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1

Flywheel energy storage workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J. [comps.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Design & development fo a 20-MW flywheel-based frequency regulation power plant : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the successful efforts of Beacon Power to design and develop a 20-MW frequency regulation power plant based solely on flywheels. Beacon's Smart Matrix (Flywheel) Systems regulation power plant, unlike coal or natural gas generators, will not burn fossil fuel or directly produce particulates or other air emissions and will have the ability to ramp up or down in a matter of seconds. The report describes how data from the scaled Beacon system, deployed in California and New York, proved that the flywheel-based systems provided faster responding regulation services in terms of cost-performance and environmental impact. Included in the report is a description of Beacon's design package for a generic, multi-MW flywheel-based regulation power plant that allows accurate bids from a design/build contractor and Beacon's recommendations for site requirements that would ensure the fastest possible construction. The paper concludes with a statement about Beacon's plans for a lower cost, modular-style substation based on the 20-MW design.

Rounds, Robert (Beacon Power, Tyngsboro, MA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Flywheel Energy Storage technology workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in recent years of high strength/lightweight materials, high performance magnetic bearings, and power electronics technology has spurred a renewed interest by the transportation, utility, and manufacturing industries in Flywheel Energy Storage (FES) technologies. FES offers several advantages over conventional electro-chemical energy storage, such as high specific energy and specific power, fast charging time, long service life, high turnaround efficiency (energy out/energy in), and no hazardous/toxic materials or chemicals are involved. Potential applications of FES units include power supplies for hybrid and electric vehicles, electric vehicle charging stations, space systems, and pulsed power devices. Also, FES units can be used for utility load leveling, uninterruptable power supplies to protect electronic equipment and electrical machinery, and for intermittent wind or photovoltaic energy sources. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a forum to highlight technologies that offer a high potential to increase the performance of FES systems and to discuss potential solutions to overcome present FES application barriers. This document consists of viewgraphs from 27 presentations.

O`Kain, D.; Howell, D. [comps.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Advanced Flywheel Composite Rotors: Low-Cost, High-Energy Density Flywheel Storage Grid Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GRIDS Project: Boeing is developing a new material for use in the rotor of a low-cost, high-energy flywheel storage technology. Flywheels store energy by increasing the speed of an internal rotor —slowing the rotor releases the energy back to the grid when needed. The faster the rotor spins, the more energy it can store. Boeing’s new material could drastically improve the energy stored in the rotor. The team will work to improve the storage capacity of their flywheels and increase the duration over which they store energy. The ultimate goal of this project is to create a flywheel system that can be scaled up for use by electric utility companies and produce power for a full hour at a cost of $100 per kilowatt hour.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Reluctance apparatus for flywheel energy storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A motor generator for providing high efficiency, controlled voltage output or storage of energy in a flywheel system. A motor generator includes a stator of a soft ferromagnetic material, a motor coil and a generator coil, and a rotor has at least one embedded soft ferromagnetic piece. Control of voltage output is achieved by use of multiple stator pieces and multiple rotors with controllable gaps between the stator pieces and the soft ferromagnetic piece.

Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

High Speed Flywheels for Integrated Energy Storage and Attitude Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Speed Flywheels for Integrated Energy Storage and Attitude Control Christopher D. Hall. Decomposition of the space of internal torques separates the attitude control functionfrom the energy storage simultaneously performing energy storage and extraction operations. 1 Introduction The power engineering

Hall, Christopher D.

7

Vibration Isolation of a Locomotive Mounted Energy Storage Flywheel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing flywheels to store and reuse energy from regenerative braking on locomotives is a new technology being developed in the Vibration Control and Electromechanics Lab at Texas A&M. This thesis focuses on the motion analysis of a locomotive...

Zhang, Xiaohua

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

8

Specific Energy and Energy Density Analysis of Conventional and NonConventional Flywheels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flywheels are widely used as a means of energy storage throughout different applications such as hybrid electric vehicles, spacecraft, and electrical grids. The research presented here investigates various steel flywheel constructions. The purpose...

Reyna, Ruben

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

9

Flywheel Energy Storage -- An Alternative to Batteries for UPS Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct current (DC) system flywheel energy storage technology can be used as a substitute for batteries for providing backup power to an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) system. Although the initial cost will usually be higher, flywheels offer a much longer life, reduced maintenance, a smaller footprint, and better reliability compared to a battery. The combination of these characteristics will generally result in a lower life-cycle cost for a flywheel compared to a battery. This paper describes the technology, its variations, and installation requirements, as well as provides application advice. One Federal application is highlighted as a “case study,” followed by an illustrative life-cycle cost comparison of batteries and flywheels. A list of manufacturers, with contact information is also provided.

Brown, Daryl R.; Chvala, William D.

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

10

1710 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS, VOL. 39, NO. 6, NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2003 An Integrated Flywheel Energy Storage System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Integrated Flywheel Energy Storage System With Homopolar Inductor Motor/Generator and High-Frequency Drive Abstract--The design, construction, and test of an integrated flywheel energy storage system that also serves as the energy storage rotor for the flywheel system. A high-frequency six-step drive scheme

Sanders, Seth

11

An Integrated Flywheel Energy Storage System with a Homopolar Inductor Motor/Generator and High-Frequency Drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Integrated Flywheel Energy Storage System with a Homopolar Inductor Motor/Generator and High Flywheel Energy Storage System with a Homopolar Inductor Motor/Generator and High-Frequency Drive Copyright 2003 by Perry I-Pei Tsao #12;1 Abstract An Integrated Flywheel Energy Storage System with a Homopolar

Sanders, Seth

12

Investigation of Synergy Between Electrochemical Capacitors, Flywheels, and Batteries in Hybrid Energy Storage for PV Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a study that investigated the synergy between electrochemical capacitors (ECs) and flywheels, in combination with each other and with batteries, as energy storage subsystems in photovoltaic (PV) systems. EC and flywheel technologies are described and the potential advantages and disadvantages of each in PV energy storage subsystems are discussed. Seven applications for PV energy storage subsystems are described along with the potential market for each of these applications. A spreadsheet model, which used the net present value method, was used to analyze and compare the costs over time of various system configurations based on flywheel models. It appears that a synergistic relationship exists between ECS and flywheels. Further investigation is recommended to quantify the performance and economic tradeoffs of this synergy and its effect on overall system costs.

Miller, John; Sibley, Lewis, B.; Wohlgemuth, John

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Fact Sheet: Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant (August  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA5 &ofDepartment of Energy On November 5, 2008, the|2013) |

14

Hazle Spindle, LLC Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many autoThisThe Hawaii Hazle Spindle, LLC

15

THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

PCIM, Nrnberg, may 2003 FLYWHEEL ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS IN HYBRID AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale storage of the type pumped hydro, compressed air, flow batteries, etc.), or even at the level of potentialPCIM, Nürnberg, may 2003 FLYWHEEL ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS IN HYBRID AND DISTRIBUTED ELECTRICITY of the electromechanical storage of energy over long operating cycles (with time constants ranging from several minutes

Boyer, Edmond

17

Lightweight flywheel containment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

Smith, James R. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Rimmed and edge thickened Stodola shaped flywheel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body composed of essentially planar isotropic high strength material. The flywheel body is enclosed by a rim of circumferentially wound fiber embedded in resin. The rim promotes flywheel safety and survivability. The flywheel has a truncated and edge thickened Stodola shape designed to optimize system mass and energy storage capability. 6 figs.

Kulkarni, S.V.; Stone, R.G.

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

19

Flywheel Project Escalates Grid Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecordFederal7.pdfFlash_2010_-24.pdfOverview Flow Cells forFluorescentFlywheel

20

'Recycling' Grid Energy with Flywheel Technology | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment ofEnergy.pdfApplications:AdjustmentDepartment'Extreme

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Benefits from flywheel energy storage for area regulation in California - demonstration results : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a high-level analysis of the benefit and cost for flywheel energy storage used to provide area regulation for the electricity supply and transmission system in California. Area regulation is an 'ancillary service' needed for a reliable and stable regional electricity grid. The analysis was based on results from a demonstration, in California, of flywheel energy storage developed by Beacon Power Corporation (the system's manufacturer). Demonstrated was flywheel storage systems ability to provide 'rapid-response' regulation. Flywheel storage output can be varied much more rapidly than the output from conventional regulation sources, making flywheels more attractive than conventional regulation resources. The performance of the flywheel storage system demonstrated was generally consistent with requirements for a possible new class of regulation resources - 'rapid-response' energy-storage-based regulation - in California. In short, it was demonstrated that Beacon Power Corporation's flywheel system follows a rapidly changing control signal (the ACE, which changes every four seconds). Based on the results and on expected plant cost and performance, the Beacon Power flywheel storage system has a good chance of being a financially viable regulation resource. Results indicate a benefit/cost ratio of 1.5 to 1.8 using what may be somewhat conservative assumptions. A benefit/cost ratio of one indicates that, based on the financial assumptions used, the investment's financial returns just meet the investors target.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Flywheel Energy Storage Device for Hybrid and Electric Vehicles - Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" |beam damageFlyer, Title VI

23

Vibration Suppression and Flywheel Energy Storage in a Drillstring Bottom-Hole-Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and environmental disposal. Extreme and harsh downhole conditions necessitate that the flywheel module withstands temperatures and pressures exceeding 300 ?F and 20 kpsi, respectively, as well as violent vibrations encountered during drilling. Moreover, the flywheel...

Saeed, Ahmed

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

24

Rimmed and edge thickened stodola shaped flywheel. [Patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body composed of essentially planar isotropic high strength material. The flywheel body is enclosed by a rim of circumferentially wound fiber embedded in resin. The rim promotes flywheel safety and survivability. The flywheel has a truncated and edge thickened Stodola shape designed to optimize system mass and energy storage capability.

Kulkarni, S.V.; Stone, R.G.

1980-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

25

Rimmed and edge thickened Stodola shaped flywheel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flywheel (10) is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel (10) has a body (15) composed of essentially planar isotropic high strength material. The flywheel (10) body (15) is enclosed by a rim (50) of circumferentially wound fiber (2) embedded in resin (3). The rim (50) promotes flywheel (10) safety and survivability. The flywheel (10) has a truncated and edge thickened Stodola shape designed to optimize system mass and energy storage capability.

Kulkarni, Satish V. (San Ramon, CA); Stone, Richard G. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

GSFC flywheel status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The assessment of flywheel energy storage for spacecraft power system is based on the conceptual flywheel design. This conceptual design of an integrated flywheel is based on the Mechanical Capacitor which evolved from development of magnetic bearings and permanent magnet ironless-brushless DC motors. The mechanical capacitor is based on three key technologies: (1) a composite rotor with a low ID to OD ratio for high energy density (weight and volume) (2) magnetic suspension close to the geometric center of the rotating mass to minimize loads normally encountered on the ends of a shaft, a no-wear mechanism in a vacuum environment, and to minimize losses at high rotational speeds (3) permanent magnet ironless-brushless DC motor/generator for high efficiency of conversion and low losses at high rotational speeds. The complete system would include the necessary electronics for the motor/generator, containment, and counterrotating wheels for attitude control compatibility.

Rodriguez, G.E.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Improved flywheel materials : characterization of nanofiber modified flywheel test specimen.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As alternative energy generating devices (i.e., solar, wind, etc) are added onto the electrical energy grid (AC grid), irregularities in the available electricity due to natural occurrences (i.e., clouds reducing solar input or wind burst increasing wind powered turbines) will be dramatically increased. Due to their almost instantaneous response, modern flywheel-based energy storage devices can act a mechanical mechanism to regulate the AC grid; however, improved spin speeds will be required to meet the necessary energy levels to balance thesegreen' energy variances. Focusing on composite flywheels, we have investigated methods for improving the spin speeds based on materials needs. The so-called composite flywheels are composed of carbon fiber (C-fiber), glass fiber, and aglue' (resin) to hold them together. For this effort, we have focused on the addition of fillers to the resin in order to improve its properties. Based on the high loads required for standard meso-sized fillers, this project investigated the utility of ceramic nanofillers since they can be added at very low load levels due to their high surface area. The impact that TiO2 nanowires had on the final strength of the flywheel material was determined by athree-point-bend' test. The results of the introduction of nanomaterials demonstrated an increase instrength' of the flywheel's C-fiber-resin moiety, with an upper limit of a 30% increase being reported. An analysis of the economic impact concerning the utilization of the nanowires was undertaken and after accounting for new-technology and additional production costs, return on improved-nanocomposite investment was approximated at 4-6% per year over the 20-year expected service life. Further, it was determined based on the 30% improvement in strength, this change may enable a 20-30% reduction in flywheel energy storage cost (%24/kW-h).

Boyle, Timothy J.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Anderson, Benjamin John; Miller, William Kenneth

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Crossroads (3 MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:InformationCrandall,CriteriaCrookstonLaminated MW)

29

Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flywheel (10) is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel (10) has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel (10) may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel (10) makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

Kulkarni, Satish V. (San Ramon, CA); Christensen, Richard M. (Danville, CA); Toland, Richard H. (West Chester, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel. [Patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

Kulkarni, S.V.; Christensen, R.M.; Toland, R.H.

1980-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

31

Reactor coolant pump flywheel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flywheel for a pump, and in particular a flywheel having a number of high density segments for use in a nuclear reactor coolant pump. The flywheel includes an inner member and an outer member. A number of high density segments are provided between the inner and outer members. The high density segments may be formed from a tungsten based alloy. A preselected gap is provided between each of the number of high density segments. The gap accommodates thermal expansion of each of the number of segments and resists the hoop stress effect/keystoning of the segments.

Finegan, John Raymond; Kreke, Francis Joseph; Casamassa, John Joseph

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

32

Fact Sheet: Grid-Scale Flywheel Energy Storage Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit|Department ofof EnergyUnited States- Dataset2012) |Fact Sheet:

33

Peak Power Bi-directional Transfer From High Speed Flywheel to Electrical Regulated Bus Voltage System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were performed to determine the energy transfer capabilities of a flywheel coupled high speed permanent magnet synchronous machine through the proposed system's energy storage tank. Results are presented

Szabados, Barna

34

Separators for flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors. 10 figs.

Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.C.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Separators for flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors.

Bender, Donald A. (Dublin, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced flywheel energy Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced power electronics interface BESS Battery energy storage system CAES Compressed air energy storage... system ERCOT Electric ... Source: Renewal Resource Data Center,...

37

Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity is critical to our economy, but growth in demand has saturated the power grid causing instability and blackouts. The economic penalty due to lost productivity in the US exceeds $100 billion per year. Opposition to new transmission lines and power plants, environmental restrictions, and an expected $100 billion grid upgrade cost have slowed system improvements. Flywheel electricity storage could provide a more economical, environmentally benign alternative and slash economic losses if units could be scaled up in a cost effective manner to much larger power and capacity than the present maximum of a few hundred kW and a few kWh per flywheel. The goal of this project is to design, construct, and demonstrate a small-scale third generation electricity storage flywheel using a revolutionary architecture scalable to megawatt-hours per unit. First generation flywheels are built from bulk materials such as steel and provide inertia to smooth the motion of mechanical devices such as engines. They can be scaled up to tens of tons or more, but have relatively low energy storage density. Second generation flywheels use similar designs but are fabricated with composite materials such as carbon fiber and epoxy. They are capable of much higher energy storage density but cannot economically be built larger than a few kWh of storage capacity due to structural and stability limitations. LaunchPoint is developing a third generation flywheel — the "Power Ring" — with energy densities as high or higher than second generation flywheels and a totally new architecture scalable to enormous sizes. Electricity storage capacities exceeding 5 megawatt-hours per unit appear both technically feasible and economically attractive. Our design uses a new class of magnetic bearing – a radial gap “shear-force levitator” – that we discovered and patented, and a thin-walled composite hoop rotated at high speed to store kinetic energy. One immediate application is power grid frequency regulation, where Power Rings could cut costs, reduce fuel consumption, eliminate emissions, and reduce the need for new power plants. Other applications include hybrid diesel-electric locomotives, grid power quality, support for renewable energy, spinning reserve, energy management, and facility deferral. Decreased need for new generation and transmission alone could save the nation $2.5 billion per year. Improved grid reliability could cut economic losses due to poor power quality by tens of billions of dollars per year. A large export market for this technology could also develop. Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

38

Model Validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Poster for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing model validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

SWITCH-MODE CONTINUOUSLY VARIABLE TRANSMISSION WITH FLYWHEEL ENERGY Tyler D. Forbes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and power dense hybrid vehicle drive train alternative. INTRODUCTION The increase in global energy efficiency of all products. A major component of global energy consumption is transportation, which consumes energy. Hybrid vehicles improve economy in three primary ways. 1) When a vehicle is stopped, the internal

Van de Ven, James D.

40

Fact Sheet: Grid-Scale Flywheel Energy Storage Plant (October 2012)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFYOxideof Energy Clean CoalDNV KEMA|East

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fiber composite flywheel rim  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flywheel comprising a hub having at least one radially projecting disc, an annular rim secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface. 2 figs.

Davis, D.E.; Ingham, K.T.

1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

42

Property:Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyoCoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed Jump to:DOEInvolveDeploymentSector JumpMW)

43

5-MW Dynamometer Ground Breaking | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EERE Blog Posts of 2014ReviewsndSIMPLE WAYS TO USE4th U.S.-China5-MW

44

EK 131/132 module: Introduction to Wind Energy MW 3-5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EK 131/132 module: Introduction to Wind Energy MW 3-5 Course. This course provides an overview of wind turbine technology and energy concepts. The question of whether wind. Students will measure personal energy use and analyze wind turbine data from the Museum of Science's wind

45

Economic Development Impact of 1,000 MW of Wind Energy in Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Texas has approximately 9,727 MW of wind energy capacity installed, making it a global leader in installed wind energy. As a result of the significant investment the wind industry has brought to Texas, it is important to better understand the economic development impacts of wind energy in Texas. This report analyzes the jobs and economic impacts of 1,000 MW of wind power generation in the state. The impacts highlighted in this report can be used in policy and planning decisions and can be scaled to get a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other wind scenarios. This report can also inform stakeholders in other states about the potential economic impacts associated with the development of 1,000 MW of new wind power generation and the relationships of different elements in the state economy.

Reategui, S.; Hendrickson, S.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Model Validation at the 204 MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe methods to derive and validate equivalent models for a large wind farm. FPL Energy's 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center, which is interconnected to the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) transmission system, was used as a case study. The methods described are applicable to any large wind power plant.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyard Energy Partners LLCBridgewater Name

48

Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyard Energy Partners LLCBridgewater

49

Global wind energy market report. Wind energy industry grows at steady pace, adds over 8,000 MW in 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cumulative global wind energy generating capacity topped 39,000 megawatts (MW) by the end of 2003. New equipment totally over 8,000 MW in capacity was installed worldwide during the year. The report, updated annually, provides information on the status of the wind energy market throughout the world and gives details on various regions. A listing of new and cumulative installed capacity by country and by region is included as an appendix.

anon.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Property:Installed Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2 Jump to: navigation,PVYears

51

Property:Permit/License Buildout (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscotInformation Max Jump to:FlatDemandMonth3

52

Property:Project Installed Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity Jump to: navigation, search PropertyTransfer Method JumpCity

53

Property:Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity Jump to: navigation,WebsiteRenewableBiofuelTechnology

54

MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska:Luz IILynnM Setek85 - Water UseMGTJump

55

PHEV America U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

shall be designed and constructed such that there is complete containment of the flywheel energy storage system during all modes of operation. Additionally, flywheels and their...

56

Optimum rotationally symmetric shells for flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flywheel rim support formed from two shell halves. Each of the shell halves has a disc connected to the central shaft. A first shell element connects to the disc at an interface. A second shell element connects to the first shell element. The second shell element has a plurality of meridional slits. A cylindrical shell element connects to the second shell element. The cylindrical shell element connects to the inner surface of the flywheel rim. A flywheel rim support having a disc connected an outer diameter of a shaft. Two optimally shaped shell elements connect to the optimally shaped disc at an interface. The interface defines a discontinuity in a meridional slope of said support. A cylindrical shell element connects to the two shell elements. The cylindrical shell element has an outer surface for connecting to the inner surface of the flywheel rim. A flywheel rim casing includes an annular shell connected to the central shaft. The annular shell connects to the flywheel rim. A composite shell surrounds the shaft, annular shell and flywheel rim.

Blake, Henry W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Canned pump having a high inertia flywheel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A canned pump is described which includes a motor, impeller, shaft, and high inertia flywheel mounted within a hermetically sealed casing. The flywheel comprises a heavy metal disk made preferably of a uranium alloy with a stainless steel shell sealably enclosing the heavy metal. The outside surfaces of the stainless steel comprise thrust runners and a journal for mating with, respectively, thrust bearing shoes and radial bearing segments. The bearings prevent vibration of the pump and, simultaneously, minimize power losses normally associated with the flywheel resulting from frictionally pumping surrounding fluid.

Veronesi, Luciano (O'Hara Twp., Allegheny County, PA); Raimondi, ALbert A. (Monroeville Borough, Allegheny County, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Canned pump having a high inertia flywheel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A canned pump is described which includes a motor, impeller, shaft, and high inertia flywheel mounted within a hermetically sealed casing. The flywheel comprises a heavy metal disk made preferably of a uranium alloy with a stainless steel shell sealably enclosing the heavy metal. The outside surfaces of the stainless steel comprise thrust runners and a journal for mating with, respectively, thrust bearing shoes and radial bearing segments. The bearings prevent vibration of the pump and, simultaneously, minimize power losses normally associated with the flywheel resulting from frictionally pumping surrounding fluid. 5 figs.

Veronesi, L.; Raimondi, A.A.

1989-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

Layered flywheel with stress reducing construction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flywheel having elastic spokes carrying an elastic rim; and a hub coupling the spokes to a shaft and deforming in response to centrifugal force to match the radial distortion of the spokes.

Friedericy, Johan A. (Palos Verdes Estates, CA); Towgood, Dennis A. (Huntington Beach, CA)

1984-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

60

California's Energy Future - The View to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time-of-use storage (CAES), battery technologies (Na/S,air energy storage (CAES), 25 flywheels and various battery

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Transient analysis of a flywheel battery containment during a full rotor burst event.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flywheels are being developed for use in an Advanced Locomotive Propulsion System (ALPS) targeted for use in high speed passenger rail service. The ALPS combines high performance, high speed gas turbines, motor/generators and flywheels to provide a light-weight, fuel-efficient power system. Such a system is necessary to avoid the high cost of railway electrification, as is currently done for high speed rail service (>100mph) since diesels are too heavy. The light-weight flywheel rotors are made from multilayered composite materials, and are operated at extremely high energy levels. Metal containment structures have been designed to enclose the rotors and provide encapsulation of the rotor during postulated failure events. One such event is a burst mode failure of the rotor in which the composite rim is assumed to burst into debris that impacts against the containment. This paper presents a finite element simulation of the transient structural response of a subscale metal flywheel containment structure to a rotor burst event.

Hsieh, B. J.

1998-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

DESIGN FOR A 1.3 MW, 13 MEV BEAM DUMP FOR AN ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is dumped at an energy close to the injection energy. This energy is chosen a 100 mA average current ERL as a synchrotron radiation source. The 13 MeV optimum injection energy resulting from the abrupt thermal cycles associated with beam trips is a potential failure mechanism. We

63

California’s Energy Future: The View to 2050 - Summary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time-of-use storage (CAES), battery technologies (Na/S,air energy storage (CAES), 25 flywheels and various battery

Yang, Christopher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Flywheel storage for photovoltaics: an economic evaluation of two applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A worth analysis is made for an advanced flywheel storage concept for tandem operation with photovoltaics currently being developed at MIT/Lincoln Laboratories. The applications examined here are a single family residence ...

Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Gamesa Installs 2-MW Wind Turbine at NWTC | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost SavingsEnergy GETEMGolden

66

Interlayer toughening of fiber composite flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An interlayer toughening mechanism to mitigate the growth of damage in fiber composite flywheel rotors for long application. The interlayer toughening mechanism may comprise one or more tough layers composed of high-elongation fibers, high-strength fibers arranged in a woven pattern at a range from 0.degree. to 90.degree. to the rotor axis and bound by a ductile matrix material which adheres to and is compatible with the materials used for the bulk of the rotor. The number and spacing of the tough interlayers is a function of the design requirements and expected lifetime of the rotor. The mechanism has particular application in uninterruptable power supplies, electrical power grid reservoirs, and compulsators for electric guns, as well as electromechanical batteries for vehicles.

Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA); Deteresa, Steven J. (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Interlayer toughening of fiber composite flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An interlayer toughening mechanism is described to mitigate the growth of damage in fiber composite flywheel rotors for long application. The interlayer toughening mechanism may comprise one or more tough layers composed of high-elongation fibers, high-strength fibers arranged in a woven pattern at a range from 0{degree} to 90{degree} to the rotor axis and bound by a ductile matrix material which adheres to and is compatible with the materials used for the bulk of the rotor. The number and spacing of the tough interlayers is a function of the design requirements and expected lifetime of the rotor. The mechanism has particular application in uninterruptable power supplies, electrical power grid reservoirs, and compulsators for electric guns, as well as electromechanical batteries for vehicles. 2 figs.

Groves, S.E.; Deteresa, S.J.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

68

Energy Philosophy in Prospective Petrochemical Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the internal heat recovery system. ENERGY EXPORT Ethylene plants normally need about 2 ? 5 MW of electrical power for smaller drives on pumps and the like. So a pattern emerges that these plants have considerable excess fuel gas and steam that they must.... Excess turbine exhaust flow is used in a flywheel boiler to raise additional high-pressure steam for export. We have seen situations, for example for ethylene plants in Russia and China, where district heating ? as hot water or LP steam - has been...

Wallsgrove, C.

