...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Activity Report, Savannah River Site - February 2014 February 2014 Operational Awareness Visit of the Savannah River Site HIAR-SRS-2014-02-25 This Independent Activity...

207

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

208

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

EIS-0163-S: Supplemental EIS/1993 Interim Columbia and Snake Rivers Flow Improvement Measures for Salmon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Walla Walla District has prepared this statement to assess alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration served as a cooperating agency in developing this supplement due to its key role in direct operation of the integrated and coordinated Columbia-Snake River System, and adopted this statement in March of 1993. This statement supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis Environmental Impact Statement, which evaluated ways to alter water management operations in 1992 on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers to enhance the survival of wild Snake River salmon.

210

Energy Savings Through Steam Trap Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Savings through Steam Trap Management Chris Gibbs, Account Manager, Armstrong International, Inc., Three Rivers, MI ESL-IE-08-05-08 Proceedings from theThirtieth Industrial Energy Technology Conference...-based steam trap management application developed by Armstrong International. The application calculates steam loss, fuel loss, dollar loss and CO 2 emission generation. The database allows for trend analysis, automatic energy report generation...

Gibbs, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Hood River Passive House  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

Hales, D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project. This project is a U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies, and technologies for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Technologies Project staff.

Fix, N. J.

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Unsteady flow model of Priest Rapids Dam releases at Hanford Reach, Columbia River, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model was developed to simulate water levels at three locations on the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam River Mile 396.1 (River Kilometer 639.0) and River Mile 361.50 (River Kilometer 581.7). The model was calibrated and verified over a range of flows. The results of calibration and verification indicate that the model, with reasonable accuracy, simulates stages to within +-0.08 m (+- 0.25 ft) and surface wave timing to within +-20 min. The model can be used by researchers, river system managers, planners, and decision makers as a tool to predict fluctuating water levels at locations downstream of dams. Data produced by the model can be used to evaluate and quantify possible impacts on aquatic organisms, water supply, navigation, irrigation, recreation, and additional hydropower enhancement. Although the results of this model calibrationand the model simulations presented are site-specific, the methodology is generic. Therefore, the model can be adapted to reflect dam discharges and resulting river flows at other river systems affected by water-level fluctuations.

Sneider, S.C.; Skaggs, R.L.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Words with Winemiller: Researcher's passion for rivers, fish began early  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. After graduation and with a Fulbright Scholarship in hand, Winemiller and his new wife, Dr. Leslie Kelso-Winemiller, arrived in Zambia, Africa, in 1989, to begin a year-long study of fish ecology on the Zambezi River and its huge floodplain. ?That... for conservation of biodiversity and fishery management but also water resource management, is just a huge bonus.? Dr. Kirk Winemiller and his wife, Dr. Leslie Kelso-Winemiller with former President George H. W. Bush, after receiving the Bush Excellence...

Wythe, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL 25 October 2006 Abstract: The recommended plan provides for flood damage reduction and restores the original degree of protection of the Wood River Levee-federal sponsor is the Wood River Drainage and Levee District. The Wood River Levee System was authorized

US Army Corps of Engineers

216

RiverFalls,Wisconsin SolarinSmall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the local government, and the citizens of River Falls have made energy conservation and renewable energy. Inspiring Interest in Renewables River Falls' energy conservation efforts benefit from RFMU's membership energy within the community.v Bringing Solar to River Falls The success of the River Falls Renewable

217

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY NATIONAL of the Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park Program Publication number: SRO-NERP-2S Printed OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BY CHARLES E. DAVIS AND LAURA L. JANECEK A PUBLICATION OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

Georgia, University of

218

The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" fish and wildlife in the Columbia River as affected by development and operation of the hydroelectric modified in terms of physical and biological processes. The development and operation of the hydroelectric

219

River Protection Project information systems assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Information Systems Assessment Report documents the results from assessing the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) Hanford Data Integrator 2000 (HANDI 2000) system, Business Management System (BMS) and Work Management System phases (WMS), with respect to the System Engineering Capability Assessment Model (CAM). The assessment was performed in accordance with the expectations stated in the fiscal year (FY) 1999 Performance Agreement 7.1.1, item (2) which reads, ''Provide an assessment report on the selected Integrated Information System by July 31, 1999.'' This report assesses the BMS and WMS as implemented and planned for the River Protection Project (RPP). The systems implementation is being performed under the PHMC HANDI 2000 information system project. The project began in FY 1998 with the BMS, proceeded in FY 1999 with the Master Equipment List portion of the WMS, and will continue the WMS implementation as funding provides. This report constitutes an interim quality assessment providing information necessary for planning RPP's information systems activities. To avoid confusion, HANDI 2000 will be used when referring to the entire system, encompassing both the BMS and WMS. A graphical depiction of the system is shown in Figure 2-1 of this report.

JOHNSON, A.L.

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

220

Savannah River site environmental report for 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of site-generated waste, restoration of the surrounding environment, and the development of industry in and around the site. However, SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC)-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program. In 1996, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance were conducted within a 31,000-square-mile area in and around SRS that includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina and extends up to 100 miles from the site. Though the environmental monitoring program was streamlined in 1996-to improve its cost-effectiveness without compromising data quality or reducing its overall ability to produce critical information-thousands of samples of air, surface water, groundwater, food products, drinking water, wildlife, rainwater, soil, sediment, and vegetation were collected and analyzed for radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants.

Arnett, M.; Mamatey, A. [eds.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

RIVER CORRIDOR BUILDINGS 324 & 327 CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major challenge in the recently awarded River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is decontaminating and demolishing (D&D) facilities in the 300 Area. Located along the banks of the Columbia River about one mile north of Richland, Washington, the 2.5 km{sup 2} (1 mi{sup 2})300 Area comprises only a small part of the 1517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. However, with more than 300 facilities ranging from clean to highly contaminated, D&D of those facilities represents a major challenge for Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), which manages the new RCC Project for DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL). A complicating factor for this work is the continued use of nearly a dozen facilities by the DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Most of the buildings will not be released to WCH until at least 2009--four years into the seven-year, $1.9 billion RCC Contract. The challenge will be to deactivate, decommission, decontaminate and demolish (D4) highly contaminated buildings, such as 324 and 327, without interrupting PNNL's operations in adjacent facilities. This paper focuses on the challenges associated with the D4 of the 324 Building and the 327 Building.

BAZZELL, K.D.; SMITH, B.A.

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

222

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from producing nuclear weapons materials for national defense to managing the waste it has generated, restoring the environment, and enhancing industrial development in and around the site. But no matter what the site`s mission is, it will continue to maintain its comprehensive environmental monitoring and surveillance program. In 1994, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance were conducted within a 30,000-square-mile area in and around SRS that includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina and extends up to 100 miles from the site. Thousands of samples of air, surface water, groundwater, foodstuffs, drinking water, wildlife, rainwater, soil, sediment, and vegetation were collected and analyzed for radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants.

Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.; Spitzer, D.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1991 EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

Not Available

1992-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

Savannah River Site environmental report for 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to meet three of the primary objectives of the Savannah River Site (SRS) environmental monitoring program. These objectives are to assess actual or potential exposures to populations form the presence of radioactive and nonradioactive materials from normal operations or nonroutine occurrences; to demonstrate compliance with applicable authorized limits and legal requirements; and to communicate results of the monitoring program to the public. This 1989 report contains descriptions of radiological and nonradiological monitoring programs, it provides data obtained from these programs, and it describes various environmental research activities ongoing at the site. Also included are summaries of environmental management and compliance activities, a summary of National Environmental Policy Act activities, and a listing of environmental permits issued by regulatory agencies.

Cummins, C.L.; Martin, D.K.; Todd, J.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2008 (SRNS-STI-2009-00190) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,' and DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.' The annual SRS Environmental Report has been produced for more than 50 years. Several hundred copies are distributed each year to government officials, universities, public libraries, environmental and civic groups, news media, and interested individuals. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (3) highlight significant programs and efforts.

Mamatey, A.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The law creates a 200-foot riverfront area that extends on both sides of rivers and streams. The riverfront area is 25 feet in the following municipalities: Boston, Brockton, Cambridge, Chelsea,...

227

Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An association organized for the purpose of addressing issues on a specific lake or river, a lake improvement district, or a lake conservation district may apply to the Star Lake Board for...

228

Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program. Fiscal year 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina, manages archaeological resources on the Savannah River Site (SRS). An ongoing research program provides the theoretical, methodological, and empirical basis for assessing site significance within the compliance process specified by law. The SRARP maintains an active public education program for disseminating knowledge about prehistory and history, and for enhancing awareness of historic preservation. This report summarizes the management, research, and public education activities of the SRARP during Fiscal Year 1994.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving STATEMENTSavannah River Site Savannah RiverSite

230

Waste certification review program at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After approving the waste certification programs for 45 generators of low-level radioactive and mixed waste, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) moved forward to implement a performance-based approach for assuring that approved waste generators maintain their waste certification programs. WSRC implemented the Waste Certification Review Program, which is comprised of two sitewide programs, waste generator self-assessments and Facility Evaluation Board reviews, integrated with the WSRC Solid Waste Management Department Waste Verification Program Evaluations. The waste generator self-assessments ensure compliance with waste certification requirements, and Facility Evaluation Board reviews provide independent oversight of generators` waste certification programs. Waste verification evaluations by the TSD facilities serve as the foundation of the program by confirming that waste contents and generator performance continue to meet waste acceptance criteria (WSRC 1994) prior to shipment to treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. Construction of the Savannah River Site (SRS) was started by the US Government in 1950. The site covers approximately 300 square miles located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina. It is operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Operations are conducted by managing and operating contractors, including the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). Historically, the primary purpose of the SRS was to produce special nuclear materials, primarily plutonium and tritium. In general, low-level radioactive and mixed waste is generated through activities in operations. Presently, 47 SRS facilities generate low-level radioactive and mixed waste. The policies, guidelines, and requirements for managing these wastes are determined by DOE and are reflected in DOE Order 5820.2A (US DOE 1988).

Faulk, G.W.; Kinney, J.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Knapp, D.C. [Bechtel Savannah River Inc., Aiken, SC (United States); Burdette, T.E. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Network Management Network Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that pertain to the operation, administration, maintenance, and provisioning of networked systems · Operation deals with keeping the network up (and the service provided by the network) · Administration involvesNetwork Management Pag. 1 Network Management Andrea Bianco Telecommunication Network Group Network

232

EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing...

233

Enforcement Documents - Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Savannah River Site (EA-2000-08) June 7, 2000 Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 Issued to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory related to...

234

Raft River Rural Electric Coop. Vigilante Electric Coop. Northern  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Farmers Electric Riverside Electric Minidoka Soda Springs Idaho Falls Lower Valley Energy Lost River Electric Coop. Fall River Rural Electric Coop. Salmon River Electric...

235

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well...

236

Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2001-2002 Kootenai River Network Annual Report reflects the organization's defined set of goals and objectives, and how by accomplishing these goals, we continue to meet the needs of communities and landowners throughout the Kootenai River Basin by protecting the resource. Our completed and ongoing projects throughout the watershed reflect the cooperation and support received and needed to accomplish the rehabilitation and restoration of critical habitat. They show that our mission of facilitation through collaboration with public and private interests can lead to improved resource management, the restoration of water quality and the preservation of pristine aquatic resources. Our vision to empower local citizens and groups from two states, one province, two countries and affected tribal nations to collaborate in natural resource management within the basin is largely successful due to the engagement of the basin's residents--the landowners, town government, local interest groups, businesses and agency representatives who live and work here. We are proof that forging these types of cooperative relationships, such as those exhibited by the Kootenai River subbasin planning process, leads to a sense of entitlement--that the quality of the river and its resources enriches our quality of life. Communication is essential in maintaining these relationships. Allowing ourselves to network and receive ideas and information, as well as to produce quality, accessible research data such as KRIS, shared with like organizations and individuals, is the hallmark of this facilitative organization. We are fortunate in the ability to contribute such information, and continue to strive to meet the standards and the needs of those who seek us out as a model for watershed rehabilitative planning and restoration. Sharing includes maintaining active, ongoing lines of communication with the public we serve--through our web site, quarterly newsletter, public presentations and stream table education--at every opportunity. We continue to seek ideas to guide us as we grow. We want to enlarge that sense of ownership that the river does indeed run through it, and belongs to us all. Through a continued and common effort, we hope to carry forward the good work and the momentum that underscores our intent. We are proud to report our accomplishments of this past year because they reflect our renewed sense of purpose. In alliance with diverse citizen groups, individuals, business, industry and tribal and government water resource management agencies, we strive to continue to protect and restore the beauty and integrity that is the Kootenai River watershed.

