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1

Design & development fo a 20-MW flywheel-based frequency regulation power plant : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the successful efforts of Beacon Power to design and develop a 20-MW frequency regulation power plant based solely on flywheels. Beacon's Smart Matrix (Flywheel) Systems regulation power plant, unlike coal or natural gas generators, will not burn fossil fuel or directly produce particulates or other air emissions and will have the ability to ramp up or down in a matter of seconds. The report describes how data from the scaled Beacon system, deployed in California and New York, proved that the flywheel-based systems provided faster responding regulation services in terms of cost-performance and environmental impact. Included in the report is a description of Beacon's design package for a generic, multi-MW flywheel-based regulation power plant that allows accurate bids from a design/build contractor and Beacon's recommendations for site requirements that would ensure the fastest possible construction. The paper concludes with a statement about Beacon's plans for a lower cost, modular-style substation based on the 20-MW design.

Rounds, Robert (Beacon Power, Tyngsboro, MA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect (Smart  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect Country Denmark Headquarters Location Sønderborg, Denmark Coordinates 54.913811°, 9.792178° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":54.913811,"lon":9.792178,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect (Smart  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

effect (Smart effect (Smart Grid Project) (Thisted, Denmark) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect Country Denmark Headquarters Location Thisted, Denmark Coordinates 56.959167°, 8.703492° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.959167,"lon":8.703492,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References EU Smart Grid Projects Map1 Overview Waste CHP plants can be used in the electricity market for upward regulation by bypassing the steam turbine. The technical...

5

Frequency regulator for synchronous generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices.

Karlicek, Robert F. (1920 Camino Centroloma, Fullerton, CA 92633)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Frequency regulator for synchronous generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices. 11 figs.

Karlicek, R.F.

1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

7

A new Main Injector radio frequency system for 2.3 MW Project X operations  

SciTech Connect

For Project X Fermilab Main Injector will be required to provide up to 2.3 MW to a neutrino production target at energies between 60 and 120 GeV. To accomplish the above power levels 3 times the current beam intensity will need to be accelerated. In addition the injection energy of Main Injector will need to be as low as 6 GeV. The current 30 year old Main Injector radio frequency system will not be able to provide the required power and a new system will be required. The specifications of the new system will be described.

Dey, J.; Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Frequency Regulation Basics and Trends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electric power system must address two unique requirements: the need to maintain a near real-time balance between generation and load, and the need to adjust generation (or load) to manage power flows through individual transmission facilities. These requirements are not new: vertically integrated utilities have been meeting them for a century as a normal part of conducting business. With restructuring, however, the services needed to meet these requirements, now called ''ancillary services'', are being more clearly defined. Ancillary services are those functions performed by the equipment and people that generate, control, and transmit electricity in support of the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has defined such services as those ''necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system''. This statement recognizes the importance of ancillary services for both bulk-power reliability and support of commercial transactions. Balancing generation and load instantaneously and continuously is difficult because loads and generators are constantly fluctuating. Minute-to-minute load variability results from the random turning on and off of millions of individual loads. Longer-term variability results from predictable factors such as the daily and seasonal load patterns as well as more random events like shifting weather patterns. Generators also introduce unexpected fluctuations because they do not follow their generation schedules exactly and they trip unexpectedly due to a range of equipment failures. The output from wind generators varies with the wind. Storage technologies should be ideal suppliers of several ancillary services, including regulation, contingency reserves (spinning reserve, supplemental reserve, replacement reserve), and voltage support. These services are not free; in regions with energy markets, generators are paid to supply these services. In vertically integrated utilities (without energy markets) the utility incurs significant costs to supply these services. Supplying these services may be a significant business opportunity for emerging storage technologies. This report briefly explores the various ancillary services that may be of interest to storage. It then focuses on regulation, the most expensive ancillary service. It also examines the impact that increasing amounts of wind generation may have on regulation requirements, decreasing conventional regulation supplies, and the implications for energy storage.

Kirby, BJ

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

9

Energy storage for frequency regulation on the electric grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ancillary services such as frequency regulation are required for reliable operation of the electric grid. Currently, the same traditional thermal generators that supply bulk power also perform nearly all frequency regulation. ...

Leitermann, Olivia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Radio Frequency Identification : regulating information privacy protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As applications of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) become more profuse, the technology itself is stirring up some controversy. Due to its potential for amassing large amounts of information about both people and ...

Laufer, Deanna (Deanna Raquel)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Wind/PV Generation for Frequency Regulation and Oscillation Damping in the Eastern Interconnection  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the control of renewable energy sources, including the variable-speed wind generators and solar photovoltaic (PV) generators, for frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping in the U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI). In this report, based on the user-defined wind/PV generator electrical control model and the 16,000-bus Eastern Interconnection dynamic model, the additional controllers for frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping are developed and incorporated and the potential contributions of renewable energy sources to the EI system frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping are evaluated.

Liu, Yong [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville] [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville; Gracia, Jose R [ORNL] [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL] [ORNL; Liu, Yilu [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

PEV-Based Combined Frequency and Voltage Regulation for Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PEV-Based Combined Frequency and Voltage Regulation for Smart Grid Chenye Wu, Student Member, IEEE benefit both users and utilities. Index Terms--Smart grid, plug-in electric vehicles, demand side the power grid by providing various ancillary services. In fact, recent studies have suggested that PEVs can

Wu, Chenye

13

HI-MW Roadmap SCE DER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 4,000 MW Wind 1,000 MW Solar Energy Storage with Advanced PCS, A Solution? ... Reliable, Cost Competitive, Innovation Incentive Rate ...

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

14

Coordinated Control and Optimization of Virtual Power Plants for Energy and Frequency Regulation Services in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With increasing penetration of intermittent resources such as wind and solar, power system operations are facing much more challenges in cost effective provision of energy balancing and frequency regulation services. Enabled by advances in sensing, control and communication, the concept of Virtual Power Plant (VPP) is proposed as one possible solution which aggregates and firms up spatially distributed resources? net power injection to the system. This thesis proposes a coordinated control and bidding strategy for VPPs to provide energy balancing and grid frequency regulation services in electricity market environment. In this thesis, the VPP consists of two energy conversion assets: a Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG)-based wind farm and a co-located Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS). The coordination of the VPP is implemented through power electronics?based controllers. A five-bus system test case demonstrates the technical feasibility of VPPs to respond to grid frequency deviation as well as to follow energy dispatch signals. To enable the participation of VPPs in electricity market, this thesis also proposes an optimization based bidding strategy for VPPs in both energy balancing and frequency regulation service markets. The potential economic benefits of this bidding strategy are demonstrated under Denmark wholesale electricity market structure. Four case studies show the economic benefit of coordinating VPPs.

Zhang, Fan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential Author Think Geoenergy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential Citation Think Geoenergy. Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential [Internet]. [updated 40219;cited 2010]. Available from: http://thinkgeoenergy.com/archives/3654 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ormat%27s_North_Brawley_plant_with_17MW_short_of_its_50MW_potential&oldid=682479"

16

Distributed Hierarchical Control of Multi-Area Power Systems with Improved Primary Frequency Regulation  

SciTech Connect

The conventional distributed hierarchical control architecture for multi-area power systems is revisited. In this paper, a new distributed hierarchical control architecture is proposed. In the proposed architecture, pilot generators are selected in each area to be equipped with decentralized robust control as a supplementary to the conventional droop speed control. With the improved primary frequency control, the system frequency can be restored to the nominal value without the help of secondary frequency control, which reduces the burden of the automatic generation control for frequency restoration. Moreover, the low frequency inter-area electromechanical oscillations can also be effectively damped. The effectiveness of the proposed distributed hierarchical control architecture is validated through detailed simulations.

Lian, Jianming; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Du, Pengwei; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

17

Requirements for Defining Utility Drive Cycles: An Exploratory Analysis of Grid Frequency Regulation Data for Establishing Battery Performance Testing Standards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery testing procedures are important for understanding battery performance, including degradation over the life of the battery. Standards are important to provide clear rules and uniformity to an industry. The work described in this report addresses the need for standard battery testing procedures that reflect real-world applications of energy storage systems to provide regulation services to grid operators. This work was motivated by the need to develop Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) testing procedures, or V2G drive cycles. Likewise, the stationary energy storage community is equally interested in standardized testing protocols that reflect real-world grid applications for providing regulation services. As the first of several steps toward standardizing battery testing cycles, this work focused on a statistical analysis of frequency regulation signals from the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland Interconnect with the goal to identify patterns in the regulation signal that would be representative of the entire signal as a typical regulation data set. Results from an extensive time-series analysis are discussed, and the results are explained from both the statistical and the battery-testing perspectives. The results then are interpreted in the context of defining a small set of V2G drive cycles for standardization, offering some recommendations for the next steps toward standardizing testing protocols.

Hafen, Ryan P.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

18

Modeling of GE Appliances: Cost Benefit Study of Smart Appliances in Wholesale Energy, Frequency Regulation, and Spinning Reserve Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second in a series of three reports describing the potential of GEs DR-enabled appliances to provide benefits to the utility grid. The first report described the modeling methodology used to represent the GE appliances in the GridLAB-D simulation environment and the estimated potential for peak demand reduction at various deployment levels. The third report will explore the technical capability of aggregated group actions to positively impact grid stability, including frequency and voltage regulation and spinning reserves, and the impacts on distribution feeder voltage regulation, including mitigation of fluctuations caused by high penetration of photovoltaic distributed generation. In this report, a series of analytical methods were presented to estimate the potential cost benefit of smart appliances while utilizing demand response. Previous work estimated the potential technical benefit (i.e., peak reduction) of smart appliances, while this report focuses on the monetary value of that participation. The effects on wholesale energy cost and possible additional revenue available by participating in frequency regulation and spinning reserve markets were explored.

Fuller, Jason C.; Parker, Graham B.

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Grid regulation services for energy storage devices based on grid frequency  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for charging and discharging an energy storage device connected to an electrical power distribution system. In one exemplary embodiment, a controller monitors electrical characteristics of an electrical power distribution system and provides an output to a bi-directional charger causing the charger to charge or discharge an energy storage device (e.g., a battery in a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV)). The controller can help stabilize the electrical power distribution system by increasing the charging rate when there is excess power in the electrical power distribution system (e.g., when the frequency of an AC power grid exceeds an average value), or by discharging power from the energy storage device to stabilize the grid when there is a shortage of power in the electrical power distribution system (e.g., when the frequency of an AC power grid is below an average value).

Pratt, Richard M; Hammerstrom, Donald J; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C.W.; Tuffner, Francis K

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

20

4 MW fast wave current drive upgrade for DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

The DIII-D program has just completed a major addition to its ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) systems. This upgrade project added two new fast wave current drive (FWCD) systems, with each system consisting of a 2 MW, 30 to 120 MHz transmitter, ceramic insulated transmission lines and tuner elements, and water-cooled four-strap antenna. With this addition of 4 MW of FWCD power to the original 2 MW, 30 to 60 MHz capability, experiments can be performed that will explore advanced tokamak plasma configurations by using the centrally localized current drive to effect current profile modifications.

Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Baity, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Crossroads (3 MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MW) MW) Jump to: navigation, search Name Crossroads (3 MW) Facility Crossroads (3 MW) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Oklahoma Gas & Electric Developer Renewable Energy Systems Ltd Energy Purchaser Oklahoma Gas & Electric Location Near Canton OK Coordinates 36.019889°, -98.669894° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.019889,"lon":-98.669894,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Effect on the condition of the metal in A K-300-3.5 turbine owing to multicycle fatigue from participation of a power generating unit in grid frequency and power regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect on the condition of the rotor material owing to multicycle fatigue caused by variable stresses during participation of a power generating unit in grid frequency and power regulation is evaluated using the K-300-23.5 steam turbine as an example. It is shown that during normalized primary frequency regulation the safety factor is at least 50, while during automatic secondary regulation of frequency and power there is essentially no damage to the metal.

Lebedeva, A. I.; Zorchenko, N. V.; Prudnikov, A. A.

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Property:Installed Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Installed Capacity (MW) Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:InstalledCapac...

24

PCFB Repowering Project 80 MW plant description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the design of a 80 MW Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) boiler for the repowering of Unit 1 at the Des Moines Energy Center. Objective is to demonstrate that PCFB combined-cycle technology is cost effective and environmentally superior compared to traditional pulverized coal burning facilities.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

DOE/EA-1631: Final Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Beacon Power Corporation Frequency Regulation Facility in Stephentown, NY (February 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 31 Environmental Assessment for DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE FOR BEACON POWER CORPORATION FREQUENCY REGULATION FACILITY IN STEPHENTOWN, N.Y. U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 February 2009 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Beacon Power Corporation Frequency Regulation Facility in Stephentown, N.Y. DOE/EA-1631 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF ACRONYMS iii 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED 1 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Agency Action 1 2.0 DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION AND NO ACTION ALTERNATIVE 3 2.1 Location 3 2.2 Proposed Action 3 2.2.1 Flywheel 3 2.2.2 Project Elements 4 2.2.3 Project Systems 5 2.2.4 Construction

26

Property:Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nameplate Capacity (MW) Nameplate Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Device Nameplate Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 0 8MW 1MW Farms of multiple machines will be deployed with installed capacity of circa 20MW + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Barfield Point + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache + 40 kW + MHK Projects/BioSTREAM Pilot Plant + 250kW pilot 1MW commercial scale + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + 40 kW +

27

Raft River 5MW Geothermal Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

Elements of design of the 5 MW(e) binary cycle plant to be built in the Raft River Valley in Idaho are discussed. Advantages of the dual boiling cycle for use with moderate temperature (250 to 350/sup 0/F) resources are discussed. A breakdown of the heat loads and power requirements is presented. Various components, including pumps, heat exchangers, cooling tower, turbine-generators, and production and injection systems, are described. (JGB)

Whitbeck, J.F.; Piscitella, R.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Latest developments on the Dutch 1MW free electron maser  

SciTech Connect

The FOM Institute (Rijnhuizen, Netherlands), as part of their fusion technology program, has undertaken the development of a Free Electron Maser with the goal of producing 1MW long pulse to CW microwave output in the range 130 GHz{endash}250GHz with wall plug efficiencies of 60{percent}. This project has been carried out as a collaborative effort with Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod Russia, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow Russia, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, U.S.A and CPI, U.S.A. The key design features of this FEM consists first of a conventional DC acceleration system at high voltage (2MV) which supplies only the unwanted beam interception current and a depressed collector system at 250kV which provides the main beam power. Low body current interception ({lt}25mA) is ensured by using robust inline beam focussing, a low emittance electron gun with halo suppression and periodic magnet side array focussing in the wiggler. The second key feature is use of a low-loss step corrugated waveguide circuit for broad band CW power handling and beam/RF separation. Finally, the required interaction efficiency and mode control is provided by a two stage stepped wiggler. The FEM has been constructed and recently undergone initial short pulse ({lt}10 usec) testing in an inverted mode with the depressed collector absent. Results to date have demonstrated 98.8{percent} beam transmission (over 5 Meters) at currents as high as 8.4 Amps, with 200GHz microwave output at 700kW. There has been good agreement between theory and experiment at the beam current levels tested so far. Details of the most recent experimental results will be presented, in particular the output frequency characteristics with detailed comparisons to theory. The immediate future plans are to operate the system at the design value of 12 Amps with at least 1MW output. The system will then be reconfigured with a 3 stage depressed collector to demonstrate, in the next year, long pulse operation (100 msec) and high wall plug efficiency. Long term future plans call for upgrading the FEM to 2MW and extrapolations up to 5MW are shown to be theoretically possible. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, L-637 Livermore California, 94551 (United States); Verhoeven, A.G.; Urbanus, W. [FOM Instituut voor Plasma Fysica, Rijnhuizen, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (The Netherlands)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

4 MW upgrade to the DIII-D fast wave current drive system  

SciTech Connect

The DIII-D fast wave current drive (FWCD) system is being upgraded by an additional 4 MW in the 30 to 120 MHz frequency range. This capability adds to the existing 2 MW 30 to 60 MHz system. Two new ABB transmitters of the type that are in use on the ASDEX-Upgrade tokamak in Garching will be used to drive two new water-cooled four-strap antennas to be installed in DIII-D in early 1994. The transmission and tuning system for each antenna will be similar to that now in use for the first 2 MW system on DIII-D, but with some significant improvements. One improvement consists of adding a decoupler element to counter the mutual coupling between the antenna straps which results in large imbalances in the power to a strap for the usual current drive intrastrap phasing of 90{degrees}. Another improvement is to utilize pressurized, ceramic-insulated transmission lines. The intrastrap phasing will again be controlled in pairs, with a pair of straps coupled in a resonant loop configuration, locking their phase difference at either 0 or 180{degrees}, depending upon the length of line installed. These resonant loops will incorporate a phase shifter so that they will be able to be tuned to resonance at several frequencies in the operating band of the transmitter. With the frequency change capability of the ABB generators, the FWCD frequency will thus be selectable on a shot-to-shot basis, from this preselected set of frequencies. The schedule is for experiments to begin with this added 4 MW capability in mid-1994. The details of the system are described.

deGrassie, J.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Cary, W.P.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 Jump to: navigation, search Name Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 Facility Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner OffshoreMW Developer Offshore MW Location Atlantic Ocean NJ Coordinates 39.584°, -73.77° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.584,"lon":-73.77,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

32

Property:Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nameplate Capacity (MW) Nameplate Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo + 100kW built and tested with 45kW 200kW and 1 4MW designs in development + MHK Technologies/AirWEC + 5kW + MHK Technologies/Aquantis + Proprietary + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 + 0 15 + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AR 1000 + 1 + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AS 400 + 0 4 + MHK Technologies/Bluetec + 1 + MHK Technologies/Current Power + from 10 kW and up + MHK Technologies/CurrentStar + 1 + MHK Technologies/Deep Green + 500 kW + MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine + 30MW +

33

3D Simulation of a 5MW Wind Turbine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the present work, the influence of turbulence and gravity forces on the tower and the rotor of a 5MW onshore wind turbine has been (more)

Namiranian, Abtin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

INDIAN INSTITUTE TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY 1 MW SOLAR THEMAL POWER PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INDIAN INSTITUTE TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY 1 MW SOLAR THEMAL POWER PROJECT PIPING MTO FOR 1 MW SOLAR THERMAL POWER PROJECT #12;PIPING MTO 1089-202-108 1 2 1 BE,7.1Thk.,Welded To ANSI B-36.10 12" 165 M

Narayanan, H.

35

Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 2 Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 2 Facility Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 2 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner OffshoreMW Developer OffshoreMW Location Atlantic Ocean NJ Coordinates 39.348°, -73.969° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.348,"lon":-73.969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Property:Project Installed Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Installed Capacity (MW) Installed Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project Installed Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Project Installed Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 0 + MHK Projects/ADM 5 + 1 + MHK Projects/AWS II + 1 + MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project + 22 + MHK Projects/Agucadoura + 2 + MHK Projects/Alaska 18 + 10 + MHK Projects/Alaska 36 + 10 + MHK Projects/Algiers Cutoff Project + 16 + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy + 300 + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 0 +

37

Puna Geothermal Venture 8MW Expantion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Venture 8MW Expantion Venture 8MW Expantion Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Puna Geothermal Venture 8MW Expantion Abstract Adding to its existing generating capacity of 27 MW, Ormat's Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) geothermal power plant recently completed a successful 8MW expansion project bringing more renewable, low-cost electricity to the people of Hawaii. The project presented several technical challenges including use of high scale potential brine in a state-of-the-art binary plant, development of highly reliable brine pH monitoring and control system, and brine injection management in a high energy resource. Each of the project challenges were overcome with unique engineering solutions. Authors Mike Kaleikini, Paul Spielman, Tom Buchanan, Ormat Technologies

38

Property:Permit/License Buildout (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Permit/License Buildout (MW) Permit/License Buildout (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Permit/License Buildout (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Permit/License Buildout (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 40 + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 20 + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 15 + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 148 + MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal + 30 + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 18 + MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal + 3 + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 94 + MHK Projects/Barfield Point + 114 + MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache + 50 + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + 152 + MHK Projects/Breeze Point + 198 + MHK Projects/Brilliant Point Project + 56 + MHK Projects/Brough Head Wave Farm + 200 +

39

Alstom 3-MW Wind Turbine Installed at NWTC (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 3-MW Alstom wind turbine was installed at NREL's NWTC in October 2010. Test data will be used to validate advanced turbine design and analysis tools. NREL signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with Alstom in 2010 to conduct certification testing on the company's 3-MW ECO 100 wind turbine and to validate models of Alstom's unique drivetrain concept. The turbine was installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in October 2010 and engineers began certification testing in 2011. Tests to be conducted by NREL include a power quality test to finalize the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) requirements for type certification of the 60-Hz unit. The successful outcome of this test will enable Alstom to begin commercial production of ECO 100 in the United States. NREL also will obtain additional measurements of power performance, acoustic noise, and system frequency to complement the 50 Hz results previously completed in Europe. After NREL completes the certification testing on the ECO 100, it will conduct long-term testing to validate gearbox performance to gain a better understanding of the machine's unique ALSTOM PURE TORQUE{trademark} drivetrain concept. In conventional wind turbines, the rotor is supported by the shaft-bearing gearbox assembly. Rotor loads are partially transmitted to the gearbox and may reduce gearbox reliability. In the ALSTOM PURE TORQUE concept, the rotor is supported by a cast frame running through the hub, which transfers bending loads directly to the tower. Torque is transmitted to the shaft through an elastic coupling at the front of the hub. According to Alstom, this system will increase wind turbine reliability and reduce operation and maintenance costs by isolating the gearbox from rotor loads. Gearbox reliability has challenged the wind energy industry for more than two decades. Gearbox failures require expensive and time-consuming replacement, significantly increasing the cost of wind plant operation while reducing the plant's power output and revenue. To solve gearbox reliability issues, NREL launched a Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) in 2006 and brought together the world's leading turbine manufacturers, consultants, and experts from more than 30 companies and organizations. GRC's goal was to validate the typical design process-from wind turbine system loads to bearing ratings-through a comprehensive dynamometer and field-test program. Design analyses will form a basis for improving reliability of future designs and retrofit packages. Through its study of Alstom's Eco 100 gearbox, NREL can compare its GRC model gearbox with Alstom's and add the results to the GRC database, which is helping to advance more reliable wind turbine technology.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accessed May 2008 from www.sce.com 9. The California BiomassCollaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Why Cogeneration? 24MW of local renewable energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why Cogeneration? · 24MW of local renewable energy · Reduced emissions and cleaner air · Retain 300 Wood Chips Sawdust Pulp Paper Emissions Production #12;Port Townsend Paper - Cogeneration Biomass

42

Update on the Southwest 1000 MW CSP Initiative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1000 MW CSP project was initiated in FY02 based on a Congressional request of the DOE to investigate the feasibility of 1000 MW of Concentrating Solar Power in the Southwest by 2006. The original charge has grown and involved a number of activities including: outreach to the SW states, support of state-level activities in NM, CA, and CO, and analysis in support of the Western Governors' Association (WGA) 30 GW Clean Energy Initiative.

Mancini, T.; Mehos, M.; Wilkins, F.; Morse, F.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Optimal power capturing of multi-MW wind generation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, an increasing number of multi-MW (1MW and up) wind generation systems are being developed and variable speed-variable pitch (VS-VP) control technology is usually adopted to improve the fast response speed and obtain the optimal energy, which ... Keywords: adaptive fuzzy proportional integral derivative, doubly-fed induction generator, hydraulic variable pitch mechanism, optimal, variable speed-variable pitch, wind turbine

Kong Yigang; Wang Zhixin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Initial operating experience of the 12-MW La Ola photovoltaic system.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1.2-MW La Ola photovoltaic (PV) power plant in Lanai, Hawaii, has been in operation since December 2009. The host system is a small island microgrid with peak load of 5 MW. Simulations conducted as part of the interconnection study concluded that unmitigated PV output ramps had the potential to negatively affect system frequency. Based on that study, the PV system was initially allowed to operate with output power limited to 50% of nameplate to reduce the potential for frequency instability due to PV variability. Based on the analysis of historical voltage, frequency, and power output data at 50% output level, the PV system has not significantly affected grid performance. However, it should be noted that the impact of PV variability on active and reactive power output of the nearby diesel generators was not evaluated. In summer 2011, an energy storage system was installed to counteract high ramp rates and allow the PV system to operate at rated output. The energy storage system was not fully operational at the time this report was written; therefore, analysis results do not address system performance with the battery system in place.

Ellis, Abraham; Lenox, Carl (SunPower Corporation, Richmond, CA); Johnson, Jay; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Aero-Structural Optimization of a 5 MW Wind Turbine Rotor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A 5 MW wind turbine rotor blade based on the NREL 5 MW Reference Turbine is optimized for maximum efficiency and minimum flapwise hub bending (more)

Vesel, Richard W., Jr.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Laser-frequency multiplication  

SciTech Connect

A high quality mode locked pulse train was obtained at 9.55 micrometers, the CO2 wavelength chosen for frequency doubling into the atmospheric window at 4.8 micrometers. The pulse train consists of a 3 micro sec burst of 1.5 nsec pulses separated by 40 nsec, in a TEM(00) mode and with a total energy of 100 mJ. The pulse intensity without focussing is about 3 MW/sq.cm., already quite close to the target intensity of 10 MW/sq.cm. for frequency doubling in a AgGaSe2 crystal. The mode-locked train is obtained by intracavity modulation at 12.5 MHz using a germanium crystal driven with a power of about 30 Watts. Line selection is achieved firstly by the use of a 0.92 mm thick CaF2 plate at the Brewster angle within the cavity, which completely suppresses 10.6 micrometer band radiation. Secondly, a particular rotational line, the P20 at 9.55 micrometers, is selected by the injection of a continuous beam is mode-matched to the pulsed laser cavity using a long focal length lens, and for best line-locking it is necessary to fine tune the length of the pulsed laser resonator. Injection causes substantial depression of the gain switched spike.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Latest Results in SLAC 75-MW PPM Klystrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

75 MW X-band klystrons utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing have been undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) for almost nine years. The klystron development has been geared toward realizing the necessary components for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) and industry. All these tubes follow from the successful SLAC design of a 50 MW PPM klystron in 1996. In 2004 the latest two klystrons were constructed and tested with preliminary results reported at EPAC2004. The first of these two devices was tested to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 microseconds pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with a tube efficiency >50%. The most recent testing of these last two devices will be presented here. Design and manufacturing issues of the latest klystron, due to be tested by the Fall of 2005, are also discussed.

Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.; Jongewaard, E.; Laurent, L.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.; /SLAC

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

48

Reference Designs of 50 MW / 250 MWh Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy storage solutions for Renewable Integration and Transmission and Distribution (T&D) Grid Support often require systems of 10's of MWs in scale, and energy durations of longer than 4 hours. The goals of this study were to develop cost, performance and conceptual design information for several current and emerging alternative bulk storage systems in the scale of 50 MW / 250 MWh.

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

49

Sacremento Municipal Utility District 100-MW sub e photovoltaic plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A status report on plans for the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) 1-MW photovoltaic power plant is presented. DOE, the California Energy Commission, and SMUD will fund the project cooperatively. Emphasis is placed on the details of the government contract/cooperation agreement.

Powell, R.V.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Intense Atmospheric Vortices Associated with a 1000 MW Fire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of vortices of various types produced in a large thermal plume are described. The apparatus used to generate the plume is the Mtotron, an array of 105 fuel oil burners with a total heat output of approximately 1000 MW. Three types ...

Christopher R. Church; John T. Snow; Jean Dessens

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Repowering the 250 MW Supercritical Power Plant at Lenenergo, Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the repowering of a supercritical 250 MW generating unit with an ABB 52.9 MN gas turbine at the Southern Plant of the Lenenergo system in Russia. It includes a review of the performance parameters of the repowered unit and an economic analysis of the repowering project.

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Magnet Technology for Power Converters: Nanocomposite Magnet Technology for High Frequency MW-Scale Power Converters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar ADEPT Project: CMU is developing a new nanoscale magnetic material that will reduce the size, weight, and cost of utility-scale PV solar power conversion systems that connect directly to the grid. Power converters are required to turn the energy that solar power systems create into useable energy for the grid. The power conversion systems made with CMUs nanoscale magnetic material have the potential to be 150 times lighter and significantly smaller than conventional power conversion systems that produce similar amounts of power.

None

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

53

MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40MW Lewis project 40MW Lewis project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":58.791595089019,"lon":-6.7286683246493,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

Operating and Maintaining a 465MW Cogeneration Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The on-line avilability of the five Frame-7E gas turbine generators installed at the 465MW Lyondell Cogeneration Plant was 90% and 95.2% respectively for the first two years of operation (1986-87). The 140MW steam turbine generator availability was well over 98% each year. Such favorable results are due primarily to the (1) formal training programs utilized before and continued after plant startup, (2) redundancies designed into the critical components of the plant, (3) the immediate actions taken on failures or near-failures, (4) a sound preventive maintenance program, and (5) improvements performed promptly on discovered design, operating, and maintenance weaknesses uncovered during the early months of operation.

Theisen, R. E.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Desktop megawatt superradiant free-electron laser at terahertz frequencies  

SciTech Connect

I present a theoretical and simulation study of a desktop, megawatt (MW), terahertz (THz) superradiance free-electron laser (FEL) driven by a THz-pulse-train photoinjector. With nominal electron parameters from a THz-pulse-train photoinjector, this superradiant FEL is capable of generating more than 5 MW power at THz frequencies from a half-meter, single-pass undulator. Tapering the undulator to a length of 1.5 m can further increase the FEL output power to nearly 15 MW.

Huang, Y.-C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Tsinghua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Greene County 100 MW Biomass Conceptual Engineering Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern Company Services, Incorporated, (SCS) is interested in constructing a 100-megawatt (MW) (net) biomass-fueled facility at an existing facility to increase its share of renewable energy generation and to support future load growth. The site of interest is the Greene County Electric Generating Plant in Demopolis, Alabama. This report represents the formal compilation of key engineering deliverables that collectively provide a better understanding of the conceptual-level parameters associated with t...

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

57

SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT 1 MW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been operating at the MW level for about one year. Experience in beam loss control and machine activation at this power level is presented. Also experience with machine protection systems is reviewed, which is critical at this power level. One of the most challenging operational aspects of high power operation has been attaining high availability, which is also discussed

Galambos, John D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Raft River 5-MW(e) geothermal pilot plant project  

SciTech Connect

The Raft River 5-MW(e) Pilot Plant Project was started in 1976. Construction is scheduled for completion in July 1980, with three years of engineering and operational testing to follow. The plant utilized a 280/sup 0/F geothermal fluid energy source and a dual boiling isobutane cycle. Developmental efforts are in progress in the areas of down hole pumps and chemical treatment of geothermal fluid for cooling tower makeup.