69

The magnetic flywheel flow meter: Theoretical and experimental contributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of contactless flow meters is an important issue for monitoring and controlling of processes in different application fields, like metallurgy, liquid metal casting, or cooling systems for nuclear reactors and transmutation machines. Shercliff described in his book “The Theory of Electromagnetic Flow Measurement, Cambridge University Press, 1962” a simple and robust device for contact-less measurements of liquid metal flow rates which is known as magnetic flywheel. The sensor consists of several permanent magnets attached on a rotatable soft iron plate. This arrangement will be placed closely to the liquid metal flow to be measured, so that the field of the permanent magnets penetrates into the fluid volume. The flywheel will be accelerated by a Lorentz force arising from the interaction between the magnetic field and the moving liquid. Steady rotation rates of the flywheel can be taken as a measure for the mean flow rate inside the fluid channel. The present paper provides a detailed theoretical description of the sensor in order to gain a better insight into the functional principle of the magnetic flywheel. Theoretical predictions are confirmed by corresponding laboratory experiments. For that purpose, a laboratory model of such a flow meter was built and tested on a GaInSn-loop under various test conditions.

Buchenau, D., E-mail: d.buchenau@hzdr.de; Galindo, V.; Eckert, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

70

A zinc-air battery and flywheel zero emission vehicle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) developed a compliance plan known as the Low Emission Vehicle Program. An integral part of that program was a sales mandate to the top seven automobile manufacturers requiring the percentage of Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEVs) sold in California to be 2% in 1998, 5% in 2001 and 10% by 2003. Currently available ZEV technology will probably not meet customer demand for range and moderate cost. A potential option to meet the CARB mandate is to use two Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) technologies, namely, zinc-air refuelable batteries (ZARBs) and electromechanical batteries (EMBs, i. e., flywheels) to develop a ZEV with a 384 kilometer (240 mile) urban range. This vehicle uses a 40 kW, 70 kWh ZARB for energy storage combined with a 102 kW, 0.5 kWh EMB for power peaking. These technologies are sufficiently near-term and cost-effective to plausibly be in production by the 1999-2001 time frame for stationary and initial vehicular applications. Unlike many other ZEVs currently being developed by industry, our proposed ZEV has range, acceleration, and size consistent with larger conventional passenger vehicles available today. Our life-cycle cost projections for this technology are lower than for Pb-acid battery ZEVs. We have used our Hybrid Vehicle Evaluation Code (HVEC) to simulate the performance of the vehicle and to size the various components. The use of conservative subsystem performance parameters and the resulting vehicle performance are discussed in detail.

Tokarz, F.; Smith, J.R.; Cooper, J.; Bender, D.; Aceves, S.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

71

Department of Energy and Beacon Power Finalize $43 Million Loan...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

has been finalized for Beacon Power Corporation's 20 megawatt innovative flywheel energy storage plant in Stephentown, NY. The plant will help improve the stability and...

72

Operation of the NRCh constriction of boilers in 300 MW energy units during combustion of anthracite dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of the furnace constriction of boilers in 300 MW units during combustion of anthracite dust with liquid slag removal now requires special attention on the part of both operating personnel at thermal power plants and designers. The reason behind this is charring of the studs and carborundum mass on the roof portion of the constriction with subsequent exposure of the tubes; external high-temperature corrosion of the tubes on the roof portion and on the upper incline of the constriction with subsequent tapering of the tube walls to 1.5 mm and their breaking; the presence of corrosion-fatigue destruction of the tube walls in the upper incline of the constriction with formation of scale, transverse deep grooves and fissures on the front side of the tubes. Overall, at the present time the constriction is a point of failure that requires intensified control and greater repair costs to replace damaged sections of the heating surfaces. In conjunction with this, complex analysis of operation of the constriction has been carried out.

Kaminskii, V.P.; Mironov, S.N.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: helical screw expander power plant, Model 76-1. Final report to the International Energy Agency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 1-MW geothermal wellhead power plant incorporating a Lysholm or helical screw expander (HSE) was field tested between 1980 and 1983 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand with technical assistance from the United States. The objectives were to provide data on the reliability and performance of the HSE and to assess the costs and benefits of its use. The range of conditions under which the HSE was tested included loads up to 933 kW, mass flowrates of 14,600 to 395, 000 lbs/hr, inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0 to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 to 40 psia, total dissolved solids up to 310,000 ppM, and noncondensible gases up to 38% of the vapor mass flow. Typical machine efficiencies of 40 to 50% were calculated. For most operations efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power, while inlet quality and rotor speed had only small effects. The HSE was designed with oversized internal clearances in the expectation that adherent scale would form during operation. Improvements in machine efficiency of 3.5 to 4 percentage points were observed over some test periods with some scale deposition. A comparison with a 1-MW back-pressure turbine showed that the HSE can compete favorably under certain conditions. The HSE was found to be a rugged energy conversion machine for geothermal applications, but some subsystems were found to require further development. 7 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1985-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

74

Interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors. The interface structure efficiently transmits high radial compression forces and withstands both large circumferential elongation and local stresses generated by mass-loading and hub attachments. The interface structure is comprised of high-strength fiber, such as glass and carbon, woven into an angle pattern which is about 45.degree. with respect to the rotor axis. The woven fiber is bonded by a ductile matrix material which is compatible with and adheres to the rotor material. This woven fiber is able to elongate in the circumferential direction to match the rotor growth during spinning.

Deteresa, Steven J. (Livermore, CA); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

75

Interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An interface structure is described for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors. The interface structure efficiently transmits high radial compression forces and withstands both large circumferential elongation and local stresses generated by mass-loading and hub attachments. The interface structure is comprised of high-strength fiber, such as glass and carbon, woven into an angle pattern which is about 45{degree} with respect to the rotor axis. The woven fiber is bonded by a ductile matrix material which is compatible with and adheres to the rotor material. This woven fiber is able to elongate in the circumferential direction to match the rotor growth during spinning. 2 figs.

Deteresa, S.J.; Groves, S.E.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

76

Design, construction, system integration, and test results of the 1 MW CW RF system for the e-gun cavity in the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven's ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) requires a 1 MW CW RF system for the superconducting electron gun cavity. The system consists primarily of a klystron tube, transmitter, and High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS). The 703.75 MHz klystron made by CPl, Inc. provides RF power of 1MW CW with efficiency of 65%. It has a single output window, diode-type electron gun, and collector capable of dissipating the entire beam power. It was fully factory tested including 24-hour heat run at 1.1 MW CWo The solid state HVPS designed by Continental Electronics provides up to 100 kV at low ripple and 2.1 MW CW with over 95% efficiency. With minimal stored energy and a fast shut-down mode no crowbar circuit is needed. Continental 's transmitter includes PLC based user interface and monitoring, RF pre-amplifier, magnet and Vac-Ion pump supplies, cooling water instrumentation, and integral safety interlock system. BNL installed the klystron, HVPS, and transmitter along with other items, such as circulator, water load, and waveguide components. The collaboration of BNL, CPI, and Continental in the design, installation, and testing was essential to the successful operation of the 1MW system.

Lenci,S.J.; Eisen, E. L.; Dickey, D. L.; Sainz, J. E.; Utay, P. F.; Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

77

NREL Controllable Grid Interface for Testing MW-scale Wind Turbine Generators (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149 Revision: - Date: 06/15/10 ABENGOANREL 2012

78

Flywheel Cooling: A Cooling Solution for Non Air-Conditioned Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Flywheel Cooling" utillzes the natural cooling processes of evaporation, ventilation and air circulation. These systems are providing low-cost cooling for distribution centers, warehouses, and other non air-conditioned industrial assembly plants...

Abernethy, D.

79

Analysis of electromechanical interactions in a flywheel system with a doubly fed induction machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper analyzes the electromechanical inter-action in a flywheel system with a doubly fed induction machine, used for wind farm power smoothing or grid frequency response control. The grid-connected electrical machine ...

Ran, Li

80

Design and analysis of a composite flywheel preload loss test rig  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION...................................................................................1 1.1 Overview.............................................................................1 1.2 Literature Review..................................................................2 1.3 Objectives and Novel Contributions...................................4 II PLM FLYWHEEL TEST RIG DESIGN................................................. 6 2.1 Design Process...

Preuss, Jason Lee

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

MIMO active vibration control of magnetically suspended flywheels for satellite IPAC service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Greek ? = Controls the sharpness of the function f ? = Damping ratio ? = Sensor gain cly? = Cylindrical mode damping ratio con? = Conical mode damping ratio 0? = Permeability of free space f? = Flywheel angular velocity relative... relative to the inertial frame spin? = Flywheel spin frequency ba /? = Angular velocity of a relative tob ?~ = ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? 0 0 0 12 13 23 ?? ?? ?? 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Overview Satellite weight and cost...

Park, Junyoung

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

PCFB Repowering Project 80 MW plant description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the design of a 80 MW Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) boiler for the repowering of Unit 1 at the Des Moines Energy Center. Objective is to demonstrate that PCFB combined-cycle technology is cost effective and environmentally superior compared to traditional pulverized coal burning facilities.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Low frequency noise from MW wind turbines --mechanisms of generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low frequency noise from MW wind turbines -- mechanisms of generation and its modeling Helge MW wind turbines -- mechanisms of generation and its modeling Department: Department of Wind Energy turbine has been simulated with a noise prediction model from NASA in US. Running the model

84

Austin Energy's Residential Solar Rate  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Leslie Libby Austin Energy Project Manager 2020 Utility Scale Solar Goal 175 MW 30 MW PPA at Webberville 2020 Distributed Solar Goal 25 MW Residential - 7.0 MW Commercial - 1.4 MW...

85

Title: Feasibility Study for 20 MW Hybrid Solar and Wind Park in Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the realistic ROI for a potential 20 MW solar/wind farm. The information generated will be sufficiently detailed to present the expected energy performance and economics of a 20 MW solar/wind farm to potential investors1 of 2 Title: Feasibility Study for 20 MW Hybrid Solar and Wind Park in Colombia Principal

Johnson, Eric E.

86

Concentric ring flywheel with hooked ring carbon fiber separator/torque coupler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A concentric ring flywheel with expandable separators, which function as torque couplers, between the rings to take up the gap formed between adjacent rings due to differential expansion between different radius rings during rotation of the flywheel. The expandable separators or torque couplers include a hook-like section at an upper end which is positioned over an inner ring and a shelf-like or flange section at a lower end onto which the next adjacent outer ring is positioned. As the concentric rings are rotated the gap formed by the differential expansion there between is partially taken up by the expandable separators or torque couplers to maintain torque and centering attachment of the concentric rings.

Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Concentric ring flywheel with hooked ring carbon fiber separator/torque coupler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A concentric ring flywheel with expandable separators, which function as torque couplers, between the rings to take up the gap formed between adjacent rings due to differential expansion between different radius rings during rotation of the flywheel. The expandable separators or torque couplers include a hook-like section at an upper end which is positioned over an inner ring and a shelf-like or flange section at a lower end onto which the next adjacent outer ring is positioned. As the concentric rings are rotated the gap formed by the differential expansion there between is partially taken up by the expandable separators or torque couplers to maintain torque and centering attachment of the concentric rings. 2 figs.

Kuklo, T.C.

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

88

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (BillionIowa" ,"Plant","Primary Energy

89

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana" ,"Plant","Primary Energy

90

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas" ,"Plant","Primary Energy

91

Comprises over of Energy Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 1% of the region's energy resources. Hydro- power 46% Coal 18% Energy Efficiency 16% Natural Gas 11 Coke* (45.6 MW) Biomass (395.4 MW) Nuclear (1,054.9 MW) Wind (1,129.7 MW) Natural Gas (3,180.6 MW) Energy Efficiency (4,633 MW) Coal (5,396 MW) Hydropower (13,401.8 MW) Dispatched Average Megawatts

92

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (BillionIowa" ,"Plant","Primary EnergyKansas"

93

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (BillionIowa"Maryland" ,"Plant","Primary Energy

94

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana" ,"Plant","Primary EnergyNebraska"

95

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana"York" ,"Plant","Primary Energy

96

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating

97

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas" ,"Plant","Primary EnergyUtah"

98

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas" ,"Plant","Primary EnergyUtah"Vermont"

99

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPriceCoalbed Methane Proved

100

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPriceCoalbed Methane ProvedArizona"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPriceCoalbed Methane

102

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPriceCoalbed MethaneConnecticut"

103

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPriceCoalbed MethaneConnecticut"Delaware"

104

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPriceCoalbed

105

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPriceCoalbedGeorgia"

106

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPriceCoalbedGeorgia"Idaho"

107

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPriceCoalbedGeorgia"Idaho"Illinois"

108

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion

109

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (BillionIowa" ,"Plant","Primary

110

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (BillionIowa"

111

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (BillionIowa"Maryland"

112

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (BillionIowa"Maryland"Minnesota"

113

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (BillionIowa"Maryland"Minnesota"Mississippi"

114

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves

115

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana" ,"Plant","Primary

116

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana" ,"Plant","PrimaryHampshire"

117

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana"

118

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana"York" ,"Plant","Primary

119

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana"York"

120

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana"York"Oklahoma"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana"York"Oklahoma"Pennsylvania"

122

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana"York"Oklahoma"Pennsylvania"Rhode

123

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved

124

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas" ,"Plant","Primary

125

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas" ,"Plant","PrimaryWashington"

126

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas" ,"Plant","PrimaryWashington"West

127

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPriceCoalbed Methane ProvedArizona"California"

128

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPriceCoalbed MethaneConnecticut"Delaware"District

129

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPriceCoalbedGeorgia" ,"Plant","Primary

130

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (BillionIowa" ,"Plant","PrimaryLouisiana"

131

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (BillionIowa"Maryland" ,"Plant","Primary

132

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana" ,"Plant","PrimaryHampshire"Jersey"

133

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana"York" ,"Plant","PrimaryDakota"

134

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana"York"Oklahoma" ,"Plant","Primary

135

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana"York"Oklahoma"Pennsylvania"Rhode Island"

136

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved ReservesMontana"York"Oklahoma"Pennsylvania"RhodeDakota"

137

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas" ,"Plant","PrimaryWashington"West Virginia"

138

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas" ,"Plant","PrimaryWashington"WestWyoming"

139

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World9, 2014 International PetroleumFuelAnnual Energy*

140

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World9, 2014 International PetroleumFuelAnnual Energy*Arkansas"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NREL Wind Turbine Blade Structural Testing of the Modular Wind Energy MW45 Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-354  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This CRADA was a purely funds-in CRADA with Modular Wind Energy (MWE). MWE had a need to perform full-scale testing of a 45-m wind turbine blade. NREL/NWTC provided the capabilities, facilities, and equipment to test this large-scale MWE wind turbine blade. Full-scale testing is required to demonstrate the ability of the wind turbine blade to withstand static design load cases and demonstrate the fatigue durability. Structural testing is also necessary to meet international blade testing certification requirements. Through this CRADA, MWE would obtain test results necessary for product development and certification, and NREL would benefit by working with an industrial partner to better understand the unique test requirements for wind turbine blades with advanced structural designs.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

bectso-10mw | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Clean Coal Power Initiative Power Plant Improvement Initiative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program FutureGen 10-MW Demonstration of...

143

2.3-MW Medium-Voltage, Three-Level Wind Energy Inverter Applying a Unique Bus Structure and 4.5-kV Si/SiC Hybrid Isolated Power Modules: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-efficiency, 2.3-MW, medium-voltage, three-level inverter utilizing 4.5-kV Si/SiC (silicon carbide) hybrid modules for wind energy applications is discussed. The inverter addresses recent trends in siting the inverter within the base of multimegawatt turbine towers. A simplified split, three-layer laminated bus structure that maintains low parasitic inductances is introduced along with a low-voltage, high-current test method for determining these inductances. Feed-thru bushings, edge fill methods, and other design features of the laminated bus structure provide voltage isolation that is consistent with the 10.4-kV module isolation levels. Inverter efficiency improvement is a result of the (essential) elimination of the reverse recovery charge present in 4.5-kV Si PIN diodes, which can produce a significant reduction in diode turn-off losses as well as insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) turn-on losses. The hybrid modules are supplied in industry-standard 140 mm x 130 mm and 190 mm x 130 mm packages to demonstrate direct module substitution into existing inverter designs. A focus on laminated bus/capacitor-bank/module subassembly level switching performance is presented.

Erdman, W.; Keller, J.; Grider, D.; VanBrunt, E.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

ISIS~1985 0.16MW SNS~2006 1.4MW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

m #12;3 J-PARC JSNS ILL ~1974 ISIS~1985 0.16MW SNS~2006 1.4MW JSNS~2008 1MW J-PARC BSNS #12;4 MLF-PARC 180 J-PARC/MLF #12;19 J-PARC #12;20 J-PARC J-PARC K GSI ISIS SNS FNAL CERN GSI J

Katsumoto, Shingo

145

Indirect measurement of $\\sin^2 ?_W$ (or $M_W$) using $?^+?^-$ pairs from $?^*/Z$ bosons produced in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drell-Yan lepton pairs are produced in the process $p\\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^- + X$ through an intermediate $\\gamma^*/Z$ boson. The forward-backward asymmetry in the polar-angle distribution of the $\\mu^-$ as a function of the invariant mass of the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ pair is used to obtain the effective leptonic determination $\\sin^2 \\theta^{lept}_{eff}$ of the electroweak-mixing parameter $\\sin^2 \\theta_W$, from which the value of $\\sin^2 \\theta_W$ is derived assuming the standard model. The measurement sample, recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponds to 9.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV, and is the full CDF Run II data set. The value of $\\sin^2 \\theta^{lept}_{eff}$ is found to be 0.2315 +- 0.0010, where statistical and systematic uncertainties are combined in quadrature. When interpreted within the context of the standard model using the on-shell renormalization scheme, where $\\sin^2 \\theta_W = 1 - M_W^2/M_Z^2$, the measurement yields $\\sin^2 \\theta_W$ = 0.2233 +- 0.0009, or equivalently a W-boson mass of 80.365 +- 0.047 GeV/c^2. The value of the W-boson mass is in agreement with previous determinations in electron-positron collisions and at the Tevatron collider.

CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Lucà; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; M. Martínez; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

146

Design of a 28 MW pulse facility for testing superconducting coils to several hundred megajoules capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Railway traction motors are available in unit sizes convenient for installation and series-parallel grouping. They are rugged. Industry builds and refurbishes them with good economy and in quantities replenishing the rolling stock. We find them well suited for reversing the current in a superconducting winding. We focus on a pulsed energy of 20 to 100 MJ, discussing our analysis and facility planning. Limitations are imposed by the following maximum numbers tolerated by the motor - pulsed current of 3.0 to 3.5 kA, current change of 40 kA/s, and pulsed voltage of 1.8 kV. Hence, the number of machines needed in parallel follows from the coil current and its rate of change. The number in series is determined by the voltage. The power transfer is limited by the torsional strength of the motor shaft to a value affected by the flywheel mass.

Vogel, H.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Ultra Clean 1.1 MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ultra Clean 1.1 MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered CHP System Contract: DE-EE0004016 GE Energy, Dresser Inc. 102010 - 92014 Jim Zurlo, Principal Investigator...

148

Energy Sciences Institute Talks at West Campus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as pumped hydroelectric storage, compressed air energy storage (CAES), flywheels, and electrochemical electric storage devices, but viable battery technology able to store large amounts of electric energyEnergy Sciences Institute Talks at West Campus Jaephil Cho Professor at SAMSUNG SDI-UNIST Future

149

INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery, water treatment/instrument air, and power conditioning/controls were built and shipped to the site. The two fuel cell modules, each rated at 1 MW on natural gas, were fabricated by FuelCell Energy in its Torrington, CT manufacturing facility. The fuel cell modules were conditioned and tested at FuelCell Energy in Danbury and shipped to the site. Installation of the power plant and connection to all required utilities and syngas was completed. Pre-operation checkout of the entire power plant was conducted and the plant was ready to operate in July 2004. However, fuel gas (natural gas or syngas) was not available at the WREL site due to technical difficulties with the gasifier and other issues. The fuel cell power plant was therefore not operated, and subsequently removed by October of 2005. The WREL fuel cell site was restored to the satisfaction of WREL. FuelCell Energy continues to market carbonate fuel cells for natural gas and digester gas applications. A fuel cell/turbine hybrid is being developed and tested that provides higher efficiency with potential to reach the DOE goal of 60% HHV on coal gas. A system study was conducted for a 40 MW direct fuel cell/turbine hybrid (DFC/T) with potential for future coal gas applications. In addition, FCE is developing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power plants with Versa Power Systems (VPS) as part of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program and has an on-going program for co-production of hydrogen. Future development in these technologies can lead to future coal gas fuel cell applications.

FuelCell Energy

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

150

CPS Energy Prospective on the EPA Proposed Carbon Rule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operation Wind 1,059.1 MW Landfill Gas 13.8 MW Solar 129.0 MW Total 1,201.9 MW Projects in Development Solar 315.3 MW Total 315.3 MW Renewable Projects Under Contract Wind 1,059.1 MW Landfill Gas 13.8 MW Solar 444.3 MW Total 1,517.2 MW Solar OCI Projects... ENERGY GRAND OPENING 17 Event held on 9/22/14 • 400 MW Solar • 200 MW cell & panel manufacturing plant • N. American HQ for OCISP and Nexolon America • 800 Permanent jobs • Capital investment - ~$100M • Educational investments ESL-KT-14-11-18 CATEE 2014...

Smith, R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Project X: A Multi-MW Proton Source at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program draws to a close a strategy has emerged of an experimental program built around the high intensity frontier. The centerpiece of this program is a superconducting H- linac that will support world leading programs in long baseline neutrino experimentation and he study of rare processes. Based on technology shared with the International Linear Collider (ILC), Project X will provide multi-MW beams at 60-120 GeV from the Main Injector, simultaneous with very high intensity beams at lower energies. Project X will also support development of a Muon Collider as a uture facility at the energy frontier.

Holmes, Stephen D.; /Fermilab

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Yolo County, California, made history in July when officials installed a 1 MW solar photovoltaic (PV) project to supply power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yolo County, California, made history in July when officials installed a 1 MW solar photovoltaic both buildings in Woodland, California, for the 1 MW ground-mounted solar PV system. Energy Analysis by examining the feasibility of installing a solar system, according to information provided by Ray Groom

153

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 245402 (2013) Limits of mechanical energy storage and structural changes in twisted carbon nanotube ropes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include gravitational potential energy in water reservoirs, electrical potential energy in capacitors and batteries, nuclear potential energy in unsta- ble isotopes, chemical potential energy in fossil fuels and explosives, and thermal energy in steam. Mechanical energy storage, used in wind-up watches and flywheels

Tománek, David

154

2 MW upgrade of the Fermilab Main Injector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January 2002, the Fermilab Director initiated a design study for a high average power, modest energy proton facility. An intensity upgrade to Fermilab's 120-GeV Main Injector (MI) represents an attractive concept for such a facility, which would leverage existing beam lines and experimental areas and would greatly enhance physics opportunities at Fermilab and in the U.S. With a Proton Driver replacing the present Booster, the beam intensity of the MI is expected to be increased by a factor of five. Accompanied by a shorter cycle, the beam power would reach 2 MW. This would make the MI a more powerful machine than the SNS or the J-PARC. Moreover, the high beam energy (120 GeV) and tunable energy range (8-120 GeV) would make it a unique high power proton facility. The upgrade study has been completed and published. This paper gives a summary report.

Weiren Chou

2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

155

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Ris-R-Report The DAN-AERO MW Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ull scale MW size rotor s as well as o n airfoils for MW size turbine s in wind tun nels. Shear ew insight into a number of fu ndamental aerodynamic and aero-acoustic issues, important and turbulence inflow characteristics were measured on a Si emens 3.6 MW turbine with a five hole pitot tube

158

COMPRESSED-AIR ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR STAND-ALONE OFF-GRID PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPRESSED-AIR ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR STAND-ALONE OFF-GRID PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULES Dominique materials, flywheels, pumped hydro (PH), superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) and compressed air-grid alternative to the large-scale compressed air energy storage systems we propose to examine the viability

Deymier, Pierre

159

Mixed Conduction in Rare-Earth Phosphates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compressed   air,   flywheels,   biofuels,   hydropower,   and   electrochemical   energy   storage  

Ray, Hannah Leung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Neutronics Design and Analysis of a 200-MW(electric) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 200-MW(electric) simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) was designed and analyzed under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative program. The compact size of a 200-MW(electric) reactor makes it attractive for countries with a less well developed engineering infrastructure, as well as for developed countries seeking to tailor generation capacity more closely to the growth of their electricity demand. The 200-MW(electric) core design reported here is based on the 600-MW(electric) General Electric SBWR core, which was first analyzed in the work performed here in order to qualify the computer codes used in the analysis. Cross sections for the 8 x 8 fuel assembly design were generated with the HELIOS lattice physics code, and core simulation was performed with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission codes RELAP5/PARCS. In order to predict the critical heat flux, the Hench-Gillis correlation was implemented in the RELAP5 code. An equilibrium cycle was designed for the 200-MW(electric) core, which provided a cycle length of more than 2 yr and satisfied the minimum critical power ratio throughout the core life.

Tinkler, Daniel R.; Downar, Thomas J. [Purdue University (United States)

2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Bearing design for flywheel energy storage using high-TC superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature superconductor material bearing system (38) This system (38) includes a rotor (50) having a ring permanent magnet (60), a plurality of permanent magnets (16, 20 and 70) for interacting to generate levitation forces for the system (38). This group of magnets are a push/pull bearing (75). A high temperature superconductor structure (30) interacts with the ting permanent magnet (60) to provide stabilizing forces for the system (38).

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Mulcahy, Thomas M. (Western Springs, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Advanced high-speed flywheel energy storage systems for pulsed power application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, they result in saving time and money by avoiding time consuming simulations performed by expensive packages, such as Simulink, PSIM, etc. In the next step, two important factors affecting operation of the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine (PMSM) implemented...

