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Sample records for mv millivolts ngvd

  1. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    You are here Home M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based Contracts (Version 4.0) M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based ...

  2. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0) M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0) ...

  3. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based Contracts Version 4.0 ... Management Program November 2015 FEMP M&V Guidelines 4.0 i ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ...

  4. Observation of 690 MV m^-1 Electron Accelerating Gradient with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Observation of 690 MV m-1 Electron Accelerating Gradient with a Laser-Driven Dielectric Microstructure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observation of 690 MV m-1...

  5. FEMP Seeking Public Comment on Draft M&V Guidelines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP is continuing its request for public comments on the Draft M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based Contracts (Version 4.0).

  6. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Verification Protocol (IPMVP) Concepts and Options for Determining Energy and Water Savings Volume 1, April 2007. M&V Guidelines 3.0 FEMP ii Contents Section Page Section...

  7. Assessment of Automated Measurement and Verification (M&V) Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granderson, Jessica; Touzani, Samir; Custodio, Claudine; Sohn, Michael; Fernandes, Samuel; Jump, David

    2015-07-01

    This report documents the application of a general statistical methodology to assess the accuracy of baseline energy models, focusing on its application to Measurement and Verification (M&V) of whole-building energy savings.

  8. State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement and Verification (M&V)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement and Verification (M&V) Webinar.

  9. COMMISSIONING AND OPERATION OF THE CEBAF 100 MV CRYOMODULES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, Trent; Davis, G; Drury, Michael; Harwood, Leigh; Hogan, John; Kimber, Andrew; Lahti, George; Merz, William; Nelson, Richard; Plawski, Tomasz; Seidman, David; Spata, Michael; Wilson, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of ten new 100 MV cryomodules and RF systems. The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at a maximum accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m. To support the higher gradients and higher Q{sub L} ({approx} 3 x 10{sup 7}), a new RF system has been developed and is being installed to power and control the cavities. The RF system employs digital control and 13 kW klystrons. Recently, two of these cryomodules and associated RF hardware and software have been installed and commissioned in the CEBAF accelerator. Electrons at linac currents up to 540 {micro}A have been successfully accelerated and used for nuclear physics experiments. This paper reports on the commissioning and operation of the RF system and cryomodules.

  10. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP's standard procedures and guidelines for M&V for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  11. Measurement and Verification (M&V) Guidelines for Federal Energy Projects, V3.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-06-11

    FEMP's standard procedures and guidelines for M&V for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  12. SU-E-T-221: Investigation of Lower Energy (< 6 MV) Photon Beams for Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y; Ming, X; Feng, Y; Zhou, L; Ahmad, M; Deng, J; Nguyen, K; Griffin, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the potential applications of the lower energy (< 6MV) photon beams in the radiotherapeutic management of pediatric cancer and lung cancer patients. Methods: Photon beams of 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6MV were first simulated with EGS4/BEAM and then used for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. For four pediatric patients with abdominal and brain lesions, six 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plans were generated using single photon energy (2 to 6MV) or mixed energies (3 and 6MV). Furthermore, a virtual machine of 3 and 6MV was commissioned in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on Monte-Carlo simulated data. Three IMRT plans of a lung cancer patient were generated on this virtual machine. All plans were normalized to D95% of target dose for 6MV plan and then compared in terms of integral dose and OAR sparing. Results: For the four pediatric patients, the integral dose for the 2, 3, 4 and 5MV plans increased by 9%, 5%, 3.5%, 1.7%, respectively as compared to 6MV. Almost all OARs in the 2MV plan received more than 10% more doses than 6MV. Mixed energy 3DCRT plans were of the same quality as 6MV plans. For the lung IMRT plans, both the 3MV plan and the mixed beam plan showed better OAR sparing in comparison to 6MV plan. Specifically, the maximum and mean doses to the spinal cord in the mixed energy plan were lower by 21% and 16%, respectively. Conclusion: Single lower energy photon beam was found to be inferior to 6MV in the radiotherapy of pediatric patients and lung cancer patients when the integral doses and the doses to the OARs were considered. However, mixed energy plans combining low with high energy beams showed significant OAR sparing while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Investigation with more patient data is ongoing for further confirmation.

  13. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based Contracts Version 4.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-02

    Document outlines the Federal Energy Management Program's standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  14. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document outlines the Federal Energy Management Program's standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  15. Low-Z linac targets for low-MV gold nanoparticle radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsiamas, P.; Mishra, P.; Berbeco, R. I.; Marcus, K.; Zygmanski, P. E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu; Cifter, F.; Sajo, E. E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of low-Z/low-MV (low-Z) linac targets for gold nanoparticle radiotherapy (GNPT) and to determine the microscopic dose enhancement ratio (DER) due to GNP for the alternative beamlines. In addition, to evaluate the degradation of dose enhancement arising from the increased attenuation of x rays and larger skin dose in water for the low-MV beams compared to the standard linac. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were used to compute dose and DER for various flattening-filter-free beams (2.5, 4, 6.5 MV). Target materials were beryllium, diamond, and tungsten-copper high-Z target. Target thicknesses were selected based on 20%, 60%, 70%, and 80% of the continuous slowing down approximation electron ranges for a given target material and energy. Evaluation of the microscopic DER was carried out for 100 nm GNP including the degradation factors due to beam attenuation. Results: The greatest increase in DER compared to the standard 6.5 MV linac was for a 2.5 MV Be-target (factor of ?2). Skin dose ranged from ?10% (Be, 6.5 MV-80%) to ?85% (Be, 2.5 MV-20%) depending on the target case. Attenuation of 2.5 MV beams at 22 cm was higher by ?75% compared with the standard beam. Taking into account the attenuation at 22 cm depth, the effective dose enhancement was up to ?60% above the DER of the high-Z target. For these cases the effective DER ranged between ?1.6 and 6 compared with the standard linac. Conclusions: Low-Z (2.5 MV) GNPT is possible even after accounting for greater beam attenuation for deep-seated tumors (22 cm) and the increased skin dose. Further, it can lead to significant sparing of normal tissue while simultaneously escalating the dose in the tumor cells.

  16. Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Completed

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A new groundwater monitoring/validation (MV) well was installed at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) in September 2013. LM proposed this well to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection ...

  17. Draft M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document describes the Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal, state, and local government energy managers and procurement officials and utility and energy service providers.

  18. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 3.0)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document describes the Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  19. Measurement and verifiction (M&V) guidelines for federal energy projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    This document provides procedures and guidelines for quantifying the savings resulting from the installation of Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) implemented with federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs) or task orders implemented under a federal IDIQ contract. The first section of this document provides an overview of measurement and verification (M&V) options and procedures. The second, third, and fourth sections provide standardized measurement and verification (M&V) methods for common types of ECMs.

  20. Generation of virtual monochromatic CBCT from dual kV/MV beam projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hao; Liu, Bo; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel on-board imaging technique which allows generation of virtual monochromatic (VM) cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a selected energy from combined kilovoltage (kV)/megavoltage (MV) beam projections. Methods: With the current orthogonal kV/MV imaging hardware equipped in modern linear accelerators, both MV projections (from gantry angle of 0°–100°) and kV projections (90°–200°) were acquired as gantry rotated a total of 110°. A selected range of overlap projections between 90° to 100° were then decomposed into two material projections using experimentally determined parameters from orthogonally stacked aluminum and acrylic step-wedges. Given attenuation coefficients of aluminum and acrylic at a predetermined energy, one set of VM projections could be synthesized from two corresponding sets of decomposed projections. Two linear functions were generated using projection information at overlap angles to convert kV and MV projections at nonoverlap angles to approximate VM projections for CBCT reconstruction. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated for different inserts in VM CBCTs of a CatPhan phantom with various selected energies and compared with those in kV and MV CBCTs. The effect of overlap projection number on CNR was evaluated. Additionally, the effect of beam orientation was studied by scanning the CatPhan sandwiched with two 5 cm solid-water phantoms on both lateral sides and an electronic density phantom with two metal bolt inserts. Results: Proper selection of VM energy [30 and 40 keV for low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polymethylpentene, 2 MeV for Delrin] provided comparable or even better CNR results as compared with kV or MV CBCT. An increased number of overlap kV and MV projection demonstrated only marginal improvements of CNR for different inserts (with the exception of LDPE) and therefore one projection overlap was found to be sufficient for the CatPhan study. It was also evident that the optimal CBCT image

  1. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  2. Real-time automatic fiducial marker tracking in low contrast cine-MV images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wei-Yang; Lin, Shu-Fang; Yang, Sheng-Chang; Liou, Shu-Cheng; Nath, Ravinder; Liu Wu

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To develop a real-time automatic method for tracking implanted radiographic markers in low-contrast cine-MV patient images used in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods: Intrafraction motion tracking using radiotherapy beam-line MV images have gained some attention recently in IGRT because no additional imaging dose is introduced. However, MV images have much lower contrast than kV images, therefore a robust and automatic algorithm for marker detection in MV images is a prerequisite. Previous marker detection methods are all based on template matching or its derivatives. Template matching needs to match object shape that changes significantly for different implantation and projection angle. While these methods require a large number of templates to cover various situations, they are often forced to use a smaller number of templates to reduce the computation load because their methods all require exhaustive search in the region of interest. The authors solve this problem by synergetic use of modern but well-tested computer vision and artificial intelligence techniques; specifically the authors detect implanted markers utilizing discriminant analysis for initialization and use mean-shift feature space analysis for sequential tracking. This novel approach avoids exhaustive search by exploiting the temporal correlation between consecutive frames and makes it possible to perform more sophisticated detection at the beginning to improve the accuracy, followed by ultrafast sequential tracking after the initialization. The method was evaluated and validated using 1149 cine-MV images from two prostate IGRT patients and compared with manual marker detection results from six researchers. The average of the manual detection results is considered as the ground truth for comparisons. Results: The average root-mean-square errors of our real-time automatic tracking method from the ground truth are 1.9 and 2.1 pixels for the two patients (0.26 mm/pixel). The

  3. Metal artifact correction for x-ray computed tomography using kV and selective MV imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Meng; Keil, Andreas; Constantin, Dragos; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The overall goal of this work is to improve the computed tomography (CT) image quality for patients with metal implants or fillings by completing the missing kilovoltage (kV) projection data with selectively acquired megavoltage (MV) data that do not suffer from photon starvation. When both of these imaging systems, which are available on current radiotherapy devices, are used, metal streak artifacts are avoided, and the soft-tissue contrast is restored, even for regions in which the kV data cannot contribute any information. Methods: Three image-reconstruction methods, including two filtered back-projection (FBP)-based analytic methods and one iterative method, for combining kV and MV projection data from the two on-board imaging systems of a radiotherapy device are presented in this work. The analytic reconstruction methods modify the MV data based on the information in the projection or image domains and then patch the data onto the kV projections for a FBP reconstruction. In the iterative reconstruction, the authors used dual-energy (DE) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) methods to simultaneously combine the kV/MV data and perform the reconstruction. Results: The authors compared kV/MV reconstructions to kV-only reconstructions using a dental phantom with fillings and a hip-implant numerical phantom. Simulation results indicated that dual-energy sinogram patch FBP and the modified dual-energy PWLS method can successfully suppress metal streak artifacts and restore information lost due to photon starvation in the kV projections. The root-mean-square errors of soft-tissue patterns obtained using combined kV/MV data are 10–15 Hounsfield units smaller than those of the kV-only images, and the structural similarity index measure also indicates a 5%–10% improvement in the image quality. The added dose from the MV scan is much less than the dose from the kV scan if a high efficiency MV detector is assumed. Conclusions: The authors have shown that it

  4. Theoretical investigation of the design and performance of a dual energy (kV and MV) radiotherapy imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Langechuan; Antonuk, Larry E. El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: In modern radiotherapy treatment rooms, megavoltage (MV) portal imaging and kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging are performed using various active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) designs. To expand the clinical utility of MV and kV imaging, MV AMFPIs incorporating thick, segmented scintillators and, separately, kV imaging using a beams eye view geometry have been investigated by a number of groups. Motivated by these previous studies, it is of interest to explore to what extent it is possible to preserve the benefits of kV and MV imaging using a single AMFPI design, given the considerably different x ray energy spectra used for kV and MV imaging. In this paper, considerations for the design of such a dual energy imager are explored through examination of the performance of a variety of hypothetical AMFPIs based on x ray converters employing segmented scintillators. Methods: Contrast, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio performances were characterized through simulation modeling of CBCT imaging, while modulation transfer function, Swank factor, and signal performance were characterized through simulation modeling of planar imaging. The simulations were based on a previously reported hybrid modeling technique (accounting for both radiation and optical effects), augmented through modeling of electronic additive noise. All designs employed BGO scintillator material with thicknesses ranging from 0.25 to 4 cm and element-to-element pitches ranging from 0.508 to 1.016 mm. A series of studies were performed under both kV and MV imaging conditions to determine the most advantageous imager configuration (involving front or rear x ray illumination and use of a mirror or black reflector), converter design (pitch and thickness), and operating mode (pitch-binning combination). Results: Under the assumptions of the present study, the most advantageous imager design was found to employ rear illumination of the converter in combination with a black reflector

  5. Tracking tumor boundary in MV-EPID images without implanted markers: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a markerless tracking algorithm to track the tumor boundary in megavoltage (MV)-electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for image-guided radiation therapy. Methods: A level set method (LSM)-based algorithm is developed to track tumor boundary in EPID image sequences. Given an EPID image sequence, an initial curve is manually specified in the first frame. Driven by a region-scalable energy fitting function, the initial curve automatically evolves toward the tumor boundary and stops on the desired boundary while the energy function reaches its minimum. For the subsequent frames, the tracking algorithm updates the initial curve by using the tracking result in the previous frame and reuses the LSM to detect the tumor boundary in the subsequent frame so that the tracking processing can be continued without user intervention. The tracking algorithm is tested on three image datasets, including a 4-D phantom EPID image sequence, four digitally deformable phantom image sequences with different noise levels, and four clinical EPID image sequences acquired in lung cancer treatment. The tracking accuracy is evaluated based on two metrics: centroid localization error (CLE) and volume overlap index (VOI) between the tracking result and the ground truth. Results: For the 4-D phantom image sequence, the CLE is 0.23 0.20 mm, and VOI is 95.6% 0.2%. For the digital phantom image sequences, the total CLE and VOI are 0.11 0.08 mm and 96.7% 0.7%, respectively. In addition, for the clinical EPID image sequences, the proposed algorithm achieves 0.32 0.77 mm in the CLE and 72.1% 5.5% in the VOI. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the authors proposed method both in tumor localization and boundary tracking in EPID images. In addition, compared with two existing tracking algorithms, the proposed method achieves a higher accuracy in tumor localization. Conclusions: In this paper, the authors presented a feasibility study of tracking tumor

  6. First Demonstration of Combined kV/MV Image-Guided Real-Time Dynamic Multileaf-Collimator Target Tracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Byungchul Poulsen, Per R.; Sloutsky, Alex; Sawant, Amit; Keall, Paul J.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: For intrafraction motion management, a real-time tracking system was developed by combining fiducial marker-based tracking via simultaneous kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imaging and a dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) beam-tracking system. Methods and Materials: The integrated tracking system employed a Varian Trilogy system equipped with kV/MV imaging systems and a Millennium 120-leaf MLC. A gold marker in elliptical motion (2-cm superior-inferior, 1-cm left-right, 10 cycles/min) was simultaneously imaged by the kV and MV imagers at 6.7 Hz and segmented in real time. With these two-dimensional projections, the tracking software triangulated the three-dimensional marker position and repositioned the MLC leaves to follow the motion. Phantom studies were performed to evaluate time delay from image acquisition to MLC adjustment, tracking error, and dosimetric impact of target motion with and without tracking. Results: The time delay of the integrated tracking system was {approx}450 ms. The tracking error using a prediction algorithm was 0.9 {+-} 0.5 mm for the elliptical motion. The dose distribution with tracking showed better target coverage and less dose to surrounding region over no tracking. The failure rate of the gamma test (3%/3-mm criteria) was 22.5% without tracking but was reduced to 0.2% with tracking. Conclusion: For the first time, a complete tracking system combining kV/MV image-guided target tracking and DMLC beam tracking was demonstrated. The average geometric error was less than 1 mm, and the dosimetric error was negligible. This system is a promising method for intrafraction motion management.

  7. Design of a 7-MV Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) for down-hole flash x-ray radiography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordova, Steve Ray; Welch, Dale Robert; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Rose, David Vincent; Johnson, David Lee; Bruner, Nichelle Lee; Leckbee, Joshua J.

    2008-09-01

    Pulsed power driven flash x-ray radiography is a valuable diagnostic for subcritical experiments at the Nevada Test Site. The existing dual-axis Cygnus system produces images using a 2.25 MV electron beam diode to produce intense x-rays from a small source. Future hydrodynamic experiments will likely use objects with higher areal mass, requiring increased x-ray dose and higher voltages while maintaining small source spot size. A linear transformer driver (LTD) is a compact pulsed power technology with applications ranging from pulsed power flash x-ray radiography to high current Z-pinch accelerators. This report describes the design of a 7-MV dual-axis system that occupies the same lab space as the Cygnus accelerators. The work builds on a design proposed in a previous report [1]. This new design provides increased diode voltage from a lower impedance accelerator to improve coupling to low impedance diodes such as the self magnetic pinch (SMP) diode. The design also improves the predicted reliability by operating at a lower charge voltage and removing components that have proven vulnerable to failure. Simulations of the new design and experimental results of the 1-MV prototype are presented.

  8. Performance and Applications of the first HVE 5MV Tandetron{sup TM} at the University of Madrid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mous, D.J.W.; Gottdang, A.; Haitsma, R.G.; Garcia Lopez, G.; Climent-Font, A.; Agullo-Lopez, F.; Boerma, D.O.

    2003-08-26

    The first HVE Tandetron{sup TM} with a nominal terminal voltage of 5 MV has been put into operation at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain) as part of their new IBA facility. The accelerator features a coaxial structure in which the all-solid-state power supply is constructed around the high-energy acceleration tube, thereby avoiding the T-shaped tank that has characterized the HVE Tandetrons{sup TM} so far. The new IBA facility covers a number of different ion beam analysis techniques including ERD using heavy-element time-of-flight, RBS, as well as an external micro-beam for PIXE. During installation, tests have shown a stable terminal voltage of 5.5 MV. The terminal voltage ripple was deduced to be below 6 x 10-6 (RMS) for terminal voltages above 800 kV. Terminal voltage undershoot was measured to be 1.4 x 10-3 for a {approx}1 kW beam at 3 MV and recovered to 1 x 10-4 within 800 ms. IBA experiments that require low energy hydrogen beams are supported by a stable terminal voltage down to 100 kV.

  9. Mapping the genome of meta-generalized gradient approximation density functionals: The search for B97M-V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-02-21

    A meta-generalized gradient approximation density functional paired with the VV10 nonlocal correlation functional is presented. The functional form is selected from more than 10{sup 10} choices carved out of a functional space of almost 10{sup 40} possibilities. Raw data come from training a vast number of candidate functional forms on a comprehensive training set of 1095 data points and testing the resulting fits on a comprehensive primary test set of 1153 data points. Functional forms are ranked based on their ability to reproduce the data in both the training and primary test sets with minimum empiricism, and filtered based on a set of physical constraints and an often-overlooked condition of satisfactory numerical precision with medium-sized integration grids. The resulting optimal functional form has 4 linear exchange parameters, 4 linear same-spin correlation parameters, and 4 linear opposite-spin correlation parameters, for a total of 12 fitted parameters. The final density functional, B97M-V, is further assessed on a secondary test set of 212 data points, applied to several large systems including the coronene dimer and water clusters, tested for the accurate prediction of intramolecular and intermolecular geometries, verified to have a readily attainable basis set limit, and checked for grid sensitivity. Compared to existing density functionals, B97M-V is remarkably accurate for non-bonded interactions and very satisfactory for thermochemical quantities such as atomization energies, but inherits the demonstrable limitations of existing local density functionals for barrier heights.

  10. Aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope with a sub-50-pm resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Tanigaki, Toshiaki Shimakura, Tomokazu; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Furutsu, Tadao; Shinada, Hiroyuki; Osakabe, Nobuyuki; Mller, Heiko; Haider, Maximilian; Tonomura, Akira

    2015-02-16

    Atomic-resolution electromagnetic field observation is critical to the development of advanced materials and to the unveiling of their fundamental physics. For this purpose, a spherical-aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope has been developed. The microscope has the following superior properties: stabilized accelerating voltage, minimized electrical and mechanical fluctuation, and coherent electron emission. These properties have enabled to obtain 43-pm information transfer. On the bases of these performances, a 43-pm resolution has been obtained by correcting lens aberrations up to the third order. Observations of GaN [411] thin crystal showed a projected atomic locations with a separation of 44?pm.

  11. Fundamental science investigations to develop a 6-MV laser triggered gas switch for ZR: first annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Van Den Avyle, James A.; Lehr, Jane Marie; Rose, David; Krompholz, Hermann G.; Vela, Russell; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Timoshkin, Igor (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Prestwich, Kenneth Randel (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Krile, John; Given, Martin (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); McKee, G. Randall; Rosenthal, Stephen Edgar; Struve, Kenneth William; Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Benwell, Andrew L. (University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri); Kovaleski, Scott; LeChien, Keith, R.; Johnson, David (Titan Pulse Sciences Division); Fouracre, R.A. (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Yeckel, Chris (University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri); Wakeland, Peter Eric; Miller, A. R. (Titan Pulse Sciences Division); Hodge, Keith Conquest (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Pasik, Michael Francis; Savage, Mark Edward; Maenchen, John Eric; Curry, Randy D.; Feltz, Greg; Bliss, David Emery; MacGregor, Scott (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Corley, J. P. (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Anaya, Victor (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Wallace, Zachariah (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Neuber, Andreas. (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX)

    2007-03-01

    In October 2005, an intensive three-year Laser Triggered Gas Switch (LTGS) development program was initiated to investigate and solve observed performance and reliability issues with the LTGS for ZR. The approach taken has been one of mission-focused research: to revisit and reassess the design, to establish a fundamental understanding of LTGS operation and failure modes, and to test evolving operational hypotheses. This effort is aimed toward deploying an initial switch for ZR in 2007, on supporting rolling upgrades to ZR as the technology can be developed, and to prepare with scientific understanding for the even higher voltage switches anticipated needed for future high-yield accelerators. The ZR LTGS was identified as a potential area of concern quite early, but since initial assessments performed on a simplified Switch Test Bed (STB) at 5 MV showed 300-shot lifetimes on multiple switch builds, this component was judged acceptable. When the Z{sub 20} engineering module was brought online in October 2003 frequent flashovers of the plastic switch envelope were observed at the increased stresses required to compensate for the programmatically increased ZR load inductance. As of October 2006, there have been 1423 Z{sub 20} shots assessing a variety of LTGS designs. Numerous incremental and fundamental switch design modifications have been investigated. As we continue to investigate the LTGS, the basic science of plastic surface tracking, laser triggering, cascade breakdown, and optics degradation remain high-priority mission-focused research topics. Significant progress has been made and, while the switch does not yet achieve design requirements, we are on the path to develop successively better switches for rolling upgrade improvements to ZR. This report summarizes the work performed in FY 2006 by the large team. A high-level summary is followed by detailed individual topical reports.