Rasmussen, T.L.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

MHK Technologies/14 MW OTECPOWER | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MW OTECPOWER MW OTECPOWER < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Technology Type Click here OTEC - Closed Cycle Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description MINIMIZE SURFACE ACTIVITIES TO REDUCE THE CAPITAL COST AND TO IMPROVE EFFICIENCY ALTERNATE WORKING FLUIDS ARE USED FOR ENHANCED POWER EFFICIENCY IN OPTEC POWER HYBRID CYCLES ARE USED TO IMPROVE POWER AND NEED WITH SUBSEA HEAT EXCHANGERS ADVANCED SUPPORTING VESSEL CONCEPT AND FREE STANDING RISER TECHNOLOGIES TO WITH STAND HARSH OCEAN ENVIRONMENT IN DEEPWATER HAD BEEN DEVELOPED FOR THIS OPTEC POWER IT IS THE ONLY RELIABLE AND PROFITABLE RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCE FOR THE NEED OF WORLD ENERGY FOR THE NEXT DECADE DESALINATION AND HDROGEN PRODUCTION ARE LINKED TO THE POWER GENERATION OF THE OTEC POWER FOR SEVERAL BY PRODUCTS COST EFFECTIVE PRODUCTION CLEAN ENERGY AND CLEAN WATER IS THE GOAL OF OTECPOWER INC OUR 14 MW OTEC POWER COSTS 50 MILLION USD ALL EQUIPMENT HAD BEEN DESINGED AND A FEW OF THEM ARE TESTED FOR OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY APPLICATION WHICHA RE BEING USED FOR OTECPOWER A RELIABLE AND FEASIBLE OTECPOWER IS PROPOSED

60

Low Beam Voltage, 10 MW, L-Band Cluster Klystron  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual design of a multi-beam klystron (MBK) for possible ILC and Project X applications is presented. The chief distinction between this MBK design and existing 10-MW MBK's is the low operating voltage of 60 kV. There are at least four compelling reasons that justify development at this time of a low-voltage MBK, namely (1) no pulse transformer; (2) no oil tank for high-voltage components and for the tube socket; (3) no high-voltage cables; and (4) modulator would be a compact 60-kV IGBT switching circuit. The proposed klystron consists of four clusters containing six beams each. The tube has common input and output cavities for all 24 beams, and individual gain cavities for each cluster. A closely related optional configuration, also for a 10 MW tube, would involve four totally independent cavity clusters with four independent input cavities and four 2.5 MW output ports, all within a common magnetic circuit. This option has appeal because the output waveguides would not require a controlled atmosphere, and because it would be easier to achieve phase and amplitude stability as required in individual SC accelerator cavities.

Teryaev, V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Yakovlev, V.P.; /Fermilab; Kazakov, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Hirshfield, J.L.; /Yale U. /Omega-P, New Haven

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery, water treatment/instrument air, and power conditioning/controls were built and shipped to the site. The two fuel cell modules, each rated at 1 MW on natural gas, were fabricated by FuelCell Energy in its Torrington, CT manufacturing facility. The fuel cell modules were conditioned and tested at FuelCell Energy in Danbury and shipped to the site. Installation of the power plant and connection to all required utilities and syngas was completed. Pre-operation checkout of the entire power plant was conducted and the plant was ready to operate in July 2004. However, fuel gas (natural gas or syngas) was not available at the WREL site due to technical difficulties with the gasifier and other issues. The fuel cell power plant was therefore not operated, and subsequently removed by October of 2005. The WREL fuel cell site was restored to the satisfaction of WREL. FuelCell Energy continues to market carbonate fuel cells for natural gas and digester gas applications. A fuel cell/turbine hybrid is being developed and tested that provides higher efficiency with potential to reach the DOE goal of 60% HHV on coal gas. A system study was conducted for a 40 MW direct fuel cell/turbine hybrid (DFC/T) with potential for future coal gas applications. In addition, FCE is developing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power plants with Versa Power Systems (VPS) as part of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program and has an on-going program for co-production of hydrogen. Future development in these technologies can lead to future coal gas fuel cell applications.

FuelCell Energy

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

62

The design of a 200 MW interphase power controller prototype  

SciTech Connect

The paper addresses the practical design aspects of a 200 MW prototype for the interconnection of two synchronous 120-kV networks that are close to their short-circuit limits. The Interphase Power Controller is a new concept for the control of active and reactive power; it uses only standard components connected in an original manner. The paper gives the results of EMTP simulations for the conditions governing the design of the components. The significant steady-state and transient capabilities of the components are given as well as insulation coordination and protection aspects. Finally, a preliminary layout is presented for the prototype.

Habashi, K.; Lombard, J.J.; Mourad, S. (ABB Canada, Inc., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)); Pelletier, P.; Morin, G.; Beauregard, F.; Brochu, J. (CITEQ, Varennes, Quebec (Canada))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Review of the Recent Frequency Performance of the Eastern, Western and ERCOT Interconnections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACE AGC CERTS ERCOT FERC FMA Hz LCL mHz MW NERC RAA RMS RS2008. We obtained data from FERC staff for four generationaverages of frequency). FERC staff provided information on

Lacommare, Kristina S H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Design and Analyses of Transmission Lines for the 110 GHzECH Upgrade to 6 MW for DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

During the summer of 1999 the installation of three new Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) transmission lines began as part of the 110 GHz ECH Upgrade to 6 MW project for DIII-D. An important step in the development of the transmission line design was the selection of the waveguide size. To make this selection, analyses were conducted to characterize the thermal and radio frequency (rf) loss performance of the key corrugated waveguide components under 1 MW, long pulse (10 s, 1% duty cycle) operation. Other factors that were analyzed included vacuum conductance and pumping speed, ease of installation, space considerations, and overall cost. The two candidate transmission line sizes were 2.50 in. and 1.25 in. id. An overview of the design and layout of the proposed transmission lines for the DIII-D ECH upgrade project is presented. Details and results are given for the vacuum conductance analysis of the overall transmission line, the rf loss analyses and tests on corrugated waveguide and miter bends, and the thermal analyses of the mirrors in the corrugated waveguide switch and the power monitor miter bend. Finally, a discussion is presented which weighs the results of these analyses with the experience gained through the installation and operation of the existing three 1 MW ECH systems at DIII-D and concludes with the selection of 1.25 in. i.d. waveguide and components for the upgrade project.

Grunloh, H.J.; Baxi, C.B.; Chin, E.; Condon, M.; Doane, J.L.; Moeller, C.P.; O'Neill, R.C.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Grid-Scale Energy Storage Demo for Ancillary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

100% 80% 20% 1960 1980 Today BESS Master Controller 4 x UltraBattery strings 900 kW Inverter 3.6 MW BES System for 3MW of Frequency Regulation 3 MW Frequency Regulation Installed...

66

Conceptual design 10 MW experimental power generation facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall or ultimate program envisions a small (10 MW) field experimental, highly instrumented, binary fluid cycle power plant facility planned to confirm the concept and evaluate technical and economic feasibility of the large scale use of geothermal energy resources. The eight year program duration anticipates four years for exploration and construction, two years for research and development of initial operations, and two years for research and development effort during production operating phase. The following are covered: a review of the design of all facilities between the supply and reinjection wells; a detailed description of the project scope; the project, system or performance requirements; the project design, procurement and construction schedule; the site layout, power plant perspective, plant layouts, single line electrical diagram, piping and instrument diagram and flow diagram; the cost estimate based on the included drawings; and project feasibility. (MHR)

Not Available

1974-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

A conceptual design of the 2+ MW LBNE beam absorber  

SciTech Connect

The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos, produced by 60-120 GeV protons from the Fermilab Main Injector, toward a detector placed at the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) in South Dakota. Secondary particles that do not decay into muons and neutrinos as well as any residual proton beam must be stopped at the end of the decay region to reduce noise/damage in the downstream muon monitors and reduce activation in the surrounding rock. This goal is achieved by placing an absorber structure at the end of the decay region. The requirements and conceptual design of such an absorber, capable of operating at 2+ MW primary proton beam power, is described.

Velev, G.; Childress, S.; Hurh, P.; Hylen, J.; Makarov, A.; Mohkhov, N.; Moore, C.D.; Novitski, I.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Definition: Frequency Response | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Frequency Response Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Frequency Response (Equipment) The ability of a system or elements of the system to react or respond to a change in system frequency. (System) The sum of the change in demand, plus the change in generation, divided by the change in frequency, expressed in megawatts per 0.1 Hertz (MW/0.1 Hz).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms system, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Frequency_Response&oldid=502580"

70

Widely-tunable mid-IR frequency comb source based on difference frequency generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a mid-infrared frequency comb source of unprecedented tunability covering the entire 3-10 {\\mu}m molecular fingerprint region. The system is based on difference frequency generation in a GaSe crystal pumped by a 151 MHz Yb:fiber frequency comb. The process was seeded with Raman shifted solitons generated in a highly nonlinear suspended-core fiber with the same source. Average powers up to 1.5 mW were achieved at 4.7 {\\mu}m wavelength.

Ruehl, Axel; Hartl, Ingmar; Fermann, Martin E; Eikema, Kjeld S E; Marangoni, Marco

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Model Validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing model validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified...

73

Wind industry installs almost 5,300 MW of capacity in December ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Approximately 40% of the total 2012 wind capacity additions (12,620 MW) came online in December, just before the scheduled expiration of the wind production tax ...

74

Design and Dynamic Modeling of the Support Structure for a 10 MW Offshore Wind Turbine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis presents two designs of tension-leg-platforms (TLP) support structures for the 10 MW reference wind turbine being developed by the Norwegian Research Centre (more)

Crozier, Aina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Environmental summary document for the Republic Geothermal, Inc. application for a geothermal loan guaranty project: 64 MW well field and 48 MW (net) geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive review and analysis is provided of the environmental consequences of (1) guaranteeing a load for the completion of the 64 MW well field and the 48 MW (net) power plant or (2) denying a guaranteed load that is needed to finish the project. Mitigation measures are discussed. Alternatives and their impacts are compared and some discussion is included on unavoidable adverse impacts. (MHR)

Layton, D.W.; Powers, D.J.; Leitner, P.; Crow, N.B.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Ricker, Y.E.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Modular 5 MW geothermal power plant design considerations and guidelines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design considerations and guideline documents given define the principal design requirements for a nominal 5 MW geothermal power plant of a type to permit over-the-road transport of its several modules. The power plant system defined is supplied with steam from a single flash steam separator stage, located at the plant area, and supplied with steam from two wells at nominal pressure of 3.8 Kg/cm/sup 2/ Abs (54 psia). In some cases where the content of noxious noncondensable gases is high, a shell and tube condenser would be substituted for the direct contact type condenser specified and an additional module containing an H/sub 2/S removal system would be added. Guidelines are given for the following: site preparation, collection system, plant installation, assembly, and test; turbine generator module; condenser and noncondensable gas removal module; plant control and switchgear module; cooling water circulation pump module; steam-water separator module; maintenance, office, and lavatory module; reinjection pump module; cooling tower modules; spray pond installation and piping; and auxiliary generator module. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

350 MW(t) design fuel cycle selection. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document discusses the results of this evaluation and a recommendation to retain the graded fuel cycle in which one-half of the fuel elements are exchanged at each refueling. This recommendation is based on the better performance of the graded cycle relative to the evaluation criteria of both economics and control margin. A choice to retain the graded cycle and a power density of 5.9 MW/m{sup 3} for the upcoming conceptual design phase was deemed prudent for the following reasons: the graded cycle has significantly better economics, and essentially the same expected availability factor as the batch design, when both are evaluated against the same requirements, including water ingress; and the reduction in maximum fuel pin power peaking in the batch design compared to the graded cycle is only a few percent and gas hot streaks are not improved by changing to a batch cycle. The preliminary 2-D power distribution studies for both designs showed that maximum fuel pin power peaking, particularly near the inner reflector, was high for both designs and nearly the same in magnitude. 10 figs., 9 tabs.

Lane, R.K.; Lefler, W.; Shirley, G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Gene Frequency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gene Frequency Gene Frequency Name: donna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: If six fingers is a dominant human trait why do we have only five? Replies: This is simple. There are just not many genes in the human population for six fingers. Steve Sample Look in any high school biology book for what is known as Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These two scientists (separately) said that gene frequencies do not change much unless something in the environment selects them over other genes. In other words, unless 6 fingers somehow becomes an advantage, and five-fingered people have less of an advantage, the frequency of six fingered people in the population will not necessarily increase. This is the same reason that recessive traits don't disappear from the population. Also, six fingers is not considered attractive and they may not get as many mates. Also, more people are born with six fingers than you might imagine but just have them amputated shortly after birth.

79

Grid Simulator for Testing MW-Scale Wind Turbines at NREL (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As described, an initiative by NREL to design and construct a 9-MVA grid simulator to operate with the existing 2.5 MW and new upcoming 5-MW dynamometer facilities will fulfill this role and bring many potential benefits to the U.S. wind industry with the ultimate goal of reducing wind energy integration costs.

Gevorgian, V.; McDade, M.; Wallen, R.; Mendoza, I.; Shirazi, M.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Author Electric Energy Publications Inc. Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Citation Electric Energy Publications Inc.. North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update [Internet]. [updated 2010;cited 2010]. Available from:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Definition: Frequency Regulation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Related Terms Balancing Authority, turbine, smart grid References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign...

82

Demonstration: Plugin EVs for Frequency Regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Balancing wind, reducing ramp rate Shifting solar peak to load peak Page 23. ... Patents Page 29. Patents Patent Applications, 2007-2010: ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Design and testing of a 13. 75-MW converter for a superconducting magnetic-energy-storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage system will be installed in 1982 in Tacoma, WA, to act as a transmission line stabilizer. Two 6 MVA transformers and a 5.5 kA, + 2.5 kV converter will connect the superconducting coil to the 13.8 kV bus and regulate the power flow between the coil and the three phase system. The design philosophy for the converter including its control and protection system is given in the paper. The converter has been tested with 10% overvoltage at no load, with 10% overcurrent at zero output voltage and with a watercooled resistive load of about 1 MW. These test results show that the converter will meet the expected full load operating conditions.

Boenig, H.J.; Turner, R.D.; Neft, C.L.; Sueker, K.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Evaluation of an SNCR Trim System on 145 MW and 375 MW Tangential Design, Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As regulations on nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from fossil-fueled power plants become stricter, post-combustion techniques such as selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) become viable options to achieve compliance. In the SNCR process, urea injected into the combustion products reacts selectively with NOx to form nitrogen and water. In this SNCR trim demonstration project, a single-level reagent injection system was evaluated at Alabama Power's Plant Barry Units 2 and 4. These units are single furnac...

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

85

Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" May 28, 2010 - 2:19pm Addthis Arizona Western College (AWC) wants to be the go-to for solar, says Bill Smith, director of facilities management. AWC is based in Yuma, Ariz., and that, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, is the sunniest place on Earth. Now, a group of private companies, researchers and AWC educators will tap the solar potential by building a 4.995 MW solar array at the college. When the solar energy system is completed, it will be the largest solar array on any U.S. college campus. "We are strategically placed geographically. Now that we have this company that has approached us with this awesome opportunity, we want ...

86

Experimental study of a 1.5-MW, 110-GHz gyrotron oscillator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reports the design, construction and testing of a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron oscillator. This high power microwave tube has been proposed as the next evolutionary step for gyrotrons used to provide electron ...

Anderson, James P. (James Paul), 1972-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

BEOWAWE number1-A 10 MW geothermal unit in northern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a project to build and operate a nominal 10 mw electrical generating unit using the geothermal heat from the Beowawe, Nevada, geothermal reservoir to power an isobutane binary unit. This 10 mw unit would be fabricated on portable skids by equipment supplier for shipment to the site. The project will be owned and operated by the NORNEV Demonstration Geothermal Company which is made up of Pacific Power and Light, Eugene Water and Electric Board, Sierra Pacific Power Company, and Sacramento Municipal Utility District. The geothermal brine for powering the 10 mw binary WGU will be purchased from Chevron Resource Company. This first unit is a research and development unit and will, hopefully, lead to total development of the 300 mw plus Beowawe reservoir.

Keilman, L.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" May 28, 2010 - 2:19pm Addthis Arizona Western College (AWC) wants to be the go-to for solar, says Bill Smith, director of facilities management. AWC is based in Yuma, Ariz., and that, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, is the sunniest place on Earth. Now, a group of private companies, researchers and AWC educators will tap the solar potential by building a 4.995 MW solar array at the college. When the solar energy system is completed, it will be the largest solar array on any U.S. college campus. "We are strategically placed geographically. Now that we have this company that has approached us with this awesome opportunity, we want ...

89

A 1-mW vibration energy harvesting system for moth flight-control applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on the approach and methodologies required to build a 1-mW energy-harvesting system for moth flight control applications. The crepuscular hawk moth Manduca sexta is the chosen test subject. This project ...

Chang, Samuel C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Survey of Landfill Gas Generation Potential: 2-MW Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molten carbonate fuel cells can operate almost as efficiently on landfill gas as on natural gas. This study identified 749 landfills in the United States having the potential to support a total of nearly 3000 2-MW fuel cells.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

10-MW GTO converter for battery peaking service  

SciTech Connect

A bidirectional 18-pulse voltage source converter utilizing gate turn-off thyristors (GTO's) is described. The converter, which is rated 10 MVA, was placed in service in early 1988 to connect an energy storage battery to a utility grid. The converter is rated and controlled to operate in all four quadrants (discharge, charge, leading vars, or lagging vars) at the full 10-MVA rating. It is capable of independent rapid control of real and reactive power with a transient response of 16 ms to changes in commanded value of real or reactive power. Thus it is usable as a reactive power controller (static var control), voltage control, frequency control, power system stabilizer, or as a real power peaking station. For use as a reactive power controller only, no battery would be needed. The design, construction, control, and application of the converter are described, and performance data taken at factory power test and at the installation are given.

Walker, L.H. (Drive Development Engineering, Drive Systems, General Electric Co., Salem, VA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Performance of the H{sup -} Ion Source Supporting 1-MW Beam Operations at SNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory reached 1-MW of beam power in September 2009, and now routinely operates near 1-MW for the production of neutrons. This paper reviews the performance, operational issues, implemented and planned mitigations of the SNS H{sup -} ion source to support such high power-level beams with high availability. Some results from R and D activities are also briefly described.

Han, B. X.; Hardek, T.; Kang, Y.; Murray, S. N. Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

93

Performance of the H- Ion Source Supporting 1-MW Beam Operations at SNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory reached 1-MW of beam power in September 2009, and now routinely operates near 1-MW for the production of neutrons. This paper reviews the performance, operational issues, implemented and planned mitigations of the SNS H- ion source to support such high power-level beams with high availability. Some results from R&D activities are also briefly described.

Han, Baoxi [ORNL; Hardek, Thomas W [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Murray Jr, S N [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Piller, Chip [ORNL; Santana, Manuel [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL; Stockli, Martin P [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

500 MW X-Band RF System of a 0.25 GeV Electron LINAC for Advanced Compton Scattering Source Application  

SciTech Connect

A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL in collaboration with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. For compactness consideration, we are looking at a folded waveguide setup. This will give us 500 MW at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to six traveling wave accelerator sections. Phase and amplitude control are located at the RF gun input and additional control points along the LINAC to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

Chu, Tak Sum; /LLNL, Livermore; Anderson, Scott; /LLNL, Livermore; Barty, Christopher; /LLNL, Livermore; Gibson, David; /LLNL, Livermore; Hartemann, Fred; /LLNL, Livermore; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore; Siders, Craig; /LLNL, Livermore; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC; Jongewaard, Erik; /SLAC; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

95

500 MW X-BAND RF SYSTEM OF A 0.25 GEV ELECTRON LINAC FOR ADVANCED COMPTON SCATTERING SOURCE APPLICATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL in collaboration with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. For compactness consideration, we are looking at a folded waveguide setup. This will give us 500 MW at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to six traveling wave accelerator sections. Phase and amplitude control are located at the RF gun input and additional control points along the LINAC to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

Chu, T S; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Marsh, R A; Siders, C; Barty, C P; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E; Tantawi, S; Vlieks, A; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Time and Frequency Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Time and Frequency Portal. Time and Frequency Portal. Programs and Projects. CODATA values of the fundamental constants ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

97

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL GROUNDWATER MONITORING VARIABILITY IN MW66 AND NEARBY WELLS, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of disposal records, soil data, and spatial/temporal groundwater data from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 7 indicate that the peak contaminant concentrations measured in monitoring well (MW) 66 result from the influence of the regional PGDP NW Plume, and does not support the presence of significant vertical transport from local contaminant sources in SWMU 7. This updated evaluation supports the 2006 conceptualization which suggested the high and low concentrations in MW66 represent different flow conditions (i.e., local versus regional influences). Incorporation of the additional lines of evidence from data collected since 2006 provide the basis to link high contaminant concentrations in MW66 (peaks) to the regional 'Northwest Plume' and to the upgradient source, specifically, the C400 Building Area. The conceptual model was further refined to demonstrate that groundwater and the various contaminant plumes respond to complex site conditions in predictable ways. This type of conceptualization bounds the expected system behavior and supports development of environmental cleanup strategies, providing a basis to support decisions even if it is not feasible to completely characterize all of the 'complexities' present in the system. We recommend that the site carefully consider the potential impacts to groundwater and contaminant plume migration as they plan and implement onsite production operations, remediation efforts, and reconfiguration activities. For example, this conceptual model suggests that rerouting drainage water, constructing ponds or basin, reconfiguring cooling water systems, capping sites, decommissioning buildings, fixing (or not fixing) water leaks, and other similar actions will potentially have a 'direct' impact on the groundwater contaminant plumes. Our conclusion that the peak concentrations in MW66 are linked to the regional PGDP NW Plume does not imply that there TCE is not present in SWMU 7. The available soil and groundwater data indicate that the some of the waste disposed in this facility contacted and/or were contaminated by TCE. In our assessment, the relatively small amount of TCE associated with SWMU 7 is not contributing detectable TCE to the groundwater and does not represent a significant threat to the environment, particularly in an area where remediation and/or management of TCE in the NW plume will be required for an extended timeframe. If determined to be necessary by the PGDP team and regulators, additional TCE characterization or cleanup activities could be performed. Consistent with the limited quantity of TCE in SWMU 7, we identify a range of low cost approaches for such activities (e.g., soil gas surveys for characterization or SVE for remediation). We hope that this information is useful to the Paducah team and to their regulators and stakeholders to develop a robust environmental management path to address the groundwater and soil contamination associated with the burial ground areas.

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

98

Development of a 2 MW CW Waterload for Electron Cyclotron Heating Systems  

SciTech Connect

Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. developed a load capable of continuously dissipating 2 MW of RF power from gyrotrons. The input uses HE11 corrugated waveguide and a rotating launcher to uniformly disperse the power over the lossy surfaces in the load. This builds on experience with a previous load designed to dissipate 1 MW of continuous RF power. The 2 MW load uses more advanced RF dispersion to double the capability in the same size device as the 1 MW load. The new load reduces reflected power from the load to significantly less than 1 %. This eliminates requirements for a preload to capture reflected power. The program updated control electronics that provides all required interlocks for operation and measurement of peak and average power. The program developed two version of the load. The initial version used primarily anodized aluminum to reduce weight and cost. The second version used copper and stainless steel to meet specifications for the ITER reactor currently under construction in France. Tests of the new load at the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency confirmed operation of the load to a power level of 1 MW, which is the highest power currently available for testing the load. Additional tests will be performed at General Atomics in spring 2013. The U.S. ITER organization will test the copper/stainless steel version of the load in December 2012 or early in 2013. Both loads are currently being marketed worldwide.

R. Lawrence,Ives; Maxwell Mizuhara; George Collins; Jeffrey Neilson; Philipp Borchard

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

99

Ecosystem Solar Electric Corp aka Solar MW Energy Inc | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Electric Corp aka Solar MW Energy Inc Solar Electric Corp aka Solar MW Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecosystem Solar Electric Corp, aka Solar MW Energy Inc Place Ontario, California Zip 91761 Product Plans to develop STEG plants in the Mojave desert. Coordinates 34.06457°, -117.647809° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.06457,"lon":-117.647809,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

100

Economic Development Impact of 1,000 MW of Wind Energy in Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Texas has approximately 9,727 MW of wind energy capacity installed, making it a global leader in installed wind energy. As a result of the significant investment the wind industry has brought to Texas, it is important to better understand the economic development impacts of wind energy in Texas. This report analyzes the jobs and economic impacts of 1,000 MW of wind power generation in the state. The impacts highlighted in this report can be used in policy and planning decisions and can be scaled to get a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other wind scenarios. This report can also inform stakeholders in other states about the potential economic impacts associated with the development of 1,000 MW of new wind power generation and the relationships of different elements in the state economy.

Reategui, S.; Hendrickson, S.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The conversion of the 2 MW reactor at the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2 MW Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission reactor is required to convert from the use of High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel using a standard LEU fuel plate which is thinner and contains more U-235 than the current HEU plate. These differences, coupled with a desire to upgrade the characteristics and capability of the reactor, have resulted in core design studies and thermal hydraulic studies not only at the current 2 MW but also at the maximum power level of the reactor, 5 MW. In addition, during 23 years of operation, it has become clear that the main uses of the reactor have been neutron scattering and neutron activation analysis. The requirement to convert to LEU presents and opportunity to optimize the core for the utilization and to restudy the thermal hydraulics using modern techniques. This paper presents the current conclusions of both aspects. 2 refs., 9 figs.

DiMeglio, A.F.; Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.; Spring, E.F. (Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission, Narragansett, RI (USA). Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center; Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission, Narragansett, RI (USA). Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

2 MW Active Bouncer Converter Design for Long Pulse Klystron Modulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents some design issues of a 2 MW interleaved buck converter which is used as an active bouncer droop compensator for a 5.5MW long pulse klystron modulator. This novel design concept presents many challenges in terms of voltage ripple versus pulse rise-time. Issues related to the voltage ripple specification versus output filter design are discussed in detail. The design study is analyzed analytically, simulated numerically and is validated by experimental results obtained from a full power prototype.

Aguglia, D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Internal Technical Report, Heat Exchanger Sizing for 20 MW Geothermal Power Plants at MX Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the analyses used to size the heaters, steam condenser, and working fluid condenser for a proposed 20 MW geothermal power plant application at MX sites in the southwest. These units would use a mixture of hydrocarbons (90% isobutane--10% n-hexane) to extract energy from moderate temperature resources (resource temperatures of 365 F, 400 F, and 450 F were considered). The working fluid will be maintained at supercritical pressures in the heater units. Studies have shown that this cycle will provide a significant net power increase over standard dual boiling single fluid cycles currently in use, e.g., the Raft River 5 MW pilot plant.

Kochan, R.J.; Bliem, C.J.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Short-Term Power Fluctuation of Wind Turbines: Analyzing Data from the German 250-MW Measurement Program from the Ancillary Services Viewpoint  

SciTech Connect

Short-term power fluctuations from wind farms may affect interconnected-grid operating costs and stability. With the increasing availability of wind power worldwide, this has become a concern for some utilities. Under electric industry restructuring in the United States, the impact of these fluctuations will be evaluated by examining provisions and costs of ancillary services for wind power. However, the magnitude of the impact and the effect of aggregation of multiple turbines are not well quantified due to a lack of actual wind farm power data. This paper analyzes individual turbine and aggregate power output data from the German ''250-MW Wind'' data project. Electric system load following and regulation impacts are examined as a function of the number of turbines and turbine spacing in order to quantify the impacts of aggregation. The results show a significant decrease in the relative system regulation burden with increasing number of turbines, even if the turbines are in close proximity.

Ernst, B. (Institut fur Solare Energieversorgungstechnik); Wan, Y.-H. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Kirby, B. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

105

Definition: Overlap Regulation Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overlap Regulation Service Overlap Regulation Service Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Overlap Regulation Service A method of providing regulation service in which the Balancing Authority providing the regulation service incorporates another Balancing Authority's actual interchange, frequency response, and schedules into providing Balancing Authority's AGC/ACE equation.[1] Related Terms regulation service, frequency response, balancing authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Overlap_Regulation_Service&oldid=502490" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions

106

Rhode Island Pretreatment Regulations (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations set standards for water pretreatment prior to release to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs), and require effluent data including the identity, amount, frequency, concentration...

107

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description This effort will support the expansion of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), supporting DOE Strategic Themes of "energy security" and sub goal of "energy diversity"; reducing the Nation's dependence on foreign oil while improving our environment. A 50 MW has been chosen as a design point, so that the project may also assess how different machinery approaches will change the costing - it is a mid point in size where multiple solutions exist that will allow the team to effectively explore the options in the design space and understand the cost.

108

Model Validation at the 204 MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe methods to derive and validate equivalent models for a large wind farm. FPL Energy's 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center, which is interconnected to the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) transmission system, was used as a case study. The methods described are applicable to any large wind power plant.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Model Validation at the 204 MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we describe methods to derive and validate equivalent models for a large wind farm. FPL Energy's 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center, which is interconnected to the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) transmission system, was used as a case study. The methods described are applicable to any large wind power plant.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

EK 131/132 module: Introduction to Wind Energy MW 3-5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EK 131/132 module: Introduction to Wind Energy MW 3-5 Course. This course provides an overview of wind turbine technology and energy concepts. The question of whether wind. Students will measure personal energy use and analyze wind turbine data from the Museum of Science's wind

111

Design and Test of a 100MW X Band TE01 Window  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is in progress on a TeV-scale linear collider that will operate at 5-10 times the energy of present generation accelerators. This will require development of high power X-Band sources generating 50-100 MW per source. Conventional pillbox window designs are capable of transmitting peak rf powers up to about 30 MW, well below the desired level required for the use of a single window per tube. SLAC has developed a 75 MW TE{sub 01} window [1] that uses a 'traveling wave' design to minimize fields at the window face. Irises match to the dielectric window impedance, resulting in a pure traveling wave in the ceramic and minimum fields on the window face. The use of the TE{sub 01} mode also has zero electric field on the braze fillet. Unfortunately, in-band resonances prevented this window design from achieving the desired 75MW power level. It was believed the resonances resulted from sudden steps in the circular guide to match the 38mm input diameter to the overmoded (TE{sub 01} and TE{sub 02} mode propagating) 65 mm diameter of the window ceramic. Calabazas Creek Research Inc. is currently developing a traveling wave window using compact, numerically optimized, parabolic tapers to match the input diameter of 38mm to the window ceramic diameter of 76mm (Figure 1). The design is projected to handle 100 MW of pulse power with a peak field at the window face of 3.6 MV/m. Cold test of the window has shown the return loss to be better than -25 dB over a 100 MHz bandwidth and to be resonance free (Figure 2). The window is scheduled for high-power testing in July 2003 at the SLAC.