Talebi Rafsanjan, Salman

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Development of a 2 MW CW Waterload for Electron Cyclotron Heating Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. developed a load capable of continuously dissipating 2 MW of RF power from gyrotrons. The input uses HE11 corrugated waveguide and a rotating launcher to uniformly disperse the power over the lossy surfaces in the load. This builds on experience with a previous load designed to dissipate 1 MW of continuous RF power. The 2 MW load uses more advanced RF dispersion to double the capability in the same size device as the 1 MW load. The new load reduces reflected power from the load to significantly less than 1 %. This eliminates requirements for a preload to capture reflected power. The program updated control electronics that provides all required interlocks for operation and measurement of peak and average power. The program developed two version of the load. The initial version used primarily anodized aluminum to reduce weight and cost. The second version used copper and stainless steel to meet specifications for the ITER reactor currently under construction in France. Tests of the new load at the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency confirmed operation of the load to a power level of 1 MW, which is the highest power currently available for testing the load. Additional tests will be performed at General Atomics in spring 2013. The U.S. ITER organization will test the copper/stainless steel version of the load in December 2012 or early in 2013. Both loads are currently being marketed worldwide.

R. Lawrence,Ives; Maxwell Mizuhara; George Collins; Jeffrey Neilson; Philipp Borchard

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

164

The influence of water, land, energy and soil-nutrient resource interactions on the food system in Uganda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Uganda has an estimated verified renewable energy potential of 5,300 MW or 167,141 TJ per annum comprised of Hydro: 2,200MW, Solar: 200 MW, Biomass: 1650 MW, Geothermal: 450 MW, and Peat: 800 MW (Buchholz & Da Silva, 2010, p.57; SE4ALL, 2012, p...

Mukuve, Feriha Mugisha; Fenner, Richard A.

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

PG&E Plans for 500 MW of PV  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

PG&E has developed a plan to install 500 MW of PV by the year 2015. The plan calls for 250 MW to be acquired through Power Purchase Agreements (PPA) and the other 250 MW to be purchased and owned by the utility. PG&E presented the plan at a public forum on April 27, 2009. A copy of the power point presentation is attached.

166

Energy Storage in Datacenters: What, Where, and How Di Wang, Chuangang Ren, Anand Sivasubramaniam, Bhuvan Urgaonkar, and Hosam Fathy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-capacitors, to different kinds of batteries, flywheels and even compressed air-based storage. These ESDs offer veryEnergy Storage in Datacenters: What, Where, and How much? Di Wang, Chuangang Ren, Anand,bhuvan}@cse.psu.edu, hkf2@engr.psu.edu ABSTRACT Energy storage - in the form of UPS units - in a datacenter has been

Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

167

Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

Akhil, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K. [R.K. Sen & Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

CERN-PS Main Power Converter Renovation How to Provide and Control the Large Flow of Energy for a Rapid Cyclic Machine?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The PS accelerator (Proton-Synchrotron) at CERN, which is part of the LHC injector chain, is composed of one hundred magnets connected in series. During a typical acceleration cycle (taking 2.4 seconds), the active power at the magnet terminals varies from plus to minus 40 MW. As this large active power variation was not acceptable to the electrical network, a motor-generator set (M-G) was inserted between the grid and the load. The M-G set (of 1968) acts as a fly-wheel with a stored kinetic energy of 233 MJ and the magnets are fed via two 12-pulse thyristor rectifiers. A renovation or replacement of the installation is planned in the near future as part of the consolidation of the LHC injectors to avoid any major breakdown, to improve overall availability and to reduce operation and maintenance costs. This paper presents a first comparison of technical solutions available to build such a power system and the strategy that will be applied for the up-grade of the system.

Bordry, Frederick; Völker, F V

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Puna Geothermal Venture's Plan for a 25 MW Commercial Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Venture's Plan for a 25 MW Commercial Geothermal Power Plant on Hawaii's Big Island Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Puna...

170

Fuel strategy for 2 MW SF-TMSR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

China has launched a series of projects for developing high performance nuclear energy systems. The 2 MW solid fuel thorium based molten salt reactor (TMSR-SF) is one of these projects, which uses TRISO fuel elements as the fuel carrier and the FLiBe molten salt (2LiF-BeF{sub 2}) as the coolant. TRISO fuel elements have been well developed in respect to manufacturing, testing experiments inside and outside reactors as well as their successful application in HTGRs. The application of LEU (low enriched uranium) spherical TRISO fuel elements in TMSR-SF can be safely conducted through careful control of temperature and power density. Although the soaking of molten salt into graphite has shown no damage to the graphite material as experienced by ORNL group in the sixties last century, the compatibility of FLiBe salt with graphite covering of the fuel elements should be tested before the application. It is expected that TMSR-SF can be an appropriate test reactor for high performance fuel element development. (authors)

Zhu, Zhiyong; Lin, Jun; Cao, Changqing; Zhang, Haiqing; Zhu, Tianbao; Li, Xiaoyun [Center for Thorium Molten Salt Reactor System, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.2019 Jialuo Road, Jiading District, Shanghai 201800 (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Operating and Maintaining a 465MW Cogeneration Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPERATING AND HAINTAINING A 465MW COGENERATION PLANT -- R. E. Theisen Plant Hanager CoGen Lyondell PSE Inc. Houston, Texas ABSTRACT The on-line av ilability of the five Fr me-7E gas turbine generators installed at the 465MW Lyondell... performed promptly on discovered design, operating, and maintenance weaknesses uncovered during the early months of operation. INTRODUCTION In March, 1985, a pa"per was presented at the ASHE-Sponsored Gas Turbine Conference in Houston, Texas...

Theisen, R. E.

172

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to MW/40 MWI-IR Battery Energy Storage Facility", proc. 23rdcompressed air, and battery energy storage are all only 65

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Why Cogeneration? 24MW of local renewable energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recycled Cardboard Wood Chips Sawdust #12;Power Boiler #10 Improve combustion efficiency by installing a new overfire system to increase firing efficiency Construct a new Dry Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP to increase sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal efficiency Reduce the amount of Reprocessed Fuel Oil (RFO) by 1

174

MHK Technologies/14 MW OTECPOWER | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE < MHKInformationInformationOTECPOWER

175

Puna Geothermal Venture 8MW Expantion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellheadWahkiakum County Place:PulteGroup JumpValleyVenture

176

Energy Conversion and Transmission Facilities (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation applies to energy conversion facilities designed for or capable of generating 100 MW or more of electricity, wind energy facilities with a combined capacity of 100 MW, certain...

177

Latest Results in SLAC 75-MW PPM Klystrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

75 MW X-band klystrons utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing have been undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) for almost nine years. The klystron development has been geared toward realizing the necessary components for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) and industry. All these tubes follow from the successful SLAC design of a 50 MW PPM klystron in 1996. In 2004 the latest two klystrons were constructed and tested with preliminary results reported at EPAC2004. The first of these two devices was tested to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 microseconds pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with a tube efficiency >50%. The most recent testing of these last two devices will be presented here. Design and manufacturing issues of the latest klystron, due to be tested by the Fall of 2005, are also discussed.

Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.; Jongewaard, E.; Laurent, L.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.; /SLAC

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

178

bectno-180mw | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste andAnniversary, partReview64,783ENCOAL® Mild180-MWe

179

bectso-10mw | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste andAnniversary, partReview64,783ENCOAL®Evaluation of3 Industrial

180

A new Main Injector radio frequency system for 2.3 MW Project X operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For Project X Fermilab Main Injector will be required to provide up to 2.3 MW to a neutrino production target at energies between 60 and 120 GeV. To accomplish the above power levels 3 times the current beam intensity will need to be accelerated. In addition the injection energy of Main Injector will need to be as low as 6 GeV. The current 30 year old Main Injector radio frequency system will not be able to provide the required power and a new system will be required. The specifications of the new system will be described.

Dey, J.; Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in West Virginia (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in West Virginia. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in West Virginia to be $1.0 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.3 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,763 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test project was to demonstrate the inherent efficiencies of a supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) power turbine and associated turbomachinery under conditions and at a scale relevant to commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) projects, thereby accelerating the commercial deployment of this new power generation technology. The project involved eight partnering organizations: NREL, Sandia National Laboratories, Echogen Power Systems, Abengoa Solar, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Electric Power Research Institute, Barber-Nichols, and the CSP Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The multi-year project planned to design, fabricate, and validate an s-CO2 power turbine of nominally 10 MWe that is capable of operation at up to 700°C and operates in a dry-cooled test loop. The project plan consisted of three phases: (1) system design and modeling, (2) fabrication, and (3) testing. The major accomplishments of Phase 1 included: Design of a multistage, axial-flow, s-CO2 power turbine; Design modifications to an existing turbocompressor to provide s-CO2 flow for the test system; Updated equipment and installation costs for the turbomachinery and associated support infrastructure; Development of simulation tools for the test loop itself and for more efficient cycle designs that are of greater commercial interest; Simulation of s-CO2 power cycle integration into molten-nitrate-salt CSP systems indicating a cost benefit of up to 8% in levelized cost of energy; Identification of recuperator cost as a key economic parameter; Corrosion data for multiple alloys at temperatures up to 650ºC in high-pressure CO2 and recommendations for materials-of-construction; and Revised test plan and preliminary operating conditions based on the ongoing tests of related equipment. Phase 1 established that the cost of the facility needed to test the power turbine at its full power and temperature would exceed the planned funding for Phases 2 and 3. Late in Phase 1 an opportunity arose to collaborate with another turbine-development team to construct a shared s-CO2 test facility. The synergy of the combined effort would result in greater facility capabilities than either separate project could produce and would allow for testing of both turbine designs within the combined budgets of the two projects. The project team requested a no-cost extension to Phase 1 to modify the subsequent work based on this collaborative approach. DOE authorized a brief extension, but ultimately opted not to pursue the collaborative facility and terminated the project.

Turchi, Craig

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

183

Ultra Clean 1.1MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dresser, Inc. (GE Energy, Waukesha gas engines) will develop, test, demonstrate, and commercialize a 1.1 Megawatt (MW) natural gas fueled combined heat and power reciprocating engine powered package. This package will feature a total efficiency > 75% and ultra low CARB permitting emissions. Our modular design will cover the 1 – 6 MW size range, and this scalable technology can be used in both smaller and larger engine powered CHP packages. To further advance one of the key advantages of reciprocating engines, the engine, generator and CHP package will be optimized for low initial and operating costs. Dresser, Inc. will leverage the knowledge gained in the DOE - ARES program. Dresser, Inc. will work with commercial, regulatory, and government entities to help break down barriers to wider deployment of CHP. The outcome of this project will be a commercially successful 1.1 MW CHP package with high electrical and total efficiency that will significantly reduce emissions compared to the current central power plant paradigm. Principal objectives by phases for Budget Period 1 include: • Phase 1 – market study to determine optimum system performance, target first cost, lifecycle cost, and creation of a detailed product specification. • Phase 2 – Refinement of the Waukesha CHP system design concepts, identification of critical characteristics, initial evaluation of technical solutions, and risk mitigation plans. Background

Zurlo, James; Lueck, Steve

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Progress towards a 200 MW electron beam accelerator for the RDHWT/Mariah II Program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radiatively Driven Hypersonic Wind Tunnel (RDHWT) program requires an unprecedented 2-3 MeV electron beam energy source at an average beam power of approximately 200MW. This system injects energy downstream of a conventional supersonic air nozzle to minimize plenum temperature requirements for duplicating flight conditions above Mach 8 for long run-times. Direct-current electron accelerator technology is being developed to meet the objectives of a radiatively driven Mach 12 wind tunnel with a free stream dynamic pressure q=2000 psf. Due to the nature of research and industrial applications, there has never been a requirement for a single accelerator module with an output power exceeding approximately 500 kW. Although a 200MW module is a two-order of magnitude extrapolation from demonstrated power levels, the scaling of accelerator components to this level appears feasible. Accelerator system concepts are rapidly maturing and a clear technology development path has been established. Additionally, energy addition experiments have been conducted up to 800 kW into a supersonic airflow. This paper will discuss progress in the development of electron beam accelerator technology as an energy addition source for the RDHWT program and results of electron beam energy addition experiments conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Reed, Kim Warren; Pena, Gary Edward; Schneider, Larry X.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Glover, Steven Frank

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Integrated Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 Off The Grid Sensor Integration Natural Daylight Base and Peak Energy Reduction 11 Lowest Cost Renewable Solar Integrated Lighting $1.0 million/MW $6 – 9 million/MW Wind $1.3 - 1.9 million/MW Biomass $1.5 – 2.5 million/MW Geothermal $1.6 million...Integrated Energy Efficiency Steve Heins VP Communications and Government Affairs Orion Energy Systems, Inc. 2 MegaTrend Convergence We need companies to commercialize technologies that use less energy without compromise to operations. Energy...

Heins, S.

186

National University of Singapore MW5200 MSC SCIENCE COMMUNICATION PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National University of Singapore MW5200 MSC SCIENCE COMMUNICATION PROJECT Project Report Strengthening student engagement in the classroom. Course: Msc (Science Communication) Faculty of Science National University of Singapore Name: Ganeshini D/O Sri kanthan Student ID: A0075383Y Project Supervisor

Aslaksen, Helmer

187

Ris-R-Report 12MW: final report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm deploying a lidar and a sodar on the transformer platform. The observed the scientific basis relevant for the next generation of huge 12 MW wind turbines operating offshore. The project data were successfully compared to offshore mast data and the wind profile was extended 100 m above

188

Energy Storage/Conservation and Carbon Emissions Reduction Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the Center for Transportation and the Environment (CTE) federal assistance for the management of a project to develop and test a prototype flywheel-­?based energy recovery and storage system in partnership with Test Devices, Inc. (TDI). TDI specializes in the testing of jet engine and power generation turbines, which uses a great deal of electrical power for long periods of time. In fact, in 2007, the company consumed 3,498,500 kW-­?hr of electricity in their operations, which is equivalent to the electricity of 328 households. For this project, CTE and TDI developed and tested a prototype flywheel-­?based energy recovery and storage system. This technology is being developed at TDI’s facilities to capture and reuse the energy necessary for the company’s core process. The new technology and equipment is expected to save approximately 80% of the energy used in the TDI process, reducing total annual consumption of power by approximately 60%, saving approximately two million kilowatt-­?hours annually. Additionally, the energy recycling system will allow TDI and other end users to lower their peak power demand and reduce associated utility demand charges. The use of flywheels in this application is novel and requires significant development work from TDI. Flywheels combine low maintenance costs with very high cycle life with little to no degradation over time, resulting in lifetimes measured in decades. All of these features make flywheels a very attractive option compared to other forms of energy storage, including batteries. Development and deployment of this energy recycling technology will reduce energy consumption during jet engine and stationary turbine development. By reengineering the current inefficient testing process, TDI will reduce risk and time to market of efficiency upgrades of gas turbines across the entire spectrum of applications. Once in place the results from this program will also help other US industries to utilize energy recycling technology to lower domestic energy use and see higher net energy efficiency. The prototype system and results will be used to seek additional resources to carry out full deployment of a system. Ultimately, this innovative technology is expected to be transferable to other testing applications involving energy-­?based cycling within the company as well as throughout the industry.

Bigelow, Erik

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Low Beam Voltage, 10 MW, L-Band Cluster Klystron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conceptual design of a multi-beam klystron (MBK) for possible ILC and Project X applications is presented. The chief distinction between this MBK design and existing 10-MW MBK's is the low operating voltage of 60 kV. There are at least four compelling reasons that justify development at this time of a low-voltage MBK, namely (1) no pulse transformer; (2) no oil tank for high-voltage components and for the tube socket; (3) no high-voltage cables; and (4) modulator would be a compact 60-kV IGBT switching circuit. The proposed klystron consists of four clusters containing six beams each. The tube has common input and output cavities for all 24 beams, and individual gain cavities for each cluster. A closely related optional configuration, also for a 10 MW tube, would involve four totally independent cavity clusters with four independent input cavities and four 2.5 MW output ports, all within a common magnetic circuit. This option has appeal because the output waveguides would not require a controlled atmosphere, and because it would be easier to achieve phase and amplitude stability as required in individual SC accelerator cavities.

Teryaev, V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Yakovlev, V.P.; /Fermilab; Kazakov, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Hirshfield, J.L.; /Yale U. /Omega-P, New Haven

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Utilization of rotor kinetic energy storage for hybrid vehicles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine, the power system comprises an electric machine (12) further comprising a first excitation source (47), a permanent magnet rotor (28) and a magnetic coupling rotor (26) spaced from the permanent magnet rotor and at least one second excitation source (43), the magnetic coupling rotor (26) also including a flywheel having an inertial mass to store kinetic energy during an initial acceleration to an operating speed; and wherein the first excitation source is electrically connected to the second excitation source for power cycling such that the flywheel rotor (26) exerts torque on the permanent magnet rotor (28) to assist braking and acceleration of the permanent magnet rotor (28) and consequently, the vehicle. An axial gap machine and a radial gap machine are disclosed and methods of the invention are also disclosed.

Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2011-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

191

Initial operating experience of the 12-MW La Ola photovoltaic system.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1.2-MW La Ola photovoltaic (PV) power plant in Lanai, Hawaii, has been in operation since December 2009. The host system is a small island microgrid with peak load of 5 MW. Simulations conducted as part of the interconnection study concluded that unmitigated PV output ramps had the potential to negatively affect system frequency. Based on that study, the PV system was initially allowed to operate with output power limited to 50% of nameplate to reduce the potential for frequency instability due to PV variability. Based on the analysis of historical voltage, frequency, and power output data at 50% output level, the PV system has not significantly affected grid performance. However, it should be noted that the impact of PV variability on active and reactive power output of the nearby diesel generators was not evaluated. In summer 2011, an energy storage system was installed to counteract high ramp rates and allow the PV system to operate at rated output. The energy storage system was not fully operational at the time this report was written; therefore, analysis results do not address system performance with the battery system in place.

Ellis, Abraham; Lenox, Carl (SunPower Corporation, Richmond, CA); Johnson, Jay; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

DOE Global Energy Storage Database  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The DOE International Energy Storage Database has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The database provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the database shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.

193

The SANS facility at the Pitesti 14MW TRIGA reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SANS facility existing at the Pitesti 14MW TRIGA reactor is presented. The main characteristics and the preliminary evaluation of the installation performances are given. A monochromatic neutron beam with 1.5 A {<=} {lambda} {<=} 5 A is produced by a mechanical velocity selector with helical slots. A fruitful partnership was established between INR Pitesti (Romania) and JINR Dubna (Russia). The first step in this cooperation consists in the manufacturing in Dubna of a battery of gas-filled positional detectors devoted to the SANS instrument.

Ionita, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research (Romania)], E-mail: ionionita@lycos.com; Grabcev, B.; Todireanu, S. [National Institute of Materials Physics (NIMP) (Romania); Constantin, F. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (Romania); Shvetsov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Anghel, E. [Institute for Nuclear Research (Romania); Popescu, G. [National College Alexandru Odobescu (Romania); Mincu, M.; Datcu, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research (Romania)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of 250 MW -- enough energy to power the equivalent of every home in San Luis Obispo County. | Photo courtesy of SunPower. 5 Super-Sized Solar Projects Transforming the Clean...

195

Response of the Los Azufres Geothermal Field to Four Years of 25 MW Wellhead Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production and chemical data have been compiled and analyzed on a six-month averaged basis for the first four years of electric energy generation with five 5-MW wellhead generators at the Los Azufres geothermal field. The data were evaluated with respect to the extent of observable thermal drawdown of the reservoir from 25 MW of generation in relation to the estimated capacity of the field of several hundred megawatts of power. The analysis updates the previous one compiled after the first two years of continuous production, at which time the results indicated that differences in reservoir temperature estimated from geochemical thermometers and wellhead production data were not statistically significant based on the number of data and the standard deviations. Analysis of the data after four years of operation were made for the larger number of data and smaller standard deviations. The results review the adequacy of the sampling frequency and the reliability of the measurements from statistical t-Test of the means of the first and second two-year periods. 3 figs., 5 tabs., 20 refs.

Kruger, P.; Ortiz, J.; Miranda, G.; Gallardo, M.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

196

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Energy Association (BWEA), 2005, “BWEA Briefing Sheet: Wind Turbineturbines with expected annual production capacity of 450 MW (Xinhua, 2011c). 3.5 Remaining Challenges for Wind Energy

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production credits, renewable energy incentives, and feed-instanding incentives supporting renewable energy, startingincentive structure to encourage the adoption of renewable energy

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Arkansas (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Arkansas. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Arkansas to be $1.15 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.7 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,507 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A Pion Production and Capture System for a 4 MW Target Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of a pion production and capture system for a 4 MW target station for a neutrino factory or muon collider is presented. Using the MARS code, we simulate the pion production produced by the interaction of a free liquid mercury jet with an intense proton beam. We study the variation of meson production with the direction of the proton beam relative to the target. We also examine the influence on the meson production by the focusing of the proton beam. The energy deposition in the capture system is determined and the shielding required in order to avoid radiation damage is discussed. The exploration for the multiple proton beam entry directions relative to mercury jet in the 8GeV proton beam case demonstrates that an asymmetric layout is required in order to achieve the same beam/jet crossing angle at the jet axis. We find a correlation between the distance of beam relative to the jet and the meson production. The peak meson production is 8% higher than for the lowest case. The examination of the influence on the meson production by the focusing of the proton beam shows the meson production loss is negligible (<1%) for a beta function to be 0.3m or higher for the proton beam. By investigating the energy deposition in the target/capture system, we see that the bulk of 4-MW proton beam power is deposited in the water cooled tungsten-carbide (WC) shielding, the mercury jet and the capture beam pipe. In addition, high power deposition in the first superconducting coil causes an issue for its operation and life time. Enhanced shielding is necessary to lower the radiation damage.

Ding, X.; Kirk, H.; Berg, J.S.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

br Owner br Facility br Type br Capacity br MW br Commercial...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magmatic Mendeleevskaya Geothermal Power Plant Ministry of Natural Resources of Russia Single Flash MW Mendeleevskaya Geothermal Area Kuril Kamchatka Arc Mindanao GEPP...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Alternative Energy Law (AEL)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Iowa requires its two investor-owned utilities (MidAmerican Energy and Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light) to own or to contract for a combined total of 105 megawatts (MW) of renewable...

202

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of production credits, renewable energy incentives, andand production rate. Due to the current market uncertainty for Renewable EnergyProduction Credits/Incentives The federal government has long standing incentives supporting renewable energy,

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

New Metallization Technique Suitable for 6-MW Pilot Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Blosse CaliSolar, Inc. Sunnyvale, California A Project Funded under the U.S. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program's Photovoltaic Technology Incubator National Renewable Energy...

204

2009 Thermoelectrics Applications Workshop | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research PetroleumDepartmentWomen17.2 (June 2004) 132007Strasik Flywheel Program9 -

205

FVB Energy Inc. Technical Assistance Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The request made by FVB asked for advice and analysis regarding the value of recapturing the braking energy of trains operating on electric light rail transit systems. A specific request was to evaluate the concept of generating hydrogen by electrolysis. The hydrogen would, in turn, power fuel cells that could supply electric energy back into the system for train propulsion or, possibly, also to the grid. To allow quantitative assessment of the potential resource, analysis focused on operations of the SoundTransit light rail system in Seattle, Washington. An initial finding was that the full cycle efficiency of producing hydrogen as the medium for capturing and reusing train braking energy was quite low (< 20%) and, therefore, not likely to be economically attractive. As flywheel energy storage is commercially available, the balance of the analysis focused the feasibility of using this alternative on the SoundTransit system. It was found that an investment in a flywheel with a 25-kWh capacity of the type manufactured by Beacon Power Corporation (BPC) would show a positive 20-year net present value (NPV) based on the current frequency of train service. The economic attractiveness of this option would increase initially if green energy subsidies or rebates were applicable and, in the future, as the planned frequency of train service grows.

DeSteese, John G.

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

206

System Modeling of ORNL s 20 MW(t) Wood-fired Gasifying Boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an overview of the new 20 MW(t) wood-fired steam plant currently under construction by Johnson Controls, Inc. at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. The new plant will utilize a low-temperature air-blown gasifier system developed by the Nexterra Systems Corporation to generate low-heating value syngas (producer gas), which will then be burned in a staged combustion chamber to produce heat for the boiler. This is considered a showcase project for demonstrating the benefits of clean, bio-based energy, and thus there is considerable interest in monitoring and modeling the energy efficiency and environmental footprint of this technology relative to conventional steam generation with petroleum-based fuels. In preparation for system startup in 2012, we are developing steady-state and dynamic models of the major process components, including the gasifiers and combustor. These tools are intended to assist in tracking and optimizing system performance and for carrying out future conceptual studies of process changes that might improve the overall energy efficiency and sustainability. In this paper we describe the status of our steady-state gasifier and combustor models and illustrate preliminary results from limited parametric studies.

Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Wiggins, Gavin [ORNL; Hao, Ye [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Ris-R-Report Multi-MW wind turbine power curve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-R-Report Multi-MW wind turbine power curve measurements using remote sensing instruments Wagner, Michael Courtney Title: Multi-MW wind turbine power curve measurements using remote sensing (max. 2000 char.): Power curve measurement for large wind turbines requires taking into account more

208

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Duane Arnold Energy Center  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Duane Arnold Energy Center" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

209

Design and analysis of a 5-MW vertical-fluted-tube condenser for geothermal applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and analysis of an industtial-sized vertical-fluted-tube condenser. The condenser is used to condense superheated isobutane vapor discharged from a power turbine in a geothermal test facility operated for the US Department of Energy. The 5-MW condenser has 1150 coolant tubes in a four-pass configuration with a total heat transfer area of 725 m/sup 2/ (7800 ft/sup 2/). The unit is being tested at the Geothermal Components Test Facility in the Imperial Valley of East Mesa, California. The condenser design is based on previous experimental research work done at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on condensing refrigerants on a wide variety of single vertical tubes. Condensing film coefficients obtained on the high-performance vertical fluted tubes in condensing refrigerants are as much as seven times greater than those obtained with vertical smooth tubes that have the same diameter and length. The overall heat transfer performance expected from the fluted tube condenser is four to five times the heat transfer obtained from the identical units employing smooth tubes. Fluted tube condensers also have other direct applications in the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program in condensing ammonia, in the petroleum industry in condensing light hydrocarbons, and in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry in condensing fluorocarbon vapors.

