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1

Imaging and sensing based on muon tomography  

SciTech Connect

Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons for imaging applications. Subtraction techniques are described to enhance the processing of the muon tomography data.

Morris, Christopher L; Saunders, Alexander; Sossong, Michael James; Schultz, Larry Joe; Green, J. Andrew; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Hengartner, Nicolas W; Smith, Richard A; Colthart, James M; Klugh, David C; Scoggins, Gary E; Vineyard, David C

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

2

Improving scintillation crystals using muon tomography  

SciTech Connect

The cosmic ray muon scanning array provides information on NaI(T1) crystals using some 65,536 trajectories, each measuring the NaI(T1) response to high energy muons. With this information, it is possible to use established computer-aided-tomography techniques to deconvolute these integrated responses and produce a detailed picture of the detector's interior.

Dowell, D.H.; Fineman, B.J.; Sandorfi, A.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Imaging and sensing based on muon tomography - Energy Innovation ...  

Subtraction techniques are described to enhance the processing of the muon tomography data. Skip to Content. ... Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies ...

4

Discussion - Next Step for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Specification of Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography (FMT): (1) 18-feet (5.5-m) drift tube, 2-inch (5-cm) diameter; (2) 108 tubes per layer; (3) Unit layer = 2 layer (detection efficiency: 0.96 x 0.96 = 92%); (4) 12 or 16 layer per module; (5) 16 layers allows momentum analysis at 30% level; (6) 2 module per super module (5.5 x 11 m{sup 2}); and (7) FMT = 2 super module. By deploying MMT next to a research reactor, we will be able to measure the impact of low level radiation fields on muon tomography and reconstruction processes. Radiation level during reactor operation is {approx}50 {micro}Sv/h which provides similar radiation environment of inside the FMT radiation shield at Fukushima Daiichi. We will implement coincidence algorithm on the FPGA board.

Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

Our Next Two Steps for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography  

SciTech Connect

After the vast disasters caused by the great earthquake and tsunami in eastern Japan, we proposed applying our Muon Tomography (MT) technique to help and improve the emergency situation at Fukushima Daiichi using cosmic-ray muons. A reactor-tomography team was formed at LANL which was supported by the Laboratory as a response to a request by the former Japanese Prime Minister, Naoto Kan. Our goal is to help the Japanese people and support remediation of the reactors. At LANL, we have carried out a proof-of-principle technical demonstration and simulation studies that established the feasibility of MT to image a reactor core. This proposal covers the next two critical steps for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Imaging: (1) undertake case study mock-up experiments of Fukushima Daiichi, and (2) system optimization. We requested funding to the US and Japanese government to assess damage of reactors at Fukushima Daiichi. The two steps will bring our project to the 'ready-to-go' level.

Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

6

Muon Collider Papers and Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of muon collider papers and reports. Muon Collider Feasibilty Study ... Snowmass Book BNL Muon Collider Project Publication Index Fermilab Muon Collider Notes Muon Collider...

7

Fermilab | Muon Collider | Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphics A chain of accelerators and other devices is necessary to produce and accelerate muons before scientists can make muons collide. Click image for larger version A muon...

8

Muon muon collider: Feasibility study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

NONE

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

9

Nuclear Waste Imaging and Spent Fuel Verification by Muon Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the use of cosmic ray muons to image the contents of shielded containers and detect high-Z special nuclear materials inside them. Cosmic ray muons are a naturally occurring form of radiation, are highly penetrating and exhibit large scattering angles on high Z materials. Specifically, we investigated how radiographic and tomographic techniques can be effective for non-invasive nuclear waste characterization and for nuclear material accountancy of spent fuel inside dry storage containers. We show that the tracking of individual muons, as they enter and exit a structure, can potentially improve the accuracy and availability of data on nuclear waste and the contents of Dry Storage Containers (DSC) used for spent fuel storage at CANDU plants. This could be achieved in near real time, with the potential for unattended and remotely monitored operations. We show that the expected sensitivity, in the case of the DSC, exceeds the IAEA detection target for nuclear material accountancy.

Jonkmans, G; Jewett, C; Thompson, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle reactions which are open to a muon collider and the physics of such reactions - what one learns and the necessary luminosity to see interesting events - are described in detail. Most of the physics accesible to an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider could be studied in a muon collider. In addition the production of Higgs bosons in the s-channel will allow the measurement of Higgs masses and total widths to high precision; likewise, t{bar t} and W{sup +}W{sup -} threshold studies would yield m{sub t} and m{sub w} to great accuracy. These reactions are at low center of mass energy (if the MSSM is correct) and the luminosity and {Delta}p/p of the beams required for these measurements is detailed in the Physics Chapter. On the other hand, at 2 + 2 TeV, a luminosity of L {approx} 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is desirable for studies such as, the scattering of longitudinal W bosons or the production of heavy scalar particles. Not explored in this work, but worth noting, are the opportunities for muon-proton and muon-heavy ion collisions as well as the enormous richness of such a facility for fixed target physics provided by the intense beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons and spallation neutrons. To see all the interesting physics described herein requires a careful study of the operation of a detector in the very large background. Three sources of background have been identified. The first is from any halo accompanying the muon beams in the collider ring. Very carefully prepared beams will have to be injected and maintained. The second is due to the fact that on average 35% of the muon energy appears in its decay electron. The energy of the electron subsequently is converted into EM showers either from the synchrotron radiation they emit in the collider magnetic field or from direct collision with the surrounding material. The decays that occur as the beams traverse the low beta insert are of particular concern for detector backgrounds. A third source of background is e{sup +} - e{sup -} pair creation from {mu}{sup +} - {mu}{sup -} interaction. Studies of

Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

11

MUON ACCELERATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major motivations driving recent interest in FFAGs is their use for the cost-effective acceleration of muons. This paper summarizes the progress in this area that was achieved leading up to and at the FFAG workshop at KEK from July 7-12, 2003. Much of the relevant background and references are also given here, to give a context to the progress we have made.

BERG,S.J.

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

12

Detection and Imaging of High-Z Materials with a Muon Tomography Station Using GEM Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Muon tomography based on the measurement of multiple scattering of atmospheric cosmic ray muons is a promising technique for detecting and imaging heavily shielded high-Z nuclear materials such as enriched uranium. This technique could complement standard radiation detection portals currently deployed at international borders and ports, which are not very sensitive to heavily shielded nuclear materials. We image small targets in 3D using $2\\times 2 \\times 2$ mm^3 voxels with a minimal muon tomography station prototype that tracks muons with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors read out in 2D with x-y microstrips of 400 micron pitch. With preliminary electronics, the GEM detectors achieve a spatial resolution of 130 microns in both dimensions. With the next GEM-based prototype station we plan to probe an active volume of ~27 liters. We present first results on reading out all 1536 microstrips of a $30 \\times 30$ cm^2 GEM detector for the next muon tomography prototype with final frontend electronics and DAQ...

Gnanvo, K; Bittner, W; Costa, F; Grasso, L; Hohlmann, M; Locke, J B; Martoiu, S; Muller, H; Staib, M; Tarazona, A; Toledo, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Muon Collider History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colliders: A Brief History Below is a brief potted history of the muon collider concept. Click here for a one transparency summary. The muon collider concept is an idea dating back...

14

Neutrino Physics at a Muon Collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics at a Muon Collider The intense muon beams needed for high luminosity muon colliders produce intense beams of neutrinos. Dedicated muon storage rings with long straight...

15

muon Collider Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Muon Collider Notes Muon Collider Notes MC-001 D. Neuffer, "Colliding Muon Beams at 90 GeV" Fermilab Note FN-319, July 1979. MC-002 D. Neuffer, "Principles and Applications of Muon Cooling" Proc. of the 12th International Conf. on High-Energy Accelerators, p. 481, 1983. MC-003 V.V. Parkhomchuk and A.N. Skrinsky, "Ionization Cooling: Physics and Applications" Proc. of the 12th International Conf. on High-Energy Accelerators, p. 485, 1983. MC-004 E.A. Perevedentsev and A.N. Skrinsky, "On the Proton Klystron" Proc. of the 12th International Conf. on High-Energy Accelerators, p. 508, 1983. MC-005 D. Neuffer, "Principles and Applications of Muon Cooling" Particle Accelerators, Vol. 14, p. 75, 1983. MC-006 D. Neuffer, "Multi-TeV Muon Colliders" Proc. of the Advanced

16

Imaging of high-Z material for nuclear contraband detection with a minimal prototype of a Muon Tomography station based on GEM detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Muon Tomography based on the measurement of multiple scattering of atmospheric cosmic ray muons in matter is a promising technique for detecting heavily shielded high-Z radioactive materials (U, Pu) in cargo or vehicles. The technique uses the deflection of cosmic ray muons in matter to perform tomographic imaging of high-Z material inside a probed volume. A Muon Tomography Station (MTS) requires position-sensitive detectors with high spatial resolution for optimal tracking of incoming and outgoing cosmic ray muons. Micro Pattern Gaseous Detector (MPGD) technologies such as Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors are excellent candidates for this application. We have built and operated a minimal MTS prototype based on 30cm \\times 30cm GEM detectors for probing targets with various Z values inside the MTS volume. We report the first successful detection and imaging of medium-Z and high-Z targets of small volumes (~0.03 liters) using GEM-based Muon Tomography.

Gnanvo, Kondo; Hohlmann, Marcus; Locke, Judson B; Quintero, Amilkar S; Mitra, Debasis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Papers on Muon Colliders  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnets for Muon Collider and Neutrino Storage Ring Magnets for Muon Collider and Neutrino Storage Ring (and Open Midplane Dipole for LARP): R. Gupta, et al., "High Field HTS Solenoid for a Muon Collider – Demonstrations, Challenges and Strategies, MT23, July 2013", presented at MT23, (talk) R. Weggel et al., "Open Midplane Dipoles for Muon Collider", 2011 Particle Accelerator Conference, New York (POSTER).. R. Gupta, M. Anerella, A. Ghosh, H. Kirk, R. Palmer, S. Plate, W. Sampson, Y. Shiroyanagi, P. Wanderer, B. Brandt, D. Cline, A. Garren, J. Kolonko, R. Scanlan, R. Weggel, "High field HTS R&D solenoid for muon collider", 2010 Applied Superconductivity Conference, Washington, DC, August 2010 >> Y. Shiroyanagi, W. Sampson, A. Ghosh, R. Gupta, "The Construction and

18

Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

Zisman, Michael S.

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

19

Performance of a Drift Chamber Candidate for a Cosmic Muon Tomography System  

SciTech Connect

In the last decade, many groups around the world have been exploring different ways to probe transport containers which may contain illicit Special Nuclear Materials such as uranium. The muon tomography technique has been proposed as a cost effective system with an acceptable accuracy. A group of Canadian institutions (see above), funded by Defence Research and Development Canada, is testing different technologies to track the cosmic muons. One candidate is the single wire Drift Chamber. With the capability of a 2D impact position measurement, two detectors will be placed above and two below the object to be probed. In order to achieve a good 3D image quality of the cargo content, a good angular resolution is required. The simulation showed that 1mrad was required implying the spatial resolution of the trackers must be in the range of 1 to 2 mm for 1 m separation. A tracking system using three prototypes has been built and tested. The spatial resolution obtained is 1.7 mm perpendicular to the wire and 3 mm along the wire.

Anghel, V.; Jewett, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Thompson, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Armitage, J.; Botte, J.; Boudjemline, K.; Erlandson, A.; Oakham, G. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Bueno, J.; Bryman, D.; Liu, Z. [Advanced Applied Physics Solutions, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Charles, E.; Gallant, G. [Canada Border Services Agency, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Cousins, T.; Noel, S. [International Safety Research, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Drouin, P.-L.; Waller, D. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Stocki, T. J. [Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

Links to Muon Collider Related Web Pages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Muon Collider related web pages: Muon Collider Feasibility Study ... Fermilab Page MUCOOL Collaboration: Ionization Cooling R&D Snowmass 1996 Feasibility Study Book Brookhaven Muon...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ATLAS Muon Detector Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS muon spectrometer consists of several major components: Monitored Drift Tubes (MDTs) for precision measurements in the bending plane of the muons, supplemented by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) in the high eta region; Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) and Thin Gap Chambers (TGCs) for trigger and second coordinate measurement in the barrel and endcap regions, respectively; an optical alignment system to track the relative positions of all chambers; and, finally, the world's largest air-core magnetic toroid system. We will describe the status and commissioning of the muon system with cosmic rays and plans for commissioning with early beams.

E. Diehl; for the ATLAS muon collaboration

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Fermilab | Muon Collider | How Does a Muon Collider Work?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A muon collider complex would comprise several machines and many different A muon collider complex would comprise several machines and many different components. Scientists across the world are developing and testing them. View full graphic How Does a Muon Collider Work? A muon collider complex would comprise several machines and many different components. Scientists across the world are developing and testing them. Proton accelerator To create lots of muons, scientists use a high-intensity proton accelerator that steers protons into a target. The collisions create short-lived particles called pions. Within 50 meters the pions decay into muons and neutral particles called neutrinos. The muons have an energy of about 200 MeV. Capture cavities Magnets guide the muons into and through a set of radiofrequency cavities. The electric field inside the cavities increases the energy of slow muons

23

The LHCb Muon System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to provide fast muon triggering and efficient offline muon identification is an essential feature of the LHCb experiment. The muon detector is required to have a high efficiency over a large area and an appropriate time resolution to identify the bunch crossing for level–0 triggers. The LHCb muon detector consists of five stations equipped with 1368 Multi Wire Proportional Chambers and 12 Gas Electron Multiplier chambers. The technical design of the chambers is briefly presented and the Quality Control procedures during the various construction steps are described. The method developed for gas gain uniformity measurement is also described together with the results on efficiency of detectors fully equipped with the front–end electronics, obtained from tests with cosmic rays.

Lenzi, Michela

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

GEANT4 Simulation of a Cosmic Ray Muon Tomography System with Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors for the Detection of High-Z Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Muon Tomography (MT) based on the measurement of multiple scattering of atmospheric cosmic ray muons traversing shipping containers is a promising candidate for identifying threatening high-Z materials. Since position-sensitive detectors with high spatial resolution should be particularly suited for tracking muons in an MT application, we propose to use compact micro-pattern gas detectors, such as Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs), for muon tomography. We present a detailed GEANT4 simulation of a GEM-based MT station for various scenarios of threat material detection. Cosmic ray muon tracks crossing the material are reconstructed with a Point-Of-Closest-Approach algorithm to form 3D tomographic images of the target material. We investigate acceptance, Z-discrimination capability, effects of placement of high-Z material and shielding materials inside the cargo, and detector resolution effects for such a MT station.

Hohlmann, Marcus; Gnanvo, Kondo; Helsby, Jennifer; Pena, David; Hoch, Richard; Mitra, Debasis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Muon Astronomy with LVD Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analysed the arrival directions of single muons detected by the first LVD tower from November, 1994 till January, 1998. The moon shadowing effect has been observed. To search for point sources of high energy photons we have analysed muons crossing the rock thickness greater than 3, 5 and 7 km w.e., which corresponds to the mean muon energies 1.6, 3.9 and 8.4 TeV at the surface, respectively. Upper limits on steady muon fluxes for selected astrophysical sources for different muon energies are presented.

LVD Collaboration

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

26

NK Muon Beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NK Muon Beam will be a modified version of the existing NT beam line. The decision to employ a modified version of the NT beam line was made based on considerations of cost and availability of the beam line. Preliminary studies considered use of other beam lines, e.g., the NW beam line, and even of moving the bubble chamber with its superconducting coils but were rejected for reasons such as cost, personnel limitations, and potential conflicts with other users.

Koizumi, G.

1988-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

27

muon_collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

muon_collider muon_collider muon_collider FridayMeetings MCTFmeetings MondayMeetings prstab texput.log #prstab.tex# last.kumac prstab.ps arxiv.tar.gz prstab.tar.gz referee_response_II.pdf prstab.pdf prstab.aux prstab.dvi prstab.end prstab.log prstab.tex prstab.tex~ accel-010307-f03.eps accel-010307-f28.eps old conclusions.tex higgsfact.tex introduction.tex mice.tex neufact.tex physics.tex prstab.tex r_and_d.tex authors_merged.tex buncher.tex temp.prt last.kumacold ringfig.eps MICE-fig.ps chgr_norm.ps chgr_merit.ps temp.csh temp.prt~ xupdn-a-model-view-iron5.eps site1-Layout1.eps rla2.eps phaserot.eps mole-hill.eps intoap.eps emit.eps cavity.eps allcount.eps MICE-88MHz-cooling.eps changes hh_ha_susy_rtsscan.eps letter_plots.eps scott33.eps scott32b.eps scott32a.eps MICE-200MHz-long.eps MICE-resolution.eps dipole_fields.eps

28

Muon Cooling R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International efforts are under way to design and test a muon ionization cooling channel. The present R&D program is described, and future plans outlined.

Steve Geer

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

ATLAS Muon Spectrometer | Brookhaven and the LHC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATLAS Muon Spectrometer small wheels Brookhaven National Laboratory led the development of the 32 muon detectors in the inner ring of the ATLAS detector's "small wheels." (A small...

30

Links to Muon Collider Related Web Pages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

useful nu-factory related web pages: Nu-FactoryMuon Collider Studies at Fermilab Neutrino Factory Design Study MUCOOL Collaboration: Ionization Cooling R&D Brookhaven Muon...

31

Performance Expectations for a Tomography System Using Cosmic Ray Muons and Micro Pattern Gas Detectors for the Detection of Nuclear Contraband  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from a detailed GEANT4 simulation of a proposed Muon Tomography System that employs compact Micro Pattern Gas Detectors with high spatial resolution. A basic Point-Of-Closest-Approach algorithm is applied to reconstructed muon tracks for forming 3D tomographic images of interrogated targets. Criteria for discriminating materials by Z and discrimination power achieved by the technique for simple scenarios are discussed for different integration times. The simulation shows that Muon Tomography can clearly distinguish high-Z material from low-Z and medium-Z material. We have studied various systematic effects that affect the performance of the MT and the discrimination power. The implications of the simulation results for the planned development of a prototype MT station are discussed.

Gnanvo, Kondo; Helsby, Jennifer; Hoch, Richie; Mitra, Debasis; Hohlmann, Marcus

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Research and Development of Future Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect

Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next generation high-energy lepton collider machine. A novel accelerator technology must be developed to overcome several intrinsic issues of muon acceleration. Recent research and development of critical beam elements for a muon accelerator, especially muon beam phase space ionization cooling channel, are reviewed in this paper.

Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Stochastic cooling in muon colliders  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10{sup 30} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to {approximately}10{sup 3} for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW.

Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Design and Construction of a First Prototype Muon Tomography System with GEM Detectors for the Detection of Nuclear Contraband  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current radiation portal monitors at sea ports and international borders that employ standard radiation detection techniques are not very sensitive to nuclear contraband that is well shielded to absorb emanating radiation. Muon Tomography (MT) based on the measurement of multiple scattering of atmospheric cosmic ray muons traversing cargo or vehicles that contain high-Z material is a promising passive interrogation technique for solving this problem. We report on the design and construction of compact Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors for a small prototype MT station. This station will employ 10 tracking stations based on 30cm x 30cm low-mass triple-GEM detectors with 2D readout. Due to the excellent spatial resolution of GEMs it is sufficient to use a gap of only a few cm between tracking stations. Together with the compact size of the GEM detectors this allows the GEM MT station to be an order of magnitude more compact than MT stations using traditional drift tubes. We present details of the production and assemb...

Hohlmann, M; Grasso, L; Locke, J B; Quintero, A; Mitra, D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Muon Collaboration Friday Meetings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaboration Friday Meetings Collaboration Friday Meetings Muon Collaboration Friday Meetings are held at Fermilab, in the Snakepit (WH 2E), at 1:30 pm CDT/CST on most Fridays. An audio bridge is available, details are in the meeting notice. To receive the weekly meeting notice, either join the NuMu-Collaboration-l mailing list or send email to Terry Hart (look me up in the FNAL Phonebook). 13-NOV-2009 Agenda Zisman.pdf 30-OCT-2009 Agenda Bross.ppt Ankenbrandt.ppt 22-OCT-2009 Agenda Fernow_1.pdf Fernow_2.pdf Snopok.pdf Palmer.pdf 16-OCT-2009 Agenda News Alexahin.ppt Alexakhin.pdf 9-OCT-2009 Agenda Yonehara.ppt 8-OCT-2009 Agenda Kirk.pdf 1-OCT-2009 Agenda Lamm.pdf 25-SEP-2009 Agenda Fernow.pdf 24-SEP-2009 Agenda 18-SEP-2009 Derun.pptx 17-SEP-2009 popovic.ppt 10-SEP-2009 Action_items.doc Bross.ppt Agenda 4-SEP-2009 Kaplan.pdf

36

Muon - proton inelastic scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This experiment will examine muon-proton inelastic scattering for virtual-photon energies of 10 to 110 GeV and for |q{sup 2}| values of 0.2 to 20.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The virtual-photon total cross sections {sigma}{sub t} + {epsilon}{sigma}{sub s}, or the equivalent expression in W{sub 1} and W{sub 2}, will be measured over this range of virtual-photon energies and q{sup 2} values. Some separation of {sigma}{sub T} and {sigma}{sub S}, or equivalently W{sub 1} and W{sub 2}, will be made. The multiplicity, momentum spectra and angular spectra of the charged hadrons produced in this reaction will be measured. Some channels such as {mu} + P {yields} {mu} + P + P{sup 0} will be isolated and completely analyzed. The experiment uses a hydrogen target, wire spark chambers and an analyzing magnet of conventional design.

Dieterle, B.; Lakin, W.; Martin, F.; Perl, M.; Petraske, E.; Tenebaum, J.; Toner, W.; Zipf, T.; /SLAC

1970-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Law of Conservation of Muons  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A multiplicative selection rule for mu meson-electron transitions is proposed. A "muon parity" = -1 is considered for the muon and its neutrino, while the "muon parity" for all other particles is +1. The selection rule then states that (-1) exp(no. of initial (-1) parity particles) = (-1) exp(no. of final (-1) parity particles). Several reactions that are forbidden by an additive law but allowed by the multiplicative law are suggested; these reactions include mu{sup +} .> e{sup +} + nu{sub mu} + {ovr nu}{sub e}, e{sup -} + e{sup -} .> mu{sup -} + mu{sup -}, and muonium .> antimuonium (mu{sup +} + e{sup -} .> mu{sup -} + e{sup +}). An intermediate-boson hypothesis is suggested. (T.F.H.)

Feinberg, G.; Weinberg, S.

1961-02-00T23:59:59.000Z

38

Prompt muon contribution to the flux underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present high energy spectra and zenith-angle distributions of the atmospheric muons computed for the depths of the locations of the underwater neutrino telescopes. We compare the calculations with the data obtained in the Baikal and the AMANDA muon experiments. The prompt muon contribution to the muon flux underwater due to recent perturbative QCD-based models of the charm production is expected to be observable at depths of the large underwater neutrino telescopes. This appears to be probable even at rather shallow depths (1-2 km), provided that the energy threshold for muon detection is raised above $\\sim 100$ TeV.

T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky

2000-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

39

NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON-STORAGE-RINGS TO MUON COLLIDERS: PHYSICS AND FACILITIES.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams ({nu} factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both {+-} {mu}. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider.

PARSA,Z.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

40

Muon capture on Chlorine-35  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report measurements of $\\gamma$--ray spectra from muon capture on $^{35}$Cl. For the allowed Gamow--Teller transitions to the $^{35}$S$(2939, 3/2^+)$ state and the $^{35}$S$(3421, 5/2^+)$ state we obtained their capture rates, hyperfine dependences and $\\gamma$--$\

S. Arole; D. S. Armstrong; T. P. Gorringe; M. D. Hasinoff; M. A. Kovash; V. Kuzmin; B. A. Moftah; R. Sedlar; T. J. Stocki; T. Tetereva

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

GEANT4 Simulation of a Scintillating-Fibre Tracker for the Cosmic-ray Muon Tomography of Legacy Nuclear Waste Containers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic-ray muons are highly penetrative charged particles that are observed at sea level with a flux of approximately one per square centimetre per minute. They interact with matter primarily through Coulomb scattering, which is exploited in the field of muon tomography to image shielded objects in a wide range of applications. In this paper, simulation studies are presented that assess the feasibility of a scintillating-fibre tracker system for use in the identification and characterisation of nuclear materials stored within industrial legacy waste containers. A system consisting of a pair of tracking modules above and a pair below the volume to be assayed is simulated within the GEANT4 framework using a range of potential fibre pitches and module separations. Each module comprises two orthogonal planes of fibres that allow the reconstruction of the initial and Coulomb-scattered muon trajectories. A likelihood-based image reconstruction algorithm has been developed that allows the container content to be determined with respect to the atomic number Z of the scattering material. Images reconstructed from this simulation are presented for a range of anticipated scenarios that highlight the expected image resolution and the potential of this system for the identification of high-Z materials within a shielded, concrete-filled container. First results from a constructed prototype system are presented in comparison with those from a detailed simulation. Excellent agreement between experimental data and simulation is observed showing clear discrimination between the different materials assayed throughout.

Anthony Clarkson; David J. Hamilton; Matthias Hoek; David G. Ireland; Russell Johnstone; Ralf Kaiser; Tibor Keri; Scott Lumsden; David F. Mahon; Bryan McKinnon; Morgan Murray; Sian Nutbeam-Tuffs; Craig Shearer; Cassie Staines; Guangliang Yang; Colin Zimmerman

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

42

Muon ID at the ILC  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a new way to reconstruct and identify muons with high efficiency and high pion rejection. Since muons at the ILC are often produced with or in jets, for many of the physics channels of interest [1], an efficient algorithm to deal with the identification and separation of particles within jets is important. The algorithm at the core of the method accounts for the effects of the magnetic field and for the loss of energy by charged particles due to ionization in the detector. We have chosen to develop the analysis within the setup of one of the Linear Collider Concept Detectors adopted by the US. Within b-pair production jets, particles cover a wide range in momenta; however {approx}80% of the particles have a momentum below 30 GeV[2]. Our study, focused on bbar-b jets, is preceded by a careful analysis of single energy particles between 2 and 50 GeV. As medium energy particles are a substantial component of the jets, many of the particles lose part of their energy in the calorimeters and the solenoid coil before reaching the muon detector where they may have energy below 2 GeV. To deal with this problem we have implemented a Runge-Kutta correction of the calculated trajectory to better handle these lower energy particles. The multiple scattering and other stochastic processes, more important at lower energy, is addressed by a Kalman-filter integrated into the reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm provides a unique and powerful separation of muons from pions. The 5 Tesla magnetic field from a solenoid surrounds the hadron calorimeter and allows the reconstruction and precision.

Milstene, C.; Fisk, G.; Para, A.; /Fermilab

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The US Muon Accelerator Program (MAP)  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy Office of High Energy Physics has recently approved a Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). The primary goal of this effort is to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for a Muon Collider after a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a brief physics motivation for, and the description of, a Muon Collider facility and then gives an overview of the program. I will then describe in some detail the primary components of the effort.

Bross, Alan D.; /Fermilab

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Trigger Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of the three-level ATLAS muon trigger as evaluated by using LHC data is presented. Events have been selected by using only the hardware-based Level-1 trigger in order to commission and to subsequently enable the (software-based) selections of the High Level Trigger. Studies aiming at selecting prompt muons from J/{\\psi} and at reducing non prompt muon contamination have been performed. A brief overview on how the muon triggers evolve with increasing luminosity is given.