Neilson, J.; Ives, L.; Tantawi, S.G.; /Calabazas Creek Res., Saratoga /SLAC

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

112

Niland development project geothermal loan guaranty: 49-MW (net) power plant and geothermal well field development, Imperial County, California: Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed federal action addressed by this environmental assessment is the authorization of disbursements under a loan guaranteed by the US Department of Energy for the Niland Geothermal Energy Program. The disbursements will partially finance the development of a geothermal well field in the Imperial Valley of California to supply a 25-MW(e) (net) power plant. Phase I of the project is the production of 25 MW(e) (net) of power; the full rate of 49 MW (net) would be achieved during Phase II. The project is located on approximately 1600 acres (648 ha) near the city of Niland in Imperial County, California. Well field development includes the initial drilling of 8 production wells for Phase I, 8 production wells for Phase II, and the possible need for as many as 16 replacement wells over the anticipated 30-year life of the facility. Activities associated with the power plant in addition to operation are excavation and construction of the facility and associated systems (such as cooling towers). Significant environmental impacts, as defined in Council on Environmental Quality regulation 40 CFR Part 1508.27, are not expected to occur as a result of this project. Minor impacts could include the following: local degradation of ambient air quality due to particulate and/or hydrogen sulfide emissions, temporarily increased ambient noise levels due to drilling and construction activities, and increased traffic. Impacts could be significant in the event of a major spill of geothermal fluid, which could contaminate groundwater and surface waters and alter or eliminate nearby habitat. Careful land use planning and engineering design, implementation of mitigation measures for pollution control, and design and implementation of an environmental monitoring program that can provide an early indication of potential problems should ensure that impacts, except for certain accidents, will be minimized.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Decommissioning of the Austrian 10 MW Research Reactor, Results and Lessons learned Paper  

SciTech Connect

After the decision to shut down the 10 MW ASTRA-MTR Research Reactor was reached in May 1998, the possible options and required phases for decommissioning and removal of the radioactive components were evaluated in a decommissioning study. To support the decisions at each phase, an estimate of the activity inventory in the various parts of the reactor and the waste volume to be expected was performed. Of the possible options an immediate dismantling to phase 1 of IAEA Technical Guide Lines after the immediately following, continued dismantling to phase 2 of these guide lines was identified as the most reasonable and under the auspices optimum choice. The actual decommissioning work on the ASTRA-Reactor began in January 2000 after its final shutdown on July 31, 1999. Preliminary evaluations of the activity inventory gave an estimated amount of 320 kg of intermediate level waste, of about 60 metric tons of contaminated and another 100 metric tons of activated low level radioactive waste. The activities were roughly estimated to be at 200 TBq in the intermediate level and 6 GBq in the low level. The structure of the decommissioning process was decided against cost-, time- and risk-optimization following the basic layout of the main tasks, e.g. the removing of the fuel, the recovering and the treatment of the intermediate level activities in the vicinity of the core, the handling and conditioning of the neutron exposed graphite and the Beryllium-elements. As an example, the dismantling of approx. 1400 metric tons of the biological shield is described in more detail from the determination of the dismantling technique to the clearing procedures and the deposition. The process of dismantling of the biological shield is presented in fast motion. The dismantling of the pump-room installations of the primary loop, the processing of the contaminated or activated metals, the dismantling of the ventilation system and the radiological clearance of the reactor building was done under optimized conditions and is explained in the following. Spent fuel was generally delivered to the US Department of Energy - DOE in several shipments over the operational time of the ASTRA reactor. With the last shipment in May 2001 all the remaining spent fuel elements out of the ASTRA reactor consignment were transferred to DOE. To reduce waste from concrete shielding, German regulations Dt.StrSchV, annex IV, table 1, two clearance values referring to 'clearance restricted for permanent deposit' and to a clearance for unrestricted re-use were used. In order to reduce the amount of an estimated 60 tons of slightly contaminated metals, it was determined that introducing re-melting procedures were the most economical way. To obtain radiological clearance of the reactor building, compliance with the release limits according to Austrian Radiation Protection Ordinance had to be proved to the regulatory body. There, in general, the limits for unrestricted release were defined as a maximum dose rate of 10 {mu}Sv effective for an individual person per year. The results of the regular yearly medical examinations of the staff indicated no influence of the work related to decommissioning. The readings of the personal dosimeters over the entire project amounted to a total of 85.6 mSv, averaging to 1.07 mSv per year and person. After finishing the decommissioning process, the material balance showed 89.6 % for unrestricted reuse, 6.6 % for conventional mass-dumping and 3.8 % of ILW and LLW. The project was covered by an extensive documentation. All operations within NES followed ISO 9000 quality insurance standards. Experiences and knowledge were presented to and shared with the community, e.g. AFR and IAEA throughout the project. (authors)

Hillebrand, G.; Meyer, F. [Nuclear Engineering Seibersdorf GmbH (NES), Seibersdorf, Austria, Europe (Austria)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community In the US DOEnergy, are there calcuations for real cost of energy considering the negative, socialized costs of all commercial large scale power generation soruces ? I am talking about the cost of mountain top removal for coal mined that way, the trip to the power plant, the sludge pond or ash heap, the cost of the gas out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs and so on. What I am tring to get at is the 'real cost' per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are

115

Sacramento Municipal Utility District 100 MW Photovoltaic Power Plant: Final environmental impact report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) proposes constructing a 100 megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic electric generation facility adjacent to its Rancho Seco nuclear plant. The project, to be built in increments over the next 12 years, is the largest facility of its kind proposed by any utility in the country. The initial 1 MW photovoltaic field will consist of four 250 kW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. Photovoltaic cell modules will be mounted on flat-plate arrays attached to centrally located torque tubes which allow the arrays to rotate on their long axis to )openreverse arrowquotes)track)closereverse arrowquotes) the sun. This Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) addresses environmental aspects of the proposed project according to the guidelines for implementing the California Environmental Quality Act and the National Enviornmental Policy Act (NEPA).

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

NREL: Wind Research - The Denver Post Highlights the NWTC's New 5-MW  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Denver Post Highlights the NWTC's New 5-MW Dynamometer The Denver Post Highlights the NWTC's New 5-MW Dynamometer January 2, 2014 On January 2, a reporter from The Denver Post toured the new 5-megawatt dynamometer test facility at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Denver Post Writer Mark Jaffe spoke with NWTC Center Director Fort Felker to learn more about how these innovative research capabilities can impact the wind industry as a whole. Read the full story . Officially dedicated in December, the new facility houses one of the largest dynamometers in the world, which offers advanced capabilities to test the mechanical and electrical power-producing systems of multimegawatt wind turbines in a controlled environment. The new dynamometer can also be directly connected to the electric grid or through a controllable grid

117

MHK Projects/NJBPU 1 5 MW Demonstration Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NJBPU 1 5 MW Demonstration Program NJBPU 1 5 MW Demonstration Program < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6032,"lon":-74.3401,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

118

Beam Loss Studies for the 2-MW LBNE Proton Beam Line  

SciTech Connect

Severe limits are put on allowable beam loss during extraction and transport of a 2.3 MW primary proton beam for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab. Detailed simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes have evaluated the impact of beam loss of 1.6 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 120 GeV, ranging from a single pulse full loss to sustained small fractional loss. It is shown that loss of a single beam pulse at 2.3 MW will result in a catastrophic event: beam pipe destruction, damaged magnets and very high levels of residual radiation inside and outside the tunnel. Acceptable beam loss limits have been determined and robust solutions developed to enable efficient proton beam operation under these constraints.

Drozhdin, A.I.; Childress, S.R.; Mokhov, N.V.; Tropin, I.S.; Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Tests with a microcomputer based adaptive synchronous machine stabilizer on a 400MW thermal unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field tests have been conducted on a microcomputer-based adaptive synchronous machine stabilizer. The adaptive control algorithm tracks the system operating conditions using a least squares identification technique with variable forgetting factor and the control is calculated by a self-searching pole-shift method. An outline of the control algorithm and the results of field tests on a 400MW thermal generating unit are described in this paper.

Malik, O.P.; Hope, G.S.; Hancock, G.C. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Mao, C.X. (Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)); Prakash, K.S. (Bharat Heavy Electricals, Banglore (India))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Economics of a conceptual 75 MW Hot Dry Rock geothermal electric power station  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Man-made, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been investigated for over ten years. As early as 1977 a research-sized reservoir was created at a depth of 2.9 km near the Valles Caldera, a dormant volcanic complex in New Mexico, by connecting two wells with hydraulic fractures. Thermal power was generated at rates of up to 5 MW(t) and the reservoir was operated for nearly a year with a thermal drawdown less than 10/sup 0/C. A small 60kW(e) electrical generation unit using a binary cycle (hot geothermal water and a low boiling point organic fluid, R-114) was operated. Interest is now worldwide with field research being conducted at sites near Le Mayet de Montagne, France; Falkenberg and Urach, Federal Republic of Germany; Yakedake, Japan; and Rosemanowes quarry in Cornwall, United Kingdom. To assess the commercial viability of future HDR electrical generating stations, an economic modeling study was conducted for a conceptual 75 MW(e) generating station operating at conditions similar to those prevailing at the New Mexico HDR site. The reservoir required for 75 MW(e), equivalent to 550 MW of thermal energy, uses at least 9 wells drilled to 4.3 km and the temperature of the water produced should average 230/sup 0/C. Thermodynamic considerations indicate that a binary cycle should result in optimum electricity generation and the best organic fluids are refrigerants R-22, R-32, R-115 or R-600a (Isobutane). The break-even bus bar cost of HDR electricity was computed by the levelized life-cycle method, and found to be competitive with most alternative electric power stations in the US.

Murphy, H.D.; Drake, R.H.; Tester, J.W.; Zyvoloski, G.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

1 MW / 7.2 MWh NaS Battery Demonstration and Case Study Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New York Power Authority (NYPA), working together with the Metropolitan Transit Authority Long Island Bus (LIB) Company, has installed an advanced sodium sulfur battery energy storage system (NaS BESS) at the LIB facility located at 700 Commercial Avenue, Garden City, New York. The BESS is capable of providing a nominal 1MW of power to the bus fueling compressor station for 6-8 hours per day, 7 days per week.

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

122

COST STUDY OF A 100-Mw(e) DIRECT-CYCLE BOILING WATER REACTOR PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A technical and economic evaluation is presented of a direct-cycle light- water boiling reactor designed for natural circulation and internal steam-water separation. The reference lOO-Mw(e) reactor power plant design evolved from the study should have the best chance (compared to similar plants) of approaching the 8 to 9 mill/kwh total power-cost level. (W.D.M.)

Bullinger, C.F.; Harrer, J.M.

1960-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Multi-Mission Capable, High g Load mW RPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past few years Hi-Z has been developing a wide range of mW generators and life testing thermoelectric modules for the Department of Energy (DOE) to fulfill requirements by NASA Ames and other agencies. The purpose of this report is to determine the capabilities of a wide range of mW generators for various missions. In the 1st quarterly report the power output of various mW generators was determined via thermal and mechanical modeling. The variable attributes of each generator modeled were: the number of RHUs (1-8), generator outer diameter (1.25-4 in.), and G-load (10, 500, or 2,000). The resultant power output was as high as 180 mW for the largest generator with the lowest Gload. Specifically, we looked at the design of a generator for high G loading that is insulated with Xenon gas and multifoil solid insulation. Because the design of this new generator varied considerably from the previous generator design, it was necessary to show in detail how it is to be assembled, calculate them as of the generator and determine the heat loss from the system. A new method of assembling the RHU was also included as part of the design. As a side issue we redesigned the test stations to provide better control of the cold sink temperature. This will help in reducing the test data by eliminating the need to 'normalize' the data to a specific temperature. In addition these new stations can be used to simulate the low ambient temperatures associated with Mars and other planets.

John C. Bass; Nathan Hiller; Velimir Jovanovic; Norbert B. Elsner

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

124

Testing and Modeling of a 3-MW Wind Turbine Using Fully Coupled Simulation Codes (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This poster describes the NREL/Alstom Wind testing and model verification of the Alstom 3-MW wind turbine located at NREL's National Wind Technology Center. NREL,in collaboration with ALSTOM Wind, is studying a 3-MW wind turbine installed at the National Wind Technology Center(NWTC). The project analyzes the turbine design using a state-of-the-art simulation code validated with detailed test data. This poster describes the testing and the model validation effort, and provides conclusions about the performance of the unique drive train configuration used in this wind turbine. The 3-MW machine has been operating at the NWTC since March 2011, and drive train measurements will be collected through the spring of 2012. The NWTC testing site has particularly turbulent wind patterns that allow for the measurement of large transient loads and the resulting turbine response. This poster describes the 3-MW turbine test project, the instrumentation installed, and the load cases captured. The design of a reliable wind turbine drive train increasingly relies on the use of advanced simulation to predict structural responses in a varying wind field. This poster presents a fully coupled, aero-elastic and dynamic model of the wind turbine. It also shows the methodology used to validate the model, including the use of measured tower modes, model-to-model comparisons of the power curve, and mainshaft bending predictions for various load cases. The drivetrain is designed to only transmit torque to the gearbox, eliminating non-torque moments that are known to cause gear misalignment. Preliminary results show that the drivetrain is able to divert bending loads in extreme loading cases, and that a significantly smaller bending moment is induced on the mainshaft compared to a three-point mounting design.

LaCava, W.; Guo, Y.; Van Dam, J.; Bergua, R.; Casanovas, C.; Cugat, C.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Alterative LEU designs for the FRM-II with power levels of 20-22 MW.  

SciTech Connect

Alternative LEU Designs for the FRM-II have been developed by the RERTR Program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at the request of an FRM-II Expert Group established by the German Federal Government in January 1999 to evaluate the options for using LEU fuel instead of HEU fuel in cores with power levels of 20 MW. The ANL designs would use the same building structure and maintain as many of the HEU design features as practical. The range of potential LEU fuels was expanded from previous studies to include already-tested silicide fuels with uranium densities up to 6.7 g/cm{sup 3} and the new U-Mo fuels that show excellent prospects for achieving uranium densities in the 8-9 g/cm{sup 3} range. For each of the LEU cores; the design parameters were chosen to match the 50 day cycle length of the HEU core and to maximize the thermal neutron flux in the Cold Neutron Source and beam tubes. The studies concluded that an LEU core with a diameter of about 29 cm instead of 24 cm in HEU design and operating at a power level of 20 MW would have thermal neutron fluxes that are 0.85 times that of the HEU design at the center of the Cold Neutron Source. With a potential future upgrade to a power of 22 MW, this ratio would increase to 0.93.

Hanan, N. A.; Smith, R. S.; Matos, J. E.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

126

Ultra Clean 1.1MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dresser, Inc. (GE Energy, Waukesha gas engines) will develop, test, demonstrate, and commercialize a 1.1 Megawatt (MW) natural gas fueled combined heat and power reciprocating engine powered package. This package will feature a total efficiency > 75% and ultra low CARB permitting emissions. Our modular design will cover the 1 6 MW size range, and this scalable technology can be used in both smaller and larger engine powered CHP packages. To further advance one of the key advantages of reciprocating engines, the engine, generator and CHP package will be optimized for low initial and operating costs. Dresser, Inc. will leverage the knowledge gained in the DOE - ARES program. Dresser, Inc. will work with commercial, regulatory, and government entities to help break down barriers to wider deployment of CHP. The outcome of this project will be a commercially successful 1.1 MW CHP package with high electrical and total efficiency that will significantly reduce emissions compared to the current central power plant paradigm. Principal objectives by phases for Budget Period 1 include: Phase 1 market study to determine optimum system performance, target first cost, lifecycle cost, and creation of a detailed product specification. Phase 2 Refinement of the Waukesha CHP system design concepts, identification of critical characteristics, initial evaluation of technical solutions, and risk mitigation plans. Background

Zurlo, James; Lueck, Steve

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Recommended Rest Frequencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Return to Table of Contents NIST Recommended Rest Frequencies for Observed Interstellar Molecular Microwave Transitions. by Frank J. Lovas. ...

128

Assessing the Value of Regulation Resources Based on Their Time Response Characteristics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fast responsive regulation resources are potentially more valuable as a power system regulation resource (more efficient) because they allow applying controls at the exact moment and in the exact amount as needed. Faster control is desirable because it facilitates more reliable compliance with the NERC Control Performance Standards at relatively lesser regulation capacity procurements. The current California ISO practices and markets do not provide a differentiation among the regulation resources based on their speed of response (with the exception of some minimum ramping capabilities). Some demand response technologies, including some generation and energy storage resources, can provide quicker control actions. California ISO practices and markets could be updated to welcome more fast regulation resources into the California ISO service area. The project work reported in this work was pursuing the following objectives: Develop methodology to assess the relative value of generation resources used for regulation and load following California ISO functions This assessment should be done based on physical characteristics including the ability to quickly change their output following California ISO signals Evaluate what power is worth on different time scales Analyze the benefits of new regulation resources to provide effective compliance with the mandatory NERC Control Performance Standards Evaluate impacts of the newly proposed BAAL and FRR standards on the potential value of fast regulation and distributed regulation resources Develop a scope for the follow-up projects to pave a road for the new efficient types of balancing resources in California. The work included the following studies: Analysis of California ISO regulating units characteristics California ISO automatic generation system (AGC) analysis California ISO regulation procurement and market analysis Fast regulation efficiency analysis Projection of the California ISO load following and regulation requirements into the future Value of fast responsive resources depending on their ramping capability Potential impacts of the balancing authority area control error limit (BAAL), which is a part of the newly proposed NERC standard Balancing Resources and Demand Potential impacts of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) frequency responsive reserve (FRR) standard Recommendations for the next phase of the project. The following main conclusions and suggestions for the future have been made: The analysis of regulation ramping requirements shows that the regulation system should be able to provide ramps of at least 40-60 MW per minute for a period up to 6 minutes. Evaluate if changes are needed in the California ISO AGC system to effectively accommodate new types of fast regulation resources and minimize the California ISO regulation procurement. California ISO may consider creating better market opportunities for and incentives for fast responsive resources. An additional study of low probability high ramp events can be recommended to the California ISO. The California ISO may be willing to consider establishing a more relaxed target CPS2 compliance level. A BAAL-related study can be recommended for the California ISO as soon as more clarity is achieved concerning the actual enforcement of the BAAL standard and its numerical values for the California ISO. The study may involve an assessment of advantages of the distributed frequency-based control for the California ISO system. The market-related issues that arise in this connection can be also investigated. A FRR-related study can be recommended for the California ISO as soon as more clarity is achieved concerning the actual enforcement of the FRR standard and its numerical values for the California ISO.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Lu, Shuai; Ma, Jian; Nguyen, Tony B.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Eastern Frequency Response Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Environmental Regulators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Reports Brookhaven's Environmental Regulators When it comes to the environment, Brookhaven National Laboratory must comply with the regulations of many local, state and...

131

Solar Pilot Plant: Phase I. Quarterly report No. 3, April--June 1976. CDRL item No. 10. [10 MW  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The baseline design for a 10 MW proof-of-concept pilot central receiver solar power plant is described. Detailed designs for the collector, steam generator, and thermal storage subsystem research experiments are presented. (WHK)

None

1976-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

132

Microphysics of Clouds Initiated from a 1000 MW Dry Heat Source in Comparison with Environmental ClodsA Statistical Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate potential atmospheric impacts of wate heat released by dry cooling towers, studies have been made of an oil burning system (the Mtotron), which emits sensible heat at a rate of 1000 MW and large quantities of aerosol particles ...

Pham van Dinh; Bruno Bnech; Lawrence F. Radke

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Global wind energy market report. Wind energy industry grows at steady pace, adds over 8,000 MW in 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulative global wind energy generating capacity topped 39,000 megawatts (MW) by the end of 2003. New equipment totally over 8,000 MW in capacity was installed worldwide during the year. The report, updated annually, provides information on the status of the wind energy market throughout the world and gives details on various regions. A listing of new and cumulative installed capacity by country and by region is included as an appendix.

anon.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Unique design features of the SMUDPV1 1MW /SUB AC/ photovoltaic central station powerplant  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the unique and innovative balance of system design features incorporated into the SMUDPV1 1MW /SUB ac/ photovoltaic central station powerplant design. These include: single-axis flat-plate tracking arrays, resistance grounded dc neutral, dc fault detection and location systems and other features designed to maximize the value of the plant to the utility, while complying with standard utility design practices and standards. The paper presents the design criteria and selection rationale, design description and expected cost and performance implications to PV1 and future large-scale photovoltaic powerplants.

Daniels, R.E.; Dilts, B.; Rosen, D.J.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

T/g upgrade adds 15 MW, extends unit life. [Turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect

This article describes turbogenerator upgrade at Maine Yankee's PWR. Maine Yankee Atomic Power Co.'s excellent experience in the upgrading and uprating of the two low-pressure (l-p) steam turbines at its only generating unit - an 865-MW, three-loop pressurized-water reactor installed in 1972 - has motivated the utility to also contract for replacement of both the high-pressure (h-p) steam path and the generator. ABB Power Generation Inc., North Brunswick, NJ, which retrofitted the l-p steam-path components, will handle the other two projects as well.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Fluidized bed combustor 50 MW thermal power plant, Krabi, Thailand. Feasibility study. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The report presents the results of a study prepared by Burns and Roe for the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand to examine the technical feasibility and economic attractiveness for building a 50 MW Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion lignite fired power plant at Krabi, southern Thailand. The study is divided into seven main sections, plus an executive summary and appendices: (1) Introduction; (2) Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion Technology Overview; (3) Fuel and Limestone Tests; (4) Site Evaluation; (5) Station Design and Arrangements; (6) Environmental Considerations; (7) Economic Analysis.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

100-MW NUCLEAR POWER PLANT UTILIZING A SODIUM COOLED, GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of a 100 Mw(e) nuclear power plant is described. The plant utilized a sodium-cooled graphite-moderated reactor with stainless- steel clad. slightiy enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel. The reactor is provided with three main coolant circuits, and the steam cycle has three stages of regenerative heating. The plant control system allows automatic operation over the range of 20 to 100% load, or manual operation at all loads. The site, reactor, sodium systems, reactor auxiliaries, fuel handling, instrumentation, turbine-generator, buildings. and safety measures are described. Engineering drawings are included. (W.D.M.)

1958-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

138

Can fluid-bed take on p-c units in the 250- to 400-MW range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is a comparison of the state of fluid-bed design with commercial pulverized coal fossil-fuel power plants. With successful operation of several units in the 100- to 200-MW range, designers have set their sights on a doubling of unit capacity. To compete with p-c units, however, comparable gains in efficiency, operability, environmental performance, and cost are necessary, too. In a decade or so, circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) boilers and bubbling-bed units have progressed from industrial-sized curiosities to several 150-200-MW single units operating today. A 250-MW CFB unit is being installed in France for startup in 1995, a 225-MW unit is being designed for installation as part of the US DOE Clean Coal Technology Demonstration program, two 230-MW units are slated to start up in Poland in 1995, and a 350-MW bubbling-bed unit is under construction in Japan. Thus, fluid-bed technology is poised to compete with pulverized-coal (p-c)-fired units for utility-scale applications. But size isn't everything. To fully compete, CFB designers have to consider thermal efficiency, environmental performance, operability, fuel flexibility, cost, and a host of other factors.

Makansi, J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

2012 CERTS LAAR Program Peer Review - Scoping Study on Industrial Regulation - Nasr Alkadi, ORNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nasr Alkadi, Ph.D. Nasr Alkadi, Ph.D. Michael Starke, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory CERTS Internal Program Review FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Scoping Study on Industrial Regulation September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Project objective: Scoping of Regulation Reserves in Industrial Sector 2 Alcoa's Smelting Process is a significant regulation asset at Warrick, IN. * Alcoa has demonstrated Regulation Band in the 50 MW range (25/25) * Represents ~10% of BL of 500 MW) 1. Develop an estimate of the amount of regulation that could reasonably be expected from industrial loads based on publicly available information. 2. Analyze the potential impact of regulation on the manufacturing process.

140

primary frequency standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST-F1 Cesium Fountain Atomic Clock The Primary Time and Frequency Standard for the United States. NIST-F1, the nation's ...

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

MW-class hybrid power system based on planar solid oxide stack technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale-Up of Planar SOFC Stack Scale-Up of Planar SOFC Stack Technology for MW-Level Combined Cycle System Final Report TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140-2390 Reference: D0136 Submitted to NETL October 3, 2003 1 NETL-Hybrid Scale-UP/D0136/SS/V1 1 Executive Summary 2 Background, Objectives & Approach 3 SOFC Cell Geometry and Modeling 4 SOFC Power Scale-up 5 System Design and Costs 6 Conclusions & Recommendations A Appendix 2 NETL-Hybrid Scale-UP/D0136/SS/V1 Executive Summary SECA Strategy NETL wanted to understand if and how SECA-style anode-supported SOFC stacks could be scaled-up for use in MW-level combined cycle plants. * SECA strategy relies on the use of modular, mass produced, SOFC stacks in the 3 - 10 kW capacity range for a wide range of applications. * Technical feasibility small-scale applications has been evaluated by SECA:

142

Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Shaber, C.R.; Thurow, T.L.

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

143

NREL Controllable Grid Interface for Testing MW-Scale Wind Turbine Generators (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to understand the behavior of wind turbines experiencing grid disturbances, it is necessary to perform a series of tests and accurate transient simulation studies. The latest edition of the IEC 61400-21 standard describes methods for such tests that include low voltage ride-through (LVRT), active power set-point control, ramp rate limitations, and reactive power capability tests. The IEC methods are being widely adopted on both national and international levels by wind turbine manufacturers, certification authorities, and utilities. On-site testing of wind turbines might be expensive and time consuming since it requires both test equipment transportation and personnel presence in sometimes remote locations for significant periods of time because such tests need to be conducted at certain wind speed and grid conditions. Changes in turbine control software or design modifications may require redoing of all tests. Significant cost and test-time reduction can be achieved if these tests are conducted in controlled laboratory environments that replicate grid disturbances and simulation of wind turbine interactions with power systems. Such testing capability does not exist in the United States today. An initiative by NREL to design and construct a 7-MVA grid simulator to operate with the existing 2.5 MW and new upcoming 5-MW dynamometer facilities will fulfill this role and bring many potential benefits to the U.S. wind industry with the ultimate goal of reducing wind energy integration costs.

McDade, M.; Gevorgian, V.; Wallen, R.; Erdman, W.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Spencer, S.G.; Shaber, C.R.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

Design and implementation of low power multistage amplifiers and high frequency distributed amplifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advancement in integrated circuit (IC) technology has resulted in scaling down of device sizes and supply voltages without proportionally scaling down the threshold voltage of the MOS transistor. This, coupled with the increasing demand for low power, portable, battery-operated electronic devices, like mobile phones, and laptops provides the impetus for further research towards achieving higher integration on chip and low power consumption. High gain, wide bandwidth amplifiers driving large capacitive loads serve as error amplifiers in low-voltage low drop out regulators in portable devices. This demands low power, low area, and frequency-compensated multistage amplifiers capable of driving large capacitive loads. The first part of the research proposes two power and area efficient frequency compensation schemes: Single Miller Capacitor Compensation (SMC) and Single Miller Capacitor Feedforward Compensation (SMFFC), for multistage amplifiers driving large capacitive loads. The designs have been implemented in a 0.5??m CMOS process. Experimental results show that the SMC and SMFFC amplifiers achieve gain-bandwidth products of 4.6MHz and 9MHz, respectively, when driving a load of 25K?/120pF. Each amplifier operates from a ??1V supply, dissipates less than 0.42mW of power and occupies less than 0.02mm2 of silicon area. The inception of the latest IEEE standard like IEEE 802.16 wireless metropolitan area network (WMAN) for 10 -66 GHz range demands wide band amplifiers operating at high frequencies to serve as front-end circuits (e.g. low noise amplifier) in such receiver architectures. Devices used in cascade (multistage amplifiers) can be used to increase the gain but it is achieved at an expense of bandwidth. Distributing the capacitance associated with the input and the output of the device over a ladder structure (which is periodic), rather than considering it to be lumped can achieve an extension of bandwidth without sacrificing gain. This concept which is also known as distributed amplification has been explored in the second part of the research. This work proposes certain guidelines for the design of distributed low noise amplifiers operating at very high frequencies. Noise analysis of the distributed amplifier with real transmission lines is introduced. The analysis for gain and noise figure is verified with simulation results from a 5-stage distributed amplifier implemented in a 0.18??m CMOS process.

Mishra, Chinmaya

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

1984-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

147

Estimating frequency of change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many online data sources are updated autonomously and independently. In this article, we make the case for estimating the change frequency of data to improve Web crawlers, Web caches and to help data mining. We first identify various scenarios, where ... Keywords: Change frequency estimation, Poisson process

Junghoo Cho; Hector Garcia-Molina

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Microfabricated ion frequency standard  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Biedermann, Grant (Albuquerque, NM); Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stick, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, III, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

149

Final Report, Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm2. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year).

Swartz, Dr Scott L.; Thrun, Dr Lora B.; Arkenberg, Mr Gene B.; Chenault, Ms Kellie M.

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

150

Beginning-of-life neutronic analysis of a 3000-MW(t) HTGR  

SciTech Connect

The results of a study of safety-related neutronic characteristics for the beginning-of-life core of a 3000-MW(t) High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor are presented. Emphasis was placed on the temperature-dependent reactivity effects of fuel, moderator, control poisons, and fission products. Other neutronic characteristics studied were gross and local power distributions, neutron kinetics parameters, control rod and other material worths and worth distributions, and the reactivity worth of a selected hypothetical perturbation in the core configuration. The study was performed for the most part using discrete-ordinates transport theory codes and neutron cross sections that were interpolated from a four-parameter nine-group library supplied by the HTGR vendor. A few comparison calculations were also performed using nine-group data generated with an independent cross-section processing code system. Results from the study generally agree well with results reported by the HTGR vendor. (auth)

Vigil, J.C.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Detailed design of the 2MW Demonstration Plant. Topical report, Task 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of the design of the 2MW carbonate fuel cell power plant which will be built and tested under DOE cooperative agreement DE-FC2l-92MC29237. The report is divided into sections which describe the process and stack module design, and Appendices which provide additional design detail. Section 2.0 provides an overview of the program, including the project objectives, site location, and schedule. A description of the overall process is presented in Section 3.0. The design of the fuel cell stack Modules is described in Section 5.0, which discusses the design of the fuel cell stacks, multi-stack enclosures, and Stack Modules. Additional detail is provided in a report Appendix, the Final Design Criteria Summary. This is an abstract of the design criteria used in the design of the Submodules and Modules.

Not Available

1993-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

152

Experiences with titanium next-to-last LP blades in a 1300 MW turbine  

SciTech Connect

The use of titanium as a material for the end blades of LP turbines has already been investigated twenty years ago by Brown Boveri. Next-to-last LP blades in the past have several times been the cause of turbine damage, because these blades work in the zone of the first condensation and thus are subjected to mechanical stress in corrosive environment. Favorable corrosion properties of titanium provided a reason for developing and manufacturing two next-to-last titanium low pressure blade rows in 1980 and to use them in a 1300 MW plant. On the occasion of an overhaul, a visual check was carried out of the titanium blades and chemical analysis of the blade surface deposits were made. From the distribution of the deposits conclusions can be drawn, retroactively, as to why steel blades might have failed. The titanium blades are undergoing a further operation period.

Meyer, H.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Recent Performance of the SNS H-Source for 1-MW Neutron Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the performance of the SNS ion source and LEBT as they continue to deliver ~50 mA H- beams at a 5.3% duty factor required for neutron production with a ~1MW proton beam since the fall of 2009. The source continues to deliver persistent H- beams for up to 6 weeks without adding Cs after an initial dose of ~4 mg, except when there are excessive plasma impurities. In one case the H- beam decayed due to an air leak, which is shown to be consistent with sputtering of the Cs layer, and which allows to bracket the plasma potential. In another case, the performance of two sources degraded progressively, which appears to be consistent with a progressive deterioration of the Cs covered Mo converter. These two and other recently discovered issues are discussed in detail.

Stockli, Martin P [ORNL; Han, Baoxi [ORNL; Murray Jr, S N [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Santana, Manuel [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

A miniaturized mW thermoelectric generator for nw objectives: continuous, autonomous, reliable power for decades.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have built and tested a miniaturized, thermoelectric power source that can provide in excess of 450 {micro}W of power in a system size of 4.3cc, for a power density of 107 {micro}W/cc, which is denser than any system of this size previously reported. The system operates on 150mW of thermal input, which for this system was simulated with a resistive heater, but in application would be provided by a 0.4g source of {sup 238}Pu located at the center of the device. Output power from this device, while optimized for efficiency, was not optimized for form of the power output, and so the maximum power was delivered at only 41mV. An upconverter to 2.7V was developed concurrently with the power source to bring the voltage up to a usable level for microelectronics.

Aselage, Terrence Lee; Siegal, Michael P.; Whalen, Scott; Frederick, Scott K.; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Model Validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center (Poster)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are: (1) to investigate the impact of aggregation on a large wind farm; and (2) to explore the dynamic behaviors of the power system and the wind turbine. The methods used are: (1) use equivalencing method previously developed to simplify Taiban Mesa wind power plant; (2) use PSLF dynamic analysis to simulate the wind power plant with AWEA-proposed low voltage ride through (LVRT) used to test the systems; and (3) represent a 204-MW wind plant two ways, treat the entire wind farm feeding a large power system network as a single generator and treat each wind turbine within the wind farm as an individual generator (136 generators) feeding the large power system network.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C plant application study report: shale oil recovery application  

SciTech Connect

The US has large shale oil energy resources, and many companies have undertaken considerable effort to develop economical means to extract this oil within environmental constraints. The recoverable shale oil reserves in the US amount to 160 x 10/sup 9/ m/sup 3/ (1000 x 10/sup 9/ bbl) and are second in quantity only to coal. This report summarizes a study to apply an 1170-MW(t) high-temperature gas-cooled reactor - process steam/cogeneration (HTGR-PS/C) to a shale oil recovery process. Since the highest potential shale oil reserves lie in th Piceance Basin of Western Colorado, the study centers on exploiting shale oil in this region.