Kruse, Gretchen (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Factors governing sustainable groundwater pumping near a river  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to provide new insights into processes affecting riverbank filtration (RBF). We consider a system with an inflatable dam installed for enhancing water production from downstream collector wells. Using a numerical model, we investigate the impact of groundwater pumping and dam operation on the hydrodynamics in the aquifer and water production. We focus our study on two processes that potentially limit water production of an RBF system: the development of an unsaturated zone and riverbed clogging. We quantify river clogging by calibrating a time-dependent riverbed permeability function based on knowledge of pumping rate, river stage, and temperature. The dynamics of the estimated riverbed permeability reflects clogging and scouring mechanisms. Our results indicate that (1) riverbed permeability is the dominant factor affecting infiltration needed for sustainable RBF production; (2) dam operation can influence pumping efficiency and prevent the development of an unsaturated zone beneath the riverbed only under conditions of sufficient riverbed permeability; (3) slow river velocity, caused by dam raising during summer months, may lead to sedimentation and deposition of fine-grained material within the riverbed, which may clog the riverbed, limiting recharge to the collector wells and contributing to the development of an unsaturated zone beneath the riverbed; and (4) higher river flow velocities, caused by dam lowering during winter storms, scour the riverbed an thus increase its permeability. These insights can be used as the basis for developing sustainable water management of a RBF system.

Zhang, Y.; Hubbard, S.S.; Finsterle, S.

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

1993 Department of Energy Records Management Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document consists of viewgraphs from the presentations at the conference. Topics included are: DOE records management overview, NIRMA and ARMA resources, NARA records management training, potential quality assurance records, filing systems, organizing and indexing technical records, DOE-HQ initiatives, IRM reviews, status of epidemiologic inventory, disposition of records and personal papers, inactive records storage, establishing administrative records, managing records at Hanford, electronic mail -- legal and records issues, NARA-GAO reports status, consultive selling, automated indexing, decentralized approach to scheduling at a DOE office, developing specific records management programs, storage and retrieval at Savannah River Plant, an optical disk case study, and special interest group reports.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, first quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During first quarter 1989 (January--March), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the first quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from first quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study develops data to present management alternatives for Yakima River spring chinook. The first objective is to determine the distribution, abundance and survival of wild Yakima River spring chinook. Naturally produced populations will be studied to determine if these runs can be sustained in the face of present harvest and environmental conditions. This information will be gathered through spawning ground surveys, counting of adults at Prosser and Roza fish ladders, and through monitoring the tribal dipnet fishery. Concurrent studies will examine potential habitat limitations within the basin. Presently, survival to emergence studies, in conjunction with substrate quality analysis is being undertaken. Water temperature is monitored throughout the basin, and seining takes place monthly to evaluate distribution and abundance. The outcome of this phase of the investigation is to determine an effective manner for introducing hatchery stocks that minimize the impacts on the wild population. The second objective of this study is to determine relative effectiveness of different methods of hatchery supplementation.

Wasserman, Larry

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1989 (July--September), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the third quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from third quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014 Site...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January 2010 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December...

244

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration DOE Geothermal...

245

HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN Hatchery Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN (HGMP) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency Take Thresholds for ESA-Listed 44 Upper Columbia River Steelhead Table 4. Tribal & Recreational Incidental Take Thresholds 45 for Unmarked Spring Chinook Table 5. Estimated Carrying Capacity of Natural

246

Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development Unconventional Fuels Conference University of Utah May 17, 2011 #12;#12;Domestic Oil Shale Resources Primary oil shale resources in the U.S. are in the Green River Formation in Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. 72 % of this oil shale resource is on Federal

Utah, University of

247

Hanford emergency management plan - release 15  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford emergency management plan for the US Department of Energy Richland, WA and Office of River Protection. The program was developed in accordance with DOE Orders as well as Federal and State regulations to protect workers and public health and safety.

CARPENTER, G.A.

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

Geist, David R.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

River System Hydrology in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,700 86,700 Proctor Leon River USACE 1963 59,400 54,702 310,100 Belton Leon River USACE 1954 457,600 432,978 640,000 Stillhouse Hollow Lampasas River USACE 1968 235,700 224,279 390,660 Georgetown San Gabriel R USACE 1980 37,100 36,980 87,600 Granger... San Gabriel R USACE 1980 65,500 50,540 162,200 Somerville Yequa Creek USACE 1967 160,110 154,254 337,700 Hubbard Creek Hubbard Creek WCTMWD 1962 317,750 317,750 í Post NF Double Mt WRMWD proposed 57,420 í í Alan Henry SF Double Mt Lubbock 1993 115...

Wurbs, R.; Zhang, Y.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

An Inside Look at River Corridor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In the seventh chapter of The Handford Story, the Energy Department takes a look at the River Corridor -- a 50-mile stretch of the Columbia River that flows through the Hanford site in southeast...

251

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

19, 2002 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Safety Basis and Radiation Protection Violations at the Savannah River Site, On March 19, 2002, the U.S....

252

Youghiogheny Wild and Scenic River (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Portions of the Youghiogheny River are protected under the Scenic and Wild Rivers Act, and development on or near these areas is restricted. COMAR section 08.15.02 addresses permitted uses and...

253

Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Belle Fourche River Compact, agreed to by South Dakota and Wyoming, seeks to provide for the most efficient use of the waters of the Belle Fourche River Basin for multiple purposes, and to...

254

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 5, 1997 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company, related to an Unplanned Radioactive Material Intake at the Savannah River Site, (EA-97-12) On December 5, 1997, the...

255

Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

Onjukka, Sam T. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR); Harbeck, Jim (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Enterprise, OR)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

Onjukka, Sam T. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR); Harbeck, Jim (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Enterprise, OR)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Scientific Computing Where We Have Been And  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions assumed responsibility for SRS management and operations · July 1, 2009 ­ Savannah River National Laboratory and Hanford Site) · SRS workforce: Approximately 8,000 ­ Prime contractor (about 58 project ­ Du Pont built SRS and operated it for nearly 40 years · April 1, 1989 ­ Westinghouse Savannah

Valtorta, Marco

258

The Hanford Site Richland Operations Office Office of River Protection Office of Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Hanford Site Richland Operations Office Office of River Protection Office of Science Plateau Remediation Contractor Tank Operations Contractor Analytical Services Contractor Waste Treatment Plant (WTP;HANFORDSMALLBUSINESSCOUNCIL Richland Operations Office Sally A. Sieracki Small Business Program Manager E-mail: sally

259

Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 200852400 CRITFC Lamprey Passage Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and conservation initiatives is imperative if this valuable resource is to be maintained and the cultural legacy Restoration Plan for the Columbia River Basin (CRITFC 2008). Province(s) Intermountain and Lower Columbia in abundance over the last few decades and the need to acquire information to inform management

260

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Environment, Safety and Health program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Conduct of Operations program at the Office of River Protection, K Basin Sludge Waste System.

262

Finishing Strong in 2011: The Recovery Act at Work at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act's highlights and accomplishments for 2011 projects. Covers the latest technology and robotics used for waste management. This video is an overview of the success ARRA brought to the Savannah River Site, the environment, the econonmy, and the surrounding communities.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Phosphorus Retention in Duke's SWAMP Mark River, Neal Flanagan, Curtis Richardson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(1), 83. Richardson, C. J., N. E. Flanagan, M. Ho, and J. W. Pahl. 2011. Integrated stream and wetland Drinking Water Reservoir: Falls Lake, Neuse River, North Carolina, USA." Journal of Soils and Sediments 13. Conclusions Duke's Stream and Wetland Assessment and Management Park (SWAMP) is a restored wetland complex

264

Finishing Strong in 2011: The Recovery Act at Work at Savannah River Site  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act's highlights and accomplishments for 2011 projects. Covers the latest technology and robotics used for waste management. This video is an overview of the success ARRA brought to the Savannah River Site, the environment, the econonmy, and the surrounding communities.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Savannah River Site Saves $10 Million with Innovative Commercial Procurement Practices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AIKEN, S.C. – The management and operations contractor for the EM program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) created more than $10 million in cost savings in fiscal year 2013 by adopting successful purchasing practices used by America’s top companies.

266

Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Water Quality Parameters Affected by Hydropower Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix E Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Water Quality Parameters Affected have reappeared as management agencies have reinstituted spill as a means of aiding downstream fish passage throughout the system. The WDOE has set a TDG standard of 110 percent of saturation for all

267

Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

C.S. Cearlock

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

268

Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System)- River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System) - River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

269

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase [Herrera Environmental Consultants, Inc.

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

270

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

May, Christopher; Geist, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

SRO -NERP-1 THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND TREATMENT by Whit Gibbons Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Aiken , South Carolina A PUBLICATION OF EROA 'S SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK -SEPTEMBER 1977 COPIES MAY BE OBTAINEO FROM SAVANNAHSRO -NERP-1 SNAKES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT WITH INFORMATION ABOUT SNAKEBITE PREVENTION

Georgia, University of

272

Atlas of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Atlas of the Columbia River Basin Oregon State University Computer-Assisted Cartography Course & GEOVISUALIZATION GROUP UNIVERSITY #12;2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin FOREWORDAtlas, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. 2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin

Jenny, Bernhard

273

SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT  

Energy Savers [EERE]

0-1 CHAPTER 10 SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT (Revised October 19, 2011) WHAT ARE THE BASIC PRINCIPLES AND OBJECTIVES OF SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT? 1. To ensure contractors establish,...

274

A Model for Predicting Daily Peak Visitation and Implications for Recreation Management and Water Quality: Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Model for Predicting Daily Peak Visitation and Implications for Recreation Management and Water carrying capacity. Keywords Visitation model Á Recreation management Á Water quality Á River visitation Á Clark, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA 123 Environmental Management DOI 10.1007/s00267-008-9079-5 #12

275

HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

BAZZELL, K.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Plant (SRP), located at Aiken, South Carolina. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The following topics are discussed: general site information; air, soil, surface water and ground water; hydrogeology; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; release of tritium oxides; radioactivity in milk; contamination of ground water and wildlife; pesticide use; and release of radionuclides into seepage basins. 149 refs., 44 figs., 53 tabs.

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Snake River Plain Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardtonManagement,SmartestEnergy Ltd JumpSmokySnake River

278

Conference Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish requirements and responsibilities with respect to managing conferences sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) or by DOE management and operating contractors and other contractors who perform work at DOE-owned or -leased facilities, including management and integration contractors and environmental restoration management contractors (when using funds that will be reimbursed by DOE). Cancels DOE N 110.3.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

279

MEMORANDUM FOR SCOTI L. SAMUELSON MANAGER OFFICE OF RIVER PROTE...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cc: P. Bosco, MA-50 D. Chung, EM-2 C. Anderson, EM-3 T. Harms, EM-4.1 W. Whitley, EM-4.1 R. Rimando, EM-I o (Acting) L. Ely, EM-11 T. Johnson, EM-50 (Acting) J. Surash, EM-80 )...

280

Columbia River Gorge Vegetation Management Project Final Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OFdegrade wedands crossed by these rights-of-way. Estibfishment and enhancement of low-growing plant communities wotid protect riparian resemes. Solid and Hazardous Waste '...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Materials System Inventory Management Practices at Washington River Protection Solutions  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopment AccidentEnergy Objective: DevelopMaterials System

282

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical:Rocky Mountain OTC GSS PIASystem (HRMS) |

283

PIA - Savannah River Site Management and Operating Contractor (HRMS) |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical:Rocky Mountain OTC GSSofDepartment of

284

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Elk River Reactor - MN 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »HillNY 28DorrE BElectrometElk

285

Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear Solutions in  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil'sofAppendix B, SeptemberandID Project Name FY TotalLDRD

286

MEMORANDUM FOR DAVID C. MOODY MANAGER SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L. Wood,3, BPA

287

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 <Ones |Laboratory, JuneDid y ou QualityandofWaste

288

Savannah River Site Contractor Receives Project Management Institute Award  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalancedDepartmentRestrictionsExample Sheet) |4, 2011 Dr.Energy - P-Area|

289

Braided river management: from assessment of river behaviour to improved sustainable development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Hokkaido, Japan § Institute of Geological and Natural Sciences, Lower Hatt, New Zealand the cost-benefit aspects of their options, and the needs and desires of society. This requires an interdisciplinary approach linking earth scientists and social scient- ists concerned with environmental economics

290

Final Review of Safety Assessment Issues at Savannah River Site, August 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) management, a review team composed of experts in atmospheric transport modeling for environmental radiation dose assessment convened at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on August 29-30, 2011. Though the meeting was prompted initially by suspected issues related to the treatment of surface roughness inherent in the SRS meteorological dataset and its treatment in the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System Version 2 (MACCS2), various topical areas were discussed that are relevant to performing safety assessments at SRS; this final report addresses these topical areas.

Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bixler, Nathan E.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1990 (July through September) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. All analytical results from third quarter 1990 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all site custodians. One or more analytes exceeded Flag 2 in 87 monitoring well series. Analytes exceeded Flat 2 for the first since 1984 in 14 monitoring well series. In addition to groundwater monitoring, EPD/EMS collected drinking water samples from SRS drinking water systems supplied by wells. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

Not Available

1991-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

294

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2003'' (WSRC-TR-2004-00015) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and DOE Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment''. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; (3) highlight significant programs and efforts; and (4) assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment. This year's report reflects a continuing effort (begun in 2001) to streamline the document and thereby increase its cost effectiveness--without omitting valuable technical data. To that end each author will continue to work toward presenting results in summary fashion, focusing on historical trends. Complete data tables again are included on the CD inside the back cover of the report. The CD also features an electronic version of the report; an appendix of site, environmental sampling location, dose, and groundwater maps; and complete 2003 reports from a number of other SRS organizations.

A. MAMATEY

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow Riverof the severity of water shortages in the river’s basin. Ina median level of runoff water shortages in the basin would

Zusman, Eric

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

E.2. Electronic Appendix -Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Upper River (above rkm 210)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 E.2. Electronic Appendix - Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Basin Upper River (above rkm 210, but improvements at pulp mills and waste water treatment plant upgrades are thought to have improved water quality

299

River Protection Project (RPP) Dangerous Waste Training Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This supporting document contains the training plan for dangerous waste management at River Protection Project TSD Units. This document outlines the dangerous waste training program developed and implemented for all Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) Units operated by River Protection Project (RPP) in the Hanford 200 East, 200 West and 600 Areas and the <90 Day Accumulation Area at 209E. Operating TSD Units managed by RPP are: the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System, 204-AR Waste Unloading Facility, Grout, and the Single-Shell Tank (SST) System. The program is designed in compliance with the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-330 and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 265.16 for the development of a written dangerous waste training program and the Hanford Facility Permit. Training requirements were determined by an assessment of employee duties and responsibilities. The RPP training program is designed to prepare employees to operate and maintain the Tank Farms in a safe, effective, efficient, and environmentally sound manner. In addition to preparing employees to operate and maintain the Tank Farms under normal conditions, the training program ensures that employees are prepared to respond in a prompt and effective manner should abnormal or emergency conditions occur. Emergency response training is consistent with emergency responses outlined in the following Building Emergency Plans: HNF-IP-0263-TF and HNF-=IP-0263-209E.

POHTO, R.E.

2000-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

300

Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky 16 September 2014 ABSTRACT: Green River Locks and Dams 3 through 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 were. The Green River Locks and Dams 5 and 6 ceased operations in 1951 due to a marked decline in navigation

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

CRAWFORD TW

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Columbia River System Inside Story  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

none,

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Methow River Conservation Easement - May 2009.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Yakama Nation to fund the Methow Conservancy's acquisition of a 44-acre conservation easement in the Methow River watershed in Okanogan County, Wash., for fi sh habitat...

304

Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is state policy to protect the outstanding scenic, geologic, ecologic, historic, recreational, agricultural, fish, wildlife, cultural, and other similar values of certain rivers and adjacent...

305

South River EMC- Energy Efficient Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

South River EMC offers a variety of rebates encouragings its members to invest in energy efficient appliances, equipment, and home upgrades. Incentives are available for clothes washers,...

306

New Columbia River Estuary purchases benefit salmon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the mouth of the Columbia River to permanently protect riverside habitat for Northwest fish and wildlife, including threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. The...

307

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA-2000-08 More Documents & Publications Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the...

308

Project Management Plan Resident Management System (RMS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Project Management Plan Resident Management System (RMS) And Quality Control System (QCS Resident Management System.........................................................................................................3 Project Management Plan - Purpose

US Army Corps of Engineers

309

Upper White River Watershed Alliance Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Upper White River Watershed Alliance Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA) P.O. Box 2065 integrity of the White River ecosystem. To successfully accomplish the vision of UWRWA, a 16-county was formed. It exists to improve and protect water quality on a watershed basis in the larger Upper White

310

Three Rivers Builders The Three Rivers House Project Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram (Alabama)TechnologyPhoenix,Further ThirdDOEThree Rivers

311

Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

Not Available

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Lesson Learned by Savannah River Site Activity-level Work Planning and Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slide Presentation by Bonnie Barnes, Savannah River Remediation. Work Planning and Control at Savannah River Remediation.

313

Assessment of trace metals during episodic events using DGT passive sampler: A proposal for water management enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in "Water Resources Management 27, 12 (2013) 4163-4181" DOI : 10.1007/s11269-013-0401-5 #12;Abstract disturbance (dredging) and provide proposal for a better water management. The results indicate that: (1) DGT of metals from the lake to the estuary; and (4) at the confluence of the Marikina River water management

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

314

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September2-SCORECARD-01-24-13 Page 1 of 1SandraSavannah River Savannah

315

Ecotoxicology | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI Home It is the mission ofEconomicSavannah River

316

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the third annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration action in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). The project is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce. Measurement of the cumulative effects of ecological restoration projects in the Columbia River estuary is a formidable task because of the size and complexity of the estuarine landscape and the meta-populations of salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Despite the challenges presented by this system, developing and implementing appropriate indicators and methods to measure cumulative effects is the best way to enable estuary managers to track the overall effectiveness of investments in estuarine restoration projects. This project is developing methods to quantify the cumulative effects of multiple restoration activities in the CRE. The overall objectives of the 2006 study were to continue to develop techniques to assess cumulative effects, refine the standard monitoring protocols, and initiate development of an adaptive management system for Corps of Engineers’ habitat restoration monitoring efforts in the CRE. (The adaptive management effort will be reported at a later date.) Field studies during 2006 were conducted in tidal freshwater at Kandoll Farm on the lower Grays River and tidal brackish water at Vera Slough on Youngs Bay. Within each of area, we sampled one natural reference site and one restoration site. We addressed the overall objectives with field work in 2006 that, coupled with previous field data, had specific objectives and resulted in some important findings that are summarized here by chapter in this report. Each chapter of the report contains data on particular monitored variables for pre- and post-restoration conditions at both the Kandoll and Vera study areas.

Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Whiting, Allan H.

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

317

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

318

Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Savannah River National...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River National Laboratory - January 2012 Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Savannah River National Laboratory - January 2012 January 2012 Follow-up Review of...

319

PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PIA - Savannah River Operations...

320

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010 ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010 May 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Site Walkthrough The U.S. Department...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - June 2010...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Site Orientation Visit The U.S....

322

Savannah River Remediation Donates $10,000 to South Carolina...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Remediation Donates 10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear Engineering Program Savannah River Remediation Donates 10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear...

323

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation...

324

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 December 2012 Review of Site...

325

The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...

326

allegheny river: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

327

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS Electronic Document...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Electronic Document Workflow RECORDS System (EDWS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS Electronic Document Workflow RECORDS System (EDWS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear...

328

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis...

329

Oversight Reports - Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 22, 2013 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - March 2013 Oversight Scheduling an Operational Awareness at the Savannah River Site HIAR-SRS-2013-03-25...

330

OHIO RIVER SHORELINE, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY, (PADUCAH, KENTUCKY LFPP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 OHIO RIVER SHORELINE, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY, (PADUCAH, KENTUCKY LFPP) RECONSTRUCTION PROJECT 22 June and private infrastructure to Paducah, Kentucky, from flooding by the Ohio River through reconstruction

US Army Corps of Engineers

331

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Informatio...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River...

332

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Solutions Badge Request and Site Personnel Roster Systems PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site Personnel Roster Systems PIA - Savannah River Nuclear...

333

Application for CALS-CCE 2013 Summer Internship Title of project: Plum Curculio Management in Organic Apple Production: Develop Management Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Organic Apple Production: Develop Management Strategies using Bio-control Nematodes Worksite location (CCE outcomes (no more than 5-10 sentences): The Hudson River Valley organic apple production has been management of plum curculio would aid organic apple production in this region of NY. The development

Keinan, Alon

334

CedarCreekanticlineCedarCreekanticline Yellowstone River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Principal Aquifer Systems in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins, United States and Canada #12;Cover. Conceptual block diagram of groundwater flow in the Williston structural basin. #12;Conceptual Model of the Uppermost Principal Aquifer Systems in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins

335

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is focused primarily on support of the national defense, nonproliferation, and environmental cleanup. SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program.

Arnett, M.

1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

336

Restoring our Rivers By Bridget Avila  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the first-ever comprehensive database of more than 37,000 stream and restoration projects nationwideRestoring our Rivers By Bridget Avila Maryland has the largest number of river restoration projects restoration and conservation. On a sweltering July afternoon, an assortment of men and women clad in T

Palmer, Margaret A.

337

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Bridging river basin scales and processes to assess human-climate impacts and the terrestrial hydrologic system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scales impacts of storm water from urban/suburban development on water quantity and quality have been and implementation of integrated instrumentation, a new generation of models, and a management framework that clearly of our water resources at the river basin scale. This paper concludes with a discussion of how a network

Wagener, Thorsten

339

The terrestrial carbon inventory on the Savannah River Site: Assessing the change in Carbon pools 1951-2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from an agricultural-woodland landscape in 1951 to a forested landscape during that latter half of the twentieth century. The corresponding change in carbon (C) pools associated land use on the SRS was estimated using comprehensive inventories from 1951 and 2001 in conjunction with operational forest management and monitoring data from the site.

Dai, Zhaohua; Trettin, Carl, C.; Parresol, Bernard, R.

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and n-alkanes in sediments of the Upper Scheldt River Basin: contamination levels and source apportionment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author manuscript, published in "Journal of Environmental Monitoring 11, 5 (2009) 1086-1093" DOI : 10 and Antwerp. Anthropogenic activities including textile and chemical industries, transport, coal mining, paper) has been developing an integrated and coordinated water management plan for the whole river basin

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems Presented by: Michael Marti SRF for implementing and monitoring research results (RIC) #12;LRRB Pavement Management Systems LRRB Structure LRRB Current Pavement Management System Used ICON (Goodpointe) Year of Pavement Management System

Minnesota, University of

342

Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subjects covered in this section are: (1) DOE's draft EIS on Yucca Mountain an important milestone; (2) EPA issues draft standards for Yucca Mountain; (3) Wisconsin Electric files spent fuel suit against DOE, asks for stay; (4) Transportation impacts considered in amended NRC rule; (5) Chem-Nuclear for sale: Bechtel/NAS pact: and other business developments; and (6) Rollin' up the river: Trojan's last voyage.

NONE

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Bull Trout Population and Habitat Surveys in the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bull trout in the Willamette River Basin were historically distributed throughout major tributaries including the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie rivers. Habitat degradation, over-harvest, passage barriers, fish removal by rotenone, and hybridization and competition with non-native brook trout are all likely factors that have led to the decline of bull trout in the Willamette Basin (Ratliff and Howell 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1998. Four bull trout populations were isolated in the upper Willamette River following the construction of flood control dams on the South Fork McKenzie River, McKenzie River, and Middle Fork Willamette River that created Cougar, Trail Bridge, and Hills Creek reservoirs. Buchanan et al. (1997) described the population in the main stem McKenzie as 'of special concern', the South Fork McKenzie population as 'high risk of extinction', the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as 'high risk of extinction', and bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette as 'probably extinct'. Various management efforts such as strict angling regulations and passage improvement projects have been implemented to stabilize and rehabilitate bull trout habitat and populations in the McKenzie River over the past 10 years. Since 1997, bull trout fry from Anderson Creek on the upper McKenzie River have been transferred to the Middle Fork Willamette basin above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to re-establish a reproducing bull trout population. This project was developed in response to concerns over the population status and management of bull trout in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Rivers by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during the early 1990s. The project was conducted under measure 9.3G(2) of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor the status, life history, habitat needs, and limiting factors for bull trout within sub basins of the Columbia River. Also, this project provides information to develop native fish recovery plans such as the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Bull Trout Recovery Plan.

Seals, Jason; Reis, Kelly

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Position Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order prescribes the policies, responsibilities, and procedures for position management within (DOE). Canceled by DOE N 1321.140. Cancels DOE 3510.1

1992-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

Water Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Management This department applies multi-disciplinary science and technology-based modeling to assess complex environmental systems. It integrates ecology, anthropology, and...

346

Program Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will participate in a wide spectrum of program and project management activities involving systems engineering and integration support for Defense Programs...

347

MANAGEMENT (MNG)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and recommendations is adequately implemented. (DOE Order 414.1A, Criterion 3; 10 CFR 830, Subpart A) Approach Record Review * Review the SWS issues management systems and...

348

Quality Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Quality Management, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security develops policies and procedures to ensure the classification and control of information is effective and...