Musto, Elisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Trigger Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of the three-level ATLAS muon trigger as evaluated by using LHC data is presented. Events have been selected by using only the hardware-based Level-1 trigger in order to commission and to subsequently enable the (software-based) selections of the High Level Trigger. Studies aiming at selecting prompt muons from J/{\\psi} and at reducing non prompt muon contamination have been performed. A brief overview on how the muon triggers evolve with increasing luminosity is given.

Elisa Musto

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Muons in minimum bias events from the first CMS data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Muon signatures are extremely important in the challenging environment of collisions at the LHC. Understanding the observed muon yield from Standard Model processes is the first task for all analyses involving muons. Basic muon kinematical observables are presented for the first CMS data at s ?=?7? TeV and compared with Monte Carlo expectations. The muon sample composition is studied by using the MC truth in terms of muons from heavy flavours

Lucia Barbone; The CMS Collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cold fusion catalyzed by muons and electrons  

SciTech Connect

Two alternative methods have been suggested to produce fusion power at low temperature. The first, muon catalyzed fusion or MCF, uses muons to spontaneously catalyze fusion through the muon mesomolecule formation. Unfortunately, this method fails to generate enough fusion energy to supply the muons, by a factor of about ten. The physics of MCF is discussed, and a possible approach to increasing the number of MCF fusions generated by each muon is mentioned. The second method, which has become known as Cold Fusion,'' involves catalysis by electrons in electrolytic cells. The physics of this process, if it exists, is more mysterious than MCF. However, it now appears to be an artifact, the claims for its reality resting largely on experimental errors occurring in rather delicate experiments. However, a very low level of such fusion claimed by Jones may be real. Experiments in cold fusion will also be discussed.

Kulsrud, R.M.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

E. -I. Esch; T. J. Bowles; A. Hime; A. Pichlmaier; R. Reifarth; H. Wollnik

2004-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to ?vert = (3.10 +0.05 ?0.07) 10?7 s ?1 cm ?2 sr ?1.

E. -i. Esch A; T. J. Bowles A; A. Hime A; A. Pichlmaier A; R. Reifarth A; H. Wollnik B

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

Esch, E I; Hime, A; Pichlmaier, A; Reifarth, R; Wollnik, H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Preparations for Muon Experiments at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

The use of existing Fermilab facilities to provide beams for two muon experiments--the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) and the New g-2 Experiment--is under consideration. Plans are being pursued to perform these experiments following the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration.

Syphers, M.J.; Popovic, M.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Proceedings of the International Workshop on Low Energy Muon Science: LEMS`93  

SciTech Connect

This report contains papers on research with low energy muons. Topics cover fundamental electroweak physics; muonic atoms and molecules, and muon catalyzed fusion; muon spin research; and muon facilities. These papers have been indexed and cataloged separately.

Leon, M. [comp.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress has been made in recent years in R&D towards a neutrino factory and muon collider. The U.S. Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) has been formed recently to expedite the R&D efforts. This paper will review the U.S. MAP R&D programs for a neutrino factory and muon collider. Muon ionization cooling research is the key element of the program. The first muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment, MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment), is under construction now at RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) in the UK. The current status of MICE will be described.

Zisman, Michael S

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

Passive Imaging of Warhead-Like Configurations Using Cosmic-Ray Muons  

SciTech Connect

Cosmic-Muon-Based Interrogation has untapped potential for national security. This presentation describes muons-based passive interrogation techniques.

Schwellenbach, D.

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

55

Muon Acceleration - RLA and FFAG  

SciTech Connect

Various acceleration schemes for muons are presented. The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and 'beam shaping' can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a non-scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. The RLAs offer very efficient usage of high gradient superconducting RF and ability to adjust path-length after each linac pass through individual return arcs with uniformly periodic FODO optics suitable for chromatic compensation of emittance dilution with sextupoles. However, they require spreaders/recombiners switchyards at both linac ends and significant total length of the arcs. The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring combines compactness with very large chromatic acceptance (twice the injection energy) and it allows for large number of passes through the RF (at least eight, possibly as high as 15).

Alex Bogacz

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Muon spin depolarization in nonmagnetic metals doped with paramagnetic impurities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diffusion of muons and their magnetic interactions are treated by describing the physics to be learned from experiments which measure muon depolarization in metallic hosts doped with dilute concentrations of magnetic impurities. (GHT)

Heffner, R.H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Use of dielectric material in muon accelerator RF cavities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The building of a muon collider is motivated by the desire to collide point-like particles while reducing the limitations imposed by synchrotron radiation. The many challenges unique to muon accelerators are derived from ...

French, Katheryn Decker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Progress in Absorber R&D for Muon Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stored-muon-beam neutrino factory may require transverse ionization cooling of the muon beam. We describe recent progress in research and development on energy absorbers for muon-beam cooling carried out by a collaboration of university and laboratory groups.

D. M. Kaplan; E. L. Black; M. Boghosian; K. W. Cassel; R. P. Johnson; S. Geer; C. J. Johnstone; M. Popovic; S. Ishimoto; K. Yoshimura; L. Bandura; M. A. Cummings; A. Dyshkant; D. Hedin; D. Kubik; C. Darve; Y. Kuno; D. Errede; M. Haney; S. Majewski; M. Reep; D. Summers

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

A Moment Equation Approach to a Muon Collider Cooling Lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Muon Collider Cooling Lattice C.M. Celata, A.M. Sessler,a Muon Collider Cooling Lattice C.M. Celata and A.M. SesslerMUON COLLIDER COOLING LATTICE eM. Celata and A. M. Sessler,

Celata, C.M.; Sessler, A.M.; Lee, P.B.; Shadwick, B.A.; Wurtele, S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Higgs boson and Z physics at the first muon collider  

SciTech Connect

The potential for the Higgs boson and Z-pole physics at the first muon collider is summarized, based on the discussions at the ``Workshop on the Physics at the First Muon Collider and at the Front End of a Muon Collider``.

Demarteau, M.; Han, T.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fermilab | Muon Collider | Reports and Papers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports and Papers Reports and Papers Comprehensive Reports J. Gallardo, R. Palmer, A. Tollestrup, A. Sessler, A. Skrinsky et al., "μ+ μ- Collider: A Feasibility Study," DPF/DPB Summer Study on New Directions for High Energy Physics, Snow- mass, Colorado, 25 Jun - 12 Jul 1996, BNL - 52503, Fermilab - Conf - 96 - 092, LBNL - 38946, http://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/pubs/snowmass96.html C. Ankenbrandt et al.,"Status of muon collider research and development and future plans," Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2 (1999) 081001, http://prst-ab.aps.org/abstract/PRSTAB/v2/i8/e081001 M. M. Alsharo'a et al., "Recent progress in neutrino factory and muon collider research within the Muon Collaboration," Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 6 (2003) 081001, http://prst-ab.aps.org/abstract/PRSTAB/v6/i8/e081001

62

Polarized photons in radiative muon capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the measurement of polarized photons arising from radiative muon capture. The spectrum of left circularly polarized photons or equivalently the circular polarization of the photons emitted in radiative muon capture on hydrogen is quite sensitive to the strength of the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant $g_P$. A measurement of either of these quantities, although very difficult, might be sufficient to resolve the present puzzle resulting from the disagreement between the theoretical prediction for $g_P$ and the results of a recent experiment. This sensitivity results from the absence of left-handed radiation from the muon line and from the fact that the leading parts of the radiation from the hadronic lines, as determined from the chiral power counting rules of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory, all contain pion poles.

Shung-ichi Ando; Harold W. Fearing; Dong-Pil Min

2001-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

63

Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

Neuffer, D.V.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Johnson, R.P.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Derbenev, Y.S.; Morozov, V.S.; /Jefferson Lab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

C. Y. Yoshikawa, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov, D.V. Neuffer, K. Yonehara

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Muon interactions at 490 GeV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

E665 is a new, high-energy muon scattering experiment at Fermilab. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on deuterium, hydrogen, and xenon targets during the 1987--88 fixed target run. These data are being analyzed with various physics objectives in mind, and a number of preliminary results have been obtained. This paper presents four of results, specifically the small {chi}{sub Bj} ratio of xenon and deuterium cross sections, inclusive hadron distributions, two jet signals, and exclusive {rho}{sup 0} production.

Schmitt, M. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA) Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Alpha-muon sticking and chaos in muon-catalysed "in flight" d-t fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the alpha-muon sticking coefficient in the muon-catalysed ``in flight" d-t fusion in the framework of the Constrained Molecular Dynamics model. Especially the influence of muonic chaotic dynamics on the sticking coefficient is brought into focus. The chaotic motion of the muon affects not only the fusion cross section but also the $\\mu-\\alpha$ sticking coefficient. Chaotic systems lead to larger enhancements with respect to regular systems because of the reduction of the tunneling region. Moreover they give smaller sticking probabilities than those of regular events. By utilizing a characteristic of the chaotic dynamics one can avoid losing the muon in the $\\mu$CF cycle. We propose the application of the so-called ``microwave ionization of a Rydberg atom" to the present case which could lead to the enhancement of the reactivation process by using X-rays.

Sachie Kimura; Aldo Bonasera

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

67

Multi-muon events at CDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a study of multi-muon events produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider and recorded by the CDF II detector. In a data set acquired with a dedicated dimuon trigger and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2100 pb$^{-1}$, we isolate a significant sample of events in which at least one of the identified muons has large impact parameter and is produced outside the beam pipe of radius 1.5 cm. We are unable to fully account for the number and properties of the events through standard model processes in conjunction with our current understanding of the CDF II detector, trigger and event reconstruction. Several topological and kinematic properties of these events are also presented. In contrast, the production cross section and kinematics of events in which both muon candidates are produced inside the beam pipe are successfully modeled by known QCD processes which include heavy flavor production. The presence of these anomalous multi-muon events offers a plausible resolution to long-standing inconsistencies related to $b\\bar{b}$ production and decay.

F. Ptochos

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Multi-muon events at CDF  

SciTech Connect

We report a study of multi-muon events produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider and recorded by the CDF II detector. In a data set acquired with a dedicated dimuon trigger and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2100 pb{sup -1}, we isolate a significant sample of events in which at least one of the identified muons has large impact parameter and is produced outside the beam pipe of radius 1.5 cm. We are unable to fully account for the number and properties of the events through standard model processes in conjunction with our current understanding of the CDF II detector, trigger and event reconstruction. Several topological and kinematic properties of these events are also presented. In contrast, the production cross section and kinematics of events in which both muon candidates are produced inside the beam pipe are successfully modeled by known QCD processes which include heavy flavor production. The presence of these anomalous multi-muon events offers a plausible resolution to long-standing inconsistencies related to b{bar b} production and decay.

Ptochos, F.; /Cyprus U.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Muon Collider Machine-Detector Interface  

SciTech Connect

In order to realize the high physics potential of a Muon Collider (MC) a high luminosity of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-collisions at the Interaction Point (IP) in the TeV range must be achieved ({approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). To reach this goal, a number of demanding requirements on the collider optics and the IR hardware - arising from the short muon lifetime and from relatively large values of the transverse emittance and momentum spread in muon beams that can realistically be obtained with ionization cooling should be satisfied. These requirements are aggravated by limitations on the quadrupole gradients as well as by the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. The overall detector performance in this domain is strongly dependent on the background particle rates in various sub-detectors. The deleterious effects of the background and radiation environment produced by the beam in the ring are very important issues in the Interaction Region (IR), detector and Machine-Detector Interface (MDI) designs. This report is based on studies presented very recently.

Mokhov, Nikolai V.; /Fermilab

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design  

SciTech Connect

The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

The ATLAS Muon Trigger vertical slice at LHC startup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS trigger system has a three-levels structure, implemented to retain interesting physics events, here described for the muon case ("Muon Vertical Slice"). The first level, implemented in a custom hardware, uses measurements from the trigger chambers of the Muon Spectrometer to select muons with high transverse momentum and defines a Region of Interest (RoI) in the detector. RoIs are then processed by a second trigger level, in which fast algorithms run on an online software architecture. Full granularity information from precision chambers is accessed inside RoIs. A third trigger level (Event Filter), using offline-like algorithms and accessing the full event, provide the best possible muon reconstruction/identification and finally confirm or discard the trigger hypothesis formed at earlier levels. Implementation and performance of the full muon trigger slice, together with first events triggered with LHC beams on, are presented.

Grancagnolo, Sergio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Performance study of the level-1 di-muon trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An event with two muons in the final state is a distinctive signal and can be triggered efficiently with the use of the level-1 di-muon trigger. Nevertheless triggering is still an issue if these muon tracks are fairly soft and fake di-muon triggers originating from muons that traverse more than one region of the trigger chambers increase the trigger rate. It is important to provide an acceptable trigger rate, while keeping high trigger efficiency to study low-pt $B$-physics such as rare $B$ hadron decays or CP violation in the $B$-events, especially in a multi-purpose experiment like ATLAS. In this note, the level-1 di-muon trigger and its expected performance are described.

The ATLAS Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

High field solenoids for muon cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed cooling system for the muon collider will consist of a 200 meter long line of alternating field straight solenoids interspersed with bent solenoids. The muons are cooled in all directions using a 400 mm long section liquid hydrogen at high field. The muons are accelerated in the forward direction by about 900 mm long, 805 MHz RF cavities in a gradient field that goes from 6 T to -6 T in about 300 mm. The high field section in the channel starts out at an induction of about 2 T in the hydrogen. As the muons proceed down the cooling channel, the induction in the liquid hydrogen section increases to inductions as high as 30 T. The diameter of the liquid hydrogen section starts at 750 mm when the induction is 2 T. As the induction in the cooling section goes up, the diameter of the liquid hydrogen section decreases. When the high field induction is 30 T, the diameter of the liquid hydrogen section is about 80 mm. When the high field solenoid induction is below 8.5 T or 9T, niobium titanium coils are proposed for generating .the magnetic field. Above 8.5 T or 9 T to about 20 T, graded niobium tin and niobium titanium coils would be used at temperatures down to 1.8 K. Above 20 T, a graded bybrid magnet system is proposed, where the high field magnet section (above 20 T) is either a conventional water cooled coil section or a water cooled Bitter type coil. Two types of superconducting coils have been studied. They include; epoxy impregnated intrinsically stable coils, and cable in conduit conductor (CICC) coils with helium in the conduit.

Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.; Kenny, S.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.

1999-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

74

Search for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCube neutrino telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the University of California. Search for muon neutrinos fromSearch for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with theWe present the results of searches for high-energy muon

Abbasi, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Muon Application to Advanced Bio- and Nano-Sciences  

SciTech Connect

Among present and future applications of the muon to various fields of sciences, there are several examples where research accomplishments can only be done by using muons. Here we would like to explain the selected two examples representing bio- and nano-sciences, namely, muon spin imaging of human brain for new brain function studies and muonium spin-exchange scattering spectroscopy for the development of spintronics materials.

Nagamine, Kanetada [Muon Science Laboratory, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0081 (Japan); Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA92521 (United States)

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

Jet production in muon scattering at Fermilab E665  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of multi-jet production rates from Muon-Nucleon and Muon-Nuclei scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates are defined by the JADE clustering algorithm. Rates in Muon-Nucleon deep-inelastic scattering are compared to Monte Carlo model predictions. Preliminary results from jet production on heavy targets, in the shadowing region, show a higher suppression of two-forward jets as compared to one-forward jet production.

Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Jack Steinberger and the Muon-Neutrino  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Jack Steinberger and the Muon-Neutrino Resources with Additional Information Jack Steinberger Photograph by Harry Sticker, courtesy AIP Emilio Segre Visual Archives, Physics Today Collection In an interview, Jack Steinberger spoke about his 1988 Nobel Prize winning research. He states "I did an experiment, together with several other people at Brookhaven National Laboratory ... which showed that there is a second kind of neutrino. The neutrino has elementary particles. Elementary particles exist in families of particles ... . At the time, the elementary particles which were involved were the electrons and the neutrino. ... [W]e required the [BNL] accelerator, which was the effort of very many people, ... and this allowed [us] to make a beam of these neutrinos, and we were able to convince ourselves that these neutrinos were not the same kind of neutrinos as those which had been seen before. They were associated with not electrons, but with something called [muons]. So we were able to understand that there is a different neutrino associated with the [muon] than with the electron.

78

Advances in Beam Cooling for Muon Colliders  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas is the basis for the latest plans for muon colliders. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields, where emittance exchange is achieved by using a continuous homogeneous absorber. Momentum-dependent path length differences in the dense hydrogen energy absorber provide the required correlation between momentum and ionization loss to accomplish longitudinal cooling. Recent studies of an 800 MHz RF cavity pressurized with hydrogen, as would be used in this application, show that the maximum gradient is not limited by a large external magnetic field, unlike vacuum cavities. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, will be employed to further reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that is being developed for an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment. The status of the designs, simulations, and tests of the cooling components for a high luminosity, low emittance muon collider will be reviewed.

R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Hydrogen Cryostat for Muon Beam Cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project was to develop cryostat designs that could be used for muon beam cooling channels where hydrogen would circulate through refrigerators and the beam-cooling channel to simultaneously refrigerate 1) high-temperature-superconductor (HTS) magnet coils, 2) cold copper RF cavities, and 3) the hydrogen that is heated by the muon beam. In an application where a large amount of hydrogen is naturally present because it is the optimum ionization cooling material, it was reasonable to explore its use with HTS magnets and cold, but not superconducting, RF cavities. In this project we developed computer programs for simulations and analysis and conducted experimental programs to examine the parameters and technological limitations of the materials and designs of Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) components (magnet conductor, RF cavities, absorber windows, heat transport, energy absorber, and refrigerant).The project showed that although a hydrogen cryostat is not the optimum solution for muon ionization cooling channels, the studies of the cooling channel components that define the cryostat requirements led to fundamental advances. In particular, two new lines of promising development were opened up, regarding very high field HTS magnets and the HS concept, that have led to new proposals and funded projects.

Johnson, Rolland P.

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

Ionization cooling in the muon collider  

SciTech Connect

The muon beams in a high luminosity muon collider are produced with a very large emittance. The process of ionization cooling offers a method for reducing the 6-dimensional normalized emittance of the beam by a factor of {approx} 10{sup 6}. A simple analytic theory has been developed that demonstrates the dependence of the net cooling on various experimental parameters. The simple theory has been checked and realistic arrangements have been examined using Monte Carlo simulations. Transverse cooling of the initial beam can be achieved using passive Li absorbers in a FOFO lattice. The last factor of 10 in transverse cooling probably requires the use of current-carrying Li lenses. Efficient longitudinal cooling requires the use of wedge shaped absorbers in a dispersive section of the beam line. An example, multi-stage cooling scenario has been developed that meets the requirements of the muon collider. Preliminary designs have been made of solenoids for use in the FOFO lattice and of solenoids and dipoles for use in the emittance exchange sections. Detailed simulation work, farther optimization, and preparations for experimental demonstrations of critical components are currently in progress.

Fernow, R.C.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Palmer, R.B. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight new ideas are being developed under SBIR/STTR grants to cool muon beams for colliders, neutrino factories, and muon experiments. Analytical and simulation studies have confirmed that a six-dimensional (6D) cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas can provide effective beam cooling. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, helical quadrupole, and helical sextupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange and achieve 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m segment. Four such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse physical dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost five orders of magnitude. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, then can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that can be used as MANX, an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

Rolland P. Johnson; Mohammad Alsharo'a; Charles Ankenbrandt; Emanuela Barzi; Kevin Beard; S. Alex Bogacz; Yaroslav Derbenev; Licia Del Frate; Ivan Gonin; Pierrick M. Hanlet; Robert Hartline; Daniel M. Kaplan; Moyses Kuchnir; Alfred Moretti; David Neuffer; Kevin Paul; Milorad Popovic; Thomas J. Roberts; Gennady Romanov; Daniele Turrioni; Victor Yarba; and Katsuya Yonehara

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector are described in this paper. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

Bonanos, P.

1990-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

Bonanos, P.

1992-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

RELIABILITY CONSIDERATIONS OF ELECTRONICS COMPONENTS FOR THE DEEP UNDERWATER MUON AND NEUTRINO DETECTION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerations for the Dtep Underwater Muon and NeutrinoPresented at the Deep Underwater Huon and Neutrino DetectionCOMPONENTS FOR THE DEEP UNDERWATER MUON AND NEUTRINO

Leskovar, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The intergration of liquid and solid muon absorbers into afocusing magnet of a muon cooling channel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes how one can integrate the muonabsorber with the focusing coils of a SFOFO muon cooling channel [1]. Theabsorber material must be a low Z material that reduces the muon momentumwith minimum scattering. The best materials to use for muon ionizationcooling absorbers are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium, andberyllium. Hydrogen or helium in an absorber would normally be in theliquid state. Lithium hydride, lithium, and beryllium would normally bein the solid state. This report limits the absorber materials discussedto hydrogen, helium, lithium, and beryllium. In order to achieve the samelevel of ionization cooling with a solid absorber as a liquid hydrogenabsorber, the beta of the muon beam must be reduced more than a factor oftwo. This affects both the designs of the absorber and the magnet aroundit. Reducing the beam beta reduces the momentum acceptance of thechannel. Integration of a liquid hydrogen absorber and solid absorberswith a superconducting focusing solenoid is discussed. The choice ofabsorber material affects the design of the superconducting focusingmagnet and the superconductor that is used to generate the magneticfield.

Green, M.A.; Black, E.L.; Cummings, M.A.; Kaplan, D.M.; Ishimoto,S.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.; Palmer, R.B.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Atmospheric Muon Flux at Sea Level, Underground, and Underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vertical sea-level muon spectrum at energies above 1 GeV and the underground/underwater muon intensities at depths up to 18 km w.e. are calculated. The results are particularly collated with a great body of the ground-level, underground, and underwater muon data. In the hadron-cascade calculations, the growth with energy of inelastic cross sections and pion, kaon, and nucleon generation in pion-nucleus collisions are taken into account. For evaluating the prompt muon contribution to the muon flux, we apply two phenomenological approaches to the charm production problem: the recombination quark-parton model and the quark-gluon string model. To solve the muon transport equation at large depths of homogeneous medium, a semi-analytical method is used. The simple fitting formulas describing our numerical results are given. Our analysis shows that, at depths up to 6-7 km w. e., essentially all underground data on the muon intensity correlate with each other and with predicted depth-intensity relation for conventional muons to within 10%. However, the high-energy sea-level data as well as the data at large depths are contradictory and cannot be quantitatively decribed by a single nuclear-cascade model.

E. V. Bugaev; A. Misaki; V. A. Naumov; T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky; N. Takahashi

1998-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

87

Chromaticity correction for a muon collider optics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Muon Collider (MC) is a promising candidate for the next energy frontier machine. However, in order to obtain peak luminosity in the 10{sup 34} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} range the collider lattice designmust satisfy a number of stringent requirements. In particular the expected large momentum spread of the muon beam and the very small {beta}* call for a careful correction of the chromatic effects. Here we present a particular solution for the interaction region (IR) optics whose distinctive feature is a three-sextupole local chromatic correction scheme. The scheme may be applied to other future machines where chromatic effects are expected to be large. The expected large muon energy spread requires the optics to be stable over a wide range of momenta whereas the required luminosity calls for {beta}* in the mm range. To avoid luminosity degradation due to hour-glass effect, the bunch length must be comparatively small. To keep the needed RF voltage within feasible limits the momentum compaction factor must be small over the wide range of momenta. A low {beta}* means high sensitivity to alignment and field errors of the Interaction Region (IR) quadrupoles and large chromatic effects which limit the momentum range of optics stability and require strong correction sextupoles, which eventually limit the Dynamic Aperture (DA). Finally, the ring circumference should be as small as possible, luminosity being inversely proportional to the collider length. A promising solution for a 1.5 TeV center of mass energy MC with {beta}* = 1 m in both planes has been proposed. This {beta}* value has been chosen as a compromise between luminosity and feasibility based on the magnet design and energy deposition considerations. The proposed solution for the IR optics together with a new flexible momentum compaction arc cell design allows to satisfy all requirements and is relatively insensitive to the beam-beam effect.

Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Effect of muon-nuclear inelastic scattering on high-energy atmospheric muon spectrum at large depth underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectra of hadron cascade showers produced by the cosmic ray muons travelling through water as well as the muon energy spectra underwater at the depth up to 4 km are calculated with two models of muon inelastic scattering on nuclei, the recent hybrid model (two-component, 2C) and the well-known generalized ector-meson-dominance model for the comparison. The 2C model involves photonuclear interactions at low and moderate virtualities as well as the hard scattering including the weak neutral current processes. For the muon scattering off nuclei substantial uclear effects, shadowing, nuclear binding and Fermi motion of nucleons are taken into account. It is shown that deep nderwater muon energy spectrum calculated with the 2C model are noticeably distorted at energies above 100 TeV as compared to that obtained with the GVMD model.

Sinegovsky, S I; Lokhtin, K S; Takahashi, N

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Effect of muon-nuclear inelastic scattering on high-energy atmospheric muon spectrum at large depth underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectra of hadron cascade showers produced by the cosmic ray muons travelling through water as well as the muon energy spectra underwater at the depth up to 4 km are calculated with two models of muon inelastic scattering on nuclei, the recent hybrid model (two-component, 2C) and the well-known generalized ector-meson-dominance model for the comparison. The 2C model involves photonuclear interactions at low and moderate virtualities as well as the hard scattering including the weak neutral current processes. For the muon scattering off nuclei substantial uclear effects, shadowing, nuclear binding and Fermi motion of nucleons are taken into account. It is shown that deep nderwater muon energy spectrum calculated with the 2C model are noticeably distorted at energies above 100 TeV as compared to that obtained with the GVMD model.

S. I. Sinegovsky; A. Misaki; K. S. Lokhtin; N. Takahashi

2007-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

90

Extended Air Showers and Muon Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to report on the influence of muon interactions on the development of air showers initiated by astroparticles. We make a comparative study of the different theoretical approaches to muon bremsstrahlung and muonic pair production interactions. A detailed algorithm that includes all the relevant characteristics of such processes has been implemented in the AIRES air shower simulation system. We have simulated ultra high energy showers in different conditions in order to measure the influence of these muonic electromagnetic interactions. We have found that during the late stages of the shower development (well beyond the shower maximum) many global observables are significantly modified in relative terms when the mentioned interactions are taken into account. This is most evident in the case of the electromagnetic component of very inclined showers. On the other hand, our simulations indicate that the studied processes do not induce significant changes either in the position of the shower maximum or the structure of the shower front surface.

A. N. Cillis; S. J. Sciutto

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

91

EPIC Muon Cooling Simulations using COSY INFINITY  

SciTech Connect

Next gen­er­a­tion mag­net sys­tems need­ed for cool­ing chan­nels in both neu­tri­no fac­to­ries and muon col­lid­ers will be in­no­va­tive and com­pli­cat­ed. De­sign­ing, sim­u­lat­ing and op­ti­miz­ing these sys­tems is a chal­lenge. Using COSY IN­FIN­I­TY, a dif­fer­en­tial al­ge­bra-based code, to sim­u­late com­pli­cat­ed el­e­ments can allow the com­pu­ta­tion and cor­rec­tion of a va­ri­ety of high­er order ef­fects, such as spher­i­cal and chro­mat­ic aber­ra­tions, that are dif­fi­cult to ad­dress with other sim­u­la­tion tools. As an ex­am­ple, a he­li­cal dipole mag­net has been im­ple­ment­ed and sim­u­lat­ed, and the per­for­mance of an epicyclic para­met­ric ion­iza­tion cool­ing sys­tem for muons is stud­ied and com­pared to sim­u­la­tions made using G4Beam­line, a GEAN­T4 toolk­it.