Rao, R.; McMain, A.T. Jr.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

FAST OXIDE BREEDER-REACTOR. PART I. PARAMETRIC STUDY OF 300(e) MW REACTOR CORE  

SciTech Connect

Physics scoping studies of a 300-Mw(e) PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/-fueled fast- breeder reactor are reported. Physics design parameters that effect fuel costs, full conservation, and reactor safety were evaluated for use in the selection of parameters for a reference design. The total breeding ratio varied from 1.1 to 1.5 in the range of parameters corsidered. Plutonium core loading ranged from 500 to 1500 kg. Doubling time was found to be reduced by high-density fuel and low steel content. A compromise figure on fuel-rod range of sizes (about 100 mils) yields a 5 operating reactivity and a small, negative sodium temperature coefficient. (J.R.D.)

Greebler, P.; Aline, P.; Sueoka, J.

1959-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm{sup 2}. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year). DISCLAIMER

Scott Swartz; Lora Thrun; Gene Arkenberg; Kellie Chenault

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Design and performance of the LAMPF 1-1/4 MW klystron modulator  

SciTech Connect

From 11th modulator symposium; New York, New York, USA (18 Sep 1973). A design for a very reliable single-triode modulator for a 11/4 MW modulating-anode klystron is presented. The operating voltage is 86 kV and the variable pulse length ranges from 200 4mmsec to 1.2 msec. The basic modulator circuit, which uses a novel Zener diode bias circuit, and several of the individual components are described in detail. Over 140,000 high-voltage hours have been accumulated on these modulators. The principal failure mechanism is grid emission from the triode. These failures can be anticipated and repaired during a normal maintenance period. The triode is then reprocessed and reused. Tube life data and a summary of the failures modes are presented. (auth)

Tallerico, P.J.; Cady, R.L.; Doss, J.D.

1974-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Los Alamos 600 MJ, 1500 MW inertial energy storage and pulsed power unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 1430 MVA synchronous generator from a cancelled nuclear power plant has been installed and commissioned at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to be used as the pulsed power generator for physics experiments. The generator is mounted on a spring foundation to prevent dynamic forces from being transmitted to the substructure and into the ground. A 6 MW load-commutated inverter drive accelerates the machine from standstill to the maximum operating speed of 1800 rpm and from 1260 rpm to 1800 rpm between load pulses. The generator cooling method has been changed from hydrogen to air cooling to facilitate operation. A current limiting fuse, with a fuse clearing current of 90 kA, will protect the generator output against short circuit currents. An overview of the installation is presented. The paper also addresses the overload capability of the generator for pulsed loads. 7 figs., 1 tab.

Boenig, H.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Eye hazard and glint evaluation for the 5-MW/sub t/ Solar Thermal Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential eye hazards associated with concentrated reflected light are evaluated for the ERDA 5-MW/sub t/ Solar Thermal Test Facility to be constructed at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Light intensities and hazardous ranges of single and multiple coincident heliostat beams are evaluated at ground level and in the air space above the facility. Possible long-range and short-range effects of distractive effects of reflected beams are discussed. Also described are certain beam control modifications which were incorporated to minimize the altitudes at which overflying aircraft could encounter unsafe levels. Recommendations are made for further evaluation of intensity excursions during fail-safe shutdown situations, and for experiments to verify analytical models and to assess distractive glint effects.

Brumleve, T.D.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Total cost of 46-Mw Borax cogen system put at $30M  

SciTech Connect

The cogeneration system, designed around a W-251B gas turbine power plant exhausting into a Deltak waste heat boiler to produce ''free'' process steam from the gas turbine exhaust, is discussed. The design includes water injection for NO/sub x/ control, self-cleaning inlet air filters, evaporative coolers, supercharger, and supplementary firing of the waste heat boiler. Once the system is operational Borax will be able to generate all of the electricity needed for on-site operations and a large share of process steam needs--plus still have 22-23 Mw surplus electric power to sell, so that the installation should pay for itself in less than 5 years of service.

de Biasi, V.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A Pion Production and Capture System for a 4 MW Target Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of a pion production and capture system for a 4 MW target station for a neutrino factory or muon collider is presented. Using the MARS code, we simulate the pion production produced by the interaction of a free liquid mercury jet with an intense proton beam. We study the variation of meson production with the direction of the proton beam relative to the target. We also examine the influence on the meson production by the focusing of the proton beam. The energy deposition in the capture system is determined and the shielding required in order to avoid radiation damage is discussed. The exploration for the multiple proton beam entry directions relative to mercury jet in the 8GeV proton beam case demonstrates that an asymmetric layout is required in order to achieve the same beam/jet crossing angle at the jet axis. We find a correlation between the distance of beam relative to the jet and the meson production. The peak meson production is 8% higher than for the lowest case. The examination of the influence on the meson production by the focusing of the proton beam shows the meson production loss is negligible (<1%) for a beta function to be 0.3m or higher for the proton beam. By investigating the energy deposition in the target/capture system, we see that the bulk of 4-MW proton beam power is deposited in the water cooled tungsten-carbide (WC) shielding, the mercury jet and the capture beam pipe. In addition, high power deposition in the first superconducting coil causes an issue for its operation and life time. Enhanced shielding is necessary to lower the radiation damage.

Ding, X.; Kirk, H.; Berg, J.S.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

NREL Establishes a 1.5-MW Wind Turbine Test Platform for Research Partnerships (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) have worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and industry partners to advance wind energy technology, improve wind turbine performance, and reduce the cost of energy. Although there have been dramatic increases in performance and drops in the cost of wind energy-from $0.80 per kilowatt-hour to between $0.06 and $0.08 per kilowatt-hour-the goal of the DOE Wind Program is to further increase performance and reduce the cost of energy for land-based systems so that wind energy can compete with natural gas by 2020. In support of the program's research and development (R and D) efforts, NREL has constructed state-of-the-art facilities at the NWTC where industry partners, universities, and other DOE laboratories can conduct tests and experiments to further advance wind technology. The latest facility to come online is the DOE-GE 1.5-MW wind turbine test platform. Working with DOE, NREL purchased and installed a GE 1.5-MW wind turbine at the NWTC in 2009. Since then, NREL engineers have extensively instrumented the machine, conducted power performance and full-system modal tests, and collected structural loads measurements to obtain baseline characterization of the turbine's power curve, vibration characteristics, and fatigue loads in the uniquely challenging NWTC inflow environment. By successfully completing a baseline for the turbine's performance and structural response, NREL engineers have established a test platform that can be used by industry, university, and DOE laboratory researchers to test wind turbine control systems and components. The new test platform will also enable researchers to acquire the measurements needed to develop and validate wind turbine models and improve design codes.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

NREL Establishes a 1.5-MW Wind Turbine Test Platform for Research Partnerships (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) have worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and industry partners to advance wind energy technology, improve wind turbine performance, and reduce the cost of energy. Although there have been dramatic increases in performance and drops in the cost of wind energy-from $0.80 per kilowatt-hour to between $0.06 and $0.08 per kilowatt-hour-the goal of the DOE Wind Program is to further increase performance and reduce the cost of energy for land-based systems so that wind energy can compete with natural gas by 2020. In support of the program's research and development (R and D) efforts, NREL has constructed state-of-the-art facilities at the NWTC where industry partners, universities, and other DOE laboratories can conduct tests and experiments to further advance wind technology. The latest facility to come online is the DOE-GE 1.5-MW wind turbine test platform. Working with DOE, NREL purchased and installed a GE 1.5-MW wind turbine at the NWTC in 2009. Since then, NREL engineers have extensively instrumented the machine, conducted power performance and full-system modal tests, and collected structural loads measurements to obtain baseline characterization of the turbine's power curve, vibration characteristics, and fatigue loads in the uniquely challenging NWTC inflow environment. By successfully completing a baseline for the turbine's performance and structural response, NREL engineers have established a test platform that can be used by industry, university, and DOE laboratory researchers to test wind turbine control systems and components. The new test platform will also enable researchers to acquire the measurements needed to develop and validate wind turbine models and improve design codes.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Effect Analysis of Regulation Mode on Small Disturbance Stability in Hydropower Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the previous stability analysis under small disturbance of the hydropower stations, there are some different regulation modes to be used. In order to analyze the regulation performance accurately and the effect of different regulation modes on system ... Keywords: hydropower station, power regulation, frequency regulation, small disturbance, regulation performance

Zhou Jianxu; Hu Rong; Cao Qing

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Enhanced frequency up-conversion in Rb vapor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate highly efficient generation of coherent 420 nm light via up-conversion of near-infrared lasers in a hot rubidium vapor cell. By optimizing pump polarizations and frequencies we achieve a single-pass conversion efficiency of 260%/W, significantly higher than in previous experiments. A full 2D exploration of the coherent light generation and fluorescence as a function of the pump frequencies reveals that coherent blue light is generated at 85Rb two-photon resonances, as predicted by theory, but at high vapor pressure it is suppressed in spectral regions that don't support phase matching or exhibit single-photon Kerr refraction. Favorable scaling of our current 1 mW blue beam power with additional pump power is predicted. Infrared pump polarization could be used for future intensity switching experiments.

Vernier, A; Riis, E; Arnold, A S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CDRL Item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume IV. Receiver subsystem. [10-MW Pilot Plant and 100-MW Commercial Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conception, design, and testing of the receiver subsystem proposed by the McDonnell Douglas/Rocketdyne Receiver team for the DOE 10-MW Pilot Plant and the 100-MW Commercial Plant are described. The receiver subsystem consists of the receiver unit, the tower on which the receiver unit is mounted above the collector field, and the supporting control and instrumentation equipment. The plans for implementation of the Pilot Plant are given including the anticipated schedule and production plan (procurement, installation, checkout, and maintenance). Specifications for the performance, design, and test requirements for the Pilot Plant receiver subsystem are included. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C plant application-study report: alumina-plant application  

SciTech Connect

This report considers the HTGR-PS/C application to producing alumina from bauxite. For the size alumina plant considered, the 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C supplies 100% of the process steam and electrical power requirements and produces surplus electrical power and/or process steam, which can be used for other process users or electrical power production. Presently, the bauxite ore is reduced to alumina in plants geographically separated from the electrolysis plant. The electrolysis plants are located near economical electric power sources. However, with the integration of an 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C unit in a commercial alumina plant, the excess electric power available (approx. 233 MW(e)) could be used for alumina electrolysis.

Rao, R.; McMain, A.T. Jr.; Stanley, J.D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Graphene Frequency Multipliers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter, the ambipolar transport properties of graphene flakes have been used to fabricate full-wave signal rectifiers and frequency-doubling devices. By correctly biasing an ambipolar graphene field-effect transistor ...

Wang, Han

171

High frequency breakdown voltage  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information about the effect of frequency on the breakdown voltage of an air gap at standard pressure and temperature, 76 mm Hg and O{degrees}C, respectively. The frequencies of interest are 47 MHz and 60 MHz. Additionally, the breakdown in vacuum is briefly considered. The breakdown mechanism is explained on the basis of collision and ionization. The presence of the positive ions produced by ionization enhances the field in the gap, and thus determines the breakdown. When a low-frequency voltage is applied across the gap, the breakdown mechanism is the same as that caused by the DC or static voltage. However, when the frequency exceeds the first critical value f{sub c}, the positive ions are trapped in the gap, increasing the field considerably. This makes the breakdown occur earlier; in other words, the breakdown voltage is lowered. As the frequency increases two decades or more, the second critical frequency, f{sub ce}, is reached. This time the electrons start being trapped in the gap. Those electrons that travel multiple times across the gap before reaching the positive electrode result in an enormous number of electrons and positive ions being present in the gap. The result is a further decrease of the breakdown voltage. However, increasing the frequency does not decrease the breakdown voltage correspondingly. In fact, the associated breakdown field intensity is almost constant (about 29 kV/cm).The reason is that the recombination rate increases and counterbalances the production rate, thus reducing the effect of the positive ions` concentration in the gap. The theory of collision and ionization does not apply to the breakdown in vacuum. It seems that the breakdown in vacuum is primarily determined by the irregularities on the surfaces of the electrodes. Therefore, the effect of frequency on the breakdown, if any, is of secondary importance.

Chu, Thanh Duy

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Arizona (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Arizona. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Arizona to be $1.15 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 818 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Nevada (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Nevada. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Nevada to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.3 million tons, and annual water savings are 944 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Indiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Indiana. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Indiana to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.8 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,684 million gallons.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Utah (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Utah. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Utah to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 828 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Idaho (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Idaho. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Idaho to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.2 million tons, and annual water savings are 906 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Rationale for a spallation neutron source target system test facility at the 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal, and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium.

Sommer, W.F.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications  

SciTech Connect

CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Experiments of Sulfur Removal in 1MW Poly-Generation System with Partial Gasification and Combustion Combined  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study on sulfur release and adsorption during coal partial gasification and combustion is conducted in a 1MW circulating fluidized bed (CFB) poly-generation system. Limestone is added to gasifier as a sorbent of sulfur produced, where ... Keywords: partial gasification, poly-generation, recycled coal gas, limestone, desulfurization

Qin Hong; Wang Qing; Wang Qinhui; Luo Zhongyang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Performance Analysis of Existing 600MW Coal-Fired Power Plant with Ammonia-Based CO2 Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the techno-economic performance of 600 MW coal-fired power plant with and without ammonia-based CO2 capture process, based on the operating data of an existing power plant. The simulation and analysis, with fully consideration of ... Keywords: CO2 capture, aqueous ammonia, existing power plant, techno-economic performance

Gang Xu; Liqiang Duan; Mingde Zhao; Yongping Yang; Ji Li; Le Li; Haizhan Chen

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comparison of safety parameters and transient behavior of a generic 10 MW reactor with HEU and LEU fuels  

SciTech Connect

Key safety parameters are compared for equilibrium cores of the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor with HEU and LEU fuels. These parameters include kinetics parameters, reactivity feedback coefficients, control rod worths, power peaking factors, and shutdown margins. Reactivity insertion and loss-of-flow transients are compared. Results indicate that HEU and LEU cores will behave in a very similar manner.

Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.; Woodruff, W.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume I. Executive overview (approved). CDRL item 2. [10 MW; Barstow, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project goals, program schedules, and preliminary design for the 10 MW central receiver pilot plant at Barstow, California are presented. Details of the collector field, receiver/tower, thermal storage system, electrical power conversion subsystem, and control systems are given. (WHK)

None

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Sacramento Municipal Utility District, 100-MW photovoltaic power plant: draft environmental impact report  

SciTech Connect

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District proposes constructing a 100 MW solar photovoltaic electric generation facility adjacent to its Rancho Seco nuclear plant. After a brief description of the proposed facility, including the location and an explanation of the need for it, the project-specific environmental analysis is presented. This addresses: geology/seismicity, soils, biological resources, land use, air quality, water resources, water quality, wastes management, public/occupational health, safety, energy and material resources, cultural resources, socioeconomics, and aesthetics. For each of these areas, the setting is described, impacts analyzed, mitigation measures given where appropriate, and cumulative impacts described. Unavoidable adverse environmental effects, irreversible environmental changes and irretrievable commitments of energy and materials are summarized. Also briefly summarized is the relationship between local short-term use of the environment and the maintenance and enhancement of long-term productivity. Environmental benefits and disadvantages associated with various alternatives to building and operating the proposed solar photovoltaic power plant are described, considering project objectives other than producing electricity. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Transition from HEU to LEU fuel in Romania`s 14-MW TRIGA reactor  

SciTech Connect

The 14-MW TRIGA steady state reactor (SSR) located in Pitesti, Romania, first went critical in the fall of 1979. Initially, the core configuration for full power operation used 29 fuel clusters each containing a 5 {times} 5 square array of HEU (10 wt%) -- ZrH -- Er (2.8 wt%) fuel-moderator rods (1.295 cm o.d.) clad in Incology. With a total inventory of 35 HEU fuel clusters, burnup considerations required a gradual expansion of the core from 29 to 32 and finally to 35 clusters before the reactor was shut down because of insufficient excess reactivity. At this time each of the original 29 fuel clusters had an overage {sup 235}U burnup in the range from 50 to 62%. Because of the US policy regarding the export of highly enriched uranium, fresh HEU TRIGA replacement fuel is not available. After a number of safety-related measurements, the SSR is expected to resume full power operation in the near future using a mixed core containing five LEU TRIGA clusters of the same geometry as the original fuel but with fuel-moderator rods containing 45 wt% U (19.7% {sup 235}U enrichment) and 1.1 wt% Er. Rods for 14 additional LEU fuel clusters will be fabricated by General Atomics. In support of the SSR mixed core operation numerous neutronic calculations have been performed. This paper presents some of the results of those calculations.

Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

System Modeling of ORNL s 20 MW(t) Wood-fired Gasifying Boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an overview of the new 20 MW(t) wood-fired steam plant currently under construction by Johnson Controls, Inc. at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. The new plant will utilize a low-temperature air-blown gasifier system developed by the Nexterra Systems Corporation to generate low-heating value syngas (producer gas), which will then be burned in a staged combustion chamber to produce heat for the boiler. This is considered a showcase project for demonstrating the benefits of clean, bio-based energy, and thus there is considerable interest in monitoring and modeling the energy efficiency and environmental footprint of this technology relative to conventional steam generation with petroleum-based fuels. In preparation for system startup in 2012, we are developing steady-state and dynamic models of the major process components, including the gasifiers and combustor. These tools are intended to assist in tracking and optimizing system performance and for carrying out future conceptual studies of process changes that might improve the overall energy efficiency and sustainability. In this paper we describe the status of our steady-state gasifier and combustor models and illustrate preliminary results from limited parametric studies.

Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Wiggins, Gavin [ORNL; Hao, Ye [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Design and analysis of a 5-MW vertical-fluted-tube condenser for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and analysis of an industtial-sized vertical-fluted-tube condenser. The condenser is used to condense superheated isobutane vapor discharged from a power turbine in a geothermal test facility operated for the US Department of Energy. The 5-MW condenser has 1150 coolant tubes in a four-pass configuration with a total heat transfer area of 725 m/sup 2/ (7800 ft/sup 2/). The unit is being tested at the Geothermal Components Test Facility in the Imperial Valley of East Mesa, California. The condenser design is based on previous experimental research work done at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on condensing refrigerants on a wide variety of single vertical tubes. Condensing film coefficients obtained on the high-performance vertical fluted tubes in condensing refrigerants are as much as seven times greater than those obtained with vertical smooth tubes that have the same diameter and length. The overall heat transfer performance expected from the fluted tube condenser is four to five times the heat transfer obtained from the identical units employing smooth tubes. Fluted tube condensers also have other direct applications in the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program in condensing ammonia, in the petroleum industry in condensing light hydrocarbons, and in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry in condensing fluorocarbon vapors.

Llewellyn, G.H.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Why inverse document frequency?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inverse Document Frequency (IDF) is a popular measure of a word's importance. The IDF invariably appears in a host of heuristic measures used in information retrieval. However, so far the IDF has itself been a heuristic. In this paper, we show IDF to ...

Kishore Papineni

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90 MW COAL FIRED BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. WE Energies has over 3,700 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90 MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the WE Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, WE Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} (TOXECON) system designed to clean the combined flue gases of units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed down stream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e. mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a novel multi-pollutant control system to reduce emissions of mercury and other air pollutants, while minimizing waste, from a coal-fired power generation system.

Richard E. Johnson

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Government Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Interest in the use of so-called voluntary approaches to supplement or replace formal environmental regulation is on the rise, both in Europe and in the United States. These approaches fall into two general ...

Ashford, Nicholas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the LANL/IPPE/EDO-GP 1-MW LBE target  

SciTech Connect

The accelerator-driven transmutation of waste (ATW) concept has been proposed by the United States and other countries to transmute plutonium, higher actinides, and other environmentally hazardous fission products. One of the key components in the ATW concept is a target that, via spallation, produces neutrons to transmute nuclear waste. Since significant heat is generated during fissioning of the waste actinides, an efficient heat removal system is necessary. Liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is an efficient coolant as well as a good spallation target for production of neutrons. The LBE coolant technology has been successfully used in Russian submarine nuclear reactors. The International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) has funded the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) and the Experiment and Design Organization-Gidropress (EDO-GP) of Russia to design and manufacture a pilot target (Target Circuit One-TC1) that incorporates Russian LBE technology into the ATW concept. The target will be tested in the 800-MeV, 1-mA proton beam at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2 yr. These target experiments will provide valuable information on the performance of LBE as both spallation target and coolant. They will also help to design target/blanket systems for future ATW facilities. In summary, the authors have carried out thermal-hydraulic analyses for the LANL/IPPE/EDO-GP 1-MW LBE target. It is shown that the current design is suitable for the beam-on tests. The diffuser plate successfully enhances the coolant flow around the window center but still avoids generating recirculation zone downstream. The temperature range is within the proper operation range for both the LBE coolant and the structural materials.

He, X.; Ammerman, C.; Woloshun, K.; Li, N.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

CO2 laser frequency multiplication  

SciTech Connect

The duration of the mode-locked CO(2) laser pulses was measured to be 0.9 + or - nsec by the technique of (second harmonic) autocorrelation. Knowing the pulse duration, the spot size, and the harmonic conversion efficiency, a detailed fit of experiment to theory gave an estimate of the nonlinear coefficient of AgGaSe(2). d36 = 31 + or - V(1), in agreement with the most accurate literature values. A number of experiments were made with longer pulse trains in which the highest harmonic energy conversion reached 78%. The damage threshold was measured and it turned out to be related much more strongly to fluence than intensity. The shorter pulse trains had peak intensities of close to 300 MW 1/cm squared whereas the longer trains (3 usec) had intensities up to 40 MW 1/cm squared.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

High frequency reference electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo'' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

193

High frequency reference electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

High frequency reference electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Alternative Regulation (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Utility regulators, including the Public Service Board, have applied a new type of regulation, often called "alternative regulation" or "incentive regulation." There are many variants of this type...

196

Listening to Customers: How Deliberative Polling Helped Build 1,000 MW of New Renewable Energy Projects in Texas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 * NREL/TP-620-33177 3 * NREL/TP-620-33177 Listening to Customers: How Deliberative Polling Helped Build 1,000 MW of New Renewable Energy Projects in Texas R.L. Lehr Attorney W. Guild, Ph.D. The Guild Group, Inc. D.L. Thomas, Ph.D. Dennis Thomas and Associates B.G. Swezey National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 June 2003 * NREL/TP-620-33177 Listening to Customers: How Deliberative Polling Helped Build 1,000 MW of New Renewable Energy Projects in Texas R.L. Lehr Attorney W. Guild, Ph.D. The Guild Group, Inc. D.L. Thomas, Ph.D. Dennis Thomas and Associates

197

10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00312  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes.

Musial, W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00312  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes.

Musial, W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C plant application study report: Geismar, Louisiana refinery/chemical complex application  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a study to apply an 1170-MW(t) high-temperature gas-cooled reactor - process steam/cogeneration (HTGR-PS/C) to an industrial complex at Geismar, Louisiana. This study compares the HTGR with coal and oil as process plant fuels. This study uses a previous broad energy alternative study by the Stone and Webster Corporation on refinery and chemical plant needs in the Gulf States Utilities service area. The HTGR-PS/C was developed by General Atomic (GA) specifically for industries which require both steam and electric energy. The GA 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PC/C design is particularly well suited to industrial applications and is expected to have excellent cost benefits over other energy sources.

McMain, Jr., A. T.; Stanley, J. D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

An analysis of the proposed MITR-III core to establish thermal-hydraulic limits at 10 MW. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 5 MW Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II) is expected to operate under a new license beginning in 1999. Among the options being considered is an upgrade in the heat removal system to allow operation at 10 MW. The purpose of this study is to predict the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits for the upgraded reactor (MITR-III). The MITR Multi-Channel Analysis Code was written to analyze the response of the MITR system to a series of anticipated transients in order to determine the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits under various operating conditions. The MIT Multi-Channel Analysis Code models the primary and secondary systems, with special emphasis placed on analyzing the thermal-hydraulic conditions in the core. The code models each MITR fuel element explicitly in order to predict the behavior of the system during flow instabilities. The results of the code are compared to experimental data from MITR-II and other sources. New definitions are suggested for the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits. MITR Limit Diagrams are included for three different heat removal system configurations. It is concluded that safe, year-round operating at 10 MW is possible, given that the primary and secondary flow rates are both increased by approximately 40%.

Harling, O.K.; Lanning, D.D.; Bernard, J.A.; Meyer, J.E.; Henry, A.F.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and continuous adjustments (frequency regulation) of power pulses. Wind Ramping Percentage Percentage Solar Shading A 20 MW flywheel energy storage resource accurately...

202

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OE PMC-EDTD FY2011 Ron Staubly 212010 - 912013 Tyngsboro, MA Beacon Power 20MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant This CX would cover routine administrative, procurement,...

203

Animation of JILA Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animation of JILA Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique. The new JILA "frequency comb spectroscopy" technique ...

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

204

Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feed-through provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflections from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

Owens, Thomas L. (Kingston, TN)

1989-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

205

Frequency mixing crystal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a laser system for converting infrared laser light waves to visible light comprising a source of infrared laser light waves and means of harmonic generation associated therewith for production of light waves at integral multiples of the frequency of the original wave, the improvement of said means of harmonic generation comprising a crystal having the chemical formula X{sub 2} Y(NO{sub 3}){sub 5} {center_dot} 2 nZ{sub 2}O wherein X is selected from the group consisting of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and Tl; Y is selected from the group consisting of Sc, Y, La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Al, Ga, and In; Z is selected from the group consisting of H and D; and n ranges from 0 to 4.

Ebbers, C.A.; Davis, L.E.; Webb, M.

1990-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

206

Frequency mixing crystal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a laser system for converting infrared laser light waves to visible light comprising a source of infrared laser light waves and means of harmonic generation associated therewith for production of light waves at integral multiples of the frequency of the original wave, the improvement of said means of harmonic generation comprising a crystal having the chemical formula X{sub 2} Y(NO{sub 3}){sub 5} {center dot} 2 nZ{sub 2}O wherein X is selected from the group consisting of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and Tl; Y is selected from the group consisting of Sc, Y, La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Al, Ga, and In; Z is selected from the group consisting of H and D; and n ranges from 0 to 4.

Ebbers, C.A.; Davis, L.E.; Webb, M.

1990-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

207

Frequency mixing crystal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a laser system for converting infrared laser light waves to visible light comprising a source of infrared laser light waves and means of harmoic generation associated therewith for production of light waves at integral multiples of the frequency of the original wave, the improvement of said means of harmonic generation comprising a crystal having the chemical formula X.sub.2 Y(NO.sub.3).sub.5 .multidot.2 nZ.sub.2 o wherein X is selected from the group consisting of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and Tl; Y is selected from the group consisting of Sc, Y, La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Al, Ga, and In; Z is selected from the group consisting of H and D; and n ranges from 0 to 4.

Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Laura E. (Manteca, CA); Webb, Mark (Salida, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Regulation of Meiotic Recombination  

SciTech Connect

Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system for assaying recombination using tetrad analysis in a higher eukaryotic system (6). This system enabled the measurement of the frequency and distribution of recombination events at a genome wide level in wild type Arabidopsis (7), construction of genetic linkage maps which include positions for each centromere (8), and modeling of the strength and pattern of interference (9). This proposal extends the use of tetrad analysis in Arabidopsis by using it as the basis for assessing the phenotypes of mutants in genes important for recombination and the regulation of crossover interference and performing a novel genetic screen. In addition to broadening our knowledge of a classic genetic problem - the regulation of recombination by crossover interference - this proposal also provides broader impact by: generating pedagogical tools for use in hands-on classroom experience with genetics, building interdisciplinary collegial partnerships, and creating a platform for participation by junior scientists from underrepresented groups. There are three specific aims: (1) Isolate mutants in Arabidopsis MUS81 homologs using T-DNA and TILLING (2) Characterize recombination levels and interference in mus81 mutants (3) Execute a novel genetic screen, based on tetrad analysis, for genes that regulate meiotic recombination

Gregory p. Copenhaver

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

209

Design and testing of an internal mode converter for a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron with a depressed collector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report experimental results on a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz, 3 microsecond pulsed gyrotron with a single-stage depressed collector. A simplified mode converter with smooth mirror surfaces has been installed in the tube. The converter ...

Tax, David Samuel

210

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Tennessee (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Tennessee. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, seven states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Tennessee to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.4 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,321 million gallons.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Wisconsin (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Wisconsin. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Wisconsin to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.2 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,476 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in North Carolina (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in North Carolina. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, seven states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in North Carolina to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.9 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,558 million gallons.

Not Available

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in West Virginia (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in West Virginia. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in West Virginia to be $1.0 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.3 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,763 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Massachusetts. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, seven states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Massachusetts to be $1.4 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.6 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,293 million gallons.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in South Dakota (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in South Dakota. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in South Dakota to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 4.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,795 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Pennsylvania. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Pennsylvania to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.4 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,837 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Montana (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Montana. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Montana to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.9 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,207 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in New Mexico (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in New Mexico. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in New Mexico to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.6 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,117 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Maine (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Maine. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Maine to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.8 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,387 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Development of a 2-MW Direct-Drive Wind Turbine for Low Wind Speed Sites; Northern Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Northern Power Systems (NPS) to develop and evaluate a 2-MW wind turbine that could offer significant opportunities for reducing the cost of energy (COE).

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evaluation of battery converters based on 4. 8-MW fuel cell demonstrator inverter. Final report. [Contains brief glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrical power conditioning is a critical element in the development of advanced electrochemical energy storage systems. This program evaluates the use of existing self-commutated converter technology (as developed by the Power Systems Division of United Technologies for the 4.8-MW Fuel Cell Demonstrator) with modification for use in battery energy storage systems. The program consists of three parts: evaluation of the cost and performance of a self-commutated converter modified to maintain production commonality between battery and fuel cell power conditioners, demonstration of the principal characteristics required for the battery application in MW-scale hardware, and investigation of the technical requirements of operation isolated from the utility system. A power-conditioning system consisting of a self-commutated converter augmented with a phase-controlled rectifier was selected and a preliminary design, prepared. A principal factor in this selection was production commonality with the fuel cell inverter system. Additional types of augmentation, and the use of a self-commutated converter system without augmentation, were also considered. A survey of advanced battery manufacturers was used to establish the dc interface characteristics. The principal characteristics of self-commutated converter operation required for battery application were demonstrated with the aid of an available 0.5-MW development system. A survey of five REA and municipal utilities and three A and E firms was conducted to determine technical requirements for operation in a mode isolated from the utility. Definitive requirements for this application were not established because of the limited scope of this study. 63 figures, 37 tables.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Dynamometer Testing of Samsung 2.5MW Drivetrain: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-311  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SHI's prototype 2.5 MW wind turbine drivetrain was tested at the NWTC 2.5 MW dynamometer test facility over the course of 4 months between December 2009 and March 2010. This successful testing campaign allowed SHI to validate performance, safety, control tuning, and reliability in a controlled environment before moving to full-scale testing and subsequent introduction of a commercial product into the American market.

Wallen, R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Producing Persistent, High-Current, High-Duty-Factor H- Beams for Routine 1 MW Operation of SNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2009, SNS has been producing neutrons with ion beam powers near 1 MW, which requires the extraction of ~50 mA H- ions from the ion source with a ~5% duty factor. The 50 mA are achieved after an initial dose of ~3 mg of Cs and heating the Cs collar to ~170 C. The 50 mA normally persist for the entire 4-week source service cycles. Fundamental processes are reviewed to elucidate the persistence of the SNS H- beams without a steady feed of Cs and why the Cs collar temperature may have to be kept near 170 C.