Llewellyn, G.H.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Top U.S. Energy Department Official Visits Iowa, Calls on Congress...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

the wind energy supply chain in Iowa. Acciona Windpower produces 1.5 MW and 3.0 MW wind turbines. At its West Branch assembly plant, the company sources over 80 percent of its...

211

Ecosystem Solar Electric Corp aka Solar MW Energy Inc | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision hasESEInformationFans on Air

212

A Design Study ofa 1MW Stall Regulated Rotor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of special tailored airfoils has been found to be around 4% on the annual energy production and 1 55 4.8 Summary 56 5 Comparison with LM 24.0 59 5.1 Assumptions 59 5.2 Geometry 60 5.3 Annual energy production and loads 62 5.4 Materia

213

Clean Coal Technology III: 10 MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption final project performance and economics report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) program is a government and industry co-funded technology development. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the performance of the GSA system in treating a 10 MW slipstream of flue gas resulting from the combustion of a high sulfur coal. This project involves design, fabrication, construction and testing of the GSA system. The Project Performance and Economics Report provides the nonproprietary information for the ``10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) Project`` installed at Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Shawnee Power Station, Center for Emissions Research (CER) at Paducah, Kentucky. The program demonstrated that the GSA flue-gas-desulfurization (FGD) technology is capable of achieving high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (greater than 90%), while maintaining particulate emissions below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), without any negative environmental impact (section 6). A 28-day test demonstrated the reliability and operability of the GSA system during continuous operation. The test results and detailed discussions of the test data can be obtained from TVA`s Final Report (Appendix A). The Air Toxics Report (Appendix B), prepared by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EERC) characterizes air toxic emissions of selected hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from the GSA process. The results of this testing show that the GSA system can substantially reduce the emission of these HAP. With its lower capital costs and maintenance costs (section 7), as compared to conventional semi-dry scrubbers, the GSA technology commands a high potential for further commercialization in the United States. For detailed information refer to The Economic Evaluation Report (Appendix C) prepared by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors.

Hsu, F.E.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Experimental study of a 1.5-MW, 110-GHz gyrotron oscillator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis reports the design, construction and testing of a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron oscillator. This high power microwave tube has been proposed as the next evolutionary step for gyrotrons used to provide electron ...

Anderson, James P. (James Paul), 1972-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Economics of a Conceptual 75 MW Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Electric...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Caldera, a dormant volcanic complex in New Mexico, by connecting two wells with hydraulic fractures. Thermal power was generated at rates of up to 5 MW(t) and the reservoir...

216

10-MW Supercritical-CO2 Turbine (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their advanced power cycles. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

New two element steam turbine for 150 to 27 MW applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A modern high efficiency two element steam turbine for application in the 150 MW to 270 MW range is discussed. Innovations utilized and the experience base from which they are derived are presented. Benefits to the power producer resulting from this innovative approach are highlighted.They include reliability and efficiency improvement, delivery time reduction, and the application of design features, microprocessor control systems, and A. I. diagnostic techniques to reduce maintenance requirements, increase life, and enhance overall power plant productivity.

Martin, H.F.; Vaccarro, F.R.; Conrad, J.D. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

EURISOL-DS MULTI-MW TARGET ISSUES: BEAM WINDOW AND TRANSVERSE FILM TARGET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The analysis of the EURISOL-DS Multi_MW target precise geometry (Fig.1) has proved that large fission yields can be achieved with a 4 MW, providing a technically feasible design to evacuate the power deposited in the liquid mercury. Different designs for the mercury flow have been proposed, which maintain its temperature below the boiling point with moderate flow speeds (maximum 4 m/s).

Adonai Herrera-Martínez, Yacine Kadi

219

What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

200MW Aggressive renewable energy growth leads to 47% non-growth, long-distance transmission can facilitate access to renewable and cleaner energy

G. Fridley, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Development of renewable energy Challenges for the electrical grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Geothermal energy... · The Voice of the Renewable Energy sector for Government & public authorities, TSOs energy consumption · Electricity : new RES capacities ­ 19 000 MW onshore wind ­ 6 000 MW offshore wind #12;RES Development Objectives (Electricity) Objectif 2020 : RES in global energy consumption 2010

Canet, Léonie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Fact Sheet | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia NanoparticlesSmart GrocerDepartment&Engineering680a Flywheel.

222

COLLOQUIUM: Achieving 10MW Fusion Power in TFTR: a Retrospective |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy, science, andAnalysis15 CNMSHydraulicLab 15,

223

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90 MW COAL FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. WE Energies has over 3,700 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90 MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the WE Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, WE Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} (TOXECON) system designed to clean the combined flue gases of units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed down stream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e. mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a novel multi-pollutant control system to reduce emissions of mercury and other air pollutants, while minimizing waste, from a coal-fired power generation system.

Richard E. Johnson

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Distributed Energy Systems in California's Future: A Preliminary Report Volume 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sis and the collection and storage of hydrogen gas has beenair storage, flywheels, synthetic fuels ( hydrogen), and the

Balderston, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Department of Energy Offers Conditional Commitment for a Loan...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

line. The project will carry approximately 600 megawatts (MW) of electricity, including renewable energy resources in northern Nevada, and will integrate existing transmission...

226

Design of a 465 MW Combined Cycle Cogeneration Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STEAM TUR8JNE GENERAIOR ELECTRICAl, POWER OUIPUI GAS TURBINE GENERAIORS ~==3:=:J PROCESS CONDENSATE TOIAl fUEl 90 MillION BBl./'l'R NEI ELECTRICAl GENERATION 46$.000 KW LOSSES Sl,\\OF JUHINPUI NfTHEAT . 10 PROCESS 43% EFFICIENT... energy efficiency within this operating envelope, the following design .features are incorporated: extraction-induction-condensing steam turbine modulating inlet guide vanes on the gas turbine~ supplementary firing on two boilers steam augmentation...

Leffler, D. W.

227

Georgia Power Compnay Three 30 MW Renewable Projects  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for naturalGeneralEnergyDepartment Certain

228

Navy Estimated Average Hourly Load Profile by Month (in MW)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn Cyber Security NuclearNewNaturalOurNavillumNavy

229

Luke AFB 15 MW Solar Array Challenges and Lessons Learned  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature Combustion DemonstratorEast ForkHeadquarters U. S.

230

Microwave (MW) and Radio Frequency (RF) as Enabling Technologies for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps MoreWSRC-STI-2007-00250 Rev. 05 Oak09 U . SThe March 23,Advanced

231

Journal of the Korean Physical Society, Vol. 49, December 2006, pp. S309S313 High-Power Pulse Transformer for a 1.5-MW Magnetron of KSTAR LHCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transformer for a 1.5-MW Magnetron of KSTAR LHCD Microwave Application Sung-Duck Jang, Yoon-Gyu Son and Jong-power magnetron. The high power pulse transformer has the function of transferring pulse energy from a pulsed power source to a high-power load. A pulse transformer producing a pulse with a peak voltage of 45 k

232

Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF{sub 6} in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % {sup 235}U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

Jordan, W.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF[sub 6] in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % [sup 235]U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

Jordan, W.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Tucson Request for Proposal for 1-5 MW PV PPA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The mission of Tucson Water, a Department of the City of Tucson (the City), is to ensure that its customers receive high quality water and excellent service in a cost efficient, safe and environmentally responsible manner. In the interest of furthering Tucson Waters mission, the City is seeking a Contractor to finance, design, build, commission, own, operate and maintain up to a 1 megawatt (MW) DCSTC hotovoltaic (PV) system. The City also seeks an option for expanding the PV system up to a total of 5 MW DCSTC PV.

235

Xcel Energy Wind and Biomass Generation Mandate  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Minnesota law (Minn. Stat. § 216B.2423) requires Xcel Energy to build or contract for 225 megawatts (MW) of installed wind-energy capacity in the state by December 31, 1998, and to build or...

236

The Wide-area Energy Management System Phase 2 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The higher penetration of intermittent generation resources (including wind and solar generation) in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) balancing authorities (BAs) raises issue of requiring expensive additional fast grid balancing services in response to additional intermittency and fast up and down power ramps in the electric supply system. The overall goal of the wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) project is to develop the principles, algorithms, market integration rules, a functional design, and a technical specification for an energy storage system to help cope with unexpected rapid changes in renewable generation power output. The resulting system will store excess energy, control dispatchable load and distributed generation, and utilize inter-area exchange of the excess energy between the California ISO and Bonneville Power Administration control areas. A further goal is to provide a cost-benefit analysis and develop a business model for an investment-based practical deployment of such a system. There are two tasks in Phase 2 of the WAEMS project: the flywheel field tests and the battery evaluation. Two final reports, the Wide-area Energy Management System Phase 2 Flywheel Field Tests Final Report and the Wide-area Energy Storage and Management System Battery Storage Evaluation, were written to summarize the results of the two tasks.

Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

National Assessment of Energy Storage for Grid Balancing and Arbitrage: Phase 1, WECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To examine the role that energy storage could play in mitigating the impacts of the stochastic variability of wind generation on regional grid operation, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) examined a hypothetical 2020 grid scenario in which additional wind generation capacity is built to meet renewable portfolio standard targets in the Western Interconnection. PNNL developed a stochastic model for estimating the balancing requirements using historical wind statistics and forecasting error, a detailed engineering model to analyze the dispatch of energy storage and fast-ramping generation devices for estimating size requirements of energy storage and generation systems for meeting new balancing requirements, and financial models for estimating the life-cycle cost of storage and generation systems in addressing the future balancing requirements for sub-regions in the Western Interconnection. Evaluated technologies include combustion turbines, sodium sulfur (Na-S) batteries, lithium ion batteries, pumped-hydro energy storage, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, redox flow batteries, and demand response. Distinct power and energy capacity requirements were estimated for each technology option, and battery size was optimized to minimize costs. Modeling results indicate that in a future power grid with high-penetration of renewables, the most cost competitive technologies for meeting balancing requirements include Na-S batteries and flywheels.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Balducci, Patrick J.; Colella, Whitney G.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Nguyen, Tony B.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Zhang, Yu

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

ME 303: Fluid Mechanics MW 10 AM-12 PM PHO 202  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ME 303: Fluid Mechanics MW 10 AM-12 PM PHO 202 Discussion Friday 12-1 PM PHO 211 Instructor: Dr@bu.edu Required Textbook/Coursewebsite: Munson, Young, Okiishi, Heubsch. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, John.wiley.com/he-bcs/Books?action=index&itemId=0470262842&bcsId=4532 Supplemental Textbook Cenegal, Cimbala. Fluid Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications

Lin, Xi

239

ME 303: Fluid Mechanics MW 10 AM-12 PM PHO 202  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ME 303: Fluid Mechanics MW 10 AM-12 PM PHO 202 Discussion Friday 12-1 PM PHO 211 Instructor: Dr Textbook/Coursewebsite: Munson, Young, Okiishi, Heubsch. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, John Wiley.wiley.com/he-bcs/Books?action=index&itemId=0470262842&bcsId=4532 Supplemental Textbook Cenegal, Cimbala. Fluid Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications

240

ME 303: Fluid Mechanics Lecture: MW 10 AM -12 PM PHO 202  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ME 303: Fluid Mechanics Lecture: MW 10 AM - 12 PM PHO 202 Discussion Section: F 12 ­ 1 PM PHO 202/Coursewebsite: Munson, Young, Okiishi, Heubsch. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 6th ed. WileyPlus Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, http://edugen.wiley.com/edugen/class/cls204683/ Supplemental

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ME 303: Fluid Mechanics Lecture: MW 10 AM -12 PM PHO 202  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ME 303: Fluid Mechanics Lecture: MW 10 AM - 12 PM PHO 202 Discussion Section: F 12 ­ 1 PM PHO 202: Required Textbook/Coursewebsite: Munson, Young, Okiishi, Heubsch. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, John.wiley.com/he-bcs/Books?action=index&itemId=0470262842&bcsId=4532 Supplemental Textbook Cenegal, Cimbala. Fluid Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications

242

An All Metal High Power Circularly Polarized 100 MW RF Load  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compact RF load has been designed using a cascaded array of lossy radial RF chokes to dissipate 100 MW peak and 8 kW average power uniformly along the length of the load. Operation in the circularly polarized Te{_}11 mode assures uniform dissipation azimuthally as well.

Fowkes, W.R.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; /SLAC

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Management and Organizational Behavior Section 301-08 @ 2:00 3:15 MW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MGMT 301 Management and Organizational Behavior Fall 2013 Section 301-08 @ 2:00 ­ 3:15 MW Beatty organizational goals by working with, and through, people and other resources. Organizations are treated factors. International as well as domestic situations are examined. Course Learning Objectives: 1

Young, Paul Thomas

244

Seismic reversal pattern for the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, MW 7.6 earthquake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic reversal pattern for the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, MW 7.6 earthquake Yih-Min Wu a , Chien the variations in seismicity patterns in the Taiwan region before and after the Chi-Chi earthquake. We have found that the areas with relatively high seismicity in the eastern Taiwan became abnormally quiet before the Chi

Wu, Yih-Min

245

Type II Transformation -Regeneration 2 Media -1 Liter Solution Substance []stock/MW Final Add ( )  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type II Transformation - Regeneration 2 Media - 1 Liter Solution Substance []stock/MW Final Add. bialaphos stock 10mg/ml 1mg/L 100ul/L Pour into 100x25mm Petri dishes in hood. 1L=30 plates. Dry plates lids

Raizada, Manish N.

246

Multidisciplinary Design Optimization for Glass-Fiber Epoxy-Matrix Composite 5 MW Horizontal-Axis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Axis Wind-Turbine Blades M. Grujicic, G. Arakere, B. Pandurangan, V. Sellappan, A. Vallejo, and M. Ozen optimization, fatigue-life assessment, horizon- tal axis wind turbine blades 1. Introduction The depletion for the development of cost-effective glass-fiber reinforced epoxy-matrix composite 5 MW horizontal-axis wind-turbine

Grujicic, Mica

247

Active thrust faulting offshore Boumerdes, Algeria, and its relations to the 2003 Mw 6.9 earthquake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active thrust faulting offshore Boumerdes, Algeria, and its relations to the 2003 Mw 6.9 earthquake offshore Boumerdes, Algeria, and its relations to the 2003 Mw 6.9 earthquake, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L that strain is distributed over a broad area, from the Atlas front to the offshore margin [Buforn et al., 1995

Déverchère, Jacques

248

Perturbation of the Izmit earthquake aftershock decaying activity following the 1999 Mw 7.2 Duzce, Turkey, earthquake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

¨zce, Turkey, earthquake Guillaume Daniel,1 David Marsan,2 and Michel Bouchon1 Received 4 August 2005; revised patterns of seismicity in western Turkey, following the occurrence of the 12 November 1999 Mw 7.2 Du activity following the 1999 Mw 7.2 Du¨zce, Turkey, earthquake, J. Geophys. Res., 111, B05310, doi:10

249

Seismic behavior in central Taiwan: Response to stress evolution following the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic behavior in central Taiwan: Response to stress evolution following the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi of seismicity occurred in the Nantou region of central Taiwan. Among the seismic activities, eight Mw P 5 magnitudes took place from 1900 to 1998. Since the seismicity rate during the Chi-Chi postseismic period has

Wu, Yih-Min

250

Department of Energy Finalizes $90.6 Million Loan Guarantee to...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Loan Guarantee to Support Colorado Solar Generating Facility The California Valley Solar Ranch has a capacity of 250 MW -- enough energy to power the equivalent of every home...

251

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

York" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Robert Moses Niagara","Hydroelectric","New York Power Authority",2353.2...

252

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Bath County","Pumped Storage","Virginia Electric & Power Co",3003 2,"North...

253

An energy return on investment for a geothermal power plant on the Texas Gulf Coast.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis examines the energy return on investment (EROI) of a model 3 MW hybrid gas-geothermal plant on the Texas Gulf Coast. The model plant… (more)

Kampa, Kyle Benjamin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

MHK Projects/NJBPU 1 5 MW Demonstration Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies JumpLuangwa Zambia5.1719°,Crossing8°

255

Aquantis 2.5MW Ocean Current Generation Device | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope Change #1 |MarketingVI,Program Training April 30,

256

,,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQProved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or

257

,,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQProved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name

258

Niland development project geothermal loan guaranty: 49-MW (net) power plant and geothermal well field development, Imperial County, California: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed federal action addressed by this environmental assessment is the authorization of disbursements under a loan guaranteed by the US Department of Energy for the Niland Geothermal Energy Program. The disbursements will partially finance the development of a geothermal well field in the Imperial Valley of California to supply a 25-MW(e) (net) power plant. Phase I of the project is the production of 25 MW(e) (net) of power; the full rate of 49 MW (net) would be achieved during Phase II. The project is located on approximately 1600 acres (648 ha) near the city of Niland in Imperial County, California. Well field development includes the initial drilling of 8 production wells for Phase I, 8 production wells for Phase II, and the possible need for as many as 16 replacement wells over the anticipated 30-year life of the facility. Activities associated with the power plant in addition to operation are excavation and construction of the facility and associated systems (such as cooling towers). Significant environmental impacts, as defined in Council on Environmental Quality regulation 40 CFR Part 1508.27, are not expected to occur as a result of this project. Minor impacts could include the following: local degradation of ambient air quality due to particulate and/or hydrogen sulfide emissions, temporarily increased ambient noise levels due to drilling and construction activities, and increased traffic. Impacts could be significant in the event of a major spill of geothermal fluid, which could contaminate groundwater and surface waters and alter or eliminate nearby habitat. Careful land use planning and engineering design, implementation of mitigation measures for pollution control, and design and implementation of an environmental monitoring program that can provide an early indication of potential problems should ensure that impacts, except for certain accidents, will be minimized.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A reactive contingency analysis algorithm using MW and MVAR distribution factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes an algorithm that can be used in analyzing reactive power flow contingencies. This approach uses MW distribution factors (DFAX) in conjunction with newly developed VAR distribution factors (RDFAX) to solve for the post-contingency bus voltage magnitude changes of an interconnecter EHV system. A prototype version of the algorithm described in this paper is presently being tested at the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland (PJM) interconnection office.

Taylor, D.G.; Maahs, L.J. (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland Interconnection, Norristown, PA (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Testing and Modeling of a 3-MW Wind Turbine Using Fully Coupled Simulation Codes (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster describes the NREL/Alstom Wind testing and model verification of the Alstom 3-MW wind turbine located at NREL's National Wind Technology Center. NREL,in collaboration with ALSTOM Wind, is studying a 3-MW wind turbine installed at the National Wind Technology Center(NWTC). The project analyzes the turbine design using a state-of-the-art simulation code validated with detailed test data. This poster describes the testing and the model validation effort, and provides conclusions about the performance of the unique drive train configuration used in this wind turbine. The 3-MW machine has been operating at the NWTC since March 2011, and drive train measurements will be collected through the spring of 2012. The NWTC testing site has particularly turbulent wind patterns that allow for the measurement of large transient loads and the resulting turbine response. This poster describes the 3-MW turbine test project, the instrumentation installed, and the load cases captured. The design of a reliable wind turbine drive train increasingly relies on the use of advanced simulation to predict structural responses in a varying wind field. This poster presents a fully coupled, aero-elastic and dynamic model of the wind turbine. It also shows the methodology used to validate the model, including the use of measured tower modes, model-to-model comparisons of the power curve, and mainshaft bending predictions for various load cases. The drivetrain is designed to only transmit torque to the gearbox, eliminating non-torque moments that are known to cause gear misalignment. Preliminary results show that the drivetrain is able to divert bending loads in extreme loading cases, and that a significantly smaller bending moment is induced on the mainshaft compared to a three-point mounting design.

LaCava, W.; Guo, Y.; Van Dam, J.; Bergua, R.; Casanovas, C.; Cugat, C.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

advanced filter systems: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ac transmission systems (FACTS), flywheel energy storage, high voltage dc transmission (HVDC), hypercapacitor, power electronics, supercapacitor, superconducting magnetic energy...

262

advanced storage rings: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ac transmission systems (FACTS), flywheel energy storage, high voltage dc transmission (HVDC), hypercapacitor, power electronics, supercapacitor, superconducting magnetic energy...

263

Hydrogen Technology Park DTE Energy -Company Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Production Detroit Edison Power Generation Energy Services* Energy Trading Biomass Energy Coal billion · 2.6 million customers · 11,000 MW of generation · 600 BCF natural gas delivery · 11,000 employees #12;3 Diversified Energy and Energy Technology Company * Energy Services: Coal Based Fuels

264

Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (India, NW Himalaya)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (India private hydroelectric facility, located at the Baspa River which is an important left-hand tributary

Bookhagen, Bodo

265

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

tapping wind energy to serve local buildings, conduct research to find a local wind company with expertise in 1-2 MW towers or mini turbines, contract with a law firm to study...

266

EIS-0354: Ivanpah Energy Center, NV  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Ivanpah Energy Center, L.P., a Diamond Generating Corporation Company, a subsidiary of Mitsubishi Corporation proposes to construct and operate a 500 Megawatt (MW) gas-fired electric power generating station in southern Clark County, Nevada.

267

Consumer Energy Use Insights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pike Powers Lab and Center for Commercialization Pecan Street Research Institute Data driven insights from the nation’s deepest ever customer energy research ESL-KT-13-12-23 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San... Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 5:15 pm! ! ! March 9, 2011! 31,262 MW! ! ! August 3, 2011! 68,416 MW Source: ERCOT 35,000 70,000 Mar 9, 2011 Aug 3, 2011 Residential Small! commercial Large C&I 51.2 % 25.2 % 23.7 % Residential Small! commercial Large C&I 27...

McCracken, B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Extensive English Summary CPB Special Publication 57: Wind energy at the North Sea: A social Cost-benefit analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Extensive English Summary CPB Special Publication 57: Wind energy at the North Sea: A social Cost 2004, in which they requested a breakdown of the costs and benefits of 6,000 MW of offshore wind energy sensitivity analyses were carried out: 1. 6,000 MW offshore wind energy, ready in 2020 2. Equivalent

269

Fluidized bed combustor 50 MW thermal power plant, Krabi, Thailand. Feasibility study. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents the results of a study prepared by Burns and Roe for the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand to examine the technical feasibility and economic attractiveness for building a 50 MW Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion lignite fired power plant at Krabi, southern Thailand. The study is divided into seven main sections, plus an executive summary and appendices: (1) Introduction; (2) Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion Technology Overview; (3) Fuel and Limestone Tests; (4) Site Evaluation; (5) Station Design and Arrangements; (6) Environmental Considerations; (7) Economic Analysis.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL-ON THREE 90 MW COAL FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90 MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} (TOXECON) system designed to clean the combined flue gases of units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed down stream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e. mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a novel multi-pollutant control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste, from a coal-fired power generation system.

Richard E. Johnson

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

271

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90-MW COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particulate control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} system designed to clean the combined flue gases of Units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON{trademark} is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed downstream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium-based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e., mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste from a coal-fired power generation system.

Steven T. Derenne

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

272

J.M. Tarascon, et al. , Electrochemical energy storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

opportunities for Electrochemical Energy Storage (EES) Mass storage (MW): Which technology? Compressed air #12J.M. Tarascon, et al. , Electrochemical energy storage for renewable energies CNRS, Jeudi 3 Octobre 28 TW Renewable EnergiesRenewable EnergiesRenewable Energies WHY ENERGY STORAGE ? Billionsdebarils

Canet, Léonie

273

Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Spencer, S.G.; Shaber, C.R.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Shaber, C.R.; Thurow, T.L.

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

275

Toxecon Retrofit for Mercury and Mulit-Pollutant Control on Three 90-MW Coal-Fired Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) project was based on a cooperative agreement between We Energies and the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to design, install, evaluate, and demonstrate the EPRI-patented TOXECON{trademark} air pollution control process. Project partners included Cummins & Barnard, ADA-ES, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The primary goal of this project was to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant in Marquette, Michigan. Additional goals were to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter emissions; allow reuse and sale of fly ash; advance commercialization of the technology; demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use at power plants; and demonstrate recovery of mercury from the sorbent. Mercury was controlled by injection of activated carbon upstream of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse, which achieved more than 90% removal on average over a 44-month period. During a two-week test involving trona injection, SO{sub 2} emissions were reduced by 70%, although no coincident removal of NOx was achieved. The TOXECON{trademark} baghouse also provided enhanced particulate control, particularly during startup of the boilers. On this project, mercury CEMs were developed and tested in collaboration with Thermo Fisher Scientific, resulting in a reliable CEM that could be used in the power plant environment and that could measure mercury as low as 0.1 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Sorbents were injected downstream of the primary particulate collection device, allowing for continued sale and beneficial use of captured fly ash. Two methods for recovering mercury using thermal desorption on the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture were successfully tested during this program. Two methods for using the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture in structural concrete were also successfully developed and tested. This project demonstrated a significant reduction in the rate of emissions from Presque Isle Units 7, 8, and 9, and substantial progress toward establishing the design criteria for one of the most promising mercury control retrofit technologies currently available. The Levelized Cost for 90% mercury removal at this site was calculated at $77,031 per pound of mercury removed with a capital cost of $63,189 per pound of mercury removed. Mercury removal at the Presque Isle Power Plant averages approximately 97 pounds per year.