J.A. Maloney, B. Erdelyi, A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Positive muon and the positron as probes of defects  

SciTech Connect

The positive muon and the positron are each being used nowadays to investigate defects in condensed matter. A brief summary of the experimental methods employed with each particle is given in this paper. Similarities and differences between the behavior of the two leptons when implanted in consensed matter are pointed out, and by means of a comparison between muon and positron data in Al it is shown that the combination of muon and positron experiments can serve as a useful new probe of defects in solids.

Lynn, K G

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Helical FOFO snake for 6D ionization cooling of muons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A channel for 6D ionization cooling of muons is described which consists of periodically inclined solenoids of alternating polarity, liquid hydrogen absorbers placed inside solenoids and RF cavities between them. Important feature of such channel (called Helical FOFO snake) is that it can cool simultaneously muons of both signs. Theoretical considerations as well as results of simulations with G4Beamline are presented which show that 200MHz HFOFO snake has sufficient acceptance to be used for initial 6D cooling in muon colliders and neutrino factories.

Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Novel Muon Beam Facilities for Project X at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

Innovative muon beam concepts for intensity-frontier experiments such as muon-to-electron conversion are described. Elaborating upon a previous single-beam idea, we have developed a design concept for a system to generate four high quality, low-energy muon beams (two of each sign) from a single beam of protons. As a first step, the production of pions by 1 and 3 GeV protons from the proposed Project X linac at Fermilab is being simulated and compared with the 8-GeV results from the previous study.

Neuffer, D.V.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Abrams, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling and Prospects for Muon Colliders  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A six-dimensional(6D)cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas* is used to achieve the small transverse emittances demanded by a high-luminosity muon collider. This helical cooling channel**(HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange. Simulations verify the analytic predictions and have shown a 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m HCC segment. Using three such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost six orders of magnitude. After this, two new post-cooling ideas can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to one or two mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. In this report we discuss the status of and the plans for the HCC simulation and engineering efforts. We also describe the new post-cooling ideas and comment on the prospects for a Higgs factory or energy frontier muon collider using existing laboratory infrastructure.

R.P. Johnson; M. Alsharo'a; P.M. Hanlet; R. E. Hartline; M. Kuchnir; K. Paul; T.J. Roberts; C.M. Ankenbrandt; E. Barzi; L. DelFrate; I.G. Gonin; A. Moretti; D.V. Neuffer; M. Popovic; G. Romanov; D. Turrioni; V. Yarba; K. Beard; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev; D.M. Kaplan; K. Yonehara

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

96

Muon Acceleration in Cosmic-ray Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in Gamma-Ray Bursts magnetars, or other sources. These source models require very high accelerating gradients, $10^{13}$ keV/cm, with the minimum gradient set by the length of the source. At gradients above 1.6 keV/cm, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. We rule out many models of linear acceleration, setting strong constraints on plasma wakefield accelerators and on models for sources like Gamma Ray Bursts and magnetars.

Spencer R. Klein; Rune Mikkelsen; Julia K. Becker Tjus

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

97

New results for rare muon decays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Branching-ratio limits obtained with the Crystal Box detector are presented for the rare muon decays ..mu.. ..-->.. eee, ..mu.. ..-->.. e..gamma.., and ..mu.. ..-->.. e..gamma gamma... These decays, which violate the conservation of separate lepton-family numbers, are expected to occur in many extensions to the standard model. We found no candidates for the decay ..mu.. ..-->.. eee, yielding an upper limit for the branching ratio of B/sub ..mu..3e/ .. e..gamma.. candidates yields an upper limit of B/sub ..mu..e..gamma../ .. e..gamma gamma.. candidates gives an upper limit of B/sub ..mu..e..gamma gamma../ < 7.2 x 10/sup -11/. These results strengthen the constraints on models that allow transitions between lepton families.

Mischke, R.E.; Bolton, R.D.; Bowman, J.D.; Cooper, M.D.; Frank, J.S.; Hallin, A.L.; Heusi, P.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; Hogan, G.E.; Mariam, F.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Ordinary Muon Capture in Hydrogen Reexamined  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rate of muon capture in a muonic hydrogen atom is calculated in heavy-nucleon chiral perturbation theory up to next-to-next-to leading order. To this order, we present the systematic evaluation of all the corrections due to the QED and electroweak radiative corrections and the proton-size effect. Since the low-energy constants involved can be determined from other independent sources of information, the theory has predictive power. For the hyperfine-singlet $\\mu p$ capture rate $\\Gamma_0$, our calculation gives $\\Gamma_0=710 \\,\\pm 5\\,s^{-1}$, which is in excellent agreement with the experimental value obtained in a recent high-precision measurement by the MuCap Collaboration.

U. Raha; F. Myhrer; K. Kubodera

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

99

When will we know a muon collider is feasible? Status and directions of muon accelerator R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following the LHC discoveries. This article briefly reviews the status of the accelerator R&D, addresses the question of the feasibility of a Muon Collider, what needs to be done to prove it and presents projected timeline of the project.

Vladimir Shiltsev

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

Melvin Schwartz and the Discovery of the Muon Neutrino  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Melvin Schwartz and the Discovery of the Muon Neutrino Melvin Schwartz and the Discovery of the Muon Neutrino Resources with Additional Information Melvin Schwartz Courtesy Brookhaven National Laboratory Melvin Schwartz was the co-winner of the 1988 Nobel Prize in Physics "for the neutrino beam method and the demonstration of the doublet structure of the leptons through the discovery of the muon neutrino". 'In 1962, Schwartz, with Leon Lederman and Jack Steinberger ... discovered the muon neutrino at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), the then brand-new accelerator at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. ... First coming to Brookhaven in 1955, Schwartz performed his Ph.D. thesis research through 1956 at the Laboratory's first accelerator, the Cosmotron. While finishing his thesis, he was employed by the Laboratory from 1956-58.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European, Japanese, and US Neutrino Factory designs are presented. The main R&D issues and associated R&D programs, future prospects, and the additional issues that must be addressed to produce a viable Muon Collider design, are discussed.

Steve Geer

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

102

Asymmetry of Charge Ratio for Low Energetic Muons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The WILLI calorimeter, installed in NIPNE Bucharest, is operated since several years for measuring charge ratio of atmospheric muons at low energies (Egeomagnetic field and also on features of the hadronic interaction.

Mitrica, Bogdan [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Horia Hulubei, Bucharest (Romania)

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

103

Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer with Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider has collected several hundred million cosmic ray events during 2008 and 2009. These data were used to commission the Muon Spectrometer and to study the performance of the trigger and tracking chambers, their alignment, the detector control system, the data acquisition and the analysis programs. We present the performance in the relevant parameters that determine the quality of the muon measurement. We discuss the single element efficiency, resolution and noise rates, the calibration method of the detector response and of the alignment system, the track reconstruction efficiency and the momentum measurement. The results show that the detector is close to the design performance and that the Muon Spectrometer is ready to detect muons produced in high energy proton-proton collisions.

The ATLAS Collaboration

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

104

On the parametrization of atmospheric muon angular flux underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analytical expression for angular integral flux of atmospheric muons in matter with the explicit relation of its parameters with those of the sea level spectrum is obtained. The fitting formula for the sea level muon spectrum at different zenith angles for spherical atmosphere is proposed. The concrete calculations for pure water are presented. Fluctuations of muon energy losses are taken into account by means of parametrized correction factor calculated using survival probabilities resulted from Monte Carlo simulations. Parametrizations of all continuous energy losses are obtained with using the most recent expressions for muon interaction cross-sections. The corresponding parametrization errors and field of method application are comprehensively discussed. The proposed formulae could be useful primarily for experimentalists processing data of arrays located deep under water or under ice.

S. I. Klimushin; E. V. Bugaev; I. A. Sokalski

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

105

Expected Muon Energy Spectra and Zenithal Distributions Deep Underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy spectra and zenith angle distributions of atmospheric muons are calculated for the depths of operation of large underwater neutrino telescopes. The estimation of the prompt muon contribution is performed with three approaches to charm hadroproduction: recombination quark-parton model, quark-gluon string model, and perturbative QCD based models. Calculations show that the larger are zenith angles and water thickness above the detector, the lower is the energy at which the prompt muon flux becomes equal to conventional one (``crossing energy'') . For instance, for the depth of the Baikal Neutrino Telescope and for zenith angle of 78 degrees the crossing energy is about 300 TeV, whereas it is only 8 TeV for the NESTOR depth. Nevertheless, the muon flux of the crossing energy at NESTOR depth is in order of magnitude lower in comparison with the Baikal depth.

A. Misaki; V. A. Naumov; T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky; N. Takahashi

1999-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

Muon Acceleration with RLA and Non-scaling FFAG Arcs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are the most likely means to achieve the rapid acceleration of shortlived muons to multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. In this paper, we present a novel return-arc optics design based on a Non Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS-FFAG) lattice that allows 5 and 9 GeV/c muons of both charges to be transported in the same string of magnets. The return arcs are made up of super cells with each super cell consisting of three triplets. By employing combined function magnets with dipole, quadrupole, sextupole and octupole magnetic field components, each super cell is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both 5 and 9 GeV/c muon momenta. This solution would reduce the number of arcs by a factor of 2, simplifying the overall design.

Vasiliy Morozov,Alex Bogacz,Dejan Trbojevic

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of [mu][sup [minus]p] atoms in each target. The rates [lambda][sub pp[mu

Jacot-Guillarmod, R. (Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique); Bailey, J.M. (Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom)); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. (Victoria Univ., BC (Canada)); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Huber, T.M. (Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States)); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The charge ratio of the atmospheric muons at low energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the nature of the muon production processes, it can be seen that the ratio of positive to negative cosmic muons has important information in both 'the atmospheric neutrino problem', and 'the hadronic interactions'. We have carried out an experiment for the measurement of the muon charge ratio in the cosmic ray flux in momentum range 0.112-0.178 GeV/c. The muon charge ratio is found to be 1.21{+-}0.01 with a mean zenith angle of 32 deg. {+-}5 deg. . From the measurements it has been obtained a zenithal angle distribution of muons as I({theta})=I(0)cos{sup n}{theta} with n=1.95{+-}0.13. An asymmetry has been observed in East-West directions because of the geomagnetic field. Meanwhile, in about the same momentum range, positive and negative muons have been studied on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations of the extensive air shower developement (Cosmic Ray Simulations for Kascade), using the Quark Gluon String model with JETs model as generator.

Bahmanabadi, M.; Samimi, J. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); ALBORZ Observatory, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sheidaei, F. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghomi, M. Khakian [ALBORZ Observatory, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Plasma Lens for Muon and Neutrino Beams  

SciTech Connect

The plasma lens is examined as an alternate to focusing horns and solenoids for use in a neutrino or muon beam facility. The plasma lens concept is based on a combined high-energy lens/target configuration. The current is fed at electrodes located upstream and downstream from the target where pion capturing is needed. The current flows primarily in the plasma, which has a lower resistivity than the target. A second plasma lens section, with an additional current feed, follows the target to provide shaping of the plasma for optimum focusing. The plasma lens is immersed in an additional solenoid magnetic field to facilitate the plasma stability. The geometry of the plasma is shaped to provide optimal pion capture. Simulations of this plasma lens system have shown a 25% higher neutrino production than the horn system. Plasma lenses have the additional advantage of negligible pion absorption and scattering by the lens material and reduced neutrino contamination during anti-neutrino running. Results of particle simulations using plasma lens will be presented.

Kahn,S.A.; Korenev, S.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M.; Gallardo, J.C.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B.M.

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

110

RF, Thermal and Structural Analysis of the 201.25 MHz Muon Ionization Cooling Cavity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMAL AND STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE 201.25 MHZ MUON IONIZATION COOLINGthe thermal performance of the cavity, including the coolingthermal and structural behavior of the prototype 201.25 MHz cavity for a muon ionization cooling

Virostek, S.; Li, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

MANX, A 6-D Muon Cooling Demonstration Experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most ionization cooling schemes now under consideration are based on using many large flasks of liquid hydrogen energy absorber. One important example is the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which has recently been approved to run at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). In the work reported here, a potential muon cooling demonstration experiment based on a continuous liquid energy absorber in a helical cooling channel (HCC) is discussed. The original HCC used a gaseous energy absorber for the engineering advantage of combining the energy absorption and RF energy regeneration in hydrogen-filled RF cavities. In the Muon And Neutrino eXperiment (MANX) that is proposed here, a liquid-filled HCC is used without RF energy regeneration to achieve the largest possible cooling rate in six dimensions. In this case, the magnetic fields of the HCC must diminish as the muons lose momentum as they pass through the liquid energy absorber. The length of the MANX device is determined by the maximum momentum of the muon test beam and the maximum practical field that can be sustained at the magnet coils. We have studied a 3 meter-long HCC example that could be inserted between the MICE spectrometers at RAL.

Roberts,Thomas; Alsharo'a, Mohammad; Hanlet, Pierrick M; Johnson, Rolland P; Kuchnir, Moyses; Paul, Kevin; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Moretti, Alfred; Popovic, Milorad; Yarba, Victor; Kaplan, Daniel; Yonehara, Katsuya

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Counting muons to probe the neutrino mass spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experimental evidence that \\theta_{13} is large opens new opportunities to identify the neutrino mass spectrum. We outline a possibility to investigate this issue by means of conventional technology. The ideal setup turns out to be long baseline experiment: the muon neutrino beam, with 10^{20} protons on target, has an average energy of 6 (8) GeV; the neutrinos, after propagating 6000 (8000) km, are observed by a muon detector of 1 Mton and with a muon energy threshold of 2 GeV. The expected number of muon events is about 1000, and the difference between the two neutrino spectra is sizeable, about 30%. This allows the identification of the mass spectrum just counting muon tracks. The signal events are well characterized experimentally by their time and direction of arrival, and 2/3 of them are in a region with little atmospheric neutrino background, namely, between 4 GeV and 10 GeV. The distances from CERN to Baikal Lake and from Fermilab to KM3NET, or ANTARES, fit in the ideal range.

Carolina Lujan-Peschard; Giulia Pagliaroli; Francesco Vissani

2013-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

113

A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new parameterisation of atmospheric muons deep underwater (or ice) is presented. It takes into account the simultaneous arrival of muons in bundle giving the multiplicity of the events and the muon energy spectrum as a function of their lateral distribution in a shower.

Annarita Margiotta

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Multiple Muons From Neutrino-Initiated Multi-W(Z) Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current underground detectors can search for multiple muons from multi-W(Z) production initiated by ultrahigh energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei. O($\\mu$b) cross sections give rise to downward going muon bundles whose features differ from those of atmospheric muon bundles.

D. A. Morris; A. Ringwald

1993-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

115

The LHCb Muon detector commissioning and first running scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb muon detector, part of the first LHCb trigger level (L0), has been built to provide a fast and efficient identification of the muons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The expected performances are: 95% L0 trigger efficiency within a 25 ns time window and muon identification in L0 with a Pr resolution of 20%. The detector has been built using Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers and Gas Electron Multiplier technology. The chambers are arranged in five stations, interspersed with iron filter placed along the beam pipe. The results obtained in the commissioning of all the installed chambers and the measured performances are presented. The strategies foreseen for the detector calibration, the results of the space and time alignment efforts and few first running scenarios are discussed.

Furcas, S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Measurement of Ground Level Muon Charge Ratio Using ECRS Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Muon charge ratio at the Earth's surface has been studied with a Geant4 based simulation for two different geomagnetic locations: Atlanta and Lynn Lake. The simulation results are shown in excellent agreement with the data from NMSU-WIZARD/CAPRICE and BESS experiments at Lynn Lake, At low momentum, ground level muon charge ratios show latitude dependent geomagnetic effects for both Atlanta and Lynn Lake from the simulation. The simulated charge ratio is 1.20 {+-} 0.05 (without geomagnetic field), 1.12 {+-} 0.05 (with geomagnetic field) for Atlanta and 1.22 {+-} 0.04 (with geomagnetic field) for Lynn Lake. These types of studies are very important for analyzing secondary cosmic ray muon flux distribution at Earth's surface and can be used to evaluate the parameter of atmospheric neutrino oscillations.

Sanjeewa, Hakmana; He Xiaochun; Cleven, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

117

Optics for Phase Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The realization of a muon collider requires a reduction of the 6D normalized emittance of an initially generated muon beam by a factor of more than 106. Analytical and simulation studies of 6D muon beam ionization cooling in a helical channel filled with pressurized gas or liquid hydrogen absorber indicate that a factor of 106 is possible. Further reduction of the normalized 4D transverse emittance by an additional two orders of magnitude is envisioned using Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC). To realize the phase shrinkage effect in the parametric resonance method, one needs to design a focusing channel free of chromatic and spherical aberrations. We report results of our study of a concept of an aberration-free wiggler transport line with an alternating dispersion function. Resonant beam focusing at thin beryllium wedge absorber plates positioned near zero dispersion points then provides the predicted PIC effect.

R.P. Johnson; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

MANX, a 6-D Muon Beam Cooling Experiment for RAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MANX is a six-dimensional muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment based on the concept of a helical cooling channel in which a beam of muons loses energy in a continuous helium or hydrogen absorber while passing through a special superconducting magnet called a helical solenoid. The goals of the experiment include tests of the theory of the helical cooling channel and the helical solenoid implementation of it, verification of the simulation programs, and a demonstration of effective six-dimensional cooling of a muon beam. We report the status of the experiment and in particular, the proposal to have MANX follow MICE at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) as an extension of the MICE experimental program. We describe the economies of such an approach which allow the MICE beam line and much of the MICE apparatus and expertise to be reused.

Yonehara, K.; Kashikhin, V.; Lamm, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab; Abrams, R.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Johnson, R.P.; Kahn, S.; /Muons Inc., Batavia; Maloney, J.; /Northern Illinois U.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

R&D Proposal for the National Muon Acccelerator Program  

SciTech Connect

This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons - the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently indicated, is essential for the long-term health of high-energy physics.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons--the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently indicated, is essential for the long-term health of high-energy physics.

Muon Accelerator Program; Zisman, Michael S.; Geer, Stephen

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of {mu}{sup {minus}p} atoms in each target. The rates {lambda}{sub pp{mu}} and {lambda}{sub pd} can be extracted.

Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique; Bailey, J.M. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Mittelenergiephysik; Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Muon Bremsstrahlung and Muonic Pair Production in Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to report on the modifications in air shower development due to muon bremsstrahlung and muonic pair production. In order to do that we have implemented new muon bremsstrahlung and muonic pair production procedures in the AIRES air shower simulation system, and have used it to simulate ultra high energy showers in different conditions. The influence of the mentioned processes in the global development of the air shower is important for primary particles of large zenith angles, while they do not introduce significant changes in the position of the shower maximum.

A. Cillis; S. J. Sciutto

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

123

Charge recombination in the muon collider cooling channel  

SciTech Connect

The final stage of the ionization cooling channel for the muon collider must transversely recombine the positively and negatively charged bunches into a single beam before the muons can be accelerated. It is particularly important to minimize any emittance growth in this system since no further cooling takes place before the bunches are collided. We have found that emittance growth could be minimized by using symmetric pairs of bent solenoids and careful matching. We show that a practical design can be found that has transmission {approx}99%, emittance growth less than 0.1%, and minimal dispersion in the recombined bunches.

Fernow, R. C.; Palmer, R. B. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

124

Doped H(2)-Filled RF Cavities for Muon Beam Cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

RF cavities pressurized with hydrogen gas may provide effective muon beam ionization cooling needed for muon colliders. Recent 805 MHz test cell studies reported below include the first use of SF{sub 6} dopant to reduce the effects of the electrons that will be produced by the ionization cooling process in hydrogen or helium. Measurements of maximum gradient in the Paschen region are compared to a simulation model for a 0.01% SF{sub 6} doping of hydrogen. The observed good agreement of the model with the measurements is a prerequisite to the investigation of other dopants.

Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Hu, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; /Fermilab; Alsharo'a, M.; Johnson, R.P.; Neubauer, M.; Sah, R.; /Muons Inc., Batavia; Rose, D.V.; /Voss Sci., Albuquerque

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Implementation of sub-nanoseconds TDC in FPGA: applications to time-of-flight analysis in muon radiography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time-of-flight (tof) techniques are standard techniques in high energy physics to determine particles propagation directions. Since particles velocities are generally close to c, the speed of light, and detectors typical dimensions at the meter level, the state-of-the-art tof techniques should reach sub-nanosecond timing resolution. Among the various techniques already available, the recently developed ring oscillator TDC ones, implemented in low cost FPGA, feature a very interesting figure of merit since a very good timing performance may be achieved with limited processing ressources. This issue is relevant for applications where unmanned sensors should have the lowest possible power consumption. Actually this article describes in details the application of this kind of tof technique to muon tomography of geological bodies. Muon tomography aims at measuring density variations and absolute densities through the detection of atmospheric muons flux's attenuation, due to the presence of matter. When the measure...

Marteau, J; Gibert, D; Jourde, K; Gardien, S; Girerd, C; Ianigro, J -C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Recent Results on Muon Capture for a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect

Scenarios for capture, bunching and phase-energy rotation of {mu}'s from a proton source have been developed. The goal is capture of a maximal number of muons in a string of rf bunches with applications in neutrino factories and {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} colliders. In this note we begin with the bunching, phase rotation and cooling scenario used in neutrino factory study 2B and adapted by R. Palmer as the initial stage of a {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} collider scenario. However the scenario produces a relatively large number of bunches that must be recombined for maximal collider luminosity. In this paper we modify the scenario to obtain a smaller number of bunches, and, after some optimization, obtain cases that are better for both n-factory and collider scenarios. We describe these examples and consider some variations toward an optimal {nu}-factory + collider scenario.

Neuffer, David; /Fermilab

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Status of Neutrino Factory R&D within the Muon Collaboration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the current status of the research within the Muon Collaboration towards realizing a Neutrino Factory. We describe briefly the physics motivation behind the neutrino factory approach to studying neutrino oscillations and the longer term goal of building the Muon Collider. The benefits of a step by step staged approach of building a proton driver, collecting and cooling muons followed by the acceleration and storage of cooled muons are emphasized. Several usages of cooled muons open up at each new stage in such an approach and new physics opportunites are realized at the completion of each stage.

Rajendran Raja

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

128

Status of Neutrino Factory R&D within the Muon Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe the current status of the research within the Muon Collaboration towards realizing a Neutrino Factory. The authors describe briefly the physics motivation behind the neutrino factory approach to studying neutrino oscillations and the longer term goal of building the Muon Collider. The benefits of a step by step staged approach of building a proton driver, collecting and cooling muons followed by the acceleration and storage of cooled muons are emphasized. Several usages of cooled muons open up at each new stage in such an approach and new physics opportunities are realized at the completion of each stage.

Rajendran Raja

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

129

The ATLAS Muon Trigger - Experience and Performance in the first 3 years of LHC pp runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) deploys three-levels processing scheme for the trigger system. The level-1 muon trigger system gets its input from fast muon trigger detectors. Fast sector logic boards select muon candidates, which are passed via an interface board to the central trigger processor and then to the High Level Trigger (HLT). The muon HLT is purely software based and encompasses a level-2 trigger followed by an event filter for a staged trigger approach. It has access to the data of the precision muon detectors and other detector elements to refine the muon hypothesis. The ATLAS experiment has taken data with high efficiency continuously over entire running periods form 2010 to 2012, for which sophisticated triggers to guard the highest physics output while reducing effectively the event rate were mandatory. The ATLAS Muon trigger has successfully adapted to this changing environment. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analysis involving mu...

Ventura, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Standard Model Predictions for the Muon $(g-2)/2$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current status of the Standard Model predictions for the muon anomalous magnetic moment is described. Various contributions expected in the Standard Model are discussed. After the reevaluation of the leading-order hadronic term based on the new \\ep data, the theoretical prediction is more than three standard deviations lower than the experimental value.

S. I. Eidelman

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

131

OPTIMIZING THE MUON COLLIDER CAPTURE TARGET & FRONT END  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[T] Field map calculated from coil current densiUes using Icool grid rou length =5-7 m- B=20-1.5 & 2.5 T Target SC Magnets Field Map 0 5 10 15 20 25 Z/25/13 6 Tracking 1E5 muons through decay channel -10 cells (50 m) Transmission

McDonald, Kirk

132

Integration and commissioning of the ATLAS Muon spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is currently waiting to record the first collision data in spring 2009. Its muon spectrometer is designed to achieve a momentum resolution of 10% pT(mu) = 1 TeV/c. The spectrometer consists of a system of three superconducting air-core toroid magnets and is instrumented with three layers of Monitored Drift Tube chambers (Cathode Strip Chambers in the extreme forward region) as precision detectors. Resistive Plate Chambers in the barrel and Thin Gap Chambers in the endcap regions provide a fast trigger system. The spectrometer passed important milestones in the last year. The most notable milestone was the installation of the inner layer of endcap muon chambers, which constituted the last big piece of the ATLAS detector to be lowered in the ATLAS cavern. In addition, during the last two years most of the muon detectors were commissioned with cosmic rays while being assembled in the underground experimental cavern. We will report on our experience with the precision and trigger chambers, the optical spectrometer alignment system, the level-1 trigger, and the ATLAS data acquisition system. Results of the global performance of the muon system from data with magnetic field will also be presented.

Alberto Belloni; for the ATLAS collaboration

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

133

Muon and Tau Neutrinos Spectra from Solar Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar neutrino flares and mixing are considered. Most power-full solar flare as the ones occurred on 23th February 1956, September 29th 1989, 28th October and on 2nd-4th November 2003 are sources of cosmic rays, X, gamma and neutrino bursts. These flares took place both on front or in the edge and in the hidden solar disk. The observed and estimated total flare energy should be a source of a prompt secondary neutrino burst originated, by proton-proton-pion production on the sun itself; a more delayed and spread neutrino flux signal arise by the solar charged flare particles reaching the terrestrial atmosphere. Our first estimates of neutrino signals in largest underground detectors hint for few events in correlation with, gamma,radio onser. Our approximated spectra for muons and taus from these rare solar eruption are shown over the most common background. The muon and tau signature is very peculiar and characteristic over electron and anti-electron neutrino fluxes. The rise of muon neutrinos will be detectable above the minimal muon threshold of 113 MeV. The rarest tau appearence will be possible only for hardest solar neutrino energies above 3.471 GeV

D. Fargion; F. Moscato

2004-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

134

MERCURY HANDLING FOR THE TARGET SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cryostat 1. Remote handling The high radiation levels and presence of hazardous, ac- tivated mercury vaporsMERCURY HANDLING FOR THE TARGET SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER Van Graves , ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 placement within the Shielding Module in a remote environment. · Providing double containment of the mercury

McDonald, Kirk

135

Neutrinos from Stored Muons nuSTORM: Expression of Interest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuSTORM facility has been designed to deliver beams of electron and muon neutrinos from the decay of a stored muon beam with a central momentum of 3.8 GeV/c and a momentum spread of 10%. The facility is unique in that it will: serve the future long- and short-baseline neutrino-oscillation programmes by providing definitive measurements of electron-neutrino- and muon-neutrino-nucleus cross sections with percent-level precision; allow searches for sterile neutrinos of exquisite sensitivity to be carried out; and constitute the essential first step in the incremental development of muon accelerators as a powerful new technique for particle physics. Of the world's proton-accelerator laboratories, only CERN and FNAL have the infrastructure required to mount nuSTORM. Since no siting decision has yet been taken, the purpose of this Expression of Interest (EoI) is to request the resources required to: investigate in detail how nuSTORM could be implemented at CERN; and develop options for decisive European contributions to the nuSTORM facility and experimental programme wherever the facility is sited. The EoI defines a two-year programme culminating in the delivery of a Technical Design Report.