Stockli, Martin P [ORNL; Han, Baoxi [ORNL; Hardek, Thomas W [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Murray Jr, S N [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Piller, Chip [ORNL; Santana, Manuel [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

South Dakota State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Identification Home Federal and State Regulations State Regulations South Dakota State Regulations: South Dakota State of South Dakota The South Dakota...

225

Optical frequency combs: From frequency metrology to optical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and to dis- tribute the load of the ... measurements of frequency ratios (ie, energy ratios), and ... accuracy or stability versus power consumption, cost, or ...

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

226

Stressing of turbine-generator-exciter shafts by variable-frequency currents superimposed on DC currents in asynchronous HVDC links and following disturbances at converter stations  

SciTech Connect

Ripple currents on the DC side of both HVDC synchronous and asynchronous. Links together with cleared HVDC and AC system disturbances can excite in some circumstances onerous torsional vibrations in large steam generator shafts. The problem has assumed importance in recent months on account of the HVDC Link between Scotland and Northern Ireland going ahead, on account of the proposed Eire/Wales Link, and because AC/DC/AC couplers are to be installed extensively to interconnect the East and West European Grid Systems. This paper discusses and analyses excitation of shaft torsional vibrations in steam turbine-generator-exciter shafts in close proximity to HVDC converter stations by (1) variable-frequency ripple currents superimposed on the DC currents in asynchronous Links, and (2) disturbances at bi-polar converter stations. The time response and tables show that for the systems studied variable-frequency ripple currents superimposed on the DC current in asynchronous Links can excite shaft torsional vibrations, the very small noncharacteristic currents could result in onerous shaft torques which might damage the machine, and that DC line faults at converter stations in close proximity of steam turbine-generator units can excite onerous turbine-generator shaft torsional response. Detailed simulation of the HVDC converter and generator is necessary for precise assessments of shaft torsional response following HVDC converter station faults. 500MW, 660MW, 1000MW and 1300MW machines are considered in the analyses that are made.

Hammons, T.J.; Bremner, J.J. (Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

228

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

229

Effective switching frequency multiplier inverter  

SciTech Connect

A switching frequency multiplier inverter for low inductance machines that uses parallel connection of switches and each switch is independently controlled according to a pulse width modulation scheme. The effective switching frequency is multiplied by the number of switches connected in parallel while each individual switch operates within its limit of switching frequency. This technique can also be used for other power converters such as DC/DC, AC/DC converters.

Su, Gui-Jia (Oak Ridge, TN); Peng, Fang Z. (Okemos, MI)

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

RELAP5-3D Results for Phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark  

SciTech Connect

The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2.

Gerhard Strydom

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Solar Thermal Small Power Systems Study. Inventory of US industrial small electric power generating systems. [Less than 10 MW  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This inventory of small industrial electric generating systems was assembled by The Aerospace Corporation to provide a data base for analyses being conducted to estimate the potential for displacement of these fossil-fueled systems by solar thermal electric systems no larger than 10 MW in rated capacity. The approximately 2100 megawatts generating capacity of systems in this category constitutes a potential market for small solar thermal and other solar electric power systems. The sources of data for this inventory were the (former) Federal Power Commission (FPC) Form 4 Industrial Ledger and Form 12-C Ledger for 1976. Table 1 alphabetically lists generating systems located at industrial plants and at Federal government installations in each of the 50 states. These systems are differentiated by type of power plant: steam turbine, diesel generator, or gas turbine. Each listing is designated as a power system rather than a power unit because the FPC Ledgers do not provide a means of determining whether more than one unit is associated with each industrial installation. Hence, the user should consider each listing to be a system capacity rating wherein the system may consist of one or more generating units with less than 10 MW/sub e/ combined rating. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Results and lessons learned from conditioning 1 MW CW 350 MHz coaxial vacuum windows  

SciTech Connect

The reliability of the radio frequency (RF) windows on the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) is critical to the success of the Accelerator Production of Tritium Program (APT). On the APT accelerator there will be over 1,000 windows, each passing on the order of 250 kW of CW RF power. This power level is well above power levels historically used in RF windows. Based on the high-power RF test results of the RF window prototypes from vendors, the coaxial windows made by EEV Ltd. of Chelmsford, England, were selected for LEDA. This paper describes the high-power RF testing of the 16 EEV coaxial windows. The RF window diagnostic equipment, data acquisition system and test stand are described. The results of the high power RF testing of the windows are presented. The successes and failures in the conditioning, manufacturing and testing techniques of the windows are presented. The conditioning timeline, power profile and the conditioning waveform are also discussed.

Cummings, K.; Cordova, R.; Rees, D.; Roybal, W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Risbud, S. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Wilcox, D. [EEV, Ltd., Chelmsford (United Kingdom)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Radio Frequency Engineering, MDE, Accelerator Operations and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Teams Low-Level Radio Frequency Magnet Power Supplies, Pulsed Power Radio Frequency, High Voltage Technologies Radio Frequency Operations CONTACTS Group Leader Dan Rees Deputy...

234

Frequency Control Performance Measurement and Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power systems operations could significantly influence primary frequency control.power system operations could not significantly influence primary frequency control.power system operations. Determination of frequency control

Illian, Howard F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Infrastructure Failure - Types and Frequency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Infrastructure Failure - Types and Frequency. Small events that have no impact on supplies Events that require supply/demand responses Events that result in a ...

236

Time and Frequency Division Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Controlled ClocksTelephone TimeDivision HistoryFrequently Asked Questions (FAQ)Time and Frequency from A to Z: An illustrated glossaryA Walk ...

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

237

Dynamic frequency allocation in fractional frequency reused OFDMA networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a dynamic fractional frequency reused cell architecture that simplifies the problem of subcarrier allocation with frequency reuse in multicell OFDMA networks. The architecture divides the cell surface into two overlapping geographical ... Keywords: 3G, cellular networks, cross-layer adaptation, data networks, mobile communication systems, opportunistic scheduling, wireless communication

Syed Hussain Ali; Victor C. M. Leung

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Context: Policy & Regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Regulation of Halon and Halon Substitutes. ... Disparities in Environmental Regulations and Their Effect ... Impediments and Incentives for Incorporating ...

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

239

Discrete pulse modulation strategies for high-frequency inverter systems  

SciTech Connect

High-performance high-frequency inverter systems for UPS applications represent a demanding application that cannot be easily realized using conventional hard-switched PWM inverter topologies. Adoption of typical soft-switched inverters such as the resonant dc link inverter require the use of discrete pulse modulation strategies. New controller structures are necessary to cope with stringent voltage regulation and distortion constraints in the presence of unbalanced and nonlinear loads. This paper presents a controller that utilizes load current feed-forward strategy with a cost function current regulator to achieve excellent transient performance characteristics. Voltage regulation is ensured using a synchronous frame regulator. Detailed simulation and experimental results verifying the concepts are presented. Although this paper focuses on soft-switching inverters, the control concepts can be applied to conventional hard-switching inverters as well.

Venkataramanan, G. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Divan, D.M. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Jahns, T.M. (General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

An Evaluation of the Water Heater Load Potential for Providing Regulation Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the possibility of providing aggregated regulation services with small loads, such as water heaters or air conditioners. A direct-load control algorithm is presented to aggregate the water heater load for the purpose of regulation. A dual-element electric water heater model is developed, which accounts for both thermal dynamics and users water consumptions. A realistic regulation signal was used to evaluate the number of water heaters needed and the operational characteristics of a water heater when providing 2-MW regulation service. Modeling results suggest that approximately 33,333 water heaters are needed to provide a 2-MW regulation service 24 hours a day. However, if water heaters only provide regulation from 6:00 to 24:00, approximately 20,000 will be needed. Because the control algorithm has considered the thermal setting of the water heater, the customer comfort is obstructed little. Therefore, the aggregated regulation service provided by water heater loads can become a major source of revenue for load-service entities when the smart grid enables the direct load control.

Kondoh, Junji; Lu, Ning; Hammerstrom, Donald J.

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Frequency Conversion of Entangled State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantum characteristics of sum-frequency process in an optical cavity with an input signal optical beam, which is a half of entangled optical beams, are analyzed. The calculated results show that the quantum properties of the signal beam can be maintained after its frequency is conversed during the intracavity nonlinear optical interaction. The frequency-conversed output signal beam is still in an entangled state with the retained other half of initial entangled beams. The resultant quantum correlation spectra and the parametric dependences of the correlations on the initial squeezing factor, the optical losses and the pump power of the sum-frequency cavity are calculated. The proposed system for the frequency conversion of entangled state can be used in quantum communication network and the calculated results can provide direct references for the design of experimental systems.

Aihong Tan; Xiaojun Jia; Changde Xie

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Frequency-Bias Tie-Line Control of Hydroelectric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work I have tried to apply effective dedicated online control systems to two equal power systems connected by a long distance tie-line. When large interconnected systems are linked electrically to others by means of tie-lines, the power transfers between them are usually decided by mutual agreement and the power is controlled by regulators. Other side it is a desired feature to achieve a better frequency constancy, which has been obtained by a controller, which is being activated by frequency-bias constant. A power frequency characteristic also has been maintained approximately straight line by governor speed regulation parameter in case any perturbation in frequency is caused by load change in any one of the area.To maintain the real power flow and single frequency in tie-line power system, the governor has been manipulated by Automatic Generation Control (AGC) action. For this works various, integral (I) proportional plus integral (PI) and proportional plus integral plus derivative (PID) controllers have been tried.

Generating Stations For

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

General Interest NIST Time and Frequency Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Time and Frequency Users Manual A detailed ... Fundamentals of Time and Frequency An overview of ... Lombardi, The Mechatronics Handbook, 2001. ...

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

High Frequency Power Modulation - TRIMET Smelters Provide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, High Frequency Power Modulation - TRIMET Smelters Provide Primary Control Power for Stabilizing the Frequency in the Electricity Grid.

246

CHARACTERISTICS OF DIAMOND WINDOWS ON THE 1 MW, 110 GHz GYROTRON SYSTEMS ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK  

SciTech Connect

Diamond disks made using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique are now in common use as gyrotron output windows. The low millimeter wave losses and excellent thermal conductivity of diamond have made it possible to use such windows in gyrotrons with {approx}1 MW output power and pulse length up to and greater than 10 s. A ubiquitous characteristic of diamond gyrotron windows is the presence of apparent hot spots in the infrared images registered during rf pulses. Many of these spots are co-located with bright points seen in visible video images. The spots do not seem to compromise the integrity of the windows. Analysis of the infrared observations on several different gyrotrons operating at the DIII-D tokamak are reported.

Y.A. GORELOV; J. LOHR; R.W. CALLIS; D. PONCE

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Design of An 18 MW Beam Dump for 500 GeV Electron/Positron Beams at An ILC  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a report on the progress made in designing 18 MW water based Beam Dumps for electrons or positrons for an International Linear Collider (ILC). Multi-dimensional technology issues have to be addressed for the successful design of the Beam Dump. They include calculations of power deposition by the high energy electron/positron beam bunch trains, computational fluid dynamic analysis of turbulent water flow, mechanical design, process flow analysis, hydrogen/oxygen recombiners, handling of radioactive 7Be and 3H, design of auxiliary equipment, provisions for accident scenarios, remote window exchanger, radiation shielding, etc. The progress made to date is summarized, the current status, and also the issues still to be addressed.

Amann, John; /SLAC; Arnold, Ray; /SLAC; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC; Walz, Dieter; /SLAC; Kulkarni, Kiran; /Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Rai, Pravin; /Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Satyamurthy, Polepalle; /Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Tiwari, Vikar; /Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Vincke, Heinz; /CERN

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

248

Design of an 18 MW Beam Dump for 500 GeV Electron/Positron Beams at an ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a report on the progress made in designing 18 MW water based Beam Dumps for electrons or positrons for an International Linear Collider (ILC). Multi-dimensional technology issues have to be addressed for the successful design of the Beam Dump. They include calculations of power deposition by the high energy electron/positron beam bunch trains, computational fluid dynamic analysis of turbulent water flow, mechanical design, process flow analysis, hydrogen/oxygen recombiners, handling of radioactive 7Be and 3H, design of auxiliary equipment, provisions for accident scenarios, remote window exchanger, radiation shielding, etc. The progress made to date is summarized, the current status, and also the issues still to be addressed

Amann, John; Seryi, Andrei; Walz, Dieter; Kulkarni, Kiran; Rai, Pravin; Satyamurthy, Polepalle; Tiwari, Vikar; Vincke, Heinz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Rotational Augmentation on a 2.3 MW Rotor Blade with Thick Flatback Airfoil Cross-Sections: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rotational augmentation was analyzed for a 2.3 MW wind turbine, which was equipped with thick flatback airfoils at inboard radial locations and extensively instrumented for acquisition of time varying surface pressures. Mean aerodynamic force and surface pressure data were extracted from an extensive field test database, subject to stringent criteria for wind inflow and turbine operating conditions. Analyses of these data showed pronounced amplification of aerodynamic forces and significant enhancements to surface pressures in response to rotational influences, relative to two-dimensional, stationary conditions. Rotational augmentation occurrence and intensity in the current effort was found to be consistent with that observed in previous research. Notably, elevated airfoil thickness and flatback design did not impede rotational augmentation.

Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Siegel, K.; Singh, M.; Medina, P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Reference design of 100 MW-h lithium/iron sulfide battery system for utility load leveling  

SciTech Connect

The first year in a two-year cooperative effort between Argonne National Laboratory and Rockwell International to develop a conceptual design of a lithium alloy/iron sulfide battery for utility load leveling is presented. A conceptual design was developed for a 100 MW-h battery system based upon a parallel-series arrangement of 2.5 kW-h capacity cells. The sales price of such a battery system was estimated to be very high, $80.25/kW-h, exclusive of the cost of the individual cells, the dc-to-ac converters, site preparation, or land acquisition costs. Consequently, the second year's efforts were directed towards developing modified designs with significantly lower potential costs.

Zivi, S.M.; Kacinskas, H.; Pollack, I.; Chilenskas, A.A.; Barney, D.L.; Grieve, W.; McFarland, B.L.; Sudar, S.; Goldstein, E.; Adler, E.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

"Neutrino-4" experiment: preparations for search for sterile neutrino at 100 MW reactor SM-3 at 6-13 meters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been designed an experimental project "Neutrino-4" for 100 MW reactor SM-3 to test the hypothesis of the "reactor antineutrino anomaly". Advantages of the reactor SM-3 for such an experiment are low background conditions as well as small dimensions of a reactor core - 35x42x42 cm3. One has carried on the Monte-Carlo modeling of a position sensitive antineutrino detector consisting of 5 operation sections, which as a result of displacement, covers the distance from 6 to 13 meters from the reactor core. One has succeeded in obtaining an experimental area of sensitivity to oscillation parameters, which enables to verify the hypothesis of reactor antineutrino oscillations into a sterile state.

A. P. Serebrov; A. K. Fomin; V. G. Zinoviev; Yu. E. Loginov; M. S. Onegin; A. M. Gagarsky; G. A. Petrov; V. A. Solovey; A. V. Chernyi; O. M. Zherebtsov; V. P. Martemyanov; V. G. Zinoev; V. G. Tarasenkov; V. I. Alyoshin; A. L. Petelin; S. V. Pavlov; M. N. Svyatkin; A. L. Izhutov; S. A. Sazontov; D. K. Ryazanov; M. O. Gromov; N. S. Khramkov; V. I. Ryikalin

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

252

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery 3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery March 4, 2011 - 5:03pm Addthis An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, Bonneville Power Administration dispatchers in the Dittmer Control Center celebrated a milestone - for the first time, wind

253

Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

AUTO ID FUTURE - FREQUENCY AGNOSTIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification of information is one key to the development of intelligent decision systems of the future. Frequency agnostic automatic identification is only one step in the physical world to make physical objects identify ...

DATTA, SHOUMEN

255

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Kansas (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Kansas. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Kansas to be $1.08 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.2 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,816 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Michigan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Michigan. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Michigan to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.9 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,542 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Virginia (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Virginia. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Virginia to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,600 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Nebraska (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Nebraska. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Nebraska to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 4.1 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,840 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Arkansas (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Arkansas. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Arkansas to be $1.15 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.7 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,507 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Ohio (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Ohio. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Ohio to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.5 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,343 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reduction, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Georgia (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Georgia. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Georgia to be $2.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,628 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Maryland (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Michigan. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Maryland to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,581 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in New York (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in New York. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in New York to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.5 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,230 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Design and implementation of frequency synthesizers for 3-10 ghz mulitband ofdm uwb communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The allocation of frequency spectrum by the FCC for Ultra Wideband (UWB) communications in the 3.1-10.6 GHz has paved the path for very high data rate Gb/s wireless communications. Frequency synthesis in these communication systems involves great challenges such as high frequency and wideband operation in addition to stringent requirements on frequency hopping time and coexistence with other wireless standards. This research proposes frequency generation schemes for such radio systems and their integrated implementations in silicon based technologies. Special emphasis is placed on efficient frequency planning and other system level considerations for building compact and practical systems for carrier frequency generation in an integrated UWB radio. This work proposes a frequency band plan for multiband OFDM based UWB radios in the 3.1-10.6 GHz range. Based on this frequency plan, two 11-band frequency synthesizers are designed, implemented and tested making them one of the first frequency synthesizers for UWB covering 78% of the licensed spectrum. The circuits are implemented in 0.25m SiGe BiCMOS and the architectures are based on a single VCO at a fixed frequency followed by an array of dividers, multiplexers and single sideband (SSB) mixers to generate the 11 required bands in quadrature with fast hopping in much less than 9.5 ns. One of the synthesizers is integrated and tested as part of a 3-10 GHz packaged receiver. It draws 80 mA current from a 2.5 V supply and occupies an area of 2.25 mm2. Finally, an architecture for a UWB synthesizer is proposed that is based on a single multiband quadrature VCO, a programmable integer divider with 50% duty cycle and a single sideband mixer. A frequency band plan is proposed that greatly relaxes the tuning range requirement of the multiband VCO and leads to a very digitally intensive architecture for wideband frequency synthesis suitable for implementation in deep submicron CMOS processes. A design in 130nm CMOS occupies less than 1 mm2 while consuming 90 mW. This architecture provides an efficient solution in terms of area and power consumption with very low complexity.

Mishra, Chinmaya

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Design of compact frequency synthesizer for self-calibration in RF circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A compact frequency synthesizer based on a phase locked loop (PLL) is designed for the self-calibration in RF circuits. The main advantage of the presented frequency synthesizer is that it can be built in a small silicon area using MOSFET interface trap charge pump (ITCP) current generators. The ITCP current generator makes it possible to use small currents at nano-ampere levels so that small capacitances can be used in the loop filter. A large resistance, which is required to compensate for the reduced capacitances, is implemented using an operational transconductance amplifier (OTA). An ITCP current generator is used as a tail current source for the OTA in order to realize a small transconductance. The presented frequency synthesizer has the output frequency range from 570 MHz to 600 MHz with a 100 KHz frequency step. Total silicon area is about 0.3 mm2 using AMIS 0.5 ??m CMOS technology, and the power consumption is 26.7 mW with 3 V single power supply.

Park, Sanghoon

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Alaska State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alaska State Regulations: Alaska State of Alaska The Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (AOGCC) regulates the drilling for and production of oil and gas resources, the...

267

Arizona State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arizona State Regulations: Arizona State of Arizona The Arizona Geological Survey (AZGS) Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (OGCC) regulates the drilling for and production of...

268

Mississippi State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississippi State Regulations: Mississippi State of Mississippi The Mississippi State Oil and Gas Board (MSOGB), an independent agency, promulgates and enforces rules to regulate...

269

Frequency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... noise terms are the result of environmental changes affecting ... respond to changes in environment, so this ... is probably of broadest concern, but some ...

2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

270

History of First U.S. Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Plant (110-MW-26 h): Volume 1: Early CAES Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1991, Alabama Electric Cooperative's 110-MW-26 h compressed air energy storage (CAES) plant, the first in the United States, became commercially operational. This report, first in a series, documents the history of the plant from project conception to the beginning of plant construction.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The simulation with the finite element method of the velocity and temperature fields for a nonturbionar jet burner of 35MW feeding with pulverized coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the analysis of coal particle combustion in nonturbionar jet burner of 35MW used the Finite Element Method made with aid of the FLUENT programme. The pulverized coal combustion simulation involves modeling a continuous gas phase flow ... Keywords: FLUENT, coal-air mixture, combustion, finite element method, injection coal, nonturbionar jet

Mihai D. L. Talu; Stefan D. L. Talu; Mihai Negru

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Simulation System on the Thermal Stress and Fatigue Life Loss of Startup and Shutdown for a Domestic 600MW Steam Turbo Generator Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Simulation System on the thermal stresses and fatigue life loss of the rotator during startup and shutdown for a domestic 600MW steam turbo generator unit, By means of the analysis of Simulation System on the thermal stress and life loss of the rotor, ... Keywords: steam turbine unit, thermal stress, Fatigue Life Loss, rotator, startup, shutdown

Yunchun Xia

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Wake Turbulence of Two NREL 5-MW Wind Turbines Immersed in a Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fluid dynamics video considers an array of two NREL 5-MW turbines separated by seven rotor diameters in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The neutral atmospheric boundary-layer flow data were obtained from a precursor ABL simulation using a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) framework within OpenFOAM. The mean wind speed at hub height is 8m/s, and the surface roughness is 0.2m. The actuator line method (ALM) is used to model the wind turbine blades by means of body forces added to the momentum equation. The fluid dynamics video shows the root and tip vortices emanating from the blades from various viewpoints. The vortices become unstable and break down into large-scale turbulent structures. As the wakes of the wind turbines advect further downstream, smaller-scale turbulence is generated. It is apparent that vortices generated by the blades of the downstream wind turbine break down faster due to increased turbulence levels generated by the wake of the upstream wind turbine.

Bashioum, Jessica L; Schmitz, Sven; Duque, Earl P N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Annual progress report on the development of a 2 MW/10 second battery energy storage system for power disturbance protection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), acting for the US Department of Energy (DOE), contracts for and administers programs for the purpose of promoting the development and commercialization of large scale, transportable battery energy storage systems. Under DOE Co-Op Agreement No. DE-FC04-94AL99852, SNL has contracted for the development and delivery of an initial prototype 250 kW bridge that becomes an integral subsystem of a 2 MW/10 Second System that can be used by utility customers to protect power sensitive equipment from power disturbances. Development work includes field installation and testing of the prototype unit at a participating utility site for extended product testing with subsequent relocation to an industrial or commercial participating utility customer site for additional evaluation. The program described by the referenced document calls for cost sharing with the successful bidder and eventual title transfer to the participating utility. Prototype delivery is scheduled for January of 1996, with a period of two years allowed for field testing. A final report summarizing the test data with conclusions and recommendations is part of the contract.

NONE

1996-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

275

Final report on the power production phase of the 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluations of the power production testing of Solar One, the 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant near Barstow, California. The Pilot Plant, a cooperative project of the US Department of Energy and utility firms led by the Southern California Edison Company, began a three year period of power production operation in August 1984. During this period, plant performance indicators, such as capacity factor, system efficiency, and availability, were studied to assess the operational capability of the Pilot Plant to reliably supply electrical power. Also studied was the long-term performance of such key plant components as the heliostats and the receiver. During the three years of power production, the Pilot Plant showed an improvement in performance. Considerable increases in capacity factor, system efficiency, and availability were achieved. Heliostat operation was reliable, and only small amounts of mirror corrosion were observed. Receiver tube leaks did occur, however, and were the main cause of the plant's unscheduled outages. The Pilot Plant provided valuable lessons which will aid in the design of future solar central receiver plants. 53 refs., 46 figs., 4 tabs.

Radosevich, L.G.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Power and Energy Measurements Low Frequency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Power and Energy Measurements, Low-Frequency. Rate our Services. ... Power and Energy Measurements, Low-Frequency (56200C-56202C). ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

277

Regulating the information gatekeepers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about biased manipulation of search results may require intervention involving government regulation.

Patrick Vogl; Michael Barrett

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Demo.mw - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... Check U A V = S zip( R[`-`], S, MatrixMatrixMultiply[R](MatrixMatrixMultiply[R](U ,A),V) ); LUklbXJvd+RkAvRkNRIUYnL Now, we consider F as a field. We need...

279

GTdemo (.mw) - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Algorithm: Backtracking (Branch & Bound) MaximumIndependentSet(G); NygiIiMiIiQiIiYiIiciIigiIzc= MaximumClique(G); NyUiIiMiIikiIio= ChromaticNumber( G...

280

Frequency Dependence in Forecast Skill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed to calculate measures of forecast skill for high, medium and low temporal frequency variations in the atmosphere. This method is applied to a series of 128 consecutive 1 to 10-day forecasts produced at NMC with their ...

H. M. van Den Dool; Suranjana Saha

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Frequency agile optical parametric oscillator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The frequency agile OPO device converts a fixed wavelength pump laser beam to arbitrary wavelengths within a specified range with pulse to pulse agility, at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the pump laser. Uses of this invention include Laser radar, LIDAR, active remote sensing of effluents/pollutants, environmental monitoring, antisensor lasers, and spectroscopy.

Velsko, Stephan P. (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Frequency agile optical parametric oscillator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The frequency agile OPO device converts a fixed wavelength pump laser beam to arbitrary wavelengths within a specified range with pulse to pulse agility, at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the pump laser. Uses of this invention include Laser radar, LIDAR, active remote sensing of effluents/pollutants, environmental monitoring, antisensor lasers, and spectroscopy. 14 figs.

Velsko, S.P.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

283

Avoiding low frequency noise in packaged HVAC equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to help those involved in the design and commissioning of packaged HVAC systems to understand the root causes of low frequency noise problems and how to avoid many of them at the design stage. In the 1980's, two things happened to dramatically change the types of noise problems encountered in typical new construction. The first was the introduction of new energy regulations that favored variable air volume (VAV) distribution systems over constant volume air distribution systems. A by-product of VAV design is that mid- and high frequency sound pressure levels produced by current air terminal devices and diffusers in many applications are significantly lower than in the past. The second factor was a trend away from the use of built-up central station fan equipment in favor of packaged, floor-by-floor air handlers or rooftop units. As a result, today's HVAC system noise problems are not confined to just the roar and hiss of the past, but now include intense low frequency rumble and time modulation. Indeed, most current noise problems in modern buildings occur in the frequency range well below 250 Hz. A large fraction of these are a result of the dominant sound pressure levels in the 12 to 40 Hz region. These factors, combined with a substantial increase in the level of low frequency sound from the rest of the system, can produce a non-neutral, time modulated, rumbly sounding background noise that many people find objectionable.

Ebbing, C.E. (Carrier Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States). Commercial Unitary Division); Blazier, W.E.Jr. (Warren Blazier Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

2012 CERTS LAAR Program Peer Review - Frequency Responsive Load Evaluation and Benefits - Isabelle Snyder, ORNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frequency responsive loads Isabelle Snyder, Ph.D. Power and Energy Systems Group ORNL 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentation_name Project objective * Study the use of load for frequency regulation: - Identify frequency measurement accuracies based on different approaches - Identify accuracy requirement for frequency responsive load applications - Study the impact of frequency responsive loads on a large system (ERCOT or EI) 3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentation_name Major technical accomplishments: overview * Identified requirements of measurement devices to satisfy accuracy requirements for frequency measurement * Initiated request for ERCOT and EI models: - ERCOT (market participant's concern about releasing ERCOT

285

Regulating with Carrots, Regulating with Sticks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of necessary brevity. To vehicle manufacturers, inconsistent1997: 461). Motor vehicle manufacturers successfully arguedonly on engine and vehicle manufacturers. 3. Regulating

Thornton, Dorothy; Kagan, Robert; Gunningham, Neil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL-ON THREE 90 MW COAL FIRED BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90 MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} (TOXECON) system designed to clean the combined flue gases of units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed down stream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e. mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a novel multi-pollutant control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste, from a coal-fired power generation system.

Richard E. Johnson

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

287

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90-MW COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particulate control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} system designed to clean the combined flue gases of Units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON{trademark} is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed downstream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium-based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e., mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste from a coal-fired power generation system.

Richard E. Johnson

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

288

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90-MW COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particulate control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} system designed to clean the combined flue gases of Units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON{trademark} is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed downstream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium-based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e., mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste from a coal-fired power generation system.

Steven T. Derenne

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

Radio Frequency Identification Tags - Active Tags ...  

Selectable, license free, RF frequency bands; Ultra low power sleep mode; Miniaturized, encapsulated bendable packaging;

290

Final report on the development of a 2 MW/10 second battery energy storage system for power disturbance protection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Voltage sags, swells and momentary power interruptions lasting a few cycles to several seconds are common disturbances on utility power distribution systems. These disturbances are a result of normal utility recloser switching activity due in part to distribution system short circuits from natural causes such as lightning, rodents, traffic accidents, and current overloads. Power disturbances pose serious problems for many customers with critical, voltage sensitive equipment. Faults can interrupt a manufacturing process, cause PLC`s to initialize their programmed logic and restart equipment out of sequence, create computer data errors, interrupt communications, lockup PC keyboards and cause equipment to malfunction. These momentary disturbances result in billions of dollars of lost productivity annually due to downtime, cleanup, lost production and the loss of customer confidence in the business. This report describes prototype development work for a factory assembled 2 MW/10 Second Battery Energy Storage System. The system design includes (1) a modular battery energy storage system comprised of several strings of batteries-each string provided with an integral Power Conversion System (PCS), (2) an Electronic Selector Device (ESD) comprised of a solid state static switch with sensing and power switching controls, and utility interconnection termination bus bars, and (3) a separate isolation transformer to step-up PCS output voltage to interface directly with the distribution transformer serving the industrial or commercial customer. The system monitors the utility distribution system voltage for voltage sags, swells, and interruptions, switches the customer`s critical loads from utility power to the energy stored in the systems batteries and provides up to 2 MVA until the disturbance clears or up to 10 seconds. Once the ESD sensing circuits have confirmed that the utility is again stable, it seamlessly returns the critical load to the utility. 22 figs., 1 tab.

NONE

1996-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

291

Crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004: Representatives of a novel protein family that adopt a four-helical bundle fold  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To extend the structural coverage of proteins with unknown functions, we targeted a novel protein family (Pfam accession number PF08807, DUF1798) for which we proposed and determined the structures of two representative members. The MW1337R gene of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Rosenbach (Wood 46) encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 13.8 kDa (residues 1-116) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.15. The lin2004 gene of the nonspore-forming bacterium Listeria innocua Clip11262 encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 14.6 kDa (residues 1-121) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.45. MW1337R and lin2004, as well as their homologs, which, so far, have been found only in Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Listeria, and related genera (Geobacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Oceanobacillus), have unknown functions and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. The genomic contexts of MW1337R and lin2004 are similar and conserved in related species. In prokaryotic genomes, most often, functionally interacting proteins are coded by genes, which are colocated in conserved operons. Proteins from the same operon as MW1337R and lin2004 either have unknown functions (i.e., belong to DUF1273, Pfam accession number PF06908) or are similar to ypsB from Bacillus subtilis. The function of ypsB is unclear, although it has a strong similarity to the N-terminal region of DivIVA, which was characterized as a bifunctional protein with distinct roles during vegetative growth and sporulation. In addition, members of the DUF1273 family display distant sequence similarity with the DprA/Smf protein, which acts downstream of the DNA uptake machinery, possibly in conjunction with RecA. The RecA activities in Bacillus subtilis are modulated by RecU Holliday-junction resolvase. In all analyzed cases, the gene coding for RecU is in the vicinity of MW1337R, lin2004, or their orthologs, but on a different operon located in the complementary DNA strand. Here, we report the crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004, which were determined using the semiautomated, high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG), part of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Protein Structure Initiative.