Steven Derenne; Robin Stewart

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

Design Principles of a flywheel Regenerative Braking System (f-RBS) for Formula SAE type racecar and system testing on a Virtual Test Rig modeled on MSC ADAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

momentum in the industry [4]. These vehicles (BEVs and HEVS) use electric motor/generator pairs to propel themselves and to recapture braking energy (electric RBS) and the power source is the battery. The regenerative braking system uses a generator..., aerodynamic and road losses. 4. Improvised Transmission design to reduce losses. 5. Hybrid and Alternative Energy Propulsion systems e.g. the Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV), the Fuel Cell Vehicle (FCV). 6. Recycling Braking energy – Storage and reuse...

Pochiraju, Anirudh

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

150-MW S-band klystron program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two S-Band klystrons operating at 150 MW have been designed, fabricated and tested at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) during the past two years for use in an experimental accelerator at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg, Germany. Both klystrons operate at the design power, 60 Hz repetition rate, 3 {micro}s pulsewidth, with an efficiency {gt} 40%, and agreement between the experimental results and simulations is excellent. The 535 kV, 700 A electron gun was tested by constructing a solenoidal focused beam stick which identified a source of oscillation, subsequently engineered out of the klystron guns. Design of the beam stick and the two klystrons is discussed, along with observation and suppression of spurious oscillations. Differences in design and the resulting performance of the Klystrons is emphasized.

Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Phillips, R.M.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Small-angle scattering instruments on a 1 MW long pulse spallation source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two small-angle neutron scattering instruments have been designed and optimized for installation at a 1 MW long pulse spallation source. The first of these instruments allows access to length scales in materials from 10 to 400 {angstrom}, and the second instrument from 40 to 1200 {angstrom}. Design characteristics were determined and optimization was done using the MCLIB Monte Carlo instrument simulation package. The code has been {open_quote}benchmarked{close_quote} by simulating the {open_quote}as-built{close_quote} D11 spectrometer at ILL and a performance comparison of the three instruments was made. Comparisons were made by evaluating the scattered intensity for {delta} scatterers at different Q values for various instrument configurations needed to span a Q-range of 0.0007 - 0.44 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1}.

Olah, G.A.; Hjelm, R.P.; Seeger, P.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Investigation of the part-load performance of two 1. 12 MW regenerative marine gas turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regenerative and intercooled-regenerative gas turbine engines with low pressure ratio have significant efficiency advantages over traditional aero-derivative engines of higher pressure ratios, and can compete with modern diesel engines for marine propulsion. Their performance is extremely sensitive to thermodynamic-cycle parameter choices and the type of components. The performance of two 1.12 MW (1,500 hp) regenerative gas turbines are predicted with computer simulations. One engine has a single-shaft configuration, and the other has a gas-generator/power-turbine combination. The latter arrangement is essential for wide off-design operating regime. The performance of each engine driving fixed-pitch and controllable-pitch propellers, or an AC electric bus (for electric-motor-driven propellers) is investigated. For commercial applications the controllable-pitch propeller may have efficiency advantages (depending on engine type and shaft arrangements). For military applications the electric drive provides better operational flexibility.

Korakianitis, T.; Beier, K.J. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Definition of a 5MW/61.5m wind turbine blade reference model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A basic structural concept of the blade design that is associated with the frequently utilized %E2%80%9CNREL offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine%E2%80%9D is needed for studies involving blade structural design and blade structural design tools. The blade structural design documented in this report represents a concept that meets basic design criteria set forth by IEC standards for the onshore turbine. The design documented in this report is not a fully vetted blade design which is ready for manufacture. The intent of the structural concept described by this report is to provide a good starting point for more detailed and targeted investigations such as blade design optimization, blade design tool verification, blade materials and structures investigations, and blade design standards evaluation. This report documents the information used to create the current model as well as the analyses used to verify that the blade structural performance meets reasonable blade design criteria.

Resor, Brian Ray

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Final Report, Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm2. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year).

Swartz, Dr Scott L.; Thrun, Dr Lora B.; Arkenberg, Mr Gene B.; Chenault, Ms Kellie M.

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

282

Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm{sup 2}. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year). DISCLAIMER

Scott Swartz; Lora Thrun; Gene Arkenberg; Kellie Chenault

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Mineralogical study of borehole MW-206 Asarco smelter site, Tacoma, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mobility of metals in ground water is an important consideration for evaluating remedial options at the Asarco smelter site. Tacoma, Washington. One factor in assessing metal mobility is the degree of secondary mineralization in a slag-fill aquifer extending into the intertidal zone along the Puget Sound shoreline. Samples of aquifer material were collected for mineralogical analysis from borehole MW-206 at five-foot intervals within the slag fill from 5 to 25 feet below the ground surface, and in the underlying marine sand and gravel at 27 feet. Grab samples of slag fragments with visually apparent secondary minerals were also collected at five intermediate depths between 12 and 19 feet. Samples were analyzed by a variety of techniques including hydride generation/atomic absorption for arsenic concentration, scanning electron microscopy/electron microprobe for mineralogical texture and microanalysis, powder x-ray diffraction for mineral identification, and optical microscopy for textural observations.

Frank, D.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

High-power targets: experience and R&D for 2 MW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-power particle production targets are crucial elements of future neutrino and other rare particle beams. Fermilab plans to produce a beam of neutrinos (LBNE) with a 2.3 MW proton beam (Project X). Any solid target is unlikely to survive for an extended period in such an environment - many materials would not survive a single beam pulse. We are using our experience with previous neutrino and antiproton production targets, along with a new series of R&D tests, to design a target that has adequate survivability for this beamline. The issues considered are thermal shock (stress waves), heat removal, radiation damage, radiation accelerated corrosion effects, physics/geometry optimization and residual radiation.

Hurh, P.; /Fermilab; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Loveridge, P.; /Rutherford; Simos, N.; /Brookhaven

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A miniaturized mW thermoelectric generator for nw objectives: continuous, autonomous, reliable power for decades.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have built and tested a miniaturized, thermoelectric power source that can provide in excess of 450 {micro}W of power in a system size of 4.3cc, for a power density of 107 {micro}W/cc, which is denser than any system of this size previously reported. The system operates on 150mW of thermal input, which for this system was simulated with a resistive heater, but in application would be provided by a 0.4g source of {sup 238}Pu located at the center of the device. Output power from this device, while optimized for efficiency, was not optimized for form of the power output, and so the maximum power was delivered at only 41mV. An upconverter to 2.7V was developed concurrently with the power source to bring the voltage up to a usable level for microelectronics.

Aselage, Terrence Lee; Siegal, Michael P.; Whalen, Scott; Frederick, Scott K.; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A 12-MW-scale pilot study of in-duct scrubbing (IDS) using a rotary atomizer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low-cost, moderate-removal efficiency, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology was selected by the US Department of Energy for pilot demonstration in its Acid Rain Precursor Control Technology Initiative. The process, identified as In-Duct Scrubbing (IDS), applies rotary atomizer techniques developed for lime-based spray dryer FGD while utilizing existing flue gas ductwork and particulate collectors. IDS technology is anticipated to result in a dry desulfurization process with a moderate removal efficiency (50% or greater) for high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. The critical elements for successful application are: (1) adequate mixing of sorbent droplets with flue gas for efficient reaction contact, (2) sufficient residence time to produce a non-wetting product, and (3) appropriate ductwork cross-sectional area to prevent deposition of wet reaction products before particle drying is comple. The ductwork in many older plants, previously modified to meet 1970 Clean Air Act requirements for particulate control, usually meet these criteria. A 12 MW-scale IDS pilot plant was constructed at the Muskingum River Plant of the American Electric Power System. The pilot plant, which operates from a slipstrem attached to the air-preheater outlet duct from the Unit 5 boiler at the Muskingum River Plant (which burns about 4% sulfur coal), is equipped with three atomizer stations to test the IDS concept in vertical and horizontal configurations. In addition, the pilot plant is equipped to test the effect of injecting IDS off- product upstream of the atomizer, on SO{sub 2}and NO{sub x} removals.

Samuel, E.A.; Murphy, K.R.; Demian, A.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Corporate Reporting of Boiler MACT Energy Assessments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% G en er at io n MW /y ea r Annua l S av ing s Aggressiveness Factor Annual Savings 0% Aggressiveness Annual Savings $ Generation MW ESL-IE-13-05-23 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy...,000 590,000 595,000 600,000 605,000 610,000 $- $100,000 $200,000 $300,000 $400,000 $500,000 $600,000 $700,000 $800,000 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% G en er at io n MW /y ea r Annua l S av ing s Aggressiveness...

McClain, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Conceptual Design of a 50--100 MW Electron Beam Accelerator System for the National Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Hypersonic Wind Tunnel program requires an unprecedented electron beam source capable of 1--2 MeV at a beam power level of 50--100 MW. Direct-current electron accelerator technology can readily generate high average power beams to approximately 5 MeV at output efficiencies greater than 90%. However, due to the nature of research and industrial applications, there has never been a requirement for a single module with an output power exceeding approximately 500 kW. Although a 50--100 MW module is a two-order extrapolation from demonstrated power levels, the scaling of accelerator components appears reasonable. This paper presents an evaluation of component and system issues involved in the design of a 50--100 MW electron beam accelerator system with precision beam transport into a high pressure flowing air environment.

SCHNEIDER,LARRY X.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

RENEWABLE ENERGY RESEARCH August 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, battery storage sized at 2 megawatt (MW), demand response initiatives, and solar thermal to generate up-and-play" energy resources. · Techniques for deploying smart grid battery storage and monitoring battery. The demonstration will address the integration issues for new wind power, large-scale energy storage, demand

290

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the external fluid mechanics of OTEC plants: report coveringocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants by mid-1980's.1980. A baseline design of a 40-MW OTEC Pilot Johns Hopkins

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

LEC 5 Toronto 11 Apr 2014 Global energy and environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation: about 36% (but, this does not include the material and energy costs of constructing the power tower) BOILER #10 SAME AMOUNT LOW PRESSURE STEAM TO MILL FOR PAPER TURBINE/ GENERATOR 25 MW MORE

292

Photo of the Week: Wheat and Wind | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Montana, generating electricity for portions of the northwest United States. With an installed capacity of 135 MW, the Judith Gap Energy Center is one of the strongest wind farms...

293

2010 Solar Technologies Market Report, November 2011, Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MENA Middle East and North Africa MG-Si metallurgical-grade silicon MNGSEC Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center MOU memorandum of understanding MT metric ton MW megawatt...

294

Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

A 180mW InP HBT Power Amplifier MMIC at 214 GHz Thomas B. Reed1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-- A solid state power amplifer MMIC is demonstrated with 180mW of saturated output power at 214GHz, from, MMICs, Power amplifier, Solid State Power Amplifier (SSPA). I. INTRODUCTION Active interest in increasing the saturated output power of solid-state power amplifiers has continued due to growing interest

Rodwell, Mark J. W.

296

The role of inert gas in MW-enhanced plasmas for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in polycrystalline diamond film CVD [3,4]. While the mechanical, thermal and acoustic properties of MCD films haveThe role of inert gas in MW-enhanced plasmas for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond thin diamond Nanocrystalline Inert gas Growth Nanocrystalline diamond thin films have been deposited using

Bristol, University of

297

ATS 680 A6: Applied Numerical Weather Prediction MW, 1:00-1:50 PM, ACRC Room 212B  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments using a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction model · Discuss the strengths and weaknesses, Parameterization Schemes: Keys to Understanding Numerical Weather Prediction Models, Cambridge University PressATS 680 A6: Applied Numerical Weather Prediction Fall 2013 MW, 1:00-1:50 PM, ACRC Room 212B Course

298

Compression Losses In Cryocoolers J.S. Reed, G. Davey, M.W. Dadd and P.B. Bailey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these losses is related to the irreversible compression of gas in the cylinder, and the magnitude of this loss1 Compression Losses In Cryocoolers J.S. Reed, G. Davey, M.W. Dadd and P.B. Bailey Department and conditions this 'lumped' loss varies with operating frequency, swept volume and pressure swing, suggesting

299

The lower hybrid (LH) heating and current drive system can generate 10-12 MW of microwave power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background The lower hybrid (LH) heating and current drive system can generate 10-12 MW reflecting optics · Remote vacuum window manufactured by CCFE · Industrial contract for periscope manufacture with Zemax model · Remote, IR compatible, double vacuum window with pumped interspace · 4, two colour

300

Gas Spring Losses in Linear Clearance Seal Compressors P.B. Bailey, M.W. Dadd, J.S. Reed*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a clearance seal linear compressor attached to a plain gas spring volume. The static flow through1 Gas Spring Losses in Linear Clearance Seal Compressors P.B. Bailey, M.W. Dadd, J.S. Reed* , C A fundamental loss mechanism in cryocoolers is associated with compression and expansion processes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Expansion of Michigan EOR Operations Using Advanced Amine Technology at a 600 MW Project Wolverine Carbon Capture and Storage Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wolverine Power Supply Cooperative Inc, a member owned cooperative utility based in Cadillac Michigan, proposes to demonstrate the capture, beneficial utilization and storage of CO{sub 2} in the expansion of existing Enhanced Oil Recovery operations. This project is being proposed in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-FOA-0000015 Section III D, 'Large Scale Industrial CCS projects from Industrial Sources' Technology Area 1. The project will remove 1,000 metric tons per day of CO{sub 2} from the Wolverine Clean Energy Venture 600 MW CFB power plant owned and operated by WPC. CO{sub 2} from the flue gas will be captured using Hitachi's CO{sub 2} capture system and advanced amine technology. The capture system with the advanced amine-based solvent supplied by Hitachi is expected to significantly reduce the cost and energy requirements of CO{sub 2} capture compared to current technologies. The captured CO{sub 2} will be compressed and transported for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO{sub 2} storage purposes. Enhanced Oil Recovery is a proven concept, widely used to recover otherwise inaccessible petroleum reserves. While post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies have been tested at the pilot scale on coal power plant flue gas, they have not yet been demonstrated at a commercial scale and integrated with EOR and storage operations. Amine-based CO{sub 2} capture is the leading technology expected to be available commercially within this decade to enable CCS for utility and industrial facilities firing coal and waste fuels such as petroleum coke. However, traditional CO{sub 2} capture process utilizing commercial amine solvents is very energy intensive for regeneration and is also susceptible to solvent degradation by oxygen as well as SOx and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas, resulting in large operating costs. The large volume of combustion flue gas with its low CO{sub 2} concentration requires large equipment sizes, which together with the highly corrosive nature of the typical amine-based separation process leads to high plant capital investment. According to recent DOE-NETL studies, MEA-based CCS will increase the cost of electricity of a new pulverized coal plant by 80-85% and reduce the net plant efficiency by about 30%. Non-power industrial facilities will incur similar production output and efficiency penalties when implementing conventional carbon capture systems. The proposed large scale demonstration project combining advanced amine CO{sub 2} capture integrated with commercial EOR operations significantly advances post-combustion technology development toward the DOE objectives of reducing the cost of energy production and improving the efficiency of CO{sub 2} Capture technologies. WPC has assembled a strong multidisciplinary team to meet the objectives of this project. WPC will provide the host site and Hitachi will provide the carbon capture technology and advanced solvent. Burns and Roe bring expertise in overall engineering integration and plant design to the team. Core Energy, an active EOR producer/operator in the State of Michigan, is committed to support the detailed design, construction and operation of the CO{sub 2} pipeline and storage component of the project. This team has developed a Front End Engineering Design and Cost Estimate as part of Phase 1 of DOE Award DE-FE0002477.

H Hoffman; Y kishinevsky; S. Wu; R. Pardini; E. Tripp; D. Barnes

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - amulti-mw wind turbine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Commission Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 22 A Review of "Small-Scale Wind Turbines Policy Perspectives and Summary: ERG200607 A Review of...

303

Economic Development Benefits from Wind Energy in Nebraska: A Report for the Nebraska Energy Office (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on the economic development impacts estimated from building and operating 7,800 MW of new wind power in Nebraska. This level of development is on the scale envisioned in the Department of Energy (DOE) report 20% Wind Energy by 2030. A practical first step to building 7,800 of wind is completing 1,000 MW. We also include the estimated economic impacts to Nebraska from building 1,000 MW of wind power. Our primary analysis indicates that the development and construction of approximately 7,800 MW of wind energy in Nebraska by 2030 will support 20,600 to 36,500 annual full-time equivalents (AFTE). In addition, operating the full 7,800 MW of wind energy could support roughly 2,000 to 4,000 full-time workers throughout the operating life of the wind facilities (LFTE). Nebraska's economy is estimated to see an average annual boost in economic activity ranging from $140 million to $260 million solely from construction and development related activities between 2011 and 2030. An additional boost of $250 - $442 million annually is estimated from operating 7,800 MW of wind capacity.

Lantz, E.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Award Score Score Status 1 CaliSolar, Inc. Manufacturing Capacity Expansion from 60 MW to 155 MW $5 SV Green Tech Corp. Expansion of Solar Panel Manufacturing in California $4,948,000 $0 61 Finalist 12STATE OF CALIFORNIA ­ NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY

305

STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Award Score Score Status 1 CaliSolar, Inc. Manufacturing Capacity Expansion from 60 MW to 155 MW $5 64 Finalist 13 12 SV Green Tech Corp. Expansion of Solar Panel Manufacturing in California $4STATE OF CALIFORNIA ­ NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY

306

Renewable Energy Action Team-Generation Tracking For Renewable Projects Revised 6/17/13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Name County Developer MW Type Solar PV 1 2009_Retzer Butte Pristine Sun Fund 6 Butte PGE LLC 0.75 Solar/Silverado Power 52 Solar PV 17 Aurora Solar Kings Iberdrola 20 Solar PV 18 Avenal Photovoltaic Solar Farm Kings 44 Calwest Energy Kern Jonathan Bender Unk Solar PV #12;Project Name County Developer MW Type 45

307

The Value of Distributed Photovoltaics to Austin Energy and the City of Austin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1 Executive Summary Introduction Austin Energy (AE) has a strong commitment to integrating solar of installing 15 MW of solar generation by the end of 2007 and 100 MW by 2020. AE wants to ensure that the cost) to perform value studies. One RFP was to determine the value of the economic development benefits of solar

Perez, Richard R.

308

Control system for 5 MW neutral beam ion source for SST1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the control system for a 5 MW ion source of the NBI (neutral beam injector) for steady-state superconducting tokamak-1 (SST-1). The system uses both hardware and software solutions. It comprises a DAS (data acquisition system) and a control system. The DAS is used to read the voltage and current signals from eight filament heater power supplies and 24 discharge power supplies. The control system is used to adjust the filament heater current in order to achieve an effective control on the discharge current in the plasma box. The system consists of a VME (Verse Module Eurocard) system and C application program running on a VxWorks{sup TM} real-time operating system. A PID (proportional, integral, and differential) algorithm is used to control the filament heater current. Experiments using this system have shown that the discharge current can be controlled within 1% accuracy for a PID loop time of 20 ms. Response of the control system to the pressure variation of the gas in the chamber has also been studied and compared with the results obtained from those of an uncontrolled system. The present approach increases the flexibility of the control system. It not only eases the control of the plasma but also allows an easy changeover to various operation scenarios.

Patel, G.B.; Onali, Raja; Sharma, Vivek; Suresh, S.; Tripathi, V.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Singh, N.P.; Thakkar, Dipal; Gupta, L.N.; Singh, M.J.; Patel, P.J.; Chakraborty, A.K.; Baruah, U.K.; Mattoo, S.K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India-382428 (India)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Modelling of NO{sub x} reduction strategies applied to 350 MW(e) utility boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational fluid dynamics model has been combined with a NO{sub x} chemistry post-processor to predict the formation and destruction of nitric oxide in three-dimensional furnaces burning pulverized fuel. The model considers the complex interaction of turbulent flow, heat transfer, combustion, and NO{sub x} reaction chemistry. Lagrangian particle dynamics are used to track burning pulverized coal particles through the computational cells. Fuel nitrogen is released in proportion to the burnout of the particle. A range of combustion NO{sub x} reduction strategies has been applied to two 350 MW(e) utility boilers burning different coals. A medium volatile bituminous coal is fired using low NO{sub x} burners in one furnace and a sub-bituminous coal is burnt using conventional swirl burners in a different furnace. The strategies include: burner out of service, overfire air, reduction in excess air, change in particle size, and fuel reburn. In general NO{sub x} predictions are better for the sub-bituminous coal than for the medium volatile bituminous coal. Typical NO{sub x} prediction errors are {+-} 10 percent.

Visona, S.P.; Singh, B. [AUSTA Electric, Brisbane (Australia); Stanmore, B.R. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Brisbane (Australia)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

HFIR Vessel Maximum Permissible Pressures for Operating Period 26 to 50 EFPY (100 MW)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extending the life of the HFIR pressure vessel from 26 to 50 EFPY (100 MW) requires an updated calculation of the maximum permissible pressure for a range in vessel operating temperatures (40-120 F). The maximum permissible pressure is calculated using the equal-potential method, which takes advantage of knowledge gained from periodic hydrostatic proof tests and uses the test conditions (pressure, temperature, and frequency) as input. The maximum permissible pressure decreases with increasing time between hydro tests but is increased each time a test is conducted. The minimum values that occur just prior to a test either increase or decrease with time, depending on the vessel temperature. The minimum value of these minimums is presently specified as the maximum permissible pressure. For three vessel temperatures of particular interest (80, 88, and 110 F) and a nominal time of 3.0 EFPY(100 MVV)between hydro tests, these pressures are 677, 753, and 850 psi. For the lowest temperature of interest (40 F), the maximum permissible pressure is 295 psi.

Cheverton, R.D.; Inger, J.R.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Low NOx burner retrofits and enhancements for a 518 MW oil and gas fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low NOx oil/gas burners originally supplied to Jacksonville Electric Authority, Northside No. 3 .500 MW unit, were based on a duplex air register design with lobed spray oil atomizers providing additional fuel staging. Although the burners could meet the targeted NOx levels of 0.3 and 0.2 lbs/10{sup 6} BTU on oil and gas respectively. There was insufficient margin on these NOx levels to enable continuous low NOx operation to be achieved. Further burner development was undertaken based on improved aerodynamic control within the burner design to give an approximate 25% improvement in NOx emission reduction thus providing an adequate operating margin. This `RoBTAS` (Round Burner with Tilted Air Supply) burner design based on techniques developed successfully for front wall coal firing applications achieved the required NOx reductions in full scale firing demonstrations on both heavy fuel oil and natural gas firing. The paper describes the development work and the subsequent application of the `RoBTAS` burners to the Northside No. 3 boiler. The burner will also be test fired on Orimulsion fuel and thus the comparison between heavy fuel oil firing and Orimulsion firing under ultra low NOx conditions will be made.

King, J.J. [Jacksonville Electric Authority, FL (United States); Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom). Rolls-Royce Industrial Power Group

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. Otec Plume Biochemical Simulation of a 100MW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent

313

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SOLID EARTH, VOL. 118, 119, doi:10.1002/jgrb.50117, 2013 The 2011 Mw 7.1 Van (Eastern Turkey) earthquake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mw 7.1 Van (Eastern Turkey) earthquake J. R. Elliott,1 A. C. Copley,2 R. Holley,3 K. Scharer,4 and B to constrain the fault parameters of the Mw 7.1 2011 Van (Eastern Turkey) reverse-slip earthquake Turkey) earthquake, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 118, doi:10.1002/jgrb.50117. 1. Introduction [2

314

NAS battery demonstration at American Electric Power:a study for the DOE energy storage program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first U.S. demonstration of the NGK sodium/sulfur battery technology was launched in August 2002 when a prototype system was installed at a commercial office building in Gahanna, Ohio. American Electric Power served as the host utility that provided the office space and technical support throughout the project. The system was used to both reduce demand peaks (peak-shaving operation) and to mitigate grid power disturbances (power quality operation) at the demonstration site. This report documents the results of the demonstration, provides an economic analysis of a commercial sodium/sulfur battery energy storage system at a typical site, and describes a side-by-side demonstration of the capabilities of the sodium/sulfur battery system, a lead-acid battery system, and a flywheel-based energy storage system in a power quality application.

Newmiller, Jeff (Endecon Engineering, San Ramon, CA); Norris, Benjamin L. (Norris Energy Consulting Company, Martinez, CA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Modeling and Analysis of the Role of Fast-Response Energy Storage in the Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large short time-scale variability of renewable energy resources presents significant challenges to the reliable operation of power systems. This variability can be mitigated by deploying fast-ramping generators. However, these generators are costly to operate and produce environmentally harmful emissions. Fast-response energy storage devices, such as batteries and flywheels, provide an environmentally friendly alternative, but are expensive and have limited capacity. To study the environmental benefits of storage, we introduce a slotted-time dynamic residual dc power flow model with the prediction error of the difference between the generation (including renewables) and the load as input and the fast-ramping generation and the storage (charging/discharging) operation as the control variables used to ensure that the demand is satisfied (as much as possible) in each time slot. We assume the input prediction error sequence to be i.i.d. zero-mean random variables. The optimal power flow problem is then formu...

Su, Han-I

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Call title: Energy Call Part 1 Call identifier: FP7-ENERGY-2010-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collaborative Project ENERGY.2010.2.5-1: Dry-cooling methods for multi-MW sized concentrated solar power plants Collaborative ProjectAREA ENERGY.2.5: CONCENTRATED SOLAR POWER ENERGY.2010.2.5-2: Main CSP components for high

Milano-Bicocca, Università

317

10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00312  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes.