D. Adey; S. K. Agarwalla; C. M. Ankenbrandt; R. Asfandiyarov; J. J. Back; G. Barker; E. Baussan; R. Bayes; S. Bhadra; V. Blackmore; A. Blondel; S. A. Bogacz; C. Booth; S. B. Boyd; A. Bravar; S. J. Brice; A. D. Bross; F. Cadoux; H. Cease; A. Cervera; J. Cobb; D. Colling; L. Coney; A. Dobbs; J. Dobson; A. Donini; P. J. Dornan; M. Dracos; F. Dufour; R. Edgecock; J. Evans; M. A. George; T. Ghosh; A. deGouvea; J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; A. Haesler; G. Hanson; M. Geelhoed; P. F. Harrison; M. Hartz; P. Hernandez; J. A. Hernando-Morata; P. J. Hodgson; P. Huber; A. Izmaylov; Y. Karadhzov; T. Kobilarcik; J. Kopp; L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; A. Kurup; Y. Kuno; P. Kyberd; J. P. Lagrange; A. M. Laing; J. Link; A. Liu; K. R. Long; N. McCauley; K. T. McDonald; K. Mahn; C. Martin; J. Martin; O. Mena; S. R. Mishra; N. Mokhov; J. Morfin; Y. Mori; W. Murray; D. Neuffer; R. Nichol; E. Noah; M. A. Palmer; S. Parke; S. Pascoli; J. Pasternak; M. Popovic; P. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; S. Ricciardi; C. Rogers; P. Rubinov; E. Santos; A. Sato; E. Scantamburlo; J. K. Sedgbeer; D. R. Smith; P. J. Smith; J. T. Sobczyk; S. Soldner-Rembold; F. J. P. Soler; M. Sorel; A. Stahl; L. Stanco; P. Stamoulis; S. Striganov; H. Tanaka; I. J. Taylor; C. Touramanis; C. D. Tunnel; Y. Uchida; N. Vassilopoulos; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; E. Wildner; M. J. Wilking; W. Winter; U. K. Yang

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

136

What does the muon-neutrino oscillate into?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The favoured resolution of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly involves an oscillation of the muon neutrino to a different state. Current experiments allow for the latter to contain a significantly large fraction of a non-standard flavour. We demonstrate how the next generation of experiments may take advantage of matter effects to resolve this issue.

Debajyoti Choudhury; Anindya Datta

2006-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

137

High-energy cosmic ray muons in the Earth's atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the calculations of the atmospheric muon fluxes at energies 10-10{sup 7} GeV based on a numerical-analytical method for solving the hadron-nucleus cascade equations. It allows the non-power-law behavior of the primary cosmic ray (PCR) spectrum, the violation of Feynman scaling, and the growth of the total inelastic cross sections for hadron-nucleus collisions with increasing energy to be taken into account. The calculations have been performed for a wide class of hadron-nucleus interaction models using directly the PCR measurements made in the ATIC-2 and GAMMA experiments and the parameterizations of the primary spectrum based on a set of experiments. We study the dependence of atmospheric muon flux characteristics on the hadronic interaction model and the influence of uncertainties in the PCR spectrum and composition on the muon flux at sea level. Comparison of the calculated muon energy spectra at sea level with the data from a large number of experiments shows that the cross sections for hadron-nucleus interactions introduce the greatest uncertainty in the energy region that does not include the knee in the primary spectrum.

Kochanov, A. A., E-mail: kochanov@iszf.irk.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russian Federation); Sinegovskaya, T. S. [Irkutsk State Railway University (Russian Federation)] [Irkutsk State Railway University (Russian Federation); Sinegovsky, S. I., E-mail: sinegovsky@api.isu.ru [Irkutsk State University (Russian Federation)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT FOR A FAST MUON TRIGGER  

SciTech Connect

This document is a Conceptual Design Report for a fast muon trigger for the PHENIX experiment that will enable the study of flavor separated quark and anti-quark spin polarizations in the proton. A powerful way of measuring these polarizations is via single spin asymmetries for W boson production in polarized proton-proton reactions. The measurement is done by tagging W{sup +} and W{sup -} via their decay into high transverse momentum leptons in the forward directions. The PHENIX experiment is capable of measuring high momentum muons at forward rapidity, but the current online trigger does not have sufficient rejection to sample the rare leptons fromW decay at the highest luminosities at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This Report details the goals, design, R&D, and schedule for building new detectors and trigger electronics to use the full RHIC luminosity to make this critical measurement. The idea for W boson measurements in polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC was first suggested by Jacques Soffer and Claude Bourrely in 1995. This prompted the RIKEN institute in Japan to supply funds to build a second muon arm for PHENIX (south muon arm). The existence of both a north and south muon arm makes it possible to utilize a Z{sup 0} sample to study and control systematic uncertainties which arise in the reconstruction of high momentum muons. This document has its origins in recommendations made by a NSAC Subcommittee that reviewed the U.S. Heavy Ion Physics Program in June 2004. Part of their Recommendation 1 was to 'Invest in near-term detector upgrades of the two large experiments, PHENIX and STAR'. In Recommendation 2 the subcommittee stated '- detector improvements proceed at a rate that allows a timely determination of the flavor dependence of the quark-antiquark sea polarization through W-asymmetry measurements' as we are proposing here. On September 13, 2004 DOE requested from BNL a report articulating a research plan for the RHIC spin physics program. The document was submitted to DOE on January 31, 2005. It pointed out that one of three top priorities for the program lies in the clean and elegant measurement of the quark and anti-quark polarizations sorted by quark flavor through the parity-violating production of W bosons.

OBRIEN,E.; BASYE, A.; ISENHOWER, D.; JUMPER, D.; SPARKS, N.; TOWELL, R.; WATTS, C.; WOOD, J.; WRIGHT, R.; HAGGERTY, J.; LYNCH, D.; BARISH, K.; EYSER, K.O.; SETO, R.; HU, S.; LI, X.; ZHOU, S.; GLENN, A.; KINNEY, E.; KIRILUK, K.; NAGLE, J.; CHI, C.Y.; SIPPACH, W.; ZAJC. W.; BUTLER, C.; HE, X.; OAKLEY, C.; YING, J.; BLACKBURN, J.; CHIU, M.; PERDEKAMP, M.G.; KIM, Y.J.; KOSTER, J.; LAYTON, D.; MAKINS, N.; MEREDITH, B.; NORTHACKER, D.; PENG, J.-C.; SEIDL, R.; THORSLAND, E.; WADHAMS, S.; WILLIAMSON, S.; YANG, R.; HILL, J.; KEMPEL, T.; LAJOIE, J.; SLEEGE, G.; VALE, C.; WEI, F.; SAITO, N.; HONG, B.; KIM, B.; LEE, K.; LEE, K.S.; PARK, S.; SIM, K.-S.; AOKI, K.; DAIRAKU, S.; IMAI, K.; KARATSU, K.; MURAKAMI, T.; SATO, A.; SENZAKA, K.; SHOJI, K.; TANIDA, K.; BROOKS, M.; LEITCH, M.; ADAMS, J.; CARINGI, A.; FADEM, B.; IDE, J.; LICHTENWALNER, P.; FIELDS, D.; MAO, Y.; HAN, R.; BUNCE, G.; XIE, W.; FUKAO, Y.; TAKETANI, A.; KURITA, K.; MURATA, J.; (PHENIX COLLABORATION)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Energy Spectra, Altitude Profiles and Charge Ratios of Atmospheric Muons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new measurement of air shower muons made during atmospheric ascent of the High Energy Antimatter Telescope balloon experiment. The muon charge ratio mu+ / mu- is presented as a function of atmospheric depth in the momentum interval 0.3-0.9 GeV/c. The differential mu- momentum spectra are presented between 0.3 and about 50 GeV/c at atmospheric depths between 13 and 960 g/cm^2. We compare our measurements with other recent data and with Monte Carlo calculations of the same type as those used in predicting atmospheric neutrino fluxes. We find that our measured mu- fluxes are smaller than the predictions by as much as 70% at shallow atmospheric depths, by about 20% at the depth of shower maximum, and are in good agreement with the predictions at greater depths. We explore the consequences of this on the question of atmospheric neutrino production.

S. Coutu; J. J. Beatty; M. A. DuVernois; S. W. Barwick; E. Schneider; A. Bhattacharyya; C. R. Bower; J. A. Musser; A. Labrador; D. Muller; S. P. Swordy; E. Torbet; C. Chaput; S. McKee; G. Tarle; A. D. Tomasch; S. L. Nutter; G. A. deNolfo

2000-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

FEASIBILITY STUDY II OF A MUON BASED NEUTRINO SOURCE.  

SciTech Connect

The concept of using a muon storage ring to provide a well characterized beam of muon and electron neutrinos (a Neutrino Factory) has been under study for a number of years now at various laboratories throughout the world. The physics program of a Neutrino Factoryis focused on the relatively unexplored neutrino sector. In conjunction with a detector located a suitable distance from the neutrino source, the facility would make valuable contributions to the study of neutrino masses and lepton mixing. A Neutrino Factory is expected to improve the measurement accuracy of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) and {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32} and provide measurements of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) and the sign of {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}. It may also be able to measure CP violation in the lepton sector.

GALLARDO,J.C.; OZAKI,S.; PALMER,R.B.; ZISMAN,M.

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Implementation of the Control System for the LHCb Muon Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Muon Detector of LHCb will be equipped with 1368 Multi- Wire Proportional Chambers and 24 Triple-GEM Detectors. Within the Framework of the CERN Control System Project, using PVSS as the main tool, we are developing an instrument to manage the Muon System of LHCb. Adjustment and monitoring of High and Low Voltage power supplies, on-line diagnostics and ne tuning of the Front-End read-out devices, data acquisition from the gas system and the monitoring of pressure and temperature of the experimental hall are being implemented. The system will also look after long term data archiving and alert handling. The Control System performance is currently under evaluation in a cosmic ray station. Built as a nal quality control of the LHCb Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers, allowing acquisition of data from as many as 600 Front-End readout channels, the cosmic ray station is fully managed by means of a Control System prototype.

Pinci, Davide; Chiodi, Giacomo; Iacoangeli, Francesco; Nobrega, Rafael; Rinaldi, Walter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

RECENT PROGRESS TOWARD A MUON RECIRCULATING LINEAR ACCELERATOR  

SciTech Connect

Both Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require very rapid acceleration due to the short lifetime of muons. After a capture and bunching section, a linac raises the energy to about 900 MeV, and is followed by one or more Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA), possibly followed by a Rapid Cycling Synchnotron (RCS) or Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring. A RLA reuses the expensive RF linac section for a number of passes at the price of having to deal with different energies within the same linac. Various techniques including pulsed focusing quadruopoles, beta frequency beating, and multipass arcs have been investigated via simulations to improve the performance and reduce the cost of such RLAs.

Slawomir Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin, Kevin Beard

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

The scattering of muons in low Z materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the measurement of the scattering of 172 MeV/c muons in assorted materials, including liquid hydrogen, motivated by the need to understand ionization cooling for muon acceleration. Data are compared with predictions from the Geant 4 simulation code and this simulation is used to deconvolute detector effects. The scattering distributions obtained are compared with the Moliere theory of multiple scattering and, in the case of liquid hydrogen, with ELMS. With the exception of ELMS, none of the models are found to provide a good description of the data. The results suggest that ionization cooling will work better than would be predicted by Geant 4.7.0p01.

D. Attwood; P. Bell; S. Bull; T. McMahon; J. Wilson; R. Fernow; P. Gruber; A. Jamdagni; K. Long; E. McKigney; P. Savage; M. Curtis-Rouse; T. R. Edgecock; M. Ellis; J. Lidbury; W. J. Murray; P. Norton; K. Peach; K. Ishida; Y. Matsuda; K. Nagamine; S. Nakamura; G. M. Marshall; S. Benveniste; D. Cline; Y. Fukui; K. Lee; Y. Pischalnikov; S. Holmes; A. Bogacz

2005-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

144

Baseline scenario(s) for muon collider proton driver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper gives an overview of the various muon collider scenarios and the requirements they put on the Proton Driver. The required proton power is about 4-6MW in all the scenarios, but the bunch repetition rate varies between 12 and 65Hz. Since none of the muon collider scenarios have been simulated end-to-end, it would be advisable to plan for an upgrade path to around 10MW. Although the proton driver energy is flexible, cost arguments seems to favor a relatively low energy. In particular, at Fermilab 8GeV seems most attractive, partly due to the possibility of reusing the three existing fixed energy storage rings for bunch manipulations.

Jansson, Andreas; /Fermilab

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Spontaneous Muon Emission during Fission, a New Nuclear Radioactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper the essential theoretical predictions for the nuclear muonic radioactivity are presented by using a special fission-like model similar with that used in description of the pionic emission during fission. Hence, a fission-like model for the muonic radioactivity takes into account the essential degree of freedom of the system: muon-fissility, muon-fission barrier height, etc. Using this model it was shown that most of the SHE-nuclei lie in the region where the muonic fissility parameters attain their limiting value X=1. Hence, the SHE-region is characterized by the absence of a classical barrier toward spontaneous muon and pion emissions. Numerical estimations on the yields for the natural muonic radioactivities of the transuranium elements as well numerical values for barrier heights are given only for even-even parent nuclei. Some experimental results from LCP-identification emission spectrum are reviewed. Also, the experimental results obtained by Khryachkov et al, using new spectrometer for investigation of ternary nuclear fission, are presented. The OPERA-experiment proposed to perform search for muonic radioactivity from lead nuclei, in the low background conditions offered by the Gran Sasso underground Laboratory (LNGS), is discussed.

D. B. Ion; M. L. D. Ion; Reveica Ion-Mihai

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

146

Status of the Fermilab Muon (g-2) Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New Muon (g-2) Collaboration at Fermilab has proposed to measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a{sub {mu}}, a factor of four better than was done in E821 at the Brookhaven AGS, which obtained a{sub {mu}} = [116592089(63)] x 10{sup -11} {+-} 0.54 ppm. The last digit of a{sub {mu}} is changed from the published value owing to a new value of the ratio of the muon-to-proton magnetic moment that has become available. At present there appears to be a difference between the Standard-Model value and the measured value, at the {approx}= 3 standard deviation level when electron-positron annihilation data are used to determine the lowest-order hadronic piece of the Standard Model contribution. The improved experiment, along with further advances in the determination of the hadronic contribution, should clarify this difference. Because of its ability to constrain the interpretation of discoveries made at the LHC, the improved measurement will be of significant value, whatever discoveries may come from the LHC.

Roberts, B.Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Open-Midplane Dipoles for a Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect

For a muon collider with copious decay particles in the plane of the storage ring, open-midplane dipoles (OMD) may be preferable to tungsten-shielded cosine-theta dipoles of large aperture. The OMD should have its midplane completely free of material, so as to dodge the radiation from decaying muons. Analysis funded by a Phase I SBIR suggests that a field of 10-20 T should be feasible, with homogeneity of 1 x 10{sup -4} and energy deposition low enough for conduction cooling to 4.2 K helium. If funded, a Phase II SBIR would refine the analysis and build and test a proof-of-principle magnet. A Phase I SBIR has advanced the feasibility of open-midplane dipoles for the storage ring of a muon collider. A proposed Phase II SBIR would refine these predictions of stresses, deformations, field quality and energy deposition. Design optimizations would continue, leading to the fabrication and test, for the first time, of a proof-of-principle dipole of truly open-midplane design.

Weggel, R.; Gupta, R.; Kolonko, J., Scanlan, R., Cline, D., Ding, X., Anerella, M., Kirk, H., Palmer, B., Schmalzle, J.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

148

LHCb: The LHCb Muon detector commissioning and first running scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb Muon detector, being part of the first trigger level (L0), has been optimized in order to provide a fast and efficient identification of the muons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The expected performances are: 95% L0 trigger efficiency within a 25ns time window and muon identification in L0 with a pT resolution of ~20%. The detector has been built, to met those stringent requirements, using Multi Wire Proportional Chambers and Gas Electron Multiplier (in the innermost region, closest to the IP) technology. The chambers (1368 MWPC + 12 GEM) are arranged in 5 detector stations, interspersed with iron filters placed along the beam pipe. While the installation of chambers in stations 2 to 5 has already been completed, the work on the first and most challenging station is still ongoing and expected to end by July 09. The results obtained in the commissioning of all the installed chambers as well as the performances measured by means of data acquired during cosmics runs since September 08 are reviewe...

Furcas, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

MaxEnt-Burg Application to Muon-Spin Resonance  

SciTech Connect

Muon-Spin Rotation ({mu}SR) is an experimental technique similar to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). {mu}SR data are recorded as a set of time-series histograms of muon-decay events. Both {mu}SR and NMR regularly produce signals that are overlapping, weak and/or broadened in frequency space. These {mu}SR histograms are usually analyzed by curve fitting and Fourier transformations. However, several NMR and {mu}SR groups have developed Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt, ME) applications to improve the sensitivity of the time series analysis. We have focused on the application of the ME-Burg algorithm. The optimal number of autoregression coefficients is between N/3 and N/5 where N is the total number of data points. Selected results for simulated data and real data ME-{mu}SR applications are reported. Most of our {mu}SR work is for cuprate superconductor studies. The strength of the ME-Burg algorithm is fully used, as there is a clear relationship between the muon-spin signal S(i) at any time i and the signals S(i-k) at earlier times. ME-Burg has the major advantage of producing in the frequency transform only structure for which sufficient statistical evidence is present.

Boekema, C.; Browne, M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose CA 95192-0106 (United States)

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

150

Lateral Distribution for Aligned Events in Muon Groups Deep Underground  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper concerns the so-called aligned events observed in cosmic rays. The phenomenon of the alignment of the most energetic subcores of gamma-ray--hadron ($\\gamma-h$) families (particles of the highest energies in the central EAS core) was firstly found in the "Pamir" emulsion chamber experiment and related to a coplanar particle production at $E_0>10^{16}$ eV. Here a separation distribution (distances between pairs of muons) for aligned events has been analyzed throughout muon groups measured by Baksan Underground Scintillation Telescope (BUST) for threshold energies $0.85 \\div 3.2$ TeV during a period of 7.7 years. Only muon groups of multiplicity $m\\geq 4$ with inclined trajectories for an interval of zenith angles $50^\\circ - 60^\\circ$ were selected for the analysis. The analysis has revealed that the distribution complies with the exponential law. Meanwhile the distributions become steeper with the increase of threshold energy. There has been no difference between the lateral distribution of all the groups and the distribution of the aligned groups.

A. L. Tsyabuk; R. A. Mukhamedshin; Yu. V. Stenkin

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

151

CMS reconstruction improvement for the muon tracking by the RPC chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The contribution of Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) to muon reconstruction in CMS has been studied on a sample of muons collected in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV at the LHC in 2011. Muon reconstruction is performed using the all-silicon inner tracker and with up to four stations of gas-ionization muon detectors. Drift Tubes and Cathode Strip Chambers detect muons in the barrel and endcap regions, respectively, and are complemented by the RPC system. Measured distributions of reconstructed hits in the RPCs crossed by muons from Z decays with a transverse momentum pT above 20 GeV/c are well reproduced by the Monte Carlo simulation. From the samples of J/psi and Z events, the efficiencies for muons with and without the inclusion of the RPC hits in the muon track reconstruction are measured and compared with the simulation. Using RPC information in track reconstruction improves up to about 3% of offline reconstruction efficiency for the muons in the region of pT above 7 GeV/c, in good agreement with simulation.

Min Suk Kim on behalf of the CMS Collaboration

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

152

An Improved Limit on the Electric Dipole Moment of the Muon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data from the muon g-2 experiment at Brookhaven National Lab has been analyzed to search for a muon electric dipole moment(EDM), which would violate parity and time reversal symmetries. An EDM would cause a tilt in the spin precession plane of the muons, resulting in a vertical oscillation in the position of electrons hitting the detectors. No signal has been observed. Based on this analysis, an improved limit of $2.8 \\times 10^{-19} e-cm(95% CL) is set on the muon EDM.

Ronald McNabb

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Muon Charge Information from Geomagnetic Deviation in Inclined Extensive Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose to extract the charge information of high energy muons in very inclined extensive air showers by analyzing their relative lateral positions in the shower transverse plane. We calculate the muon lateral deviation under the geomagnetic field and compare it to dispersive deviations from other causes. By our criterion of resolvability, positive and negative muons with energies above $10^4$ GeV will be clearly separated into two lobes if the shower zenith angle is larger than $70^\\circ$. Thus we suggest a possible approach to measure the $\\mu^+ / \\mu^-$ ratio for high energy muons.

BingKan Xue; Bo-Qiang Ma

2006-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

154

Hadronic Light-by-Light Contribution to Muon g-2: Status and Prospects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review the recent calculations and present status of the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the muon g-2.

Joaquim Prades

2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

155

THERMAL SHOCK ANALYSIS OF WINDOWS INTERACTING WITH ENERGETIC, FOCUSED BEAM OF THE BNL MUON TARGET EXPERIMENT*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMAL SHOCK ANALYSIS OF WINDOWS INTERACTING WITH ENERGETIC, FOCUSED BEAM OF THE BNL MUON TARGET In this paper, issues associated with the interaction of a proton beam with windows designed for the muon to maintain an enclosed environment around the target implies the use of beam windows that will survive

McDonald, Kirk

156

Study of single muons with the Large Volume Detector at Gran Sasso Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present study is based on the sample of about 3 mln single muons observed by LVD at underground Gran Sasso Laboratory during 36500 live hours from June 1992 to February 1998. We have measured the muon intensity at slant depths from 3 km w.e. to 20 km w.e. Most events are high energy downward muons produced by meson decay in the atmosphere. The analysis of these muons has revealed the power index of pion and kaon spectrum: 2.76 \\pm 0.05. The reminders are horizontal muons produced by the neutrino interactions in the rock surrounding LVD. The value of this flux is obtained. The results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations and the world data.

Aglietta, M; Antonioli, P; Badino, G; Bari, G; Basile, M; Berezinsky, Veniamin Sergeevich; Bersani, F; Bertaina, M; Bertoni, R; Bruni, G; Cara Romeo, G; Castagnoli, C; Castellina, A; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Dadykin, V L; Dos Santos, L G; Enikeev, R I; Fulgione, W; Galeotti, P; Ghia, P; Giusti, P; Gómez, F; Granella, R; Grianti, F; Gurentsov, V I; Iacobucci, G; Inoue, N; Kemp, E; Khalchukov, F F; Korolkova, E V; Korchaguin, P V; Korchaguin, V B; Kudryavtsev, V A; Luvisetto, Marisa L; Malguin, A S; Massam, Thomas; Mengotti-Silva, N; Morello, C; Nania, R; Navarra, G; Periale, L; Pesci, A; Picchi, P; Pless, I A; Ryasny, V G; Ryazhskaya; Saavedra, O; Saitoh, K; Sartorelli, G; Selvi, M; Taborgna, N; Talochkin, P; Trinchero, G C; Tsuji, S; Turtelli, A; Vallania, P; Vernetto, S; Vigorito, C; Votano, L; Wada, T; Weinstein, R; Widgoff, M; Yakushev, V F; Yamamoto, I; Zatsepin, G T; Zichichi, A

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Contributions to the muon's anomalous magnetic moment from a hidden sector  

SciTech Connect

Research Highlights: > Described scenario involving hidden and connector particles that couple to the standard model which could be relevant for dark matter. > Examined constraints on such particles in the case that the SM particle they couple to is the muon. > Found regions of couplings which could explain the discrepancy in the muon's anomalous magnetic moment which differ for different hidden and connector particles' spins. - Abstract: The measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon provides a stringent test of the standard model and of any physics that lies beyond it. There is currently a deviation of 3.1{sigma} between the standard model prediction for the muon's anomalous magnetic moment and its experimental value. We calculate the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment in theories where the muon couples to a particle in a hidden sector (that is, uncharged under the standard model) and a connector (which has nontrivial standard model gauge and hidden sector quantum numbers).

McKeen, David, E-mail: mckeen@uvic.ca [Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Observation of Up-going Charged Particles Produced by High Energy Muons in Underground Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study of the production of up-going charged particles in inelastic interactions of down-going underground muons is reported, using data obtained from the MACRO detector at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. In a sample of 12.2 10^6 single muons, corresponding to a detector livetime of 1.55 y, 243 events are observed having an up-going particle associated with a down-going muon. These events are analysed to determine the range and emission angle distributions of the up-going particle, corrected for detection and reconstruction efficiency. Measurements of the muon neutrino flux by underground detectors are often based on the observation of through-going and stopping muons produced in $\

The MACRO Collaboration; M. Ambrosio et al

1998-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Cosmic Ray Sun Shadow in Soudan 2 Underground Muon Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The absorption of cosmic rays by the sun produces a shadow at the earth. The angular offset and broadening of the shadow are determined by the magnitude and structure of the interplanetary magnetic field (IPMF) in the inner solar system. We report the first measurement of the solar cosmic ray shadow by detection of deep underground muon flux in observations made during the entire ten-year interval 1989 to 1998. The sun shadow varies significantly during this time, with a $3.3\\sigma$ shadow observed during the years 1995 to 1998.

Soudan 2 Collaboration

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

160

Muon Collider Final Cooling in 30-50 T Solenoids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Muon ionization cooling to the required normalized rms emittance of 25 microns transverse, and 72 mm longitudinal, can be achieved with liquid hydrogen in high field solenoids, provided that the momenta are low enough. At low momenta, the longitudinal emittance rises from the negative slope of energy loss versus energy. Assuming initial emittances that have been achieved in six dimensional cooling simulations, optimized designs are given using solenoid fields limited to 30, 40, and 50 T. The required final emittances are achieved for the two higher field cases. Preliminary simulations of transverse cooling in hydrogen, at low energies, suggests that muon collider emittance requirements can be met using solenoid fields of 40 T or more. It might also be acceptable with 30 T. But these simulations did not include hydrogen windows,matching or reacceleration, whose performance, with one exception, was based on numerical estimates. Full simulations of more stages are planned. The design and simulation of hydrogen windows must be included, and space charge effects, and absorber heating, calculated.

Palmer, R.B.; Fernow, R.C.; Lederman, J.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Muon Collider interaction region and machine-detector interface design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the key systems of a Muon Collider (MC) - seen as the most exciting option for the energy frontier machine in the post-LHC era - is its interaction region (IR). Designs of its optics, magnets and machine-detector interface are strongly interlaced and iterative. As a result of recent comprehensive studies, consistent solutions for the 1.5-TeV c.o.m. MC IR have been found and are described here. To provide the required momentum acceptance, dynamic aperture and chromaticity, an innovative approach was used for the IR optics. Conceptual designs of large-aperture high-field dipole and high-gradient quadrupole magnets based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor were developed and analyzed in terms of the operating margin, field quality, mechanics, coil cooling and quench protection. Shadow masks in the interconnect regions and liners inside the magnets are used to mitigate the unprecedented dynamic heat deposition due to muon decays ({approx}0.5 kW/m). It is shown that an appropriately designed machine-detector interface (MDI) with sophisticated shielding in the detector has a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector.

Mokhov, N.V.; Alexahin, Y.I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Striganov, S.I.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment on YouTube  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is one of two large general-purpose particle physics detectors built on the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland and France. The CMS detector is located in an underground cavern at Cessy in France and studies many aspects of proton collisions at 14 TeV, the center-of-mass energy of the LHC particle accelerator. [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_Muon_Solenoid]. US groups have made significant contributions to nearly every aspect of the detector throughout all phases including construction, installation and now in the data-taking stage. The US collaboration also made major contributions to the construction and operation of the computing facilities needed to analyze the unprecedented amount of data to be generated by CMS. This work includes the software that allows physicists to operate the CMS detector, reconstruct the data, analyze it and extract new physics. The CMS channel on YouTube was established in 2009.