Kozbial, Piotr; Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-Andr; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Koesema, Eric; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Spraggon, Glen; Trout, Christina V.; ban den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps); (SSRL); (JCSG); (UCSD); (Burnham)

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

292

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

293

Radio frequency pulse compression experiments at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposed future positron-electron linear colliders would be capable of investigating fundamental processes of interest in the 0.5--5 TeV beam-energy range. At the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) gradient of about 20 MV/m this would imply prohibitive lengths of about 50--250 kilometers per linac. We can reduce the length by increasing the gradient but this implies high peak power, on the order of 400-- to 1000-MW at X-Band. One possible way to generate high peak power is to generate a relatively long pulse at a relatively low power and compress it into a short pulse with higher peak power. It is possible to compress before DC to RF conversion, as is done using magnetic switching for induction linacs, or after DC to RF conversion, as is done for the SLC. Using RF pulse compression it is possible to boost the 50-- to 100-MW output that has already been obtained from high-power X-Band klystrons the levels required by the linear colliders. In this note only radio frequency pulse compression (RFPC) is considered.

Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Spalek, G.; Wilson, P.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radio frequency coaxial vacuum feedthrough is provided which utilizes a cylindrical ceramic vacuum break formed of an alumina ceramic. The cylinder is coaxially disposed and brazed between tapered coaxial conductors to form a vacuum sealed connection between a pressurized upstream coaxial transmission line and a utilization device located within a vacuum container. The feedthrough provides 50 ohm matched impedance RF feedthrough up to about 500 MHz at power levels in the multimegawatt range.

Owens, Thomas L. (Kingston, TN); Baity, Frederick W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hoffman, Daniel J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Variable frequency microwave furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system includes a microwave signal generator or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator. A second amplifier is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier. The second amplifier outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity. In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply is provided for operation of the second amplifier. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load. 5 figs.

Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

296

Incentive regulation and the regulation of incentives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis explores the regulatory problem of incentives and the question of how to create a regulatory framework that most nearly aligns the firm's private interests with the public good. The main themes are: (1) an efficiency loss is inherent in the regulatory relationship, as long as the regulator knows less about the firm's operations than the firm itself; and (2) regulation itself is an incentive mechanism, so that the regulator can choose how to motivate the firm but now whether to do so. An analytical model is used to show the tradeoff between inducing efficient production and efficient pricing. The thesis surveys and analyzes incentive regulation mechanisms adopted by state utility commissions, using a Washington state plan as a case study. A natural extension of incentive regulation is discussed, in which the firm's reward depends on the total gain in consumer surplus rather than just the reduction in expenditures. The ability of the regulator to commit to future actions is central to incentive regulation, as well as many other aspects of regulation.

Blackmon, B.G. Jr.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Micro-joule sub-10-fs VUV pulse generation by MW pump pulse using highly efficient chirped-four-wave mixing in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically study chirped four-wave mixing for VUV pulse generation in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers. We predict the generation of sub-10-fs VUV pulses with energy of up to hundreds of microjoule by broad-band chirped idler pulses at 830 nm and MW pump pulses with narrow-band at 277 nm. MW pump could be desirable to reduce the complexity of the laser system or use a high repetition rate-laser system. The energy conversion efficiency from pump pulse to VUV pulse reaches to 30%. This generation can be realized in kagome-lattice hollow-core PCF filled with noble gas of high pressure with core-diameter less than 40 micrometers which would enable technically simple or highly efficient coupling to fundamental mode of the fiber.

Im, Song-Jin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Collection and conversion of silicon furnace waste gas into higher value products: Phase 3, 6 MW pilot plant dc closed furnace technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The construction and operation of a 6 MW, closed dc furnace for smelting silicon was the primary focus of Phase 3. A 6 MW, dc closed furnace pilot plant was built in East Selkirk, Manitoba, Canada. The furnace is equipped with world`s most modern automatic control system used to control and monitor the process variables and operational data. This control system is suitable for commercial applications and could be used with either closed or open dc furnaces for smelting silicon or ferrosilicon. The construction was started in September 1990, and the facility was operational within 18 months. Following successful commissioning of the pilot plant in June 1992, twelve smelting test campaigns were conducted through November 1994.

Dosaj, V.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and Multi-Pollutant Control on Three 90 MW Coal-Fired Boilers (Completed September 30, 2009)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and Multi-Pollutant Control on Three 90 MW Coal-Fired Boilers (Completed September 30, 2009) Project Description Wisconsin Electric Power Company (We Energies) has designed, installed, operated, and evaluated the TOXECON process as an integrated mercury, particulate matter, SO 2 , and NO X emissions control system for application on coal-fired power generation systems. TOXECON is a process in which sorbents, including powdered activated

300

Solid radioactive waste management facility design for managing CANDU{sup R} 600 MW nuclear generating station re-tube/refurbishment Waste Streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main design features of the re-tube canisters, waste handling equipment and waste containers designed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL{sup R}) and implemented in support of the re-tube/refurbishment activities for Candu 600 MW nuclear generating stations are described in this paper. The re-tube/refurbishment waste characterization and the waste management principles, which form the basis of the design activities, are also briefly outlined. (authors)

Pontikakis, N.; Hopkins, J.; Scott, D.; Bajaj, V.; Nosella, L. [AECL, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

King County Carbonate Fuel Cell Demonstration Project: Case Study of a 1MW Fuel Cell Power Plant Fueled by Digester Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study documents the first-year demonstration experiences of a 1-MW carbonate fuel cell system operating on anaerobic digester gas at a wastewater treatment plant in King County, Washington. The case study is one of several fuel cell project case studies under research by the EPRI Distributed Energy Resources Program. This case study is designed to help utilities and other interested parties understand the early applications of fuel cell systems to help them in their resource planning efforts an...

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes The Laboratory must comply with environmental laws and regulations that apply to Laboratory operations. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Environmental laws and regulations LANL complies with more than 30 state and federal regulations and policies designed to protect human health and the environment. Regulators Regulators Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) EPA Homepage EPA - Region VI U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) DOE Homepage DOE Environmental Policy DOE Citizen's Advisory Board U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Southwest Region 2 New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) NMED Homepage NMED DOE Oversight Office

303

New York State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New York New York State Regulations: New York State of New York The primary responsibility for regulating oil and gas activities within New York resides with the Bureau of Oil and Gas Regulation in the Division of Mineral Resources (Office of Natural Resources) of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). Other offices and divisions within the NYSDEC administer the major environmental protection laws. Contact New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Division of Mineral Resources Bureau of Oil and Gas Regulation 625 Broadway, 3rd Floor Albany, NY 12233-6500 (518) 402-8056 (phone) (518) 402-8060 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations Environmental conservation rules and regulations are contained in Title 6 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules and Regulations of the State of New York (6 NYCRR). The rules and regulations for oil, gas and solution mining are provided in 6 NYCRR Parts 550-559.

304

Electromagnetic Compatibility from a Time-Frequency Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract In wireless communication, interference between two radio systems may occur when they operate at close frequency bands, sharing the same environment at the same time. Such systems coexist if both of them perform correctly in the presence of the other. To ensure their coexistence, Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) is used to specify rules within standardization bodies. According to current EMC standards, the radio spectrum has been divided into non-overlapping bands often with exclusive access. However, nowadays there is a proliferation of new digital systems sharing common frequency bands because the spectrum is a limited resource. Many of them are operating in unlicensed bands regulated by The International Telecommunications Union (ITU), for example the 2.45 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) band. The frequency allocation is also changing with the emergence of digital systems and this is the case for white spaces in the broadcast television (TV) spectrum. To avoid high interference levels, it is necessary to consider some parameters related to signal variations, representing more accurately the environment. Some techniques have been proposed in the literature to reduce interference levels but they are applied to specific sharing studies. Hence, we evaluate in this paper the impact of time-frequency considerations for radio coexistence. We show that EMC studies are more precise and more representative of the reality when additional parameters relevant to the time domain are taken into account in the analysis framework. We illustrate these concepts through a specific study case. We evaluate the results for different system parameters, first considering that both of them occupy the same band and then assuming that they use overlapping but non-equal frequency bands. Index Terms Radio coexistence, electromagnetic compatibility, frequency-domain analysis, time-domain analysis.

Najett Neji; Raul De Lacerda; Alain Azoulay; Thierry Letertre

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery March 4, 2011 - 5:03pm Addthis An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, Bonneville Power Administration dispatchers in the Dittmer Control Center celebrated a milestone - for the first time, wind

306

Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

THE ORNL GCR-3, A 750-Mw(e) GAS-COOLED CLAD-FUEL REACTOR POWER PLANT. A JOINT DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect

ABS>An advanced, gas-cooled, clad-fuel reactor power plant to generate 750 Mw of electricity was designed as a study of the potential capability of that system. The graphitemoderated reactor generates 1908 Mw of heat in 1062 fuel channels 21 ft long for a power density of 5.5 kw/liter. Gas temperatures entering and leaving the reactor are 574 and 1150 deg F, respectively, operating at 420 psia. Steam at 2415 psia and 950 deg F with reheat to 1000 deg F drives a 763-Mw(e) turbogenerator and also four 31,000-hp blower drive turbines and the boiler feed pumps. Net thermal efficiency of the plant is 39.4%. Estimated direct cost of construction is 0,267,000, or 7 per kilowatt net electric output. Fuel-cycle costs at 20,000 Mwd per metric ton of uranium are 1.46 mills/ kwhr, operating and maintenance costs are 0.39 mill, and fixed charges range from 1.80 to 4.65 mills, depending on method of financing. Total power generation costs at an 80% load factor range from 3.65 to 6.50 mills/kwhr. (auth)

1963-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

TESTS ON HALF-SCALE FLOW MODEL OF 40-MW(E) PROTOTYPE HTGR (PEACH BOTTOM ATOMIC POWER STATION)  

SciTech Connect

A half-scale clear plastic nonnuclear flow model of the 40-Mw(e) Peach Bottom High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) vessel and internals was operated during the period from January 1981, through October 1981. The model was operated as an induced system using ambient air as the working fluid. The maximum Reynolds number achieved in the model was approximately one-half of the Reynolds number corresponding to the full-load design conditions in the prototype. The prototype reactor pressure-drop values extrapolated from the flow-model data indicated a pressure drop of 2.0 psi for a helium flow rate of 468,000 lb/hr and pressure of 350 psia, and a constant inlet and Outlet temperature of 650 deg F. The corresponding conservatively calculated pressure-drop value was approximately 2.9 psi. No areas of serious flow starvation were observed within the model during tests with flow through only one nozzle or through both nozzles. The inlet flow divided almost equally into the upward and downward directions. Regions where low velocities were indicated appeared to be turbulent and free from stagnation. Completely closing the four off-center openings in the top head reduced the flow of air from the outer flow jacket to the inner flow jackets by only about 20%. This result supported the design approach of providing only one nozzle in the center of the top head for flow from the outer to the inner flow jackets. The heat-transfer coefficients measured at the inner surface of the pressure vessel varied over a range from 50 to 200 Btu/(hr)(ft2)( deg F), at the design flow rate, and in general were about twice the caiculated values for corresponding points. The tilting reflector was found to be a workable concept. No vibration or movement could be induced in the core by manual manipulation of various reflector blocks. There was no detectable vibration of the core during any mode of flowmodel operation. (auth)

Ross, S.; Dav, E.A.; Skeehan, R.A.

1962-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

309

Toxecon Retrofit for Mercury and Mulit-Pollutant Control on Three 90-MW Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) project was based on a cooperative agreement between We Energies and the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to design, install, evaluate, and demonstrate the EPRI-patented TOXECON{trademark} air pollution control process. Project partners included Cummins & Barnard, ADA-ES, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The primary goal of this project was to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant in Marquette, Michigan. Additional goals were to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter emissions; allow reuse and sale of fly ash; advance commercialization of the technology; demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use at power plants; and demonstrate recovery of mercury from the sorbent. Mercury was controlled by injection of activated carbon upstream of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse, which achieved more than 90% removal on average over a 44-month period. During a two-week test involving trona injection, SO{sub 2} emissions were reduced by 70%, although no coincident removal of NOx was achieved. The TOXECON{trademark} baghouse also provided enhanced particulate control, particularly during startup of the boilers. On this project, mercury CEMs were developed and tested in collaboration with Thermo Fisher Scientific, resulting in a reliable CEM that could be used in the power plant environment and that could measure mercury as low as 0.1 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Sorbents were injected downstream of the primary particulate collection device, allowing for continued sale and beneficial use of captured fly ash. Two methods for recovering mercury using thermal desorption on the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture were successfully tested during this program. Two methods for using the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture in structural concrete were also successfully developed and tested. This project demonstrated a significant reduction in the rate of emissions from Presque Isle Units 7, 8, and 9, and substantial progress toward establishing the design criteria for one of the most promising mercury control retrofit technologies currently available. The Levelized Cost for 90% mercury removal at this site was calculated at $77,031 per pound of mercury removed with a capital cost of $63,189 per pound of mercury removed. Mercury removal at the Presque Isle Power Plant averages approximately 97 pounds per year.

Steven Derenne; Robin Stewart

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

Serious pitting hazard in the raft river 5MW(e) Geothermal Power Plant isobutane cooling loop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 5MW(e) Dual Boiling Cycle Geothermal Power Plant, hence referred to as the Raft River plant, is being developed for DOE by EG and G, Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho. This pilot power plant is of the binary concept and utilizes isobutane as the working second fluid. The plant will demonstrate the feasibility of power generation from an intermediate temperature ({approx} 290 F) resource. The plant is schematically diagrammed in Figure 1. During the final design phase and after the major components were specified to be made of carbon steel, and ordered, various conditions forced the power plant design to switch from surface water to geothermal fluid for the condenser cooling loop make-up water. Because the geothermal fluid contains significant concentrations of chlorides and sulfates, about 1000 ppm and 65 ppm respectively, aeration in the cooling tower causes this water to become extremely aggressive, especially in the pitting of carbon steel components. Although essentially all of the condenser cooling loop materials are carbon steel, the isobutane condenser and turbine lube oil cooler are the most vulnerable. These components are tubed with carbon steel tubes of 0.085 and 0.075 inch wall thickness. These two components are extremely leak critical heat exchangers. For example, even a single pit perforation in the isobutane condenser can cause plant shutdown through loss of isobutane. Such a leak also poses an explosion or fire hazard. As isobutane pressure falls, the incursion of cooling water into the isobutane loop could occur, causing damage to anhydrous service seals. Under a DOE contract for geothermal failure analysis, Radian Corporation has made a preliminary investigation of the pitting hazard presented by the aggressive cooling fluid and the corrosion inhibition treatment that has thus far been proposed. This report documents Radian's understanding of the present situation and the results of its investigation on possible mitigation of this hazard. Finally, various conclusions and recommendations are made that may, if pursued, lead to a satisfactory solution that will avert a certain early prolonged plant shutdown due to failure of the thin walled isobutane and turbine lube oil cooler tubes.

Ellis, Peter F.

1980-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

311

Computer Use Regulation Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Use Regulation #12;Introduction · The following training materials will reference the contents of the Computer Use Regulations, but should not serve as a substitute for reading the actual responsibilities NCSU employees have under the regulations. · North Carolina State University's computer networks

Liu, Paul

312

Radio frequency sustained ion energy  

SciTech Connect

Electromagnetic (E.M.) energy injection method and apparatus for producing and sustaining suprathermal ordered ions in a neutral, two-ion-species, toroidal, bulk equilibrium plasma. More particularly, the ions are produced and sustained in an ordered suprathermal state of existence above the average energy and velocity of the bulk equilibrium plasma by resonant rf energy injection in resonance with the natural frequency of one of the ion species. In one embodiment, the electromagnetic energy is injected to clamp the energy and velocity of one of the ion species so that the ion energy is increased, sustained, prolonged and continued in a suprathermal ordered state of existence containing appreciable stored energy that counteracts the slowing down effects of the bulk equilibrium plasma drag. Thus, selective deuteron absorption may be used for ion-tail creation by radio-frequency excitation alone. Also, the rf can be used to increase the fusion output of a two-component neutral injected plasma by selective heating of the injected deuterons.

Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ); Hooke, William M. (Princeton, NJ)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Designing superior incentive regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discussion begun in the February 15 issue pointed out some potential drawbacks to popular incentive drawbacks to popular incentive regulation (IR) plans, as they operate in practice. The principal drawback is that the plans can create strong incentives for recontracting by well-intentioned regulators who face strong pressures to please their constituents. The likelihood of recontracting, in turn, can diminish the incentives for superior performance presented to the regulated firm. The question that remains is whether popular IR plans like price-cap regulation (PCR) can be modified to reduce the likelihood of recontracting, and thereby restore incentives for superior performance by the regulated firm. The answer is yes'.

Sappington, D.E.M.; Weisman, D.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Multiscale wireless sensor node for impedance-based SHM and low-frequency vibration data acquisition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents recent developments in an extremely compact, wireless impedance sensor node (WID3, Wireless Impedance Device) at Los Alamos National Laboratory for use in impedance-based structural health monitoring (SHM), Sensor diagnostics and low-frequency vibrational data acquisition. The current generation WID3 is equipped with an Analog Devices AD5933 impedance chip that can resolve measurements up to 100 kHz, a frequency range ideal for many SHM applications. An integrated set of multiplexers allows the end user to monitor seven piezoelectric sensors from a single sensor node. The WID3 combines on-board processing using an Atmega1281 microcontroller, data storage using flash memory, wireless communications capabilities, and a series of internal and external triggering options into a single package to realize a truly comprehensive, self-contained wireless active-sensor node for SHM applications. Furthermore, we recently extended the capability of this device by implementing low-frequency analog to digital and digital and analog converters so that the same device can measure structural vibration data. The WID3 requires less than 70 mW of power to operate, and it can operate in various wireless network paradigms. The performance of this miniaturized and portable device is compared to our previous results and its broader capabilities are demonstrated.

Taylor, Stuart G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D [UCSD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Stability issues in IC Low Drop Out voltage regulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance issues of IC Low Drop Out (LDO) voltage regulators, with specific reference to stability, are discussed in this thesis. Evaluation of existing frequency compensation schemes and their performances across operating loads is presented. The problem of instability of the LDO voltage regulator at low Electo Static Resistance (ESR) of the load capacitors and the consequences of this problem are highlighted. As a solution to some of the discussed problems, an alternate LDO voltage regulator topology that is stable with low Electro Static Resistance (ESR) capacitive loads is presented. The proposed scheme, instead of relying on the zero generated by the load capacitor and its ESR combination for stability, generates a zero internally. The LDO voltage regulator is implemented and fabricated in AMI 0.5mm CMOS technology through MOSIS service. It is demonstrated that this scheme realizes robust frequency compensation, facilitates use of Multi Layer Ceramic Capacitors (MLCC) for load of LDO regulators, and improves transient response and noise performance. Test results from the prototype provide an evaluation of the most important parameters of the regulator: ground current, load regulation, line regulation, output noise and start-up time.

Chava, Krishna Chaitanya

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Frequency synthesis using MEMS piezoelectric resonators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) Ultimately, this thesis presents two approaches to frequency synthesizer design. The first uses frequency windows of approximately 200 MHz. The 800 MHz to 1 GHz matching network is presented in detail along with ...

Calhoun, Paul Jacob, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Definition: Frequency Bias Setting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Frequency Bias, Balancing Authority, frequency response, smart grid References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign...

318

Universal Frequency Spectra of Surface Meteorological Fluctuations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical characteristics of surface meteorology are examined in terms of frequency spectra. According to a recent work using hourly data over 50 yr in the Antarctic, the frequency spectra have a characteristic shape proportional to two ...

Chikara Tsuchiya; Kaoru Sato; Tomoe Nasuno; Akira T. Noda; Masaki Satoh

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A Study of Target Frequency Bond for Frequency Control Performance Score Calculations in an Isolated System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Power system frequency is one of the key performance indices of system operation. Abnormal frequency deviations would incur negative impacts to power equipments and service (more)

Lee, Hung-hsi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

Welton, Robert F [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Roseberry, Ron T [ORNL; Stockli, Martin P [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system is disclosed. The system utilizes heterodyning of a pulsed laser beam with a continuous wave laser beam to form a beat signal. The beat signal is processed by a controller or computer which determines both the average frequency of the laser pulse and any changes or chirp of the frequency during the pulse.

Wyeth, Richard W. (Livermore, CA); Johnson, Michael A. (Pleasanton, CA); Globig, Michael A. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system is disclosed. The system utilizes heterodyning of a pulsed laser beam with a continuous wave laser beam to form a beat signal. The beat signal is processed by a controller or computer which determines both the average frequency of the laser pulse and any changes or chirp of th frequency during the pulse.

Wyeth, Richard W. (Livermore, CA); Johnson, Michael A. (Pleasanton, CA); Globig, Michael A. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A radio frequency coaxial feedthrough  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feedthrough is provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflection from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits the voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

Owens, T.L.

1987-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Expansion of Michigan EOR Operations Using Advanced Amine Technology at a 600 MW Project Wolverine Carbon Capture and Storage Project  

SciTech Connect

Wolverine Power Supply Cooperative Inc, a member owned cooperative utility based in Cadillac Michigan, proposes to demonstrate the capture, beneficial utilization and storage of CO{sub 2} in the expansion of existing Enhanced Oil Recovery operations. This project is being proposed in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-FOA-0000015 Section III D, 'Large Scale Industrial CCS projects from Industrial Sources' Technology Area 1. The project will remove 1,000 metric tons per day of CO{sub 2} from the Wolverine Clean Energy Venture 600 MW CFB power plant owned and operated by WPC. CO{sub 2} from the flue gas will be captured using Hitachi's CO{sub 2} capture system and advanced amine technology. The capture system with the advanced amine-based solvent supplied by Hitachi is expected to significantly reduce the cost and energy requirements of CO{sub 2} capture compared to current technologies. The captured CO{sub 2} will be compressed and transported for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO{sub 2} storage purposes. Enhanced Oil Recovery is a proven concept, widely used to recover otherwise inaccessible petroleum reserves. While post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies have been tested at the pilot scale on coal power plant flue gas, they have not yet been demonstrated at a commercial scale and integrated with EOR and storage operations. Amine-based CO{sub 2} capture is the leading technology expected to be available commercially within this decade to enable CCS for utility and industrial facilities firing coal and waste fuels such as petroleum coke. However, traditional CO{sub 2} capture process utilizing commercial amine solvents is very energy intensive for regeneration and is also susceptible to solvent degradation by oxygen as well as SOx and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas, resulting in large operating costs. The large volume of combustion flue gas with its low CO{sub 2} concentration requires large equipment sizes, which together with the highly corrosive nature of the typical amine-based separation process leads to high plant capital investment. According to recent DOE-NETL studies, MEA-based CCS will increase the cost of electricity of a new pulverized coal plant by 80-85% and reduce the net plant efficiency by about 30%. Non-power industrial facilities will incur similar production output and efficiency penalties when implementing conventional carbon capture systems. The proposed large scale demonstration project combining advanced amine CO{sub 2} capture integrated with commercial EOR operations significantly advances post-combustion technology development toward the DOE objectives of reducing the cost of energy production and improving the efficiency of CO{sub 2} Capture technologies. WPC has assembled a strong multidisciplinary team to meet the objectives of this project. WPC will provide the host site and Hitachi will provide the carbon capture technology and advanced solvent. Burns and Roe bring expertise in overall engineering integration and plant design to the team. Core Energy, an active EOR producer/operator in the State of Michigan, is committed to support the detailed design, construction and operation of the CO{sub 2} pipeline and storage component of the project. This team has developed a Front End Engineering Design and Cost Estimate as part of Phase 1 of DOE Award DE-FE0002477.

H Hoffman; Y kishinevsky; S. Wu; R. Pardini; E. Tripp; D. Barnes

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

325

WIDE BAND REGENERATIVE FREQUENCY DIVIDER AND MULTIPLIER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative frequency divider and multiplier having wide band input characteristics is presented. The circuit produces output oscillations having frequencies related by a fixed ratio to input oscillations over a wide band of frequencies. In accomplishing this end, the divider-multiplier includes a wide band input circuit coupled by mixer means to a wide band output circuit having a pass band related by a fixed ratio to that of the input circuit. A regenerative feedback circuit derives a fixed frequency ratio feedback signal from the output circuit and applies same to the mixer means in proper phase relation to sustain fixed frequency ratio oscillations in the output circuit.

Laine, E.F.

1959-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

326

Pressure reducing regulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

327

Alabama State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State Regulations » Alabama State Regulations » Alabama State Regulations: Alabama State of Alabama The State Oil and Gas Board of Alabama, under the direction of the State Geologist and Oil and Gas Supervisor, is responsible for the regulation of oil and gas operations. The Board is divided into two administrative regions-north and south. The Board has broad authority in Alabama's oil and gas conservation statutes to promulgate and enforce rules and regulations to ensure the conservation and proper development of Alabama's petroleum resources. A major duty of the Board is to prevent pollution of fresh water supplies by oil, gas, salt water, or other contaminants resulting from oil and gas operations. The Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) administers the major federal environmental protection laws through regulations governing air pollution, water quality and supply, solid and hazardous waste management.

328

Regulation of natural monopolies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the theoretical and empirical literature on the regulation of natural monopolies. It covers alternative definitions of natural monopoly, regulatory goals, alternative ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Florida State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to conserve the state's oil and gas resources and minimize environmental impacts from exploration and production operations through regulation and inspection activities. The...

330

Louisiana State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Natural Resources (DNR), Office of Conservation (OC), is tasked with regulating the exploration and production of oil, gas, and other hydrocarbons, as well as protecting...

331

West Virginia State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection (DEP) is responsible for monitoring and regulating all actions related to the exploration, drilling, storage, and production of oil and natural gas. The DEP, through...

332

Uniform Laws and Regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Page 2. Uniform Laws and Regulations in the areas of legal metrology and engine fuel quality as adopted by the ...

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nuclear Regulation (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute establishes a regulatory program for sources of ionizing radiation, to be administered by the Montana Department of Health and Human Services. These regulations address permitting and...

334

Uniform Laws and Regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Uniform Laws and Regulations in the areas of legal metrology and engine fuel quality as adopted by the 96th National Conference on ...

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

335

Utah State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Disposal). The DEQ administers Utah's environmental rules. Underground Disposal of Drilling Fluids (R649-3-25). The regulation allows injection of reserve pit drilling...

336

WIPP Documents - Federal Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Regulations 40 CFR Part 191 Environmental radiation protection standards for management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high-level and transuranic radioactive wastes....

337

Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

338

Regulators warned in adopting incentive regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Illinois Commerce Commission economist warns that regulators should be cautious about adopting incentive regulations, which are risky to consumers because of the inaccurate cost-efficiency measurement, faulty program design, and difficulties in program evaluation. The biggest problem with existing incentive programs is that they don't always produce lower rates in the long term. Properly designed and implemented, however, the programs can benefit both ratepayers and utilities. Programs which penalize bad performance without rewarding the good can cause problems. The authors outlines common characteristics of the program and recommends several incentive options.

Not Available

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Conceptual design of electrical balance of plant for advanced battery energy storage facility. Annual report, March 1979. [20-MW, 100 MWh  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale efforts are in progress to develop advanced batteries for utility energy storage systems. Realization of the full benefits available from those systems requires development, not only of the batteries themselves, but also the ac/dc power converter, the bulk power interconnecting equipment, and the peripheral electric balance of plant equipment that integrate the battery/converter into a properly controlled and protected energy system. This study addresses these overall system aspects; although tailored to a 20-MW, 100-MWh lithium/sulfide battery system, the technology and concepts are applicable to any battery energy storage system. 42 figures, 14 tables. (RWR)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Integrally formed radio frequency quadrupole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved radio frequency quadrupole (10) is provided having an elongate housing (11) with an elongate central axis (12) and top, bottom and two side walls (13a-d) symmetrically disposed about the axis, and vanes (14a-d) formed integrally with the walls (13a-d), the vanes (14a-d) each having a cross-section at right angles to the central axis (12) which tapers inwardly toward the axis to form electrode tips (15a-d) spaced from each other by predetermined distances. Each of the four walls (13a-d), and the vanes (14a-d) integral therewith, is a separate structural element having a central lengthwise plane (16) passing through the tip of the vane, the walls (13a-d) having flat mounting surfaces (17, 18) at right angles to and parallel to the control plane (16), respectively, which are butted together to position the walls and vane tips relative to each other.

Abbott, Steven R. (Concord, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

International Association for Energy Economics | 35 Regulating Generation Investment in Latin America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and Belo Monte hydro plant (11,233 MW) at prices of about 45 USD/MWh. In addition, about 3,000 MW have been

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

342

Damage to DNA thymine residues in CHO cells by hydrogen peroxide and copper, ascorbate and copper, hypochlorite, or other oxidants: Protection by low MW polyethylene glycol  

SciTech Connect

Polyethylene glycol (PEG) MW 200-600, has been shown to protect animals against oxidant and radiation damage. In order to study the mechanism the authors examined the effect of PEG on damage to thymine residues in the DNA of living Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. After growing to confluence in the presence of (methyl{sup 3}H)thymidine, the cells were treated, usually for 1 hr, with various combinations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, Cu{sup ++}, Fe{sup ++}, Ocl{sup {minus}}, ascorbate UV or X-irradiation, and PEG MW 300. The oxidants H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/Cu{sup ++}, and OCL{sup {minus}} released {sup 3}H into the medium from DNA thymine, and also formed thymine glycol residues in the DNA that were assayed by alkaline borohydride. The presence of 10% PEG during treatment significantly reduced the release of {sup 3}H into the medium but did not prevent formation of thymine glycol residues bound to the DNA. PEG at 10% had no effect on the cloning efficiency of CHO cells.

Schellenberg, K.A.; Shaeffer, J. (Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk (United States))

1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

343

Test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: helical screw expander power plant, Model 76-1. Final report to the International Energy Agency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1-MW geothermal wellhead power plant incorporating a Lysholm or helical screw expander (HSE) was field tested between 1980 and 1983 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand with technical assistance from the United States. The objectives were to provide data on the reliability and performance of the HSE and to assess the costs and benefits of its use. The range of conditions under which the HSE was tested included loads up to 933 kW, mass flowrates of 14,600 to 395, 000 lbs/hr, inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0 to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 to 40 psia, total dissolved solids up to 310,000 ppM, and noncondensible gases up to 38% of the vapor mass flow. Typical machine efficiencies of 40 to 50% were calculated. For most operations efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power, while inlet quality and rotor speed had only small effects. The HSE was designed with oversized internal clearances in the expectation that adherent scale would form during operation. Improvements in machine efficiency of 3.5 to 4 percentage points were observed over some test periods with some scale deposition. A comparison with a 1-MW back-pressure turbine showed that the HSE can compete favorably under certain conditions. The HSE was found to be a rugged energy conversion machine for geothermal applications, but some subsystems were found to require further development. 7 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1985-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

344

Frequency modulation drive for a piezoelectric motor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piezoelectric motor has peak performance at a specific frequency f.sub.1 that may vary over a range of frequencies. A drive system is disclosed for operating such a motor at peak performance without feedback. The drive system consists of the motor and an ac source connected to power the motor, the ac source repeatedly generating a frequency over a range from f.sub.1 -.DELTA.x to f.sub.1 +.DELTA.y.

Mittas, Anthony (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

A high-voltage low-power DC-DC buck regulator for automotive applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents a High-Voltage Low-Power CMOS DC-DC buck regulator for automotive applications. The overall system, including the high and low voltage analog devices, the power MOS and the low voltage digital devices, was realized in the Austriamicrosystems ... Keywords: DC-DC regulator, buck converter, current control, low quiscent current, pulse frequency modulation

G. Pasetti; L. Fanucci; R. Serventi

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

SIM Time and Frequency Working Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... SIM Time and Frequency Metrology Course at INTI. Buenos Aires, Argentina (February 4th through February 7th, 2008). Schedule in PDF format. ...