Musial, W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

39610 Energy Conversion & Supply (6) 39611 Energy Demand &Utilization (6)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

() 19740 (24740) Comb. & Air Pollution Ctrl 19612 Int. Life Cycle Assessment (12) 19739 (18875) Econ& Engr Combustion & Air Pollution (12) 24642 Fuel Cell Systems (12)MW9:3011:20 24643 S.T. Electrochem. Energy Course (18) 12711 Adv. Project Management for Construction (12) 12742 Data Mining

McGaughey, Alan

319

CALTECH SUSTAINABILITY CALTECH ENERGY PORTFOLIO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-site natural gas combine heat and power system; 2) on-site solar photovoltaic arrays; 3) on-site Bloom fuel.4%. This system meets approximately 60% of the campus energy demand. Technical · 10 MW Solar Mars gas turbine and Distribution · Cogeneration Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) capacity: 44,500 lbs per hour steam at 300

Faraon, Andrei

320

250 MW single train CFB cogeneration facility. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technical Progress Report (Draft) is submitted pursuant to the Terms and Conditions of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC27403 between the Department of Energy (Morgantown Energy Technology Center) and York County Energy Partners, L.P. a wholly owned project company of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. covering the period from January 1994 to the present for the York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration Project. The Technical Progress Report summarizes the work performed during the most recent year of the Cooperative Agreement including technical and scientific results.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electric utility applications of hydrogen energy storage systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the capital cost associated with various energy storage systems that have been installed for electric utility application. The storage systems considered in this study are Battery Energy Storage (BES), Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and Flywheel Energy Storage (FES). The report also projects the cost reductions that may be anticipated as these technologies come down the learning curve. This data will serve as a base-line for comparing the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen energy storage (HES) systems in the electric utility sector. Since pumped hydro or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is not particularly suitable for distributed storage, they are not considered in this report. There are no comparable HES systems in existence in the electric utility sector. However, there are numerous studies that have assessed the current and projected cost of hydrogen energy storage system. This report uses such data to compare the cost of HES systems with that of other storage systems in order to draw some conclusions as to the applications and the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen as a electricity storage alternative.

Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs November 19, 2014 For Oncor Internal Use Only ESL-KT-14-11-04 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs A Comparison of Trends For Oncor... Internal Use Only 2 ESL-KT-14-11-04 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 2012 – 2015 Energy Efficiency Goals Year Demand Goal MW Energy Goal MWh Basis 2012 53.1 93,031 25% of Average Load Growth 2013 54.6 95...

Betts, C.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

,,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQProved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet nameNumber of

324

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Ancillary Services in the United  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ISOs Market Installed Capacity Miles of Transmission Population PJM 164,895 MW 56,499 51M MISO 146,497 MW 53 · Capacity Markets #12;5 Ancillary Services · Ancillary services can either be cost-based or market April 2013 NREL/PR6A2058554 #12;2 North American Energy Markets Source: ISO/RTO Council #12;3 U.S. RTOs

325

Energy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGY MEASUREMENTS;/:4,4 (; . 1.;Suire

326

RSP-MW UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII RADIOACTIVE MIXED WASTE PICKUP REQUEST FORM Revision, 4/04 (WASTE CONTAINING BOTH RADIOISOTOPES AND HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RSP-MW UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII RADIOACTIVE MIXED WASTE PICKUP REQUEST FORM Revision, 4/04 (WASTE AND UNDERSTAND ALL CONDITIONS ON THIS FORM. GENERATOR CERTIFICATION: I certify the above waste contains

Browder, Tom

327

1352 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 37, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2002 A 120-mW 3-D Rendering Engine With 6-Mb Embedded DRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1352 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 37, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2002 A 120-mW 3-D Rendering digital assistant (PDA) in which the power has to be supplied by batteries. Since the lithium battery

Yoo, Hoi-Jun

328

Design and testing of an internal mode converter for a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron with a depressed collector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report experimental results on a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz, 3 microsecond pulsed gyrotron with a single-stage depressed collector. A simplified mode converter with smooth mirror surfaces has been installed in the tube. The converter ...

Tax, David Samuel

329

Suggested performance specifications of standard modular controls for the automation of small hydro electric facilities. [Plant capacities from 50 kW to 15 MW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These specifications are made available by the Department of Energy for the voluntary use by any person, corporation or governmental body in the writing of purchase specifications for the automatic control of small hydro generating stations, i.e., hydro plants ranging in size from 50 kW to 15 MW. It is believed that the use of these specifications will permit competition among capable vendors and, at the same time, assure proper and reliable operation of both the automation hardware and software purchased. The specifications are detailed to a degree which should assure the interchangeability of hardware and software from various suppliers. This also increases the likelihood that spare parts and service will be available for many years. The specifications are written in modules, each of which can be included or excluded for ease of editing to match a particular application. Brief but detailed instructions are included for such editing. An extensive appendix gives the alternatives which were considered and reasons for the various choices specified.

Beckwith, R.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

U.S. Virgin Islands Ramping Up Clean Energy Efforts with an Eye...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable energy technologies, such as the 5 MW Estate Donor Solar Project located on St. Thomas, have helped the U.S. Virgin Islands reduce its fossil fuel use by 20% over the...

331

McMinnville Water and Light- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

McMinnville Water and Light Company offers a variety of rebates for commercial and industrial customers to make energy efficient improvements to eligible facilities. MW&L offers rebates in...

332

Energy-efficient LTE transmission techniques : introducing Green Radio from resource allocation perspective   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy consumption has recently become a key issue from both environmental and economic considerations. A typical mobile phone network in the UK may consume approximately 40- 50 MW, contributing a significant proportion ...

Wang, Rui

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

333

IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 42, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2007 2021 A 0.2-mW 2-Mb/s Digital Transceiver Based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 42, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2007 2021 A 0.2-mW 2-Mb/s Digital rate of 1.1 10 7, dissipating only 0.2 mW from a 1-V supply generated by a 1.5-V battery. Index Terms body, corresponding to 1­2 m. Moreover, it should be powered by a very small battery in order

Yoo, Hoi-Jun

334

Dynamometer Testing of Samsung 2.5MW Drivetrain: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-311  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SHI's prototype 2.5 MW wind turbine drivetrain was tested at the NWTC 2.5 MW dynamometer test facility over the course of 4 months between December 2009 and March 2010. This successful testing campaign allowed SHI to validate performance, safety, control tuning, and reliability in a controlled environment before moving to full-scale testing and subsequent introduction of a commercial product into the American market.

Wallen, R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Puna Geothermal Venture's Plan for a 25 MW Commercial Geothermal Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County, Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump(Redirected from

336

Southern company energy storage study : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates the business case for additional bulk electric energy storage in the Southern Company service territory for the year 2020. The model was used to examine how system operations are likely to change as additional storage is added. The storage resources were allowed to provide energy time shift, regulation reserve, and spinning reserve services. Several storage facilities, including pumped hydroelectric systems, flywheels, and bulk-scale batteries, were considered. These scenarios were tested against a range of sensitivities: three different natural gas price assumptions, a 15% decrease in coal-fired generation capacity, and a high renewable penetration (10% of total generation from wind energy). Only in the elevated natural gas price sensitivities did some of the additional bulk-scale storage projects appear justifiable on the basis of projected production cost savings. Enabling existing peak shaving hydroelectric plants to provide regulation and spinning reserve, however, is likely to provide savings that justify the project cost even at anticipated natural gas price levels. Transmission and distribution applications of storage were not examined in this study. Allowing new storage facilities to serve both bulk grid and transmission/distribution-level needs may provide for increased benefit streams, and thus make a stronger business case for additional storage.

Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Black, Clifton [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL; Jenkins, Kip [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, chaired by Sandia's Georgianne Huff, are below. ESS 2012 Peer Review - Higher Power Motor for ARPA-E Flywheel - Jim Arseneaux, Beacon Power ESS 2012 Peer Review - Acid Based...

338

RESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCE ASSESSMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;California Renewable Energy Center Organization of this session: · Overview of solar, wind, geothermal · End of 2013 ­ Global: 318 GW ­ U.S.: 61 GW ­ California: 5,829 MW · State with 2nd most wind capacity at the California Energy Commission (CEC) September 3, 2014 California Renewable Energy Center #12;California

California at Davis, University of

339

Optimal Power Cost Management Using Stored Energy in Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the aver- age price of 1 MW-Hour of electricity. Consequently, mini- mization of energy consumption needOptimal Power Cost Management Using Stored Energy in Data Centers Rahul Urgaonkar, Bhuvan Urgaonkar that arise by the use of uninterrupted power supply (UPS) units as energy storage devices. This rep- resents

Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

340

Energy Policy 34 (2006) 16451658 Technological learning and renewable energy costs: implications for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity cost estimates used in energy policy planning models. Sensitivities of the learning rates: Learning by doing; Renewable energy costs; Research expenditures 1. Introduction Changes in the electricity,000 MW by 2000 (McVeigh et al., 1999). Analysts in the private sector produced similar scenarios

Vermont, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Magnet Technology for Power Converters: Nanocomposite Magnet Technology for High Frequency MW-Scale Power Converters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar ADEPT Project: CMU is developing a new nanoscale magnetic material that will reduce the size, weight, and cost of utility-scale PV solar power conversion systems that connect directly to the grid. Power converters are required to turn the energy that solar power systems create into useable energy for the grid. The power conversion systems made with CMU’s nanoscale magnetic material have the potential to be 150 times lighter and significantly smaller than conventional power conversion systems that produce similar amounts of power.

None

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

342

1.5 MW turbine installation at NREL's NWTC on Aug. 21  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Generating 20 percent of the nation's electricity from clean wind resources will require more and bigger wind turbines. NREL is installing two large wind turbines at the National Wind Technology Center to examine some of the industry's largest machines and address issues to expand wind energy on a commercial scale.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

343

First Generation 50 MW OTEC Plantship for the Production of Electricity and Desalinated Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These are based on existing technology and current offshore industry practices. The CC-OTEC plant utilizes Michaelis, Energy Island Ltd. UK Copyright 2010, Offshore Technology Conference This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2010 Offshore Technology Conference held in Houston, Texas, USA, 3­6 May 2010. This paper

344

On the Use of Energy Storage Technologies for Regulation Services in Electric Power Systems with Significant Penetration of Wind Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy produced by intermittent renewable resources is sharply increasing in the United States. At high penetration levels, volatility of wind power production could cause additional problems for the power system balancing functions such as regulation. This paper reports some partial results of a project work, recently conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project proposes to mitigate additional intermittency with the help of Wide Area Energy Management System (WAEMS) that would provide a two-way simultaneous regulation service for the BPA and California ISO systems by using a large energy storage facility. The paper evaluates several utility-scale energy storage technology options for their usage as regulation resources. The regulation service requires a participating resource to quickly vary its power output following the rapidly and frequently changing regulation signal. Several energy storage options have been analyzed based on thirteen selection criteria. The evaluation process resulted in the selection of flywheels, pumped hydro electric power (or conventional hydro electric power) plant and sodium sulfur or nickel cadmium batteries as candidate technologies for the WAEMS project. A cost benefit analysis should be conducted to narrow the choice to one technology.

Yang, Bo; Makarov, Yuri V.; DeSteese, John G.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.; Nyeng, Preben; McManus, Bart; Pease, John

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

345

Development of a 16-MW sub th coal-water/heavy oil burner for front-wall firing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Canadian program of coal-water fuel (CWF) technology development has included the demonstration of commercial burners for CWF in both coal and oil-designed utility boilers. The demonstrations clearly showed that these burners were prototypes, and were, in fact, modified oil burners that were mismatched to the rheological properties of the CWF. As the demonstrations were proceeding, a simultaneous research program was undertaken in which the basic principles governing atomization and combustion of CWF were studied. Results from the fundamental studies which led to the development of a novel prototype dual fuel CWF/oil burner are described. In the various stages of development, the burner was scaled up from 1.5 MW{sub th} to an industrial scale of 16 MS{sub th} for demonstration in a 20-MW{sub (e)} oil-designed industrial utility boiler and for a single-burner commercial operation in an oil designed package steam boiler. A summary of the burner performance in these demonstrations is also given in this paper.

Thambimuthu, K.V.; Whaley, H. (EMR Canada/CANMET, Ottawa (CA)); Bennet, A.; Jonasson, K.A. (NRC Canada, Ottawa (CA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

RELAP5-3D Results for Phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2.

Gerhard Strydom

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: Networking for37 East and WestLydiaEnabling timeEnergeticsEnergy

348

Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI Home It is the|ResourcesCareersEmploymentEnergy

349

CX-000760: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory Develop a low-cost flywheel system and demonstrate a utility-scale installation to provide the...

350

SciTech Connect: NREL Controllable Grid Interface for Testing MW-Scale Wind  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) CuFuture

351

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine:Barbers Point Housing,Illinois: Energy Resources Jump8150781°Call

352

10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine, CRADA Number CRD-08-00312  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite JC-118794 PREPRINTWillisHormetic effect

353

Microwave (MW) and Radio Frequency (RF) as Enabling Technologies for Advanced Manufacturing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps MoreWSRC-STI-2007-00250 Rev. 05 Oak09 U . SThe March 23,AdvancedWorkshop:

354

A major boost to develop geothermal energy in India under NGRI-NTPC Ltd collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A major boost to develop geothermal energy in India under NGRI-NTPC Ltd collaboration Exchange geothermal energy. The world over about 3000 MW equivalent of energy being generated using their geothermal Manager of Renewable Energy Development Group of NTPC Limited in the presence of Dr. V.P. Dimri(third from

Harinarayana, T.

355

The emerging roles of energy storage in a competitive power market: Summary of a DOE Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of the workshop, {open_quotes}The Emerging Roles of Energy Storage in a Competitive Power Market,{close_quotes} which was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories and was held in Pleasanton, California on December 6-7, 1994. More than 70 people attended, representing government agencies, national laboratories, equipment vendors, electric utilities and other energy providers, venture capital interests, and consultants. Many types of energy storage were discussed, including electrical (batteries and superconducting magnets), mechanical (flywheels and pumped hydro), hydrogen, compressed air, and thermal energy storage. The objectives of the workshop were to communicate within the energy storage community regarding the costs, benefits, and technical status of various technology options; to explore and elucidate the evolving roles of energy storage in a more dynamic and competitive power and energy marketplace; and to discuss the optimum federal role in this area. The goals of the workshop were fully realized through knowledgeable and insightful presentations and vigorous discussion, which are summarized.

Gordon, S.P.; Falcone, P.K. [eds.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL GROUNDWATER MONITORING VARIABILITY IN MW66 AND NEARBY WELLS, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of disposal records, soil data, and spatial/temporal groundwater data from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 7 indicate that the peak contaminant concentrations measured in monitoring well (MW) 66 result from the influence of the regional PGDP NW Plume, and does not support the presence of significant vertical transport from local contaminant sources in SWMU 7. This updated evaluation supports the 2006 conceptualization which suggested the high and low concentrations in MW66 represent different flow conditions (i.e., local versus regional influences). Incorporation of the additional lines of evidence from data collected since 2006 provide the basis to link high contaminant concentrations in MW66 (peaks) to the regional 'Northwest Plume' and to the upgradient source, specifically, the C400 Building Area. The conceptual model was further refined to demonstrate that groundwater and the various contaminant plumes respond to complex site conditions in predictable ways. This type of conceptualization bounds the expected system behavior and supports development of environmental cleanup strategies, providing a basis to support decisions even if it is not feasible to completely characterize all of the 'complexities' present in the system. We recommend that the site carefully consider the potential impacts to groundwater and contaminant plume migration as they plan and implement onsite production operations, remediation efforts, and reconfiguration activities. For example, this conceptual model suggests that rerouting drainage water, constructing ponds or basin, reconfiguring cooling water systems, capping sites, decommissioning buildings, fixing (or not fixing) water leaks, and other similar actions will potentially have a 'direct' impact on the groundwater contaminant plumes. Our conclusion that the peak concentrations in MW66 are linked to the regional PGDP NW Plume does not imply that there TCE is not present in SWMU 7. The available soil and groundwater data indicate that the some of the waste disposed in this facility contacted and/or were contaminated by TCE. In our assessment, the relatively small amount of TCE associated with SWMU 7 is not contributing detectable TCE to the groundwater and does not represent a significant threat to the environment, particularly in an area where remediation and/or management of TCE in the NW plume will be required for an extended timeframe. If determined to be necessary by the PGDP team and regulators, additional TCE characterization or cleanup activities could be performed. Consistent with the limited quantity of TCE in SWMU 7, we identify a range of low cost approaches for such activities (e.g., soil gas surveys for characterization or SVE for remediation). We hope that this information is useful to the Paducah team and to their regulators and stakeholders to develop a robust environmental management path to address the groundwater and soil contamination associated with the burial ground areas.

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

357

Rotational Augmentation on a 2.3 MW Rotor Blade with Thick Flatback Airfoil Cross-Sections: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rotational augmentation was analyzed for a 2.3 MW wind turbine, which was equipped with thick flatback airfoils at inboard radial locations and extensively instrumented for acquisition of time varying surface pressures. Mean aerodynamic force and surface pressure data were extracted from an extensive field test database, subject to stringent criteria for wind inflow and turbine operating conditions. Analyses of these data showed pronounced amplification of aerodynamic forces and significant enhancements to surface pressures in response to rotational influences, relative to two-dimensional, stationary conditions. Rotational augmentation occurrence and intensity in the current effort was found to be consistent with that observed in previous research. Notably, elevated airfoil thickness and flatback design did not impede rotational augmentation.

Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Siegel, K.; Singh, M.; Medina, P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Public design report (preliminary and final)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Public Design Report presents the design criteria of a DOE Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of NO{sub x} emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 (500 MW) near Rome, Georgia. The technologies being demonstrated at this site include Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation`s advanced overfire air system and Controlled Flow/Split Flame low NO{sub x} burner. This report provides documentation on the design criteria used in the performance of this project as it pertains to the scope involved with the low NO{sub x} burners, advanced overfire systems, and digital control system.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Future of Offshore Wind Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Future of Offshore Wind Energy #12;2 #12;3 Offshore Wind Works · Offshore wind parks: 28 in 10 countries · Operational since 1991 · Current installed capacity: 1,250 MW · Offshore wind parks in the waters around Europe #12;4 US Offshore Wind Projects Proposed Atlantic Ocean Gulf of Mexico Cape Wind

Firestone, Jeremy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC) #12;#12;Claude's Off Rio de Janeiro (1933) · Floating Ice Plant: 2.2 MW OC- OTEC to produce 2000

362

Energy  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997Environment > Voluntary826Industry forEmergingM

363

ENERGY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatement ||More EmphasisofEMABTank WasteEnvironmental

364

Case Studies of Onsite Energy Systems for Healthcare Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Central Texas. Combining the high efficiency, low emission, 4.6 MW Solar Turbines Mercury-50 combustion turbine, a 1000 Ton Trane steam absorption chiller and an 8000 Ton-hr Thermal Energy Storage tank, this onsite energy system is designed to achieve...

Schwass, R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

College Station, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaft River 5 MW Power Plant | Open

366

College Station, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaft River 5 MW Power Plant | Open

367

Colman, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaft River 5 MW Power Plant |

368

Colorado City, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaft River 5 MW

369

Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i n cement plants Installing electricity generation capacityelectricity generation was assumed to be a 6 MW power plant,electricity generation, then is considered to be the difference between actual energy consumption at the cogeneration plant

Zhiping, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 32, NO. 12, DEC 1997 1 A 12mW Wide Dynamic Range CMOS Front-End  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 32, NO. 12, DEC 1997 1 A 12mW Wide Dynamic Range CMOS into their products. For many of these hand-held devices, one of the primary concerns is battery life. Thus

Lee, Thomas H.

371

Representative Syllabus for P140 Prof. Sandra Shapshay P140 M/W 11:15pm-12:05pm Woodburn Hall 009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Representative Syllabus for P140 Prof. Sandra Shapshay P140 M/W 11:15pm-12:05pm Woodburn Hall 009-10:30am, SY 021 Syllabus: P140 Introduction to Ethics Welcome to Introduction to Ethics. This is a lecture

Indiana University

372

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The 2011 Mw 7.1 Van (Eastern Turkey) Earthquake -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The 2011 Mw 7.1 Van (Eastern Turkey, 2012, 5:45pm D R A F T #12;X - 2 ELLIOTT ET AL.: 2011 VAN EARTHQUAKE, EASTERN TURKEY moment and source.: 2011 VAN EARTHQUAKE, EASTERN TURKEY X - 3 Interferograms from the ENVISAT satellite were derived from

Cambridge, University of

373

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System--A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location, Location, Location  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Develop a baseline cost model of a 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System, including all aspects of the project, from finding the resource through to operation, for a particularly challenging scenario: the deep, radioactively decaying granitic rock of the Pioneer Valley in Western Massachusetts.

374

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Energy Efficiency, Wind and Renewables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND RENEWABLES May 2008 Energy Systems Laboratory p. 2 Electricity Production from Wind Farms (2002-2007) ? Installed capacity of wind turbines was 3,026 MW (March 2007). ? Announced new project capacity is 3,125 MW by 2010. ? Lowest electricity period... Speed (MPH) T u rb in e P o w er (k W h /h ) Hourly electricity produced vs on- site wind data acceptable for hourly modeling. Issue: hourly on-site data not always available. Calculating NOx Reductions from Wind Farms Energy...

Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

375

New Technology and Energy Alternatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

traditional electrical power. Equipment used and case histories, including economics of the industrial installations, are included. Sites range in size from 650 kW to 22.0 MW. AI I systems use reciprocating engine generators as prime movers. Introduct... I be discussed. Our focus is on industrial plants, but the same methods and equipment can be util ized to reduce energy costs at commercial, institutional, and nonprofit facilities. A brief review of electric util ity rate structures wil I...

Lamphere, F. J.

376

Rangan Banerjee Energy Systems Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

America Latin America OECD Europe Non- OECD Europe Former Soviet Union Middle East Africa China Asia © ) % © ¨ ) %$4 © # #12; ¡¢ £ ¤ ¡¥ ¦ ¡ § ¨ © ¡ ¨ ¥ ¨ Large Hydro 2% Renew ables 2% Trad Biomass 9% Coal;Characteristics of Renewables Large, Inexhaustible source -Solar energy intercepted by earth 1.8*1011 MW Clean

Banerjee, Rangan

377

Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The purpose of the Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to provide space where high pressure hydrogen components can be safely tested. High pressure hydrogen storage is an integral part of energy storage technology for use in fuel cell and in other distributed energy scenarios designed to effectively utilize the variability inherent with renewable energy sources. The high pressure storage laboratory is co-located with energy storage activities such as ultra-capacitors, super conducting magnetic flywheel and mechanical energy storage systems laboratories for an integrated approach to system development and demonstration. Hazards associated with hydrogen storage at pressures up to 10,000 psi include oxygen displacement, combustion, explosion, and pressurization of room air due to fast release and physical hazards associated with burst failure modes. A critical understanding of component failure modes is essential in developing reliable, robust designs that will minimize failure risk beyond the end of service life. Development of test protocol for accelerated life testing to accurately scale to real world operating conditions is essential for developing regulations, codes and standards required for safe operation. NREL works closely with industry partners in providing support of advanced hydrogen technologies. Innovative approaches to product design will accelerate commercialization into new markets. NREL works with all phases of the product design life cycle from early prototype development to final certification testing. High pressure tests are performed on hydrogen components, primarily for the validation of developing new codes and standards for high pressure hydrogen applications. The following types of tests can be performed: Performance, Component and system level efficiency, Strength of materials and hydrogen compatibility, Safety demonstration, Model validation, and Life cycle reliability.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Secretary Chu Announces $620 Million for Smart Grid Demonstration...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

projects include advanced battery systems (including flow batteries), flywheels, and compressed air energy systems. View the full list of selected projects. Media contact(s):...

379

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 23, 2010 The Streator Cayuga Ridge South Wind Farm has 300 MW capacity of electricity. | Photo courtesy of Greater Livingston County Economic Development Council VP 100:...

380

Advanced Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems Part 1: Systems and Topologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes power electronic interfaces for DE applications and the topologies needed for advanced power electronic interfaces. It focuses on photovoltaic, wind, microturbine, fuel cell, internal combustion engine, battery storage, and flywheel storage systems.

Kramer, W.; Chakraborty, S.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ANTHONY EGGERT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR POLICY INSTITUTE FOR ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT AND THE ECONOMY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 MW (2006) Energy Expenditures (2010) ~$33.4B Electricity ~$15B Natural Gas ~$72B Petroleum Total of residential, commercial, industrial heating #12;THANK YOU! More information: · energyANTHONY EGGERT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR POLICY INSTITUTE FOR ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT AND THE ECONOMY

California at Davis, University of

382

Analysis and simulation of a small-angle neutron scattering instrument on a 1 MW long pulse spallation source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied the design and performance of a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument for a proposed 1 MW, 60 Hz long pulsed spallation source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). An analysis of the effects of source characteristics and chopper performance combined with instrument simulations using the LANSCE Monte Carlo instrument simulations package shows that the T{sub 0} chopper should be no more than 5 m from the source with the frame overlap and frame definition choppers at 5.6 and greater than 7 m, respectively. The study showed that an optimal pulse structure has an exponential decaying tail with {tau} {approx} 750 {mu}s. The Monte Carlo simulations were used to optimize the LPSS SANS, showing that an optimal length is 18 m. The simulations show that an instrument with variable length is best to match the needs of a given measurement. The performance of the optimized LPSS instrument was found to be comparable with present world standard instruments.

Olah, G.A.; Hjelm, R.P.; Lujan, M. Jr.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Wake Turbulence of Two NREL 5-MW Wind Turbines Immersed in a Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fluid dynamics video considers an array of two NREL 5-MW turbines separated by seven rotor diameters in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The neutral atmospheric boundary-layer flow data were obtained from a precursor ABL simulation using a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) framework within OpenFOAM. The mean wind speed at hub height is 8m/s, and the surface roughness is 0.2m. The actuator line method (ALM) is used to model the wind turbine blades by means of body forces added to the momentum equation. The fluid dynamics video shows the root and tip vortices emanating from the blades from various viewpoints. The vortices become unstable and break down into large-scale turbulent structures. As the wakes of the wind turbines advect further downstream, smaller-scale turbulence is generated. It is apparent that vortices generated by the blades of the downstream wind turbine break down faster due to increased turbulence levels generated by the wake of the upstream wind turbine.