163

Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics should allow an order of magnitude smaller final equilibrium transverse beam emittances than conventional ionization cooling alone. In this scheme, a half-integer parametric resonance is induced in a cooling channel causing the beam to be naturally focused with the period of the channel?s free oscillations. Thin absorbers placed at the focal points then cool the beam?s angular divergence through the usual ionization cooling mechanism where each absorber is followed by RF cavities. A special continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion was developed for PIC. We present the results of modeling PIC in such a channel using GEANT4/ G4beamline. We discuss the challenge of precise beam aberration control from one absorber to another over a wide angular spread.

V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, B. Erdelyi, J.A. Maloney

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Parametric-resonance ionization cooling of muon beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics should allow an order of magnitude smaller final equilibrium transverse beam emittances than conventional ionization cooling alone. In this scheme, a half-integer parametric resonance is induced in a cooling channel causing the beam to be naturally focused with the period of the channel's free oscillations. Thin absorbers placed at the focal points then cool the beam's angular divergence through the usual ionization cooling mechanism where each absorber is followed by RF cavities. A special continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion was developed for PIC. We present the results of modeling PIC in such a channel using GEANT4/G4beamline. We discuss the challenge of precise beam aberration control from one absorber to another over a wide angular spread.

Morozov, V. S.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Afanasev, A.; Johnson, R. P.; Erdelyi, B.; Maloney, J. A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Muons, Inc., Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States) and George Washington University, Washington, D.C. 20052 (United States); Muons, Inc., Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

165

A parameterisation of the flux and energy spectrum of single and multiple muons in deep water/ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper parametric formulas are presented to evaluate the flux of atmospheric muons in the range of vertical depth between 1.5 to 5 km of water equivalent (km w.e.) and up to 85^o for the zenith angle. We take into account their arrival in bundles with different muon multiplicities. The energy of muons inside bundles is then computed considering the muon distance from the bundle axis. This parameterisation relies on a full Monte Carlo simulation of primary Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions, shower propagation in the atmosphere and muon transport in deep water [1]. The primary CR flux and interaction models, in the range in which they can produce muons which may reach 1.5 km w.e., suffer from large experimental uncertainties. We used a primary CR flux and an interaction model able to correctly reproduce the flux, the multiplicity distribution, the spatial distance between muons as measured by the underground MACRO experiment.

M. Bazzotti; S. Biagi; G. Carminati; S. Cecchini; T. Chiarusi; G. Giacomelli; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

166

Perspectives of a Midrapidity Dimuon Program at RHIC: A Novel and Compact Muon Telescope Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) at mid-rapidity and for the next generation of detectors at a possible electron-ion collider. We utilize Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers with large modules and long readout strips (Long-MRPC) in the detector design. The results from cosmic ray and beam tests show the intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a Long-MRPC are 60-70 ps and $\\sim1$ cm, respectively. The prototype performance of such a novel muon telescope detector at STAR indicates that muon identification at the transverse momentum of a few GeV/$c$ can be achieved through the combined information of track matching with the MTD, ionization energy loss in the Time Projection Chamber, and time-of-flight measurements. A primary muon over secondary muon ratio of better than 1/3 can be achieved. This provides a promising device for future quarkonium programs and primordial dilepton measurements at RHIC. Simulations of the muon efficiency, the signal-to-background ratio of $J/\\psi$, the separation of $\\Upsilon$ 1S from 2S+3S states, and the electron-muon correlation from charm pair production in the RHIC environment are presented.

L. Ruan; G. Lin; Z. Xu; K. Asselta; H. F. Chen; W. Christie; H. J. Crawford; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; T. J. Hallman; C. Li; J. Liu; W. J. Llope; R. Majka; T. Nussbaum; J. Scheblein; M. Shao; R. Soja; Y. Sun; Z. Tang; X. Wang; Y. Wang

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

167

20 years of cosmic muons research performed in IFIN-HH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last two decades a modern direction in particle physics research has been developed in IFIN-HH Bucharest, Romania. The history started with the WILLI detector built in IFIN-HH Bucharest in collaboration with KIT Karlsruhe (formerly Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe). The detector was designed for measurements of the low energy muon charge ratio (geomagnetic field on the trajectories of positive and negative muons in air. In parallel, flux measurement, taking into account muon events with nergies > 0.4GeV, show a diurnal modulation of the muon flux. The analysis of the muon events for energies geomagnetic field, depending, in particular, of the primary mass. Based on the results, we can say that WILLI-EAS experiment could be used for testing the hadronic interaction models. Measurements of the high energy muon flux in underground of the salt mine from Slanic Prahova, Romania was performed using a new mobile detector developed in IFIN-HH, Bucharest. Consisting of 2 scintillator plates measuring in coincidence, the detector is installed on a van which facilitates measurements on different positions at surface or in underground. The detector was used to measure muon fluxes in different locations at surface or in underground. The detector was used to measure muon fluxes at different sites of Romania and in the underground of the salt mines from Slanic Prahova, Romania where IFIN-HH has a modern underground laboratory. New methods for the detection of cosmic ray muons are investigated in our institute based on scintillator techniques using optical fiber and MPPC photodyodes.

Mitrica, Bogdan [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH, Bucharest, P.O.B.MG-6 (Romania)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

168

Vertical muon intensity measured with MACRO at the Gran Sasso laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical underground muon intensity has been measured in the slant depth range 3200--7000 hg cm{sup {minus}2} (standard rock) with the completed lower part of the MACRO detector at the Gran Sasso laboratory, using a large sample of data. These observations are used to compute the surface muon flux and the primary ``all-nucleon`` spectrum. An analysis of systematic uncertainties introduced by the interaction models in the atmosphere and the underground propagation of muons is presented. A comparison of our results with published data is also presented.

Ambrosio, M.; Antolini, R.; Auriemma, G.; Baker, R.; Baldini, A.; Barbarino, G.C.; Barish, B.C.; Battistoni, G.; Bellotti, R.; Bemporad, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bilokon, H.; Bisi, V.; Bloise, C.; Bower, C.; Bussino, S.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Campana, D.; Carboni, M.; Castellano, M.; Cecchini, S.; Cei, F.; Celio, P.; Chiarella, V.; Corona, A.; Coutu, S.; De Cataldo, G.; Dekhissi, H.; De Marzo, C.; De Mitri, I.; De Vincenzi, M.; Di Credico, A.; Erriquez, O.; Favuzzi, C.; Forti, C.; Fusco, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Giannini, G.; Giglietto, N.; Grassi, M.; Grillo, A.; Guarino, F.; Guarnaccia, P.; Gustavino, C.; Habig, A.; Hanson, K.; Hawthorne, A.; Heinz, R.; Hong, J.T.; Iarocci, E.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kearns, E.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Lamanna, E.; Lane, C.; Levin, D.S.; Lipari, P.; Liu, R.; Longley, N.P.; Longo, M.J.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, G.; Mancarella, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Margiotta-Neri, A.; Marini, A.; Martello, D.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Michael, D.G.; Mikheyev, S.; Miller, L.; Mittelbrunn, M.; Monacelli, P.; Montaruli, T.; Monteno, M.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nicolo, D.; Nolty, R.; Okada, C.; Orth, C.; Osteria, G.; Palamara, O.; Parlati, S.; Patera, V.; Patrizii, L.; Pazzi, R.; Peck, C.W.; Petrera, S.; Pignatano, N.D.; Pistilli, P.; Popa, V.; Raino, A.; Reynoldson, J.; Ronga, F.; Sanzgiri, A.; Sartogo, F.; Satriano, C.; Satta, L.; Scapparone, E.; Scholberg, K.; Sciubba, A.; Serra-Lugaresi, P.; Severi, M.; Sitta, M.; Spinelli, P.; Spinetti, M.; Spurio, M.; Steinberg, R.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Surdo, A.; Tarle, G.; Tassoni, F.; Togo, V.; Valente, V.; Walter, C.W.; Webb, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita di Bari and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 70126 Bari (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita di Bologna and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 40126 Bologna (Italy)]|[Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)]|[California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)...

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Alternative Muon Front-end for the International Design Study (IDS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss alternative designs of the muon capture front end of the Neutrino Factory International Design Study (IDS). In the front end, a proton bunch on a target creates secondary pions that drift into a capture channel, decaying into muons. A sequence of RF cavities forms the resulting muon beams into strings of bunches of differing energies, aligns the bunches to (nearly) equal central energies, and initiates ionization cooling. This design is affected by limitations on accelerating gradients within magnetic fields. The effects of gradient limitations are explored, and mitigation strategies are presented

Alekou, A; Martini, M; Prior, G; Rogers, C; Stratakis, D; Yoshikawa, C; Zisman, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron interaction cross sections for boron. While corrections to the data files themselves are simple to implement and distribute, it is quite possible, however, that coding changes may be required in G4beamline or even in GEANT4 to fully correct nuclear interactions. Regardless, these studies are ongoing and future results will be reflected in updated releases of G4beamline.

Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Measurement of muon neutrino quasi-elastic scattering on carbon  

SciTech Connect

Low energy (200 < E{sub v} < 2000 MeV) neutrino oscillation experiments, including MiniBooNE, require a model of charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino interactions to predict signal samples. Using a high-statistics sample of muon neutrino CCQE events, MiniBooNE finds that a simple Fermi gas model, with appropriate adjustments, accurately characterizes the CCQE events observed in a carbon-based detector. The extracted parameters include an effective axial mass, M{sub A} = 1.23 {+-} 0.20 GeV, used to describe the four-momentum dependence of the axial-vector form factor of the nucleon; and a Pauli-suppression parameter, {kappa} = 1.019 {+-} 0.011.

Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; Djurcic, Z.; /Alabama U. /Bucknell

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Mercury Handling for the Target System for a Muon Collider  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The baseline target concept for a Muon Collider or Neutrino Factory is a free-stream mercury jet being impacted by an 8-GeV proton beam. The target is located within a 20-T magnetic field, which captures the generated pions that are conducted to a downstream decay channel. Both the mercury and the proton beam are introduced at slight downward angles to the magnetic axis. A pool of mercury serves as a receiving reservoir for the mercury and a dump for the unexpended proton beam. The impact energy of the remaining beam and jet are substantial, and it is required that splashes and waves be controlled in order to minimize the potential for interference of pion production at the target. Design issues discussed in this paper include the nozzle, splash mitigation in the mercury pool, the mercury containment vessel, and the mercury recirculation system.

Graves, Van B [ORNL; Mcdonald, K [Princeton University; Kirk, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Weggel, Robert [Particle Beam Laser, Inc.; Souchlas, Nicholas [Particle Beam Laser, Inc.; Sayed, H [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Ding, X [University of California, Los Angeles

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Investigation and simulation of muon cooling rings with tilted solenoids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alternating solenoid focused muon cooling ring without special bending magnets is considered and investigate in detail. Both fringe field between solenoid coils with opposite directed current, and an inclination of the coils in vertical plane are used to provide a bending and closing of the particle trajectories. Realistic (Maxwellian) magnetic field is calculated and used for a simulation. Methodic is developed and applied to find closed orbit at any energy, dispersion, region of stability, and other conventional accelerator characteristics. Earlier proposed RFOFO cooling ring with 200 MHz RF system and liquid hydrogen absorbers is investigated in detail. After an optimization, normalized 6D emittance about 20 mm{sup 3} and transmission 57% are obtained.

Valeri I. Balbekov

2003-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

INTERACTION OF MUON BEAM WITH PLASMA DEVELOPED DURING IONIZATION COOLING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle-in-cell simulations involving the interaction of muon beam (peak density 10{sup 18} m{sup 3}) with Li plasma (ionized medium) of density 10{sup 16}-10{sup 22} m{sup -3} have been performed. This study aimed to understand the effects of plasma on an incoming beam in order to explore scenario developed during the process of ionization cooling. The computer code takes into account the self-consistent electromagnetic effects of beam interacting with plasma. This study shows that the beam can pass through the plasma of densities four order of magnitude higher than its peak density. The low density plasmas are wiped out by the beam, however, the resonance is observed for densities of similar order. Study reveals the signature of plasma wakefield acceleration.

S. Ahmed, D. Kaplan, T. Roberts, L. Spentzouris, K. Beard

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Proposal to the Fermilab PAC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuSTORM facility has been designed to deliver beams of electron neutrinos and muon neutrinos (and their anti-particles) from the decay of a stored muon beam with a central momentum of 3.8 GeV/c and a momentum acceptance of 10%. The facility is unique in that it will: 1. Allow searches for sterile neutrinos of exquisite sensitivity to be carried out; 2. Serve future long- and short-baseline neutrino-oscillation programs by providing definitive measurements of electron neutrino and muon neutrino scattering cross sections off nuclei with percent-level precision; and 3. Constitutes the crucial first step in the development of muon accelerators as a powerful new technique for particle physics. The document describes the facility in detail and demonstrates its physics capabilities. This document was submitted to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee in consideration for Stage I approval.

D. Adey; S. K. Agarwalla; C. M. Ankenbrandt; R. Asfandiyarov; J. J. Back; G. Barker; E. Baussan; R. Bayes; S. Bhadra; V. Blackmore; A. Blondel; S. A. Bogacz; C. Booth; S. B. Boyd; A. Bravar; S. J. Brice; A. D. Bross; F. Cadoux; H. Cease; A. Cervera; J. Cobb; D. Colling; P. Coloma; L. Coney; A. Dobbs; J. Dobson; A. Donini; P. Dornan; M. Dracos; F. Dufour; R. Edgecock; J. Evans; M. Geelhoed; M. A. George; T. Ghosh; J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; A. de Gouvea; A. Haesler; G. Hanson; P. F. Harrison; M. Hartz; P. Hernandez; J. A. Hernando Morata; P. Hodgson; P. Huber; A. Izmaylov; Y. Karadzhov; T. Kobilarcik; J. Kopp; L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; Y. Kuno; A. Kurup; P. Kyberd; J. B. Lagrange; A. Laing; A. Liud; J. M. Link; K. Long; K. Mahn; C. Mariani; C. Martin; J. Martin; N. McCauley; K. T. McDonald; O. Mena; S. R. Mishra; N. Mokhov; J. Morfin; Y. Mori; W. Murray; D. Neuffer; R. Nichol; E. Noah; M. A. Palmer; S. Parke; S. Pascoli; J. Pasternak; M. Popovic; P. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; S. Ricciardi; C. Rogers; P. Rubinov; E. Santos; A. Sato; T. Sen; E. Scantamburlo; J. K. Sedgbeer; D. R. Smith; P. J. Smith; J. T. Sobczyk; L. Soby; F. J. P. Soler; S. Soldner-Rembold; M. Sorel; P. Snopok; P. Stamoulis; L. Stanco; S. Striganov; H. A. Tanaka; I. J. Taylor; C. Touramanis; C. D. Tunnell; Y. Uchida; N. Vassilopoulos; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; M. J. Wilking; E. Wildner; W. Winter; U. K. Yang

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Muon Radiography at LANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Muon Radiography at LANL Muon Radiography at LANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Muon Radiography at LANL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Application of tracking chambers and algorithms to observe deflections of cosmic ray muons as they pass through heavy materials Developed at: Los Alamos National Laboratory

177

Search for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCube neutrino telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009, GCN: The Gamma ray bursts Coordinates Network, http://for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCubeMereghetti, S. 2004, in Gamma-ray Bursts: 30 Years of

Abbasi, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric muons play an important role in underwater/ice neutrino detectors. In this paper, a parameterisation of the flux of single and multiple muon events, their lateral distribution and of their energy spectrum is presented. The kinematics parameters were modelled starting from a full Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of primary cosmic rays with atmospheric nuclei; secondary muons reaching the sea level were propagated in the deep water. The parametric formulas are valid for a vertical depth of 1.5-5 km w.e. and up to 85 deg for the zenith angle, and can be used as input for a fast simulation of atmospheric muons in underwater/ice detectors.

Y. Becherini; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

Measurement of the cosmic ray and neutrino-induced muon flux at the Sudbury neutrino observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth’s surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring ...

Formaggio, Joseph A.

180

Strong WW scattering physics: A comparative study for the LHC, NLC and a Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the model independent parameterization for a strongly interacting electroweak sector. Phenomenological studies are made to probe such a sector for future colliders such as the LHC, e{sup +}e{sup -} Linear collider and a muon collider.

Han, Tao

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The Target System and Support Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off in a hot cell. Kirk T. McDonald May 4, 2001 12 #12;The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Target System Support Facility Extensive shielding; remote handling capability. Kirk T. Mc

McDonald, Kirk

182

The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The R&D Program for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off in a hot cell. Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 18 #12;The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Target System Support Facility Extensive shielding; remote handling capability. Kirk T. Mc

McDonald, Kirk

183

The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The Target System and Support Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off in a hot cell. Kirk T. McDonald May 4, 2001 12 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Target System Support Facility Extensive shielding; remote handling capability. Kirk T. Mc

McDonald, Kirk

184

The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The R&D Program for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

products can be distilled off in a hot cell. Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 17 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Target System Support Facility Extensive shielding; remote handling

McDonald, Kirk

185

On the order of magnitude of 8th order corrections to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the 8th order contribution to the muon anomaly can be as large as 100-200*( alpha / pi )/sup 4/. (10 refs).

Lautrup, B

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

On inconsistency of experimental data on primary nuclei spectra with sea level muon intensity measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the first time a complete set of the most recent direct data on primary cosmic ray spectra is used as input into calculations of muon flux at sea level in wide energy range $E_\\mu=1-3\\cdot10^5$ GeV. Computations have been performed with the CORSIKA/QGSJET and CORSIKA/VENUS codes. The comparison of the obtained muon intensity with the data of muon experiments shows, that measurements of primary nuclei spectra conform to sea level muon data only up to several tens of GeV and result in essential deficit of muons at higher energies. As it follows from our examination, uncertainties in muon flux measurements and in the description of nuclear cascades development are not suitable to explain this contradiction, and the only remaining factor, leading to this situation, is underestimation of primary light nuclei fluxes. We have considered systematic effects, that may distort the results of the primary cosmic ray measurements with the application of the emulsion chambers. We suggest, that re-examination of these measurements is required with the employment of different hadronic interaction models. Also, in our point of view, it is necessary to perform estimates of possible influence of the fact, that sizable fraction of events, identified as protons, actually are antiprotons. Study of these cosmic ray component begins to attract much attention, but today nothing definite is known for the energies $>40$ GeV. In any case, to realize whether the mentioned, or some other reasons are the sources of disagreement of the data on primaries with the data on muons, the indicated effects should be thoroughly analyzed.

A. A. Lagutin; A. G. Tyumentsev; A. V. Yushkov

2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

187

The Muon (g-2) Theory Value: Present and Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This White Paper briefly reviews the present status of the muon (g-2) Standard-Model prediction. This value results in a 3 - 4 standard-deviation difference with the experimental result from Brookhaven E821. The present experimental uncertainty is $\\pm 63 \\times 10^{-11}$ (0.54~ppm), and the Standard-Model uncertainty is $\\simeq \\pm 49 \\times 10^{-11}$. Fermilab experiment E989 has the goal to reduce the experimental error to $\\pm 16 \\times 10^{-11}$. Improvements in the Standard-Model value, which should be achieved between now and when the first results from Fermilab E989 could be available, should lead to a Standard-Model uncertainty of $\\sim \\,\\pm 35 \\times 10^{-11}$. These improvements would halve the uncertainty on the difference between experiment and theory, and should clarify whether the current difference points toward New Physics, or to a statistical fluctuation. At present, the (g-2) result is arguably the most compelling indicator of physics beyond the Standard Model and, at the very least, it represents a major constraint for speculative new theories such as supersymmetry, dark gauge bosons or extra dimensions.

Thomas Blum; Achim Denig; Ivan Logashenko; Eduardo de Rafael; B. Lee Roberts; Thomas Teubner; Graziano Venanzoni

2013-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

188

Progress on muon parametric-resonance ionization cooling channel development  

SciTech Connect

Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is intended as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. To implement PIC, a continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel was developed. A 6D cooling with stochastic effects off is demonstrated in a GEANT4/G4beamline model of a system where wedge-shaped Be absorbers are placed at the appropriate dispersion points in the twin-helix channel and are followed by short rf cavities. To proceed to cooling simulations with stochastics on, compensation of the beam aberrations from one absorber to another is required. Initial results on aberration compensation using a set of various-order continuous multipole fields are presented. As another avenue to mitigate the aberration effect, we optimize the cooling channel's period length. We observe a parasitic parametric resonance naturally occurring in the channel's horizontal plane due to the periodic beam energy modulation caused by the absorbers and rf. We discuss options for compensating this resonance and/or properly combining it with the induced half-integer parametric resonance needed for PIC.

V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, K.B. Beard, R.P. Johnson, B. Erdelyi, J.A. Maloney

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Improving Higgs Sensitivity at CDF by Introducing New Muon Triggers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A search for Standard Model Higgs boson production in the H {yields} WW {yields} {ell}{nu}jj channel using 5.7 fb{sup -1} of CDF II data is presented. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which event probability densities for the signal and background hypotheses are calculated and used to create a powerful disciminator (called the event probability discriminant, EPD). The EPD distributions for signal and background are fit to the data using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. To improve the limits on the H production cross section, a new muon category, CMP, is added. No evidence for a Higgs boson signal is observed, and 95% confidence level upper limits on the H cross section times the branching ratio of the Higgs boson to decay to two W of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} H) x BR(H {yields} WW)/SM Higgs boson masses of between m{sub H} = 150 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub H} = 200 GeV/c{sup 2} are found. The expected (median) limit estimated in pseudo-experiments is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} H) x BR(H {yields} WW)/SM < 12.5 to 41.0 at 95% C.L. The inclusion of the phi gap trigger lead to improvements in the sensitivity of up to 7.3%; on average, the improvement in the sensitivity was 3.3%.

Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; /Zurich, ETH

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Anomalous Lagrangians and the radiative muon capture in hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of an anomalous Lagrangian of the pi-rho-omega-a_1 system is investigated within the hidden local SU(2)_R x SU(2)_L symmetry approach. The interaction of the external electromagnetic and weak vector and axial-vector fields with the above hadron system is included. The Lagrangian of interest contains the anomalous Wess-Zumino term following from the well known Wess-Zumino-Witten action and six independent homogenous terms. It is characterized by four constants that are to be determined from a fit to the data on various elementary reactions. Present data allows one to extract the constants with a good accuracy. The homogenous part of the Lagrangian has been applied in the study of anomalous processes that could enhance the high energy tail of the spectrum of photons, produced in the radiative muon capture in hydrogen. It should be noted that recently, an intensive search for such enhancement processes has been carried in the literature, in an attempt to resolve the so called "g_P puzzle": an about 50 % difference between the theoretical prediction of the value of the induced pseudoscalar constant g_P and its value extracted from the high energy tail of the photon spectrum, measured in the precision TRIUMF experiment. Here, more details on the studied material are presented and new results, obtained by using the Wess-Zumino term, are provided.

J. Smejkal; E. Truhlik; F. C. Khanna

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

191

Higgs mass and muon anomalous magnetic moment in supersymmetric models with vectorlike matters  

SciTech Connect

We study the muon anomalous magnetic moment (muon g-2) and the Higgs boson mass in a simple extension of the minimal supersymmetric (SUSY) standard model with extra vectorlike matters, in the frameworks of gauge-mediated SUSY breaking (GMSB) models and gravity mediation (mSUGRA) models. It is shown that the deviation of the muon g-2 and a relatively heavy Higgs boson can be simultaneously explained in large tan{beta} region. (i) In GMSB models, the Higgs mass can be more than 135 GeV (130 GeV) in the region where the muon g-2 is consistent with the experimental value at the 2{sigma} (1{sigma}) level, while maintaining the perturbative coupling unification. (ii) In the case of mSUGRA models with universal soft masses, the Higgs mass can be as large as about 130 GeV when the muon g-2 is consistent with the experimental value at the 2{sigma} level. In both cases, the Higgs mass can be above 140 GeV if the g-2 constraint is not imposed.

Endo, Motoi; Hamaguchi, Koichi [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Chiba, 277-8583 (Japan); Iwamoto, Sho; Yokozaki, Norimi [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Delayed muons in extensive air showers and double-front showers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a long-term experiment performed in the period between 1995 and 2006 with the aid of the MUON-T underground (20 mwe) scintillation facility arranged at the Tien Shan mountain research station at an altitude of 3340 m above sea level are presented. The time distribution of delayed muons with an energy in excess of 5 GeV in extensive air showers of energy not lower than 106 GeV with respect to the shower front was obtained with a high statistical significance in the delay interval between 30 and 150 ns. An effect of the geomagnetic field in detecting delayed muons in extensive air showers was discovered. This effect leads to the asymmetry of their appearance with respect to the north-south direction. The connection between delayed muons and extensive air showers featuring two fronts separated by a time interval of several tens of to two hundred nanoseconds is discussed. This connection gives sufficient grounds to assume that delayed muons originate from the decays of pions and kaons produced in the second, delayed, front of extensive air showers.

Beisembaev, R. U.; Vavilov, Yu. N., E-mail: yuvavil@mail.ru; Vildanov, N. G.; Kruglov, A. V.; Stepanov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Institute of Physics (Russian Federation); Takibaev, J. S. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University (Kazakhstan)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Improving Higgs Sensitivity at CDF by Introducing New Muon Triggers  

SciTech Connect

A search for Standard Model Higgs boson production in the H {yields} WW {yields} {ell}{nu}jj channel using 5.7 fb{sup -1} of CDF II data is presented. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which event probability densities for the signal and background hypotheses are calculated and used to create a powerful disciminator (called the event probability discriminant, EPD). The EPD distributions for signal and background are fit to the data using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. To improve the limits on the H production cross section, a new muon category, CMP, is added. No evidence for a Higgs boson signal is observed, and 95% confidence level upper limits on the H cross section times the branching ratio of the Higgs boson to decay to two W of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} H) x BR(H {yields} WW)/SM < 7.7 to 62.1 for Higgs boson masses of between m{sub H} = 150 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub H} = 200 GeV/c{sup 2} are found. The expected (median) limit estimated in pseudo-experiments is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} H) x BR(H {yields} WW)/SM < 12.5 to 41.0 at 95% C.L. The inclusion of the phi gap trigger lead to improvements in the sensitivity of up to 7.3%; on average, the improvement in the sensitivity was 3.3%.

Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; /Zurich, ETH

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Leon Lederman, the K-meson, the Muon Neutrino, and the Bottom Quark  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Leon Lederman, the K-meson, the Muon Leon Lederman, the K-meson, the Muon Neutrino, and the Bottom Quark His Honors · His Involvement in Science Education His Wisdom and Humor · Resources with Additional Information Leon Lederman started his career in Physics at Columbia University, where he earned his Ph.D. in 1952. He 'stayed on at Columbia following his studies, remaining for nearly 30 years, as the Eugene Higgins Professor and, from 1961 until 1979, as director of Nevis Laboratories in Irvington, the Columbia physics department center for experimental research in high-energy physics. ... Leon Lederman Courtesy of Fermilab In 1956, working with a Columbia team at the Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, Lederman discovered a new particle, the long-lived neutral K-meson, which had been predicted from theory. Further research at Columbia demonstrated the non-conservation of parity during muon decay. ...