347

SIM Time and Frequency Working Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... file). Schedule and Slides from Time and Frequency Metrology Course in Buenos Aires, Argentina (2/4/08 to 02/07/08). Schedule ...

348

NIST Time and Frequency Division 1994 - Technical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In three dimensions, the zero-point energy (n x =n y =n z = 0 ... During the last year, Richard Fox of the Optical Frequency Measurements Group has ...

349

Indiana State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indiana Indiana State Regulations: Indiana State of Indiana The Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Division of Oil and Gas regulates petroleum exploration, production, and site abandonment activities, underground injection control, test hole drilling, and geophysical surveying operations. Otherwise, the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) administers the major environmental protection laws. Contact Division of Oil and Gas (Indianapolis Central Office) 402 West Washington Street, Room 293 Indianapolis, IN 46204 (317) 232-4055 (phone) (317) 232-1550 (fax) (Division Contacts) Indiana Department of Environmental Management P.O. Box 6015 Indianapolis, IN 46206-6015 (317) 232-8603 (phone) (317) 233-6647 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations

350

North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity...

351

Multi-dimensional ultra-high frequency passive radio frequency identification tag antenna designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we present the design, simulation, and empirical evaluation of two novel multi-dimensional ultra-high frequency (UHF) passive radio frequency identification (RFID) tag antennas, the Albano-Dipole antenna ...

Delichatsios, Stefanie Alkistis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Interviewee Travel Regulations Scope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 Interviewee Travel Regulations Scope These regulations apply to the reimbursement of round-trip travel expenses incurred by interviewees. These regulations do not apply to applicants who live within a 50-mile radius of Los Alamos based on the Rand McNally Standard Highway Mileage Guide. Reimbursement With the exception of airfare, interviewees will be reimbursed for travel expenses according to Federal travel regulations. For interviewees, airfare reimbursement is limited to the lesser of the standard coach airfare or the actual amount paid. The lowest available airfare should be obtained based on the official business dates and locations. The reimbursement amount will be based on the most direct route available between the interviewee's residence and the laboratory. Costs incurred over the lowest available fare will be the

353

New Mexico State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Mexico New Mexico State Regulations: New Mexico State of New Mexico The Oil Conservation Division (OCD) in the New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department regulates oil and gas and geothermal operations in New Mexico. The OCD has the responsibility to gather oil and gas production data, permit new wells, establish pool rules and oil and gas allowables, issue discharge permits, enforce rules and regulations of the division, monitor underground injection wells and ensure that abandoned wells are properly plugged and the land is responsibly restored. Otherwise, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) administers the major environmental protection laws. The Water Quality Control Commission (WQCC), which is administratively attached to the NMED, assigns responsibility for administering its regulations to constituent agencies, including the OCD.

354

GUIDANCE REGARDING NEPA REGULATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This memorandum was published in the Federal Register and appears at 48 Fed. Reg. 34263 (1983). Ed. Note] This memorandum was published in the Federal Register and appears at 48 Fed. Reg. 34263 (1983). Ed. Note] GUIDANCE REGARDING NEPA REGULATIONS 40 CFR Part 1500 Executive Office of the President Council on Environmental Quality 722 Jackson Place, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 July 22, 1983 Memorandum For: Heads of Federal Agencies From: A. Alan Hill, Chairman Re: Guidance Regarding NEPA Regulations The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) were issued on November 29, 1978. These regulations became effective for, and binding upon, most federal agencies on July 30, 1979, and for all remaining federal agencies on November 30, 1979. As part of the Council's NEPA oversight responsibilities it solicited through an August 14,

355

Virginia State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virginia Virginia State Regulations: Virginia State of Virginia The Division of Gas and Oil in the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy (DMME) regulates the effects of gas and oil operations both on and below the surface. The Virginia Gas and Oil Board is to foster, encourage, and promote the safe and efficient exploration for and development, production, and utilization of gas and oil resources. Otherwise, three regulatory citizen boards are responsible for adopting Virginia 's environmental regulations. The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) staff administers the regulations as approved by the boards. Finally, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 3, through its Water Protection Division, administers Class II underground injection control (UIC) programs in Virginia in direct implementation.

356

Sulfur Dioxide Regulations (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides sulfur dioxide emission limits for every county, as well as regulations for the emission, monitoring and...

357

Montana State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana State Regulations: Montana State of Montana The Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation (MBOGC) is a quasi-judicial body that is attached to the Department of Natural...

358

Designing superior incentive regulation  

SciTech Connect

The key to success in designing effective incentive regulation is relatively simple: Anticipate all of the incentives that will ultimately come to bear, and structure regulatory policy in advance to limit any adverse incentives. All is a critical word here. Attention commonly is focused on the incentives a proposed regulatory plan creates for the regulated firm to minimize production costs, diversify into new markets, and so on. While the incentives are important in assessing a regulatory plan, they are only one consideration. It is also critical to analyze the incentives the plan creates for other key players in the regulatory arena, particularly regulators. It is premature to draw any broad conclusions about the success of incentive regulation in the electric power and natural gas industries. While there is reason for optimism, concern remain. Some incentive regulation plans have been abandoned, in part because of: (1) unforeseen exogenous event that could not be administered within the confines of the plan; (2) public opposition to rewarding a utility for the superior performance it should have realized without the promise of financial reward; (3) adverse reaction to utility earnings in excess of those commonly authorized under traditional regulation, and (4) questions about the legality of the plans under state statutes.

Sappington, D.E.M.; Weisman, D.L.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Method and apparatus for monitoring the rotating frequency of de-energized induction motors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The rotational speed of a coasting induction motor is measured by sensing e residual electrical voltages at the power terminals of the motor, thus eliminating the need for conventional tachometer equipment, additional mechanical components or modifications to the induction motor itself. The power terminal voltage signal is detected and transformed into a DC voltage proportional to the frequency of the signal. This DC voltage can be input to the control system of a variable frequency motor controller to regulate the output characteristics thereof relative to the speed of the coasting motor.

Mikesell, Harvey E. (McMurray, PA); Lucy, Eric (Murrysville, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Method and apparatus for monitoring the rotating frequency of de-energized induction motors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The rotational speed of a coasting induction motor is measured by sensing e residual electrical voltages at the power terminals of the motor, thus eliminating the need for conventional tachometer equipment, additional mechanical components or modifications to the induction motor itself. The power terminal voltage signal is detected and transformed into a DC voltage proportional to the frequency of the signal. This DC voltage can be input to the control system of a variable frequency motor controller to regulate the output characteristics thereof relative to the speed of the coasting motor. 6 figs.

Mikesell, H.E.; Lucy, E.

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Digital slip frequency generator and method for determining the desired slip frequency  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The output frequency of an electric power generator is kept constant with variable rotor speed by automatic adjustment of the excitation slip frequency. The invention features a digital slip frequency generator which provides sine and cosine waveforms from a look-up table, which are combined with real and reactive power output of the power generator.

Klein, Frederick F. (Monroeville, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Producing persistent, high-current, high-duty-factor H{sup -} beams for routine 1 MW operation of Spallation Neutron Source (invited)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2009, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been producing neutrons with ion beam powers near 1 MW, which requires the extraction of {approx}50 mA H{sup -} ions from the ion source with a {approx}5% duty factor. The 50 mA are achieved after an initial dose of {approx}3 mg of Cs and heating the Cs collar to {approx}170 deg. C. The 50 mA normally persist for the entire 4-week source service cycles. Fundamental processes are reviewed to elucidate the persistence of the SNS H{sup -} beams without a steady feed of Cs and why the Cs collar temperature may have to be kept near 170 deg. C.

Stockli, Martin P.; Han, B. X.; Hardek, T. W.; Kang, Y. W.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Cooperation Reliability Testing of the Clipper Windpower Liberty 2.5 MW Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-210  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Clipper Windpower (CWP) has developed the Liberty 2.5 MW wind turbine. The development, manufacturing, and certification process depends heavily on being able to validate the full-scale system design and performance under load in both an accredited structural test facility and through accredited field testing. CWP requested that DOE/ NREL upgrade blade test capabilities to perform a scope of work including structural testing of the C-96 blade used on the CWP Liberty turbine. This funds-in CRADA was developed to upgrade NREL blade test capability, while enabling certification testing of the C-96 blade through the facility and equipment upgrades. NREL shared resource funds were used to develop hardware necessary to structurally attach a large wind turbine to the test stand at the NWTC. Participant funds-in monies were used for developing the test program.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Helping in collaborative activity regulation: modeling regulation scenarii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The regulation was introduced into groupware in order to improve the actors collaboration. In our context, the regulation means the ability given to a group or a person that manages a group. This paper describes an approach of setting up about this regulation ... Keywords: XML, groupware, regulation, scenario

Stphane Talbot; Philippe Pernelle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Turbine bucket natural frequency tuning rib  

SciTech Connect

A tuning rib is added preferably in the aft cavity of a cored turbine bucket to alter the bucket's natural frequencies. The tuning rib may be a solid rib or a segmented rib and is particularly suited for altering high order frequency modes such as 2T, 4F and 1-3S. As such, detrimental crossings of natural bucket frequencies and gas turbine stimuli can be avoided to thereby improve the reliability of a gas turbine without impacting other features of the bucket that are important to the performance of the gas turbine.

Wang, John Zhiqiang (Greenville, SC); Norton, Paul Francis (Greenville, SC); Barb, Kevin Joseph (Halfmoon, NY); Jacala, Ariel Caesar-Prepena (Simpsonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

High power radio frequency attenuation device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

Kerns, Quentin A. (Bloomingdale, IL); Miller, Harold W. (Winfield, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Wyoming State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming State Regulations: Wyoming State of Wyoming The Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC) is the state agency authorized to regulate oil and gas exploration and production waste. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) administers general environmental protection regulations. Contact Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission 2211 King Blvd. Casper, WY 82602 (street address) P.O. Box 2640 Casper, WY 82602 (mailing address) (307) 234-7147 (phone) (307) 234-5306 (fax) Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality 122 West 25th Street, Herscheler Building Cheyenne, WY 82002 (307) 777-7937 (phone) (307) 777-7682 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations Document # 4855, Agency (Oil and Gas Conservation Commission), General Agency, Board or Commission Rules, Chapter 4 (Environmental Rules, Including Underground Injection Control Program Rules for Enhanced Recovery and Disposal Projects), Section 1. Pollution and Surface Damage (Forms 14A and 14B) of the Wyoming Rules and Regulations contains the environmental rules administered by the WOGCC with respect to management options for exploration and production waste.

368

Markedness and frequency: a computational analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When the markedness analysis is extended to the lexical and grammatical levels, the question arises whether an analogue of the markedness/frequency correlation, observed in phonology, also exists on these higher linguistic levels. This article presents ...

Henry Ku?era

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Very-High-Frequency Resonant Boost Converters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a resonant boost topology suitable for very-high-frequency (VHF, 30-300 MHz) DC-DC power conversion. The proposed design features low device voltage stress, high efficiency over a wide load range, and ...

Perreault, David J.

370

Radio frequency dc-dc power conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THIS THESIS addresses the development of system architectures and circuit topologies for dc-dc power conversion at very high frequencies. The systems architectures that are developed are structured to overcome limitations ...

Rivas, Juan, 1976-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Propagation of Rossby Waves of Nonzero Frequency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The propagation of Rossby waves of positive and negative frequency, corresponding to eastward and westward phase speeds, respectively, is investigated. The techniques used are theoretical analysis, ray tracing, and initial value problems in ...

Gui-Ying Yang; Brian J. Hoskins

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Security approaches for Radio Frequency Identification systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I explore the challenges related to the security of the Electronic Product Code (EPC) class of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags and associated data. RFID systems can be used to improve supply chain ...

Foley, Joseph Timothy, 1976-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Definition: Frequency Bias | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Authority Area, Balancing Authority, frequency error, smart grid References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign...

374

Definition: Frequency Error | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

difference between the actual and scheduled frequency. (FA - FS)1 References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up...

375

Frequency Discrimination of Random?Amplitude Tones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of human observers to discriminate frequencies of tones between 1000 and 15 000 cps was measured in a temporal 2?alternative forced?choice discriminationexperiment. On each trial

G. Bruce Henning

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Frequency Distribution of Thunderstorm Durations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The frequency distributions of thunderstorm durations were analyzed for 30 years at 36 stations in the United States in order to develop an appropriate summarizing statistic for durations. The incomplete gamma function provides a close fit to the ...

P. J. Robinson; D. R. Easterling

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Development of Radio Frequency Exposure Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While unconfirmed claims of adverse human health effects from electromagnetic radiation date to the 1930s, development of modern safety standards did not begin until the 1952 Hirsch study of eye damage at a microwave power density of 100 mW/cm2. Early work on standards focused on microwave frequencies due to rapid development of radar and microwave communications links. In the years since 1952, radio frequency (RF) exposure standards have kept pace with those technological advancements. While refinements...

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Overview of Personal Radio Frequency Communication Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of wireless electronic communication devices and their applications is creating an increasingly complex radio frequency (RF) environment in the workplace and home. Personal communication applications discussed in this report include cordless telephones, analog cellular telephones, digital cellular telephones, and a dozen more. Depending on the specific wireless device, different frequency ranges, modulation types, multiple access types, and power levels can be encountered. The significant grow...

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

379

Michigan State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michigan Michigan State Regulations: Michigan State of Michigan The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), through the Supervisor of Wells, Geological and Land Management Division (GLM), oversees the regulation of oil and gas activities. DEQ staff monitors the environmental impacts of well drilling operations, oil and gas production facilities, and gas storage wells. Contact Michigan Department of Environmental Quality Geological and Land Management Division P.O. Box 30256 Lansing, MI 48909-7756 (517) 241-1515 (phone) (517) 241-1601 (fax) (Organization Chart) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations The rules governing oil and gas operations are contained in Part 615, Rules 324.101-324.1301 (Department of Environmental Quality, Oil and Gas Operations) of the Michigan Administrative Code.

380

Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nuclear regulation and safety  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear regulation and safety are discussed from the standpoint of a hypothetical country that is in the process of introducing a nuclear power industry and setting up a regulatory system. The national policy is assumed to be in favor of nuclear power. The regulators will have responsibility for economic, reliable electric production as well as for safety. Reactor safety is divided into three parts: shut it down, keep it covered, take out the afterheat. Emergency plans also have to be provided. Ways of keeping the core covered with water are discussed. (DLC)

Hendrie, J.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

ISM band to U-NII band frequency transverter and method of frequency transversion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frequency transverter (10) and method for enabling bi-frequency dual-directional transfer of digitally encoded data on an RF carrier by translating between a crowded or otherwise undesirable first frequency band, such as the 2.4 GHz ISM band, and a less-crowded or otherwise desirable second frequency band, such as the 5.0 GHz 6.0 GHz U-NII band. In a preferred embodiment, the transverter (10) connects between an existing data radio (11) and its existing antenna (30), and comprises a bandswitch (12); an input RF isolating device (14); a transmuter (16); a converter (18); a dual output local oscillator (20); an output RF isolating device (22); and an antenna (24) tuned to the second frequency band. The bandswitch (12) allows for bypassing the transverter (10), thereby facilitating its use with legacy systems. The transmuter (14) and converter (16) are adapted to convert to and from, respectively, the second frequency band.

Stepp, Jeffrey David (Grandview, MO); Hensley, Dale (Grandview, MO)

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

383

ISM band to U-NII band frequency transverter and method of frequency transversion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frequency transverter (10) and method for enabling bi-frequency dual-directional transfer of digitally encoded data on an RF carrier by translating between a crowded or otherwise undesirable first frequency band, such as the 2.4 GHz ISM band, and a less-crowded or otherwise desirable second frequency band, such as the 5.0 GHz-6.0 GHz U-NII band. In a preferred embodiment, the transverter (10) connects between an existing data radio (11) and its existing antenna (30), and comprises a bandswitch (12); an input RF isolating device (14); a transmuter (16); a converter (18); a dual output local oscillator (20); an output RF isolating device (22); and an antenna (24) tuned to the second frequency band. The bandswitch (12) allows for bypassing the transverter (10), thereby facilitating its use with legacy systems. The transmuter (14) and converter (16) are adapted to convert to and from, respectively, the second frequency band.

Stepp, Jeffrey David (Grandview, MO); Hensley, Dale (Grandview, MO)

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

384

Emotion Regulation CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in emotion and emotion regulation. 3 This is a chapter excerpt from Guilford Publications. Handbook a fundamental role in the develop- ment of emotion, particularly in infancy and early childhood. Third the interaction of external and intrinsic influences. FUNDAMENTAL QUESTIONS AND DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE INQUIRY

Gross, James J.

385

High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Dymond, Jr., Lauren E. (North Potomac, MD); Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Montgomery Village, MD); Grimm, William G. (Silver Spring, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD); Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Ola, Samuel A. (Silver Spring, MD); Simpson, James E. (Gaithersburg, MD); Trimble, William C. (Columbia, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Dolan, James T. (Frederick, MD); Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Leng, Yongzhang (Damascus, MD)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Frequency Instability Problems in North American Interconnections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequency Instability Problems in Frequency Instability Problems in North American Interconnections May 1, 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1473 Frequency Instability Problems in North American Interconnections Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

388

Frequency Scanned Interferometry for ILC Tracker Alignment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we report high-precision absolute distance and vibration measurements performed with frequency scanned interferometry. Absolute distance was determined by counting the interference fringes produced while scanning the laser frequency. High-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometers were used to determine frequency changes during scanning. A dual-laser scanning technique was used to cancel drift errors to improve the absolute distance measurement precision. A new dual-channel FSI demonstration system is also presented which is an interim stage toward practical application of multi-channel distance measurement. Under realistic conditions, a precision of 0.3 microns was achieved for an absolute distance of 0.57 meters. A possible optical alignment system for a silicon tracker is also presented.

Hai-Jun Yang; Tianxiang Chen; Keith Riles

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

389

Electrojet-independent ionospheric extremely low frequency/very low frequency wave generation by powerful high frequency waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of extremely low frequency/very low frequency (ELF/VLF) wave generation by intensity-modulated high frequency (HF) heaters of 3.2 MHz in Gakona, Alaska, near local solar noon during a geomagnetic quiet time, are presented to support an electrojet-independent ELF/VLF wave generation mechanism. The modulation was set by splitting the HF transmitter array into two subarrays; one was run at cw full power and the other run alternatively at 50% and 100% power modulation by rectangular waves of 2.02, 5, 8, and 13 kHz. The most effective generation was from the X-mode heater with 100% modulation. While the 8 kHz radiation has the largest wave amplitude, the spectral intensity of the radiation increases with the modulation frequency, i.e., 13 kHz line is the strongest. Ionograms recorded significant virtual height spread of the O-mode sounding echoes. The patterns of the spreads and the changes of the second and third hop virtual height traces caused by the O/X-mode heaters are distinctively different, evidencing that it is due to differently polarized density irregularities generated by the filamentation instability of the O/X-mode HF heaters.

Kuo, Spencer [Polytechnic Institute of New York University, 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Snyder, Arnold [NorthWest Research Associates, P.O. Box 530, Stockton Springs, Maine 04981 (United States); Chang, Chia-Lie [BAE Systems-Technology Solutions, 2000 North 15th Street, Suite 1100, Arlington, Virginia 22201-2627 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Seismic isolation systems with distinct multiple frequencies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for isolating a building or other structure from smic vibratory motion which provides increased assurance that large horizontal motion of the structure will not occur than is provided by other isolation systems. Increased assurance that large horizontal motion will not occur is achieved by providing for change of the natural frequency of the support and structure system in response to displacement of the structure beyond a predetermined value. The natural frequency of the support and structure system may be achieved by providing for engaging and disengaging of the structure and some supporting members in response to motion of the supported structure.

Wu, Ting-shu (Downers Grove, IL); Seidensticker, Ralph W. (Wheaton, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Seismic isolation systems with distinct multiple frequencies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for supporting a structure such as a building, bridge, or power plant such that it is isolated from seismic vibratory ground motion. More particularly, the present invention relates to a method and apparatus for supporting a structure by an isolation system which will not allow large dynamic loads to be transmitted to the supported structure due to seismic motions which have damaging energy at frequencies at or near the natural frequency of the structure and the overall structural systems. 4 figs.

Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W.

1989-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

392

Wave generation and heating near ion cyclotron frequency in the ST Tokamak  

SciTech Connect

The results of the recent, high power ICRH experiments performed on the ST Tokamak are reported. It was demonstrated that both the fast and slow waves could be generated in toroidal geometry, and heating of the plasma ions at power levels up to 1 MW was observed both at the ion cyclotron frequency ($omega$/sub ci/) and its second harmonic (2$omega$/sub ci/). Measurements by a charge exchange neutral detector directed tangentially to the plasma torus revealed that at 2$omega$/sub ci/ the ion energy within the bulk of the ion distribution function (''parallel body temperature'') could be increased from about 100 eV up to 200 eV with efficiencies ranging from 8 to 45 percent. Efficiency at $omega$/ sub ci/ in raising the parallel temperature was less than at 2$omega$/sub ci/. Charge exchange neutral detection perpendicular to the plasma column showed that both at $omega$/sub ci/ and 2$omega$/sub ci/ the ''perpendicular body temperature'' was enhanced very rapidly by a factor of up to 3. Also, buildup of a high energy ''tail'' in the ion energy distribution was observed. Power transfer to the ions seemed extremely efficient. (auth)

Takahashi, H.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Dry SO/sub 2/ particulate removal for coal-fired boilers. Volume 2. 22-MW demonstration using nahcolite, trona, and soda ash. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second phase of a full scale demonstration of the integration of the dry injection of sodium sorbents coupled with a fabric filter baghouse was conducted at Public Service Company of Colorado's Cameo Unit 1, a 22 MW coal-fired utility boiler equipped with an eight compartment baghouse. An initial test series conducted in 1980 had demonstrated the capability of 70% SO/sub 2/ removal with nahcolite injection without significant impact on the baghouse operation. The objectives of the second test series were to expand the evaluation of nahcolite to operation at reduced baghouse temperatures, high temperature injection and varied coal applications, and the use of several alternative and potentially more available sorbent materials. SO/sub 2/ removal was shown to be primarily a function of the type and rate of sorbent injection. The performance of nahcolite was consistent with the previous tests achieving approximately 80% SO/sub 2/ removal with the injection of a stoichiometric amount into the flue gases. Comparable injection quantities of the three trona materials evaluated resulted in 55% SO/sub 2/ removal. Soda ash was ineffective in removing SO/sub 2/ at all injection rates. No significant differences in the SO/sub 2/ removal characteristics of nahcolite were observed while firing coal from several sources. Sorbent injection had no appreciable impact on the baghouse pressure drop characteristics or bag cleanability. Baghouse collection efficiency remained at 99.9+% levels. 3 references, 19 figures, 8 tables.

Muzio, L.J.; Sonnichsen, T.W.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Analytical analyses of startup measurements associated with the first use of LEU fuel in Romania's 14-MW TRIGA reactor  

SciTech Connect

The 14-MW TRIGA steady state reactor (SSR) is located in Pitesti, Romania. Beginning with an HEU core (10 wt% U), the reactor first went critical in November 1979 but was shut down ten years later because of insufficient excess reactivity. Last November the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), which operates the SSR, received from the ANL RERTR program a shipment of 125 LEU pins fabricated by General Atomics and of the same geometry as the original fuel but with an enrichment of 19.7% 235U and a loading of 45 wt% U. Using 100 of these pins, four LEU clusters, each containing a 5 x 5 square array of fuel rods, were assembled. These four LEU clusters replaced the four most highly burned HEU elements in the SSR. The reactor resumed operations last February with a 35-element mixed HEU/LEU core configuration. In preparation for full power operation of the SSR with this mixed HEU/LEU core, a number of measurements were made. These included control rod calibrations, excess reactivity determinations, worths of experiment facilities, reaction rate distributions, and themocouple measurements of fuel temperatures as a function of reactor power. This paper deals with a comparison of some of these measured reactor parameters with corresponding analytical calculations.

Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Ciocanescu, M. (Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Analytical analyses of startup measurements associated with the first use of LEU fuel in Romania`s 14-MW TRIGA reactor  

SciTech Connect

The 14-MW TRIGA steady state reactor (SSR) is located in Pitesti, Romania. Beginning with an HEU core (10 wt% U), the reactor first went critical in November 1979 but was shut down ten years later because of insufficient excess reactivity. Last November the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), which operates the SSR, received from the ANL RERTR program a shipment of 125 LEU pins fabricated by General Atomics and of the same geometry as the original fuel but with an enrichment of 19.7% 235U and a loading of 45 wt% U. Using 100 of these pins, four LEU clusters, each containing a 5 x 5 square array of fuel rods, were assembled. These four LEU clusters replaced the four most highly burned HEU elements in the SSR. The reactor resumed operations last February with a 35-element mixed HEU/LEU core configuration. In preparation for full power operation of the SSR with this mixed HEU/LEU core, a number of measurements were made. These included control rod calibrations, excess reactivity determinations, worths of experiment facilities, reaction rate distributions, and themocouple measurements of fuel temperatures as a function of reactor power. This paper deals with a comparison of some of these measured reactor parameters with corresponding analytical calculations.

Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ciocanescu, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Economics of a 75-MW(e) hot-dry-rock geothermal power station based upon the design of the Phase II reservoir at Fenton Hill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based upon EE-2 and EE-3 drilling costs and the proposed Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir conditions the break-even cost of producing electricity is 4.4 cents per kWh at the bus bar. This cost is based upon a 9-well, 12-reservoir hot dry rock (HDR) system producing 75 MW(e) for 10 yr with only 20% drawdown, and an assumed annual finance charge of 17%. Only one-third of the total, potentially available heat was utilized; potential reuse of wells as well as thermal stress cracking and augmentation of heat transfer was ignored. Nearly half the bus bar cost is due to drilling expenses, which prompted a review of past costs for wells GT-2, EE-1, EE-2, and EE-3. Based on comparable depth and completion times it is shown that significant cost improvements have been accomplished in the last seven years. Despite these improvements it was assumed for this study that no further advancements in drilling technology would occur, and that even in commercially mature HDR systems, drilling problems would continue nearly unabated.

Murphy, H.; Drake, R.; Tester, J.; Zyvoloski, G.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Suggested performance specifications of standard modular controls for the automation of small hydro electric facilities. [Plant capacities from 50 kW to 15 MW  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These specifications are made available by the Department of Energy for the voluntary use by any person, corporation or governmental body in the writing of purchase specifications for the automatic control of small hydro generating stations, i.e., hydro plants ranging in size from 50 kW to 15 MW. It is believed that the use of these specifications will permit competition among capable vendors and, at the same time, assure proper and reliable operation of both the automation hardware and software purchased. The specifications are detailed to a degree which should assure the interchangeability of hardware and software from various suppliers. This also increases the likelihood that spare parts and service will be available for many years. The specifications are written in modules, each of which can be included or excluded for ease of editing to match a particular application. Brief but detailed instructions are included for such editing. An extensive appendix gives the alternatives which were considered and reasons for the various choices specified.

Beckwith, R.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

Brenholdt, I.R.

1957-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

399

California State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California California State Regulations: California State of California The California Department of Conservation's Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources oversees the drilling, operation, maintenance, and plugging and abandonment of oil, natural gas, and geothermal wells. The regulatory program emphasizes the development of oil, natural gas, and geothermal resources in the state through sound engineering practices that protect the environment, prevent pollution, and ensure public safety. Other agencies that may be involved in the regulation of drilling wastes include the State Water Resources Control Board and appropriate Regional Water Quality Control Boards, the California Integrated Waste Management Board, the California Air Resources Board and appropriate Air Quality Management Districts or Air Pollution Control Districts, and the Department of Toxic Substances Control.

400

North Dakota State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Dakota North Dakota State Regulations: North Dakota State of North Dakota The North Dakota Industrial Commission (NDIC), through its Oil and Gas Division (OGD), is the regulatory agency for oil and gas exploration and production activities in North Dakota. The North Dakota Department of Health (NDDH) Environmental Health Section (EHS) has the responsibility to safeguard the quality of North Dakota's air, land, and water resources. Contact North Dakota Industrial Commission Oil and Gas Division 600 East Boulevard Avenue, Dept. 405 Bismarck, ND 58505-0840 (701) 328-8020 (phone) (701) 328-8022 (fax) North Dakota Department of Health Environmental Health Section 1200 Missouri Avenue P.O. Box 5520 Bismarck, ND 58506-5520 (701) 328-5150 (phone) (701) 328-5200 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nevada State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nevada Nevada State Regulations: Nevada State of Nevada The Nevada Division of Minerals (Nevada Commission of Mineral Resources) administers programs and activities to further the responsible development and production of Nevada's mineral resources, including the regulation of oil- and gas-well drilling operations. Otherwise, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (Nevada Department of Conservation and Mineral Resources) administers the major environmental protection laws. Contact Nevada Division of Minerals (Carson City Office) 400 West King Street, Suite 106 Carson City, NV 89703 (775) 684-7040 (phone) (775) 684-7052 (fax) (Las Vegas Office) 2030 East Flamingo Road, Suite 220 Las Vegas, NV 89119 (702) 486-4343 (phone) (702) 486-4345 (fax) Nevada Division of Environmental Protection

402

Colorado State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado Colorado State Regulations: Colorado State of Colorado The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC), a division of the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), regulates oil and gas activities in Colorado. The COGCC has broad statutory authority with respect to impacts on any air, water, soil, or biological resources resulting from oil and gas operations. The COGCC implements the state ground water standards and classifications as they relate to oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) activities. The COGCC has jurisdiction for all Class II injection wells except those on Indian lands. The COGCC has jurisdiction for the management of all E&P wastes except at commercial disposal facilities. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) administers the environmental protection laws related to air quality, waste discharge to surface water, and commercial disposal facilities.

403

Kansas State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kansas Kansas State Regulations: Kansas State of Kansas The Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC) Conservation Division regulates oil and gas operations and protects correlative rights and environmental resources. Otherwise, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) administers the major environmental protection laws. Contact Kansas Corporation Commission (Main Office) 1500 S.W. Arrowhead Road Topeka, KS 66604-2425 (785) 271-3100 (phone) (785) 271-3354 (fax) Conservation Division Finney State Office Building 130 South Market, Room 2078 Wichita, KS 67202-3802 (316) 337-6200 (phone) (316) 337-6211 (fax) Kansas Department of Health and Environment Charles Curtis State Office Building 1000 S.W. Jackson Topeka, KS 66612 (785) 296-1500 (phone) (785) 368-6368 (fax)

404

Oklahoma State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oklahoma Oklahoma State Regulations: Oklahoma State of Oklahoma The Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC), through the Oil and Gas Division, assists the domestic oil and gas industry, protects and preserves the environment, and conserves the natural resources. General environmental protection regulations are administered by the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). Contact Oklahoma Corporation Commission Oil and Gas Division P.O. Box 52000 Oklahoma City, OK 73152-2000 (mailing address) (405) 521-2302 (phone) 2101 North Lincoln Blvd. Oklahoma City, OK 73105 (street address) Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality P.O. Box 1677 Oklahoma City, OK 73101-1677 (mailing address) 707 North Robinson Oklahoma City, OK 73102 (street address) (405) 702-1000 (phone)

405

A regulated magnetron pulser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes and analysis of a 4.5-kV, 500-mA, regulated current pulser used to drive a Hitachi ZM130 magnetron in a particle-accelerator injector. In this application, precise beam from the injector. A high-voltage triode vacuum tube with active feedback is used to control the magnetron current. Current regulation and accuracy is better than 1%. The pulse width may be varied from as little as 5 {mu}m to cw by varying the width of a gate pulse. The current level can be programmed between 10 and 500 mA. Design of the pulser including circuit simulations, power calculations, and high-voltage issues are discussed.