Bashioum, Jessica L; Schmitz, Sven; Duque, Earl P N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Multi-MW 22.8 GHz Harmonic Multiplier - RF Power Source for High-Gradient Accelerator R&D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrodynamic and particle simulation studies have been carried out to optimize design of a two-cavity harmonic frequency multiplier, in which a linear electron beam is energized by rotating fields near cyclotron resonance in a TE111 cavity in a uniform magnetic field, and in which the beam then radiates coherently at the nth harmonic into a TEn11 output cavity. Examples are worked out in detail for 7th and 2nd harmonic converters, showing RF-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 45% and 88%, respectively at 19.992 GHz (K-band) and 5.712 GHz (C-band), for a drive frequency of 2.856 GHz. Details are shown of RF infrastructure (S-band klystron, modulator) and harmonic converter components (drive cavity, output cavities, electron beam source and modulator, beam collector) for the two harmonic converters to be tested. Details are also given for the two-frequency (S- and C-band) coherent multi-MW test stand for RF breakdown and RF gun studies.

Jay L. Hirshfield

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

385

PRODUCTION START-UP OF 2 MW a-Si PV MANUFACTURING LINE AT SOVLUX M. Im, X. Den& II. C. Ovshinsky,R. Crucetand S.R Ovshimky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRODUCTION START-UP OF 2 MW a-Si PV MANUFACTURING LINE AT SOVLUX PLANT M. Im, X. Den& II. C start-up efforts at the 2MW Sovlux photovoltaic production line. Triple-junction solar cells with higher than 10% initial effXency were producedin this production line with subcell yield up to 96

Deng, Xunming

386

Crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004: Representatives of a novel protein family that adopt a four-helical bundle fold  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To extend the structural coverage of proteins with unknown functions, we targeted a novel protein family (Pfam accession number PF08807, DUF1798) for which we proposed and determined the structures of two representative members. The MW1337R gene of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Rosenbach (Wood 46) encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 13.8 kDa (residues 1-116) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.15. The lin2004 gene of the nonspore-forming bacterium Listeria innocua Clip11262 encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 14.6 kDa (residues 1-121) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.45. MW1337R and lin2004, as well as their homologs, which, so far, have been found only in Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Listeria, and related genera (Geobacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Oceanobacillus), have unknown functions and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. The genomic contexts of MW1337R and lin2004 are similar and conserved in related species. In prokaryotic genomes, most often, functionally interacting proteins are coded by genes, which are colocated in conserved operons. Proteins from the same operon as MW1337R and lin2004 either have unknown functions (i.e., belong to DUF1273, Pfam accession number PF06908) or are similar to ypsB from Bacillus subtilis. The function of ypsB is unclear, although it has a strong similarity to the N-terminal region of DivIVA, which was characterized as a bifunctional protein with distinct roles during vegetative growth and sporulation. In addition, members of the DUF1273 family display distant sequence similarity with the DprA/Smf protein, which acts downstream of the DNA uptake machinery, possibly in conjunction with RecA. The RecA activities in Bacillus subtilis are modulated by RecU Holliday-junction resolvase. In all analyzed cases, the gene coding for RecU is in the vicinity of MW1337R, lin2004, or their orthologs, but on a different operon located in the complementary DNA strand. Here, we report the crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004, which were determined using the semiautomated, high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG), part of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Protein Structure Initiative.

Kozbial, Piotr; Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-André; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Koesema, Eric; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Spraggon, Glen; Trout, Christina V.; ban den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps); (SSRL); (JCSG); (UCSD); (Burnham)

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

387

Maui energy storage study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report investigates strategies to mitigate anticipated wind energy curtailment on Maui, with a focus on grid-level energy storage technology. The study team developed an hourly production cost model of the Maui Electric Company (MECO) system, with an expected 72 MW of wind generation and 15 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation in 2015, and used this model to investigate strategies that mitigate wind energy curtailment. It was found that storage projects can reduce both wind curtailment and the annual cost of producing power, and can do so in a cost-effective manner. Most of the savings achieved in these scenarios are not from replacing constant-cost diesel-fired generation with wind generation. Instead, the savings are achieved by the more efficient operation of the conventional units of the system. Using additional storage for spinning reserve enables the system to decrease the amount of spinning reserve provided by single-cycle units. This decreases the amount of generation from these units, which are often operated at their least efficient point (at minimum load). At the same time, the amount of spinning reserve from the efficient combined-cycle units also decreases, allowing these units to operate at higher, more efficient levels.

Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Karlson, Benjamin

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

ITER Fusion Energy  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

ITER (in Latin ?the way?) is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier over one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen ? deuterium and tritium ? fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q ? 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). The ITER Organization was officially established in Cadarache, France, on 24 October 2007. The seven members engaged in the project ? China, the European Union, India, Japan, Korea, Russia and the United States ? represent more than half the world?s population. The costs for ITER are shared by the seven members. The cost for the construction will be approximately 5.5 billion Euros, a similar amount is foreseen for the twenty-year phase of operation and the subsequent decommissioning.

Dr. Norbert Holtkamp

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

389

1010 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 43, NO. 4, APRIL 2008 A Scalable 515 Gbps, 1475 mW Low-Power I/O  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1010 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 43, NO. 4, APRIL 2008 A Scalable 5­15 Gbps, 14­75 mW Low-Power I/O Transceiver in 65 nm CMOS Ganesh Balamurugan, Member, IEEE, Joseph Kennedy, Member, IEEE'Mahony, Bryan Casper, and Randy Mooney, Member, IEEE Abstract--We present a scalable low-power I/O transceiver

Palermo, Sam

390

Automatic system for regulating the frequency and power of the 500 MW coal-dust power generating units at the Reftinskaya GRES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The monitoring and control systems at the 500 MW coal-dust power generating units No. 7, 8, and 9 at the Reftinskaya GRES have been modernized using information-regulator systems. Layouts for instrumental construction of these systems and expanded algorithmic schemes for the automatic frequency and power control system and for the boiler supply and fuelling are discussed. Results from tests and normal operation of the automatic frequency and power control system are presented.

Bilenko, V. A.; Gal'perina, A. I.; Mikushevich, E. E.; Nikol'skii, D. Yu. [JSC 'Interavtomatka' (Russian Federation); Zhugrin, A. G.; Bebenin, P. A.; Syrchin, M. V. [JSC 'Reftinskaya GRES' (Russian Federation)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 106, NO. 5, 10 MARCH 2014 665 What makes Gujarat a hotspot for solar energy investments?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy investments? Komalirani Yenneti With over 300 days of sunshine and solar radiation of 5.6­6.0 kWh/m2 /day (refs 1, 2), the state of Gujarat has a potential of generating 750 GW from solar energy3 II, the project is expected to generate about 500 MW of solar energy. All this growth in the solar

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

393

EIS-0462: Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project, Grant and Codington Counties, South Dakota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to approve a grid interconnection request by NextEra Energy Resources for its proposed 150-megawatt (MW) Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project with the Western Area Power Administration's existing Watertown Substation in Codington County, South Dakota.

394

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar thermal power plants, with a total capacity of 350 MW, have used this technology in the Mojave Desert, California.

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

CHALLENGES FOR THE SNS RING ENERGY UPGRADE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source accumulator ring presently operates at a beam power of about 1 MW with a beam energy of about 910 MeV. A power upgrade is planned to increase the beam energy to 1.3 GeV. For the accumulator ring this mostly involves modifications to the injection and extraction sections. A variety of modifications to the existing injection section were necessary to achieve 1 MW, and the tools developed and the lessons learned from this work are now being applied to the design of the new injection section. This paper will discuss the tools and the lessons learned, and also present the design and status of the upgrades to the accumulator ring.

Plum, Michael A [ORNL; Gorlov, Timofey V [ORNL; Holmes, Jeffrey A [ORNL; Hunter, W Ted [ORNL; Roseberry, Jr., R Tom [ORNL; Wang, Jian-Guang [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI) Solar Trend Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the finance trends for small-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) projects (PV <1 MW), large-scale PV projects (PV greater than or equal to 1 MW), and concentrated solar power projects as reported in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI). The report presents REFTI data during the five quarterly periods from the fourth quarter of 2009 to the first half of 2011. The REFTI project relies exclusively on the voluntary participation of industry stakeholders for its data; therefore, it does not offer a comprehensive view of the technologies it tracks. Despite this limitation, REFTI is the only publicly available resource for renewable energy project financial terms. REFTI analysis offers usable inputs into the project economic evaluations of developers and investors, as well as the policy assessments of public utility commissions and others in the renewable energy industry.

Hubbell, R.; Lowder, T.; Mendelsohn, M.; Cory, K.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Demand Response Initiatives at CPS Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Initiatives at CPS Energy Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Conference December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-53 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 CPSE’s DR Program • DR... than the military bases and Toyota combined. • Schools & Universities contributed 6 MW’s of Demand Response in 2013. 2013 DR Participants Trinity University - $5,654 Fort Sam ISD - $18,860 Judson ISD - $45,540 Alamo Colleges - $98,222 UTSA - $168...

Luna, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

EIS-0049: Geothermal Demonstration Program 50-MW Power Plant-Baca Ranch, Sandoval and Rio Arriba Counties, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) developed this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of joint funding by DOE and commercial partners of a 50-megawatt demonstration geothermal, power plant at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico, including construction of the geothermal well field and transmission line.

399

Conceptual Site Treatment Plan Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Environmental Restoration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (the Act) of 1992 waives sovereign immunity for federal facilities for fines and penalties under the provisions of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, state, interstate, and local hazardous and solid waste management requirements. However, for three years the Act delays the waiver for violations involving US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Act, however, requires that the DOE prepare a Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) for each of its sites that generate or store mixed wastes (MWs). The purpose of the CSTP is to present DOE`s preliminary evaluations of the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating a site`s MW. This CSTP presents the preliminary capacity and technology evaluation for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR). The five identified MW streams at LEHR are evaluated to the extent possible given available information. Only one MW stream is sufficiently well defined to permit a technology evaluation to be performed. Two other MW streams are in the process of being characterized so that an evaluation can be performed. The other two MW streams will be generated by the decommissioning of inactive facilities onsite within the next five years.

Chapman, T.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s 102 MW Donghaiqiao offshore wind farm becoming the firstoperating large-scale offshore wind farm. In Octoberto construct four offshore wind farms in Jiangsu province

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A space crystal diffraction telescope for the energy range of nuclear transitions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper contains literature from American Power Conference Air Toxics Being Measured Accurately, Controlled Effectively NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} Emissions Reduced; Surface Condensers Improve Heat Rate; Usable Fuel from Municipal Solid Waste; Cofiring Technology Reduces Gas Turbine Emissions; Trainable, Rugged Microsensor Identifies of Gases; High-Tc Superconductors Fabricated; High-Temperature Superconducting Current Leads; Vitrification of Low-Level Radioactive and Mixed Wastes; Characterization, Demolition, and Disposal of Contaminated Structures; On-Line Plant Diagnostics and Management; Sulfide Ceramic Materials for Improved Batteries; Flywheel Provides Efficient Energy Storage; Battery Systems for Electric Vehicles; Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells for Transportation; Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells for Transportation; Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Monitors Emissions in Real-Time; Advance Alternative-Fueled Automotive Technologies; Thermal & Mechanical Process; Flow-Induced Vibration & Flow Distribution in Shell-and-Tube Heat Exchangers; Ice Slurries for District Cooling; Advanced Fluids; Compact Evaporator and Condenser Technology; and Analysis of Failed Nuclear Power Station Components.

von Ballmoos, P.; Naya, J.E.; Albernhe, F.; Vedrenne, G. [Centre d`Etude Spatial des Rayonmenments, Toulouse (France); Smither, R.K.; Faiz, M.; Fernandez, P.; Graber, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Cooperation Reliability Testing of the Clipper Windpower Liberty 2.5 MW Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-210  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clipper Windpower (CWP) has developed the Liberty 2.5 MW wind turbine. The development, manufacturing, and certification process depends heavily on being able to validate the full-scale system design and performance under load in both an accredited structural test facility and through accredited field testing. CWP requested that DOE/ NREL upgrade blade test capabilities to perform a scope of work including structural testing of the C-96 blade used on the CWP Liberty turbine. This funds-in CRADA was developed to upgrade NREL blade test capability, while enabling certification testing of the C-96 blade through the facility and equipment upgrades. NREL shared resource funds were used to develop hardware necessary to structurally attach a large wind turbine to the test stand at the NWTC. Participant funds-in monies were used for developing the test program.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progess report presents the LNCFS Level III long-term data collected during this quarter. NO{sub x} emissions for each day of long-term testing are presented. The average NO{sub x} emission during long-term testing was 0.39 lb/MBtu at an average load of 155 MW. The effect of the low NO{sub x} combustion system on other combustion parameters such as carbon monoxide, excess oxygen level, and carbon carryover are also included.

Not Available

1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO[sub x] combustion technologies on NO[sub x] emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO[sub x] control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO[sub x] concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progess report presents the LNCFS Level III long-term data collected during this quarter. NO[sub x] emissions for each day of long-term testing are presented. The average NO[sub x] emission during long-term testing was 0.39 lb/MBtu at an average load of 155 MW. The effect of the low NO[sub x] combustion system on other combustion parameters such as carbon monoxide, excess oxygen level, and carbon carryover are also included.

Not Available

1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

405

STATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Connie Bruins, Compliance Project Manager SUBJECT: Midway Sunset Cogeneration Project (85-AFC-3C) Staff a petition from the Midway Sunset Cogeneration Company (MSCC) to amend the Energy Commission Decision for the Midway Sunset Cogeneration Project. The Midway Sunset Cogeneration Project is a 225 MW cogeneration power

406

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY GENERATION AND UTILIZATION Luis D. Berrizbeitia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as solar power, wind power, and geothermal power. Geothermal energy is a source of electricity generation, with a current capacity of 3,093 megawatts (MW). The largest geothermal development in the world is located at the Geysers north of San Francisco, in Sonoma County, California

Polly, David

407

STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the California Solar Initiative, a comprehensive statewide solar program. The NSHP provides rebates to encourage of the NSHP is to install 400 MW of solar electric capacity on new homes and residential buildings by the endSTATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY

408

EA-1970: Fishermen’s Energy LLC Offshore Wind Demonstration Project, offshore Atlantic City, New Jersey  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is proposing to provide funding to Fishermen’s Energy LLC to construct and operate up to five 5.0 MW wind turbine generators, for an offshore wind demonstration project, approximately 2.8 nautical miles off the coast of Atlantic City, NJ. The proposed action includes a cable crossing from the turbines to an on-shore existing substation.

409

STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(RNS), and is based on the amount of current electric generation from renewable resources) that is generated from renewable generation resources instead of the capacity (megawatt ­ MW) of these facilitiesSTATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY

410

Letter Report on Testing of Distributed Energy Resource, Microgrid, and End-Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the same support to the grid. Figure 1 indicates that 1 MW of storage (provided by a battery or ramping as an Enabling Technology. Subtask 8.2: Use of Hydrogen for Energy Storage Under this subtask, HNEI evaluated the use of hydrogen as part of an integrated storage system with emphasis on the use of hydrogen

411

BIZKAIA WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT PROJECT February, 2005 SUMMARY REPORT Page 1 of 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas turbine generator with 43 MW power output. e) 1 Heat recovery steam generator at 100 bars. #12 a) Thermal power exhaust gases from the gas turbine. b) Superheated steam (538 ºC 100 bar) to the steam turbine. c) Natural gas burners using fresh air to replace thermal energy in case of a gas turbine

Columbia University

412

Assessing geothermal energy potential in upstate New York. Final report, Tasks 1, 3, and 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New York State`s geothermal energy potential was evaluated based on a new resource assessment performed by the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY-Buffalo) and currently commercial technologies, many of which have become available since New York`s potential was last evaluated. General background on geothermal energy and technologies was provided. A life-cycle cost analysis was performed to evaluate the economics of using geothermal energy to generate electricity in upstate New York. A conventional rankine cycle, binary power system was selected for the economic evaluation, based on SUNY-Buffalo`s resource assessment. Binary power systems are the most technologically suitable for upstate New York`s resources and have the added advantage of being environmentally attractive. Many of the potential environmental impacts associated with geothermal energy are not an issue in binary systems because the geothermal fluids are contained in a closed-loop and used solely to heat a working fluid that is then used to generate the electricity Three power plant sizes were selected based on geologic data supplied by SUNY-Buffalo. The hypothetical power plants were designed as 5 MW modular units and sized at 5 MW, 10 MW and 15 MW. The life-cycle cost analysis suggested that geothermal electricity in upstate New York, using currently commercial technology, will probably cost between 14 and 18 cents per kilowatt-hour.

Manger, K.C.

1996-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

413

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Mapping Wind Resource Potential Wind resource maps are among the most valuable tools used by NREL's WPA Indiana map showed considerably more wind resource potential (especially at 70 meters and 100 meters above Indiana's House Utilities Commission that Indiana has at least 40,000 MW of wind energy potential

414

Progress in Photovoltaics Research and Applications, 14:179-190, 2006 Energy Pay-Back and Life Cycle CO2 Emissions of the BOS in an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle CO2 Emissions of the BOS in an Optimized 3.5 MW PV Installation J.M. Mason1 , V.M. Fthenakis2 , T-cycle greenhouse gas emissions are 29 kg CO2-eq. /m2 . From field measurements, the energy payback time (EPT, energy payback, greenhouse gas emissions #12;INTRODUCTION This study is a life-cycle analysis

415

CX-004955: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

support laboratory and bench scale research and development on a flywheel energy storage module that will provide 4 times the stored energy at 118 the cost-per-energy of Beacon's...

416

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

China Energy Primer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

protections, develop clean coal technology (CCT), as well asplants. Promote clean coal technology, construct 600 MW (perGreatly develop clean coal technology including constructing

Ni, Chun Chun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Moving Towards a More Sustainable and Secure Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-emitting replacement ? Natural gas ? Clean coal with carbon capture ? Renewables 6 Rio Nogales: 800 MW Combined Cycle Natural Gas Plant - Acquired by CPS Energy in April 2012 - Located in Seguin, TX off of IH10 - Primary replacement... office in SA ? $600k education investment ? LEDs (light-emitting diodes) ? HQ and Mfrg in SA ? Plan for 25,000 LED street lights in SA major thorough fares ? $10/light produced in SA for education ? Clean coal w carbon capture ? R&D council...

Stoker, K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Colombia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaft River 5 MW Power

420

A 58.4mW Solid-State Power Amplifier at 220 GHz using InP HBTs Abstract --A 220 GHz solid state power amplifier MMIC is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 58.4mW Solid-State Power Amplifier at 220 GHz using InP HBTs Abstract -- A 220 GHz solid state, Solid State Power Amplifier (SSPA). I. INTRODUCTION Future high resolution imaging systems and high bandwidth communications systems will benefit from the continued development of solid-state power amplifiers

Rodwell, Mark J. W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A 97mW 110MS/s 12b Pipeline ADC Implemented in 0.18m Digital CMOS Terje N. Andersen, Atle Briskemyr, Frode Telst, Johnny Bjrnsen, Thomas E. Bonnerud,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 97mW 110MS/s 12b Pipeline ADC Implemented in 0.18µm Digital CMOS Terje N. Andersen, Atle Semiconductor, Trondheim, Norway Abstract A 12 bit Pipeline ADC fabricated in a 0.18 m pure digital CMOS addresses these challenges by presenting a 12 bit pipeline ADC which utilizes a 1.8V supply voltage

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

422

SRP- EarthWise Solar Energy Incentive Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

'''''NOTE: SRP reopened its incentive programs effective May 1, 2013. SRP has funding available for 12 MW of residential photovoltaic (PV) systems, 4 MW of small commercial PV systems, 5 MW of...

423

Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers at the National Renewable Energy Labora-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers, improve wind turbine performance, and reduce the cost of energy. Although there have been dramatic turbine test platform. Working with DOE, NREL purchased and installed a GE 1.5-MW wind turbine at the NWTC

424

EIS-0469: Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh County, North Dakota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Western Area Power Administration is evaluating the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting NextEra Energy Resources proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, near Bismarck, North Dakota, to Western’s existing Wilton/Baldwin substation and allowing NextEra’s existing wind projects in this area to operate above 50 annual MW. Western is preparing a Supplemental Draft EIS to address substantial changes to the proposal, including 30 turbine locations and 5 alternate turbine locations in Crofte Township.

425

Colorado - C.R.S. 12-25-201 - Surveyors - General Provisions | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaft River 5 MW PowerEnergy

426

Novel Compressed Air Approach to Off-Shore Wind Energy Storage (NSF Grant #: EFRI-1038294)! Principal Investigators: Perry Li1,a, Terry Simon1,b, James Van de Ven1,c, Eric Loth2,d, Steve Crane3,e!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel Compressed Air Approach to Off-Shore Wind Energy Storage (NSF Grant #: EFRI-1038294 compressed air approach. It is desired to store wind energy at the power of 3MW for about 8 hours during not require special geological sites or additional fossil fuel as in conventional compressed air storage

Li, Perry Y.

427

Renewable Energy | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Technologies Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Renewable energy increases energy security, creates jobs, and powers our clean energy economy. Renewable energy increases energy...

428

Differences between Western US Markets for Renewables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. of CO (Xcel) Colorado Green 81 MW owned (162 MW project) Public Service Co. of CO (Xcel) San Luis 30 MW MW owned Locust Ridge 26 MW owned PPL EnergyPlus Locust Ridge II 102 MW owned Various healthcare organizations Casselman 34.5 MW owned FirstEnergy Solutions Rugby 149.1 MW owned Missouri River Energy Services

429

The Path to Magnetic Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When the possibility of fusion as an energy source for electricity generation was realized in the 1950s, understanding of the plasma state was primitive. The fusion goal has been paced by, and has stimulated, the development of plasma physics. Our understanding of complex, nonlinear processes in plasmas is now mature. We can routinely produce and manipulate 100 million degree plasmas with remarkable finesse, and we can identify a path to commercial fusion power. The international experiment, ITER, will create a burning (self-sustained) plasma and produce 500 MW of thermal fusion power. This talk will summarize the progress in fusion research to date, and the remaining steps to fusion power.

Prager, Stewart (PPPL) [PPPL

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

430

Collier Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaft River 5 MW Power Plant | OpenCollier

431

Thermal-Hydraulic Bases for the Safety Limits and Limiting Safety System Settings for HFIR Operation at 100 MW and 468 psig Primary Pressure, Using Specially Selected Fuel Elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes thermal hydraulic analyses performed to support HFIR operation at 100 MW and 468 psig pressure using specially selected fuel elements. The analyses were performed with the HFIR steady state heat transfer code, originally developed during HFIR design. This report addresses the increased core heat removal capability which can be achieved in fuel elements having coolant channel thicknesses that exceed the minimum requirements of the HFIR fuel fabrication specifications. Specific requirements for the minimum value of effective uniform as-built coolant channel thickness are established for fuel elements to be used at 100 MW. The burnout correlation currently used in the steady-state heat transfer code was also compared with more recent experimental results for stability of high-velocity flow in narrow heated channels, and the burnout correlation was found to be conservative with respect to flow stability at typical HFIR hot channel exit conditions at full power.

Rothrock, R.B.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Indiana Energy Energy Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indiana Energy Conference Energy Challenges And Opportunities November 5, 2013 ­ 9:00 a.m. ­ 5:00 p spectrum of business sectors including: Energy Community Manufacturing Policymakers Finance Engineering of Energy & Water: A Well of Opportunity Our water and energy systems are inextricably linked. Energy

Ginzel, Matthew

433

Matter & Energy Wind Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

See Also: Matter & Energy Wind Energy Energy Technology Physics Nuclear Energy Petroleum 27, 2012) -- Energy flowing from large-scale to small-scale places may be prevented from flowing, indicating that there are energy flows from large to small scale in confined space. Indeed, under a specific

Shepelyansky, Dima

434

2446 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 40, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2005 A 50-MS/s (35 mW) to 1-kS/s (15 W) Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2446 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 40, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2005 A 50-MS/s (35 mW) to 1-kS/s (15 W) Power Scaleable 10-bit Pipelined ADC Using Rapid Power-On Opamps and Minimal Bias Current Variation Imran Ahmed, Student Member, IEEE, and David A. Johns, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--A novel rapid power

Johns, David A.

435

Self-Adaptive Management of The Sleep Depths of Idle Nodes in Large Scale Systems to Balance Between Energy Consumption and Response Times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Between Energy Consumption and Response Times Yongpeng Liu(1) , Hong Zhu(2) , Kai Lu(1) , Xiaoping Wang(1.659 MW, which equals the power usage of a middle scale city. In 2006, US servers and data centers U.S. electricity consumption or the output of about 15 typical power plants [2]. In 2007

Zhu, Hong

436

Colorado Air Pollutant Emission Notice (APEN) Form | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaft River 5 MW PowerEnergyInformation

437

Accelerator Driven Nuclear Energy - The Thorium Option  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional nuclear reactors use enriched Uranium as fuel and produce nuclear waste which needs to be stored away for over 10,000 years.   At the current rate of use, existing sources of Uranium will last for 50-100 years.  We describe a solution to the problem that uses particle accelerators to produce fast neutrons that can be used to burn existing nuclear waste and produce energy.  Such systems, initially proposed by Carlo Rubbia and collaborators in the 1990's, are being seriously considered by many countries as a possible solution to the green energy problem.  Accelerator driven reactors operate in a sub-critical regime and, thus, are safer and can obtain energy from plentiful elements such as Thorium-232 and Uranium-238. What is missing is the high intensity (10MW) accelerator that produces 1 GeV protons. We will describe scenarios which if implemented will make such systems a reality.  