195

Geek-Up[12.23.2010]: Muons at the South Pole and Dr. Nick Holoynak |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2.23.2010]: Muons at the South Pole and Dr. Nick Holoynak 2.23.2010]: Muons at the South Pole and Dr. Nick Holoynak Geek-Up[12.23.2010]: Muons at the South Pole and Dr. Nick Holoynak December 23, 2010 - 12:05pm Addthis Illustration of the IceCube neutrino observatory. Source: LBNL Illustration of the IceCube neutrino observatory. Source: LBNL Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Earlier today, the Energy Blog featured Los Alamos National Lab's system to track Santa. However, while there is a lot of attention focused on the North Pole right now, the Geek-Up[date] team is taking a look at the opposite end of the Earth. This past weekend, a collaborative group of 40 institutions from around the world, including DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, celebrated the completion of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory

196

Distortions of Experimental Muon Arrival Time Distributions of Extensive Air Showers by the Observation Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Event-by-event measured arrival time distributions of Extensive Air Shower (EAS) muons are affected and distorted by various interrelated effects which originate from the time resolution of the timing detectors, from fluctuations of the reference time and the number (multiplicity) of detected muons spanning the arrival time distribution of the individual EAS events. The origin of these effects is discussed, and different correction procedures, which involve detailed simulations, are proposed and illustrated. The discussed distortions are relevant for relatively small observation distances (R < 200 m) from the EAS core. Their significance decreases with increasing observation distance and increasing primary energies. Local arrival time distributions which refer to the observed arrival time of the first local muon prove to be less sensitive to the mass of the primary. This feature points to the necessity of arrival time measurements with additional information on the curvature of the EAS disk.

R. Haeusler; A. F. Badea; H. Rebel; I. M. Brancus; J. Oehlschlaeger

2001-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

197

ATLAS Great Lakes Tier-2 Computing and Muon Calibration Center Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large-scale computing in ATLAS is based on a grid-linked system of tiered computing centers. The ATLAS Great Lakes Tier-2 came online in September 2006 and now is commissioning with full capacity to provide significant computing power and services to the USATLAS community. Our Tier-2 Center also host the Michigan Muon Calibration Center which is responsible for daily calibrations of the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tubes for ATLAS endcap muon system. During the first LHC beam period in 2008 and following ATLAS global cosmic ray data taking period, the Calibration Center received a large data stream from the muon detector to derive the drift tube timing offsets and time-to-space functions with a turn-around time of 24 hours. We will present the Calibration Center commissioning status and our plan for the first LHC beam collisions in 2009.

Shawn McKee

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Prompt muon-induced fission: a probe for nuclear energy dissipation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve the time-dependent Dirac equation for a muon which is initially bound to a fissioning actinide nucleus. The computations are carried out on a 3-D cartesian lattice utilizing the Basis-Spline collocation method. The muon dynamics is sensitive to the nuclear energy dissipation between the outer fission barrier and the scission point. From a comparison with experimental data we find a dissipated energy of about 10 MeV and a fission time delay due to friction of order $2 \\times 10^{-21}$ s.

Volker E. Oberacker

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

199

Prompt muon-induced fission: a probe for nuclear energy dissipation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We solve the time-dependent Dirac equation for a muon which is initially bound to a fissioning actinide nucleus. The computations are carried out on a 3-D cartesian lattice utilizing the Basis-Spline collocation method. The muon dynamics is sensitive to the nuclear energy dissipation between the outer fission barrier and the scission point. From a comparison with experimental data we find a dissipated energy of about 10 MeV and a fission time delay due to friction of order 2 × 10 ?21 s.

Volker E. Oberacker

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Hadronic Light-by-Light Scattering Contribution to the Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the current status of theoretical calculations of the hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Different approaches and related issues such as OPE constraints and large breaking of chiral symmetry are discussed. Combining results of different models with educated guesses on the errors we come to the estimate $$a^{\\rm HLbL}=(10.5\\pm 2.6)\\times 10^{-10}.$$ The text is prepared as a contribution to the {\\it Glasgow White Paper on the present status of the Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment}.

Joaquim Prades; Eduardo de Rafael; Arkady Vainshtein

2009-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Limits to the muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the AMANDA detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for an excess of muon-neutrinos from neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the AMANDA-II neutrino detector using data collected in 143.7 days of live-time in 2001. No excess over the expected atmospheric neutrino background has been observed. An upper limit at 90% confidence level has been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun, as well as the corresponding muon flux limit at the Earth, both as functions of the neutralino mass in the range 100 GeV-5000 GeV.

The AMANDA collaboration; M. Ackermann

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

202

Prompt muon-induced fission: a sensitive probe for nuclear energy dissipation and fission dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the formation of an excited muonic atom, inner shell transitions may proceed without photon emission by inverse internal conversion, i.e. the muonic excitation energy is transferred to the nucleus. In actinides, the 2p ? 1s and the 3d ? 1s muonic transitions result in excitation of the nuclear giant dipole and giant quadrupole resonances, respectively, which act as doorway states for fission. The nuclear excitation energy is typically 6.5 ? 10 MeV. Because the muon lifetime is long compared to the timescale of prompt nuclear fission, the motion of the muon in the Coulomb field of the fissioning nucleus may be utilized to learn about the dynamics of fission. If there is large friction between the outer fission barrier and the scission point the muon will remain in the lowest molecular energy level and emerge in the 1s bound state of the heavy fission fragment. On the other hand, if friction is small (i.e. the nuclear collective motion is fast) there is a nonvanishing probability that the muon may be promoted to higher-lying molecular orbitals, e.g. the 2p? level, from where

Volker E. Oberacker; A. Sait Umar; Feodor F. Karpeshin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

AN IONIZATION COOLING CHANNEL FOR MUON BEAMS BASED ON ALTERNATING SOLENOIDS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The muon collider requires intense, cooled muon bunches to reach the required luminosity. Due to the limited life-time of the muon, the cooling process must take place very rapidly. Ionization cooling seems to be our only option, given the large emittances of the muon beam from pion decay. However, this ionization cooling method has been found quite difficult to implement in practice. We describe a scheme based on the use of liquid hydrogen absorbers followed by r.f. cavities (''pillbox'' or ''open iris'' type), embedded in a transport lattice based on high field solenoids. These solenoidal fields are reversed periodically in order to suppress the growth of the canonical angular momentum. This channel has been simulated in detail with independent codes, featuring conventional tracking in e.m. fields and detailed simulation of multiple scattering and straggling in the absorbers and windows. These calculations show that the 15 Tesla lattice cools in 6-D phase space by a factor {approx} 2 over a distance of 20 m.

GALLARDO,J.C.; FERNOW,R.C.; KIRK,H.G.; PALMER,R.B.; LEBRUN,P.; MORETTI,A.; TOLLESTRUP,A.T.; KAPLAN,D.M.; FUKUI,Y.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

204

Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

SciTech Connect

Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S.N.; Andersen, T.C.; Anthony, A.E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E.W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S.D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M.G.; Burritt, T.H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M.C.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P.J.; Dosanjh, R.S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J.TM.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Harvey, P.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hemingway, R.J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Klein, J.R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A.B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M.L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A.J.; Oblath, N.S.; Okada, C.E.; O?Keeffe, H.M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Oser, S.M.; Ott, R.A.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Secrest, J.A.; Seibert, S.R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J.J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M.W.E.; Sonley, T.J.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill, L.C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R.G.; VanDevender, B.A.; Virtue, C.J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C.E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D.L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wilson, J.R.; Wouters, J.M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

205

Test with cosmic rays of the GEM chambers for the LHCb muon system produced in Cagliari  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inner region of the first LHCb muon station will be equipped with twelve Gas Electron Multiplier chambers. The seven chambers produced in Cagliari were studied for several days each using cosmic rays. We measured the efficiency, timing resolution, and uniformity, cluster-size and out-of-time multiplicity. We find all seven chambers perform well.

Bonivento, W; Oldeman, R G C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Detection of Ionizing Radiation by Plasma-Panel Sensors: Cosmic Muons, Ion Beams, and Cancer Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The plasma panel sensor is an ionizing photon and particle radiation detector derived from PDP technology with high gain and nanosecond response. Experimental results in detecting cosmic ray muons and beta particles from radioactive sources are described along with applications including high energy and nuclear physics, homeland security and cancer therapeutics.

Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Simulations of a Gas-Filled Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A helical cooling channel (HCC) has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. The HCC is composed of a series of RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas that acts as the energy absorber for ionization cooling and suppresses RF breakdown in the cavities. Magnetic solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole coils outside of the RF cavities provide the focusing and dispersion needed for the emittance exchange for the beam as it follows a helical equilibrium orbit down the HCC. In the work presented here, two Monte Carlo programs have been developed to simulate a HCC to compare with the analytic predictions and to begin the process of optimizing practical designs that could be built in the near future. We discuss the programs, the comparisons with the analytical theory, and the prospects for a HCC design with the capability to reduce the six-dimensional phase space emittance of a muon beam by a factor of over five orders of magnitude in a linear channel less than 100 meters long.

K. Yonehara; D.M. Kaplan; K. Beard; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev; R.P. Johnson; K. Paul; T.J. Roberts

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

208

Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

SciTech Connect

Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S.N.; Andersen, T.C.; Anthony, A.E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E.W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S.D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M.G.; Burritt, T.H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M.C.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P.J.; Dosanjh, R.S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J.TM.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Harvey, P.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hemingway, R.J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Klein, J.R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A.B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M.L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A.J.; Oblath, N.S.; Okada, C.E.; O?Keeffe, H.M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Oser, S.M.; Ott, R.A.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Secrest, J.A.; Seibert, S.R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J.J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M.W.E.; Sonley, T.J.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill, L.C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R.G.; VanDevender, B.A.; Virtue, C.J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C.E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D.L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wilson, J.R.; Wouters, J.M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

209

Study of various photomultiplier tubes with muon beams and Cerenkov light produced in electron showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of various photomultiplier tubes with muon beams and Cerenkov light produced in electron beams and Cerenkov light produced in electron showers CMS HCAL collaboration E-mail: Burak their windows were traversed by energetic charged particles. This signal, which is due to Cerenkov light

Akgun, Ugur

210

Ballpark prediction for the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the muon (g-2)_?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the momentum dependence of the dressed quark mass and the well-known formulae for the mass dependent quark loop contribution to the light-by-light scattering insertions, we compute the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the the muon anomalous magnetic moment. We ascribe for the first time a systematic error on the calculation.

Pere Masjuan; Marc Vanderhaeghen

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

211

A Diffusion Cloud Chamber Study of Very Slow Mesons. II. Beta Decay of the Muon  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The spectrum of electrons arising from the decay of the negative mu meson has been determined. The muons are arrested in the gas of a high pressure hydrogen filled diffusion cloud chamber. The momenta of the decay electrons are determined from their curvature in a magnetic field of 7750 gauss. The spectrum of 415 electrons has been analyzed according to the theory of Michel.

Lederman, L. M.; Sargent, C. P.; Rinehart, M.; Rogers, K.

1955-03-00T23:59:59.000Z

212

Intensity of Upward Muon Flux Due to Cosmic-Ray Neutrinos Produced in the Atmosphere  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Calculations were performed to determine the upward going muon flux leaving the earth's surface after production by cosmic-ray neutrinos in the crust. Only neutrinos produced in the earth's atmosphere are considered. Rates of the order of one per 100 sq m/day might be expected if an intermediate boson exists and has a mass less than 2 Bev. (auth)

Lee, T. D.; Robinson, H.; Schwartz, M.; Cool, R.

1963-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

213

Simulation analysis of data processing activities in Compact Muon Solenoid physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scale, complexity and worldwide geographical spread of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) computing and data analysis problems are unprecedented in scientific research. The complexity of processing and accessing this data is increased substantially ... Keywords: Compact Muon Solenoid, large-scale distributed systems, simulation model

Ciprian Dobre

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Studies of a Gas-filled Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A helical cooling channel (HCC) can quickly reduce the six dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. The HCC is composed of solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields to provide the focusing and dispersion needed for emittance exchange as the beam follows an equilibrium helical orbit through a continuous homogeneous absorber. We consider liquid helium and liquid hydrogen absorbers in HCC segments that alternate with RF accelerating sections and we also consider gaseous hydrogen absorber in pressurized RF cavities imbedded in HCC segments. In the case of liquid absorber, the possibility of using superconducting RF in low magnetic field regions between the HCC segments may provide a cost effective solution to the high repetition rate needed for an intense neutrino factory or high average luminosity muon collider. In the gaseous hydrogen absorber case, the pressurized RF cavities can be operated at low temperature to improve their efficiency for higher repetition rates. Numerical simulations are used to optimize and compare the liquid and gaseous HCC techniques.

R.P. Johnson; K. Paul; T.J. Roberts; Y.S. Derbenev; K. Yonehara

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

215

Possible evidence of a ground level enhancement of muons in association with a SWIFT Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting from April 2007, a search for solar daily variation of the muon intensity ($E_\\mu >0.2$ GeV) at sea level and using two directional muon telescopes is in progress. In this survey, several ground level enhancements (GLEs) on the muon counting rate background have been found. Here, we highlight one of them, observed in the vertical telescope on 07 August 2007 for the following reasons: The GLE consists of a single narrow peak, with a statistical significance of 4.4$\\sigma$. The GLE is in temporal coincidence with a SWIFT trigger $N^0287222$, at 21:16:05 UT according to the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board of the SWIFT spacecraft. However, the Swift StarTracker had lost stellar lock minutes before that and the resulting improper s/c attitude information caused BAT to "trigger" on a known source. Even so, the SWIFT trigger coordinates are inside the effective field of view of the vertical Tupi muon telescope. The temporal and directional coincidences between this GLE and the SWIFT satellite unknown event strongly suggest that they may be physically associated. Details and implications of this possible association are reported in this work.

C. R. A. Augusto; C. E. Navia; M. B. Robba; K. H. Tsui

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

216

Neutrinos from Decaying Muons, Pions, Kaons and Neutrons in Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the internal shock model of gamma ray bursts ultrahigh energy muons, pions, neutrons and kaons are likely to be produced in the interactions of shock accelerated relativistic protons with low energy photons (KeV-MeV). These particles subsequently decay to high energy neutrinos/antineutrinos and other secondaries. In the high internal magnetic fields of gamma ray bursts, the ultrahigh energy charged particles ($\\mu^+$, $\\pi^+$, $K^+$) lose energy significantly due to synchrotron radiations before decaying into secondary high energy neutrinos and antineutrinos. The relativistic neutrons decay to high energy antineutrinos, protons and electrons. We have calculated the total neutrino flux (neutrino and antineutrino) considering the decay channels of ultrahigh energy muons, pions, neutrons and kaons. We have shown that the total neutrino flux generated in neutron decay can be higher than that produced in $\\mu^+$ and $\\pi^+$ decay. The charged kaons being heavier than pions, lose energy slowly and their secondary total neutrino flux is more than that from muons and pions at very high energy. Our detailed calculations on secondary particle production in $p\\gamma$ interactions give the total neutrino fluxes and their flavour ratios expected on earth. Depending on the values of the parameters (luminosity, Lorentz factor, variability time, spectral indices and break energy in the photon spectrum) of a gamma ray burst the contributions to the total neutrino flux from the decay of different particles (muon, pion, neutron and kaon) may vary and they would also be reflected on the neutrino flavour ratios.

Reetanjali Moharana; Nayantara Gupta

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

217

nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee  

SciTech Connect

The idea of using a muon storage ring to produce a high-energy ({approx_equal} 50 GeV) neutrino beam for experiments was first discussed by Koshkarev in 1974. A detailed description of a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments was first produced by Neuffer in 1980. In his paper, Neuffer studied muon decay rings with E{sub {mu}} of 8, 4.5 and 1.5 GeV. With his 4.5 GeV ring design, he achieved a figure of merit of {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 9} useful neutrinos per 3 x 10{sup 13} protons on target. The facility we describe here ({nu}STORM) is essentially the same facility proposed in 1980 and would utilize a 3-4 GeV/c muon storage ring to study eV-scale oscillation physics and, in addition, could add significantly to our understanding of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} cross sections. In particular the facility can: (1) address the large {Delta}m{sup 2} oscillation regime and make a major contribution to the study of sterile neutrinos, (2) make precision {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-section measurements, (3) provide a technology ({mu} decay ring) test demonstration and {mu} beam diagnostics test bed, and (4) provide a precisely understood {nu} beam for detector studies. The facility is the simplest implementation of the Neutrino Factory concept. In our case, 60 GeV/c protons are used to produce pions off a conventional solid target. The pions are collected with a focusing device (horn or lithium lens) and are then transported to, and injected into, a storage ring. The pions that decay in the first straight of the ring can yield a muon that is captured in the ring. The circulating muons then subsequently decay into electrons and neutrinos. We are starting with a storage ring design that is optimized for 3.8 GeV/c muon momentum. This momentum was selected to maximize the physics reach for both oscillation and the cross section physics. See Fig. 1 for a schematic of the facility.

Kyberd, P.; Smith, D.R.; /Brunel U.; Coney, L.; /UC, Riverside; Pascoli, S.; /Durham U., IPPP; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cease, H.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; /Fermilab /Yerkes Observ. /Glasgow U. /Imperial Coll., London /Valencia U. /Jefferson Lab /Kyoto U. /Northwestern U. /Osaka U.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A Search for Muon Neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts wih the IceCube 22-String Detector.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two searches are conducted for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) using the IceCube detector. Gamma-Ray Bursts are brief and transient emissions of keV/MeV radiation… (more)

Roth, A Philip

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Construction and Performance of Large-Area Triple-GEM Prototypes for Future Upgrades of the CMS Forward Muon System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, part of the forward RPC muon system of the CMS detector at the CERN LHC remains uninstrumented in the high-\\eta region. An international collaboration is investigating the possibility of covering the 1.6 radiation hardness, these micro-pattern gas detectors are an appealing option for simultaneously enhancing muon tracking and triggering capabilities in a future upgrade of the CMS detector. A general overview of this feasibility study will be presented. The design and construction of small (10\\times10 cm2) and full-size trapezoidal (1\\times0.5 m2) triple-GEM prototypes will be described. During detector assembly, different techniques for stretching the GEM foils were tested. Results from measurements with x-rays and from test beam campaigns at the CERN SPS will be shown for the small and large prototypes. Preliminary simulation studies on the expected muon reconstruction and trigger performances of this proposed upgraded muon system will be reported.

M. Tytgat; A. Marinov; N. Zaganidis; Y. Ban; J. Cai; H. Teng; A. Mohapatra; T. Moulik; M. Abbrescia; A. Colaleo; G. de Robertis; F. Loddo; M. Maggi; S. Nuzzo; S. A. Tupputi; L. Benussi; S. Bianco; S. Colafranceschi; D. Piccolo; G. Raffone; G. Saviano; M. G. Bagliesi; R. Cecchi; G. Magazzu; E. Oliveri; N. Turini; T. Fruboes; D. Abbaneo; C. Armagnaud; P. Aspell; S. Bally; U. Berzano; J. Bos; K. Bunkowski; J. P. Chatelain; J. Christiansen; A. Conde Garcia; E. David; R. De Oliveira; S. Duarte Pinto; S. Ferry; F. Formenti; L. Franconi; A. Marchioro; K. Mehta; J. Merlin; M. V. Nemallapudi; H. Postema; A. Rodrigues; L. Ropelewski; A. Sharma; N. Smilkjovic; M. Villa; M. Zientek; A. Gutierrez; P. E. Karchin; K. Gnanvo; M. Hohlmann; M. J. Staib

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

The ATLAS Muon Trigger Performance in pp Collisions at sqrt(s)=8 TeV in Year 2012 Runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Events with muons in the final state are an important signature for many physics topics at Large Hadron Collider (LHC), for instance, searches for Higgs boson production or new phenomena, measurements on the standard model processes like top-quark, W, Z production. Thus, efficient trigger on muons in data taking and understanding its performance are crucial to perform these physics studies. At LHC high rejection power against large backgrounds, while maintaining high efficiency for rare signal events, is required for online selection at the trigger level. The ATLAS experiment employs a multi-level trigger architecture that selects the events in three sequential steps of increasing complexity and accuracy to cope with this challenging task. The L1 muon trigger system gets its input from fast muon trigger detectors. Fast sector logic boards select muon candidates, which are passed via an interface board to the central trigger processor and then to the High Level Trigger (HLT). The Muon HLT is purely software ba...

Nobe, T; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Investigation of the relative abundance of heavy versus light nuclei in primary cosmic rays using underground muon bundles  

SciTech Connect

We study multiple muon events (muon bundles) recorded underground at a depth of 2090 mwe. To penetrate to this depth, the muons must have energies above 0.8 TeV at the Earth`s surface; the primary cosmic ray nuclei which give rise to the observed muon bundles have energies at incidence upon the upper atmosphere of 10 to 10{sup 5}TeV. The events are detected using the Soudan 2 experiment`s fine grained tracking calorimeter which is surrounded by a 14 m {times}10 m {times} 31 m proportional tube array (the ``active shield``). Muon bundles which have at least one muon traversing the calorimeter, are reconstructed using tracks in the calorimeter together with hit patterns in the proportional tube shield. All ionization pulses are required to be coincident within 3 microseconds. A goal of this study is to investigate the relative nuclear abundances in the primary cosmic radiation around the ``knee`` region (10{sup 3} {minus} 10{sup 4} TeV) of the incident energy spectrum. Four models for the nuclear composition of cosmic rays are considered: The Linsley model, the Constant Mass Composition model (CMC), the Maryland model and the Proton-poor model. A Monte Carlo which incorporates one model at a time is used to simulate events which are then reconstructed using the same computer algorithms that are used for the data. Identical cuts and selections are applied to the data and to the simulated events.

Sundaralingam, N.

1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

222

Prompt muon-induced fission: a sensitive probe for nuclear energy dissipation and fission dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the formation of an excited muonic atom, inner shell transitions may proceed without photon emission by inverse internal conversion, i.e. the muonic excitation energy is transferred to the nucleus. In actinides, the 2p -> 1s and the 3d -> 1s muonic transitions result in excitation of the nuclear giant dipole and giant quadrupole resonances, respectively, which act as doorway states for fission. The nuclear excitation energy is typically 6.5 - 10 MeV. Because the muon lifetime is long compared to the timescale of prompt nuclear fission, the motion of the muon in the Coulomb field of the fissioning nucleus may be utilized to learn about the dynamics of fission.

Volker E. Oberacker; A. Sait Umar; Feodor F. Karpeshin

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

A new measurement of the altitude dependence of the atmospheric muon intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new measurement of atmospheric muons made during an ascent of the High Energy Antimatter Telescope balloon experiment. The muon charge ratio mu+/mu- as a function of atmospheric depth in the momentum interval 0.3-0.9 GeV/c is presented. The differential mu- intensities in the 0.3-50 GeV/c range and for atmospheric depths between 4-960 g/cm^2 are also presented. We compare these results with other measurements and model predictions. We find that our charge ratio is ~1.1 for all atmospheric depths and is consistent, within errors, with other measurements and the model predictions. We find that our measured mu- intensities are also consistent with other measurements, and with the model predictions, except at shallow atmospheric depths.

J. J. Beatty; S. Coutu; S. A. Minnick; A. Bhattacharyya; C. R. Bower; J. A. Musser; S. P. McKee; M. Schubnell; G. Tarle; A. D. Tomasch; A. W. Labrador; D. Muller; S. P. Swordy; M. A. DuVernois; S. L. Nutter

2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

New measurement of the altitude dependence of the atmospheric muon intensity  

SciTech Connect

We present a new measurement of atmospheric muons made during an ascent of the High Energy Antimatter Telescope balloon experiment. The muon charge ratio {mu}{sup +}/{mu}{sup -} as a function of atmospheric depth in the momentum interval 0.3-0.9 GeV/c is presented. The differential {mu}{sup -} intensities in the 0.3-50 GeV/c range and for atmospheric depths between 4-960 g/cm{sup 2} are also presented. We compare these results with other measurements and model predictions. We find that our charge ratio is {approx}1.1 for all atmospheric depths and is consistent, within errors, with other measurements and the model predictions. We find that our measured {mu}{sup -} intensities are also consistent with other measurements, and with the model predictions, except at shallow atmospheric depths.

Beatty, J.J.; Coutu, S.; Minnick, S.A.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Bower, C.R.; Musser, J.A.; McKee, S.P.; Schubnell, M.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch, A.D.; Labrador, A.W.; Mueller, D.; Swordy, S.P.; DuVernois, M.A.; Nutter, S.L. [Departments of Physics and of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 104 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Department of Physics, Swain Hall West, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States); Department of Physics, Randall Laboratory, University of Michigan, 500 E. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1120 (United States); Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, 933 E. 56th Street, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); School of Physics and Astronomy, 16 Church Street SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Department of Physics and Geology, SC 147, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, Kentucky 41099 (United States)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Muon (g-2): A Probe of the Standard Model and Beyond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the experiments of Stern and Gerlach, magnetic moments of 'elementary' particles have been important in our quest to understand subatomic physics. The first 'QED loop calculation' was done by Schwinger to explain the larger than expected hydrogen hyperfine structure. The definitive measurement of the electron's anomalous magnetic moment by Kusch and Foley followed and agreed well with Schwinger's calculation of ae = (alpha/ 2 pi). The muon's anomaly, which is sensitive to a broad range of physics beyond the standard model, will be discussed in a historical context, following the intellectual development of modern physics through the 20th century. Experiment E821 at Brookhaven will be described, as well as possible improvements, which are highly desirable since the present value of the muon anomaly, appears to differ from the standard-model value by 3.4 standard deviations.

Roberts, Lee (Boston University)

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

226

Constraining Anomaly Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking Framework via Ongoing Muon g-2 Experiment at Brookhaven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ongoing high precision E821 Brookhaven National Laboratory experiment on muon g-2 is promising to probe a theory involving supersymmetry. We have studied the constraints on the minimal Anomaly Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking (AMSB) model using the current data of muon g-2 from Brookhaven. A scenario of seeing no deviation from the Standard Model is also considered, within a $2\\sigma$ limit of the combined error from the Standard Model result and the Brookhaven predicted uncertainty level. The resulting constraint is found to be complementary to what one obtains from $b \\to s+ \\gamma$ bounds within the AMSB scenario, since only a definite sign of $\\mu$ is effectively probed via $b \\to s+ \\gamma$. A few relevant generic features of the model are also described for disallowed regions of parameter space.

Utpal Chattopadhyay; Dilip Kumar Ghosh; Sourov Roy

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

227

Closed-cell 201.25 MHz RF structures for a muon cooling channel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on the research and development of high gradient low frequency closed-cell structures for possible use in a muon cooling channel. The presence of strong magnetic fields precludes the use of superconducting RF. These multi-cell structures have the ''beam iris'' closed by conducting oils, grids of tubes or other isolating structures. This greatly increases the shunt impedance and also allows the individually powered cells to be set independently to any phase. The isolating structure must be made using a very small amount of low-Z material to avoid unacceptable scattering of the muon beam. Various cell designs and methods of closure are presented and compared. The problems of RF heating and breakdown at high gradient are discussed with regard to the vulnerable isolating structures. RF, thermal and stress analyses are presented and the integration of the RF with the solenoid cryostat and liquid hydrogen absorbers is considered.

Rimmer, R.; Hartman, N.; Ladran, A.; Li, D.; Moretti, A.; Jurgens, T.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

D Note 3563 LED Pulser System for the D Muon Upgrade Scintillation Counters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the technical design for an LED based pulser system for the D Upgrade Muon Scintillation counters. For Run II, accurate timing information from the scintillation counters is imperative for the proper performance of the muon triggers. The LED Pulser System will serve in the commissioning of the counters and for the continuous monitoring of the PMTs ' performances and gains. A detailed description of the system is presented, as well as the results of tests on individual components and integrated system. Proceedures for production, assembly, quality control, installation, and commissioning are presented. Cost estimates and resource needs to complete the system are presented, as well as an estimated schedule. From the test results, the D LED Pulser System performs at a level exceeding speci cations for a fraction of the initial cost estimated for performing the required tasks.