349

Evaluation of Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2006 Project Completion Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River Distinct Population Segment of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1998. One of the identified major threats to the species is fragmentation resulting from dams on over-wintering habitats of migratory subpopulations. A migratory subgroup in the Tucannon River appeared to utilize the Snake River reservoirs for adult rearing on a seasonal basis. As a result, a radio telemetry study was conducted on this subgroup from 2002-2006, to help meet Reasonable and Prudent Measures, and Conservation Recommendations associated with the lower Snake River dams in the FCRPS Biological Opinion, and to increase understanding of bull trout movements within the Tucannon River drainage. We sampled 1,109 bull trout in the Tucannon River; 124 of these were surgically implanted with radio tags and PIT tagged, and 681 were only PIT tagged. The remaining 304 fish were either recaptures, or released unmarked. Bull trout seasonal movements within the Tucannon River were similar to those described for other migratory bull trout populations. Bull trout migrated upstream in spring and early summer to the spawning areas in upper portions of the Tucannon River watershed. They quickly moved off the spawning areas in the fall, and either held or continued a slower migration downstream through the winter until early the following spring. During late fall and winter, bull trout were distributed in the lower half of the Tucannon River basin, down to and including the mainstem Snake River below Little Goose Dam. We were unable to adequately radio track bull trout in the Snake River and evaluate their movements or interactions with the federal hydroelectric dams for the following reasons: (1) none of our radio-tagged fish were detected attempting to pass a Snake River dam, (2) our radio tags had poor transmission capability at depths greater than 12.2 m, and (3) the sample size of fish that actually entered the Snake River was small (n=6). In spite of this project's shortcomings, bull trout continue to be observed in low numbers at Snake River dam fish facilities. It is highly possible that bull trout observed at the Snake River dam fish facilities are originating from sources other than the Tucannon River. We suggest that these fish might come from upstream sources like the Clearwater or Salmon rivers in Idaho, and are simply following the outmigration of juvenile anadromous fish (a food supply) as they emigrate toward the Pacific Ocean. Based on our study results, we recommend abandoning radio telemetry as a tool to monitor bull trout movements in the mainstem Snake River. We do recommend continuing PIT tagging and tag interrogation activities to help determine the origin of bull trout using the Snake River hydropower facilities. As a complementary approach, we also suggest the use of genetic assignment tests to help determine the origin of these fish. Lastly, several recommendations are included in the report to help manage and recover bull trout in the Tucannon subbasin.

Faler, Michael P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Mendel, Glen; Fulton, Carl [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

350

Ichthyoplankton entrainment study at the SRS Savannah River water intakes for Westinghouse Savannah River Company  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooling water for L and K Reactors and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pump houses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water and passed through the reactor's heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70[degrees]C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is assumed to be 100 percent. The number of ichthyoplankton entrained into the cooling system depends on a variety of variables, including time of year, density and distribution of ichthyoplankton in the river, discharge levels in the river, and the volume of water withdrawn by the pumps. Entrainment at the 1 G pump house, which is immediately downstream from the confluence of Upper Three Runs Creek and the Savannah River, is also influenced by discharge rates and ichthyoplankton densities in Upper Three Runs Creek. Because of the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River, the Department of Energy requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory sample ichthyoplankton at the SRS Savannah River intakes. Dams Moore, Inc., under a contract with Westinghouse Savannah River Company performed the sampling and data analysis for the ESS.

Paller, M. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

351

Adaptive Management Team Total Dissolved Gas in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Management Team Total Dissolved Gas in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Evaluation of the 115 Percent Total Dissolved Gas Forebay Requirement Washington State Department of Ecology and State of Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Final January 2009 Publication no. 09-10-002 #12;Publication and Contact

352

Revised 6/26/09 Master of Environmental Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Westside Willamette Wildlife Corridor Resource Assessment - Three Rivers Land Conservancy · InventoryRevised 6/26/09 Master of Environmental Management Selected Projects/Partners · Riparian Assessment in Oregon: Policy Review, Analysis and Recommendations - Oregon Department of State Lands · Assessment

353

Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River By Steve Ress The itinerary is set and the seats have been filled for an early June bus tour to New Mexico's lower Pecos River basin compacts on Nebraska's Republican River and New Mexico's Pecos River to see what can be learned from

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

354

Columbia-Snake River Irrigators Association Eastern Oregon Irrigators Association  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to river flows, reservoir elevations and hydroelectric power production. Its results are currently being

355

Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP's defined smolt-to-adult (SAR) survival rate guidelines. The observed low SAR was due to precocity, straying, and incidence of BKD in the spring Chinook program; which ultimately led to the program's inability to achieve the subbasin's overly optimistic biological fish objectives. The summer steelhead hatchery program was not providing the fishery or population benefits anticipated and will be discontinued. The winter steelhead program was performing as planned and no changes are foreseen. This updated Master Plan addresses the several proposed changes to the existing HRPP, which are described.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

356

Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that connects the pump, distribution tank and holding ponds. As of April 15, 2013, three of the ponds were completed and have been lined with a synthetic liner to prevent seepage and leakage as this was a major problem in early projects. Pecos River WPP...Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update Funding Provided by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board through a Clean Water Act §319(h) Nonpoint Source Grant from the U.S Environmental Protection Agency TR-447 October 2013 Pecos River...

Gregory, L.; Hauck, L.; Blumenthal, B.; Brown, M.; Porter, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

BachelorofManagement InternationalManagement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the official transcript (see Part 11 - Faculty of Management in the 2007/2008 Calendar). Program Planning Guide Management 3050/Political Science 3420 - Human Resource Management Management 3061 - Information Systems Environment Management 3640 - Cross-Cultural Management Practices Management 3660/Geography 3225 - Industrial

Seldin, Jonathan P.

358

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy and new technologies. The agency funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River...

359

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy and new technologies. The agency funds regional efforts to protect and rebuild fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River...

360

Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C.

U.S. Bonneville Power Administration

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Disposal of Draeger Tubes at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in Aiken, South Carolina that is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). At SRS Draeger tubes are used to identify the amount and type of a particular chemical constituent in the atmosphere. Draeger tubes rely on a chemical reaction to identify the nature and type of a particular chemical constituent in the atmosphere. Disposal practices for these tubes were identified by performing a hazardous waste evaluation per the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Additional investigations were conducted to provide guidance for their safe handling, storage and disposal. A list of Draeger tubes commonly used at SRS was first evaluated to determine if they contained any material that could render them as a RCRA hazardous waste. Disposal techniques for Draeger tubes that contained any of the toxic contaminants listed in South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79. 261.24 (b) and/or contained an acid in the liquid form were addressed.

Malik, N.P.

2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

362

Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE- SR),has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume I. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore,pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021.Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW.The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

Lawrence, B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Berry, M.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and Hood River Counties, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild its 24-mile long, 115 kilovolt Bonneville-Hood River transmission line. The existing line runs between the Bonneville Powerhouse at Bonneville Dam in Multnomah County, Oregon, and BPA's existing Hood River Substation in Hood River County, Oregon. The project would include replacing structures and conductor wires, improving access roads, and constructing new access roads or trails where needed.

364

Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River during Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Migration, 2002-2006 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10 C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir's epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water's surface and during periods of low river discharge often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The thickness (depth) of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004. Although temperature, and hence density, differences during flow augmentation periods between the Clearwater and Snake rivers were approximately equal (7-12 C) for all four years, the discharge ratio varied which resulted in significant differences in entrainment of cooler Clearwater River water into the Lower Granite Reservoir epilimnion. However, as a direct result of system management, Lower Granite Dam tailrace temperatures were maintained near 20 C during all years. Primary differences in the other three lower Snake River reservoirs were therefore a result of meteorological conditions and dam operations, which produced variations in wind setup and surface heating. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are capable of matching diurnal and long-term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the three-dimensional non-hydrostatic model Flow3D. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake river discharge. Simulation results were linked with the particle tracking model FINS to develop reservoir-integrated metrics that varied due to these alternative operation schemes. Findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir, which may also impact the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

Cook, C.; Dibrani, B.; Richmond, M.; Bleich, M.; Titzler, P..; Fu, T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1990 (April through June) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1990 are listed in this report.

Not Available

1991-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program: Second quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1992, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of criteria to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Since 1991, the flagging criteria have been based on the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking water standards and on method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1992 are listed in this report.

Rogers, C.D. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program: Fourth quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from fourth quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

Rogers, C.D. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

368

Implementation of ISO140001 at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC recently received ISO14001 certification. ISO14001 is an internationally recognized standard that delineates the elements of an effective environmental management system (EMS) and enhances environmental stewardship. SRS preparations for ISO14001 certification involved a comparison of existing programs to the requirements of the standard. Gaps in the program were identified and work initiated to fill those gaps. Primarily, these deficiencies were related to documentation of the SRS EMS and employee training. Certification was granted after an extensive review by a team of independent auditors. The review included personnel interviews, documentation reviews, and work practice observations. An overview of the preparation process as well as the independent review will be presented.

Marra, S.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Reeves, R.D.

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

River Data Package for the 2004 Composite Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in fiscal year 2003, the DOE Richland Operations Office initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support the 2004 Composite Analysis. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The State aims to preserve and protect Minnesota rivers and adjacent lands with outstanding scenic, recreational, natural, historical, scientific and similar values. Chapter 103F defines...

371

GOLF COURSES FRASER RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practices (BMP's) for golf courses, entitled Greening your BC Golf Course. A Guide to Environmental. It also summarizes conditions and practices in the Fraser Basin, reviews best management practices.C. Prepared by: UMA ENVIRONMENTAL A Division of UMA Engineering Ltd. Burnaby, B.C. March 1996 #12;THIRD PARTY

372

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

373

Microsoft Word - CX_Okanogan_River.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Confederated Tribes for the purchase of two parcels of land along the Okanogan River. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2007-224-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10...

374

Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership. The  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of land on the north side of the Columbia River in Cowlitz County, Wash., to protect fish habitat. An additional 75 acres of land will be donated by the Port of Longview. BPA...

375

Clinch River MRS Task Force Recommendations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Clinch River HRS Task Force was appointed in July 1985 by the Roane County Executive and the Oak Ridge City Council to evaluate the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility proposed by the...

376

Flint River Drought Protection Act (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Flint River Drought Protection Act is to maintain in-stream flow in times of drought by providing incentives for farmers to take acres out of irrigation. It allows Environmental...

377

The Ecology of the Navasota River, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-44 1973 The Ecology of the Navasota River, Texas By: William J. Clark Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report No. 44 Texas A&M University System...

Clark, W. J.

378

River Falls Municipal Utilities- Distributed Solar Tariff  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU), a member of WPPI Energy, offers a special energy purchase rate to its customers that generate electricity using solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The special...

379

River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Catawba/Wateree and Yadkin/Pee Dee River Basins Advisory Commissions are permanent public bodies jointly established by North and South Carolina. The commissions are responsible for assessing...

380

Lumbee River EMC- Residential Weatherization Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lumbee River Electric Membership Corporation (LREMC) offers low interest loans to help its residential members increase the energy efficiency of their homes. Loans up to $10,000 are available for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Think water : reconditioning the Malden River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this thesis is to link water, history and culture through architectural and urban design by researching the potential for the rejuvenation of a neglected industrial site at the edge of a river. The Malden ...

Oda, Kazuyo, 1969-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Eco-Design of River Fishways for Upstream Passage: Application for Hanfeng Dam, Pengxi River, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a scientific approach to eco-design of river fishways to allow upstream movement of fish past new and existing dams in China. This eco-design approach integrates principles of fish ecology/behavior and engineering, a scientific field also known as bio-engineering or eco-hydraulics. We define a fishway as a structure or mechanism to convey fish upstream past a dam. Man-made or natural stream beds can be part of the fishway mechanism. Fish include bony and non-bony fishes, and upstream passage is the concern here, not downstream passage. The problem is dams block access to upstream habitat used for spawning, rearing, and refuge, i.e., dams decrease habitat connectivity. A solution to alleviate this problem is to design fishways, preferably while the dam is being designed, but if necessary, as retrofits afterward to provide a route that fish can and will use to pass safely upstream without undue delay. Our eco-design approach for fishways involves eight steps: 1) identify the primary species of importance; 2) understand basic ecology and behavior of these fish; 3) characterize the environmental conditions where passage is or will be blocked; 4 identify fishway alternatives and select a preferred alternative; 5) establish eco-design criteria for the fishway, either from management agencies or, if necessary, developed specifically for the given site; 6) where needed, identify and perform research required to resolve critical uncertainties and finalize the eco-design criteria; 7) apply the eco-design criteria and site-specific considerations to design the fishway, involving peer-review by local stakeholders in the process; 8) build the fishway, monitor its effectiveness, and apply the lessons learned. Example fishways are described showing a range of eco-designs depending on the dam site and fish species of concern. We apply the eco-design principles to recommend an approach and next steps for a fishway to pass fish upstream at Hanfeng Dam, an existing regulating dam forming Hanfeng Lake on the Pengxi River near Kaixian, China.