  12. TH-E-17A-11: Tracking Tumors Boundary in MV Image Sequences for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X; Homma, N; Ichiji, K; Abe, M; Sugita, N; Yoshizawa, M; Narita, Y; Takai, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a level set method (LSM)-based algorithm to track the tumors boundary in MV image sequences for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Method: Four MV image sequences, each of which consists of 100 frames at frame rate of 7.5 Hz, are acquired by using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) (Varian Medical Systems, Pal Alto, USA) during the treatment of lung cancer. In the first frame of each sequence, we roughly delineate an initial contour of the target tumor by hand. Using a LSM-based algorithm, the initial contour can automatically shape itself to fit the tumor, and eventually detect the tumors boundary. We then employ the tumors boundary obtained from the previous frame as the initial contour in the subsequent frame, so that the LSM-based method can drive this initial contour to the tumors boundary quickly and fulfill a tracking task. Results: The proposed method has been evaluated on four MV image sequences. The mean tracking errors were 0.23, 0.29, 0.37, and 1.18 mm, and their corresponding standard deviations were 0.97, 0.75, 1.2 and 1.48 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Compared with conventional tumor tracking techniques, the proposed system is capable not only of tracking the tumors position, but also of detecting the tumors boundary varying with the respiration during the treatment. Considering current radiation therapy technique, for example, dynamical multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) has been widely applied in clinical treatment, this study indicates the potential for significant accuracy improvement in radiation therapy. This work was partially supported by a research grant from Varian Medical Systems (Palo Alto, California)

  13. SU-E-T-322: The Evaluation of the Gafchromic EBT3 Film in Low Dose 6 MV X-Ray Beams with Different Scanning Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H; Sung, J; Yoon, M; Kim, D; Chung, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the response of the Gafchromic EBT3 film in low dose for 6 MV x-ray beams with two scanning modes, the reflection scanning mode and the transmission scanning mode. Methods: We irradiated the Gafcromic EBT3 film using a 60 degree enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) with 6 MV x-ray beams from Clinac iX Linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The irradiated Gafchromic EBT3 film was scanned with different scanning modes, the reflection scanning mode and the transmission scanning mode. The scanned Gafchromic EBT3 film was analyzed with MATLAB. Results: When 7.2 cGy was irradiated to the Gafchromic EBT3 film, the uncertainty was 0.54 cGy with reflection scanning mode and was 0.88 cGy with transmission scanning mode. When 24 cGy was irradiated to the Gafchromic EBT3 film, the uncertainty was similar to the case of 7.2 cGy irradiation showing 0.51 cGy of uncertainty with reflection scanning mode and 0.87 cGy of uncertainty with transmission scanning mode. The result suggests that the reflection mode should be used in Gafchromic EBT3 film for low irradiation. Conclusion: The result suggests that the reflection mode should be used in Gafchromic EBT3 film for low irradiation.

  14. SU-E-T-175: Evaluation of the Relative Output Ratio for Collimator Jaw and MLC Defined Small Static 6MV Photon Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, G; Thwaites, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate relative output ratio of collimator jaw and MLC defined small photon fields. Methods: Relative output ratios were measured using Gafchromic EBT3 film for a 6 MV photon beam on a Novalis Tx with HD120 MLC. Beam collimation was achieved by the jaws for 1.0 cm and 3.0 cm and MLC defined square field sizes between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm with varying jaw settings between 2.0 and 4.0 cm. Film pieces were exposed to 4 Gy. Experiments were repeated with each session consisting of five consecutive exposures for the given MLC and/or jaw collimation and with the MLC and the jaws reset for each exposure. Films were scanned using EPSON 10000XL flatbed scanner approximately 24 hours after exposure in 48 bit RGB format at 150 dpi. Film calibration data were corrected for daily linac output variations. Doses were evaluated using the green channel with square ROI sizes of 0.1 – 0.6 cm. Converted doses were normalised for output ratio calculation using the 3.0 cm field as a machine specific reference field size. Mean output ratio and coefficient of variation (CV) were calculated for each experimental session. Results: For the Novalis 6 MV photon beam the output ratios between 0.719 and 0.872 have been measured for the jaw/MLC combinations tested. For a jaw setting of 4.0 cm field, the mean CV of the output ratios increased from 0.77% to 1.48% with decreasing MLC field size from 1.0 cm to 0.5 cm. For a nominal MLC 1.0 cm field, the CV increased to 1.00% from 0.77% with reducing jaw field size from 4.0 cm to 2.0 cm. Conclusion: The relative output ratio and the associated CV were dependent on the collimator jaw and MLC settings. The field size dependent CV showed similar trends to those reported in the literature.

  15. Metal Buildings M&V

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Reference Slides A&S Building Systems American Buildings Architectural Testing Atlas Bolt & Screw Behlen Manufacturing Butler Manufacturing Building Research Systems Kirby ...

  16. Ab initio structures of As{sub m}V complexes and the simulation of Rutherford backscattering channeling spectra in heavily As-doped crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satta, Alessandra; Albertazzi, Eros; Lulli, Giorgio; Colombo, Luciano

    2005-12-15

    Geometrical models of neutral single vacancy-arsenic complexes are determined from first principles and used for atomistic simulation of Rutherford backscattering channeling (RBS-C) spectra in heavily As-doped crystalline silicon, both with and without compensating Si self-interstitials. The goal is to investigate whether the relaxation patterns of complexes containing different numbers (from 1 to 4) of As atoms can be used as a fingerprint in structural analysis by conventional RBS-C. Simulation of RBS-C spectra in million-atoms supercells containing a population of As{sub m}V, show the off-lattice displacement of the Si atoms neighboring the vacancy, due to Jahn-Teller effect. On the other side, As displacement is found to be similar in all clusters investigated. The present results suggest that in the case of samples equilibrated at high temperature, the lack of any significant disorder of Si atoms is consistent with the hypothesis of electrically inactive As being in the form of either As{sub 3}V or As{sub 4}V complexes.

  17. Fiducial marker and marker-less soft-tissue detection using fast MV fluoroscopy on a new generation EPID: Investigating the influence of pulsing artifacts and artifact suppression techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poels, Kenneth Verellen, Dirk; Van de Vondel, Iwein; El Mazghari, Rafik; De Ridder, Mark; Depuydt, Tom

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Because frame rates on current clinical available electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are limited to 7.5 Hz, a new commercially available PerkinElmer EPID (XRD 1642 AP19) with a maximum frame rate of 30 Hz and a new scintillator (Kyokko PI200) with improved sensitivity (light output) for megavolt (MV) irradiation was evaluated. In this work, the influence of MV pulse artifacts and pulsing artifact suppression techniques on fiducial marker and marker-less detection of a lung lesion was investigated, because target localization is an important component of uncertainty in geometrical verification of real-time tumor tracking. Methods: Visicoil markers with a diameter of 0.05 and 0.075 cm were used for MV marker tracking with a frame rate of, respectively, 7.5, 15, and 30 Hz. A 30 Hz readout of the detector was obtained by a 2 2 pixel binning, reducing spatial resolution. Static marker detection was conducted in function of increasing phantom thickness. Additionally, marker-less tracking was conducted and compared with the ground-truth fiducial marker motion. Performance of MV target detection was investigated by comparing the least-square sine wave fit of the detected marker positions with the predefined sine wave motion. For fiducial marker detection, a Laplacian-of-Gaussian enhancement was applied after which normalized cross correlation was used to find the most probable marker position. Marker-less detection was performed by using the scale and orientation adaptive mean shift tracking algorithm. For each MV fluoroscopy, a free running (FR-nF) (ignoring MV pulsing during readout) acquisition mode was compared with two acquisition modes intending to reduce MV pulsing artifacts, i.e., combined wavelet-FFT filtering (FR-wF) and electronic readout synchronized with respect to MV pulses. Results: A 0.05 cm Visicoil marker resulted in an unacceptable root-mean square error (RMSE) > 0.2 cm with a maximum frame rate of 30 Hz during FR-nF readout. With a

  18. M&V 2.0 Demonstrations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Long-term: scaled adoption of cost effective, accurate, meter-based savings estimation Below: Replication of CBI Logic Model - objectives, activities, short- mid- and long-term ...

  19. Document

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    reservoir having a normal maximum water surface elevation of 716 feet (ngvd) and a ... to minimize the use of electricity and water, streamline operations through ...

  20. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    staff. The persistence of the changes can be addressed through checking performance benchmarks, conducting periodic tune-ups, or a more aggressive commissioning approach. This...

  1. MHK ISDB/Instruments/POS MV Surfmaster | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  2. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... measured (e.g., reduced solar gain and heat loss through ... The power draw on lighting, plug load, HVAC equipment, and ... controls, exterior photocells, and improved programmed ...

  3. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nEnergyPlus%2Bredirect%2B1 for discussion of simulation issues. 17 http:rredc.nrel.govsolarolddatansrdb1991-2005tmy3. 18 See ASHRAE Guideline 14-2015 and Section 4.2.2...

  4. db03.book

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... in April, from a low of 5 percent the first of October. ... above its natural rim (6,223 feet above NGVD of 1929). ... OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP WATER YEAR ...

  5. Six novel transition-metal phosphite compounds, with structure related to yavapaiite: Crystal structures and magnetic and thermal properties of A{sup I}[M{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}] (A=K, NH{sub 4}, Rb and M=V, Fe)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamchaoui, Farida; Alonzo, Veronique; Universite Europeenne de Bretagne ; Venegas-Yazigi, Diego; Rebbah, Houria; Le Fur, Eric

    2013-02-15

    Six new transition metal(III) phosphites A{sup I}[V{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}], where A=K (1), NH{sub 4} (2) and Rb (3) and A{sup I}[Fe{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}] where A=K (4), NH{sub 4} (5) and Rb (6) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and the solid-state structures were solved from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. These compounds crystallize in the hexagonal system, space group P6{sub 3}mc (no. 186), with a=5.3294(2) A and c=12.3130(5) A for 1, a=5.3330(2) A and c=12.8760(4) A for 2, a=5.3459(2) A and c=12.6850(8) A for 3, a=5.3256(1) A and c=12.2362(3) A for 4, a=5.3229(2) A and c=12.8562(4) A for 5, a=5.3393(2) A and c=12.6913(5) A for 6, with Z=2 in the six phases. The crystal structures of these compounds are isotypic and exhibit a layered structure stacked along the c-axis with the A{sup +} cations located in the interlayer space. The [M{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup -} sheets are formed by MO{sub 6} octahedra interconnected by HPO{sub 3} tetrahedral phosphite oxoanions through sharing vertices. Thermal analysis shows a large range of stability for compounds containing potassium and rubidium cations with decomposition starting around 550 K for stable compounds and above 840 K for the most stable compounds leading in general to pyrophosphate compounds. Triangular nets of metallic centers are observed within the layers in which antiferromagnetic interactions are evidenced by magnetic susceptibility measurements suggesting magnetic frustration. - Graphical abstract: Six new transition metal(III) phosphites A{sup I}[M{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}], where A=K, NH{sub 4}, Rb and M=V, Fe, have been synthesized. The crystal structures of these compounds are isotypic and exhibit a lamellar structure related to Yavapaiite. The M(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2} layers separated by cationic species present the metallic centers in a triangular arrangement. Bulk antiferromagnetic behavior is observed for all the studied compounds. Highlights: Black

  6. Deadline to Review Draft M&V Guidelines Extended to December...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is extending its request for public comment on ... FEMP has reopened the comment period and requests that new comments on this draft be sent ...

  7. Calculations of atomic sputtering and displacement cross-sections in solid elements by electrons with energies from threshold to 1. 5 MV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, C.R.

    1988-12-01

    The kinetics of knock-on collisions of relativistic electrons with nuclei and details of the numerical evaluation of differential, recoil, and total Mott cross-sections are reviewed and discussed. The effects of electron beam induced displacement and sputtering, in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) environment, on microanalysis are analyzed with particular emphasis placed on the removal of material by knock-on sputtering. The mass loss predicted due to transmission knock-on sputtering is significant for many elements under conditions frequently encountered in microanalysis. Total Mott cross-sections are tabulated for all naturally occurring solid elements up to Z = 92 at displacement energies of one, two, four, and five times the sublimation energy and for accelerating voltages accessible in the transmission electron microscope. Fortran source code listings for the calculation of the differential Mott cross-section as a function of electron scattering angle (dMottCS), as a function of nuclear recoil angle (RECOIL), and the total Mott cross-section (TOTCS) are included. 48 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. WE-G-17A-09: Novel Magnetic Shielding Design for Inline and Perpendicular Integrated 6 MV Linac and 1.0 T MRI Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X; Ma, B; Kuang, Y; Diao, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The influence of fringe magnetic fields delivered by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the beam generation and transportation in Linac is still a major challenge for the integration of linear accelerator and MRI (Linac-MRI). In this study, we investigated an optimal magnetic shielding design for Linac-MRI and further characterized the beam trajectory in electron gun. Methods: Both inline and perpendicular configurations were analyzed in this study. The configurations, comprising a Linac-MRI with a 100cm SAD and an open 1.0 T superconductive magnet, were simulated by the 3D finite element method (FEM). The steel shielding around the Linac was included in the 3D model, the thickness of which was varied from 1mm to 20mm, and magnetic field maps were acquired with and without additional shielding. The treatment beam trajectory in electron gun was evaluated using OPERA 3d SCALA with and without shielding cases. Results: When Linac was not shielded, the uniformity of diameter sphere volume (DSV) (30cm) was about 5 parts per million (ppm) and the fringe magnetic fields in electron gun were more than 0.3 T. With shielding, the magnetic fields in electron gun were reduced to less than 0.01 T. For the inline configuration, the radial magnetic fields in the Linac were about 0.02T. A cylinder steel shield used (5mm thick) altered the uniformity of DSV to 1000 ppm. For the perpendicular configuration, the Linac transverse magnetic fields were more than 0.3T, which altered the beam trajectory significantly. A 8mm-thick cylinder steel shield surrounding the Linac was used to compensate the output losses of Linac, which shifted the magnetic fields' uniformity of DSV to 400 ppm. Conclusion: For both configurations, the Linac shielding was used to ensure normal operation of the Linac. The effect of magnetic fields on the uniformity of DSV could be modulated by the shimming technique of the MRI magnet. NIH/NIGMS grant U54 GM104944, Lincy Endowed Assistant Professorship.

  9. Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ...L) Upper Piezometer Development MV-1 - Air MV-1 Well Dev. 052509 2250 WD 36.56 -1441 ...L) Upper Piezometer Development MV-3 - Air MV-3 Well Dev. 060309 2325 WD 37.56 -4324 ...

  10. Assessment of Advanced Measurement and Verification Methods ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (M&V 2.0) Assessment of Advanced Measurement and Verification Methods (M&V 2.0) Automated M&V from Noesis Automated M&V from Noesis Lead Performer: Lawrence Berkeley ...

  11. Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 March 11, 2011 - 4:03pm Addthis The MV-1, a ...

  12. Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Savings Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measurement and verification (M&V) activities help agencies confirm that legally and ... When done correctly, M&V: Appropriately allocates risks Reduces uncertainty of savings ...

  13. State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings Measurement and Verification (M&V) State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement and Verification (M&V) DOE's Technical Assistance Program ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Joint Venture (United States) Strategic Petroleum Reserve Office, New Orleans, ... body radiotherapy underwent treatment planning for a 7 MV FFF and a 6 MV FF beams to ...

  15. Transformer current sensor for superconducting magnetic coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.

    1985-04-16

    The present invention is a current transformer for operating currents larger than 2kA (two kiloamps) that is capable of detecting a millivolt level resistive voltage in the presence of a large inductive voltage. Specifically, the present invention includes substantially cylindrical primary turns arranged to carry a primary current and substantially cylindrical secondary turns arranged coaxially with and only partially within the primary turns, the secondary turns including an active winding and a dummy winding, the active and dummy windings being coaxial, longitudinally separated and arranged to mutually cancel voltages excited by commonly experienced magnetic fields, the active winding but not the dummy winding being arranged within the primary turns.

  16. Structure and physical properties of single crystal PrCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} and CeM{sub 2}Al{sub 20} (M=V, Cr): A comparison of compounds adopting the CeCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} structure type

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kangas, Michael J.; Schmitt, Devin C.; Sakai, Akito; Nakatsuji, Satoru; Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 ; Chan, Julia Y.

    2012-12-15

    Crystal growth and full structure determination of compounds adopting the CeCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} structure type, LnTi{sub 2}Al{sub 20} (Ln=La-Pr, Sm, and Yb), LnV{sub 2}Al{sub 20} (Ln=La-Pr, and Sm), and LnCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} (Ln=La-Pr, Sm, and Yb), are reported. Resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity of flux grown single crystals of the nonmagnetic CeM{sub 2}Al{sub 20} (Ln=Ce, Yb; M=Ti, V) compounds are compared to PrCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20}. Of particular interest is PrCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} which does not show any phase transition down to the lowest temperature of the measurement (400 mK in resistivity measurement and 1.8 K for magnetic susceptibility measurements) and exhibits Kondo behavior at low temperatures. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of SmV{sub 2}Al{sub 20} showing the interpenetrating diamond-like samarium network and pyrochlore-like vanadium network. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single crystals of LnM{sub 2}Al{sub 20} were grown from a molten aluminum flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic, electrical, and specific heat of single crystal LnM{sub 2}Al{sub 20} are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PrCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} exhibits evidence of Kondo effect.

  17. Guide to Government Witnessing and Review of Measurement and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    witnessing of measurement and verification (M&V) activities in Federal energy savings performance contract (ESPC) projects. Witnessing of M&V activities is a part of the process of ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... properties (1) dielectric thin films (1) diffusion (1) ... onto the film surface. Surface potential decreased from about 280mV to about 100 mV and resistance decreased ...

  19. Influence of acidic pH on hydrogen and acetate production by...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mV (0.065 mAcm2 sterile control at -800 mV) by the Acetobacterium-dominated community. ... Dept. of Ecology and Evolution; Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA (United States); ...

  20. Spectroscopy of Supercapacitor Electrodes In Operando

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electrode in 1 M NaCl (aq) under (a) constant dc biases between +250 and +1000 mV (green), (b) zero bias (orange), and (c) -1000 mV (dark blue). Fits to the experimental...

  1. Measurement and Verification Activities Required in the Energy Savings Performance Contract Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There are four major measurement and verification (M&V) activities in the energy savings performance contract (ESPC) procurement process.

  2. Example Measurement and Verification Plan for an ESPC Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Report features a comprehensive measurement and verification (M&V) plan for a fictitious energy savings performance contract (ESPC) project.

  3. Guide to Government Witnessing and Review of Measurement and Verification Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document provides guidance pertaining to government witnessing of measurement and verification (M&V) activities in Federal energy savings performance contract (ESPC) projects. Witnessing of M&V activities is a part of the process of reviewing and approving M&V deliverables and the on-site inspections, spot measurements, short-term monitoring, and performance tests described in the M&V plan.

  4. Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods Outline (IDIQ Attachment J-8)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document outlines measurement and verification (M&V) planning and savings calculation methods for an energy savings performance contract (ESPC).

  5. Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MV-5 Data This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Well Completion Report for CAU 443 CNTA December 2009 Doc. No. S05827 Page C-1 Table C-1. MV-5 Chronology Date Time Depth (ft bgs) Activity 05/09/09 through 05/10/09 NA NA Move rig and equipment from MV-4 pad to MV-5 pad and prepare to drill MV-5. 05/10/09 12:10 0 Rig inspection and drill pad walk through inspection, continue with preparations for drilling. 05/10/09 14:00 0 Begin drilling 31-inch diameter conductor casing

  6. Electrogenerative oxidation of lower alcohols to useful products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meshbesher, Thomas M.

    1987-01-01

    In the disclosed electrogenerative process for converting alcohols such as ethanol to aldehydes such as acetaldehyde, the alcohol starting material is an aqueous solution containing more than the azeotropic amount of water. Good first-pass conversions (<40% and more typically <50%) are obtained at operating cell voltages in the range of about 80 to about 350 millivolts at ordinary temperatures and pressures by using very high flow rates of alcohol to the exposed anode surface (i.e. the "gas" side of an anode whose other surface is in contact with the electrolyte). High molar flow rates of vaporized aqueous alcohol also help to keep formation of undesired byproducts at a low level.

  7. Standard Measurement & Verification Plan for Lighting Equipment Retrofit or Replacement Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2009-11-04

    This document provides a framework for a standard Measurement and Verification (M&V) plan for lighting projects. It was developed to support cost-effective retrofits (partial and complete replacements) of lighting systems and is intended to provide a foundation for an M&V plan for a lighting retrofit utilizing a "best practice" approach, and to provide guidance to site owners, contractors, and other involved organizations on what is essential for a robust M&V plan for lighting projects. This document provides examples of appropriate elements of an M&V plan, including the calculation of expected energy savings. The standard M&V plan, as provided, also allows for consistent comparison with other similar lighting projects. Although intended for lighting retrofit applications, M&V plans developed per this framework document may also be used for other non-lighting technology retrofits and new installations.

  8. Measurement and Verification of Energy Savings and Performance from Advanced Lighting Controls

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document provides a framework for measurement and verification (M&V) of energy savings, performance, and user satisfaction from lighting retrofit projects involving occupancy-sensor-based, daylighting, and/or other types of automatic lighting. It was developed to provide site owners, contractors, and other involved organizations with the essential elements of a robust M&V plan for retrofit projects and to assist in developing specific project M&V plans.

  9. How Energy Savings Performance Contracting Can Support State...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    levels, best practices, energy savings examples, cost-effectiveness, EM&V and DOE support. ... Savings Measurement and Verification (M&V) Developing an Evaluation Measurement and ...

  10. High Impact Technology Hub - Resources for Evaluators - General...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0) Assessment of Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification Methods - 2014 BTO Peer Review ...

  11. Standard Measurement and Verification Plan for Lighting Retrofit Projects for Buildings and Building Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2012-10-31

    This document provides a framework for standard measurement and verification (M&V) of lighting retrofit and replacement projects. It was developed to provide site owners, contractors, and other involved organizations with the essential elements of a robust M&V plan for lighting projects. It includes details on all aspects of effectively measuring light levels of existing and post-retrofit projects, conducting power measurement, and developing cost-effectiveness analysis. This framework M&V plan also enables consistent comparison among similar lighting projects, and may be used to develop M&V plans for non--lighting-technology retrofits and new installations.

  12. Assessment of Automated Measurement and Verification Methods

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Many buildings, metered data * Split data set into hypothetical training & prediction ... M&V models, representative data set of 100s of buildings from PG&E territory ...

  13. Quadrennial Energy Review Comments by FirstFuel Software, Inc...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distribution (T&D) Resource Promote Meter-Based Measurement and Verification (M&V) ... Especially as "smart meter" deployments roll out across the country, utilities and ...

  14. ARM - Datastreams - prpfrsr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( time ) Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance No-shadow record, mean signal from the broadband channel when no shadow is detected mV signalbroadband ( time )...

  15. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Spring 2011...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    are determined before the project; custom savings: the savings are not pre-determined (M&V is required) UTILITY BUSINESS PRACTICES ISSUES COMPETITIVE SUBCONTRACTING - GORDON...

  16. Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 443 Central Nevada Test Area Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-01

    The drilling program described in this report is part of a new corrective action strategy for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443 at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). The drilling program included drilling two boreholes, geophysical well logging, construction of two monitoring/validation (MV) wells with piezometers (MV-4 and MV-5), development of monitor wells and piezometers, recompletion of two existing wells (HTH-1 and UC-1-P-1S), removal of pumps from existing wells (MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3), redevelopment of piezometers associated with existing wells (MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3), and installation of submersible pumps. The new corrective action strategy includes initiating a new 5-year proof-of-concept monitoring period to validate the compliance boundary at CNTA (DOE 2007). The new 5-year proof-of-concept monitoring period begins upon completion of the new monitor wells and collection of samples for laboratory analysis. The new strategy is described in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan addendum (DOE 2008a) that the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection approved (NDEP 2008).

  17. High Impact Technology HQ - Resources for Evaluators - General...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    main phases govern demonstrations: Site Evaluation, Selection and Project Kick-Off, ... of Advanced Measurement and Verification Methods (M&V 2.0) Reviewing Measurement and ...

  18. ESPC ENABLE Measurement and Verification Protocol

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document provides an overview of the Measurement and Verification (M&V) Protocol utilized within ENABLE energy savings performance contract projects.

  19. Notice of Intent: Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Next Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NGEMs combine high power density, high RPM motors with integrated power electronics. Specifically, this upcoming FOA will facilitate efforts to integrate Medium Voltage (MV) class ...

  20. Wannier90

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wannier90 Wannier90 Description Wannier90 computes maximally-localised Wannier functions (MLWF) following the method of Marzari and Vanderbilt (MV). It can be used in conjunction...