Pierrick Hanlet Matthew Marcus; Al Ito; Bob Jones; Tom Regan; B. S. Acharya; Juan Pablo Negret; Manuel Zanabria

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A Fast Algorithm for Muon Track Reconstruction and its Application to the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An algorithm is presented, that provides a fast and robust reconstruction of neutrino induced upward-going muons and a discrimination of these events from downward-going atmospheric muon background in data collected by the ANTARES neutrino telescope. The algorithm consists of a hit merging and hit selection procedure followed by fitting steps for a track hypothesis and a point-like light source. It is particularly well-suited for real time applications such as online monitoring and fast triggering of optical follow-up observations for multi-messenger studies. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated with Monte Carlo simulations and various distributions are compared with that obtained in ANTARES data.

ANTARES collaboration; J. A. Aguilar; I. Al Samarai; A. Albert; M. Andre; M. Anghinolfi; G. Anton; S. Anvar; M. Ardid; A. C. Assis Jesus; T. Astraatmadja; J-J. Aubert; R. Auer; B. Baret; S. Basa; M. Bazzotti; V. Bertin; S. Biagi; C. Bigongiari; C. Bogazzi; M. Bou-Cabo; M. C. Bouwhuis; A. M. Brown; J. Brunner; J. Busto; F. Camarena; A. Capone; C. Carloganu; G. Carminati; J. Carr; S. Cecchini; Ph. Charvis; T. Chiarusi; M. Circella; R. Coniglione; H. Costantini; N. Cottini; P. Coyle; C. Curtil; M. P. Decowski; I. Dekeyser; A. Deschamps; C. Distefano; C. Donzaud; D. Dornic; Q. Dorosti; D. Drouhin; T. Eberl; U. Emanuele; J-P. Ernenwein; S. Escoffier; F. Fehr; V. Flaminio; U. Fritsch; J-L. Fuda; S. Galata; P. Gay; G. Giacomelli; J. P. Gomez-Gonzalez; K. Graf; G. Guillard; G. Halladjian; G. Hallewell; H. van Haren; A. J. Heijboer; Y. Hello; J. J. Hernandez-Rey; B. Herold; J. Hößl; C. C. Hsu; M. de Jong; M. Kadler; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; O. Kalekin; A. Kappes; U. Katz; P. Kooijman; C. Kopper; A. Kouchner; V. Kulikovskiy; R. Lahmann; P. Lamare; G. Larosa; D. Lefevre; G. Lim; D. Lo Presti; H. Loehner; S. Loucatos; F. Lucarelli; S. Mangano; M. Marcelin; A. Margiotta; J. A. Martinez-Mora; A. Mazure; A. Meli; T. Montaruli; M. Morganti; L. Moscoso; H. Motz; C. Naumann; M. Neff; D. Palioselitis; G. E. Pavalas; P. Payre; J. Petrovic; N. Picot-Clemente; C. Picq; V. Popa; T. Pradier; E. Presani; C. Racca; C. Reed; G. Riccobene; C. Richardt; R. Richter; A. Rostovtsev; M. Rujoiu; G. V. Russo; F. Salesa; P. Sapienza; F. Schöck; J-P. Schuller; R. Shanidze; F. Simeone; A. Spiess; M. Spurio; J. J. M. Steijger; Th. Stolarczyk; M. Taiuti; C. Tamburini; L. Tasca; S. Toscano; B. Vallage; V. Van Elewyck; G. Vannoni; M. Vecchi; P. Vernin; G. Wijnker; E. de Wolf; H. Yepes; D. Zaborov; J. D. Zornoza; J. Zuniga

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

230

On the possibility to discriminate the mass of the primary cosmic ray using the muon arrival times from extensive air showers: Application for Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we study the possibility to discriminate the mass of the primary cosmic ray by observing the muon arrival times in ground detectors. We analyzed extensive air showers (EAS) induced by proton and iron nuclei with the same energy 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} eV simulated with CORSIKA, and analyzed the muon arrival times at ground measured by the infill array detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO). From the arrival times of the core and of the muons the atmospheric depth of muon generation locus is evaluated. The results suggest a potential mass discrimination on the basis of muon arrival times and of the reconstructed atmospheric depth of muon production. An analysis of a larger set of CORSIKA simulations carried out for primary energies above 10{sup 18} eV is in progress.

Arsene, N.; Rebel, H.; Sima, O. [Institute of Space Science (ISS), Bucharest-Magurele, P.O. Box MG-23 (Romania) and Physics Department, University of Bucharest, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Physics Department, University of Bucharest, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

231

AGS performance and upgrades; A possible proton driver for a muon collider  

SciTech Connect

After the successful completion of the AGS Booster and several upgrades of the AGS, a new intensity record of 6.3 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse accelerated to 24GeV was achieved. Further intensity upgrades are being discussed that could increase the average delivered beam intensity by up to a factor of six. The total beam power then reaches almost 1 MW and the AGS can then be considered as a proton driver for a muon collider.

Roser, T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the Muon and Higgs-Mediated Flavor Changing Neutral Currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the two-Higgs doublet extension of the standard model, flavor-changing neutral couplings arise naturally. In the lepton sector, the largest such coupling is expected to be $\\mu-\\tau-\\phi#. We consider the effects of this coupling on the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. The resulting bound on the coupling, unlike previous bounds, is independent of the value of other unknown couplings. It will be significantly improved by the upcoming E821 experiment at Brookhaven National Lab.

Shuquan Nie; Marc Sher

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

233

MuCap: Muon capture on the proton to determine the pseudoscalar coupling, gp  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MuCap collaboration has measured the capture rate of the muon on the proton and reported its first value for the weak pseudoscalar coupling: gp 7.3{+-}1.1. To achieve 5% uncertainty on gp, many hardware upgrades were implemented for the subsequent 2006-2007 running periods. These improvements are described and the outlook for MuCap and the followup experiment, MuSun, is discussed.

Kiburg, Brendan [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

234

Six-dimensional muon beam cooling in a continuous, homogeneous, gaseous hydrogen absorber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fast reduction of the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams is required for muon colliders and is also of great importance for neutrino factories based on accelerated muon beams. Ionization cooling, where all momentum components are degraded by an energy absorbing material and only the longitudinal momentum is restored by RF cavities, provides a means to quickly reduce transverse beam sizes. However, the beam momentum spread cannot be reduced by this method unless the longitudinal emittance can be transformed or exchanged into the transverse emittance. The best emittance exchange plans up to now have been accomplished by using magnets to disperse the beam along the face of a wedge-shaped absorber such that higher momentum particles pass through thicker parts of the absorber and thus suffer larger ionization energy loss. In the scheme advocated in this paper, it is noted that one can generate a magnetic channel filled with absorber where higher momentum corresponds to a longer path length and therefore larger ionization energy loss. Thus a homogeneous absorber, without any special edge shaping, can provide the desired emittance exchange. An attractive example of a cooling channel based on this principle involves the use of RF cavities filled with a continuous gaseous hydrogen absorber in a magnetic channel composed of a solenoidal field with superimposed helical transverse dipole, quadrupole, and octupole fields. The theory of this helical channel is described to support the analytical prediction of a million-fold reduction in phase space volume in a channel 150 m long.

Yaroslav Derbenev; Rolland P. Johnson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

A lattice for the 50 GeV muon collider ring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent progress report on the lattice design of the 50-50 GeV muon collider is presented. The ring circumference needs to be as small as possible due to the short lifetime of the 50 GeV muons. The background at the detector is affected by the continuous decay of muons into electrons which requires a dipole between the high focusing quadrupoles and the detector. To obtain a luminosity on the order of 1{times}10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} it is required to have beam intensities on the order of 1{times}10{sup 12} particles per bunch. The rms momentum spread of the beam is equal to 0.12% and the beta functions at the interaction point are equal to 4 cm. The maxima of the betatron functions at these quadrupoles are 1,300 m, resulting in large chromaticities which must be corrected by local chromatic correction. Pairs of horizontal and vertical chromatic sextupoles are located at locations where the corresponding betatron functions are 100 m and the values of the horizontal dispersion functions are 3 and 2 m, respectively. They are carefully placed so that most of their nonlinear effects are canceled. The dynamic aperture is larger than 7 times the mean size of the beam for the momentum offsets larger than {minus}6 and +10 sigmas.

Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Ng, K.Y.; Weishi, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Muon anomalous magnetic moment constraints on supersymmetric U(1){sup '} models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon in supersymmetric E{sub 6} models and generic U(1){sup '} models to probe the model reactions and to find constraints on the large parameter space of these models. For future searches, by imposing the existing bounds coming from collider searches and theoretical considerations upon the U(1){sup '} model parameters, we examine the lightest Higgs boson mass m{sub h} and the mass of the additional Z boson m{sub Z{sub 2}} in such singlet extensions of the MSSM. We observed that not only supersymmetric E{sub 6} models but also generic U(1){sup '} models are sensitive to the imposition of the considered bounds. Indeed, without the muon anomaly constraints E{sub 6} models and generic U(1){sup '} models can predict m{sub h} as large as {approx}150 GeV and {approx}180 GeV, respectively. However, in addition to the mentioned constraints when a 1{sigma} range for the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon is considered, we observe that generic U(1){sup '} models do not favor the mass of the lightest Higgs boson to be larger than 140 GeV; it should be smaller than 135 GeV in E{sub 6} models.

Cincioglu, Elif; Solmaz, Saime; Solmaz, Levent; Hicyilmaz, Yasar [Department of Physics, Balikesir University, TR10145, Balikesir (Turkey); Kirca, Zerrin [Department of Physics, Balikesir University, TR10145, Balikesir (Turkey); Department of Physics, Uludag University, TR16000, Bursa (Turkey); Sert, Hale [Department of Physics, Izmir Institute of Technology, TR35430, Izmir (Turkey)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial muon flux: A lookup table  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to an increased flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. Typical cosmic ray energies may be much higher than the ~ 1 GeV flux which normally dominates. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the radiation dose. Muons contribute 85% to the radiation dose from cosmic rays. This enhanced dose could be potentially harmful to the biosphere. This mechanism has been discussed extensively in literature but has never been quantified. Here, we have developed a lookup table that can be used to quantify this effect by modeling terrestrial muon flux from any arbitrary cosmic ray spectra with 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries. This will enable us to compute the radiation dose on terrestrial planetary surfaces from a number of astrophysical sources.

Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

Electromagnetic Design of RF Cavities for Accelerating Low-Energy Muons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-gradient linear accelerator for accelerating low-energy muons and pions in a strong solenoidal magnetic field has been proposed for homeland defense and industrial applications. The acceleration starts immediately after collection of pions from a target in a solenoidal magnetic field and brings decay muons, which initially have kinetic energies mostly around 15-20 MeV, to 200 MeV over a distance of {approx}10 m. At this energy, both ionization cooling and further, more conventional acceleration of the muon beam become feasible. A normal-conducting linac with external-solenoid focusing can provide the required large beam acceptances. The linac consists of independently fed zero-mode (TM{sub 010}) RF cavities with wide beam apertures closed by thin conducting edge-cooled windows. Electromagnetic design of the cavity, including its RF coupler, tuning and vacuum elements, and field probes, has been developed with the CST MicroWave Studio, and is presented.

Kurennoy, Sergey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

239

Novel linac structures for low-beta ions and for muons  

SciTech Connect

Development of two innovative linacs is discussed. (1) High-efficiency normal-conducting accelerating structures for ions with beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Two existing accelerator technologies - the H-mode resonator cavities and transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ) - are merged to create efficient structures for light-ion beams of considerable currents. The inter-digital H-mode accelerator with PMQ focusing (IH-PMQ) has the shunt impedance 10-20 times higher than the standard drift-tube linac. Results of the combined 3-D modeling for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank - electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations, and thermal-stress analysis - are presented. H-PMQ structures following a short RFQ accelerator can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications like a compact mobile deuteron-beam accelerator up to a few MeV. (2) A large-acceptance high-gradient linac for accelerating low-energy muons in a strong solenoidal magnetic field. When a proton beam hits a target, many low-energy pions are produced almost isotropically, in addition to a small number of high-energy pions in the forward direction. We propose to collect and accelerate copious muons created as the low-energy pions decay. The acceleration should bring muons to a kinetic energy of {approx}200 MeV in about 10 m, where both an ionization cooling of the muon beam and its further acceleration in a superconducting linac become feasible. One potential solution is a normal-conducting linac consisting of independently fed O-mode RF cavities with wide apertures closed by thin metal windows or grids. The guiding magnetic field is provided by external superconducting solenoids. The cavity choice, overall linac design considerations, and simulation results of muon acceleration are presented. Potential applications range from basic research to homeland defense to industry and medicine.

Kurennoy, Sergey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

How Many Muons Do We Need to Store in a Ring For Neutrino Cross-Section Measurements?  

SciTech Connect

Analytical estimate of the number of muons that must decay in the straight section of a storage ring to produce a neutrino & anti-neutrino beam of sufficient intensity to facilitate cross-section measurements with a statistical precision of 1%. As we move into the era of precision long-baseline {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} measurements there is a growing need to precisely determine the {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-sections in the relevant energy range, from a fraction of 1 GeV to a few GeV. This will require {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} beams with precisely known fluxes and spectra. One way to produce these beams is to use a storage ring with long straight sections in which muon decays ({mu}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub e} if negative muons are stored, and {nu}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} if positive muons are stored) produce the desired beam. The challenge is to capture enough muons in the ring to obtain useful neutrino and anti-neutrino fluxes. Early proposals to use a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments were based upon injecting 'high energy' charged pions into the ring which then decayed to create stored muons. These proposals were hampered by lack of sufficient intensity to pursue the physics. The Neutrino Factory proposal in 1997 was designed to fix this problem by using a Muon Collider class 'low energy' muon source to capture many more pions at low energy, allow them to decay in an external decay channel, manipulate their phase space to capture as many muons as possible within the acceptance of an accelerator, and then accelerate to the energy of choice before injecting into a specially designed ring with long straight sections. All this technology would do a wonderful job in fixing the intensity problem, but at a price that excludes this solution from being realized in the short term. The question that we are now faced with is whether the older, lower intensity 'parasitic' muon storage ring based on 'high energy' pion decays can, with suitable modification, produce sufficient intensity to measure the desired cross-sections. Fortunately, the intensity requirements for cross-section measurements are less demanding than the corresponding requirements for oscillation measurements, so there is hope. To fuel the discussion, in this note we consider the design goal: how many muons do we need to store?

Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A measurement of neutrino oscillations with muon neutrinos in the MINOS experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental evidence has established that neutrino flavor states evolve over time. A neutrino of a particular flavor that travels some distance can be detected in a different neutrino flavor state. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline experiment that is designed to study this phenomenon, called neutrino oscillations. MINOS is based at Fermilab near Chicago, IL, and consists of two detectors: the Near Detector located at Fermilab, and the Far Detector, which is located in an old iron mine in Soudan, MN. Both detectors are exposed to a beam of muon neutrinos from the NuMI beamline, and MINOS measures the fraction of muon neutrinos that disappear after traveling the 734 km between the two detectors. One can measure the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting and mixing angle by observing the energy-dependence of this muon neutrino disappearance. MINOS has made several prior measurements of these parameters. Here I describe recently-developed techniques used to enhance our sensitivity to the oscillation parameters, and I present the results obtained when they are applied to a dataset that is twice as large as has been previously analyzed. We measure the mass splitting {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = (2.32{sub -0.08}{sup +0.12}) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}/c{sup 4} and the mixing angle sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 32}) > 0.90 at 90% C.L. These results comprise the world's best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. Alternative disappearance models are also tested. The neutrino decay hypothesis is disfavored at 7.2{sigma} and the neutrino quantum decoherence hypothesis is disfavored at 9.0{sigma}.

Coleman, Stephen James; /William-Mary Coll.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Search for Higgs boson production in trilepton and like-charge electron-muon final states with the D0 detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for Higgs bosons in multilepton final states in pp-bar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, using the full Run II data set with integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1. The multilepton states considered are two electron plus muon, electron with two muons, muon with two hadronic tau leptons, and like-charge electron-muon pairs. These channels directly probe the HVV (V=W,Z) coupling of the Higgs boson in production and decay. The muon with two hadronic tau lepton channel is also sensitive to H to tau lepton pair decays. Upper limits at the 95% C.L on the rate of standard model Higgs boson production are derived in the mass range 100 Higgs boson model.

D0 Collaboration

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

243

An additional study of multi-muon events produced in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present one additional study of multi-muon events produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider and recorded by the CDF II detector. We use a data set acquired with a dedicated dimuon trigger and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.9 fb{sup -1}. We investigate the distribution of the azimuthal angle between the two trigger muons in events containing at least four additional muon candidates to test the compatibility of these events with originating from known QCD processes. We find that this distribution is markedly different from what is expected from such QCD processes and this observation strongly disfavours the possibility that multi-muon events result from an underestimate of the rate of misidentified muons in ordinary QCD events.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Fermilab

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors for Charged-Particle Tracking and Muon Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of the 2013 APS-DPF Snowmass summer study conducted by the U.S. HEP community, this white paper outlines a roadmap for further development of Micro-pattern Gas Detectors for tracking and muon detection in HEP experiments. We briefly discuss technical requirements and summarize current capabilities of these detectors with a focus of operation in experiments at the energy frontier in the medium-term to long-term future. Some key directions for future R&D on Micro-pattern Gas Detectors in the U.S. are suggested.

M. Hohlmann; V. Polychronakos; A. White; J. Yu

2013-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

245

CP and T violation in long baseline experiments with low energy neutrino from muon storage ring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stimulated by the idea of PRISM, a very high intensity muon ring with rather low energy, we consider possibilities of observing CP-violation effects in neutrino oscillation experiments. More than 10% of CP-violation effect can be seen within the experimentally allowed region. Destructive sum of matter effect and CP-violation effect can be avoided with use of initial nu_e beam. We finally show that the experiment with (a few) x 100 MeV of neutrino energy and (a few) x 100 km of baseline length, which is considered in this paper, is particularly suitable for a search of CP violation in view of statistical error.

Masafumi Koike; Joe Sato

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

246

The development of high performance online tracker for High Level Trigger of Muon Spectrometer of ALICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Muon Spectrometer (MS) of the ALICE experiment at LHC is equipped with a HLT (High Level Trigger), whose aim is to improve the accuracy of the trigger cuts delivered at the L0 stage. A computational challenge of real-time event reconstruction is satisfied to achieve this software trigger cut of the HLT. After the description of the online algorithms, the performance of the online tracker is compared with that of the offline tracker using the measured pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV.

Indranil Das

2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

247

The development of high performance online tracker for High Level Trigger of Muon Spectrometer of ALICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Muon Spectrometer (MS) of the ALICE experiment at LHC is equipped with a HLT (High Level Trigger), whose aim is to improve the accuracy of the trigger cuts delivered at the L0 stage. A computational challenge of real-time event reconstruction is satisfied to achieve this software trigger cut of the HLT. After the description of the online algorithms, the performance of the online tracker is compared with that of the offline tracker using the measured pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV.

Das, Indranil

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Gauge symmetric delta(1232) couplings and the radiative muon capture in hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the difference between the gauge symmetric and standard pi-N-delta couplings, a contact pi-pi-N-N term, quadratic in the pi-N-delta coupling, is explicitly constructed. Besides, a contribution from the delta excitation mechanism to the photon spectrum for the radiative muon capture in hydrogen is derived from the gauge symmetric pi-N-delta and gamma-N-delta couplings. It is shown for the photon spectrum, studied recently experimentally, that the new spectrum is for the photon momentums k > 60 MeV by 4-10 % smaller than the one obtained from standardly used couplings with the on-shell deltas.

J. Smejkal; E. Truhlik

2004-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

249

Ionization of hydrogen by neutrino magnetic moment, relativistic muon, and WIMP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We studied the ionization of hydrogen by scattering of neutrino magnetic moment, relativistic muon, and weakly-interacting massive particle with a QED-like interaction. Analytic results were obtained and compared with several approximation schemes often used in atomic physics. As current searches for neutrino magnetic moment and dark matter have lowered the detector threshold down to the sub-keV regime, we tried to deduce from this simple case study the influence of atomic structure on the the cross sections and the applicabilities of various approximations. The general features being found will be useful for cases where practical detector atoms are considered.

Jiunn-Wei Chen; C. -P. Liu; Chien-Fu Liu; Chih-Liang Wu

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

250

Spectrum and Charge Ratio of Vertical Cosmic Ray Muons up to Momenta of 2.5 TeV/c  

SciTech Connect

The ALEPH detector at LEP has been used to measure the momentum spectrum and charge ratio of vertical cosmic ray muons underground. The sea-level cosmic ray muon spectrum for momenta up to 2.5 TeV/c has been obtained by correcting for the overburden of 320 meter water equivalent (mwe). The results are compared with Monte Carlo models for air shower development in the atmosphere. From the analysis of the spectrum the total flux and the spectral index of the cosmic ray primaries is inferred. The charge ratio suggests a dominantly light composition of cosmic ray primaries with energies up to 10{sup 15} eV.

Schmelling, M.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Hashim, N.O.; /Kenyatta U. Coll.; Grupen, C.; /Siegen U.; Luitz, S.; /SLAC; Maciuc, F.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Mailov, A.; /Siegen U.; Muller, A.-S.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Sander, H.-G.; /Mainz U., Inst. Phys.; Schmeling, S.; /CERN; Tcaciuc, R.; /Siegen U.; Wachsmuth, H.; /CERN; Zuber, K.; /Dresden, Tech. U.

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

251

DUMAND-II (deep underwater muon and neutrino detector) progress report  

SciTech Connect

The DUMAND II detector will search for astronomical sources of high energy neutrinos. Successful deployment of the basic infrastructure, including the shore cable, the underwater junction box, and an environmental module was accomplished in December, 1993. One optical module string was also deployed and operated, logging data for about 10 hours. The underwater cable was connected to the shore station where we were able to successfully exercise system controls and log further environmental data. After this time, water leaking into the electronics control module for the deployed string disabled the string electrical system. The acquired data are consistent with the expected rate of downgoing muons, and our ability to reconstruct muons was demonstrated. The measured acoustical backgrounds are consistent with expectation, which should allow acoustical detection of nearby PeV particle cascades. The disabled string has been recovered and is undergoing repairs ashore. We have identified the source of the water leak and implemented additional testing and QC procedures to ensure no repetition in our next deployment. We will be ready to deploy three strings and begin continuous data taking in late 1994 or early 1995. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

Young, K.K. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); The DUMAND Collaboration

1995-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

A ROTATING METAL BAND TARGET FOR PION PRODUCTION AT MUON COLLIDERS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual design is presented for a high power pion production target for muon colliders that is based on a rotating metal band. Three candidate materials are considered for the target band: inconel alloy 718, titanium alloy 6Al-4V grade 5 and nickel. A pulsed proton beam tangentially intercepts a chord of the target band that is inside a 20 Tesla tapered solenoidal magnetic pion capture channel similar to designs previously considered for muon colliders and neutrino factories. The target band has a radius of 2.5 meters and is continuously rotated at approximately 1 m/s to carry heat away from the production region and through a water cooling tank. The mechanical layout and cooling setup of the target are described, including the procedure for the routine replacement of the target band. A rectangular band cross section is assumed, optionally with I-beam struts to enhance stiffness and minimize mechanical vibrations. Results are presented from realistic MARS Monte Carlo computer simulations of the pion yield and energy deposition in the target and from ANSYS finite element calculations for the corresponding shock heating stresses. The target scenario is found to perform satisfactorily and with conservative safety margins for multi-MW pulsed proton beams.

KING,B.J.; SIMOS,N.; WEGGEL,R.V.; MOKHOV,N.V.

2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

253

High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel  

SciTech Connect

We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q{sub 0} of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons.

Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Summers, D.; Norem, J.

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

DUMAND-II (Deep Underwater Muon and Neutrino Detector) PROGRESS Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The DUMAND-II detector will search for astronomical sources of high energy neutrinos. Successful deployment of the basic infrastructure, including the shore cable, the underwater junction box, and an environmental module was accomplished in December, 1993. One optical module string was also deployed and operated, logging data for about 10 hours. The underwater cable was connected to the shore station where we were able to successfully exercise system controls and log further environmental data. After this time, water leaking into the electronics control module for the deployed string disabled the string electrical system. The acquired data are consistent with the expected rate of downgoing muons, and our ability to reconstruct muons was demonstrated. The measured acoustical backgrounds are consistent with expectation, which should allow acoustical detection of nearby PeV particle cascades. The disabled string has been recovered and is undergoing repairs ashore. We have identified the source of the water leak and implemented additional testing and QC procedures to ensure no repetition in our next deployment. We will be ready to deploy three strings and begin continuous data taking in 1995.

Kenneth K. Young

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

255

A Test Stand for the Muon Trigger Development for the CMS Experiment at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the flagship experiments in particle physics operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). CMS was built to search for signatures of Higgs bosons, supersymmetry, and other new phenomena. The coming upgrade of the collider will increase the rate of collisions and expand the physics reach of CMS, but will also push the detector systems beyond their current capabilities. One critically affected element is the CMS trigger, a system responsible for making a fast decision if a particular event is of interest and trigger the readout of the detector. As saving the data from every collision would require a technically unattainable bandwidth and is not possible, triggering inefficiencies propagate into reduction of physics reach for the entire experiment. One proposal to handle the future increase in collision rates aims to combine the capabilities of the existing Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) with the newly proposed Gaseous Electron Multiplication (GEM) detectors to improve the efficiency and discriminating power of the electronics-based muon Level-1trigger. This project focuses on development of a test-stand to emulate operational conditions of such a system, taking into account geometries of the two detector elements. The results of this study will present a proof of principle that building a joint GEM-CSC trigger system is feasible and it can be used to improve trigger efficiency.

Lakdawala, Samir

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A Novel Method for Transport and Cooling of a Muon Beam Based on Magnetic Insulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unwanted field emission is a well known problem for high-gradient accelerating structures as it can cause damage and initiate breakdown. Recent experiments indicated that the deleterious effects of field-emission are greatly enhanced in the presence of external magnetic fields. In the context of designing a muon accelerator this imposes numerous constraints since rf cavities need to operate within strong magnetic fields in order to successfully transport the beam. Here, a novel design of a magnetically insulated cavity in which the walls are parallel to the magnetic field lines is presented. We show that with magnetic insulation, damage from field emission can be significantly suppressed. Effects of coil positioning errors on the cavity performance are discussed and the required magnetic field strength to achieve insulation is estimated. We present a conceptual design of a muon collider cooling lattice with magnetic insulated cavities and cross-check its performance to the one with pillbox cavities. Finally an experiment to test magnetic insulation is described.

Stratakis, Diktys; Gallardo, Juan C.; Palmer, Robert B. [Department of Physics, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

257

Design and testing of the New Muon Lab cryogenic system at Fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is constructing a superconducting 1.3 GHz cryomodule test facility located at the New Muon Lab building. The facility will be used for testing and validating cryomodule designs as well as support systems. For the initial phase of the project, a single Type III plus 1.3 GHz cryomodule will be cooled and tested using a single Tevatron style standalone refrigerator. Subsequent phases involve testing as many as two full RF units consisting of up to six 1.3 GHz cryomodules with the addition of a new cryogenic plant. The cryogenic infrastructure consists of the refrigerator system, cryogenic distribution system as well as an ambient temperature pumping system to achieve 2 K operations with supporting purification systems. A discussion of the available capacity for the various phases versus the proposed heat loads is included as well as commissioning results and testing schedule. This paper describes the plans, status and challenges of this initial phase of the New Muon Lab cryogenic system.