Johnson, Gary E.; Rainey, William S.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

383

Large-scale spatial variability of riverbed temperature gradients in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States, hydroelectric dam operations are often based on the predicted emergence timing of salmon fry from the riverbed. The spatial variability and complexity of surface water and riverbed temperature gradients results in emergence timing predictions that are likely to have large errors. The objectives of this study were to quantify the thermal heterogeneity between the river and riverbed in fall Chinook salmon spawning areas and to determine the effects of thermal heterogeneity on fall Chinook salmon emergence timing. This study quantified river and riverbed temperatures at 15 fall Chinook salmon spawning sites distributed in two reaches throughout 160 km of the Snake River in Hells Canyon, Idaho, USA, during three different water years. Temperatures were measured during the fall Chinook salmon incubation period with self-contained data loggers placed in the river and at three different depths below the riverbed surface. At all sites temperature increased with depth into the riverbed, including significant differences (p<0.05) in mean water temperature of up to 3.8°C between the river and the riverbed among all the sites. During each of the three water years studied, river and riverbed temperatures varied significantly among all the study sites, among the study sites within each reach, and between sites located in the two reaches. Considerable variability in riverbed temperatures among the sites resulted in fall Chinook salmon emergence timing estimates that varied by as much as 55 days, depending on the source of temperature data used for the estimate. Monitoring of riverbed temperature gradients at a range of spatial scales throughout the Snake River would provide better information for managing hydroelectric dam operations, and would aid in the design and interpretation of future empirical research into the ecological significance of physical riverine processes.

Hanrahan, Timothy P.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to administer the project. Phase one of the project began in October 1999. During the initial meetings to begin planning the process of saltcedar removal, several major concerns emerged. First, the treatment method selected should provide a high rate...SR- 2004-01 The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report C. Hart Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University 1 2003 The Pecos River Ecosystem Project...

Hart, C.

385

Seismic interpretation of the Wind River Mountains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC INTERPBETATICN OF THE BIND RIVER MOUNTAINS A Thesis DAVID VAN VOORHIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ACM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Auqust 'l982 Majcr Subject...: Geophysics SEISNIC INTERFRETATION OF THE HIND RIVER NOUNTAINS A Thes is by DAVID VAN VOORBIS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman cf. Committee) (N em ber } m (Head of Department) August l 982 ABSTRACT Seismic Interpretation of the Wind...

Van Voorhis, David

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Columbia River Component Data Gap Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Data Gap Analysis report documents the results of a study conducted by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) to compile and reivew the currently available surface water and sediment data for the Columbia River near and downstream of the Hanford Site. This Data Gap Analysis study was conducted to review the adequacy of the existing surface water and sediment data set from the Columbia River, with specific reference to the use of the data in future site characterization and screening level risk assessments.

L. C. Hulstrom

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving STATEMENTSavannah River Site Savannah River Site

388

Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving STATEMENTSavannah River Site Savannah River

389

Columbia River Treaty 2014/2024 Review • Phase 1 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Columbia River Treaty (Treaty or CRT) of 1964, Canada and the United States (U.S.) jointly regulate and manage the Columbia River as it flows from British Columbia into the U.S. The Treaty has provided substantial flood control and power generation benefits to both nations. The Treaty established Canadian and U.S. Entities as implementing agents for each government. British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority (BC Hydro) was designated as the Canadian Entity. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Administrator and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Division Engineer, Northwestern Division, were designated as the U.S. Entity. The Canadian and U.S. Entities are empowered by their respective governments with broad discretion to implement the existing Columbia River Treaty. They are not, however, authorized to terminate, renegotiate, or otherwise modify the Treaty. In the U.S., authority over international treaties rests with the President, assisted in foreign relations and international negotiations by the Department of State and subject in certain cases to the advice and consent of the U.S. Senate. In Canada, international treaties are within the prerogative of the executive branch of the federal government. Under current policy, treaties are tabled in the House of Commons, and are subject to a waiting period before the executive branch brings the treaty into effect. In the case of the Columbia River Treaty, Canada has assigned certain rights and obligations relating to the Treaty to British Columbia pursuant to the Canada-B.C. Agreement. The Phase 1 report is provided to those respective governmental bodies to support possible independent and/or joint decisions that may be made with respect to the future of the Treaty. The Treaty contains two important provisions that take effect on and after September 16, 2024, that could impact the current power and flood control benefits: 1. Canadian flood control obligations automatically change from a pre-determined annual operation to a “Called Upon” operation. 2. The year 2024 is the earliest date that either Canada or the U.S. can terminate most of the provisions of the Treaty, with a minimum 10-years advance written notice. Hence, September 16, 2014, is the latest date that either nation could provide notice of intent to terminate and still have the termination effective at its earliest possible date in 2024. While termination would end most Treaty obligations, Called Upon flood control and Libby coordination provisions will continue regardless of termination. However, it is important to note that the Treaty has no end date and absent either country using the termination option will continue indefinitely.

none,

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Characterization and Monitoring Data for Evaluating Constructed Emergent Sandbar Habitat in the Missouri River Mainstem 2004-2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) provides the primary operational management of the Missouri River Main Stem Reservoir System. Management of the Missouri River has generally reduced peak river flows that form and maintain emergent sandbar habitat. Emergent sandbars provide non-vegetated nesting habitat for the endangered interior least tern (Sternula antillarum athalassos) and the threatened Northern Great Plains piping plover (Charadrius melodus). Since 2000, piping plover nesting habitat within the Gavins Point Reach, Garrison Reach, Lake Oahe, and Lake Sakakawea has fledged the majority of piping plovers produced along the Missouri River system. Habitats within Lewis and Clark Lake have also recently become important plover production areas. Mechanical construction of emergent sandbar habitat (ESH) within some of these reaches within the Missouri River began in 2004. Through 2009, 11 sandbar complexes had been constructed (10 in Gavins Point Reach, 1 in Lewis and Clarke Lake) totaling about 543 ac of piping plover and interior least tern nesting habitat. ESH Construction has resulted in a net gain of tern and plover nesting habitat. Both terns and plovers successfully nest and fledge young on constructed sandbars, and constructed habitats were preferred over natural habitats. Natural processes may limit the viability of constructed sandbars as nesting habitat. Continued research is needed to identify if changes in constructed sandbar engineering and management increase the length of time constructed habitats effectively function as nesting habitat. However, the transfer of information from researchers to planners through technical research reports may not be timely enough to effectively foster the feedback mechanisms of an adaptive management strategy.

Duberstein, Corey A.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Risk Management Procedures Category: Strategic Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/POLICY SUPPORTED Risk Management Policy Tertiary Education Quality Standards Agency Act 2011 (TEQSA Act 2011) 21 Risk Management Procedures Category: Strategic Management 1. LEGISLATION/ENTERPRISE AGREEMENT. PROCEDURAL DETAILS 2.1. Responsibilities Entity / Officer Responsibilities Planning and Management Committee

392

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment columbia river Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: assessment columbia river Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 352000 Columbia river Basin Fish and Wildlife Program "...the Council is adopting Summary: 352000 Columbia river Basin...

393

Conference Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for managing conferences sponsored or co-sponsored by the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 110.3. Canceled by DOE N 251.97.

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

394

Project Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a project manager in the Fuel Cell Technologies Office in the DOE-EERE Office of Transportation responsible for a wide variety of highly...

395

On September 28, 2012 twenty-nine people participated in a bus tour of seven sites where stormwater management practices had been installed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- timately the Passaic River. A Regional Storm- water Manage- ment Plan for the Troy Brook was developed of Environmental Protection. It is through that Plan that the Troy Troy Brook Stormwater Best Management Practices Management Practices (BMPs) is the best way to under- stand them,'" confirm the desire to continue

Goodman, Robert M.

396

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan : Executive Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Northwest Power Act directs the NPPC to develop a program to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance'' fish and wildlife of the Columbia River and its tributaries. The overarching goals include: A Columbia River ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife; Mitigation across the basin for the adverse effects to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem; Sufficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest and for non-tribal harvest; and Recovery of the fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the hydrosystem that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.

Childs, Allen B.; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Integration of Environmental Compliance at the Savannah River Site - 13024  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a large federal installation hosting diverse missions and multiple organizations with competing regulatory needs. Accordingly, there was a need to integrate environmental compliance strategies to ensure the consistent flow of information between Department of Energy-Savannah River (DOE-SR), the regulatory agencies and other interested parties. In order to meet this objective, DOE and major SRS contractors and tenants have committed to a strategy of collaboratively working together to ensure that a consistent, integrated, and fully coordinated approach to environmental compliance and regulator relationships is maintained. DOE-SR and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, the SRS management and operations contractor, have established an environmental compliance integration process that provides for the consistent flow down of requirements to projects, facilities, SRS contractors, and subcontractors as well as the upward flow of information to assist in the early identification and resolution of environmental regulatory issues and enhancement of compliance opportunities. In addition, this process strongly fosters teamwork to collaboratively resolve complex regulatory challenges, promote pollution prevention and waste minimization opportunities to advance site missions in a manner that balances near-term actions with the long-term site vision, while being protective of human health and the environment. Communication tools are being utilized, some with enhancements, to ensure appropriate information is communicated to all levels with environmental responsibility at SRS. SRS internal regulatory integration is accomplished through a variety of informational exchange forums (e.g., Challenges, Opportunities and Resolution (COR) Team, DOE's Joint Site Regulatory Integration Team, and the Senior Environmental Managers Council (SEMC)). SRS communications and problem-solving with the regulatory agencies have been enhanced through formation of an interagency 'SRS Regulatory Integration Team (SRIT)'. The SRIT is a partnership comprised of representatives from DOE-SR (with contractor support), EPA Region 4 and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and is chartered to develop a consensus understanding of SRS regulatory issues and activities. These forums and a formal environmental compliance integration process improve timely cross-functional decision making, problem solving, information sharing, and issue resolution. The SRS internal process has been formally documented in an Environmental Regulatory Integration Program Description, which is linked to the SRS Environmental Policy and agreed upon by all major contractors, subcontractors and tenants. (authors)

Hoel, David [United States Department of Energy - Savannah River Operations Office (United States)] [United States Department of Energy - Savannah River Operations Office (United States); Griffith, Michael [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NPPC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

HANFORD SITE RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT (RPP) TANK FARM CLOSURE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection and the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. are responsible for the operations, cleanup, and closure activities at the Hanford Tank Farms. There are 177 tanks overall in the tank farms, 149 single-shell tanks (see Figure 1), and 28 double-shell tanks (see Figure 2). The single-shell tanks were constructed 40 to 60 years ago and all have exceeded their design life. The single-shell tanks do not meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 [1] requirements. Accordingly, radioactive waste is being retrieved from the single-shell tanks and transferred to double-shell tanks for storage prior to treatment through vitrification and disposal. Following retrieval of as much waste as is technically possible from the single-shell tanks, the Office of River Protection plans to close the single-shell tanks in accordance with the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order [2] and the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 [3] requirements. The double-shell tanks will remain in operation through much of the cleanup mission until sufficient waste has been treated such that the Office of River Protection can commence closing the double-shell tanks. At the current time, however, the focus is on retrieving waste and closing the single-shell tanks. The single-shell tanks are being managed and will be closed in accordance with the pertinent requirements in: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and its Washington State-authorized Dangerous Waste Regulations [4], US DOE Order 435.1 Radioactive Waste Management [5], the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 [6], and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 [7]. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, which is commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA, was originally signed by Department of Energy, the State of Washington, and the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1989. Meanwhile, the retrieval of the waste is under way and is being conducted to achieve the completion criteria established in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

JARAYSI, M.N.; SMITH, Z.; QUINTERO, R.; BURANDT, M.B.; HEWITT, W.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

403

Stormwater Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management program must be developed that would meet the standard of reducing pollutants to the maximum extent practicable. Stormwater management programs for medium and large MS4s include measures to: ? Identify major outfalls and pollutant loadings... seeding: The vegetation used will be part of final landscaping, but during construction it prevents soil erosion. ? Mulching: Materials such as hay, grass, woodchips, gravel, or straw are placed on top of the soil to keep it from eroding. Structural...

Jaber, Fouad

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

404

Indian River Hydroelectric Project Grant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report provides a concise retrospective and summary of all facets of the Sheldon Jackson College electrical Infrastructure Renovation portion of the Indian River Hydroelectric Project Grant of the City and Borough of Sitka, Alaska. The Project Overview describes the origins of the project, the original conditions that provided the impetus for the grant funding, how the grant amendment was developed, the conceptual design development, and the actual parameters of the final project as it went out to bid. The Project Overview also describes the ''before and after'' conditions of the project. The Objectives division of this Final Technical Report describes the amendment-funded goals of the project. It also describes the milestones of project development and implementation, as well as, the rationale behind the milestone array. The Description of Activities Performed division of this report provides an in-depth chronological analysis of progressive project implementation. Photographs will provide further illustration of particular functional aspects of the renovation project within project parameters. The Conclusions and Recommendations division of this report provides a comprehensive retrospective analysis of the project.