  1. Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Measurement and verification (M&V) activities help agencies confirm that legally and contractually required savings guarantees are met in federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

  2. Measurement & Verification with Green Button Data | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement & Verification with Green Button Data Measurement & Verification with Green ... Measurement and verification (M&V) focuses on ensuring that the savings from energy ...

  3. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  4. Using Measurement and Verification to Manage Risk in Federal Energy- and Water-Saving Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Risk," in the context of measurement and verification (M&V), refers to the uncertainty that expected savings will be realized. Assumption of risk implies acceptance of the potential monetary consequences. Energy service companies (ESCOs) and agencies are each reluctant to assume responsibility for factors they cannot control, and holding certain parameters fixed in the M&V plan can match up responsibilities.

  5. Canine distemper virus neutralization activity is low in human serum and it is sensitive to an amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia L.; Domi, Arban; Wright, Kevin J.; Driscoll, Jonathan; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J.; Kamali, Anatoli; Allen, Susan; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A.; Parks, Christopher L.

    2015-08-15

    Serum was analyzed from 146 healthy adult volunteers in eastern Africa to evaluate measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb) prevalence and potency. MV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) results indicated that all sera were positive for MV nAbs. Furthermore, the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) for the majority of sera corresponded to antibody titers induced by MV vaccination. CDV nAbs titers were low and generally were detected in sera with high MV nAb titers. A mutant CDV was generated that was less sensitive to neutralization by human serum. The mutant virus genome had 10 nucleotide substitutions, which coded for single amino acid substitutions in the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) glycoproteins and two substitutions in the large polymerase (L) protein. The H substitution occurred in a conserved region involved in receptor interactions among morbilliviruses, implying that this region is a target for cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. - Highlights: • Screened 146 serum samples for measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb). • MV nAb is prevalent in the sera. • CDV neutralizing activity is generally low or absent and when detected it is present in sera with high MV nAb titers. • A neutralization-resistant CDV mutant was isolated using human serum selection. • A mutation was identified in the receptor-binding region of CDV hemagglutinin protein that confers the neutralization resistance.

  6. Influence of Temperature on the Corrosion of Uranium Dioxide Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broczkowski, Michael E.; Noel, Jamie J.; Shoesmith, David W.

    2007-07-01

    The anodic dissolution of UO{sub 2} has been studied at 60 deg. C and the results compared to previous observations at 22 deg. C. The rate of oxidation / dissolution was determined electrochemically at constant potentials in the range -500 mV to 500 mV (vs. SCE). The composition of the electrochemically oxidized surface was determined by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The onset of oxidation (UO{sub 2} {yields} UO{sub 2+x}) occurred at approximately the same potential (-400 mV) at both temperatures. However, the conversion of U{sub V} to U{sub VI}, and hence to soluble UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, was accelerated by temperature. This acceleration of dissolution caused the development of acidity at localized sites on the fuel surface at lower (less oxidizing) potentials ({>=} 100 mV) at 60 deg. C than at 22 deg. C ({>=} 350 mV)

  7. Appearance of thermochemical emf in some conducting materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrov, Y.S.; Maslikhov, V.V.; Shcheglov, V.D.

    1983-05-01

    The appearance of an emf in conductors when they are heated is described by the Seebeck and Thompson effects. If some part of the surface of a conductor is covered by a pyrotechnical material and ignited, then while the pyrotechnical material is burning and after it has burned, an emf arises at the ends of the conductor. The direction of the emf depends on the location of maximum temperature of the heated section of the conductor. If the heating is terminated for some time and started up again, then the emf and current appear again, with no necessity for re-application of the pyrotechnical material. Conductors of Nichrome, Constantan and tungsten, as well as graphite rods were studied with small sections of the conductors covered with lead azide, black gunpowder, or match-head composition. The current ranged from -5 to 6 microamps, and the emf from -0.4 to 1 millivolt. The effects described can be used to convert thermal energy into electrical energy in sensors, etc.

  8. Development of thermoelectric fibers for miniature thermoelectric devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ren, Fei; Menchhofer, Paul A.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; Wang, Hsin

    2016-09-23

    Miniature thermoelectric (TE) devices may be used in a variety of applications such as power sources of small sensors, temperature regulation of precision electronics, etc. Reducing the size of TE elements may also enable design of novel devices with unique form factor and higher device efficiency. Current industrial practice of fabricating TE devices usually involves mechanical removal processes that not only lead to material loss but also limit the geometry of the TE elements. In this project, we explored a powder-processing method for the fabrication of TE fibers with large length-to-area ratio, which could be potentially used for miniature TEmore » devices. Powders were milled from Bi2Te3-based bulk materials and then mixed with a thermoplastic resin dissolved in an organic solvent. Through an extrusion process, flexible, continuous fibers with sub-millimeter diameters were formed. The polymer phase was then removed by sintering. Sintered fibers exhibited similar Seebeck coefficients to the bulk materials. Moreover, their electrical resistivity was much higher, which might be related to the residual porosity and grain boundary contamination. Prototype miniature uni-couples fabricated from these fibers showed a linear I-V behavior and could generate millivolt voltages and output power in the nano-watt range. Further development of these TE fibers requires improvement in their electrical conductivities, which needs a better understanding of the causes that lead to the low conductivity in the sintered fibers.« less

  9. Novel air electrode for metal-air battery with new carbon material and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, Jr., Philip N.

    1990-01-01

    A novel carbonaceous electrode support material is disclosed characterized by a corrosion rate of 0.03 wt. %/hour or less when measured a5 550 millivolts vs. a Hg/HgO electrode in a 30 wt. % KOH electrolyte a5 30.degree. C. The electrode support material comprises a preselected carbon black material which has been heat-treated by heating the material to a temperature of from about 2500.degree. to about 3000.degree. C. over a period of from about 1 to about 5 hours in an inert atmosphere and then maintaining the preselected carbon black material at this temperature for a period of at least about 1 hour, and preferably about 2 hours, in the inert atmosphere. A carbonaceous electrode suitable for use as an air electrode in a metal-air cell may be made from the electrode support material by shaping and forming it into a catalyst support and then impregnating it with a catalytically active material capable of catalyzing the reaction with oxygen at the air electrode of metal-air cell.

  10. Measurement&verification reality check: A yawning gapbetween theory and practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Satish; Haberl, Jeff; Claridge, David; Turner, Dan; O'Neal, Dennis; Sharp, Terry; Sifuentes, Teresa; Lopez, Felix; Taylor, Dub

    2002-06-01

    The success of an energy efficiency program should bemeasured in terms of the actual energy savings, and not against"stipulated" or estimated energy savings.Although M&V guidelines andprotocols have standardized methods for verifying energy savings accruingfrom the implementation of an energy efficiency project, M&V islargely viewed as a cost center rather than a value proposition. The jurymay still be out on the real value of M&V because it is oftenperceived as very expensive and too technical. This paper will reviewmeasured energy savings data from the Texas LoanSTAR Program and analyzeavailable data and program requirements of Federal and state performancecontracting programs that require some level of M&V to verify energysavings. The intent is to determine the role of M&V in differentprograms and what implications it has on the success or failure of theprograms. The paper concludes with suggestions to use M&V as a riskmanagement tool wherein both the service provider and the customer have avested interest to perform appropriate level of M&V to reduceuncertainty in energy savings in a cost effective manner.

  11. TH-E-17A-10: Markerless Lung Tumor Tracking Based On Beams Eye View EPID Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, T; Kearney, V; Liu, H; Jiang, L; Foster, R; Mao, W; Rozario, T; Bereg, S; Klash, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dynamic tumor tracking or motion compensation techniques have proposed to modify beam delivery following lung tumor motion on the flight. Conventional treatment plan QA could be performed in advance since every delivery may be different. Markerless lung tumor tracking using beams eye view EPID images provides a best treatment evaluation mechanism. The purpose of this study is to improve the accuracy of the online markerless lung tumor motion tracking method. Methods: The lung tumor could be located on every frame of MV images during radiation therapy treatment by comparing with corresponding digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). A kV-MV CT corresponding curve is applied on planning kV CT to generate MV CT images for patients in order to enhance the similarity between DRRs and MV treatment images. This kV-MV CT corresponding curve was obtained by scanning a same CT electron density phantom by a kV CT scanner and MV scanner (Tomotherapy) or MV CBCT. Two sets of MV DRRs were then generated for tumor and anatomy without tumor as the references to tracking the tumor on beams eye view EPID images. Results: Phantom studies were performed on a Varian TrueBeam linac. MV treatment images were acquired continuously during each treatment beam delivery at 12 gantry angles by iTools. Markerless tumor tracking was applied with DRRs generated from simulated MVCT. Tumors were tracked on every frame of images and compared with expected positions based on programed phantom motion. It was found that the average tracking error were 2.3 mm. Conclusion: This algorithm is capable of detecting lung tumors at complicated environment without implanting markers. It should be noted that the CT data has a slice thickness of 3 mm. This shows the statistical accuracy is better than the spatial accuracy. This project has been supported by a Varian Research Grant.

  12. Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batumalai, Vikneswary; Quinn, Alexandra; Jameson, Michael; Delaney, Geoff; Holloway, Lois

    2015-03-15

    Correct target positioning is crucial for accurate dose delivery in breast radiotherapy resulting in utilisation of daily imaging. However, the radiation dose from daily imaging is associated with increased probability of secondary induced cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify doses associated with three imaging modalities and investigate the correlation of dose and varying breast size in breast radiotherapy. Planning computed tomography (CT) data sets of 30 breast cancer patients were utilised to simulate the dose received by various organs from a megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT), megavoltage electronic portal image (MV-EPI) and megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). The mean dose to organs adjacent to the target volume (contralateral breast, lungs, spinal cord and heart) were analysed. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between imaging dose and primary breast volume and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of induced secondary cancer was calculated for the contralateral breast. The highest contralateral breast mean dose was from the MV-CBCT (1.79 Gy), followed by MV-EPI (0.22 Gy) and MV-CT (0.11 Gy). A similar trend was found for all organs at risk (OAR) analysed. The primary breast volume inversely correlated with the contralateral breast dose for all three imaging modalities. As the primary breast volume increases, the likelihood of a patient developing a radiation-induced secondary cancer to the contralateral breast decreases. MV-CBCT showed a stronger relationship between breast size and LAR of developing a radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in comparison with the MV-CT and MV-EPI. For breast patients, imaging dose to OAR depends on imaging modality and treated breast size. When considering the use of imaging during breast radiotherapy, the patient's breast size and contralateral breast dose should be taken into account.

  13. March 2010 Groundwater Sampling at the Project Shoal Site, Nevada (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Project Shoal Area (Shoal) in March 2010. Wells HC-4, HC-5, HC-7, HC-8, MV-1, MV-2 and MV-3 were sampled March 10-12, 2010, as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Wells HC-1, HC-2, HC-3, and HC-6 were sampled March 24, 2010, by Desert Research Institute personnel.

  14. The CAMS Accelerator Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the cams accelerator facility The CAMS Accelerator Facility Today CAMS's primary facility is a ~10,000 ft2 building that houses three state-of-the-art, accelerator-based technologies. Upper Left: The HVEC 10 MV Model FN Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator and the lighter-ion AMS beamline. Upper Right: The NEC 1.0 MV Model 3SDH-1 Tandem Accelerator for BioAMS. Lower: The NEC 1.7 MV Model 5SDH-2 Tandem Accelerator for Ion Beam Analysis and neutron production. CAMS' principal research instrument is a

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Modeling of GeoSystems;A.N. Alshawabkeh, K.R. Reddy, M.V. Khire;American Society of Civil Engineers;1028-1035 Quantitative 3D petrography using X-ray tomography 4: Assessing ...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... contacts by P implantations into either intrinsic (undoped) or in-situ B-doped a-Si layers with implied open-circuit voltages (iVsub oc) of 725 and 720 mV, respectively. ...

  17. CX-009369: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Regional Innovation Cluster (M&V Equipment) CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2 Date: 09/17/2012 Location(s): Multiple Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. Better Buildings Alliance, Advanced Rooftop Unit Campaign: Rooftop Unit Measurement and Verification (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    This document provides facility managers and building owners an introduction to measurement and verification (M&V) methods to estimate energy and cost savings of rooftop units replacement or retrofit projects to estimate paybacks or to justify future projects.

  19. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Francois Hemez (X-1-MV: METHODS AND VERIFICATION) Dr. Gyuhae Park (INST-OFF: INSTITUTES) Dr. Irene Beyerlein (T-03: FLUID DYNAMICS) Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV's) are being used by ...

  20. BPA, in partnership with its customer utilities, conducted an...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3. 2. 1. 2. 3. BPA can improve reliability of savings estimates by clarifying BPA M&V protocols (e.g., first-year vs typical savings and current practice baseline), improve the...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... a search of new technologies to take advantage of renewable energy such as solar and wind. ... The MV4-HO-TEMPO ARFB has an exceptionally high cell voltage, 1.25 V. Prototypes of the ...

  2. Class 8 Truck Freight Efficiency Improvement Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... HEV Engine controls Integration SAE Hybrid Committee Standards development for ... testing on-going HV-LV DCDC Inverter Junction Box HV-MV DCDC HV Battery eAC Comp. ...

  3. Microsoft Word - HV-BPL Final Report to NETL.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... channels that control their electrical grid. ... Line (BPL) connection operating on the in-service, 0.77 mile, 69 kV transmission line ... on MV distribution lines, making ...

  4. Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NPS Phase 1 Thesis 19,600year 23,400year Up to 50,000day* Attributes Conservation Effect Smart Building Diagnostics M&V for EE Programs EV Integration Voltage Regulation...

  5. SIC ENABLED HIGH-FREQUENCY MEDIUM VOLTAGE DRIVE FOR HIGH-SPEED...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A medium voltage drive system using SiC semiconductors and a high-speed motor to reduce ... MV high frequency drive, (ii) a high-speed motor, and (iii) advanced insulation systems. ...

  6. EMGeo Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods (QMR in one case, and IDR in the other), both solvers are dominated by memory bandwidth intensive operations like sparse matrix-vector multiply (SpMV), dot...

  7. DOE EPCA Commercial Refrigeration Standards - EERE-2010-BT-STD...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    We have a revolutionary product that is the only in the business that has built in Measurement & Verification (M&V). All other anti-sweat heater controls are old technology that ...

  8. FEMP Focus - Spring 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-04-29

    Features information about Measurement and Verification (M&V) of Energy Savings, Energy Rate Escalation calculator, Landfill Gas-to-Energy Project, Natural Gas Markets, GSA develops new O&M contract, and more for federal agencies.

  9. CEBAF SRF Performance during Initial 12 GeV Commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Allison, Trent; Daly, Edward; Drury, Michael; Hovater, J; Lahti, George; Mounts, Clyde; Nelson, Richard; Plawski, Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of eleven new 100 MV cryomodules (88 cavities). The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at an accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m with a QL of 3×107. Not all the cavities were operated at the minimum gradient of 19.3 MV/m with the beam. Though the initial 12 GeV milestones were achieved during the initial commissioning of CEBAF, there are still some issues to be addressed for long term reliable operation of these modules. This paper reports the operational experiences during the initial commissioning and the path forward to improve the performance of C100 (100 MV) modules.

  10. Maldives: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Maldives Population 393,500 GDP 1,944,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MV 3-letter ISO code MDV Numeric ISO...

  11. Competing charge, spin, and superconducting orders in underdoped...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ruixing ; Bonn, D.A. ; Hardy, W.N. ; Gutowski, O. ; Zimmermann, M.v. ; Hayden, S.M. ; Chang, J. 1 ; Denmark) 2 ; UBC) 2 ; DESY) 2 ; Ecole) 2 ; CIFAR) 2 ; Bristol) 2 ...

  12. PSA_Well_Completion_Report.book

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... B.1-4 Geophysical Data Project Shoal Area MV-3 Spontaneous Potential and Gamma Ray . . . . ... The Vela Uniform Program was a joint effort conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission ...

  13. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measure project, this should be the date when the M&V for all measures was completed. O Optional: Project Name Name assigned to project. Data Entry Fields: Columns B through AG...

  14. Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    101001 Field Measurements Alkalinity mgL 189 182 Conductivity c mhoscm 560 560 DO c mgL 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u....

  15. Microsoft Word - S02459_2006Annual GW Rpt.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    101001 Field Measurements Alkalinity mgL 189 182 Conductivity b mhoscm 560 560 DO b mgL 1.4 -- ORP b mV -51 -46 pH b s.u....

  16. Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06a,b

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    101001 Field Measurements Alkalinity mgL 189 182 Conductivity c mhoscm 560 560 DO c mgL 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u....

  17. Microsoft Word - S03623_2007AnnRep_091007.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    101001 Field Measurements Alkalinity mgL 189 182 Conductivity c mhoscm 560 560 DO c mgL 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u....

  18. SU-E-T-423: TrueBeam Small Field Dosimetry Using Commercial Plastic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    system and to compare them to values measured with an IBA CC01 ionization chamber and a Sun Nuclear Edge detector diode for 6 MV photon beams. Methods: The Exradin W1 is a new...

  19. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    system and to compare them to values measured with an IBA CC01 ionization chamber and a Sun Nuclear Edge detector diode for MV photon beams Methods The Exradin W1 is a new small...

  20. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    system and to compare them to values measured with an IBA CC01 ionization chamber and a Sun Nuclear Edge detector diode for 6 MV photon beams. Methods: The Exradin W1 is a new...

  1. Medium-Voltage Cables in Nuclear Plant Applications - State of Industry and Conditioning Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Braun

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 This report reviews the types of medium-voltage (MV) cables in use in nuclear power plants and the techniques that are currently available to assess the condition of MV cable systems. The project identified the types of cable systems in nuclear plants and their operating conditions and then assessed the aging and failure mechanisms of these cables and suitable diagnostic test techniques. In addition, ways to alleviate conditions that cause the most severe aging were identified.

  2. Multipacting in a grooved choke joint at SRF gun for BNL ERL prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Burrill, A.; Holmes, D.; Kayran, D.; McIntyre, G.; Sheehy, B.

    2011-03-28

    The 703 MHz superconducting gun for BNL ERL prototype was tested at JLab with and without choke-joint and cathode stalk. Without choke-joint and cathode stalk, the gradient reached was 25 MV/m with Q{sup 0} {approx} 6E9. The gun cathode insertion port is equipped with a grooved choke joint for multipacting suppression. We carried out tests with choke-joint and cathode stalk. The test results show that there are at least two barriers at about 3.5 MV/m and 5 MV/m. We considered several possibilities and finally found that fine details of the grooved shape are important for multipacting suppression. A triangular groove with round crest may cause strong multipacting in the choke-joint at 3.5 MV/m, 5 MV/m and 10 MV/m. This paper presents the primary test results of the gun and discusses the multipacting analysis in the choke-joint. It also suggests possible solutions for the gun and multipacting suppressing for a similar structure.

  3. Beam generation and planar imaging at energies below 2.40 MeV with carbon and aluminum linear accelerator targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, David; Robar, James L.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Recent work has demonstrated improvement of image quality with low-Z linear accelerator targets and energies as low as 3.5 MV. In this paper, the authors lower the incident electron beam energy between 1.90 and 2.35 MeV and assess the improvement of megavoltage planar image quality with the use of carbon and aluminum linear accelerator targets. Methods: The bending magnet shunt current was adjusted in a Varian linear accelerator to allow selection of mean electron energy between 1.90 and 2.35 MeV. Linac set points were altered to increase beam current to allow experimental imaging in a practical time frame. Electron energy was determined through comparison of measured and Monte Carlo modeled depth dose curves. Planar image CNR and spatial resolution measurements were performed to quantify the improvement of image quality. Magnitudes of improvement are explained with reference to Monte Carlo generated energy spectra. Results: After modifications to the linac, beam current was increased by a factor greater than four and incident electron energy was determined to have an adjustable range from 1.90 MeV to 2.35 MeV. CNR of cortical bone was increased by a factor ranging from 6.2 to 7.4 and 3.7 to 4.3 for thin and thick phantoms, respectively, compared to a 6 MV therapeutic beam for both aluminum and carbon targets. Spatial resolution was degraded slightly, with a relative change of 3% and 10% at 0.20 lp/mm and 0.40 lp/mm, respectively, when reducing energy from 2.35 to 1.90 MV. The percentage of diagnostic x-rays for the beams examined here, ranges from 46% to 54%.Conclusion: It is possible to produce a large fraction of diagnostic energy x-rays by lowering the beam energy below 2.35 MV. By lowering the beam energy to 1.90 MV or 2.35 MV, CNR improves by factors ranging from 3.7 to 7.4 compared to a 6 MV therapy beam, with only a slight degradation of spatial resolution when lowering the energy from 2.35 MV to 1.90 MV.

  4. Current transport mechanisms in plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited AlN thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altuntas, Halit E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Donmez, Inci; Biyikli, Necmi E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr

    2015-04-21

    Here, we report on the current transport mechanisms in AlN thin films deposited at a low temperature (i.e., 200?C) on p-type Si substrates by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition. Structural characterization of the deposited AlN was carried out using grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, revealing polycrystalline films with a wurtzite (hexagonal) structure. Al/AlN/ p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor structures were fabricated and investigated under negative bias by performing current-voltage measurements. As a function of the applied electric field, different types of current transport mechanisms were observed; i.e., ohmic conduction (15.221.5 MV/m), Schottky emission (23.639.5 MV/m), Frenkel-Poole emission (63.8211.8 MV/m), trap-assisted tunneling (226280 MV/m), and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling (290447 MV/m). Electrical properties of the insulating AlN layer and the fabricated Al/AlN/p-Si MIS capacitor structure such as dielectric constant, flat-band voltage, effective charge density, and threshold voltage were also determined from the capacitance-voltage measurements.

  5. Influence of acidic pH on hydrogen and acetate production by an electrosynthetic microbiome

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    LaBelle, Edward V.; Marshall, Christopher W.; Gilbert, Jack A.; May, Harold D.; Battista, John R.

    2014-10-15

    Production of hydrogen and organic compounds by an electrosynthetic microbiome using electrodes and carbon dioxide as sole electron donor and carbon source, respectively, was examined after exposure to acidic pH (~5). Hydrogen production by biocathodes poised at -600 mV vs. SHE increased>100-fold and acetate production ceased at acidic pH, but ~5–15 mM (catholyte volume)/day acetate and>1,000 mM/day hydrogen were attained at pH ~6.5 following repeated exposure to acidic pH. Cyclic voltammetry revealed a 250 mV decrease in hydrogen overpotential and a maximum current density of 12.2 mA/cm2 at -765 mV (0.065 mA/cm2 sterile control at -800 mV) by the Acetobacterium-dominatedmore » community. Supplying -800 mV to the microbiome after repeated exposure to acidic pH resulted in up to 2.6 kg/m3/day hydrogen (≈2.6 gallons gasoline equivalent), 0.7 kg/m3/day formate, and 3.1 kg/m3/day acetate ( = 4.7 kg CO2 captured).« less

  6. The Effect of the iBEAM Evo Carbon Fiber Tabletop on Skin Sparing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, John B. Godwin, Guy A.

    2011-10-01

    Replicating the attenuation properties of the treatment tabletop are of primary importance for accurate treatment planning; however, the effect of the tabletop on the skin-sparing properties of x-rays can be overlooked. Under some conditions, the reaction of skin to the radiation can be so serious as to be the dose-limiting organ for radiotherapy treatment. Hence, an understanding of the magnitude of the reduction in skin sparing is important. Because of the development of image-guided radiotherapy, modern tabletops have been developed without the use of metal supports that otherwise provided the necessary level of rigidity. Rigidity is instead provided by compressed foam within a carbon-fiber shell, which, although it provides artefact-free imaging and high levels of rigidity, has an adverse affect on the dose in the build-up region. Representative of this type is the iBEAM evo tabletop, whose effect on the skin dose was determined at 6-MV, 10-MV, and 18-MV x-rays. Skin dose was found to increase by 60-70% owing to the tabletop, with the effect increasing with field size and decreasing with energy. By considering an endpoint of erythema, a radiobiological advantage of selecting 10 MV over 6 MV for applicable treatments was demonstrated.