Rajendran Raja

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

Accelerator Driven Nuclear Energy - The Thorium Option  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Conventional nuclear reactors use enriched Uranium as fuel and produce nuclear waste which needs to be stored away for over 10,000 years.   At the current rate of use, existing sources of Uranium will last for 50-100 years.  We describe a solution to the problem that uses particle accelerators to produce fast neutrons that can be used to burn existing nuclear waste and produce energy.  Such systems, initially proposed by Carlo Rubbia and collaborators in the 1990's, are being seriously considered by many countries as a possible solution to the green energy problem.  Accelerator driven reactors operate in a sub-critical regime and, thus, are safer and can obtain energy from plentiful elements such as Thorium-232 and Uranium-238. What is missing is the high intensity (10MW) accelerator that produces 1 GeV protons. We will describe scenarios which if implemented will make such systems a reality.  

Rajendran Raja

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

439

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

a low-cost flywheel system and demo a utility-scale installation to provide the foundation for scaling intermittent energy resources (wind & PV solar power). AOI 2: Grid Scale...

440

A1078 Journal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1,2 Compared to other grid-scale energy storage mechanisms such as flywheel and pump hydro, EESs are favorable because of their high efficiency, fast response, and because...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Matter & Energy Solar Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

See Also: Matter & Energy Solar Energy· Electronics· Materials Science· Earth & Climate Energy and the Environment · Renewable Energy· Environmental Science · Reference Chemical compound· Semiconductor· Gallium at the University of Illinois, the future of solar energy just got brighter. Although silicon is the industry

Rogers, John A.

442

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

None

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Long-term Energy Plan (Ontario, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Currently, Ontario’s electricity system has a capacity of approximately 35,000 MW of power. The Ontario Power Authority forecasts that more than 15,000 MW will need to be renewed, replaced or added...

444

A Green Prison: Santa Rita Jail Creeps Towards Zero Net Energy (ZNE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large project is underway at Alameda County's twenty-year old 45 ha 4,000-inmate Santa Rita Jail, about 70 km east of San Francisco. Often described as a green prison, it has a considerable installed base of distributed energy resources including a seven-year old 1.2 MW PV array, a four-year old 1 MW fuel cell with heat recovery, and efficiency investments. A current US$14 M expansion will add approximately 2 MW of NaS batteries, and undetermined wind capacity and a concentrating solar thermal system. This ongoing effort by a progressive local government with considerable Federal and State support provides some excellent lessons for the struggle to lower building carbon footprint. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) finds true optimal combinations of equipment and operating schedules for microgrids that minimize energy bills and/or carbon emissions without 2 of 12 significant searching or rules-of-thumb prioritization, such as"efficiency first then on-site generation." The results often recommend complex systems, and sensitivities show how policy changes will affect choices. This paper reports an analysis of the historic performance of the PV system and fuel cell, describes the complex optimization applied to the battery scheduling, and shows how results will affect the jail's operational costs, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. DER-CAM is used to assess the existing and proposed DER equipment in its ability to reduce tariff charges.

Marnay, Chris; DeForest, Nicholas; Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jon; Dierckxsens, Carlos; Mendes, Goncalo; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo Ferreira

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency, energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Efficiency Energy Efficiency energy consumption savings households, buildings, industry & vehicles The Energy Efficiency Page reflects EIA's information on energy efficiency and...

446

Physics of Sustainable Energy Berkeley CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Largest Solar Thermal Electric Plant SEGS Mojave Desert (CA) 354 MW Ivanpah Mojave Desert (CA) 400 (Canada) 80MW Finsterwald (Germany) 80 MW wind exceeds solar in installed capacity solar poised for rapid growth Installed Wind and Solar Capacity GW 14 10 6 2 18 22

Kammen, Daniel M.

447

New Metallization Technique Suitable for 6-MW Pilot Production of Efficient Multicrystalline Solar Cells Using Upgraded Metallurgical Silicon: Final Technical Progress Report, December 17, 2007-- June 16, 2009  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes CaliSolar's work as a Photovoltaic Technology Incubator awardee within the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program. The term of this subcontract with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory was two years. During this time, CaliSolar evolved from a handful of employees to over 100 scientists, engineers, technicians, and operators. On the technical side, the company transitioned from a proof-of-concept through pilot-scale to large-scale industrial production. A fully automated 60-megawatt manufacturing line was commissioned in Sunnyvale, California. The facility converts upgraded metallurgical-grade silicon feedstock to ingots, wafers, and high-efficiency multicrystalline solar cells.

448

Visions on Energy Production Technologies for Finland up to 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of combined heat and power production (CHP) 1960 28% 28% 28% 31% 37% 50% 0.4 0.45 0.50 1.0 1.00.15-0.20 0 for a future plant Wood input Power output Heat production Total efficiency Power-to-heat ratio 150 MW 60 MW 70 plant Wood input 200 MW Power output 115 MW Heat production 77 MW Efficiencies, (LHV) Power District

449

Renewable Energy | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Research Topics Renewable Energy Renewable Energy he Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) 2014 Postdoctoral Research Awards are sponsored by: Solar Energy...

450

Energy 101 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Literacy Energy 101 Energy 101 What is the Energy 101 Initiative? The Energy 101 Dialogue Series: Dialogue 1: Energy in the Classroom Webinar Slides Increasing opportunities...

451

20to2-3T5m2+5: 16-cm I.R., 46-cm O.D., 8.6 MW, Optimized Cooling Robert J. Weggel; Magnet Optimization Research Engineering (M.O.R.E.), LLC; 1/26/2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization Research Engineering (M.O.R.E.), LLC; 1/26/2014 Fig. 1. On-axis field profiles of 20-T magnets20to2-3T5m2+5: 16-cm I.R., 46-cm O.D., 8.6 MW, Optimized Cooling Robert J. Weggel; Magnet of 16-cm I.R. The copper magnet generates 5 T at 8.6 MW with five tightly-nested two-layer coils

McDonald, Kirk

452

IDS120M20to2T5m: 16-cm I.R., 46-cm O.D., 8.6 MW, Optimized Cooling Robert J. Weggel; Magnet Optimization Research Engineering (M.O.R.E.), LLC; 1/21/2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization Research Engineering (M.O.R.E.), LLC; 1/21/2014 Fig. 1. On-axis field profile of 20-T magnet of 16IDS120M20to2T5m: 16-cm I.R., 46-cm O.D., 8.6 MW, Optimized Cooling Robert J. Weggel; Magnet-cm inner radius. The copper magnet generates 5 T at 8.6 MW with five tightly-nested two-layer coils

McDonald, Kirk

453

Current non-conservation effects in ultra-high energy neutrino interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overall hardness scale of the ultra-high energy neutrino-nucleon interactions is usually estimated as $Q^2\\sim m_W^2$. The effect of non-conservation of weak currents pushes this scale up to the top quark mass squared and changes dynamics of the scattering process. The Double Leading Log Approximation provides simple and numerically accurate formula for the top-bottom contribution to the total cross section $\\sigma^{\

R. Fiore; V. R. Zoller

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

454

Analysis of Future Prices and Markets for High Temperature Superconductors ENERGY SAVINGS IN HTS DEVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in developing prototypes of these devices made of HTS components. Table 1-1 Energy Parameters of HTS Devices required per unit stated ($) Motors 134 per 20 MVA 1.246 4,427 per MW Transformers 130 per 65 MVA 0.39 415 refrigeration systems have a specific power (SP) of 11 when the cold end is at 77 K, and 12 when it is at 70 K

455

Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

No matter the source, offshore wind energy plant cost estimates are significantly higher than for land-based projects. For instance, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) review on the 2010 cost of wind energy found baseline cost estimates for onshore wind energy systems to be 71 dollars per megawatt-hour ($/MWh), versus 225 $/MWh for offshore systems. There are many ways that innovation can be used to reduce the high costs of offshore wind energy. However, the use of such innovation impacts the cost of energy because of the highly coupled nature of the system. For example, the deployment of multimegawatt turbines can reduce the number of turbines, thereby reducing the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with vessel acquisition and use. On the other hand, larger turbines may require more specialized vessels and infrastructure to perform the same operations, which could result in higher costs. To better understand the full impact of a design decision on offshore wind energy system performance and cost, a system analysis approach is needed. In 2011-2012, NREL began development of a wind energy systems engineering software tool to support offshore wind energy system analysis. The tool combines engineering and cost models to represent an entire offshore wind energy plant and to perform system cost sensitivity analysis and optimization. Initial results were collected by applying the tool to conduct a sensitivity analysis on a baseline offshore wind energy system using 5-MW and 6-MW NREL reference turbines. Results included information on rotor diameter, hub height, power rating, and maximum allowable tip speeds.

Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Damiami, R.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Veers, P.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program DOE/CESA/TTC Hydrogen and Fuel Cells: Addressing Energy Challenges #12;4 Fuel Cells -- Where are we today? Fuel Cells for Transportation

457

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Source: US DOE 10/2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies ­ Upcoming Workshops & Solicitations Source: US DOE 10/2010 2 #12; Double Renewable Energy Capacity by 2012 Update Dr. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Fuel

458

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Richard Farmer Hydrogen Business Council September 14, 2010 #12; Double Renewable Energy Capacity by 2012 Invest $150 Deputy Program Manager Fuel Cell Technologies Program United States Department of Energy Mountain States

459

Energy Conservation Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Conservation Renewable Energy The Future at Rutgers University Facilities & Capital Planning Operations & Services Utilities Operations 6 Berrue Circle Piscataway, NJ 08854 #12;Energy Conservation Wh C ti ? R bl EWhy Conservation? Renewable Energy · Climate control reduces green house gases · Reduces

Delgado, Mauricio

460

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy 2009 FUEL CELL MARKET REPORT NOVEMBER 2010 #12;Authors of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program for their support and guidance in the preparation of this report-Jerram of Fuel Cell Today Consulting, Rachel Gelman of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Jennifer Gangi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy AUGUST 2010 2009 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT EXECUTIVE (Berkeley Lab) Kevin Porter and Sari Fink (Exeter Associates) Suzanne Tegen (National Renewable Energy relatively high levels of wind energy penetration in their electricity grids: end-of-2009 wind power capacity

462

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and operations of geothermal power plants. ANL/EVS/R-10/5,10,000 MW electric (87). Geothermal power plants use threeused geothermal system, is a flash steam power plant. Flash

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Wind Energy Permitting Standards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All wind facilities larger than 0.5 megawatts (MW) that begin construction after July 1, 2010, must obtain a permit from any county in which the facility is located. Facilities must also obtain...

464

China Energy Primer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MW domestically-designed nuclear plant went online in 1991.Table 2-33 Existing Nuclear Power Plants (As of the end ofand Planned Nuclear Power Plants 61 Table

Ni, Chun Chun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

storm. On Wednesday the Arizona Public Service Commission announced that the Palo Verde 3 nuclear plant would be going down for 2 weeks for repairs, taking nearly 1,300 MW of...

466

Abengoa | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

biomass cogeneration plant will use the residual solids and waste water treatment biogas to generate up to 21 MW gross electrical power-enough to supply all of the...

467

7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during a one-day period and the rate of air flowing through the furnace are to be determined.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7-11 7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during The heating value of the coal is given to be 28,000 kJ/kg. Analysis (a) The rate and the amount of heat inputs'tQQ The amount and rate of coal consumed during this period are kg/s48.33 s360024 kg10893.2 MJ/kg28 MJ101.8 6

Bahrami, Majid

468

Evaluation on Energy Performance of Heating Plant System Installed Energy Saving Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Cooling Water in Production Area: 3.5MW (11942KBtu/h), 1unit Heat Discharge: 2.6MW (8872KBtu/h), 1unit Additional Operation with Screw Refrigeration Machine: 2.3MW (7847KBtu/h), 1unit Turbo Refrigerating Machine (1.41MW): 152m3/h (5398mf3/h), 2units... Production Area (North) Production Area (South) Water Treatment Plant 21Cells Unit (14.1MW) Turbo Refrigerating Machines (1.4MW, 2units/ 4.2MW,6units) Screw Refrigerating Machines (0.8MW, 2units) Iced-thermal Storage Tank (28.5GJ, 2units) HEX for Additional...

Song, Y.; Akashi, Y.; Kuwahara, Y.; Baba, Y.; Iribe, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Evaluation of energy system analysis techniques for identifying underground facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a study to determine the feasibility and potential usefulness of applying energy system analysis techniques to help detect and characterize underground facilities that could be used for clandestine activities. Four off-the-shelf energy system modeling tools were considered: (1) ENPEP (Energy and Power Evaluation Program) - a total energy system supply/demand model, (2) ICARUS (Investigation of Costs and Reliability in Utility Systems) - an electric utility system dispatching (or production cost and reliability) model, (3) SMN (Spot Market Network) - an aggregate electric power transmission network model, and (4) PECO/LF (Philadelphia Electric Company/Load Flow) - a detailed electricity load flow model. For the purposes of most of this work, underground facilities were assumed to consume about 500 kW to 3 MW of electricity. For some of the work, facilities as large as 10-20 MW were considered. The analysis of each model was conducted in three stages: data evaluation, base-case analysis, and comparative case analysis. For ENPEP and ICARUS, open source data from Pakistan were used for the evaluations. For SMN and PECO/LF, the country data were not readily available, so data for the state of Arizona were used to test the general concept.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; Portante, E.C. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Renewability and sustainability aspects of nuclear energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewability and sustainability aspects of nuclear energy have been presented on the basis of two different technologies: (1) Conventional nuclear technology; CANDU reactors. (2) Emerging nuclear technology; fusion/fission (hybrid) reactors. Reactor grade (RG) plutonium, {sup 233}U fuels and heavy water moderator have given a good combination with respect to neutron economy so that mixed fuel made of (ThO{sub 2}/RG?PuO{sub 2}) or (ThC/RG-PuC) has lead to very high burn up grades. Five different mixed fuel have been selected for CANDU reactors composed of 4 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 96 % ThO{sub 2}; 6 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 94 % ThO{sub 2}; 10 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 90 % ThO{sub 2}; 20 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 80 % ThO{sub 2}; 30 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 70 % ThO{sub 2}, uniformly taken in each fuel rod in a fuel channel. Corresponding operation lifetimes have been found as ? 0.65, 1.1, 1.9, 3.5, and 4.8 years and with burn ups of ? 30 000, 60 000, 100 000, 200 000 and 290 000 MW.d/ton, respectively. Increase of RG?PuO{sub 2} fraction in radial direction for the purpose of power flattening in the CANDU fuel bundle has driven the burn up grade to 580 000 MW.d/ton level. A laser fusion driver power of 500 MW{sub th} has been investigated to burn the minor actinides (MA) out of the nuclear waste of LWRs. MA have been homogenously dispersed as carbide fuel in form of TRISO particles with volume fractions of 0, 2, 3, 4 and 5 % in the Flibe coolant zone in the blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. Tritium breeding for a continuous operation of the fusion reactor is calculated as TBR = 1.134, 1.286, 1.387, 1.52 and 1.67, respectively. Fission reactions in the MA fuel under high energetic fusion neutrons have lead to the multiplication of the fusion energy by a factor of M = 3.3, 4.6, 6.15 and 8.1 with 2, 3, 4 and 5 % TRISO volume fraction at start up, respectively. Alternatively with thorium, the same fusion driver would produce ?160 kg {sup 233}U per year in addition to fission energy production in situ, multiplying the fusion energy by a factor of ?1.3.

?ahin, Sümer, E-mail: ssahin@atilim.edit.tr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, ATILIM University, 06836 ?ncek, Gölba??, Ankara (Turkey)

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

471

China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems Capacity (MW) Small Hydro Capacity (MW) Source:power technologies Small hydro power generation Miicro-hydrois all generation from small hydro stations (rural grids),

Fridley, Ed., David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy Options for the Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydropower dams, several windpower and geothermal projects,only 83 MW of installed windpower capacity, despite havinginstall 2,000 MW or more of windpower capacity annually. If

Shields, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the ..Section..1603 Treasury Grant Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the Section 1603 grant program.

Steinberg, D.; Porro, G.; Goldberg, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Maintenance building structural design description: 4 x 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR [High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maintenance Building is a grade-founded, two-story, steel-framed structure, located adjacent to the Turbine Building in the Energy Conversion Area. It has a reinforced concrete foundation and slab on grade, and insulated sheet metal exterior walls and roof decking.

NONE

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

A 76.8 GB/s 46 mW Low-latency Network-on-Chip for Real-time Object Recognition Processor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has been widely used in various applications such as mobile robot navigation, autonomous vehicle consumption. The NoC is implemented in 0.13µm CMOS process and provides 76.8 GB/s aggregated bandwidth at 400 computing power and required complex data synchronization mechanism. In this paper, a low-latency and energy

Yoo, Hoi-Jun

476

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Acceptance Hydrogen Supply & Delivery Infrastructure Hydrogen Cost Target*: $2 ­ 3 /gge, (dispensedEnergy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Overview of DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Dr. Sunita, domestic resources. Stationary Power (including CHP & backup power) Auxiliary & Portable Power

477

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Delivery Infrastructure Hydrogen Cost Target: $2 ­ 3 /gge, delivered Key Challenges Technology ValidationEnergy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Dr. Sunita. Stationary Power (including CHP & backup power) Auxiliary & Portable Power Transportation Benefits

478

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Harbor #12;U.S. Energy Consumption U.S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector 2 #12 · Efficiencies can be 60% (electrical) and 85% (with CHP) · > 90% reduction in criteria pollutants U.S. Department of Energy #12;7 Market Transformation Government acquisitions could significantly reduce the cost

479

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions 20 Percent below 1990 levels by 2020by 2020 · Enhance Energy Security: Save More Oil than the U security, and environmental challenges concurrently. Energy Security Economic · Deploy the cheapest.S. DOE #12;President's National Objectives for DOE-- Energy to Secure America's Future · Quickly

480

Colombia-Clean Technology Fund (CTF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaft River 5 MW Power Plant |Colombia-Climate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mw flywheel energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Energy Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Technologies Energy Technologies State, local, and tribal governments can use clean energy technologies to address increasing energy use and costs, economic investment and...

482

Progress in passive solar energy systems. Volume 8. Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents the papers given at a conference sponsored by the US DOE, the Solar Energy Research Institute, SolarVision, Inc., and the Southern California Solar Energy Society. The topics considered at the conference included sizing solar energy systems for agricultural applications, a farm scale ethanol production plant, the EEC wind energy RandD program, the passive solar performance assessment of an earth-sheltered house, the ARCO 1 MW photovoltaic power plant, the performance of a dendritic web photovoltaic module, second generation point focused concentrators, linear fresnel lens concentrating photovoltaic collectors, photovoltaic conversion efficiency, amorphous silicon thin film solar cells, a photovoltaic system for a shopping center, photovoltaic power generation for the utility industry, spectral solar radiation, and the analysis of insolation data.

Hayes, J.; Andrejko, D.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

EIS-0449: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Solar Millennium for the Proposed Blythe Solar Power Project, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Environmental Impact Statement addresses the possible United States Bureau of Land Management approval of an amendment to the California Desert Conservation Area Plan (CDCA Plan) to allow for solar energy and of a right?of?way grant to lease land managed by the BLM for construction, operation and decommissioning of a solar electricity generation facility. The Agency Preferred Alternative covers approximately 7,025 acres (ac), managed by the BLM, and would generate 1000 megawatts (MW) of electricity annually.

485

Gas cooled fast reactor control rod drive mechanism deceleration unit. Test program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the airtesting portion of the proof-of-principle testing of a Control Rod Scram Deceleration Device developed for use in the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). The device utilizes a grooved flywheel to decelerate the translating assembly (T/A). Two cam followers on the translating assembly travel in the flywheel grooves and transfer the energy of the T/A to the flywheel. The grooves in the flywheel are straight for most of the flywheel length. Near the bottom of the T/A stroke the grooves are spiraled in a decreasing slope helix so that the cam followers accelerate the flywheel as they transfer the energy of the falling T/A. To expedite proof-of-principle testing, some of the materials used in the fabrication of certain test article components were not prototypic. With these exceptions the concept appears to be acceptable. The initial test of 300 scrams was completed with only one failure and the failure was that of a non-prototypic cam follower outer sleeve material.

Wagner, T.H.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Energy Saver | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Save Energy, Save Money Start 2015 with an EnergyResolution to Save Money and Energy All Year Long Start 2015 with an EnergyResolution to Save Money and Energy All Year Long...

487

Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

488

NV Energy Electricity Storage Valuation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benet the operations of NV Energy in 2020, and assesses whether those benets justify the cost of the storage system. In order to determine how grid-level storage might impact NV Energy, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (\\BA") as projected for 2020 was built and used for the study. Storage facilities were found to add value primarily by providing reserve. Value provided by the provision of time-of-day shifting was found to be limited. If regulating reserve from storage is valued the same as that from slower ramp rate resources, then it appears that a reciprocating engine generator could provide additional capacity at a lower cost than a pumped storage hydro plant or large storage capacity battery system. In addition, a 25-MW battery storage facility would need to cost $650/kW or less in order to produce a positive Net Present Value (NPV). However, if regulating reserve provided by storage is considered to be more useful to the grid than that from slower ramp rate resources, then a grid-level storage facility may have a positive NPV even at today's storage system capital costs. The value of having storage provide services beyond reserve and time-of-day shifting was not assessed in this study, and was therefore not included in storage cost-benefit calculations.

Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

489

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

offshore wind turbines typically have taller towers withTower Development. 17 Table 9. Reported Material Input per 1.25 MW Onshore Wind Turbine ..wind turbine and substation component manufacturing, transport of equipment to the wind farm site, construction of the tower

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.5 MW open-field poly-Si PV plant in Arizona (Mason, et al,proxy for Chinese PV plants. As shown in the table below,is in large-scale PV power plants, which would also optimize

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Summary of Input to DOE Request for Information DE FOA, stationary, portable power, and early market applications. Comments on the existing DOE targets and justification for any proposed modifications. Topics to be included in the potential workshop / pre

492

Energy 101: Geothermal Energy  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

See how we can generate clean, renewable energy from hot water sources deep beneath the Earth's surface. The video highlights the basic principles at work in geothermal energy production, and illustrates three different ways the Earth's heat can be converted into electricity.

None

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

493

Energy 101: Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

See how we can generate clean, renewable energy from hot water sources deep beneath the Earth's surface. The video highlights the basic principles at work in geothermal energy production, and illustrates three different ways the Earth's heat can be converted into electricity.

None

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

494

New Multi-group Transport Neutronics (PHISICS) Capabilities for RELAP5-3D and its Application to Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PHISICS is a neutronics code system currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its goal is to provide state of the art simulation capability to reactor designers. The different modules for PHISICS currently under development are a nodal and semi-structured transport core solver (INSTANT), a depletion module (MRTAU) and a cross section interpolation (MIXER) module. The INSTANT module is the most developed of the mentioned above. Basic functionalities are ready to use, but the code is still in continuous development to extend its capabilities. This paper reports on the effort of coupling the nodal kinetics code package PHISICS (INSTANT/MRTAU/MIXER) to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D, to enable full core and system modeling. This will enable the possibility to model coupled (thermal-hydraulics and neutronics) problems with more options for 3D neutron kinetics, compared to the existing diffusion theory neutron kinetics module in RELAP5-3D (NESTLE). In the second part of the paper, an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark is given. This benchmark has been approved by the OECD, and is based on the General Atomics 350 MW Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) design. The benchmark includes coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics exercises that require more capabilities than RELAP5-3D with NESTLE offers. Therefore, the MHTGR benchmark makes extensive use of the new PHISICS/RELAP5-3D coupling capabilities. The paper presents the preliminary results of the three steady state exercises specified in Phase I of the benchmark using PHISICS/RELAP5-3D.

Gerhard Strydom; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Northeast Clean Energy Application Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From October 1, 2009 through September 30, 2013 (“contract period”), the Northeast Clean Energy Application Center (“NE-CEAC”) worked in New York and New England (Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine) to create a more robust market for the deployment of clean energy technologies (CETs) including combined heat and power (CHP), district energy systems (DES), and waste heat recovery (WHR) systems through the provision of technical assistance, education and outreach, and strategic market analysis and support for decision-makers. CHP, DES, and WHR can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce electrical and thermal energy costs, and provide more reliable energy for users throughout the United States. The NE-CEAC’s efforts in the provision of technical assistance, education and outreach, and strategic market analysis and support for decision-makers helped advance the market for CETs in the Northeast thereby helping the region move towards the following outcomes: • Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and criteria pollutants • Improvements in energy efficiency resulting in lower costs of doing business • Productivity gains in industry and efficiency gains in buildings • Lower regional energy costs • Strengthened energy security • Enhanced consumer choice • Reduced price risks for end-users • Economic development effects keeping more jobs and more income in our regional economy Over the contract period, NE-CEAC provided technical assistance to approximately 56 different potential end-users that were interested in CHP and other CETs for their facility or facilities. Of these 56 potential end-users, five new CHP projects totaling over 60 MW of install capacity became operational during the contract period. The NE-CEAC helped host numerous target market workshops, trainings, and webinars; and NE-CEAC staff delivered presentations at many other workshops and conferences. In total, over 60 different workshops, conferences, webinars, and presentation were hosted or delivered during the contract period. The NE-CEAC also produced publically available educational materials such as CHP project profiles. Finally, the NE-CEAC worked closely with the relevant state agencies involved with CHP development. In New York, the NE-CEAC played an important role in securing and maintaining funding for CHP incentive programs administered by the New York State Energy Research Development Authority. NE-CEAC was also involved in the NYC Mayor's Office DG Collaborative. The NECEAC was also named a strategic resource for the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection’s innovative Microgrid Pilot Program.

Bourgeois, Tom

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

496

Nuclear Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Energy Idaho National Laboratory is the Department of Energy's lead nuclear energy research and development facility. Building upon its legacy responsibilities,...

497

Energy Policy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Department is focusing on an all-of-the-above energy policy, investing in all sources of American energy.

498

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Future On Monday, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) issued the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release. This preview report provides updated projections for U.S....

499

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

a piece which gave criticism to wide-scale energy efficiency measures. Yesterday, Henry Kelly, the Acting Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, published...

500

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

18, 2008 Energy Resources for Students and Teachers The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has resources to help students research that report or teachers set up...