Rebecca Garrett

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

405

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR); Perkins, Raymond R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ontario, OR)

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Spencer, S.G.; Shaber, C.R.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

Breeding bird populations and habitat associations within the Savannah River Site (SRS).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gauthreaux, Sidney, A., and Steven J. Wagner. 2005. Breeding bird populations and habitat associations within the Savannah River Site (SRS). Final Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 48 pp. Abstract: During the 1970's and 1980's a dramatic decline occurred in the populations of Neotropical migratory birds, species that breed in North America and winter south of the border in Central and South America and in the Caribbean. In 1991 an international initiative was mounted by U. S. governmental land management agencies, nongovernmental conservation agencies, and the academic and lay ornithological communities to understand the decline of Neotropical migratory birds in the Americas. In cooperation with the USDA Forest Service - Savannah River (FS - SR) we began 1992 a project directed to monitoring population densities of breeding birds using the Breeding Bird Census (BBC) methodology in selected habitats within the Savannah River Site SRS. In addition we related point count data on the occurrence of breeding Neotropical migrants and other bird species to the habitat data gathered by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the USDA Forest Service and data on habitat treatments within forest stands.

Gauthreaux, Sidney, A.; Steven J. Wagner.

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

Screening assessment and requirements for a comprehensive assessment: Volume 1, Draft. Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the impact to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site-derived contaminants, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology initiated a study referred to as the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). To address concerns about the scope and direction of CRCIA as well as enhance regulator, tribal, stockholder, and public involvement, the CRCIA Management Team was formed in August 1995. The Team agreed to conduct CRCIA using a phased approach. The initial phase, includes two components: 1) a screening assessment to evaluate the potential impact to the river, resulting from current levels of Hanford-derived contaminants in order to support decisions on Interim Remedial Measures, and 2) a definition of the essential work remaining to provide an acceptable comprehensive river impact assessment. The screening assessment is described in Part I of this report. The essential work remaining is Part II of this report. The objective of the screening assessment is to identify areas where the greatest potential exists for adverse effects on humans or the environment. Part I of this report discusses the scope, technical approach, and results of the screening assessment. Part II defines a new paradigm for predecisional participation by those affected by Hanford cleanup decisions.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Shaber, C.R.; Thurow, T.L.

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

410

Energy Management of Steam Distribution Systems Through Energy Audits and Computerized Reporting Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY KANAGEKBNT OF STEAM DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS THROUGH BNKRGY AUDITS AND COItPlTl'ERIZED REPORTING PROGRAtIS NORMAN J. RIVERS and HARTIN MANDZUK Armstrong Machine Works, Inc. Three Rivers, Michigan ABSTRACT This presentation will highlight... the economic losses associated with steam distribution systems and how to establish good energy management programs to reduce energy cost by 15 to 25 percent. Recognizing energy losses in steam systems involves I 1. Steam lost through defective valves...

Rivers, N.; Mandzuk, N.

411

Entrainment sampling at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Savannah River water intakes (1991)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooling water for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) L-Reactor, K-Reactor, and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pumphouses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water. They are passed through the reactor heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70{degree}C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is presumably 100%. Apart from a small pilot study conducted in 1989, ichthyoplankton samples have not been collected from the vicinity of the SRS intake canals since 1985. The Department of Energy (DOE) has requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) resume ichthyoplankton sampling for the purpose of assessing entrainment at the SRS Savannah River intakes. This request is due to the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River. The following scope of work presents a sampling plan that will collect information on the spatial and temporal distribution of fish eggs and larvae near the SRS intake canal mouths. This data will be combined with information on water movement patterns near the canal mouths in order to determine the percentage of ichthyoplankton that are removed from the Savannah River by the SRS intakes. The following sampling plan incorporates improvements in experimental design that resulted from the findings of the 1989 pilot study. 1 fig.

Paller, M.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Office of River Protection Mission Completion Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) is readying itself to commence construction of a Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) that will start the process of turning Hanford tank waste into glass. The plant is state-of-the art and includes reasonable flexibility to improve operations as technology and operational understandings improve. During its 40 year design life the plant has the capability to treat half of the total volume of tank waste and reduce risk to the public by up to ninety percent. Looking beyond initial processing towards the project end state, however, it is apparent that ORP's baseline approach is part of the issue raised by the DOE Secretary when he said that $300 billion and 75 years is too costly and too long for DOE's environmental cleanups. ORP has reviewed its cost and schedule drivers and has started identifying areas where better technologies and risk-based strategies could substantially decrease its life cycle cost and schedule. Specific technologies under consideration will be discussed along with expected return on investment. ORP is totally committed to taking all steps necessary during cleanup to protect human health and the environment and to comply with appropriate regulations and commitments. But, ORP is also very conscious of the fact that the history of Hanford production and tank farm operations has resulted in very large tank-to-tank variabilities in the waste constituents. Not all tank wastes demand the same high level of rigor in treatment as provided by the WTP in order to protect people and the environment. Parallel treatment paths, keyed to the hazards and chemical challenges each tank presents, need to be developed. The WTP vitrification capabilities should be deployed for the higher risk wastes that require vitrification. By getting wastes in the proper paths for treatment based upon their chemical characteristics and inherent risks, ORP will be able to both accelerate the cleanup schedule and bring its life cycle and annual funding requirements into line. The WTP needs to be managed and its throughput enhanced to vitrify all of the HLW and approximately 50% of the low-level tank waste by about 2030. That represents the lion's share of the current and long-term risk presented by the tanks.

Wiegman, S. A.; Hewitt, W. M.; Yuracko, K.; Holbrook, J. H.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

413

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report (U). Third and fourth quarters 1996, Vol. I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1996.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Managing the Management: CORBAbased Instrumentation of Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing the Management: CORBA­based Instrumentation of Management Systems A. Keller Munich Network to dynamically exchange customer­ and technology­related data. In this context, management systems are crucial providers: On the one hand, different service providers have chosen different management systems

416

Business Management Analyst Business Manager Director of Communication Contracts Manager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Business Management Analyst · Business Manager · Director of Communication · Contracts Manager of Sales · President/Owner · Instructor of Business · Senior Buyer · North American Sales Manager · Talent graduation. You will have the skills & knowledge to manage and grow a successful business. You will be able

Maxwell, Bruce D.

417

Overview of engineering and agricultural design considerations of the Raft River soil-warming and heat-dissipation experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The engineering and agricultural considerations of the Raft River soil-warming and heat-dissipation experiment are presented. The experiment is designed to investigate the thermal characteristics of a subsurface pipe network for cooling power-plant condenser effluent, and crop responses to soil warming in an open-field plot. The subsurface soil-warming system is designed to dissipate approximately 100 kW of heat from circulating, 38/sup 0/C geothermal water. Summer operating conditions in the Raft River area, located on the Intermountain Plateau are emphasized. Design is based on the thermal characteristics of the local soil, the climate of the Raft River Valley, management practices for normal agriculture, and the need for an unheated control plot. The resultant design calls for 38-mm polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe in a grid composed of parallel loops, for dissipating heat into a 0.8-hectare experimental plot.

Stanley, N.E.; Engen, I.A.; Yrene, C.S.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

New River Geothermal Exploration (Ram Power Inc.)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The New River Geothermal Exploration (DOE Award No. EE0002843) is located approximately 25km south of the Salton Sea, near town of Brawley in Imperial County and approximately 150km east of San Diego, California. A total of 182 MT Logger sites were completed covering the two separate Mesquite and New River grids. The data was collected over a frequency range of 320Hz to 0.001Hz with variable site spacing. A number of different inversion algorithms in 1D, 2D and 3D were used to produce resistivity-depth profiles and maps of subsurface resistivity variations over the survey area. For 2D inversions, a total of eighteen lines were constructed in east-west and north-south orientations crossing the entire survey area. For MT 3D inversion, the New River property was divided in two sub-grids, Mesquite and New River areas. The report comprises of two parts. For the first part, inversions and geophysical interpretation results are presented with some recommendations of the potential targets for future follow up on the property. The second part of the report describes logistics of the survey, survey parameters, methodology and the survey results (data) in digital documents. The report reviews a Spartan MT survey carried out by Quantec Geoscience Limited over the New River Project in California, USA on behalf of Ram Power Inc. Data was acquired over a period of 29 days from 2010/06/26 to 2010/07/24.

Miller, Clay

419

Savannah River Site (SRS) environmental overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environmental surveillance activities at and in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site (SRS) (formerly the Savannah River Plant (SRP)) comprise one of the most comprehensive and extensive environmental monitoring programs in the United States. This overview contains monitoring data from routine and nonroutine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities, summaries of environmental protection programs in progress, a summary of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities, and a listing of environmental permits (Appendix A) issued by regulatory agencies. This overview provides information about the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment. The SRS occupies a large area of approximately 300 square miles along the Savannah River, principally in Aiken and Barnwell counties of South Carolina. SRS's primary function is the production of tritium, plutonium, and other special nuclear materials for national defense, for other governmental uses, and for some civilian purposes. From August 1950 to March 31, 1989, SRS was operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by E. I. du Pont de Nemours Co. On April 1, 1989 the Westinghouse Savannah River Company assumed responsibility as the prime contractor for the Savannah River Site.

O'Rear, M.G. (USDOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, SC (USA)); Steele, J.L.; Kitchen, B.G. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA)) (eds.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

New River Geothermal Exploration (Ram Power Inc.)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New River Geothermal Exploration (DOE Award No. EE0002843) is located approximately 25km south of the Salton Sea, near town of Brawley in Imperial County and approximately 150km east of San Diego, California. A total of 182 MT Logger sites were completed covering the two separate Mesquite and New River grids. The data was collected over a frequency range of 320Hz to 0.001Hz with variable site spacing. A number of different inversion algorithms in 1D, 2D and 3D were used to produce resistivity-depth profiles and maps of subsurface resistivity variations over the survey area. For 2D inversions, a total of eighteen lines were constructed in east-west and north-south orientations crossing the entire survey area. For MT 3D inversion, the New River property was divided in two sub-grids, Mesquite and New River areas. The report comprises of two parts. For the first part, inversions and geophysical interpretation results are presented with some recommendations of the potential targets for future follow up on the property. The second part of the report describes logistics of the survey, survey parameters, methodology and the survey results (data) in digital documents. The report reviews a Spartan MT survey carried out by Quantec Geoscience Limited over the New River Project in California, USA on behalf of Ram Power Inc. Data was acquired over a period of 29 days from 2010/06/26 to 2010/07/24.

Miller, Clay

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Modified Streamflows 1990 Level of Irrigation : Missouri, Colorado, Peace and Slave River Basin, 1928-1989.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data for monthly mean streamflows adjusted for storage change, evaporation, and irrigation, for the years 1928-1990, for the Colorado River Basin, the Missouri River Basin, the Peace River Basin, and the Slave River Basin.

A.G. Crook Company; United States. Bonneville Power Administration

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Managing Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tx H2O | pg. 19 Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) project managers work together with scientists and educators as well as government funding agencies to address water quality and quantity issues in Texas. Each of TWRI?s five project... the funds.? Gregory began his role at TWRI in 2006 upon com- pletion of a master?s degree in water management and hydrological science at Texas A&M University. A former Mills Scholar, Gregory was familiar with TWRI. He saw that the institute...