  7. Comparative Simulation Studies of Multipacting in Higher-Order-Mode Couplers of Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. M.; Liu, Kexin; Geng, Rongli

    2014-02-01

    Multipacting (MP) in higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers of the International Linear Collider (ILC) baseline cavity and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) 12 GeV upgrade cavity is studied by using the ACE3P suites, developed by the Advanced Computations Department at SLAC. For the ILC cavity HOM coupler, the simulation results show that resonant trajectories exist in three zones, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 0.6-1.6 MV/m, 21-34 MV/m, 32-35 MV/m, and > 40MV/m, respectively. For the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade cavity HOM coupler, resonant trajectories exist in one zone, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 6-13 MV/m. Potential implications of these MP barriers are discussed in the context of future high energy pulsed as well as medium energy continuous wave (CW) accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency cavities. Frequency scaling of MP's predicted in HOM couplers of the ILC, CBEAF upgrade, SNS and FLASH third harmonic cavity is given and found to be in good agreement with the analytical result based on the parallel plate model.

  8. CEBAF Upgrade: Cryomodule Performance And Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, Michael A.; Davis, G. Kirk; Hogan, John P.; Hovater, J. Curt; King, Lawrence; Marhauser, Frank; Park, HyeKyoung; Preble, Joe; Reece, Charles E.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Wiseman, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is currently engaged in the 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The goal of the 12 GeV Upgrade is a doubling of the available beam energy of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. This increase in beam energy will be due in large part to the addition of ten C100 cryomodules plus associated new RF in the CEBAF linacs. The C100 cryomodules are designed to deliver 100 MeV per installed cryomodule. Each C100 cryomodule is built around a string of eight seven-cell, electro-polished, superconducting RF cavities. While an average performance of 100MV per cryomodule is needed to achieve the overall 12 GeV beam energy goal, the actual performance goal for the cryomodules is an average energy gain of 108 MV to provide operational headroom. Cryomodule production started in December 2010. All ten of the C100 cryomodules are installed in the linac tunnels and are on schedule to complete commissioning by September 2013. Performance during Commissioning has ranged from 104 MV to 118 MV. In May, 2012 a test of an early C100 achieved 108 MV with full beam loading. This paper will discuss the performance of the C100 cryomodules along with operational challenges and lessons learned for future designs.

  9. Influence of acidic pH on hydrogen and acetate production by an electrosynthetic microbiome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBelle, Edward V.; Marshall, Christopher W.; Gilbert, Jack A.; May, Harold D.; Battista, John R.

    2014-10-15

    Production of hydrogen and organic compounds by an electrosynthetic microbiome using electrodes and carbon dioxide as sole electron donor and carbon source, respectively, was examined after exposure to acidic pH (~5). Hydrogen production by biocathodes poised at -600 mV vs. SHE increased>100-fold and acetate production ceased at acidic pH, but ~5–15 mM (catholyte volume)/day acetate and>1,000 mM/day hydrogen were attained at pH ~6.5 following repeated exposure to acidic pH. Cyclic voltammetry revealed a 250 mV decrease in hydrogen overpotential and a maximum current density of 12.2 mA/cm2 at -765 mV (0.065 mA/cm2 sterile control at -800 mV) by the Acetobacterium-dominated community. Supplying -800 mV to the microbiome after repeated exposure to acidic pH resulted in up to 2.6 kg/m3/day hydrogen (≈2.6 gallons gasoline equivalent), 0.7 kg/m3/day formate, and 3.1 kg/m3/day acetate ( = 4.7 kg CO2 captured).

  10. A dosimetric characterization of a novel linear accelerator collimator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, C. M.; Weston, S. J. Cosgrove, V. C.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to characterize a new linear accelerator collimator which contains a single pair of sculpted diaphragms mounted orthogonally to a 160 leaf multileaf collimator (MLC). The diaphragms have “thick” regions providing full attenuation and “thin” regions where attenuation is provided by both the leaves and the diaphragm. The leaves are mounted on a dynamic leaf guide allowing rapid leaf motion and leaf travel over 350 mm. Methods: Dosimetric characterization, including assessment of leaf transmission, leaf tip transmission, penumbral width, was performed in a plotting tank. Head scatter factor was measured using a mini-phantom and the effect of leaf guide position on output was assessed using a water phantom. The tongue and groove effect was assessed using multiple exposures on radiochromic film. Leaf reproducibility was assessed from portal images of multiple abutting fields. Results: The maximum transmission through the multileaf collimator is 0.44% at 6 MV and 0.52% at 10 MV. This reduced to 0.22% and 0.27%, respectively, when the beam passes through the dynamic leaf guide in addition to the MLC. The maximum transmission through the thick part of the diaphragm is 0.32% and 0.36% at 6 and 10 MV. The combination of leaf and diaphragm transmission ranges from 0.08% to 0.010% at 6 MV and 0.10% to 0.14% depending on whether the shielding is through the thick or thin part of the diaphragm. The off-axis intertip transmission for a zero leaf gap is 2.2% at 6 and 10 MV. The leaf tip penumbra for a 100 × 100 mm field ranges from 5.4 to 4.3 mm at 6 and 10 MV across the full range of leaf motion when measured in the AB direction, which reduces to 4.0–3.4 mm at 6 MV and 4.5–3.8 mm at 10 MV when measured in the GT direction. For a 50 × 50 mm field, the diaphragm penumbra ranges from 4.3 to 3.7 mm at 6 MV and 4.5 to 4.1 mm at 10 MV in the AB direction and 3.7 to 3.2 mm at 6 MV and 4.2 to 3.7 mm when measured in the GT direction. The

  11. Performance of 3-cell Seamless Niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLBA; Jelezov, I. [DESY, Hamburg; Singer, W. [DESY, Hamburg; Singer, X. [DESY, Hamburg

    2009-11-01

    In the last several months we have surface treated and cryogenically tested three TESLA-type 3-cell cavities, which had been manufactured at DESY as seamless assemblies by hydroforming. The cavities were completed at JLab with beam tube/flange assemblies. All three cavities performed very well after they had been post-purified with titanium at 1250C for 3 hrs. The cavities, two of which consisted of an end cell and 2 center cells and one was a center cell assembly, achieved gradients of Eacc = 32 MV/m, 34 MV/m and 35 MV/m without quenches. The performance was limited by the appearance of the Q-drop in the absence of field emission. This contribution reports about the various measurements undertaken with these cavities.

  12. Solicitation and Selection of Partner Projects, Technical Team Leads, and Measurement and Validation Contractors for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Funded Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP-2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesse, Ronald J.; Baechler, Michael C.; Iverson, Megan M.

    2010-09-30

    In March 2010, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) joined two other labs receiving ARRA funding, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the National Renewable National Laboratory (NREL), to began weekly conference calls with the goal of coordinating a joint lab solicitation to support the ARRA-funded CBP project. Two solicitations were identified for: 1) new CBP Partners; 2) technical contractors to provide technical assistance and measurement and verification (M&V) contractors. The M&V contractors support the work by providing model reviews and conducting monitoring studies to verify building performance. This report documents the process used by the labs for the solicitations, and describes the process and outcomes for PNNL, selection of candidate Partners, technical teams, and M&V contractors.

  13. Renewable Energy and the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, A.; Thompson, A.; Mills, D.; Kats, G. H.

    1999-04-14

    The Renewables Subcommittee for the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP) is developing a section of the IPMVP treating the special issues related to performance measurement of renewable energy systems. An industry consensus framework for measuring project benefits is important in realizing the promise of renewable energy. This work represents a voluntary, consensus-building process among sponsoring organizations from 21 countries and several disciplines. Measurement and Verification (M&V) can provide a common tool for standardization to support performance-based contracting, financing, and emissions trading. M&V can ensure that savings and generation requirements in energy projects will be achieved accurately and objectively. The protocol defines procedures that are consistently applicable to similar projects, internationally accepted, and reliable. Actual M&V project results can demonstrate success and provide developers, investors, lenders, and customers with more confidence in the value of future projects.

  14. On the determination of reference levels for quality assurance of flattening filter free photon beams in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clivio, Alessandro; Belosi, Maria Francesca; Cozzi, Luca; Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Fogliata, Antonella; Bolard, Grgory; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Krauss, Harald

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: New definitions for some dosimetric parameters for use in quality assurance of flattening filter free (FFF) beams generated by medical linear accelerators have been suggested. The present study aims to validate these suggestions and to propose possible reference levels. Methods: The main characteristics of FFF photon beams were described in terms of: field size, penumbra, unflatness, slope, and peak-position parameters. Data were collected for 6 and 10 MV-FFF beams from three different Varian TrueBeam Linacs. Measurements were performed with a 2D-array (Starcheck system from PTW-Freiburg) and with the portal dosimetry method GLAaS utilizing the build-in portal imager of TrueBeam. Data were also compared to ion chamber measurements. A cross check validation has been performed on a FFF beam of 6 MV generated by a Varian Clinac-iX upgraded to FFF capability. Results : All the parameters suggested to characterize the FFF beams resulted easily measurable and little variation was observed among different Linacs. Referring to two reference field sizes of 10 10 and 20 20 cm{sup 2}, at SDD = 100 cm and d = dmax, from the portal dosimetry data, the following results (averaging X and Y profiles) were obtained. Field size: 9.95 0.02 and 19.98 0.03 cm for 6 MV-FFF (9.94 0.02 and 19.98 0.03 cm for 10 MV-FFF). Penumbra: 2.7 0.3 and 2.9 0.3 mm for 6 MV-FFF (3.1 0.2 and 3.3 0.3 for 10 MV-FFF). Unflatness: 1.11 0.01 and 1.25 0.01 for 6 MV-FFF (1.21 0.01 and 1.50 0.01 for 10 MV-FFF). Slope: 0.320 0.020%/mm and 0.43 0.015%/mm for 6 MV-FFF (0.657 0.023%/mm and 0.795 0.017%/mm for 10 MV-FFF). Peak Position ?0.2 0.2 and ?0.4 0.2 mm for 6 MV-FFF (?0.3 0.2 and 0.7 0.3 mm for 10 MV-FFF). Results would depend upon measurement depth. With thresholds set to at least 95% confidence level from the measured data and to account for possible variations between detectors and methods and experimental settings, a tolerance set of: 1 mm for field

  15. Modeling the Distribution of Acidity within Nuclear Fuel (UO{sub 2}) Corrosion Product Deposits and Porous Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheong, W.J.; Keech, P.G.; Wren, J.C.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Qin, Z.

    2007-07-01

    A model for acidity within pores within corrosion products on anodically-dissolving UO{sub 2} was developed using Comsol Multiphysics 3.2 to complement ongoing electrochemical measurements. It was determined that a depression of pH within pores can be maintained if: electrochemically measured dissolution currents used in the calculations are attenuated to reflect very localized pores; corrosion potentials exceed -250 mV (vs. SCE); and pore depths are >1 {mu}m for 300 mV or >100 {mu}m for -50 mV (vs. SCE). Mixed diffusional-chemical equilibria control is suggested through deviations in the shapes between pH-potential and pH-pore depth plots. (authors)

  16. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hatzell, Marta C.; Raju, Muralikrishna; Watson, Valerie J.; Stack, Andrew G.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-11-03

    We report that the amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10–5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g–1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in themore » LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g–1) had a negative rise potential (₋31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to ₋6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. In conclusion, these results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.« less

  17. Noise suppression in reconstruction of low-Z target megavoltage cone-beam CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Jing; Robar, James; Guan Huaiqun

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To improve the image contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratio for low-Z target megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) using a statistical projection noise suppression algorithm based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion. Methods: Projection images of a contrast phantom, a CatPhan{sup Registered-Sign} 600 phantom and a head phantom were acquired by a Varian 2100EX LINAC with a low-Z (Al) target and low energy x-ray beam (2.5 MeV) at a low-dose level and at a high-dose level. The projections were then processed by minimizing the PWLS objective function. The weighted least square (WLS) term models the noise of measured projection and the penalty term enforces the smoothing constraints of the projection image. The variance of projection data was chosen as the weight for the PWLS objective function and it determined the contribution of each measurement. An anisotropic quadratic form penalty that incorporates the gradient information of projection image was used to preserve edges during noise reduction. Low-Z target MV CBCT images were reconstructed by the FDK algorithm after each projection was processed by the PWLS smoothing. Results: Noise in low-Z target MV CBCT images were greatly suppressed after the PWLS projection smoothing, without noticeable sacrifice of the spatial resolution. Depending on the choice of smoothing parameter, the CNR of selected regions of interest in the PWLS processed low-dose low-Z target MV CBCT image can be higher than the corresponding high-dose image.Conclusion: The CNR of low-Z target MV CBCT images was substantially improved by using PWLS projection smoothing. The PWLS projection smoothing algorithm allows the reconstruction of high contrast low-Z target MV CBCT image with a total dose of as low as 2.3 cGy.

  18. M & V Shootout: Setting the Stage For Testing the Performance of New Energy Baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Touzani, Samir; Custodio, Claudine; Sohn, Michael; Fernandes, Samuel; Granderson, Jessica; Jump, David; Taylor, Cody

    2015-07-01

    Trustworthy savings calculations are critical to convincing investors in energy efficiency projects of the benefit and cost-effectiveness of such investments and their ability to replace or defer supply-side capital investments. However, today’s methods for measurement and verification (M&V) of energy savings constitute a significant portion of the total costs of efficiency projects. They also require time-consuming data acquisition and often do not deliver results until years after the program period has ended. A spectrum of savings calculation approaches are used, with some relying more heavily on measured data and others relying more heavily on estimated or modeled data, or stipulated information. The rising availability of “smart” meters, combined with new analytical approaches to quantifying savings, has opened the door to conducting M&V more quickly and at lower cost, with comparable or improved accuracy. Energy management and information systems (EMIS) technologies, not only enable significant site energy savings, but are also beginning to offer M&V capabilities. This paper expands recent analyses of public-domain, whole-building M&V methods, focusing on more novel baseline modeling approaches that leverage interval meter data. We detail a testing procedure and metrics to assess the performance of these new approaches using a large test dataset. We also provide conclusions regarding the accuracy, cost, and time trade-offs between more traditional M&V and these emerging streamlined methods. Finally, we discuss the potential evolution of M&V to better support the energy efficiency industry through low-cost approaches, and the long-term agenda for validation of building energy analytics.

  19. Enrichment of Microbial Electrolysis Cell Biocathodes from Sediment Microbial Fuel Cell Bioanodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pisciotta, JM; Zaybak, Z; Call, DF; Nam, JY; Logan, BE

    2012-07-18

    Electron-accepting (electrotrophic) biocathodes were produced by first enriching graphite fiber brush electrodes as the anodes in sediment-type microbial fuel cells (sMFCs) using two different marine sediments and then electrically inverting the anodes to function as cathodes in two-chamber bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). Electron consumption occurred at set potentials of -439 mV and -539 mV (versus the potential of a standard hydrogen electrode) but not at -339 mV in minimal media lacking organic sources of energy. Results at these different potentials were consistent with separate linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) scans that indicated enhanced activity (current consumption) below only ca. -400 mV. MFC bioanodes not originally acclimated at a set potential produced electron-accepting (electrotrophic) biocathodes, but bioanodes operated at a set potential (+11 mV) did not. CO, was removed from cathode headspace, indicating that the electrotrophic biocathodes were autotrophic. Hydrogen gas generation, followed by loss of hydrogen gas and methane production in one sample, suggested hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. There was abundant microbial growth in the biocathode chamber, as evidenced by an increase in turbidity and the presence of microorganisms on the cathode surface. Clone library analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated prominent sequences most similar to those of Eubacterium limosum (Butyribacterium methylotrophicum), Desulfovibrio sp. A2, Rhodococcus opacus, and Gemmata obscuriglobus. Transfer of the suspension to sterile cathodes made of graphite plates, carbon rods, or carbon brushes in new BESs resulted in enhanced current after 4 days, demonstrating growth by these microbial communities on a variety of cathode substrates. This report provides a simple and effective method for enriching autotrophic electrotrophs by the use of sMFCs without the need for set potentials, followed by the use of potentials more negative than -400 mV.

  20. CX-005298: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005298: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vehicle Production Group LLC, MV-1 Assembly Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.31, B5.1 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Mishawaka, Indiana Office(s): Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program, Loan Guarantee Program Office The Department of Energy's (DOE) proposed action is to issue a loan to The Vehicle Production Group LLC (VPG) for an MV-I vehicle, the assembly of which would take place in an existing

  1. Fundamental Research in Superconducting RF Cavity Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Georg Hoffstaetter

    2012-11-13

    This is a 3-year SRF R&D proposal with two main goals: 1) to benefit near term high gradient SRF applications by understanding the causes of quench at high fields in present-day niobium cavities 2) to open the long-range prospects for SRF applications by experimentally verifying the recent exciting theoretical predication for new cavity materials such as Nb3Sn and MgB2. These predictions shwo that ultimately gradients of 100Mv/m to 200MV/m may become possible as material imperfections are overcome.

  2. Kondo and mixed-valence regimes in multilevel quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chudnovskiy, A. L.; Ulloa, S. E.

    2001-04-15

    We investigate the dependence of the ground state of a multilevel quantum dot on the coupling to an external fermionic system and on the interactions in the dot. As the coupling to the external system increases, the rearrangement of the effective energy levels in the dot signals the transition from the Kondo regime to a mixed-valence (MV) regime. The MV regime in a two-level dot is characterized by an intrinsic mixing of the levels in the dot, resulting in nonperturbative subtunneling and supertunneling phenomena that strongly influence the Kondo effect.

  3. Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MV-4 Data This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Well Completion Report for CAU 443 CNTA December 2009 Doc. No. S05827 Page B-1 Table B-1. MV-4 Chronology Date Time Depth (ft bgs) Activity 04/16/09 through 04/22/09 NA NA Mobilization to CNTA and rig-up to drill 04/22/09 15:45 0 Rig inspection and drill pad walk through inspection, continue with preparations for drilling. 04/22/09 21:50 0 Begin drilling 31-inch diameter conductor casing borehole 04/23/09 10:10 100 Advanced

  4. Hybrid Back Surface Reflector GaInAsSb Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RK Huang; CA Wang; MK Connors; GW Turner; M Dashiell

    2004-05-11

    Back surface reflectors have the potential to improve thermophotovoltaic (TPV) device performance though the recirculation of infrared photons. The ''hybrid'' back-surface reflector (BSR) TPV cell approach allows one to construct BSRs for TPV devices using conventional, high efficiency, GaInAsSb-based TPV material. The design, fabrication, and measurements of hybrid BSR-TPV cells are described. The BSR was shown to provide a 4 mV improvement in open-circuit voltage under a constant shortcircuit current, which is comparable to the 5 mV improvement theoretically predicted. Larger improvements in open-circuit voltage are expected in the future with materials improvements.

  5. Meet the CAMS Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meet the cams staff Meet the CAMS Staff Members of the CAMS staff standing near the 10 MV Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator at CAMS, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Members of the CAMS staff standing near the 10 MV Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator at CAMS, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Name Title E-mail Phone Graham Bench Director bench1@llnl.gov +1-925-423-5155 Thomas A. Brown Scientific Staff tabrown@llnl.gov +1-925-423-8507 Bruce Buchholz Scientific Staff bbuchholz@llnl.gov

  6. Megavoltage imaging with a photoconductor based sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partain, Larry Dean; Zentai, George

    2011-02-08

    A photodetector for detecting megavoltage (MV) radiation comprises a semiconductor conversion layer having a first surface and a second surface disposed opposite the first surface, a first electrode coupled to the first surface, a second electrode coupled to the second surface, and a low density substrate including a detector array coupled to the second electrode opposite the semiconductor conversion layer. The photodetector includes a sufficient thickness of a high density material to create a sufficient number of photoelectrons from incident MV radiation, so that the photoelectrons can be received by the conversion layer and converted to a sufficient of recharge carriers for detection by the detector array.

  7. SU-E-T-583: Optimizing the MLC Model Parameters for IMRT in the RayStation Treatment Planning System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S; Yi, B; Xu, H; Yang, X; Prado, K; D'Souza, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To optimize the MLC model parameters for IMRT in the RayStation v.4.0 planning system and for a Varian C-series Linac with a 120-leaf Millennium MLC. Methods: The RayStation treatment planning system models rounded leaf-end MLC with the following parameters: average transmission, leaf-tip width, tongue-and-groove, and position offset. The position offset was provided by Varian. The leaf-tip width was iteratively evaluated by comparing computed and measured transverse dose profiles of MLC-defined fields at dmax in water. The profile comparison was also used to verify the MLC position offset. The transmission factor and leaf tongue width were derived iteratively by optimizing five clinical patient IMRT QA Results: brain, lung, pancreas, head-and-neck (HN), and prostate. The HN and prostate cases involved splitting fields. Verifications were performed with Mapcheck2 measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Finally, the MLC model was validated using five test IMRT cases from the AAPM TG119 report. Absolute gamma analyses (3mm/3% and 2mm/2%) were applied. In addition, computed output factors for MLC-defined small fields (22, 33, 44, 66cm) of both 6MV and 18MV were compared to those measured by the Radiological Physics Center (RPC). Results: Both 6MV and 18MV models were determined to have the same MLC parameters: 2.5% transmission, tongue-and-groove 0.05cm, and leaftip 0.3cm. IMRT QA analysis for five cases in TG119 resulted in a 100% passing rate with 3mm/3% gamma analysis for 6MV, and >97.5% for 18MV. With 2mm/2% gamma analysis, the passing rate was >94.6% for 6MV and >90.9% for 18MV. The difference between computed output factors in RayStation and RPC measurements was less than 2% for all MLCdefined fields, which meets the RPC's acceptance criterion. Conclusion: The rounded leaf-end MLC model in RayStation 4.0 planning system was verified and IMRT commissioning was clinically acceptable. The IMRT commissioning was well validated using guidance from the

  8. Josephson tunnel junctions with chemically vapor deposited polycrystalline germanium barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroger, H.; Jillie, D.W.; Smith, L.N.; Phaneuf, L.E.; Potter, C.N.; Shaw, D.M.; Cukauskas, E.J.; Nisenoff, M.

    1984-03-01

    High quality Josephson tunnel junctions have been fabricated whose tunneling barrier is polycrystalline germanium chemically vapor deposited on a NbN base electrode and covered by a Nb counterelectrode. These junctions have excellent characteristics for device applications: values of V/sub m/ (the product of the critical current and the subgap resistance measured at 2 mV and 4.2 K) ranging between 35--48 mV, ideal threshold curves, a steep current rise at the gap voltage, and Josephson current densities from 100 to 1100 A/cm/sup 2/.

  9. CAMS Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cams capabilities CAMS Capabilities HVEC 10 MV Model FN Tandem Of the three accelerators CAMS utilizes the largest is the HVEC 10 MV Model FN Tandem, which was obtained from the University of Washington and installed at LLNL in the mid-80s. During installation the accelerator's belt charging system was replaced with a NEC Pelletron, new Dowlish spiral-inclined beam tubes were installed, as were the gas-handling systems necessary for use of SF6 as the insulating tank gas. The FN accelerator is

  10. Preliminary PBFA II design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D. L.; VanDevender, J. P.; Martin, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    The upgrade of Sandia National Laboratories particle beam fusion accelerator, PBFA I, to PBFA II presents several interesting and challenging pulsed power design problems. PBFA II requires increasing the PBFA I output parameters from 2 MV, 30 TW, 1 MJ to 4 MV, 100 TW, 3.5 MJ with the constraint of using much of the same PBFA I hardware. The increased PBFA II output will be obtained by doubling the number of modules (from 36 to 72), increasing the primary energy storage (from 4 MJ to 15 MJ), lowering the pulse forming line (PFL) output impedance, and adding a voltage doubling network.

  11. Technetium Sorption by Cementitious Materials Under Reducing Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Estes, Shanna L.; Powell, Brian A.