Rose, C.R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

REGULATING HAWAII'S PETROLEUM INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was prepared in response to House Resolution No. 174, H.D. 2, which was adopted during the Regular Session of 1995. The Resolution requested the Legislative Reference Bureau to conduct a study to obtain the views of selected state agencies and representatives of Hawaii's petroleum industry in order to assist the Legislature in formulating policies that protect the interests of Hawaii's gasoline consumers. The Resolution sought information and the views of survey participants on a broad range of proposals to regulate Hawaii's petroleum industry. This study reviews each of these proposals in terms of their value to consumers, and explores both regulatory policy options and alternatives to regulation available to state lawmakers. The Bureau extends its sincere appreciation to all those whose participation and cooperation made this study possible. A list of contact persons, including the names of survey participants and others who helped to contribute to this study, is contained in Appendix B.

Mark J. Rosen; Wendell K. Kimura

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Computing Borel's Regulator II.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In our earlier article we described a power series formula for the Borel regulator evaluated on the odd-dimensional homology of the general linear group of a number field and, concentrating on dimension three for simplicity, described a computer algorithm which calculates the value to any chosen degree of accuracy. In this sequel we give an algorithm for the construction of the input homology classes and describe the results of one cyclotomic field computation.

Zacky Choo; Wajid Mannan; Rubn J. Snchez-Garca; Victor P. Snaith

408

Joint TVA EPRI Evaluation of Steel Arc Furnace Regulation Impacts and Potential Innovative Mitigation Solutions: Phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is considering the costs and benefits of serving arc furnace loads. One potential adverse power system impact of arc furnaces is that their electric power consumption is extremely volatile and can significantly impact the short-term frequency regulation requirements of the TVA power system, increasing the regulating reserve requirements needed to meet North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) reliability criteria. A one-month analysis of TVA regulation ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

409

Development and testing of artificial low?frequency speech codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous work on frequency lowered speech for listeners whose hearing is confined to low frequencies has focused on signal processing of natural speech. In the present research

C. M. Reed; M. H. Power; K. K. Foss; N. I. Durlach; L. D. Braids

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS...

411

Improving CS regulations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

President Carter issued Executive Order 12044 (3/28/78) that required all Federal agencies to distinguish between significant and insignificant regulations, and to determine whether a regulation will result in major impacts. This study gathered information on the impact of the order and the guidelines on the Office of Conservation and Solar Energy (CS) regulatory practices, investigated problems encountered by the CS staff when implementing the order and guidelines, and recommended solutions to resolve these problems. Major tasks accomplished and discussed are: (1) legislation, Executive Orders, and DOE Memoranda concerning Federal administrative procedures relevant to the development and analysis of regulations within CS reviewed; (2) relevant DOE Orders and Memoranda analyzed and key DOE and CS staff interviewed in order to accurately describe the current CS regulatory process; (3) DOE staff from the Office of the General Counsel, the Office of Policy and Evaluation, the Office of the Environment, and the Office of the Secretary interviewed to explore issues and problems encountered with current CS regulatory practices; (4) the regulatory processes at five other Federal agencies reviewed in order to see how other agencies have approached the regulatory process, dealt with specific regulatory problems, and responded to the Executive Order; and (5) based on the results of the preceding four tasks, recommendations for potential solutions to the CS regulatory problems developed. (MCW)

Nesse, R.J.; Scheer, R.M.; Marasco, A.L.; Furey, R.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Federal Regulations: BOEM and BSEE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

development and enforcement of safety and environmental regulations, permitting offshore exploration, development and production, inspections, offshore regulatory programs, oil...

413

220-MW compressed air storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SOYLAND Power Cooperative, Inc., a Decatur, Illinois based co-op, could get reasonably priced baseload power from neighboring utilities, had a plant of its own planned for the near future as well as a share in another, but peaking power, generated by oil and gas, to meet surges in demand, was very costly. The co-op's solution, first in the U.S., is a 220-megawatt compressed air energy storage system (CAES), which the electric utility industry is watching with great interest. CAES splits the two basic stages of a conventional gas turbine, making the most of baseload power while using the least peaking or intermediate fuel. During off-peak periods, inexpensive baseload electricity from coal or nuclear power plants runs a combination motor-generator in motor mode which, in turn, operates a compressor. The compressed air is cooled and pumped into an underground storage reservoir hundreds of thousands of cubic yards in volume and about two thousand feet (about 610 m) below the surface. There the air remains, at pressures up to about 60 atm (6.1 MPa), until peaking or intermediate power is required. Then, the air is released into a combustor at a controlled rate, heated by oil or gas, and expanded through a turbine. The turbine drives the motor-generator in a generator mode, thereby supplying peaking or intermediate power to the grid.

Lihach, N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Home monitoring using wearable radio frequency transmitters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: Location tracking of a wearable radio frequency (RF) transmitter in a wireless network is a potentially useful tool for the home monitoring of patients in clinical applications. However, the problem of converting RF signals into accurate ... Keywords: Gaussian mixture models, Home monitoring, Motion tracking, Wireless network

Anthony Almudevar; Adrian Leibovici; Aleksey Tentler

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Clustering local frequency items in multiple databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frequent items could be considered as a basic type of patterns in a database. In the context of multiple data sources, most of the global patterns are based on local frequency items. A multi-branch company transacting from different branches often needs ... Keywords: Association, Clustering, Data mining, Measure of association, Multi-database mining

Animesh Adhikari

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Science with the Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for Solar Terrestrial Research 19 / 30 Energy Release and Particle Acceleration Energy ReleaseScience with the Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope Dale E. Gary New Jersey Institute of Technology #12;EGU Meeting 2004 April 29 NJIT Center for Solar Terrestrial Research 2 / 30 #12;EGU Meeting

417

Frequency scaling of linear super-colliders  

SciTech Connect

The development of electron-positron linear colliders in the TeV energy range will be facilitated by the development of high-power rf sources at frequencies above 2856 MHz. Present S-band technology, represented by the SLC, would require a length in excess of 50 km per linac to accelerate particles to energies above 1 TeV. By raising the rf driving frequency, the rf breakdown limit is increased, thereby allowing the length of the accelerators to be reduced. Currently available rf power sources set the realizable gradient limit in an rf linac at frequencies above S-band. This paper presents a model for the frequency scaling of linear colliders, with luminosity scaled in proportion to the square of the center-of-mass energy. Since wakefield effects are the dominant deleterious effect, a separate single-bunch simulation model is described which calculates the evolution of the beam bunch with specified wakefields, including the effects of using programmed phase positioning and Landau damping. The results presented here have been obtained for a SLAC structure, scaled in proportion to wavelength.

Mondelli, A.; Chernin, D.; Drobot, A.; Reiser, M.; Granatstein, V.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

FAST: Frequency-aware static timing analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy is a valuable resource in embedded systems as the lifetime of many such systems is constrained by their battery capacity. Recent advances in processor design have added support for dynamic frequency/voltage scaling (DVS) for saving energy. Recent ... Keywords: Real-time systems, dynamic voltage scaling, scheduling, worst-case execution time analysis

Kiran Seth; Aravindh Anantaraman; Frank Mueller; Eric Rotenberg

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Frequency dependence of mud volcano response to earthquakes Maxwell L. Rudolph1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the nearby Hudson Ranch I geothermal facility; all visits occurred prior to the plant's commissioning on March 9, 2012 (M. Cichon, 49.9-MW Hudson Ranch I Geothermal Plant Unveiled in California, 2012, http://www. renewableenergyworld.com/rea/news/article/2012/05/49-9- mw-hudson-ranch-i-geothermal-plant-unveiled-in-calif). [7

Manga, Michael

420

Policy and Regulations | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy and Regulations Policy and Regulations In supporting Department of Energy needs, we provide assistance in internal and external policy. DOE Policies Federal Regulations OMB...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw frequency regulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Texas State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas Texas State Regulations: Texas State of Texas The Railroad Commission of Texas (RCC), through the Oil and Gas Division, administers oil and gas exploration, development, and production operations, except for oil and gas leasing, royalty payments, surface damages through oil and gas operations, and operator-landowner contracts. The RCC and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), formerly, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding clarifying jurisdiction over oil field wastes generated in connection with oil and gas exploration, development, and production. The RCC Oil and Gas Division operates nine district offices, each staffed with field enforcement and support personnel.

422

Self-regulating valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable, self-regulating valve having a hydraulic loss coefficient proportional to a positive exponential power of the flow rate. The device includes two objects in a flow channel and structure which assures that the distance between the two objects is an increasing function of the flow rate. The range of spacing between the objects is such that the hydraulic resistance of the valve is an increasing function of the distance between the two objects so that the desired hydraulic loss coefficient as a function of flow rate is obtained without variation in the flow area.

Humphreys, D.A.

1982-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

423

Growth regulation by macrophages  

SciTech Connect

The evidence reviewed here indicates that macrophages, either acting alone or in concert with other cells, influence the proliferation of multiple types of cells. Most of the data indicate that these effects are mediated by soluble macrophage-elaborated products (probably proteins) although the role of direct cell-to-cell contacts cannot be ruled out in all cases. A degree of success has been achieved on the biochemical characterization of these factors, due mainly to their low specific activity in conditioned medium and the lack of rapid, specific assays. Understanding the growth-regulating potential of macrophages is an important and needed area of research.

Wharton, W.; Walker, E.; Stewart, C.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Internal Technical Report, Management Plan for Fluid Supply and Injection System for the Raft River 5 MW(e) Pilot Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details a plan for developing a fluid supply system for the First 5 MW(e) Pilot Power Plant at Raft River. The pilot plant has been specifically designed to use the medium-temperature geothermal water so common throughout the West. EG and G Idaho, Inc., the Department of Energy Raft River Rural Electric Co-op, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the State of Idaho have worked together to develop a facility that will use an organic liquid as the working fluid. Four wells have been drilled in the Raft River Valley, about ten miles South of Malta, in southern Idaho. The completed well system will consist of seven wells: two conventional injection wells, three production wells, and a standby reserve well of each type. The additional three wells are to be drilled in FY-1978, in order to complete a coordinated test program before the First Pilot Power Plant is ready for operation. The system has been designed to meet the test-loop pilot plant's basic requirement: a 2450 gpm supply of geothermal fluid, at a nominal temperature of 290 F and with salinity of less than 5000 ppm. Injection of cooled geothermal fluid into the Raft River reservoir will also require a network of monitor wells. The Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR), USGS, EG and G Idaho, and the Department of Energy will jointly select sites for two 1500-foot and five 500-foot monitoring wells. This plan considers the work required to complete construction of the fluid supply system and obtain a preliminary check of its performance capability; the plan will discuss project management, costs, schedules, drilling, testing, environmental monitoring, and safety.

None

1978-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

425

Engineering study of a 20 MW lead--acid battery energy storage demonstration plant. Final report for the period ending October 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Research and Engineering Operation of Bechtel Corporation conducted an engineering study of a 20-MW lead--acid battery energy storage demonstration plant. Ten alternative designs were evaluated. Basically, the configurations proposed for the demonstration plants are those of the mature plants which would follow. The designs of the individual plants are based on the cell designs and the means used to house the cells. Initially, proposed cell designs from five manufacturers were considered. To conform with the level of effort allowed for this engineering study, two manufacturers' cells (one open-tank design and one sealed cell design) were selected by ERDA and Bechtel as being representative. These designs formed the basis for the detailed evaluation conducted in this study. The plant and battery configurations evaluated in the study are a large open-tank cell, configured in rows and housed in four buildings; a sealed cell, configured in a single layer of close packed rows in a single building; a sealed cell, configured in a three-tiered arrangement in a single building; and a sealed cell, configured with groups of cells housed in weatherproof modules and placed outdoors. Annual operating costs based on these mature plant costs show lead--acid load-leveling plants are generally not economically competitive with the alternatives when no consideration is given to their other possible benefits to the power system. However, application of credits (e.g., transmission line or spinning reserve credits) can make such plants economically competitive with gas turbine peaking units in specific situations. 46 figures, 25 tables. (RWR)

Not Available

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Geology and potential uses of the geopressure resources of the Gulf Coast. [6,000 MW-centuries of recoverable electric energy, 200 Tcf of methane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US ERDA has supported efforts to evaluate the potential contribution to the national energy supply of geopressured geothermal resources in the Gulf Coast. Efforts include a program of resource assessment and programs to examine utilization of the resource for the production of electricity and as a source of industrial-process heat. Work on resource assessment has suggested the presence of perhaps as much as 6,000 MW-centuries of recoverable electric energy and of 200 Tcf of methane. This program has emphasized finding significantly large sand bodies within the geopressured stratigraphic section in addition to defining the distribution of abnormal fluid pressures and formation temperatures. Regional sand facies analyses conducted thus far indicate five locations in the Frio formation of Central and South Texas where adequately large geopressured geothermal resources may be present. Engineering studies of energy-conversion systems based on total-flow, flashed-steam, and binary-cycle concepts show that development of electric power from the Gulf Coast geopressure resource is technically feasible. Study of use of the resource as process heat in pulp and paper mills and new sugar refineries has shown that these uses also are technically sound. The thermal content of a barrel of geothermal brine can cost as little as 9 mills when credited for recoverable hydraulic energy and methane. The value of heat approaches 50 mills per bbl for certain applications. All programs have pointed out clearly the need for better specific understanding of the resource, especially its dissolved methane content and its ability to produce for tens of years.

Howard, J.H.; House, P.A.; Johnson, P.M.; Towse, D.F.; Bebout, D.G.; Dorfman, M.H.; Agagu, O.K.; Hornburg, C.D.; Morin, O.J.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Tunable single-photon frequency conversion in a Sagnac interferometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the single-photon frequency conversion of a five-level emitter coupled to a Sagnac interferometer. We show that the unity conversion efficiency can be achieved either in resonance or off-resonance case under the ideal condition. In particular, the frequency of the output photon can be controlled by the frequencies and Rabi frequencies of the external driving fields.

Wei-Bin Yan; Jin-Feng Huang; Heng Fan

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Delta-sigma (??) frequency synthesizers for wireless applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the state-of-the-art design approaches to delta-sigma (@D@S) frequency synthesizers for wireless transceiver applications. Various synthesizer architectures, including the integer and fractional-N synthesizers, and frequency-to-digital ... Keywords: Frequency synthesizers, Frequency-to-digital converters, RF transmitters, Sigma-delta modulation

Bertan Bakkaloglu; Sayfe Kiaei; Bikram Chaudhuri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Laser frequency combs for astronomical observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A direct measurement of the universe's expansion history could be made by observing in real time the evolution of the cosmological redshift of distant objects. However, this would require measurements of Doppler velocity drifts of about 1 centimeter per second per year, and astronomical spectrographs have not yet been calibrated to this tolerance. We demonstrate the first use of a laser frequency comb for wavelength calibration of an astronomical telescope. Even with a simple analysis, absolute calibration is achieved with an equivalent Doppler precision of approximately 9 meters per second at about 1.5 micrometers - beyond state-of-the-art accuracy. We show that tracking complex, time-varying systematic effects in the spectrograph and detector system is a particular advantage of laser frequency comb calibration. This technique promises an effective means for modeling and removal of such systematic effects to the accuracy required by future experiments to see direct evidence of the universe's putative acceleration.

Tilo Steinmetz; Tobias Wilken; Constanza Araujo-Hauck; Ronald Holzwarth; Theodor W. Hnsch; Luca Pasquini; Antonio Manescau; Sandro D'Odorico; Michael T. Murphy; Thomas Kentischer; Wolfgang Schmidt; Thomas Udem

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

430

High Frequency Effects of Variable Frequency Drives (VFD) on Electrical Submersible Pump (ESP) Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Variable frequency drives (VFD) and subsea (umbilical) cables are frequently used in electrical submersible pump (ESP) systems for offshore platforms. There are two basic system configurations for ESP systems; VFD can be installed on the platform and the motor is connected to it through an umbilical cable, and VFD and the motor are installed closely and they are connected to the system through an umbilical cable. In this thesis, the pros and cons of each configuration are mentioned, but the focus is on the system with a VFD controlled motor through a long umbilical cable. A 36-pulse VFD is studied. Since multilevel VFDs have high frequency harmonics, high frequency modeling of the umbilical cable is used, and skin effect is also taken into consideration in the cable. The effect of the interactions between the umbilical cable and high frequency harmonics on the motor terminal voltage is explored.

Ozkentli, Esra

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Solar heat regulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar heat regulating device is described for selectively heating with sunlight the air inside a building having a window and shielding and insulating the air inside the building from the heat of sunlight outside the building including: a frame for mounting the solar heat regulating device inside the building and adjacent to the window; a plurality of hollow vanes, each of the vanes having at least one passageway for passing air therethrough; the vanes having a heat absorptive surface on a first side thereof which allows solar radiation impinging on the heat absorptive surface to heat the air contained in the one passageway of the vanes; the vanes having a heat reflective surface on a second side of the vanes which reflects the solar radiation impinging on the second side of the vanes and shields the inside of the building from solar radiation impinging on the vanes; and the vanes having side portions extending between the first and second sides of the vanes, the side portions, and the first and second sides forming the one passageway through each of the vanes, the side portions and the first and second sides of the vanes terminating in top end and bottom end portions.

Boynton, S.L.

1987-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

432

[Regulation of terpene metabolism  

SciTech Connect

During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

Croteau, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

[Regulation of terpene metabolism  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

Croteau, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

Brambilla, Marco (St. Egreve, FR); Lallia, Pascal (Grenoble, FR)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

San Diego County - Wind Regulations (California) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Regulations (California) San Diego County - Wind Regulations (California) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Wind Buying & Making...

436

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial...

437

Kentucky State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kentucky Kentucky State Regulations: Kentucky State of Kentucky The Division of Oil and Gas (DOG) in the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) fosters conservation of all mineral resources, encourages exploration of such resources, protects the correlative rights of land and mineral owners, prohibits waste and unnecessary surface loss and damage, and encourages the maximum recovery of oil and gas from all deposits. The Energy and Environment Cabinet brings together various Kentucky agencies. It is tasked with protecting and enhancing Kentucky's natural resources. The Department for Environmental Protection (DEP) administers the major environmental protection laws. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4 administers Class II underground injection control (UIC) programs in Kentucky in direct implementation.

438

Nebraska State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nebraska Nebraska State Regulations: Nebraska State of Nebraska The Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (NOGCC) seeks to prevent waste, protect correlative rights of all owners, and encourage and authorize secondary recovery, pressure maintenance, cycling, or recycling, in order that the greatest ultimate recovery of oil and gas may be obtained within the state while protecting the environment. Otherwise, the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) administers the major environmental protection laws. Contact Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission 922 Illinois Street, P.O. Box 399 Sidney, NE 69162 (308) 254-6919 (phone) (308) 254-6922 (fax) Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality 1200 "N" Street, Suite 400 P.O. Pox 98922 Lincoln, NE 68509

439

Regulation of Terpene Metabolism  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Research over the last four years has progressed fairly closely along the lines initially proposed, with progress-driven expansion of Objectives 1, 2 and 3. Recent advances have developed from three research thrusts: 1. Random sequencing of an enriched peppermint oil gland cDNA library has given access to a large number of potential pathway and regulatory genes for test of function; 2. The availability of new DNA probes and antibodies has permitted investigation of developmental regulation and organization of terpenoid metabolism; and 3. The development of a transformation system for peppermint by colleagues at Purdue University has allowed direct transgenic testing of gene function and added a biotechnological component to the project. The current status of each of the original research objectives is outlined below.

Rodney Croteau

2004-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

440

Biophysics of filament length regulation by molecular motors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulating physical size is an essential problem that biological organisms must solve from the subcellular to the organismal scales, but it is not well understood what physical principles and mechanisms organisms use to sense and regulate their size. Any biophysical size-regulation scheme operates in a noisy environment and must be robust to other cellular dynamics and fluctuations. This work develops theory of filament length regulation inspired by recent experiments on kinesin-8 motor proteins, which move with directional bias on microtubule filaments and alter microtubule dynamics. Purified kinesin-8 motors can depolymerize chemically-stabilized microtubules. In the length-dependent depolymerization model, the rate of depolymerization tends to increase with filament length, because long filaments accumulate more motors at their tips and therefore shorten more quickly. When balanced with a constant filament growth rate, this mechanism can lead to a fixed polymer length. However, the mechanism by which kinesin-8 motors affect the length of dynamic microtubules in cells is less clear. We study the more biologically realistic problem of microtubule dynamic instability modulated by a motor-dependent increase in the filament catastrophe frequency. This leads to a significant decrease in the mean filament length and a narrowing of the filament length distribution. The results improve our understanding of the biophysics of length regulation in cells.

Hui-Shun Kuan; M. D. Betterton

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Air-flow regulation system for a coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved air-flow regulator for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which allows close air-flow regulation from a compressor source even though the pressure variations are too rapid for a single primary control loop to respond. The improved system includes a primary controller to control a valve in the main (large) air supply line to regulate large slow changes in flow. A secondary controller is used to control a smaller, faster acting valve in a secondary (small) air supply line parallel to the main line valve to regulate rapid cyclic deviations in air flow. A low-pass filter with a time constant of from 20 to 50 seconds couples the output of the secondary controller to the input of the primary controller so that the primary controller only responds to slow changes in the air-flow rate, the faster, cyclic deviations in flow rate sensed and corrected by the secondary controller loop do not reach the primary controller due to the high frequency rejection provided by the filter. This control arrangement provides at least a factor of 5 improvement in air-flow regulation for a coal gasifier in which air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor through a surge tank.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

[Regulation of terpene metabolism  

SciTech Connect

Terpenoid oils, resins, and waxes from plants are important renewable resources. The objective of this project is to understand the regulation of terpenoid metabolism using the monoterpenes (C[sub 10]) as a model. The pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism have been established, and the relevant enzymes characterized. Developmental studies relating enzyme levels to terpene accumulation within the oil gland sites of synthesis, and work with bioregulators, indicate that monoterpene production is controlled by terpene cyclases, the enzymes catalyzing the first step of the monoterpene pathway. As the leaf oil glands mature, cyclase levels decline and monoterpene biosynthesis ceases. Yield then decreases as the monoterpenes undergo catabolism by a process involving conversion to a glycoside and transport from the leaf glands to the root. At this site, the terpenoid is oxidatively degraded to acetate that is recycled into other lipid metabolites. During the transition from terpene biosynthesis to catabolism, the oil glands undergo dramatic ultrastructural modification. Degradation of the producing cells results in mixing of previously compartmentized monoterpenes with the catabolic enzymes, ultimately leading to yield decline. This regulatory model is being applied to the formation of other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15] C[sub 20], C[sub 30], C[sub 40]) within the oil glands. Preliminary investigations on the formation of sesquiterpenes (C[sub 15]) suggest that the corresponding cyclases may play a lesser role in determining yield of these products, but that compartmentation effects are important. From these studies, a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of terpene metabolism is being constructed. Results from this project wail have important consequences for the yield and composition of terpenoid natural products that can be made available for industrial exploitation.

Croteau, R.

1989-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

443

Federal Regulations: Environmental Protection Agency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations Hazardous Waste Exemption for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Wastes. In 1980, Congress conditionally exempted oil and gas...

444

California Appliance Efficiency Regulation Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Julie Osborn As part of the response to last summer's electricity crisis, the California Energy Commission (CEC) is updating the state's appliance efficiency regulations. On...

445

Underground Injection Control Regulations (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article prohibits injection of hazardous or radioactive wastes into or above an underground source of drinking water, establishes permit conditions and states regulations for design,...

446

Export.gov - Regulations / Licenses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division of the U.S. Census Bureau. The blog has several posts related to the Foreign Trade Regulations and maintaining export compliance. Foreign Standards and Certification...

447

Self isolating high frequency saturable reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention discloses a saturable reactor and a method for decoupling the interwinding capacitance from the frequency limitations of the reactor so that the equivalent electrical circuit of the saturable reactor comprises a variable inductor. The saturable reactor comprises a plurality of physically symmetrical magnetic cores with closed loop magnetic paths and a novel method of wiring a control winding and a RF winding. The present invention additionally discloses a matching network and method for matching the impedances of a RF generator to a load. The matching network comprises a matching transformer and a saturable reactor.

Moore, James A. (Powell, TN)

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

448

Communicating oscillatory networks: Frequency Domain Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-deterministic models and used the presented techni- que of frequency domain analysis to investigate the differ- ences. The quasi-deterministic models are constructed from exactly the same reaction scheme and kinetic para- meters, however the kinetic functions... significant role in our findings. Note in particular from Additional file 1 Table S4 that the two species that directly perturb the cell cycle (namely p53a and NF-#1;Bn) have low stochasticity, so any noise inherent in their respective net- works does...

Ihekwaba, Adaoha E C; Sedwards, Sean

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

449

Low frequency pressure modulation of indium antimonide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lumped parameter resonator capable of generating megapascal pressures at low frequency (kilohertz) is described. Accelerometers are used to determine the applied pressure, and are calibrated with a piezoelectric sample. A laser diagnostic was also developed to measure the pressure in semiconductor samples through the band gap pressure dependence. In addition, the laser diagnostic has been used to measure the attenuation coefficient {alpha} of commercially available indium antimonide (InSb) wafers. The resonator and laser diagnostic have been used with InSb samples to verify the pressure response.

Hallock, Gary A. [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-0240 (United States); Meier, Mark A. [ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, Texas 77252-2189 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

THE IMPACT OF FREQUENCY STANDARDS ON COHERENCE IN VLBI AT THE HIGHEST FREQUENCIES  

SciTech Connect

We have carried out full imaging simulation studies to explore the impact of frequency standards in millimeter and submillimeter very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), focusing on the coherence time and sensitivity. In particular, we compare the performance of the H-maser, traditionally used in VLBI, to that of ultra-stable cryocooled sapphire oscillators over a range of observing frequencies, weather conditions, and analysis strategies. Our simulations show that at the highest frequencies, the losses induced by H-maser instabilities are comparable to those from high-quality tropospheric conditions. We find significant benefits in replacing H-masers with cryocooled sapphire oscillator based frequency references in VLBI observations at frequencies above 175 GHz in sites which have the best weather conditions; at 350 GHz we estimate a 20%-40% increase in sensitivity over that obtained when the sites have H-masers, for coherence losses of 20%-10%, respectively. Maximum benefits are to be expected by using co-located Water Vapor Radiometers for atmospheric correction. In this case, we estimate a 60%-120% increase in sensitivity over the H-maser at 350 GHz.

Rioja, M.; Dodson, R. [ICRAR, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Asaki, Y. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuou, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Hartnett, J. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Tingay, S., E-mail: maria.rioja@icrar.org [ICRAR, Curtin University, Perth (Australia)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Computer-specific metrics for the regulation and load following ancillary services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In competitive electricity markets, the costs for each ancillary service should be charged to those who cause the costs to be incurred with charges based on the factors that contribute to these costs. For example, the amount of generating capacity assigned to the regulation service is a function of the short-term volatility of system load. Therefore, the charges for regulation should be related to the volatility of each load, not to its average demand. This report discusses the economic efficiency and equity benefits of assessing charges on the basis of customer-specific costs (rather than the traditional billing determinants, MWh or MW), focusing on two key real-power ancillary services, regulation and load following. The authors determine the extent to which individual customers and groups of customers contribute to the system's generation requirements for these two services. In particular, they analyze load data to determine whether some customers account for shares of these two services that differ substantially from their shares of total electricity consumption.

Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Trirotron: triode rotating beam radio frequency amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High efficiency amplification of radio frequencies to very high power levels including: establishing a cylindrical cloud of electrons; establishing an electrical field surrounding and coaxial with the electron cloud to bias the electrons to remain in the cloud; establishing a rotating electrical field that surrounds and is coaxial with the steady field, the circular path of the rotating field being one wavelength long, whereby the peak of one phase of the rotating field is used to accelerate electrons in a beam through the bias field in synchronism with the peak of the rotating field so that there is a beam of electrons continuously extracted from the cloud and rotating with the peak; establishing a steady electrical field that surrounds and is coaxial with the rotating field for high-energy radial acceleration of the rotating beam of electrons; and resonating the rotating beam of electrons within a space surrounding the second field, the space being selected to have a phase velocity equal to that of the rotating field to thereby produce a high-power output at the frequency of the rotating field.

Lebacqz, Jean V. (Stanford, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Simple Low-Frequency Beam Pickup  

SciTech Connect

Detection of the field induced by a beam outside of the beam pipe can be used as a beam diagnostic. Wires placed in longitudinal slots in the outside wall of the beam pipe can be used as a beam pickup. This has a very small beam-coupling impedance and avoids complications of having a feedthrough. The signal can be reasonably high at low frequencies. We present a field waveform at the outer side of a beam pipe, obtained as a result of calculations and measurements. We calculate the beam-coupling impedance due to a long longitudinal slot in the resistive wall and the signal induced in a wire placed in such a slot and shielded by a thin screen from the beam. These results should be relevant for impedance calculations of the slot in an antechamber and for slots in the PEP-II distributed ion pump screens. The design of the low-frequency beam position monitor is very simple. It can be used in storage rings, synchrotron light sources, and free electron lasers, like LINAC coherent light source.

Novokhatski, A.; Heifets, S.; /SLAC; Aleksandrov, A.; /Oak Ridge

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

454

New approach of determinations of earthquake moment magnitude using near earthquake source duration and maximum displacement amplitude of high frequency energy radiation  

SciTech Connect

The new approach method to determine the magnitude by using amplitude displacement relationship (A), epicenter distance ({Delta}) and duration of high frequency radiation (t) has been investigated for Tasikmalaya earthquake, on September 2, 2009, and their aftershock. Moment magnitude scale commonly used seismic surface waves with the teleseismic range of the period is greater than 200 seconds or a moment magnitude of the P wave using teleseismic seismogram data and the range of 10-60 seconds. In this research techniques have been developed a new approach to determine the displacement amplitude and duration of high frequency radiation using near earthquake. Determination of the duration of high frequency using half of period of P waves on the seismograms displacement. This is due tothe very complex rupture process in the near earthquake. Seismic data of the P wave mixing with other wave (S wave) before the duration runs out, so it is difficult to separate or determined the final of P-wave. Application of the 68 earthquakes recorded by station of CISI, Garut West Java, the following relationship is obtained: Mw = 0.78 log (A) + 0.83 log {Delta}+ 0.69 log (t) + 6.46 with: A (m), d (km) and t (second). Moment magnitude of this new approach is quite reliable, time processing faster so useful for early warning.

Gunawan, H.; Puspito, N. T.; Ibrahim, G.; Harjadi, P. J. P. [ITB, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Tecnology (Indonesia); BMKG (Indonesia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

455

High-frequency Light Reflector via Low-frequency Light Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the momentum of light can be reversed via the atomic coherence created by another light with one or two orders of magnitude lower frequency. Both the backward retrieval of single photons from a time-ordered Dicke state and the reflection of continuous waves by high-order photonic band gaps are analyzed. A proof-of-principle experiment with thermal Rb vapor is proposed based on presently available techniques. This holds promise for X-ray reflectors controlled by low-frequency light.

Wang, Da-Wei; Evers, Joerg; Scully, Marlan O

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Energy Storage for Use in Load Frequency Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Certain energy storage technologies are well-suited to the high-frequency, high-cycling operation which is required in provision of load frequency control (LFC). To limit the total stored energy capacity required while ...

Leitermann, Olivia

457

Automatic calibration of modulated fractional-N frequency synthesizers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this research has been the development of a low power, radio frequency transmitter architecture. Specifically, a technique for in service automatic calibration of a modulated phase locked loop (PLL) frequency ...