Baker, Emily

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Hatchery Element : Project Progress Report 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numbers of Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka have declined dramatically in recent years. In Idaho, only the lakes of the upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Valley) remain as potential sources of production (Figure 1). Historically, five Sawtooth Valley lakes (Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, Stanley, and Yellowbelly) supported sockeye salmon (Bjornn et al. 1968; Chapman et al. 1990). Currently, only Redfish Lake receives a remnant anadromous run. On April 2, 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service (NOAA - formerly National Marine Fisheries Service) received a petition from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) to list Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. On November 20, 1991, NOAA declared Snake River sockeye salmon endangered. In 1991, the SBT, along with the Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG), initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project (Sawtooth Valley Project) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The goal of this program is to conserve genetic resources and to rebuild Snake River sockeye salmon populations in Idaho. Coordination of this effort is carried out under the guidance of the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC), a team of biologists representing the agencies involved in the recovery and management of Snake River sockeye salmon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service ESA Permit Nos. 1120, 1124, and 1481 authorize IDFG to conduct scientific research on listed Snake River sockeye salmon. Initial steps to recover the species involved the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho and at NOAA facilities in Washington State (for a review, see Flagg 1993; Johnson 1993; Flagg and McAuley 1994; Kline 1994; Johnson and Pravecek 1995; Kline and Younk 1995; Flagg et al. 1996; Johnson and Pravecek 1996; Kline and Lamansky 1997; Pravecek and Johnson 1997; Pravecek and Kline 1998; Kline and Heindel 1999; Hebdon et al. 2000; Flagg et al. 2001; Kline and Willard 2001; Frost et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2003; Kline et al. 2003a; Kline et al. 2003b; Willard et al. 2003a; Willard et al. 2003b; Baker et al. 2004; Baker et al. 2005; Willard et al. 2005; Baker et al. 2006; Plaster et al. 2006; Baker et al. 2007). The immediate goal of the program is to utilize captive broodstock technology to conserve the population's unique genetics. Long-term goals include increasing the number of individuals in the population to address delisting criteria and to provide sport and treaty harvest opportunity. (1) Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake sockeye salmon, culture broodstocks and produce progeny for reintroduction. (2) Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward avoiding population extinction and increasing population abundance. (3) Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Sawtooth Valley lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program reintroduction efforts. (4) Utilize genetic analysis to discern the origin of wild and broodstock sockeye salmon to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. (5) Transfer technology through participation in the technical oversight committee process, provide written activity reports, and participate in essential program management and planning activities. Idaho Department of Fish and Game's participation in the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program includes two areas of effort: (1) sockeye salmon captive broodstock culture, and (2) sockeye salmon research and evaluations. Although objectives and tasks from both components overlap and contribute to achieving the same goals, work directly related to sockeye salmon captive broodstock research and enhancement will appear under a separate cover. Research and enhancement activities associated with Snake River sockeye salmon are permitted under NOAA permit numbers 1120, 1124, and 1481. This report details fish

Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Green, Daniel G.; Kline, Paul A.

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hood River Monitoring and Evaluation Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project is co-managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The program is divided up to share responsibilities, provide efficiency, and avoid duplication. From October 2002 to September 2003 (FY 03) project strategies were implemented to monitor, protect, and restore anadromous fish and fish habitat in the Hood River subbasin. A description of the progress during FY 03 is reported here. Additionally an independent review of the entire program was completed in 2003. The purpose of the review was to determine if project goals and actions were achieved, look at critical uncertainties for present and future actions, determine cost effectiveness, and choose remedies that would increase program success. There were some immediate changes to the implementation of the project, but the bulk of the recommendations will be realized in coming years.

Vaivoda, Alexis

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Preliminary Review of Safety Assessment Issues at Savannah River Site, August 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) management, a review team composed of experts in atmospheric transport modeling for environmental radiation dose assessment convened at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on August 29-30, 2011. Several issues were presented at the meeting for discussion. This is a short summary that is organized in accordance with the primary issues discussed, which is not necessarily a chronological record. Issues include: SRS Meteorological Data and its Use in MACCS2; Deposition Velocities for Particles; Deposition Velocities for Tritium; MACCS2 Dispersion Coefficients; Use of Low Surface Roughness in Open Areas; Adequacy of Meteorological Tower and Instrumentation; Displacement Height; and Validity of MACCS2 Calculations at Close-in Distances. A longer report will be issued at a later date that expands upon these topics and recommendations.

Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bixler, Nathan E.

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, first quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During first quarter 1989 (January--March), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the first quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from first quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1989 (July--September), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the third quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from third quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project has provided science-based tools for the long-term management of salinity in drainage discharges from wetlands to the San Joaquin River. The results of the project are being used to develop best management practices (BMP) and a decision support system to assist wetland managers adjust the timing of salt loads delivered to the San Joaquin River during spring drawdown. Adaptive drainage management scheduling has the potential to improve environmental compliance with salinity objectives in the Lower San Joaquin River by reducing the frequency of violation of Vernalis salinity standards, especially in dry and critically dry years. The paired approach to project implementation whereby adaptively managed and traditional practices were monitored in a side-by-side fashion has provided a quantitative measure of the impacts of the project on the timing of salt loading to the San Joaquin River. The most significant accomplishments of the project has been the technology transfer to wetland biologists, ditch tenders and water managers within the Grasslands Ecological Area. This “learning by doing” has build local community capacity within the Grassland Water District and California Department of Fish and Game providing these institutions with new capability to assess and effectively manage salinity within their wetlands while simultaneously providing benefits to salinity management of the San Joaquin River.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.; Johnson, C.B.

2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

431

Human and Organizational Management in Natural Resources Course Syllabus Jane L. Bachelor, MBA, SPHR Page 1 of 14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human and Organizational Management in Natural Resources­ Course Syllabus Jane L. Bachelor, MBA, SPHR Page 1 of 14 FOR6934 Human and Organizational Management in Natural Resources Tentative Distance Learning Course Syllabus Instructor: Jane L. Bachelor, MBA, SPHR Office: Indian River Research

Watson, Craig A.

432

Historical river flow rates for dose calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

Carlton, W.H.

1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

433

Snake and Columbia Rivers Sediment Sampling Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal of dredged material in water is defined as a discharge under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and must be evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR 230. Because contaminant loads in the dredged sediment or resuspended sediment may affect water quality or contaminant loading, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Walla Walla District, has requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to collect and chemically analyze sediment samples from areas that may be dredged near the Port Authority piers on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Sediment samples were also collected at River Mile (RM) stations along the Snake River that may undergo resuspension of sediment as a result of the drawdown. Chemical analysis included grain size, total organic carbon, total volatile solids, ammonia, phosphorus, sulfides, oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and 21 congeners of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

Pinza, M.R.; Word, J.Q; Barrows, E.S.; Mayhew, H.L.; Clark, D.R. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

435

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2005 Annual Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2005 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

Paul M. Bertsch

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

436

RETURN OF THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 5 Freshwater Habitats131  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rivers of the world and also one of the most developed with ten major hydroelectric dams on the main the major hydroelectric projects and the owner-operator of each project. #12;RETURN OF THE RIVER - 2000

437

Floodplain River Foodwebs in the Lower Mekong Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dynamics in tropical rivers undergo significant seasonal shifts and emphasizes that river food webs are altered by dams and flow regulation. Seston and benthic algae were the most important production sources supporting fish biomass during the dry season...

Ou, Chouly

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory FY2006 Annual Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FY2006 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of the University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, County, SC.

Paul M. Bertsch

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

439

Columbia River Food Webs: Developing a Broader Scientific Foundation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Columbia River Food Webs: Developing a Broader Scientific Foundation for Fish and Wildlife and Conservation Council #12;i Columbia River Food Webs: Developing a Broader Scientific Foundation for Fish

440

Type B Accident Investigation of the Savannah River Site Arc...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Savannah River Site Arc Flash Burn Injury on September 23, 2009, in the D Area Powerhouse Type B Accident Investigation of the Savannah River Site Arc Flash Burn Injury on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS), LLC, related to a Worker Fall from a Scaffold in the K-Area Complex at the Savannah River Site On November 9, 2012, the U.S. Department of...

442

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2004 Annual Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2004 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

Paul M. Bertsch

2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

443

Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), was established on June 30, 1948 to control and abate pollution in the Ohio River Basin. ORSANCO is an interstate commission...

444

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through...

445

Wekiva River and Wekiva Parkway Protection Acts (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Wekiva River Protection Act directs the Orange, Lake, and Seminole Counties to emphasize the Wekiva River Protection Area in their planning efforts and regulations. Each county’s local...

446

Wild and Scenic River Acts (Lower St. Croix Riverway)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The lower portion of the St. Croix River in Minnesota and Wisconsin is regulated under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Program. Most new residential, commercial, and industrial uses are...

447

Savannah River Site, Liquid Waste Program, Savannah River Remediation American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Benefits and Lessons Learned - 12559  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilizing funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the Liquid Waste Program at Savannah River site successfully executed forty-one design, procurement, construction, and operating activities in the period from September 2009 through December 2011. Project Management of the program included noteworthy practices involving safety, integrated project teams, communication, and cost, schedule and risk management. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure were accomplished. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually identified and applied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. The funding of a portion of the Liquid Waste Program at SRS by ARRA was a major success. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure was accomplished. Integrated Project Teams ensured quality products and services were provided to the Operations customers. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually reviewed and reapplied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. (authors)

Schmitz, Mark A.; Crouse, Thomas N. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Salmon Subbasin Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yellow Pine Mid Fk Lodge Salmon River 10 0 10 20 30 40 50 Miles #S #S #S #S #S #S #S#S #S #S #S MONTANA

449

Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to deliver on its mission. BPA also funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River...

450

EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

Chen, K.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

451

Biodiversity and the Recovery of Threatened and Endangered Salmon Species in the Columbia River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report of 8 of 11.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stated purpose of the Endangered Species Act is to provide a means whereby the ecosystem upon which endangered species and threatened species depend may be conserved. Conservation of the Columbia River ecosystem and the diversity of gene pools, life histories, species, and communities that comprise it, should become a major objective of species recovery and fish and wildlife management programs in the Columbia River Basin. Biodiversity is important to both species and ecosystem health, and is a prerequisite to long-term sustainability of biological resources. In this paper, I provide an overview of various approaches to defining, measuring, monitoring, and protecting biodiversity. A holistic approach is stressed that simultaneously considers diverse species and resource management needs. Emphasis is on threatened and endangered species of salmon and their associated habitat.

Steward, C. R. (Cleveland R.)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Linking ecosystem services, rehabilitation, and river hydrogeomorphology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of all services for all FPZs combined. Table 1 includes only 5 of the 14 to 15 variables used to delineate FPZs in our river-typing methods, but these are sufficient to illustrate why ecosystem services should vary among FPZs. The first three.... Ecological Applications 13: 1762–1772. Loomis J, Kent P, Strange L, Fausch K, Covich A. 2000. Measuring the total economic value of restoring ecosystem services in an impaired river basin: Results from contingent valuation survey. Ecological Economics 33: 103...

Thorp, James H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Cities and Rivers: Interdisciplinary and International Perspectives New Directions in the Earth Sciences and the Humanities is conducting a workshop in St  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems that are highly sensitive to climate, development, and river management, such as changes Sciences and the Humanities is conducting a workshop in St Petersburg, Russia, June 19-23, 2004 for 30 boundaries. · To explore differences in approaches among researchers in the United States and in Russia

Colorado at Boulder, University of

454

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site- August 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project

455

Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SURVEYS; IDAHO; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; GEOTHERMAL WELLS; KGRA; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT; ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES; EXPLORATION; GEOPHYSICAL...

456

Terrestrial Carbon Inventory at the Savannah River Site, 1951 – 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Power Point slide presentation/report on the terestrial carbon inventory at the Savannah River Site.

US Forest Service - Annonymous,

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to deliver that power. Today, BPA markets wholesale power from 31 federal hydroelectric projects, most of which are located in the Columbia River Basin. BPA also markets power from...

458

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for that power. Today, BPA markets wholesale power from 31 federal hydroelectric projects, most of which are located in the Columbia River Basin. BPA also markets power from Energy...

459

Object Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Object-Oriented Database Management Systems for EngineeringR. Cassel. Distribution Management Systems: Functions and8-PWR 1988. Network Management Systems 52 Subodh Bapat.

Gollu, Aleks Ohannes

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R-3 • Environmental Management System Plan References 30.of Energy, Safety Management System Policy, DOE P 450.4 (E), Environmental Management Systems ? Requirements with

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management Program, R-3 • Environmental Management SystemEnvironmental policy 3. Environmental aspects 4. Legal andObjectives, targets, and Environmental Management Programs

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Ecological Responses to Hydrogeomorphic Fluctuations in a Sand Bed Prairie River: River Complexity, Habitat Availability, and Benthic Invertebrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rivers with stochastic precipitation have fauna that overcome unique challenges. Organisms surmount these challenges by using refugia. Research was conducted on the sand bed Kansas River (Kaw). I (a) quantified how the hydrology affects the Kaw...

O'Neill, Brian James

2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

463

Fraser River Hydro and Fisheries Research Project fonds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fraser River Hydro and Fisheries Research Project fonds Revised by Erwin Wodarczak (1998 Fraser River Hydro and Fisheries Research Project fonds. ­ 19561961. 13 cm of textual records. Administrative History The Fraser River Hydro and Fisheries Research Project was established in 1956, financed

Handy, Todd C.