    2012-09-28

    The objective of this study was to measure technetium ({sup 99}Tc) sorption to cementitious materials under reducing conditions to simulate Saltstone Disposal Facility conditions. {sup 99}Tc(VII) batch sorption experiments were conducted for 319 days in an inert glovebag with a variety of cementitious materials (aged cement, Vault 2, TR545, and TR547) containing varying amounts of blast furnace slag. Between 154 and 319 days, the {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations tended to remain constant and samples amended with different initial {sup 99}Tc concentrations, tended to merge at about 10{sup -9} M for Vault 2 (17% slag) and TR545 (90% slag) and 10{sup -8} M for TR547 (45% slag). This data provided strong evidence that solubility, and not adsorption (K{sub d} values), was controlling aqueous {sup 99}Tc concentrations. Laboratory data superimposed over thermodynamic speciation diagrams further supported the conclusion that solubility, and not adsorption controlled {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations. The oxidation state of the aqueous {sup 99}Tc at the end of the sorption experiment was determined by solvent extraction to be almost entirely {sup 99}Tc(VII). The pH of the present system was ~11.8. Previously proposed solubility controlling phases including Tc-sulfides may be present, but do not appear to control solubility. After the 319 day sorption period, the suspensions were removed from the glovebag and a desorption step under oxic conditions was conducted for 20 days by adding oxic, pH-buffered solutions to the suspensions. {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations increased by more than an order of magnitude and Eh increased by several hundred millivolts within 24 hours after the introduction of the oxic solutions. These desorption results are consistent with re-oxidation and dissolution/desorption of {sup 99}Tc(IV) phases possibly present in the cementitious materials after the anoxic sorption step of the experiment. Aqueous {sup 99}Tc concentrations continued to increase

  12. Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neilson, J.; Tantawi, S.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2012-05-25

    We are investigating a standing wave accelerator structure that uses a rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.

  13. Road Map for Studies to Produce Consistent and High Performance SRF Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapati Rao Myneni; John F. OHanlon

    2007-06-20

    Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator structures made from high purity niobium are becoming the technological choice for a large number of future accelerators and energy recovery LINACs (ERL). Most of the presently planned accelerators and ERL requirements will be met with some effort by the current SRF technology where accelerating gradients of about 20 MV/m can be produced on a routine basis with an acceptable yield. However, the XFEL at DESY and the planned ILC require acceleration gradients more than 28 MV/m and 35 MV/m respectively. At the recent ILC meeting at Snowmass (2005) concern was expressed regarding the wide spread in the achieved accelerator gradients and the relatively low yields. For obtaining accelerating gradients of 35 MV/m in SRF accelerator structures consistently, a deeper understanding of the causes for the spread has to be gained and advances have to be made in many scientific and high technology fields, including materials, surface and vacuum sciences, application of reliable processes and procedures, which provide contamination free surfaces and avoid recontamination and cryogenics related technologies. In this contribution a road map for studies needed to produce consistent and high performance SRF accelerator structures from the needed materials development to clean and non-recontaminating processes and procedures will be presented.

  14. Advanced Distributor Products: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0304)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Advanced Distributor Products finding that basic model N2H348A(G)KB* + H,GE50560 + *8MPV125 and basic model N2H360A(G)KB* + H,GE50560 + MV16J22**B* do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  15. Q0 Improvement of Large-Grain Multi-Cell Cavities by Using JLab's Standard ILC EP Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, R. L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Eremeev, G. V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Kneisel, P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Liu, K. X. [IHIP, Peking University, Beijing (China); Lu, X. Y. [IHIP, Peking University, Beijing (China); Zhao, K. [IHIP, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2011-07-01

    As reported previously at the Berlin workshop, applying the JLab standard ILC electropolishing (EP) recipe on previously buffered chemical polishing (BCP) etched fine-grain multi-cell cavities results in improvement both in gradient and Q{sub 0}. We recently had the opportunity to experiment with two 1300 MHz 9-cell large-gain niobium cavities manufactured by JLab and Peking University. Both cavities were initially BCP etched and further processed by using JLab's standard ILC EP recipe. Due to fabrication defects, these two cavities only reached a gradient in the range of 20-30 MV/m. Interestingly both cavities demonstrated significant Q{sub 0} improvement in the gradient range of 15-20 MV/m. At 2K, a Q{sub 0} value of 2E10 is achieved at 20 MV/m. At a reduced temperature of 1.8K, a Q{sub 0} value of 3E10 is achieved at 20 MV/m. These results suggest that a possible path for obtaining higher Q{sub 0} in the medium gradient range is to use the large-grain material for cavity fabrication and EP and low temperature bake for cavity processing.

  16. Multipacting-free quarter-wavelength choke joint design for BNL SRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, W.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Liaw, C. J.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, E.; Weiss, D.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-05-03

    The BNL SRF gun cavity operated well in CW mode up to 2 MV. However, its performance suffered due to multipacting in the quarter-wavelength choke joint. A new multipacting-free cathode stalk was designed and conditioned. This paper describes RF and thermal design of the new cathode stalk and its conditioning results.

  17. Novel, electrolyte solutions comprising fully inorganic salts with high anodic stability for rechargeable magnesium batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doe, RE; Han, R; Hwang, J; Gmitter, AJ; Shterenberg, I; Yoo, HD; Pour, N; Aurbach, D

    2014-01-01

    Herein the first inorganic magnesium salt solution capable of highly reversible magnesium electrodeposition is presented. Synthesized by acid-base reaction of MgCl2 and Lewis acidic compounds such as AlCl3, this salt class demonstrates upwards of 99% Coulombic efficiency, deposition overpotential of <200 mV, and anodic stability of 3.1 V.

  18. AMO FOA Targets Advanced Components for Next-Generation Electric Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO’s Next Generation Electric Machines (NGEM) program announced up to $20 million is now available to develop a new generation of energy efficient, high power density, high speed integrated medium voltage (MV) drive systems for a wide variety of critical energy applications.

  19. Performance of a CEBAF production cavity after high-temperature heat treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneisel, P.; Rao, M.

    1993-06-01

    CEBAF`s production cavities are tested in a vertical configuration after appropriate chemical surface treatment prior to installation into the accelerator. The performance of these cavities is excellent, often exceeding the specifications of E{sub acc}=5 MV/m at 2 K by factors of 2 to 3. In such cases the cavities are often limited by thermal-magnetic breakdown. A cavity that exhibited a limiting gradient of E{sub acc} {le} 16.4 MV/m has been heat-treated at 1400{degrees}C for 6 hours in the presence of titanium as a solid state gettering material to improve the thermal stability of the niobium. After the heat treatment a gradient of E{sub acc}=20.5 MV/m corresponding to a peak surface electric field of E{sub peak}=52 MV/m has been measured. In addition to the cavity results, data on thermal conductivity and tensile properties of samples which have undergone the same treatments as the cavity are reported.

  20. Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neilson, Jeffrey; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery

    2010-11-04

    We are investigating a standing wave structure with an rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.

  1. How do I know if my RTUs are Efficient? When do I Replace or Retrofit them?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Because roof top unit (RTU) air conditioners have such long useful lifetimes, building owners/managers don’t always know the best way to optimize them. The Advanced RTU Campaign offers an Evaluation Methodology that ranges from an initial RTU inventory through analysis, procurement, and M&V.

  2. Y

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  3. Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05&

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Measurements Alkalinity mgL 302 370 291 250 362 276 Conductivity c mhoscm 1894 1947 1670 1605 1752 2295 DO c mgL 4.35 6.01 -- 2.33 -- -- ORP c mV 151 123.5 93 105.2 75 64 ...

  4. Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Alkalinity mgL 302 370 291 250 362 276 337 186 Conductivity c mhoscm 1894 1947 1670 1605 1752 2295 1875 1521 DO c mgL 4.35 6.01 -- 2.33 -- -- -- -- ORP c mV 151 ...

  5. Microsoft Word - S03623_2007AnnRep_091007.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Field Measurements Alkalinity mgL 302 370 Conductivity c mhoscm 1894 1947 DO c mgL 4.35 6.01 ORP c mV 151 123.5 pH c s.u. 6.86 7.06 Temperature c C 14.36 8.90 ...

  6. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Custom Programs: Pre-Approved M&V and Evaluated Custom Program March 2011 Summer Goodwin Lauren Gage B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N 2 Goal of the...

  7. SU-E-T-110: Development of An Independent, Monte Carlo, Dose Calculation, Quality Assurance Tool for Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faught, A; Davidson, S; Kry, S; Ibbott, G; Followill, D; Fontenot, J; Etzel, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive end-to-end test for Varian's TrueBeam linear accelerator for head and neck IMRT using a custom phantom designed to utilize multiple dosimetry devices. Purpose: To commission a multiple-source Monte Carlo model of Elekta linear accelerator beams of nominal energies 6MV and 10MV. Methods: A three source, Monte Carlo model of Elekta 6 and 10MV therapeutic x-ray beams was developed. Energy spectra of two photon sources corresponding to primary photons created in the target and scattered photons originating in the linear accelerator head were determined by an optimization process that fit the relative fluence of 0.25 MeV energy bins to the product of Fatigue-Life and Fermi functions to match calculated percent depth dose (PDD) data with that measured in a water tank for a 10x10cm2 field. Off-axis effects were modeled by a 3rd degree polynomial used to describe the off-axis half-value layer as a function of off-axis angle and fitting the off-axis fluence to a piecewise linear function to match calculated dose profiles with measured dose profiles for a 4040cm2 field. The model was validated by comparing calculated PDDs and dose profiles for field sizes ranging from 33cm2 to 3030cm2 to those obtained from measurements. A benchmarking study compared calculated data to measurements for IMRT plans delivered to anthropomorphic phantoms. Results: Along the central axis of the beam 99.6% and 99.7% of all data passed the 2%/2mm gamma criterion for 6 and 10MV models, respectively. Dose profiles at depths of dmax, through 25cm agreed with measured data for 99.4% and 99.6% of data tested for 6 and 10MV models, respectively. A comparison of calculated dose to film measurement in a head and neck phantom showed an average of 85.3% and 90.5% of pixels passing a 3%/2mm gamma criterion for 6 and 10MV models respectively. Conclusion: A Monte Carlo multiple-source model for Elekta 6 and 10MV therapeutic x-ray beams has been developed as a quality

  8. Optimization of leaf margins for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using a flattening filter-free beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakai, Nobuhide; Sumida, Iori; Otani, Yuki; Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Masatoshi

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The authors sought to determine the optimal collimator leaf margins which minimize normal tissue dose while achieving high conformity and to evaluate differences between the use of a flattening filter-free (FFF) beam and a flattening-filtered (FF) beam. Methods: Sixteen lung cancer patients scheduled for stereotactic body radiotherapy underwent treatment planning for a 7 MV FFF and a 6 MV FF beams to the planning target volume (PTV) with a range of leaf margins (?3 to 3 mm). Forty grays per four fractions were prescribed as a PTV D95. For PTV, the heterogeneity index (HI), conformity index, modified gradient index (GI), defined as the 50% isodose volume divided by target volume, maximum dose (Dmax), and mean dose (Dmean) were calculated. Mean lung dose (MLD), V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for the lung (defined as the volumes of lung receiving at least 20 and 5 Gy), mean heart dose, and Dmax to the spinal cord were measured as doses to organs at risk (OARs). Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: HI was inversely related to changes in leaf margin. Conformity index and modified GI initially decreased as leaf margin width increased. After reaching a minimum, the two values then increased as leaf margin increased (V shape). The optimal leaf margins for conformity index and modified GI were ?1.1 0.3 mm (mean 1 SD) and ?0.2 0.9 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared to ?1.0 0.4 and ?0.3 0.9 mm, respectively, for 6 MV FF. Dmax and Dmean for 7 MV FFF were higher than those for 6 MV FF by 3.6% and 1.7%, respectively. There was a positive correlation between the ratios of HI, Dmax, and Dmean for 7 MV FFF to those for 6 MV FF and PTV size (R = 0.767, 0.809, and 0.643, respectively). The differences in MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung between FFF and FF beams were negligible. The optimal leaf margins for MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung were ?0.9 0.6, ?1.1 0.8, and ?2.1 1.2 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared to ?0.9 0.6, ?1.1 0

  9. Use of Quantitative Uncertainty Analysis to Support M&VDecisions in ESPCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul A.; Koehling, Erick; Kumar, Satish

    2005-05-11

    Measurement and Verification (M&V) is a critical elementof an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) - without M&V, thereisno way to confirm that the projected savings in an ESPC are in factbeing realized. For any given energy conservation measure in an ESPC,there are usually several M&V choices, which will vary in terms ofmeasurement uncertainty, cost, and technical feasibility. Typically,M&V decisions are made almost solely based on engineering judgmentand experience, with little, if any, quantitative uncertainty analysis(QUA). This paper describes the results of a pilot project initiated bythe Department of Energy s Federal Energy Management Program to explorethe use of Monte-Carlo simulation to assess savings uncertainty andthereby augment the M&V decision-making process in ESPCs. The intentwas to use QUA selectively in combination with heuristic knowledge, inorder to obtain quantitative estimates of the savings uncertainty withoutthe burden of a comprehensive "bottoms-up" QUA. This approach was used toanalyze the savings uncertainty in an ESPC for a large federal agency.The QUA was seamlessly integrated into the ESPC development process andthe incremental effort was relatively small with user-friendly tools thatare commercially available. As the case study illustrates, in some casesthe QUA simply confirms intuitive or qualitative information, while inother cases, it provides insight that suggests revisiting the M&Vplan. The case study also showed that M&V decisions should beinformed by the portfolio risk diversification. By providing quantitativeuncertainty information, QUA can effectively augment the M&Vdecision-making process as well as the overall ESPC financialanalysis.

  10. Comments on shielding for dual energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossi, M. C.; Lincoln, H. M.; Quarin, D. J.; Zwicker, R. D.

    2008-06-15

    Determination of shielding requirements for medical linear accelerators has been greatly facilitated by the publication of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) latest guidelines on this subject in NCRP Report No. 151. In the present report the authors review their own recent experience with patient treatments on conventional dual energy linear accelerators to examine the various input parameters needed to follow the NCRP guidelines. Some discussion is included of workloads, occupancy, use factors, and field size, with the effects of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments included. Studies of collimator settings showed average values of 13.1x16.2 cm{sup 2} for 6 MV and 14.1x16.8 cm{sup 2} for 18 MV conventional ports, and corresponding average unblocked areas of 228 and 254 cm{sup 2}, respectively. With an average of 77% of the field area unblocked, this gives a mean irradiated area of 196 cm{sup 2} for the 18 MV beam, which dominates shielding considerations for most dual energy machines. Assuming conservatively small room dimensions, a gantry bin angle of 18 deg. was found to represent a reasonable unit for tabulation of use factors. For conventional 18 MV treatments it was found that the usual treatment angles of 0, 90, 180, and 270 deg. were still favored, and use factors of 0.25 represent reasonable estimates for these beams. As expected, the IMRT fields (all at 6 MV) showed a high degree of gantry angle randomization, with no bin having a use factor in excess of 0.10. It is concluded that unless a significant number of patients are treated with high energy IMRT, the traditional use factors of 0.25 are appropriate for the dominant high energy beam.

  11. Dosimetric characterization of the iBEAM evo carbon fiber couch for radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, David W.; Christophides, Damianos; Dean, Christopher; Naisbit, Mitchell; Mason, Joshua; Morgan, Andrew

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: This study characterizes the dosimetric properties of the iBEAM evo carbon fiber couch manufactured by Medical Intelligence and examines the accuracy of the CMS XiO and Nucletron Oncentra Masterplan (OMP) treatment planning systems for calculating beam attenuation due to the presence of the couch. Methods: To assess the homogeneity of the couch, it was CT scanned at isocentric height and a number of signal intensity profiles were generated and analyzed. To simplify experimental procedures, surface dose and central axis depth dose measurements were performed in a solid water slab phantom using Gafchromic film for 6 and 10 MV photon beams at gantry angles of 0 deg. (normal incidence), 30 deg., and 60 deg. with an inverted iBEAM couch placed on top of the phantom. Attenuation measurements were performed in a cylindrical solid water phantom with an ionization chamber positioned at the isocenter. Measurements were taken for gantry angles from 0 deg. to 90 deg. in 10 deg. increments for both 6 and 10 MV photon beams. This setup was replicated in the XiO and OMP treatment planning systems. Dose was calculated using the pencil beam, collapsed cone, convolution, and superposition algorithms. Results: The CT scan of the couch showed that it was uniformly constructed. Surface dose increased by (510{+-}30)% for a 6 MV beam and (600{+-}20)% for a 10 MV beam passing through the couch at normal incidence. Obliquely incident beams resulted in a higher surface dose compared to normally incident beams for both open fields and fields with the couch present. Depth dose curves showed that the presence of the couch resulted in an increase in dose in the build up region. For 6 and 10 MV beams incident at 60 deg., nearly all skin sparing was lost. Attenuation measurements derived using the ionization chamber varied from 2.7% (0 deg.) to a maximum of 4.6% (50 deg.) for a 6 MV beam and from 1.9% (0 deg.) to a maximum of 4.0% (50 deg.) for a 10 MV beam. The pencil beam and

  12. Imaging a moving lung tumor with megavoltage cone beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gayou, Olivier Colonias, Athanasios

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Respiratory motion may affect the accuracy of image guidance of radiation treatment of lung cancer. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image spans several breathing cycles, resulting in a blurred object with a theoretical size equal to the sum of tumor size and breathing motion. However, several factors may affect this theoretical relationship. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of tumor motion on megavoltage (MV)-CBCT images, by comparing target sizes on simulation and pretreatment images of a large cohort of lung cancer patients. Methods: Ninety-three MV-CBCT images from 17 patients were analyzed. Internal target volumes were contoured on each MV-CBCT dataset [internal target volume (ITV{sub CB})]. Their extent in each dimension was compared to that of two volumes contoured on simulation 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) images: the combination of the tumor contours of each phase of the 4D-CT (ITV{sub 4D}) and the volume contoured on the average CT calculated from the 4D-CT phases (ITV{sub ave}). Tumor size and breathing amplitude were assessed by contouring the tumor on each CBCT raw projection where it could be unambiguously identified. The effect of breathing amplitude on the quality of the MV-CBCT image reconstruction was analyzed. Results: The mean differences between the sizes of ITV{sub CB} and ITV{sub 4D} were −1.6 ± 3.3 mm (p < 0.001), −2.4 ± 3.1 mm (p < 0.001), and −7.2 ± 5.3 mm (p < 0.001) in the anterior/posterior (AP), left/right (LR), and superior/inferior (SI) directions, respectively, showing that MV-CBCT underestimates the full target size. The corresponding mean differences between ITV{sub CB} and ITV{sub ave} were 0.3 ± 2.6 mm (p = 0.307), 0.0 ± 2.4 mm (p = 0.86), and −4.0 ± 4.3 mm (p < 0.001), indicating that the average CT image is more representative of what is visible on MV-CBCT in the AP and LR directions. In the SI directions, differences between ITV{sub CB} and ITV{sub ave} could be

  13. Improved quality of intrafraction kilovoltage images by triggered readout of unexposed frames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Jonassen, Johnny; Jensen, Carsten; Schmidt, Mai Lykkegaard

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The gantry-mounted kilovoltage (kV) imager of modern linear accelerators can be used for real-time tumor localization during radiation treatment delivery. However, the kV image quality often suffers from cross-scatter from the megavoltage (MV) treatment beam. This study investigates readout of unexposed kV frames as a means to improve the kV image quality in a series of experiments and a theoretical model of the observed image quality improvements. Methods: A series of fluoroscopic images were acquired of a solid water phantom with an embedded gold marker and an air cavity with and without simultaneous radiation of the phantom with a 6 MV beam delivered perpendicular to the kV beam with 300 and 600 monitor units per minute (MU/min). An in-house built device triggered readout of zero, one, or multiple unexposed frames between the kV exposures. The unexposed frames contained part of the MV scatter, consequently reducing the amount of MV scatter accumulated in the exposed frames. The image quality with and without unexposed frame readout was quantified as the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the gold marker and air cavity for a range of imaging frequencies from 1 to 15 Hz. To gain more insight into the observed CNR changes, the image lag of the kV imager was measured and used as input in a simple model that describes the CNR with unexposed frame readout in terms of the contrast, kV noise, and MV noise measured without readout of unexposed frames. Results: Without readout of unexposed kV frames, the quality of intratreatment kV images decreased dramatically with reduced kV frequencies due to MV scatter. The gold marker was only visible for imaging frequencies ≥3 Hz at 300 MU/min and ≥5 Hz for 600 MU/min. Visibility of the air cavity required even higher imaging frequencies. Readout of multiple unexposed frames ensured visibility of both structures at all imaging frequencies and a CNR that was independent of the kV frame rate. The image lag was 12.2%, 2

  14. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, Peter

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double

  15. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, Peter

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with resultsmore » of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have

  16. SU-E-T-625: Use and Choice of Ionization Chambers for the Commissioning of Flattened and Flattening-Filter-Free Photon Beams: Determination of Recombination Correction Factor (ks)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stucchi, C; Mongioj, V; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Bonfantini, F; Bresolin, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the recombination effect for some ionization chambers to be used for linacs commissioning for Flattened Filter (FF) and Flattening Filter Free (FFF) photon beams. Methods: A Varian TrueBeam linac with five photon beams was used: 6, 10 and 15 MV FF and 6 and 10 MV FFF. Measurements were performed in a water tank and in a plastic water phantom with different chambers: a mini-ion chamber (IC CC01, IBA), a plane-parallel ion chamber (IC PPC05, IBA) and two Farmer chambers (NE2581 and FPC05-IBA). Measurement conditions were Source- Surface Distance of 100 cm, two field sizes (10x10 and 40x40 cm2) and five depths (1cm, maximum buildup, 5cm, 10cm and 20cm). The ion recombination factors (kS), obtained from the Jaffe's plots (voltage interval 50-400 V), were evaluated at the recommended operating voltage of +300V. Results: Dose Per Pulse (DPP) at dmax was 0.4 mGy/pulse for FF beams, 1.0 mGy/pulse and 1.9 mGy/pulse for 6MV and 10 MV FFF beams respectively. For all measurement conditions, kS ranged between 0.996 and 0.999 for IC PPC05, 0.997 and 1.008 for IC CC01. For the FPC05 IBA Farmer IC, kS varied from 1.001 to 1.011 for FF beams, from 1.004 to 1.015 for 6 MV FFF and from 1.009 to 1.025 for 10 MV FFF. Whereas, for NE2581 IC the values ranged from 1.002 to 1.009 for all energy beams and measurement conditions. Conclusion: kS depends on the chamber volume and the DPP, which in turn depends on energy beam but is independent of dose rate. Ion chambers with small active volume can be reliably used for dosimetry of FF and FFF beams even without kS correction. On the contrary, for absolute dosimetry of FFF beams by Farmer ICs it is necessary to evaluate and apply the kS correction. Partially supported by Lega Italiana Lotta contro i Tumori (LILT)

  17. Multivariate analysis of remote LIBS spectra using partial least squares, principal component analysis, and related techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, Samuel M; Barefield, James E; Wiens, Roger C; Sklute, Elizabeth; Dyare, Melinda D

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis with LIBS traditionally employs calibration curves that are complicated by the chemical matrix effects. These chemical matrix effects influence the LIBS plasma and the ratio of elemental composition to elemental emission line intensity. Consequently, LIBS calibration typically requires a priori knowledge of the unknown, in order for a series of calibration standards similar to the unknown to be employed. In this paper, three new Multivariate Analysis (MV A) techniques are employed to analyze the LIBS spectra of 18 disparate igneous and highly-metamorphosed rock samples. Partial Least Squares (PLS) analysis is used to generate a calibration model from which unknown samples can be analyzed. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) are employed to generate a model and predict the rock type of the samples. These MV A techniques appear to exploit the matrix effects associated with the chemistries of these 18 samples.

  18. High Efficiency Organic Solar Cells: December 16, 2009 - February 2, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, K.; Joslin, S.

    2011-05-01

    Details on the development of novel organic solar cells incorporating Trimetasphere based acceptors are presented including: baseline performance for Lu-PCBEH acceptor blended with P3HT demonstrated at 4.89% PCE exceeding the 4.5% PCE goal; an increase of over 250mV in Voc was demonstrated for Lu-PCBEH blended with low band gap polymers compared to a comparable C60-PCBM device. The actual Voc was certified at 260mV higher for a low band gap polymer device using the Lu-PCBEH acceptor; and the majority of the effort was focused on development of a device with over 7% PCE. While low current and fill factors suppressed overall device performance for the low band gap polymers tested, significant discoveries were made that point the way for future development of these novel acceptor materials.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: How Does the Z

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Machine Work? How Does the Z Machine Work? z-machine i Marx Bank Generator Marx Bank. Each Marx bank has sixty 2.6 μF capacitors (43 nF per Marx when erected) that are charged in parallel and discharged in series. When charged to 85 kV its output voltage is 5.1 MV, and stored energy is 20 MJ for all 36. (For a 90 kV charge it is 5.4 MV and 23 MJ.) When discharged, the peak current of each Marx is about 150 kA with a 1.5 μs time to peak. i Intermediate-Store Capacitor Intermediate-Store

  20. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION REPORT FOR TANKS 241-AW-103 & 241-AZ-102 & 241-AN-106 & 241-AN-107 & 241-AY-101 & 241-AY-102

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB

    2007-08-22

    Corrosion rates using supernatant samples retrieved from near the top of the liquid layer were determined for the tanks. Corrosion rates using settled solids (saltcake) were determined. The supernatant samples were tested as received without argon sparging. The settled solid sample segments were extruded under anaerobic condition and kept under a sweep of humidified argon gas during 'the electrochemical corrosion testing. The class of steel used to construct the tank in question was used, and test coupons were allowed to equilibrate for a minimum of 18 hours before a Tafel scan was initiated. The coupons were scanned from -250 mV to +250 mV from the rest or open circuit potential. The corrosion rate is reported along with the corrosion current measurement, open circuit potential, and a chi-square statistic generated by the instrument controlling and analysis algorithm.

  1. Recent developments in electropolishing and tumbling R&D at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, C.; Brandt, J.; Cooley, L.; Ge, M.; Harms, E.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ozelis, J.; Boffo, C.; /Babcock Noell, Wuerzburg

    2009-10-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Lab (Fermilab) is continuing to improve its infrastructure for research and development on the processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities. A single cell 3.9 GHz electropolishing tool built at Fermilab and operated at an industrial partner was recently commissioned. The EP tool was used to produce a single cell 3.9 GHz cavity that reached an accelerating gradient of 30 MV/m with a quality factor of 5 x 10{sup 9}. A single cell 1.3 GHz cavity was also electropolished at the same industrial vendor using the vendor's vertical full-immersion technique. On their first and only attempt the vendor produced a single cell 1.3 GHz cavity that reached 30 MV/m with a quality factor of 1 x 10{sup 10}. These results will be detailed along with preliminary tumbling results.

  2. Operational experience with CW high gradient and high QL cryomodules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovater, J. Curt; Allison, Trent L.; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Daly, Edward F.; Drury, Michael A.; Lahti, George E.; Mounts, Clyde I.; Nelson, Richard M.; Plawski, Tomasz E.

    2014-12-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of ten new 100 MV cryomodules (80 cavities). The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at an accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m with a QL of 3×107. The RF system employs single cavity control using new digital LLRF controls and 13 kW klystrons. Recently, all of the new cryomodules and associated RF hardware and software have been commissioned and operated in the CEBAF accelerator. Electrons at linac currents up to 10 ?A have been successfully accelerated and used for nuclear physics experiments. This paper reports on the commissioning and operation of the cryomodules and RF system.

  3. New results of development on high efficiency high gradient superconducting rf cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, Rongli; Li, Z.; Hao, K.; Liu, K.-X.; Zhao, H.-Y.; Adolphsen, C.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the latest results of development on high efficiency high gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Several 1-cell cavities made of large-grain niobium (Nb) were built, processed and tested. Two of these cavities are of the Low Surface Field (LSF) shape. Series of tests were carried out following controlled thermal cycling. Experiments toward zero-field cooling were carried out. The best experimentally achieved results are Eacc = 41 MV/m at Q0 = 6.5×1010 at 1.4 K by a 1-cell 1.3 GHz large-grain Nb TTF shape cavity and Eacc = 49 MV/m at Q0 = 1.5×1010 at 1.8 K by a 1-cell 1.5 GHz large-grain Nb CEBAF upgrade low-loss shape cavity.

  4. Half-Wave, beta=0.43 Cavity Prototyping for a Heavy Ion Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popielarski, John; Compton, Chris C.; Hartung, Walter; Johnson, Mat; Oliva, John; York, R. C.; Marti, Felix

    2008-04-01

    A medium velocity half wave resonator has been designed and prototyped at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University (MSU) for use in a heavy ion linac. The cavity is designed to provide 3.7 MV of accelerating voltage at an optimum beta = v/c = 0.53, with peak surface electric and magnetic fields of 32.5 MV/m and 79 mT, respectively. The cavity was designed for stiffness and tunability, as well as straightforward fabrication, assembly and cleaning. Measurements were performed to confirm Finite Element Analysis (FEA) predictions for modal analysis, bath pressure sensitivity, tuner stiffness and tuning range. A copper cavity prototype has been fabricated to confirm tolerances and formability. A tuner prototype has been built. The helium vessel and power coupler have been designed.

  5. The effects of ionophores and metabolic inhibitors on methanogenesis and energy-related properties of Methanobacterium bryantii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarrell, K.F.; Sprott, G.D.

    1983-08-01

    The effects of numerous ionophores and inhibitors were tested on methane synthesis, intracellular ATP and potassium concentrations, and the proton motive force of the methanogenic archaebacterium Methanobacterium bryantii. M. bryantii had an internal pH near 6.8 (and hence little delta pH during growth) with an electrical potential of --127 mV in growth medium and --105 mV in a pH 6.5 buffer. The study has identified agents which, in M. bryantii, can effectively cause a decline of intracellular ATP (gramicidin, acetylene) and potassium concentrations (gramicidin, nigericin), inhibit methane synthesis (acetylene, gramicidin, nigericin, triphenylmethylphosphonium bromide), eliminate the electrical potential (high extracellular potassium ion concentrations), and dissipate artificially imposed, inside alkaline, pH gradients (monensin, nigericin, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone). Carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone was generally ineffective in media or buffers reduced with cysteine-sulfide but could be effective in cysteine-free solutions reduced with hydrogen sulfide.

  6. Emittance Studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 Cell Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, D.T.; Wang, X.J.; Miller, R.H.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Pellegrini, C.; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; Winick, H.; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; /Brookhaven

    2011-09-09

    The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 {mu}s. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub o}, of the copper cathode has been measured.

  7. Two-klystron Binary Pulse Compression at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.

    1993-04-01

    The Binary Pulse Compression system installed at SLAC was tested using two klystrons, one with 10 MW and the other with 34 MW output. By compressing 560 ns klystron pulses into 70 ns, the measured BPC output was 175 MW, limited by the available power from the two klystrons. This output was used to provide 100-MW input to a 30-cell X-band structure in which a 100-MV/m gradient was obtained. This system, using the higher klystron outputs expected in the future has the potential to deliver the 350 MW needed to obtain 100 MV/m gradients in the 1.8-m NLC prototype structure. This note describes the timing, triggering, and phase coding used in the two-klystron experiment, and the expected and measured net-work response to three- or two-stage modulation.

  8. Automatic bench for study and selection of single-electron photomultipliers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venikov, A.A.; Shelevoi, K.D.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes apparatus based on the Elektronika-60 computer that selects single-electron photomultipliers that are most suitable for lidar studies of the atmosphere and, having determined their amplitude distribution, establishes optimum discrimination thresholds for differential and integral amplitudes discriminators. The photmultiplier-supply range is 1.0-3.0 kV and the range of discrimination levels is 0-10 mV. The circuit of the original differential pulse discriminatorcounter used in the bench is given.

  9. SU-E-J-52: Decreasing Frequency of Performing TG-142 Imaging QA – 5 Year Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, T; Ma, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose This study is an update to check if the frequency of imaging QA suggested by AAPM Task Group Report 142 (TG142) is necessary with our 5 year experience. TG142 presents recommendations for QA criteria of IGRT treatment. ACR has adopted it to be the requirements for any radiatiotherapy practices; however, we propose to reduce the frequency on image quality QA according to this 5 year study.Method and Materials: This study uses VarianIX2100 and Siemens Artiste Linacs to perform QAs on KV, MV, CBCT modalities. The QA was designed following under the recommendations of TG142. This study reports the daily imaging positioning/repositioning and imaging and treatment coordinate coincidence. QA results on kV, MV and CBCT from 4/7/2010∼3/11/15 are analyzed. KV, MV, CBCT images are taken with the Varian isocube localized at the isocenter. Digital graticule is used in the software to verify the isocenter position. CBCT images are taken with the cube placed at 1cm superior, lateral and anterior of the isocenter. In-line fusion software is used to verify the contrived shift. Digital ruler provided at the on-board-imaging software or adaptive-targeting software was used to measure the position differences. The position differences were recorded at AP,LR,SI directions. Results 5 year records on kV, MV, CBCT show the shifts in all three directions are within the tolerance of 1mm suggested in TG142 for stereotactic radiation treatment(SRS/SRT). There is no occasion where shifts are outside 1mm tolerance. Conclusions The daily imaging QA suggested in TG142 is useful in ensuring the accuracy needed for SRS/SRT in IGRT. 5 year measurements presented suggest that decreasing the frequency of imaging QA may be acceptable, in particular for institutions reporting no violation of tolerance over periods of few years.

  10. EMGeo IXPUG 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tareq Malas, Thorsten Kurth, Jack Deslippe Optimizing SpMV and IDR Krylov solver in EMGeo for Intel KNL IXPUG 2016 Frankfurt, Germany June 23, 2016 * Geophysical tomography: measure composition of the ground by scattering seismic waves (inverse scattering problem) 2 EMGeo - Introduction Petrov and Newman 2014 * Geophysical tomography: measure composition of the ground by scattering seismic waves (inverse scattering problem) * Finite-Difference approximation of propagation kernel on grid with N=N

  11. Cryogenic test of double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC High luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, B.; Alberty, L.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Cullen, C.; Capatina, O.; Hammons, L.; Li, Z.; Marques, C.; Skaritka, J.; Verdu-Andres, S.; Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109. We report the test results of this design.

  12. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

    1988-10-11

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  13. 2012 Groundwater Monitoring Report Central Nevada Test Area, Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 443

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    The Central Nevada Test Area was the site of a 0.2- to 1-megaton underground nuclear test in 1968. The surface of the site has been closed, but the subsurface is still in the corrective action process. The corrective action alternative selected for the site was monitoring with institutional controls. Annual sampling and hydraulic head monitoring are conducted as part of the subsurface corrective action strategy. The site is currently in the fourth year of the 5-year proof-of-concept period that is intended to validate the compliance boundary. Analytical results from the 2012 monitoring are consistent with those of previous years. Tritium remains at levels below the laboratory minimum detectable concentration in all wells in the monitoring network. Samples collected from reentry well UC-1-P-2SR, which is not in the monitoring network but was sampled as part of supplemental activities conducted during the 2012 monitoring, indicate concentrations of tritium that are consistent with previous sampling results. This well was drilled into the chimney shortly after the detonation, and water levels continue to rise, demonstrating the very low permeability of the volcanic rocks. Water level data from new wells MV-4 and MV-5 and recompleted well HTH-1RC indicate that hydraulic heads are still recovering from installation and testing. Data from wells MV-4 and MV-5 also indicate that head levels have not yet recovered from the 2011 sampling event during which several thousand gallons of water were purged. It has been recommended that a low-flow sampling method be adopted for these wells to allow head levels to recover to steady-state conditions. Despite the lack of steady-state groundwater conditions, hydraulic head data collected from alluvial wells installed in 2009 continue to support the conceptual model that the southeast-bounding graben fault acts as a barrier to groundwater flow at the site.

  14. Real-Time Target Position Estimation Using Stereoscopic Kilovoltage/Megavoltage Imaging and External Respiratory Monitoring for Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Tracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Byungchul; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan; Keall, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a real-time target position estimation method using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV)/megavoltage (MV) imaging and external respiratory monitoring, and to investigate the performance of a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system using this method. Methods and Materials: The real-time three-dimensional internal target position estimation was established by creating a time-varying correlation model that connected the external respiratory signals with the internal target motion measured intermittently using kV/MV imaging. The method was integrated into a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system. Tracking experiments were performed for 10 thoracic/abdominal traces. A three-dimensional motion platform carrying a gold marker and a separate one-dimensional motion platform were used to reproduce the target and external respiratory motion, respectively. The target positions were detected by kV (1 Hz) and MV (5.2 Hz) imaging, and external respiratory motion was captured by an optical system (30 Hz). The beam-target alignment error was quantified as the positional difference between the target and circular beam center on the MV images acquired during tracking. The correlation model error was quantified by comparing a model estimate and measured target positions. Results: The root-mean-square errors in the beam-target alignment that had ranged from 3.1 to 7.6 mm without tracking were reduced to <1.5 mm with tracking, except during the model building period (6 s). The root-mean-square error in the correlation model was submillimeters in all directions. Conclusion: A novel real-time target position estimation method was developed and integrated into a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system and demonstrated an average submillimeter geometric accuracy after initializing the internal/external correlation model. The method used hardware tools available on linear accelerators and therefore shows promise for clinical implementation.

  15. A simple method to quantify the coincidence between portal image graticules and radiation field centers or radiation isocenter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du Weiliang; Yang, James; Luo Dershan; Martel, Mary

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a computerized method to quantify the coincidence between portal image graticules and radiation field centers or radiation isocenter. Three types of graticules were included in this study: Megavoltage (MV) mechanical graticule, MV electronic portal imaging device digital graticule, and kilovoltage (kV) on-board imaging digital graticule. Methods: A metal ball bearing (BB) was imaged with MV and kV x-ray beams in a procedure similar to a Winston-Lutz test. The radiation fields, graticules, and BB were localized in eight portal images using Hough transform-based computer algorithms. The center of the BB served as a static reference point in the 3D space so that the distances between the graticule centers and the radiation field centers were calculated. The radiation isocenter was determined from the radiation field centers at different gantry angles. Results: Misalignments of MV and kV portal imaging graticules varied with the gantry or x-ray source angle as a result of mechanical imperfections of the linear accelerator and its imaging system. While the three graticules in this study were aligned to the radiation field centers and the radiation isocenter within 2.0 mm, misalignments of 1.5-2.0 mm were found at certain gantry angles. These misalignments were highly reproducible with the gantry rotation. Conclusions: A simple method was developed to quantify the alignments of portal image graticules directly against the radiation field centers or the radiation isocenter. The advantage of this method is that it does not require the BB to be placed exactly at the radiation isocenter through a precalibrated surrogating device such as room lasers or light field crosshairs. The present method is useful for radiation therapy modalities that require high-precision portal imaging such as image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy.

  16. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kung, Harold H. (Wilmette, IL); Chaar, Mohamed A. (Homs, SY)

    1988-01-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M.sub.3 (VO.sub.4).sub.2 and MV.sub.2 O.sub.6, M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  17. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficient silicon solar cells with dopant-free asymmetric heterocontacts Light JV characteristic and schematic of the dopant-free asymmetric heterocontact (DASH) silicon solar cell showing a conversion efficiency of 19.4%, with a high Voc above 710 mV, has been achieved at the proof-of-concept stage. TCO refers to a Transparent Conductive Oxide stack. Scientific Achievement Demonstration of efficient crystalline silicon solar cells by Molecular Foundry users and staff without the use of

  18. Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear science nuclear chemistry Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry Nuclear Physics The 10-MV tandem accelerator at CAMS provides a platform for conducting nuclear physics experiment both for basic science and lab mission-related programs. For example, we performed a new cross section measurement of the astrophysically important reaction 40Ca(a,g)44Ti in which high purity CaO targets were irradiated with helium ions at several different discrete energies. The reaction rate was measured on-line

  19. Electromagnetic squeezer for compressing squeezable electron tunneling junctions. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreland, J.; Hansma, P.K.

    1984-01-01

    The resistance of squeezable electron tunnel junctions (SET junctions) can be adjusted with an electromagnetic squeezer. For junctions immersed in liquid helium, the resistance is stable to approximately 0.1%. This stability is sufficient for measurements of superconducting energy gaps and for superconducting phonon spectroscopy out to 50 mV applied bias. Increased stability, especially at higher biases, will be necessary for inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy.

  20. Electromagnetic squeezer for compressing squeezable electron tunnelling junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreland, J.; Hansma, P.K.

    1984-03-01

    The resistance of squeezable electron tunnel junctions (SET junctions) can be adjusted with an electromagnetic squeezer. For junctions immersed in liquid helium, the resistance is stable to approximately 0.1%. This stability is sufficient for measurements of superconducting energy gaps and for superconducting phonon spectroscopy out to 50-mV applied bias. Increased stability, especially at higher biases, will be necessary for inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy.

  1. Section 60

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Extinction of 0.44 to 12 M Radiation by Atmospheric Hazes (Continent, Coastal and Arid Zones) Yu.A. Pkhalagov, M.V. Panchenko, V.N. Uzhegov, and N.N. Shchelkanov Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Tomsk, Russia The atmospheric haze is known to enhance the earth's albedo, characterization of meteorological conditions at the time of and this must be accounted for in radiation calculations. Since measurements being discussed is given in Table 1, listing the the optical properties of

  2. Relativistic klystron research at SLAC and LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Morton, P.L.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Schwarz, H.D.; Takeuchi, Y.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.; Hopkins, D.B.; Sessler, A.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Birx, D.L.; Boyd, J.K.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We are developing relativistic klystrons as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications such as large linear electron-positron colliders and compact accelerators. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here briefly on our experiments so far. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-11-011 Michigan EC.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 SECTION A. Project Title: Acquisition of a 3 MV Tandem Accelerator for Research and Teaching in Nuclear Science and Engineering - University of Michigan SECTION B. Project Description The goal of this project is to provide upgraded, robust and long-term capability to conduct radiation damage studies, ion beam analysis of materials and processing of materials using ion beams, in support of the research and teaching mission in nuclear science and engineering at the University of Michigan. The

  4. Poster Thur Eve 62: A Retrospective Assessment of the Prevalence and Dosimetric Effect of Lateral Electron Disequilibrium in a Population of Lung Cancer Patients Treated by Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Disher, Brandon; Wade, Laura; Hajdok, George; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J.; Palma, David

    2014-08-15

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) is a treatment option for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). SBRT uses tightly conformed megavoltage (MV) x-ray beams to ablate the tumour. However, small MV x-ray fields may produce lateral electron disequilibrium (LED) within lung tissue, which can reduce the dose to tumour. The goal of this work is to estimate the prevalence of LED in NSCLC patients treated with SBRT, and determine dose effects for patients prone or averse to LED. Thirty NSCLC patients were randomly selected for analysis. 4-dimensional CT lung images were segmented into the right and left upper and lower lobes (RUL, RLL, LUL, LLL), and the right middle lobe. Dose calculations were performed using volume-modulated arc therapy in the Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS. Most tumours were located in the upper lobes (RUL 53%, LUL 27%) where density was significantly lower (RUL ?80846 HU vs. RLL ?74371 HU; LUL ?808 56 HU vs. LLL ?74670 HU; p<0.001). In general, the prevalence of LED increased with higher beam energy. Using 6MV photons, patients with a RUL tumour experienced moderate (81 %), and mild (19%) levels of LED. At 18MV, LED became more prominent with severe (50%) and moderate (50%) LED exhibited. Dosimetrically, for patients prone to LED, poorer target coverage (i.e. increased R100 by 20%) and improved lung sparing (i.e. reduced V20 by ?46%) was observed. The common location of lung cancers in the upper lobes, coupled with lower lung density, results in the potential occurrence of LED, which may underdose the tumour.

  5. Large scale two-dimensional arrays of magnesium diboride superconducting quantum interference devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cybart, Shane A. Dynes, R. C.; Wong, T. J.; Cho, E. Y.; Beeman, J. W.; Yung, C. S.; Moeckly, B. H.

    2014-05-05

    Magnetic field sensors based on two-dimensional arrays of superconducting quantum interference devices were constructed from magnesium diboride thin films. Each array contained over 30?000 Josephson junctions fabricated by ion damage of 30?nm weak links through an implant mask defined by nano-lithography. Current-biased devices exhibited very large voltage modulation as a function of magnetic field, with amplitudes as high as 8?mV.

  6. Poster — Thur Eve — 18: Cherenkov Emission By High-Energy Radiation Therapy Beams: A Characterization Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zlateva, Y.; El Naqa, I.; Quitoriano, N.

    2014-08-15

    We investigate Cherenkov emission (CE) by radiotherapy beams via radiation dose-versus-CE correlation analyses, CE detection optimization by means of a spectral shift towards the near-infrared (NIR) window of biological tissue, and comparison of CE to on-board MV imaging. Dose-CE correlation was investigated via simulation and experiment. A Monte Carlo (MC) CE simulator was designed using Geant4. Experimental phantoms include: water; tissue-simulating phantom composed of water, Intralipid®, and beef blood; plastic phantom with solid water insert. The detector system comprises an optical fiber and diffraction-grating spectrometer incorporating a front/back-illuminated CCD. The NIR shift was carried out with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs), emitting at (650±10) nm. CE and MV images were acquired with a CMOS camera and electronic portal imaging device. MC and experimental studies indicate a strong linear dose-CE correlation (Pearson coefficient > 0.99). CE by an 18-MeV beam was effectively NIR-shifted in water and a tissue-simulating phantom, exhibiting a significant increase at 650 nm for QD depths up to 10 mm. CE images exhibited relative contrast superior to MV images by a factor of 30. Our work supports the potential for application of CE in radiotherapy online imaging for patient setup and treatment verification, since CE is intrinsic to the beam and non-ionizing and QDs can be used to improve CE detectability, potentially yielding image quality superior to MV imaging for the case of low-density-variability, low-optical-attenuation materials (ex: breast/oropharynx). Ongoing work involves microenvironment functionalization of QDs and application of multi-channel spectrometry for simultaneous acquisition of dosimetric and tumor oxygenation signals.

  7. High gradient rf gun studies of CsBr photocathodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vecchione, Theodore; Maldonado, Juan R.; Gierman, Stephen; Corbett, Jeff; Hartmann, Nick; Pianetta, Piero A.; Hesselink, Lambertus; Schmerge, John F.

    2015-04-03

    CsBr photocathodes have 10 times higher quantum efficiency with only 3 times larger intrinsic transverse emittance than copper. They are robust and can withstand 80 MV/m fields without breaking down or emitting dark current. They can operate in 2×10⁻⁹ torr vacuum and survive exposure to air. They are well suited for generating high pulse charge in rf guns without a photocathode transfer system.

  8. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relative Content of Black Carbon in Submicron Aerosol as a Sign of the Effect of Forest Fire Smokes V.S. Kozlov, M.V. Panchenko, and E.P. Yausheva Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Biomass burning occurs often in regions containing vast forest tracts and peat-bogs. These processes are accompanied by the emission of aerosol particles and crystal carbon (black carbon [BC], soot). BC is the predominant source of solar absorption in atmospheric aerosol, which impacts

  9. Evaluation of Sulfur Spinel Compounds for Multivalent Battery Cathode

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research August 17, 2016, Research Highlights Evaluation of Sulfur Spinel Compounds for Multivalent Battery Cathode Applications A group of 3d transition-metal sulfur-spinel compounds were systematically assessed for MV cathode applications, based on their electrochemical and thermodynamic properties . Cr2S4, Ti2S4 and Mn2S4 spinel compounds exhibit superior Mg2+ mobility, and hence, emerge as the top three candidates. Scientific Achievement

  10. High gradient rf gun studies of CsBr photocathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vecchione, Theodore; Maldonado, Juan R.; Gierman, Stephen; Corbett, Jeff; Hartmann, Nick; Pianetta, Piero A.; Hesselink, Lambertus; Schmerge, John F.