464

SURVEY OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER AND ITS TRIBUTARIES -Part VII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURVEY OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER AND ITS TRIBUTARIES - Part VII I ^^^^'fie^BkJioJS SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC, Director Special Scientific Report - Fisheries No. UO SURVEY OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER AND ITS TRIBUTARIES PART these have been divided for con- venience into four sub-areas. On the Idaho side of the Snake River

465

Kentucky River Pleasant Hill/ S.R.33 Burgin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lexington U.S.68 S.R.1268 Wilmore S.R. 33 Kentucky River Mt. Zion Church Pleasant Hill/ S.R.33 Lexington on US 68 heading SSW. Drive across the Kentucky River ­ down palisades and up the other side, Mercer Co. Ky The church is located between the Kentucky River and Shaker Village. There is no indoor

Finkel, Raphael

466

CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory JUN16 1954 WOODS HOLE, MASS MAP CREEL CENSUS SUN RIVER MONTANA DRAWN i*^ ^ TRACED- _2ÂŁjLt:l SUBMITTED . 1 V N 01 1 VN ei

467

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry

468

Waste Management Program management plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the prime contractor to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) provides comprehensive waste management services to all contractors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) through the Waste Management (WM) Program. This Program Management Plan (PMP) provides an overview of the Waste Management Program objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. This document will be reviewed at least annually and updated as needed to address revisions to the Waste Management`s objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. Waste Management Program is managed by LMITCO Waste Operations Directorate. The Waste Management Program manages transuranic, low-level, mixed low-level, hazardous, special-case, and industrial wastes generated at or transported to the INEEL.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT -INVENTORY CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT - INVENTORY CONTROL Record of Property Transferred from ______ ___________________________________ 2. DEAN (If Applies) ______ ___________________________________ 5. UNIVERSITY DIRECTOR OF MATERIALS MANAGEMENT ______ ___________________________________ 3. HOSPITAL DIRECTOR (If Applies) ______ IF YOU NEED

Oliver, Douglas L.

470

Managing Critical Management Improvement Initiatives  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides requirements and responsibilities for planning, executing and assessing critical management improvement initiatives within DOE. DOE N 251.59, dated 9/27/2004, extends this Notice until 10/01/2005. Archived 11-8-10. Does not cancel other directives.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Habitat restoration and sediment transport in rivers Streams and rivers or any bodies of flowing water are dynamic by nature. Through erosion and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Habitat restoration and sediment transport in rivers Streams and rivers or any bodies of flowing water are dynamic by nature. Through erosion and deposition, streams and rivers transport and transform important. Current Projects: Fish habitat restoration in rivers: In the past rivers' dynamic nature has been

Barthelat, Francois

472

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.

Wein, G.; Rosier, B.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

473

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.

Wein, G.; Rosier, B.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

EIS-0268: Shutdown of River Water System at the Savannah River Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to shut down the Savannah R]ver Site River Water System in order to save money; that is, to prevent further expenditure of the...

475

Coal River Mountain Action Several people asked for more information about the 23 June civil disobedience near Coal River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal River Mountain Action Several people asked for more information about the 23 June civil disobedience near Coal River Mountain. We need Dickens to describe the local situation, but you can glean the practice of mountaintop removal. Vernon Haltom vernoncrmw@gmail.com, head of Coal River Mountain Watch

Hansen, James E.

476

Best Management Practice #1: Water Management Planning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful water management program starts with developing a comprehensive water management plan. This plan should be included within existing facility operating plans.

477

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Technical Review Report: Oak Ridge Reservation Review of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge By Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE; William H....

478

EIS-0351: Operation of Flaming Gorge Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Colorado River, UT  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior (Secretary), acting through the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is considering whether to implement a proposed action under which Flaming Gorge Dam would be operated to achieve the flow and temperature regimes recommended in the September 2000 report Flow and Temperature Recommendations for Endangered Fishes in the Green River Downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam (2000 Flow and Temperature Recommendations), published by the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program (Recovery Program).

479

Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving STATEMENTSavannah River Site Savannah RiverSite |

480

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted during the first quarter of 1992. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

Not Available

1992-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "myakka river management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Savannah River Technology Center. Monthly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains information about the research programs being conducted at the Savannah River Plant. Topics of discussion include: thermal cycling absorption process, development of new alloys, ion exchange, oxalate precipitation, calcination, environmental research, remedial action, ecological risk assessments, chemical analysis of salt cakes, natural phenomena hazards assessment, and sampling of soils and groundwater.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

OkanoganRiver SpringChinookSalmon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency/Operator: Watershed and Region: Date Submitted: Date Last Updated: NOTE Chinook Above Wells Dam Table 3. Tribal Incidental Take Thresholds for ESA-Listed 44 Upper Columbia River Steelhead Table 4. Tribal & Recreational Incidental Take Thresholds 45 for Unmarked Spring Chinook Table 5

483

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Washington. The Act authorized the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish Overview 11 Sixth Northwest Power Plan boosts energy efficiency, renewable energy, Energy efficiency

484

Fast Facts About the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration, the federal agency that markets the electricity generated at federal dams in the Columbia River Energy Regulatory Commission; electric utilities; and state energy regulatory agencies. State, tribal directs more than $220 million annually in federal electricity revenues to implement more than 400

485

The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by EPD/EMS in the first quarter of 1991. In includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

Not Available

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

486

How We Got Started Sheyenne River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Riparian Ecosystems · Field Tours · Rancher Meetings · Educational Materials #12;Project Collaborators Source Program #12;· The goals of this project is to improve and strengthen the ability of resource Project #12;· 6 New Riparian ESDs · MLRA 54 · Knife River · Spring Creek · MLRA 55B · Baldhill Creek

487

Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g. long-term trends could affect hydropower, ecosystems and aquatic species...). 1917 2005 Athabasca; #12;4 Reduced Water Supply from Reservoirs Climate Change Issues in the US 1. Rainfall vs Snowmelt; 21 Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers in the US and South Korea Pierre Y. Julien Dept

Julien, Pierre Y.

488

Carolina bays of the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much of the research to date on the Carolina bays of the Savannah River Plant and elsewhere has focused on certain species or on environmental features. Different levels of detail exist for different groups of organisms and reflect the diverse interests of previous investigators. This report summarizes aspects of research to date and presents data from numerous studies. 70 refs., 14 figs., 12 tabs.

Schalles, J.F. (Creighton Univ., Omaha, NE (USA)); Sharitz, R.R.; Gibbons, J.W.; Leversee, G.J.; Knox, J.N. (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Trough to trough The Colorado River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trough to trough The Colorado River and the Salton Sea Robert E. Reynolds, editor Trough to trough....................................................................................5 Robert E. Reynolds The vegetation of the Mojave and Colorado deserts geological excursions and observations of the Colorado Desert region by William Phipps Blake, 1853 and 1906

de Lijser, Peter

490

2008 Peconic River Monitoring Report Highlights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Fish Identification (Area - Age (years)) Mercury(mg/kg) Largemouth bass tissue mercury (mg/kg) EPA Criterion (0.3 mg/kg) Average largemouth bass tissue mercury (0.41 mg/kg) ?? Fish large for age 5 #12;6 2008 Pickerel Largemouth Bass Pumpkinseed 6 #12;8 Fish 2008 Peconic River Average Fish Tissue Mercury by Area 0

Homes, Christopher C.

491

Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Walleye · Smallmouth bass · Northern pike · Others 5 Native and Non-native Fish Predators #12;· At dams#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program Summary of Predation Event Center #12;Council's 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Piscivorous Predator Control · Implement

492

Peconic River Update Environmental Protection Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

largemouth bass from Donahue's Pond Fish age and Hg content · 5-year old brown bullhead from Area C had 0 · Fish 5-Year Review update and recommendations for changes to the Peconic River monitoring program · Sediment · Water · Fish 2 #12;Refresher - The Clean-up ROD Goals ­ Mercury in Sediment · Onsite ­ Average

Homes, Christopher C.

493

3. Hydrogeomorphic Variability and River Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is difficult to design effective stream and channel restoration measures, or evaluate project performance expansion of efforts in and expenditures for stream restoration. Increasingly, resto- ration efforts focus39 3. Hydrogeomorphic Variability and River Restoration D. R. MONTGOMERY1 AND S. M. BOLTON2

Montgomery, David R.

494

Environmental Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Another key aspect of the NNSS mission is Environmental Management program, which addresses the environmental legacy from historic nuclear weapons related activities while also ensuring the health and safety of present day workers, the public, and the environment as current and future missions are completed. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management site receives low-level and mixed low-level waste from some 28 different generators from across the DOE complex in support of the legacy clean-up DOE Environmental Management project. Without this capability, the DOE would not be able to complete the clean up and proper disposition of these wastes. The program includes environmental protection, compliance, and monitoring of the air, water, plants, animals, and cultural resources at the NNSS. Investigation and implementation of appropriate corrective actions to address the contaminated ground water facilities and soils resulting from historic nuclear testing activities, the demolition of abandoned nuclear facilities, as well as installation of ground water wells to identify and monitor the extent of ground water contamination.

None

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

495

Environmental Management  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Another key aspect of the NNSS mission is Environmental Management program, which addresses the environmental legacy from historic nuclear weapons related activities while also ensuring the health and safety of present day workers, the public, and the environment as current and future missions are completed. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management site receives low-level and mixed low-level waste from some 28 different generators from across the DOE complex in support of the legacy clean-up DOE Environmental Management project. Without this capability, the DOE would not be able to complete the clean up and proper disposition of these wastes. The program includes environmental protection, compliance, and monitoring of the air, water, plants, animals, and cultural resources at the NNSS. Investigation and implementation of appropriate corrective actions to address the contaminated ground water facilities and soils resulting from historic nuclear testing activities, the demolition of abandoned nuclear facilities, as well as installation of ground water wells to identify and monitor the extent of ground water contamination.

None

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

496

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Priest River Project, Technical Report 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 140.73 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 60.05 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow habitat provides 7.39 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 71.13 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Open water habitat provides 2.16 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. The objective of using HEP at the Priest River Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Contract Management Certificate Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract Management Certificate Program Accelerate Your Career BusinessandManagement extension bearing the UC seal signifies a well- known, uncompromising standard of academic excellence. #12;Contract Management Certificate Program UC Irvine Extension's Contract Management Certificate Program focuses on core

Rose, Michael R.

498

Flathead River Creel Report, 1992-1993. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A roving creel survey was conducted on the Flathead River system, May 1992 through May 1993, as part of Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, funded by Bonneville Power Administration. The Flathead River system is a tributary to the Clarks Fork of the Columbia River originating in northwest Montana and southern British Columbia. The river creel survey was conducted in conjunction with a Flathead Lake creel survey. This document summarizes the creel survey on the river system. The purpose of these creel surveys was to quantify fishery status prior to mitigation efforts and provide replicative survey methodology to measure success of future mitigation activities. 4 figs., 21 tabs.

Hanzel, Delano

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2009 (SRNS-STI-2010-00175) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A,'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,' and DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.' The annual SRS Environmental Report has been produced for more than 50 years. Several hundred copies are distributed each year to government officials, universities, public libraries, environmental and civic groups, news media, and interested individuals. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (3) highlight significant programs and efforts. SRS maintained its record of environmental excellence in 2009, as its operations continued to result in minimal impact to the offsite public and the surrounding environment. The site's radioactive and chemical discharges to air and water were well below regulatory standards for environmental and public health protection; its air and water quality met applicable requirements; and the potential radiation dose from its discharges was less than the national dose standards. The largest radiation dose that an offsite, hypothetical, maximally exposed individual could have received from SRS operations during 2009 was estimated to be 0.12 millirem (mrem). (An mrem is a standard unit of measure for radiation exposure.) The 2009 SRS dose is just 0.12 percent of the DOE all-pathway dose standard of 100 mrem per year, and far less than the natural average dose of about 300 mrem per year (according to Report No. 160 of the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) to people in the United States. This 2009 all-pathway dose of 0.12 mrem was the same as the 2008 dose. Environmental monitoring is conducted extensively within a 2,000-square-mile network extending 25 miles from SRS, with some monitoring performed as far as 100 miles from the site. The area includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina. Thousands of samples of air, rainwater, surface water, drinking water, groundwater, food products, wildlife, soil, sediment, and vegetation are collected by SRS and state authorities and analyzed for the presence of radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants. Compliance with environmental regulations and with DOE orders related to environmental protection provides assurance that onsite processes do not impact the public or the environment adversely. Such compliance is documented in this report. SRS had a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) compliance rate of 99.92 percent in 2009, with only four of the 4,989 sample analyses performed exceeding permit limits. The NPDES program protects streams, reservoirs, and other wetlands by limiting the release of nonradiological pollution into surface waters. Discharge limits are set for each facility to ensure that SRS operations do not negatively impact aquatic life or degrade water quality.

Mamatey, A.; Fanning, R.

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

500

Forrest Conservation Area : Management & Implementation FY 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Conservation Area during July of 2002. The property is located in the Upper John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The property consists of two parcels comprising 4,232 acres. The Mainstem parcel consists of 3,445 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem John Day River. The Middle Fork parcel consists of 786 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the Middle Fork John Day River. The Forrest Conservation Area is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. Acquisition of the Forrest Conservation Area was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The intent of the Conservation Area is to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, {section}11.1, {section}7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of management funding for the protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat through a memorandum of agreement.

Smith, Brent

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z