    2015-04-03

    CsBr photocathodes have 10 times higher quantum efficiency with only 3 times larger intrinsic transverse emittance than copper. They are robust and can withstand 80 MV/m fields without breaking down or emitting dark current. They can operate in 210?? torr vacuum and survive exposure to air. They are well suited for generating high pulse charge in rf guns without a photocathode transfer system.

  11. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at LENA| Reaction Rates| UNC Astrophysics| Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA) The LENA is among only a few accelerator facilities in the world dedicated entirely to nuclear astrophysics experiments. It has two low-energy electrostatic accelerators that are capable of delivering high-current charged-particle beams to a common target. One is an ECR source on a 200-kV platform and the other one is a 1-MV JN Van de Graaff accelerator. Both accelerators are fully

  12. SU-E-T-238: Monte Carlo Estimation of Cerenkov Dose for Photo-Dynamic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chibani, O; Price, R; Ma, C; Eldib, A; Mora, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Estimation of Cerenkov dose from high-energy megavoltage photon and electron beams in tissue and its impact on the radiosensitization using Protoporphyrine IX (PpIX) for tumor targeting enhancement in radiotherapy. Methods: The GEPTS Monte Carlo code is used to generate dose distributions from 18MV Varian photon beam and generic high-energy (45-MV) photon and (45-MeV) electron beams in a voxel-based tissueequivalent phantom. In addition to calculating the ionization dose, the code scores Cerenkov energy released in the wavelength range 375425 nm corresponding to the pick of the PpIX absorption spectrum (Fig. 1) using the Frank-Tamm formula. Results: The simulations shows that the produced Cerenkov dose suitable for activating PpIX is 4000 to 5500 times lower than the overall radiation dose for all considered beams (18MV, 45 MV and 45 MeV). These results were contradictory to the recent experimental studies by Axelsson et al. (Med. Phys. 38 (2011) p 4127), where Cerenkov dose was reported to be only two orders of magnitude lower than the radiation dose. Note that our simulation results can be corroborated by a simple model where the Frank and Tamm formula is applied for electrons with 2 MeV/cm stopping power generating Cerenkov photons in the 375425 nm range and assuming these photons have less than 1mm penetration in tissue. Conclusion: The Cerenkov dose generated by high-energy photon and electron beams may produce minimal clinical effect in comparison with the photon fluence (or dose) commonly used for photo-dynamic therapy. At the present time, it is unclear whether Cerenkov radiation is a significant contributor to the recently observed tumor regression for patients receiving radiotherapy and PpIX versus patients receiving radiotherapy only. The ongoing study will include animal experimentation and investigation of dose rate effects on PpIX response.

  13. Low power zinc-oxide based charge trapping memory with embedded silicon nanoparticles via poole-frenkel hole emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar; Ozcan, Ayse; Alkis, Sabri; Okyay, Ali K.; Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara

    2014-01-06

    A low power zinc-oxide (ZnO) charge trapping memory with embedded silicon (Si) nanoparticles is demonstrated. The charge trapping layer is formed by spin coating 2?nm silicon nanoparticles between Atomic Layer Deposited ZnO steps. The threshold voltage shift (?V{sub t}) vs. programming voltage is studied with and without the silicon nanoparticles. Applying ?1?V for 5?s at the gate of the memory with nanoparticles results in a ?V{sub t} of 3.4?V, and the memory window can be up to 8?V with an excellent retention characteristic (>10 yr). Without nanoparticles, at ?1?V programming voltage, the ?V{sub t} is negligible. In order to get ?V{sub t} of 3.4?V without nanoparticles, programming voltage in excess of 10?V is required. The negative voltage on the gate programs the memory indicating that holes are being trapped in the charge trapping layer. In addition, at 1?V the electric field across the 3.6?nm tunnel oxide is calculated to be 0.36 MV/cm, which is too small for significant tunneling. Moreover, the ?V{sub t} vs. electric field across the tunnel oxide shows square root dependence at low fields (E?MV/cm) and a square dependence at higher fields (E?>?2.7 MV/cm). This indicates that Poole-Frenkel Effect is the main mechanism for holes emission at low fields and Phonon Assisted Tunneling at higher fields.

  14. Coaxial Coupling Scheme for TESLA/ILC-type Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.K. Sekutowicz, P. Kneisel

    2010-05-01

    This paper reports about our efforts to develop a flangeable coaxial coupler for both HOM and fundamental coupling for 9-cell TESLA/ILC-type cavities. The cavities were designed in early 90‘s for pulsed operation with a low duty factor, less than 1 %. The proposed design of the coupler has been done in a way, that the magnetic flux B at the flange connection is minimized and only a field of <5 mT would be present at the accelerating field Eacc of ~ 36 MV/m (B =150 mT in the cavity). Even though we achieved reasonably high Q-values at low field, the cavity/coupler combination was limited in the cw mode to only ~ 7 MV/m, where a thermally initiated degradation occurred. We have improved the cooling conditions by initially drilling radial channels every 30 degrees, then every 15 degrees into the shorting plate. The modified prototype performed well up to 9 MV/m in cw mode. This paper reports about our experiences with the further modified coaxial coupler and about test results in cw and low duty cycle pulsed mode, similar to the TESLA/ILC operation conditions.

  15. March 2011 Groundwater Sampling at the Project Shoal Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Project Shoal Area (Shoal) in March 2011. Wells HC-1, HC-2, HC-4, HC-5, HC-6, HC-7, MV-1, MV-2 and MV-3 were sampled as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Two extra tritium samples were collected from well HC-4, one sample (HC-4-400) was collected at about 1/3 of the purge volume (135 gallons), the second sample (HC-4-400) was collected at 2/3 of purge volume (270 gallons). These additional samples were collected prior to completing the well purging process to evaluate the effects well purging has on the analytical results. Samples were not collected from locations HC-3 and HC-8 at the direction of the S.M. Stoller Corporation site lead.

  16. Fission Spectrum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  17. Low Wind Speed Turbine Project Phase II: The Application of Medium-Voltage Electrical Apparatus to the Class of Variable Speed Multi-Megawatt Low Wind Speed Turbines; 15 June 2004--30 April 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdman, W.; Behnke, M.

    2005-11-01

    Kilowatt ratings of modern wind turbines have progressed rapidly from 50 kW to 1,800 kW over the past 25 years, with 3.0- to 7.5-MW turbines expected in the next 5 years. The premise of this study is simple: The rapid growth of wind turbine power ratings and the corresponding growth in turbine electrical generation systems and associated controls are quickly making low-voltage (LV) electrical design approaches cost-ineffective. This report provides design detail and compares the cost of energy (COE) between commercial LV-class wind power machines and emerging medium-voltage (MV)-class multi-megawatt wind technology. The key finding is that a 2.5% reduction in the COE can be achieved by moving from LV to MV systems. This is a conservative estimate, with a 3% to 3.5% reduction believed to be attainable once purchase orders to support a 250-turbine/year production level are placed. This evaluation considers capital costs as well as installation, maintenance, and training requirements for wind turbine maintenance personnel. Subsystems investigated include the generator, pendant cables, variable-speed converter, and padmount transformer with switchgear. Both current-source and voltage-source converter/inverter MV topologies are compared against their low-voltage, voltage-source counterparts at the 3.0-, 5.0-, and 7.5-MW levels.

  18. Results of two LANL [beta]=0.175, 350-MHZ, 2-GAP spoke cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tajima, T.; Edwards, R. L.; Gentzlinger, R.C.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Ledford, J. E.; Liu, Jianfei; Montoya, D. I.; Roybal, R. J.; Schrage, D. L.; Shapiro, A. H.; Barni, D.; Bosotti, A.; Pagani, C. D.

    2003-01-01

    Two {beta} = 0.175, 350 MHz, 2-gap superconducting (SC) spoke cavities were fabricated in industry under the Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) project for the transmutation of nuclear waste. These cavities are promising candidates for the accelerating structures between a RFQ and the elliptical SC cavities for proton and heavy ion linacs. Since their delivery in July 2002, they have been tested in terms of mechanical properties, low-temperature performance, i.e., Qo-Eaccc urves at 4 K and 2 K, surface resistance dependence on temperature and for multipacting (MP). The two cavities achieved accelerating fields of 13.5 MV/m and 13.0 MV/m as compared to the required field of 7.5 MV/m with enough margin for the quality factor. These cavities seem to need more time to condition away MP than elliptical cavities, but MP does not occur once the cavity is conditioned and kept at 4 K. The length of the 103 mm-diameter nominal coupler port was found to be too short for the penetrating field.

  19. Cobalt-60 tomotherapy: Clinical treatment planning and phantom dose delivery studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhanesar, Sandeep; Darko, Johnson; Joshi, Chandra P.; Kerr, Andrew; John Schreiner, L.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Investigations have shown that a Cobalt-60 (Co-60) radioactive source has the potential to play a role in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In this paper, Co-60 tomotherapy's conformal dose delivery potential is evaluated by delivering conformal dose plans on a cylindrical homogeneous phantom containing clinical structures similar to those found in a typical head and neck (H and N) cancer. Also, the clinical potential of Co-60 tomotherapy is investigated by generating 2D clinical treatment plans for H and N and prostate anatomical regions. These plans are compared with the 6 MV based treatment plans for modalities such as linear accelerator-based tomotherapy and broad beam IMRT, and 15 MV based 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT).Methods: For experimental validation studies, clinical and nonclinical conformal dose patterns were delivered on circular, homogeneous phantoms containing GafChromic film. For clinical planning study, dose calculations were performed with the EGSnrc Monte Carlo program, where a Theratronics 780C Co-60 unit and a 6 MV linear accelerator were modeled with a MIMiC binary multileaf collimator. An inhouse inverse treatment planning system was used to optimize tomotherapy plans using the same optimization parameters for both Co-60 and 6 MV beams. The IMRT and 3DCRT plans for the clinical cases were generated entirely in the Eclipse treatment planning system based on inhouse IMRT and 3DCRT site specific protocols.Results: The doses delivered to the homogeneous phantoms agreed with the calculations, indicating that it is possible to deliver highly conformal doses with the Co-60 unit. The dose distributions for Co-60 tomotherapy clinical plans for both clinical cases were similar to those obtained with 6 MV based tomotherapy and IMRT, and much more conformal compared to 3DCRT plans. The dose area histograms showed that the Co-60 plans achieve the dose objectives for the targets and organs at risk.Conclusions: These results

  20. TU-C-BRE-02: A Novel, Highly Efficient and Automated Quality Assurance Tool for Modern Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddu, S; Sun, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Kamal, G; Mutic, S; Baltes, C; Rose, S; Stinson, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Quality assurance (QA) of complex linear accelerators is critical and highly time consuming. Varians Machine Performance Check (MPC) uses IsoCal phantom to test geometric and dosimetric aspects of the TrueBeam systems in <5min. In this study we independently tested the accuracy and robustness of the MPC tools. Methods: MPC is automated for simultaneous image-acquisition, using kV-and-MV onboard-imagers (EPIDs), while delivering kV-and-MV beams in a set routine of varying gantry, collimator and couch angles. MPC software-tools analyze the images to test: i) beam-output and uniformity, ii) positional accuracy of isocenter, EPIDs, collimating jaws (CJs), MLC leaves and couch and iii) rotational accuracy of gantry, collimator and couch. 6MV-beam dose-output and uniformity were tested using ionization-chamber (IC) and ICarray. Winston-Lutz-Tests (WLT) were performed to measure isocenter-offsets caused by gantry, collimator and couch rotations. Positional accuracy of EPIDs was evaluated using radio-opaque markers of the IsoCal phantom. Furthermore, to test the robustness of the MPC tools we purposefully miscalibrated a non-clinical TrueBeam by introducing errors in beam-output, energy, symmetry, gantry angle, couch translations, CJs and MLC leaves positions. Results: 6MV-output and uniformity were within 0.6% for most measurements with a maximum deviation of 1.0%. Average isocenter-offset caused by gantry and collimator rotations was 0.3160.011mm agreeing with IsoLock (0.274mm) and WLT (0.41mm). Average rotation-induced couch-shift from MPC was 0.3780.032mm agreeing with WLT (0.35mm). MV-and-kV imager-offsets measured by MPC were within 0.15mm. MPC predicted all machine miscalibrations within acceptable clinical tolerance. MPC detected the output miscalibrations within 0.61% while the MLC and couch positions were within 0.06mm and 0.14mm, respectively. Gantry angle miscalibrations were detected within 0.1. Conclusions: MPC is a useful tool for QA of

  1. SU-E-J-205: Monte Carlo Modeling of Ultrasound Probes for Real-Time Ultrasound Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hristov, D; Schlosser, J; Bazalova, M; Chen, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the effect of ultrasound (US) probe beam attenuation for radiation therapy delivered under real-time US image guidance by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: MC models of two Philips US probes, an X6-1 matrix-array transducer and a C5-2 curved-array transducer, were built based on their CT images in the EGSnrc BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes. Due to the metal parts, the probes were scanned in a Tomotherapy machine with a 3.5 MV beam. Mass densities in the probes were assigned based on an electron density calibration phantom consisting of cylinders with mass densities between 0.2–8.0 g/cm{sup 3}. Beam attenuation due to the probes was measured in a solid water phantom for a 6 MV and 15 MV 15x15 cm{sup 2} beam delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator. The dose was measured with the PTW-729 ionization chamber array at two depths and compared to MC simulations. The extreme case beam attenuation expected in robotic US image guided radiotherapy for probes in upright position was quantified by means of MC simulations. Results: The 3.5 MV CT number to mass density calibration curve was found to be linear with R{sup 2} > 0.99. The maximum mass densities were 4.6 and 4.2 g/cm{sup 3} in the C5-2 and X6-1 probe, respectively. Gamma analysis of the simulated and measured doses revealed that over 98% of measurement points passed the 3%/3mm criteria for both probes and measurement depths. The extreme attenuation for probes in upright position was found to be 25% and 31% for the C5-2 and X6-1 probe, respectively, for both 6 and 15 MV beams at 10 cm depth. Conclusion: MC models of two US probes used for real-time image guidance during radiotherapy have been built. As a Result, radiotherapy treatment planning with the imaging probes in place can now be performed. J Schlosser is an employee of SoniTrack Systems, Inc. D Hristov has financial interest in SoniTrack Systems, Inc.

  2. TU-F-BRE-07: In Vivo Neutron Detection in Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Primary Kidney Cancer Using 6Li and 7Li Enriched TLD Pairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lonski, P; Kron, T; Franich, R; Keehan, S; Siva, S; Taylor, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for primary kidney cancer often involves the use of high-energy photons combined with a large number of monitor units. While important for risk assessment, the additional neutron dose to untargeted healthy tissue is not accounted for in treatment planning. This work aims to detect out-of-field neutrons in vivo for patients undergoing SABR with high-energy (>10 MV) photons and provides preliminary estimates of neutron effective dose. Methods: 3 variations of high-sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) material, each with varying {sup 6}Li / {sup 7}Li concentrations, were used in custom-made Perspex holders for in vivo measurements. The variation in cross section for thermal neutrons between Li isotopes was exploited to distinguish neutron from photon signal. Measurements were made out-of-field for 7 patients, each undergoing 3D-conformal SABR treatment for primary kidney cancer on a Varian 21iX linear accelerator. Results: In vivo measurements show increased signal for the {sup 6}Li enriched material for patients treated with 18 MV photons. Measurements on one SABR patient treated using only 6 MV showed no difference between the 3 TLD materials. The out-of-field photon signal decreased exponentially with distance from the treatment field. The neutron signal, taken as the difference between {sup 6}Li enriched and {sup 7}Li enriched TLD response, remains almost constant up to 50 cm from the beam central axis. Estimates of neutron effective dose from preliminary TLD calibration suggest between 10 and 30 mSv per 1000 MU delivered at 18 MV for the 7 patients. Conclusion: TLD was proven to be a useful tool for the purpose of in vivo neutron detection at out-of-field locations. Further work is required to understand the relationship between TL signal and neutron dose. Dose estimates based on preliminary TLD calibration in a neutron beam suggest the additional neutron dose was <30 mSv per 1000 MU at 18 MV.

  3. Beam characteristics of energy-matched flattening filter free beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paynter, D.; Weston, S. J.; Cosgrove, V. P.; Evans, J. A.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerators can increase treatment efficiency and plan quality. There are multiple methods of defining a FFF beam. The Elekta control system supports tuning of the delivered FFF beam energy to enable matching of the percentage depth-dose (PDD) of the flattened beam at 10 cm depth. This is compared to FFF beams where the linac control parameters are identical to those for the flattened beam. All beams were delivered on an Elekta Synergy accelerator with an Agility multi-leaf collimator installed and compared to the standard, flattened beam. The aim of this study is to compare “matched” FFF beams to both “unmatched” FFF beams and flattened beams to determine the benefits of matching beams. Methods: For the three modes of operation 6 MV flattened, 6 MV matched FFF, 6 MV unmatched FFF, 10 MV flattened, 10 MV matched FFF, and 10 MV unmatched FFF beam profiles were obtained using a plotting tank and were measured in steps of 0.1 mm in the penumbral region. Beam penumbra was defined as the distance between the 80% and 20% of the normalized dose when the inflection points of the unflattened and flattened profiles were normalized with the central axis dose of the flattened field set as 100%. PDD data was obtained at field sizes ranging from 3 cm × 3 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. Radiation protection measurements were additionally performed to determine the head leakage and environmental monitoring through the maze and primary barriers. Results: No significant change is made to the beam penumbra for FFF beams with and without PDD matching, the maximum change in penumbra for a 10 cm × 10 cm field was within the experimental error of the study. The changes in the profile shape with increasing field size are most significant for the matched FFF beam, and both FFF beams showed less profile shape variation with increasing depth when compared to flattened beams, due to consistency in beam energy spectra across the radiation field

  4. The RR Lyrae stars: New perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, D. H.; Barnes, J. E-mail: jonathan.barnes@slcc.edu

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate that the Oosterhoff II (Oo II) RR Lyrae ab variables are hotter by ?270 K, at the same period, than Oo I variables. Or, at the same ((B) (V)){sub 0} value the Oo II variables have larger radii than Oo I variables. This accounts for the reason Oo II variables are brighter (0.12-0.20 mag) than Oo I variables. The dependence of the light amplitude of RR Lyrae variables on temperature is independent of Oo type. This makes it possible to derive an accurate set of equations to relate intrinsic (B V){sub 0} color indices to light amplitudes, which in turn can be used to determine the interstellar reddening (E (B V)). With just a few variables (?5), it is possible to determine the E (B V) to an accuracy of <0.01 mag in the absence of systematic photometric errors. We discuss the errors introduced in color excess determinations by including the Blazhko stars in a solution. A comparison of color excess values of 23 globular clusters and two regions of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), determined with the aid of our newly developed equations, are found to compare favorably (?0.01 mag) with color excess values found in the literature. Four new Oo III variables, some found in metal-poor clusters, are discussed. An analysis of the galactic-field variables indicates the majority are Oo I and Oo II variables, but a few short-period (log P < 0.36) metal-strong variables, so far not found in galactic globular clusters are evidently ?0.30 mag fainter than Oo I variables. Oo III variables may also be present in the field. We conclude that the RR Lyrae ab variables are primarily restricted to four sequences or groups. If we assume that the Oo I variables' mean absolute magnitude is Mv = 0.61, the mean absolute magnitudes of the other three sequences are: short-period variables Mv ? 0.89 mag, Oo II Mv ? 0.43 mag, and Oo III Mv ? 0.29 mag. The Oo I fundamental RR Lyrae ab red edge (FRE) and fundamental blue edge (FBE) occur at approximately the following

  5. Influence of compensator thickness, field size, and off-axis distance on the effective attenuation coefficient of a cerrobend compensator for intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haghparast, Abbas; Hashemi, Bijan; Eivazi, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be performed by using compensators. To make a compensator for an IMRT practice, it is required to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient (?{sub eff}) of its material, which is affected by various factors. We studied the effect of the variation of the most important factors on the calculation of the ?{sub eff} of the cerrobend compensator for 6-MV photon beams, including the field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis distance. Experimental measurements were carried out at 100 cm source-to-surface distance and 10 cm depth for the 6-MV photon beams of an Elekta linac using various field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis settings. The field sizes investigated ranged from 4 4 to 25 25 cm{sup 2} and the cerrobend compensator thicknesses from 0.56 cm. For a fixed compensator thickness, variation of the ?{sub eff} with the field size ranged from 3.76.8%, with the highest value attributed to the largest compensator thickness. At the reference field size of 10 10 cm{sup 2}, the ?{sub eff} varied by 16.5% when the compensator thickness was increased from 0.56 cm. However, the variation of the ?{sub eff} with the off-axis distance was only 0.99% at this field size, whereas for the largest field size, it was more significant. Our results indicated that the compensator thickness and field size have the most significant effect on the calculation of the compensator ?{sub eff} for the 6-MV photon beam. Therefore, it is recommended to consider these parameters when calculating the compensator thickness for an IMRT practice designed for these beams. The off-axis distance had a significant effect on the calculation of the ?{sub eff} only for the largest field size. Hence, it is recommended to consider the effect of this parameter only for field sizes larger than 25 25 cm{sup 2}.

  6. Overview of high gradient SRF R&D for ILC cavities at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, Rongli [JLAB

    2009-11-01

    We report the progress on high gradient R&D of ILC cavities at Jefferson Lab (JLab) since the Beijing workshop. Routine 9-cell cavity electropolishing (EP) processing and RF testing has been enhanced with added surface mapping and T-mapping instrumentations. 12 new 9-cell cavities (10 of them are baseline fine-grain TESLA-shape cavities: 5 built by ACCEL/Research Instruments, 4 by AES and 1 by JLab; 2 of them are alternative cavities: 1 fine-grain ICHIRO-shape cavity built by KEK/Japan industry and 1 large-grain TESLA-shape cavity built by JLab) are EP processed and tested. 76 EP cycles are accumulated, corresponding to more than 200 hours of active EP time. Field emission (FE) and quench behaviors of electropolished 9-cell cavities are studied. EP process continues to be optimized, resulting in advanced procedures and hence improved cavity performance. Several 9-cell cavities reached 35 MV/m after the first light EP processing. FE-free performance has been demonstrated in 9-cell cavities in 35-40 MV/m range. 1-cell cavity studies explore new techniques for defect removal as well as advanced integrated cavity processing. Surface studies of niobium samples electropolished together with real cavities provide new insight into the nature of field emitters. Close cooperation with the US cavity fabrication industry has been undertaking with the successful achievement of 41 MV/m for the first time in a 9-cell ILC cavity built by AES. As the size of the data set grows, it is now possible to construct gradient yield curves, from which one can see that significant progress has been made in raising the high gradient yield.

  7. Poster — Thur Eve — 42: Radiochromic film calibration for low-energy seed brachytherapy dose measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, H; Menon, G; Sloboda, R

    2014-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of radiochromic film calibration procedures used in external beam radiotherapy when applied to I-125 brachytherapy sources delivering higher doses, and to determine any necessary modifications to achieve similar accuracy in absolute dose measurements. GafChromic EBT3 film was used to measure radiation doses upwards of 35 Gy from 6 MV, 75 kVp and (∼28 keV) I-125 photon sources. A custom phantom was used for the I-125 irradiations to obtain a larger film area with nearly constant dose to reduce the effects of film heterogeneities on the optical density (OD) measurements. RGB transmission images were obtained with an Epson 10000XL flatbed scanner, and calibration curves relating OD and dose using a rational function were determined for each colour channel and at each energy using a non-linear least square minimization method. Differences found between the 6 MV calibration curve and those for the lower energy sources are large enough that 6 MV beams should not be used to calibrate film for low-energy sources. However, differences between the 75 kVp and I-125 calibration curves were quite small; indicating that 75 kVp is a good choice. Compared with I-125 irradiation, this gives the advantages of lower type B uncertainties and markedly reduced irradiation time. To obtain high accuracy calibration for the dose range up to 35 Gy, two-segment piece-wise fitting was required. This yielded absolute dose measurement accuracy above 1 Gy of ∼2% for 75 kVp and ∼5% for I-125 seed exposures.

  8. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, MM; Hoarfrost, AL; Bose, A; Joye, SB; Girguis, PR

    2013-05-14

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C-2), propane (C-3), and butane (C-4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C-1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C-1-C-4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C-1-C-4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75 degrees C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C-2-C-4 alkanes. Maximum C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55 degrees C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C-3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C-4, C-2, and C-1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C-2-C(4)alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C-1 derived from these hydrothermal systems.

  9. RF Processing Experience with the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmerge, J.F.

    2010-11-24

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. A total of five different metal cathodes (4 Cu and 1 Mg) have been installed on the GTF gun. The rf processing history with the different cathodes will be presented including peak field achieved at the cathode. The LCLS gun is intended to operate at 120 MV/m and fields up to 140 MV/m have been achieved in the GTF gun. After installing a new cathode the number of rf pulses required to reach 120 MV/m is approximately 5-10 million. Total emitted dark current and Fowler Nordheim plots are also shown over the life of the cathode. The GTF photo-injector gun is an S-band standing-wave structure, with two resonant cavities and an intervening thick washer (Figure 1). The flat, back wall of the first cavity is a copper plate that serves as photocathode when illuminated with ultraviolet light from a pulsed, high-power laser. RF power enters the gun through an iris on the outer wall of the second cavity, and is coupled to the first through the axial opening of the washer. The first cavity is often referred to as a half cell, because its full-cell length has been truncated by the cathode plate and the second cavity is called the full cell. The gun is designed to operate in a {pi} mode, with the peak field on axis in each cell approximately equal. The maximum in the half cell occurs at the cathode, and in the full cell near the center of the cavity. The field profile and tuning procedures are discussed in a separate tech note [1].

  10. SU-E-T-570: Management of Radiation Oncology Patients with Cochlear Implant and Other Bionic Devices in the Brain and Head and Neck Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, F.Q; Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the current status of clinical usage of cochlear implant (CI) and other bionic devices (BD) in the brain and head and neck regions (BH and N) and their management in patients during radiotherapy to ensure patient health and safety as well as optimum radiation delivery. Methods: Literature review was performed with both CIs and radiotherapy and their variants as keywords in PubMed, INSPEC and other sources. The focus was on CIs during radiotherapy, but it also included other BDs in BHȦN, such as auditory brainstem implant, bionic retinal implant, and hearing aids, among others. Results: Interactions between CIs and radiation may cause CIs malfunction. The presence of CIs may also cause suboptimum dose distribution if a treatment plan was not well designed. A few studies were performed for the hearing functions of CIs under irradiations of 4 MV and 6 MV x-rays. However, x-rays with higher energies (10 to 18 MV) broadly used in radiotherapy have not been explored. These higher energetic beams are more damaging to electronics due to strong penetrating power and also due to neutrons generated in the treatment process. Modern CIs are designed with more and more complicated integrated circuits, which may be more susceptible to radiation damage and malfunction. Therefore, careful management is important for safety and treatment outcomes. Conclusion: Although AAPM TG-34, TG-63, and TG-203 (update of TG-34, not published yet) reports may be referenced for management of CIs and other BDs in the brain and H and N regions, a site- and device-specified guideline should be developed for CIs and other BDs. Additional evaluation of CI functions under clinically relevant set-ups should also be performed to provide clinicians with better knowledge in clinical decision making.

  11. Quench Studies of Six High Temperature Nitrogen Doped 9 Cell Cavities for Use in the LCLS-II Baseline Prototype Cryomodule at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palczewski, Ari; Geng, Rongli; Eremeev, Grigory; Reece, Charles

    2015-09-01

    Jefferson Lab (JLab) processed six nine-cell cavities as part of a small-scale production for LCLS-II cavity processing development utilizing the promising nitrogen-doping process. [1] Various nitrogen-doping recipes have been scrutinized to optimize process parameters with the aim to guarantee an unloaded quality factor (Q 0) of 2.7·1010 at an accelerating field (Eacc) of 16 MV/m at 2.0 K in the cryomodule. During the R&D phase the characteristic Q0 vs. Eacc performance curve of the cavities has been measured in JLab’s vertical test area at 2 K. The findings showed the characteristic rise of the Q0 with Eacc as expected from nitrogen-doping. Initially, five cavities achieved an average Q0 of 3.3·1010 at the limiting Eacc averaging to 16.8 MV/m, while one cavity experienced an early quench accompanied by an unusual Q 0 vs. Eacc curve. The project accounts for a cavity performance loss from the vertical dewar test (with or without the helium vessel) to the horizontal performance in a cryomodule, such that these results leave no save margin to the cryomodule specification. Consequently, a refinement of the nitrogen-doping has been initiated to guarantee an average quench field above 20 MV/m without impeding the Q 0. This paper covers the refinement work performed for each cavity, which depends on the initial results, as well as a quench analysis carried out before and after the rework during the vertical RF tests as far as applicable.

  12. Remnant PbI{sub 2}, an unforeseen necessity in high-efficiency hybrid perovskite-based solar cells?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Duyen H.; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Malliakas, Christos D.; Katz, Michael J.; Hupp, Joseph T. E-mail: m-kanatzidis@northwestern.edu; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G. E-mail: m-kanatzidis@northwestern.edu; Farha, Omar K.

    2014-09-01

    Perovskite-containing solar cells were fabricated in a two-step procedure in which PbI{sub 2} is deposited via spin-coating and subsequently converted to the CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite by dipping in a solution of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}I. By varying the dipping time from 5 s to 2 h, we observe that the device performance shows an unexpectedly remarkable trend. At dipping times below 15 min the current density and voltage of the device are enhanced from 10.1 mA/cm{sup 2} and 933 mV (5 s) to 15.1 mA/cm{sup 2} and 1036 mV (15 min). However, upon further conversion, the current density decreases to 9.7 mA/cm{sup 2} and 846 mV after 2 h. Based on X-ray diffraction data, we determined that remnant PbI{sub 2} is always present in these devices. Work function and dark current measurements showed that the remnant PbI{sub 2} has a beneficial effect and acts as a blocking layer between the TiO{sub 2} semiconductor and the perovskite itself reducing the probability of back electron transfer (charge recombination). Furthermore, we find that increased dipping time leads to an increase in the size of perovskite crystals at the perovskite-hole-transporting material interface. Overall, approximately 15 min dipping time (?2% unconverted PbI{sub 2}) is necessary for achieving optimal device efficiency.

  13. SciThur AM: YIS - 04: Gold Nanoparticle Enhanced Arc Radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koger, B; Kirkby, C

    2014-08-15

    Introduction: The use of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in radiotherapy has shown promise for therapeutic enhancement. In this study, we explore the feasibility of enhancing radiotherapy with GNPs in an arc-therapy context. We use Monte Carlo simulations to quantify the macroscopic dose-enhancement ratio (DER) and tumour to normal tissue ratio (TNTR) as functions of photon energy over various tumour and body geometries. Methods: GNP-enhanced arc radiotherapy (GEART) was simulated using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code and penEasy main program. We simulated 360 arc-therapy with monoenergetic photon energies 50 1000 keV and several clinical spectra used to treat a spherical tumour containing uniformly distributed GNPs in a cylindrical tissue phantom. Various geometries were used to simulate different tumour sizes and depths. Voxel dose was used to calculate DERs and TNTRs. Inhomogeneity effects were examined through skull dose in brain tumour treatment simulations. Results: Below 100 keV, DERs greater than 2.0 were observed. Compared to 6 MV, tumour dose at low energies was more conformai, with lower normal tissue dose and higher TNTRs. Both the DER and TNTR increased with increasing cylinder radius and decreasing tumour radius. The inclusion of bone showed excellent tumour conformality at low energies, though with an increase in skull dose (40% of tumour dose with 100 keV compared to 25% with 6 MV). Conclusions: Even in the presence of inhomogeneities, our results show promise for the treatment of deep-seated tumours with low-energy GEART, with greater tumour dose conformality and lower normal tissue dose than 6 MV.

  14. SU-E-T-602: Beryllium Seeds Implant for Photo-Neutron Yield Using External Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koren, S; Veltchev, I; Furhang, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the Neutron yield obtained during prostate external beam irradiation. Methods: Neutrons, that are commonly a radiation safety concern for photon beams with energy above 10 MV, are induced inside a PTV from Beryllium implemented seeds. A high megavoltage photon beam delivered to a prostate will yield neutrons via the reaction Be-9(?,n)2?. Beryllium was chosen for its low gamma,n reaction cross-section threshold (1.67 MeV) to be combined with a high feasible 25 MV photon beam. This beam spectra has a most probable photon energy of 2.5 to 3.0 MeV and an average photon energy of about 5.8 MeV. For this feasibility study we simulated a Beryllium-made common seed dimension (0.1 cm diameter and 0.5 cm height) without taking into account encapsulation. We created a 0.5 cm grid loading pattern excluding the Urethra, using Variseed (Varian inc.) A total of 156 seeds were exported to a 4cm diameter prostate sphere, created in Fluka, a particle transport Monte Carlo Code. Two opposed 25 MV beams were simulated. The evaluation of the neutron dose was done by adjusting the simulated photon dose to a common prostate delivery (e.g. 7560 cGy in 42 fractions) and finding the corresponding neutron dose yield from the simulation. A variance reduction technique was conducted for the neutrons yield and transported. Results: An effective dose of 3.65 cGy due to neutrons was found in the prostate volume. The dose to central areas of the prostate was found to be about 10 cGy. Conclusion: The neutron dose yielded does not justify a clinical implant of Beryllium seeds. Nevertheless, one should investigate the Neutron dose obtained when a larger Beryllium loading is combined with commercially available 40 MeV Linacs.

  15. Lessons learned in implementing a demand side management contract at the Presidio of San Francisco

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sartor, D.; Munn, M.

    1998-06-01

    The National Park Service (NSP) recently completed the implementation phase of its Power Saving Partners (PSP) Demand Side Management (DSM) contract with the local utility, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E). Through the DSM contract, NPS will receive approximately $4.1 million over eight years in payment for saving 61 kW of electrical demand, 179,000 km of electricity per year, and 1.1 million therms of natural gas per year. These payments are for two projects: the installation of high-efficiency lighting systems at the Thoreau Center for Sustainability and the replacement of an old central boiler plant with new, distributed boilers. Although these savings and payments are substantial, the electrical savings and contract payments fall well short of the projected 1,700 kW of electrical demand, 8 million kwh of annual electricity savings, and $11 million in payments, anticipated at the project's onset. Natural gas savings exceeded the initial forecast of 800,000 therms per year. The DSM contract payments did not meet expectations for a variety of reasons which fall into two broad categories: first, many anticipated projects were not constructed, and second, some of the projects that were constructed were not included in the program because the cost of implementing the DSM program's measurement and verification (M&V) requirements outweighed anticipated payments. This paper discusses the projects implemented, and examines the decisions made to withdraw some of them from the DSM contract. It also presents the savings that were realized and documented through M&V efforts. Finally, it makes suggestions relative to M&V protocols to encourage all efficiency measures, not just those that are easy to measure.

  16. Iron-mediated remediation of RDX-contaminated water and soil under controlled Eh/pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, J.; Comfort, S.D.; Shea, P.J.

    1999-05-01

    Soil and water contaminated with hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a serious environmental problem at several active and abandoned munitions production facilities. Zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) can effectively remediate RDX-contaminated soil and water. The objective of this study was to manipulate Eh and pH for enhanced Fe{sup 0}-mediated destruction of RDX. This was accomplished by monitoring RDX destruction under controlled Eh-pH conditions (Eh: {minus}300 to +150 mV; pH: 2--10). Decreasing Eh and pH increased RDX destruction in aqueous solution. Treating 20 mg of RDX L{sup {minus}1} (90 {micro}M) under a static Eh of {minus}150 mV and pH 7 with 20 g of Fe{sup 0} L{sup {minus}1} removed 95% of the RDX within 4 h; no RDX was detected after 8 h. Treating a soil slurry (20% solids; 510 mg RDX kg{sup {minus}1} soil) with 20 g of Fe{sup 0} L{sup {minus}1} at an Eh of {minus}150 mV and pH 7 increased RDX destruction by 24% over the unbuffered control and resulted in 99% RDX destruction within 24 h. Adding 4.2 mM sodium sulfide (in lieu of a static Eh) under similar conditions resulted in 93% RDX loss within 24 h. Results indicated that lowering Eh and maintaining neutral pH during Fe{sup 0} treatment can increase RDX destruction in contaminated soil and water.

  17. Engineering research and development for the Elise Heavy Ion Induction Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reginato, L.; Peters, C.

    1995-08-01

    The Fusion Energy Research engineering team has been conducting Research and Development Associated with the Construction (RDAC) of the Elise accelerator since the approval of Key Decision one (KD1 is start of construction). The engineering design effort has worked in close cooperation with the physics design staff to achieve all parameters of the Elise accelerator. The design included the 2 MV injector, matching section, combiner, induction cells, electric/magnetic quadrupoles, alignment system and controls. All major designs and some hardware testing will be discussed.

  18. SU-D-207-05: Real-Time Intrafractional Motion Tracking During VMAT Delivery Using a Conventional Elekta CBCT System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Yang-Kyun; Sharp, Gregory C.; Gierga, David P.; Winey, Brian A.; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Real-time kV projection streaming capability has become recently available for Elekta XVI version 5.0. This study aims to investigate the feasibility and accuracy of real-time fiducial marker tracking during CBCT acquisition with or without simultaneous VMAT delivery using a conventional Elekta linear accelerator. Methods: A client computer was connected to an on-board kV imaging system computer, and receives and processes projection images immediately after image acquisition. In-house marker tracking software based on FFT normalized cross-correlation was developed and installed in the client computer. Three gold fiducial markers with 3 mm length were implanted in a pelvis-shaped phantom with 36 cm width. The phantom was placed on a programmable motion platform oscillating in anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions simultaneously. The marker motion was tracked in real-time for (1) a kV-only CBCT scan with treatment beam off and (2) a kV CBCT scan during a 6-MV VMAT delivery. The exposure parameters per projection were 120 kVp and 1.6 mAs. Tracking accuracy was assessed by comparing superior-inferior positions between the programmed and tracked trajectories. Results: The projection images were successfully transferred to the client computer at a frequency of about 5 Hz. In the kV-only scan, highly accurate marker tracking was achieved over the entire range of cone-beam projection angles (detection rate / tracking error were 100.0% / 0.6±0.5 mm). In the kV-VMAT scan, MV-scatter degraded image quality, particularly for lateral projections passing through the thickest part of the phantom (kV source angle ranging 70°-110° and 250°-290°), resulting in a reduced detection rate (90.5%). If the lateral projections are excluded, tracking performance was comparable to the kV-only case (detection rate / tracking error were 100.0% / 0.8±0.5 mm). Conclusion: Our phantom study demonstrated a promising Result for real-time motion tracking using a

  19. Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) ENABLE Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-06-01

    The Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) ENABLE program, a new project funding approach, allows small Federal facilities to realize energy and water savings in six months or less. ESPC ENABLE provides a standardized and streamlined process to install targeted energy conservation measures (ECMs) such as lighting, water, and controls with measurement and verification (M&V) appropriate for the size and scope of the project. This allows Federal facilities smaller than 200,000 square feet to make progress towards important energy efficiency and water conservation requirements.

  20. Temperature dependent photoluminescence and micromapping of multiple stacks InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Ming Jaffré, Alexandre Alvarez, José Kleider, Jean-Paul Boutchich, Mohamed; Jittrong, Apichat; Chokamnuai, Thitipong; Panyakeow, Somsak; Kanjanachuchai, Songphol

    2015-02-27

    We utilized temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) techniques to investigate 1, 3 and 5 stack InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on cross-hatch patterns. PL mapping can well reproduce the QDs distribution as AFM and position dependency of QD growth. It is possible to observe crystallographic dependent PL. The temperature dependent spectra exhibit the QDs energy distribution which reflects the size and shape. The inter-dot carrier coupling effect is observed and translated as a red shift of 120mV on the [1–10] direction peak is observed at 30K on 1 stack with regards to 3 stacks samples, which is assigned to lateral coupling.

  1. Detailed high-accuracy megavoltage transmission measurements: A sensitive experimental benchmark of EGSnrc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: There are three goals for this study: (a) to perform detailed megavoltage transmission measurements in order to identify the factors that affect the measurement accuracy, (b) to use the measured data as a benchmark for the EGSnrc system in order to identify the computational limiting factors, and (c) to provide data for others to benchmark Monte Carlo codes. Methods: Transmission measurements are performed at the National Research Council Canada on a research linac whose incident electron parameters are independently known. Automated transmission measurements are made on-axis, down to a transmission value of {approx}1.7%, for eight beams between 10 MV (the lowest stable MV beam on the linac) and 30 MV, using fully stopping Be, Al, and Pb bremsstrahlung targets and no fattening filters. To diversify energy differentiation, data are acquired for each beam using low-Z and high-Z attenuators (C and Pb) and Farmer chambers with low-Z and high-Z buildup caps. Experimental corrections are applied for beam drifts (2%), polarity (2.5% typical maximum, 6% extreme), ion recombination (0.2%), leakage (0.3%), and room scatter (0.8%)-the values in parentheses are the largest corrections applied. The experimental setup and the detectors are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included (up to a 5.6% effect). A detailed sensitivity analysis is carried out for the measured and calculated transmission data. Results: The developed experimental protocol allows for transmission measurements with 0.4% uncertainty on the smallest signals. Suggestions for accurate transmission measurements are provided. Measurements and EGSnrc calculations agree typically within 0.2% for the sensitivity of the transmission values to the detector details, to the bremsstrahlung target material, and to the incident electron energy. Direct comparison of the measured and calculated transmission data shows agreement better than 2% for C (3.4% for the 10 MV beam) and

  2. Innovative Demonstration Platform: PEC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    JOINT CENTER FOR ARTIFICIAL PHOTOSYNTHESIS SOLAR PEC H 2 DEVICES FRANCES HOULE AWSM workshop April 14-15, 2016 LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY THE STATE OF THE ART Fraunhofer/JCAP JCAP JCAP JCAP JCAP 2016 >15% JCAP Updated with 2015-16 demonstrations DEVICE TYPES FOR DEMONSTRATIONS 10% PLANAR DEVICE: THE LOUVERED DESIGN WITH FULL PRODUCT SEPARATION Potential (mV) Cell parameters: PV width = 1.43 cm Nafion height = 3.10 mm Channel height = 3.25 mm Catalysts: IrO 2 and Pt Solution: 1 M H

  3. Infrared response of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-. delta. films to pulsed, broadband synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, G.L.; Quijada, M.; Tanner, D.B. . Dept. of Physics); Hirschmugl, C.J.; Williams, G.P. ); Etemad, S.; DeRosa, F.; Venkatesan, T. ); Dutta, B.; Hemmick, D.; Xi, X. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    We report studies of a thin high {Tc} film operating as a fast bolometric detector of infrared radiation. The film has a response of infrared radiation. The film has a response of several mV when exposed to a 1 W, 1 ns duration broadband infrared pulse. The decay after the pulse was about 4 ns. The temperature dependence of the response accurately tracked dR/dT. A thermal model, in which the film's temperature varies relative to the substrate, provides a good description of the response. We find no evidence for other (non-bolometric) response mechanisms for temperatures near or well below {Tc}. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  4. HSI Usage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Usage HSI Usage HSI is a flexible and powerful command-line utility to access the NERSC HPSS storage systems. Like FTP, you can use it to store and retrieve files but it has a much larger set of commands for listing your files and directories, creating directories, changing file permissions, etc. The command set has a UNIX look and feel (e.g. mv, mkdir, rm, cp, cd, etc.) so that moving through your HPSS directory tree is almost identical to what you would find on a UNIX file system. HSI can be

  5. Result of MHI 2-Cell Seamless Dumb-Bell Cavity Vertical Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okihira, K.; Hara, H.; Ikeda, N.; Inoue, F.; Sennyu, K.; Geng, Rongli; Rimmer, Robert A.; Kako, E.

    2014-12-01

    MHI have supplied several 9-cell cavities for STF (R&D of ILC project at KEK) and have been considering production method for stable quality and cost reduction, seamless dumb-bell cavity was one of them. We had fabricated a 2 cell seamless dumb-bell cavity for cost reduction and measured RF performance in collaboration with JLab, KEK and MHI. Surface treatment recipe for ILC was applied for MHI 2-cell cavity and vertical test was performed at JLab. The cavity reached Eacc=32.4MV/m after BCP and EP. Details of the result are reported.

  6. EBT GAFCHROMIC{sup TM} film dosimetry in compensator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaezzadeh, Seyedali [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Allahverdi, Mahmoud, E-mail: alahverdi@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of RadiotherapyOncology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nedaie, Hasan A. [Department of RadiotherapyOncology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ay, Mohammadreza [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirazi, Alireza; Yarahmadi, Mehran [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The electron benefit transfer (EBT) GAFCHROMIC films possess a number of features making them appropriate for high-quality dosimetry in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Compensators to deliver IMRT are known to change the beam-energy spectrum as well as to produce scattered photons and to contaminate electrons; therefore, the accuracy and validity of EBT-film dosimetry in compensator-based IMRT should be investigated. Percentage-depth doses and lateral-beam profiles were measured using EBT films in perpendicular orientation with respect to 6 and 18 MV photon beam energies for: (1) different thicknesses of cerrobend slab (open, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 6.0 cm), field sizes (55, 1010, and 2020 cm{sup 2}), and measurement depths (D{sub max}, 5.0 and 10.0 cm); and (2) step-wedged compensator in a solid phantom. To verify results, same measurements were implemented using a 0.125 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber in a water phantom and also in Monte Carlo simulations using the Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code. The mean energy of photons was increased due to beam hardening in comparison with open fields at both 6 and 18 MV energies. For a 2020 cm{sup 2} field size of a 6 MV photon beam and a 6.0 cm thick block, the surface dose decreased by about 12% and percentage-depth doses increased up to 3% at 30.0 cm depth, due to the beam-hardening effect induced by the block. In contrast, at 18 MV, the surface dose increased by about 8% and depth dose reduced by 3% at 30.0 cm depth. The penumbral widths (80% to 20%) increase with block thickness, field size, and beam energy. The EBT film results were in good agreement with the ionization chamber dose profiles and Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code simulation behind the step-wedged compensator. Also, there was a good agreement between the EBT-film and the treatment-planning results on the anthropomorphic phantom. The EBT films can be accurately used as a 2D dosimeter for dose

  7. Effect of RF Gradient upon the Performance of the Wisconsin SRF Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosch, Robert; Legg, Robert A.

    2013-12-01

    The performance of the Wisconsin 200-MHz SRF electron gun is simulated for several values of the RF gradient. Bunches with charge of 200 pC are modeled for the case where emittance compensation is completed during post-acceleration to 85 MeV in a TESLA module. We first perform simulations in which the initial bunch radius is optimal for the design gradient of 41 MV/m. We then optimize the radius as a function of RF gradient to improve the performance for low gradients.

  8. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01

    High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable operating conditions, and

  9. Experimental and simulational result multipactors in 112 MHz QWR injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xin, T.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Brutus, J. C.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.

    2015-05-03

    The first RF commissioning of 112 MHz QWR superconducting electron gun was done in late 2014. The coaxial Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) and Cathode Stalk (stalk) were installed and tested for the first time. During this experiment, we observed several multipacting barriers at different gun voltage levels. The simulation work was done within the same range. The comparison between the experimental observation and the simulation results are presented in this paper. The observations during the test are consisted with the simulation predictions. We were able to overcome most of the multipacting barriers and reach 1.8 MV gun voltage under pulsed mode after several round of conditioning processes.

  10. Continuous On-Line Partial Discharge Monitor for Medium-Voltage Cable Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Fenger

    2005-11-30

    Partial discharge (PD) assessment is one method of detecting cable conditions that predict approaching failure. While not all PDs in cable systems lead to failure, PDs within the cable's insulation can lead to relatively rapid failure. Accordingly, on-line PD assessment may be more useful than periodic PD assessment because the period of partial discharging at the end of a cable's life may be quite short. The research described in this report studied the feasibility of developing an on-line PD monitor for assessing both shielded and unshielded MV cables.