Martinez, A.; Klebaner, A.L.; Theilacker, J.C.; DeGraff, B.D.; Leibfritz, J.; /Fermilab

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Search for the gamma-branch of the shape isomers of separated U isotopes using muon for nuclide excitation  

SciTech Connect

We have searched for back-decay gamma rays from the shape isomeric states in /sup 235/U, /sup 236/U, and /sup 238/U possibly excited in muon radiationless transition. The energies and intensities of gamma rays following muon atomic capture were measured as a function of time after muon stopping. Background was suppressed by requiring that the candidate gamma ray be followed by another gamma ray (..mu..-capture gamma ray). The prompt gamma-ray spectra included the U-muonic x rays. The measured /sup 235/U and /sup 238/U x-ray energies were in good agreement with previously reported results. The x-ray spectrum from /sup 236/U has not been previously reported. The /sup 236/U spectrum is very similar to that of /sup 238/U, except that the K x-rays exhibit an isotope shift of approximately 20 keV, the /sup 236/U energies being higher. In the analysis of the delayed spectra of /sup 236/U and /sup 238/U using the GAMANL peak searching program, and with an effective lower-limit detection efficiency of .15% per stopping muon, no candidate gamma rays for the back decay transitions from the shape isomeric state were observed.

Mireshghi, A.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Muon g - 2 anomaly and 125 GeV Higgs: Extra vector-like quark and LHC prospects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ATLAS and CMS collaborations recently reported indication of a Higgs boson around 125GeV. If we add extra vector-like quarks to the MSSM, such a relatively heavy Higgs can be naturally realized in the GMSB framework, simultaneously explaining the muon g - 2 anomaly. I will discuss LHC prospect of this attractive model.

Iwamoto, Sho [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

260

Search for di-muon decays of a low-mass Higgs boson in radiative decays of the ?(1S)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search for di-muon decays of a low-mass Higgs boson (A[superscript 0]) produced in radiative ?(1S) decays. The ?(1S) sample is selected by tagging the pion pair in the ?(2S,3S)??[superscript +]?[superscript -]?(1S) ...

Cowan, Ray Franklin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Total Hadron Cross Section, New Particles, and Muon Electron Events in e{sup +}e{sup -} Annihilation at SPEAR  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The review of total hadron electroproduction cross sections, the new states, and the muon--electron events includes large amount of information on hadron structure, nine states with width ranging from 10's of keV to many MeV, the principal decay modes and quantum numbers of some of the states, and limits on charm particle production. 13 references. (JFP)

Richter, B.

1976-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

262

Effect of Field Errors in Muon Collider IR Magnets on Beam Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to achieve peak luminosity of a Muon Collider (MC) in the 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} range very small values of beta-function at the interaction point (IP) are necessary ({beta}* {le} 1 cm) while the distance from IP to the first quadrupole can not be made shorter than {approx}6 m as dictated by the necessity of detector protection from backgrounds. In the result the beta-function at the final focus quadrupoles can reach 100 km making beam dynamics very sensitive to all kind of errors. In the present report we consider the effects on momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture of multipole field errors in the body of IR dipoles as well as of fringe-fields in both dipoles and quadrupoles in the ase of 1.5 TeV (c.o.m.) MC. Analysis shows these effects to be strong but correctable with dedicated multipole correctors.

Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.V.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

Summers, D.J.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Perera, L.P.; Reep, M.; /Mississippi U.; Witte, H.; /Brookhaven; Hansen, S.; Lopes, M.L.; /Fermilab; Reidy Jr., J.; /Oxford High School

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

D. J. Summers; L. M. Cremaldi; T. L. Hart; L. P. Perera; M. Reep; H. Witte; S. Hansen; M. L. Lopes; J. Reidy, Jr.

2012-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

265

Multi-purpose 805 MHz Pillbox RF Cavity for Muon Acceleration Studies  

SciTech Connect

An 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity has been designed and constructed to investigate potential muon beam acceleration and cooling techniques. The cavity can operate at vacuum or under pressure to 100 atmospheres, at room temperature or in a liquid nitrogen bath at 77 K. The cavity is designed for easy assembly and disassembly with bolted construction using aluminum seals. The surfaces of the end walls of the cavity can be replaced with different materials such as copper, aluminum, beryllium, or molybdenum, and with different geometries such as shaped windows or grid structures. Different surface treatments such as electro polished, high-pressure water cleaned, and atomic layer deposition are being considered for testing. The cavity has been designed to fit inside the 5-Tesla solenoid in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. Current status of the cavity prepared for initial conditioning and operation in the external magnetic field is discussed.

Kurennoy, Sergey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chan, Kwok-Chi Dominic [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jason, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turchi, Peter J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A 125GeV Higgs Boson and Muon g-2 in More Generic Gauge Mediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations reported exciting hints of a Standard Model-like Higgs boson with a mass around 125GeV. A Higgs boson this heavy is difficult to realize in conventional models of gauge mediation. Here we revisit the lightest Higgs boson mass in "more generic gauge mediation," where the Higgs doublets mix with the messenger doublets. We show that a Higgs boson mass around 125GeV can be realized in more generic gauge mediation models, even for a relatively light gluino mass ~1TeV. We also show that the muon anomalous magnetic moment can be within 1sigma of the experimental value for these models, even when the Higgs boson is relatively heavy. We also discuss the LHC constraints and the prospects of discovery.

Evans, Jason L; Shirai, Satoshi; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Simultaneous observation of extensive air showers and deep-underground muons at the Gran Sasso Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined measurements of extensive air showers at the surface and high-energy muons deep underground have been initiated at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. The underground detector is the first supermodule of MACRO (area=140 m{sup 2}, depth=3100 m of water equivalent , {ital E}{sub {mu}}{gt}1.3 TeV) and the surface detector is the EAS-TOP array (altitude 2000 m above sea level, total enclosed area {ital A}{approximately}10{sup 5} m{sup 2}). We discuss the correlation technique, the comparison between the shower parameters as determined by the two detectors, and some of the characteristics of the reconstructed events.

Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Caliccio, M.; De Cataldo, G.; De Marzo, C.; Erriquez, O.; Favuzzi, C.; Giglietto, N.; Nappi, E.; Spinelli, P. (Istituto di Fisica dell'Universita di Bari, Via Amendola, Bari (Italy)); Cecchini, S.; Fabbri, M.; Giacomelli, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Matteuzzi, P.; Pal, B.; Patrizii, L.; Predieri, F.; Sanzani, G.L.; Serra, P.; Spurio, M. (Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126, Bologna (Italy)); Ahlen, S.; Ficenec, D.; Hazen, E.; Klein, S.; Levin, D.; Marin, A.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Worstell, W. (Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA (USA)); Barish, B.; Coutu, S.; Hong, J.; Liu, G.; Peck, C.; Solie, D.; Steele, J. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (USA)); Lane, C.; Steinberg, R. (Physics Department, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (USA)); Battistoni, G.; Bilokon, H.; Bloise, C.; Campana, P.; Chiarella, V.; Forti, C.; Grillo, A.; Iarocci, E.; Marini, A.; Patera, V.; Re; MACRO Collaboration

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Electron to Muon Conversion in Low-Energy Electron-Nucleus Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an estimate of the electron to muon conversion cross section in fixed-target elastic electron scattering. The matrix element $$ is calculated analytically in two scenarios introducing suitable approximations. We consider on the one hand side the case of three light Dirac neutrinos with CKM-type leptonic mixing and on the other hand a typical see-saw scenario. We evaluate the coulombic contribution to the scattering cross section in the limit of vanishing energy transfer to the nucleus and, thus, obtain a realistic estimate for the total conversion cross section. Although we find that in the see-saw scenario the cross section can be enhanced by as much as twenty orders of magnitude in comparison to the Dirac case, it is still not experimentally accessible.

Kai-Peer O. Diener

2004-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

269

Slepton Flavor Nonuniversality, the Muon EDM and its Proposed sensitive Search at Brookhaven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the electric dipole moment of the electron ($d_e$), of the neutron ($d_n$) and of the muon ($d_{\\mu}$) using the cancellation mechanism in the presence of nonuniversalities of the soft breaking parameters. It is shown that the nonuniversalities in the slepton sector produce a strong violation of the scaling relation $d_{\\mu}/d_e\\simeq m_{\\mu}/m_e$ in the cancellation region. An analysis of $d_e, d_n$ and $d_{\\mu}$ under the constraints of the current experimental limits on $d_e$ and $d_n$ and under the constraints of the recent Brookhaven result on $g_{\\mu}-2$ shows that in the non-scaling region $d_{\\mu}$ can be as large as ($10^{-24}-10^{-23}$)ecm and thus within reach of the recently proposed Brookhaven experiment for a sensitive search for $d_{\\mu}$ at the level of $10^{-24}$ ecm.

Tarek Ibrahim; Pran Nath

2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

270

Slepton Flavor Nonuniversality, the Muon EDM and its Proposed Sensitive Search at Brookhaven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the electric dipole moment of the electron (de), of the neutron (dn) and of the muon (dµ) using the cancellation mechanism in the presence of nonuniversalities of the soft breaking parameters. It is shown that the nonuniversalities in the slepton sector produce a strong violation of the scaling relation dµ/de ? mµ/me in the cancellation region. An analysis of de,dn and dµ under the constraints of the current experimental limits on de and dn and under the constraints of the recent Brookhaven result on gµ ?2 shows that in the non-scaling region dµ can be as large as (10?24 ? 10?23)ecm and thus within reach of the recently proposed Brookhaven experiment for a sensitive search for dµ at the level of 10?24 ecm. 1 Permanent address

Tarek Ibrahim (a; Pran Nath (b

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

First Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic Double Differential Cross Section  

SciTech Connect

A high-statistics sample of charged-current muon neutrino scattering events collected with the MiniBooNE experiment is analyzed to extract the first measurement of the double differential cross section (d{sup 2}{sigma}/dT{sub {mu}}d cos {theta}{sub {mu}}) for charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering on carbon. This result features minimal model dependence and provides the most complete information on this process to date. With the assumption of CCQE scattering, the absolute cross section as a function of neutrino energy ({sigma}[E{sub {nu}}]) and the single differential cross section (d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}) are extracted to facilitate comparison with previous measurements. These quantities may be used to characterize an effective axial-vector form factor of the nucleon and to improve the modeling of low-energy neutrino interactions on nuclear targets. The results are relevant for experiments searching for neutrino oscillations.

Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; /Mexico U., CEN; Anderson, C.E.; /Yale U.; Bazarko, A.O.; /Princeton U.; Brice, S.J.; /Fermilab; Brown, B.C.; /Fermilab; Bugel, L.; /Columbia U.; Cao, J.; /Michigan U.; Coney, L.; /Columbia U.; Conrad, J.M.; /MIT; Cox, D.C.; /Indiana U.; Curioni, A.; /Yale U. /Columbia U.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A PULSED MODULATOR POWER SUPPLY FOR THE G-2 MUON STORAGE RING INJECTION KICKER.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the pulse modulator power supplies used to drive the kicker magnets that inject the muon beam into the 8-2 storage ring that has been built at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three modulators built into coaxial structures consisting of a series circuit of an energy storage capacitor, a damping resistor and a fast thyratron switch are used to energize three magnets that kick the beam into the proper orbit. A 100 kV charging power supply is used to charge the capacitor to 95kV. The damping resistor shapes the magnet current waveform to a 450 nanosecond half-sine to match the injection requirements. This paper discusses the modulator design, construction and operation.

MI,J.LEE,Y.Y.MORSE,W.M.PAI,C.I.PAPPAS,G.C.SANDERS,Y.SEMERTIZIDIS,Y.,ET AL.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Pulsed Modulator Power Supply for the g-2 Muon Storage Ring Injection Kicker  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the pulse modulator power supplies used to drive the kicker magnets that inject the muon beam into the g-2 storage ring that has been built at Brookhaven. Three modulators built into coaxial structures consisting of a series circuit of an energy storage capacitor, damping resistor and a fast thyratron switch are used to energize three magnets that kick the beam into the proper orbit. A 100 kV charging power supply is used to charge the capacitor to 95 kV. the damping resistor shapes the magnet current waveform to a 450 nanosecond half-sine to match the injection requirements. this paper discusses the modulator design, construction and operation.

Mi,J.; Lee, Y.Y.; Morse, W. M.; Pai, C.; Pappas, G.; Sanders, R.; Semertzidis, Y.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

274

First Measurement of Muon Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic (CCQE) Double Differential Cross Section  

SciTech Connect

Using a high statistics sample of muon neutrino charged current quasielastic (CCQE) events, we report the first measurement of the double differential cross section (d{sup 2}{sigma}/dT{sub {mu}}d cos {theta}{sub {mu}}) for this process. The result features reduced model dependence and supplies the most complete information on neutrino CCQE scattering to date. Measurements of the absolute cross section as a function of neutrino energy ({sigma}[E{sub v}{sup QE,RFG}]) and the single differential cross section (d{sigma}/dQ{sub QE}{sup 2}) are also provided, largely to facilitate comparison with prior measurements. This data is of particular use for understanding the axial-vector form factor of the nucleon as well as improving the simulation of low energy neutrino interactions on nuclear targets, which is of particular relevance for experiments searching for neutrino oscillations.

Katori, Teppei; /MIT, LNS

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Electron-muon heat conduction in neutron star cores via the exchange of transverse plasmons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the thermal conductivity of electrons and muons kappa_{e-mu} produced owing to electromagnetic interactions of charged particles in neutron star cores and show that these interactions are dominated by the exchange of transverse plasmons (via the Landau damping of these plasmons in nonsuperconducting matter and via a specific plasma screening in the presence of proton superconductivity). For normal protons, the Landau damping strongly reduces kappa_{e-mu} and makes it temperature independent. Proton superconductivity suppresses the reduction and restores the Fermi-liquid behavior kappa_{e-mu} ~ 1/T. Comparing with the thermal conductivity of neutrons kappa_n, we obtain kappa_{e-mu}> kappa_n for T>2 GK in normal matter and for any T in superconducting matter with proton critical temperatures T_c>3e9 K. The results are described by simple analytic formulae.

P. S. Shternin; D. G. Yakovlev

2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

276

Distinguishing a SM-like MSSM Higgs boson from SM Higgs boson at muon collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the possibility of distinguishing the SM-like MSSM Higgs boson from the SM Higgs boson via Higgs boson pair production at future muon collider. We study the behavior of the production cross section in SM and MSSM with Higgs boson mass for various choices of MSSM parameters tan \\beta and m\\sub A. We observe that at fixed CM energy, in the SM, the total cross section increases with the increase in Higgs boson mass whereas this trend is reversed for the MSSM case. The changes that occur for the MSSM case in comparison to the SM predictions are quantified in terms of the relative percentage deviation in cross section. The observed large deviations in cross section for different choices of Higgs mass suggest that the measurements of the cross section could possibly distinguish the SM-like MSSM Higgs boson from the SM Higgs boson.

Jai Kumar Singhal; Sardar Singh; Ashok K Nagawat

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment a_\\mu^{\\rm lbl}, paying particular attention to the consistent matching between the short- and the long-distance behavior of the light-by-light scattering amplitude. We argue that the short-distance QCD imposes strong constraints on this amplitude overlooked in previous analyses. We find that accounting for these constraints leads to approximately 50 per cent increase in the central value of a_\\mu^{\\rm lbl}, compared to existing estimates. The hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution becomes a_\\mu^{\\rm lbl}=136(25) \\times 10^{-11}, thereby shifting the Standard Model prediction closer to the experimental value.

Kirill Melnikov; Arkady Vainshtein

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

278

A Neutron Multiplicity Meter for Deep Underground Muon-Induced High Energy Neutron Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the design of an instrument capable of measuring the high energy ($>$60 MeV) muon-induced neutron flux deep underground. The instrument is based on applying the Gd-loaded liquid-scintillator technique to measure the rate of high-energy neutrons underground based on the neutron multiplicity induced in a Pb target. We present design studies based on Monte Carlo simulations that show that an apparatus consisting of a Pb target of 200 cm by 200 cm area by 60 cm thickness covered by a 60 cm thick Gd-loaded liquid scintillator (0.5% Gd content) detector could measure, at a depth of 2000 meters of water equivalent, a rate of $70\\pm8$ (stat) events/year. Based on these studies, we also discuss the benefits of using a neutron multiplicity meter as a component of active shielding in such experiments.

R. Hennings-Yeomans; D. S. Akerib

2006-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

279

Azimuthal asymmetries of charged hadrons produced by high-energy muons scattered off longitudinally polarised deuterons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of positive (h^+) and negative hadrons (h^-) have been measured by scattering 160 GeV muons off longitudinally polarised deuterons at CERN. The asymmetries were decomposed in several terms according to their expected modulation in the azimuthal angle phi of the outgoing hadron. Each term receives contributions from one or several spin and transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions. The amplitudes of all phi-modulation terms of the hadron asymmetries integrated over the kinematic variables are found to be consistent with zero within statistical errors, while the constant terms are nonzero and equal for h^+ and h^- within the statistical errors. The dependencies of the phi-modulated terms versus the Bjorken momentum fraction x, the hadron fractional momentum z, and the hadron transverse momentum p_h^T were studied. The x dependence of the constant terms for both positive and negative hadrons is in agreement with the longitudin...

Alekseev, M G; Alexandrov, Yu; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Austregesilo, A; Bade?ek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Baum, G; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bertini, R; Bettinelli, M; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Brona, G; Burtin, E; Bussa, M P; Chaberny, D; Chiosso, M; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Colantoni, M; Crespo, M L; Dalla Torre, S; Das, S; Dasgupta, S S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Diaz, V; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dünnweber, W; Efremov, A; El Alaoui, A; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Filin, A; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Fischer, H; Franco, C; Friedrich, J M; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gazda, R; Gerassimov, S; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gnesi, I; Gobbo, B; Goertz, S; Grabmüller, S; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Gushterski, R; Guskov, A; Haas, F; von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Heß, C; Hinterberger, F; Horikawa, N; Höppner, Ch; d’Hose, N; Ilgner, C; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, O; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jasinski, P; Jegou, G; Joosten, R; Kabuß, E; Kang, D; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koblitz, S; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Königsmann, K; Konopka, R; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Korzenev, A; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Kowalik, K; Krämer, M; Kral, A; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuhn, R; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Lauser, L; Le Goff, J M; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Liska, T; Maggiora, A; Maggiora, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Mann, A; Marchand, C; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Massmann, F; Matsuda, T; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu V; Moinester, M A; Mutter, A; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nassalski, J; Negrini, T; Nerling, F; Neubert, S; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Nunes, A S; Olshevsky, A G; Ostrick, M; Padee, A; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B; Perevalova, E; Pesaro, G; Peshekhonov, D V; Piragino, G; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polak, J; Polyakov, V A; Pontecorvo, G; Pretz, J; Quintans, C; Rajotte, J F; Ramos, S; Rapatsky, V; Reicherz, G; Richter, A; Robinet, F; Rocco, E; Rondio, E; Ryabchikov, D I; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Santos, H; Sapozhnikov, M G; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schlüter, T; Schmitt, L; Schopferer, S; Schröder, W; Shevchenko, O Yu; Siebert, H W; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sissakian, A N; Slunecka, M; Smirnov, G I; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Takekawa, S; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Tkatchev, L G; Uhl, S; Uman, I; Virius, M; Vlassov, N V; Vossen, A; Weitzel, Q; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Wollny, H; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zhao, J; Zhuravlev, N; Zvyagin, A; 10.1140/epjc/s10052-010-1461-9

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Multimedia Resources, including the CMS Eye, from the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment at CERN  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is one of two large general-purpose particle physics detectors built on the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland and France. The CMS detector is located in an underground cavern at Cessy in France. The CMS detector will study many aspects of proton collisions at 14 TeV, the center-of-mass energy of the LHC particle accelerator. [from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_Muon_Solenoid]

The US CMS collaboration, with 48 institutions, 420 Ph.D. physicists, over 100 graduate students, and nearly 200 engineers, technicians, and computer scientists is the largest national group in the CMS collaboration. US groups have made significant contributions to nearly every aspect of the detector throughout all phases including construction, installation and preparation for data-taking. The US collaboration also made major contributions to the construction and operation of the computing facilities needed to analyze the unprecedented amount of data to be generated by CMS. This work includes the software that allows physicists to operate the CMS detector, reconstruct the data, analyze it and extract new physics.

The CMS media website from CERN provides images, videos, presentations, and the CMS Eye, a system of webcams looking into the underground cavern at Cessy, into the control room, and even out of the window of the control room at the village of Cessy and the Jura Mountains. Many event displays are available in the image collections, as well as the CMS Photo Book covering 1998 û 2008 when CMS was being assembled, installed, and commissioned.

US-LHC and the International CMS Collaboration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Search for right-handed currents by means of muon spin rotation  

SciTech Connect

A muon spin rotation (..mu..SR) technique has been used to place limits on right-handed weak currents in ..mu../sup +/ decay. A beam of almost 100% polarized 'surface' muons obtained from the TRIUMF M13 beamline was stopped in essentially non-depolarizing >99.99% pure metal foils. The ..mu../sup +/ spins were precessed by 70-G or 110-G transverse fields. Decay e/sup +/ emitted within 225 mrad of the beam direction and with momenta above 46 MeV/c were momentum-analyzed to 0.2%. Comparison of the ..mu..SR signal amplitude with that expected for (V-A) decay yields an endpoint asymmetry xiP..mu..delta/rho>0.9951 with 90% confidence. In the context of manifest left-right symmetric models with massless neutrinos the results imply the 90% confidence limits M(W/sub 2/)>381 GeV/c/sup 2/ and -0.057

Stoker, D.P.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

$B_s \\to ?^+ ?^-$ and the upward-going muon flux from the WIMP annihilation in the sun or the earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the upward-going muon flux due to the WIMP annihilations in the cores of the sun and the earth, including the upper bound on the branching ratio for $B_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ decay. We find that the constraint from $B_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ is very strong in most parameter space, and exclude the supergravity parameter space regions where the expected upward-going muon fluxes are within the expected reach of AMANDA II.

Seungwon Baek; Yeong Gyun Kim; P. Ko

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

283

The performance of the CMS muon detector in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of all subsystems of the CMS muon detector has been studied by using a sample of proton--proton collision data at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected at the LHC in 2010 that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 40 inverse picobarns. The measured distributions of the major operational parameters of the drift tube (DT), cathode strip chamber (CSC), and resistive plate chamber (RPC) systems met the design specifications. The spatial resolution per chamber was 80-120 micrometers in the DTs, 40-150 micrometers in the CSCs, and 0.8-1.2 centimeters in the RPCs. The time resolution achievable was 3 ns or better per chamber for all 3 systems. The efficiency for reconstructing hits and track segments originating from muons traversing the muon chambers was in the range 95-98%. The CSC and DT systems provided muon track segments for the CMS trigger with over 96% efficiency, and identified the correct triggering bunch crossing in over 99.5% of such events. The measured performance is well reproduced by Monte Carlo simulation of the muon system down to the level of individual channel response. The results confirm the high efficiency of the muon system, the robustness of the design against hardware failures, and its effectiveness in the discrimination of backgrounds.

The CMS Collaboration

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

284

Perturbations to aquatic photosynthesis due to high-energy cosmic ray induced muon flux in the extragalactic shock model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We modify a mathematical model of photosynthesis to quantify the perturbations that high energy muons could make on aquatic primary productivity. Then we apply this in the context of the extragalactic shock model, according to which Earth receives an enhanced dose of high-energy cosmic rays when it is at the galactic north. We obtain considerable reduction in the photosynthesis rates, consistent with potential drops in biodiversity.

Rodriguez, Lien; Rodriguez, Oscar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Measurement of the ATLAS di-muon trigger efficiency in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the LHC, muons are produced in many final states and used in a variety of analysis, such as Standard Model precision measurements and searches for new physics. The B-physics programme in ATLAS includes the measurement of CP violating effects in B meson decays, the search for rare b decay signatures, as well as the study of the production cross sections. The ATLAS detector can identify muons with high purity in a transverse momentum ($p_{T}$) range from a few GeV to several TeV. In order to achieve a high trigger efficiency for low $p_{T}$ di-muon events and at the same time keep an acceptable trigger rate, dedicated trigger algorithms have been designed and implemented in the trigger menu since the 2010 data taking period. There are two categories of B-physics triggers, one topological and one non-topological. Both of these have been studied and their performance assessed using collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV. The performance found with data has been verified with simulated events.

E. Piccaro; On Behalf of the ATLAS Collaboration

2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

286

Muon spin rotation in heavy-electron pauli-limit superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formalism for analyzing the magnetic field distribution in the vortex lattice of Pauli-limit heavy-electron superconductors is applied to the evaluation of the vortex lattice static linewidth relevant to the muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) experiment. Based on the Ginzburg-Landau expansion for the superconductor free energy, we study the evolution with respect to the external field of the static linewidth both in the limit of independent vortices (low magnetic field) with a variational expression for the order parameter and in the near H{sub c2}{sup P}(T) regime with an extension of the Abrikosov analysis to Pauli-limit superconductors. We conclude that in the Ginzburg-Landau regime in the Pauli-limit, anomalous variations of the static linewidth with the applied field are predicted as a result of the superconductor spin response around a vortex core that dominates the usual charge-response screening supercurrents. We propose the effect as a benchmark for studying new puzzling vortex lattice properties recently observed in CeCoIn{sub 5}.

Michal, V. P., E-mail: vincent.michal@cea.fr [INAC/SPSMS, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (France)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

A pre- and post-processor for the ICOOL muon transport code  

SciTech Connect

ICOOL[1] is a Fortran77 macroparticle transport code widely used by researchers to study the front end of a neutrino factory/muon collider[2]. In part due to the desire that ICOOL be usable over multiple computer platforms and operating systems, the code uses simple text files for input/output services. This choice together with user-driven requests for greater and greater choice of lattice element type and configuration has led to ICOOL input decks becoming rather difficult to compose and modify easily. Moreover, the lack of a standard graphical post-processor has prevented many ICOOL users from extracting all but the most simple results from the output files. Here I present two attempts to improve this situation: First, a simple but quite general graphical pre-processor (NIME) written in the Tcl/TK[3] to permit users to write and maintain ASCII-formatted input files by use of simple macro definitions and expansions. Second, an interactive post-processor written in Fortran90 and NCAR graphics, which allows users to define, extract, and then examine the behavior of various particle subsets. In this paper I show some examples of use of both the pre- and post-processor for a standard ICOOL run.

Fawley, W.M.

2001-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Neutrino-nucleus reactions and muon capture in {sup 12}C  

SciTech Connect

The neutrino-nucleus cross section and the muon-capture rate are discussed within a simple formalism that facilitates nuclear structure calculations. The corresponding formulas depend on only four types of nuclear matrix elements currently used in nuclear {beta} decay. We have also considered nonlocality effects arising from the velocity-dependent terms in the hadronic current. We show that for both observables in {sup 12}C the higher order relativistic corrections are of the order of {approx}5% only and therefore do not play a significant role. As a nuclear model framework we use the projected quasiparticle random-phase approximation and show that the number projection plays a crucial role in removing the degeneracy between the proton-neutron two-quasiparticle states at the level of the mean field. Comparison is done with both the experimental data and the previous shell model calculations. The possible consequences of the present study on the determination of the {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} neutrino oscillation probability are briefly addressed.

Krmpotic, F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05315-970 Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica La Plata, CONICET, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Samana, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05315-970 Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil); Mariano, A. [Instituto de Fisica La Plata, CONICET, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C. C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Tests of hadronic vacuum polarization fits for the muon anomalous magnetic moment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a physically motivated model for the isospin-one non-strange vacuum polarization function Pi(Q^2) based on a spectral function given by vector-channel OPAL data from hadronic tau decays for energies below the tau mass and a successful parametrization, employing perturbation theory and a model for quark-hadron duality violations, for higher energies. Using a covariance matrix and Q^2 values from a recent lattice simulation, we then generate fake data for Pi(Q^2) and use it to test fitting methods currently employed on the lattice for extracting the hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment. This comparison reveals a systematic error much larger than the few-percent total error sometimes claimed for such extractions in the literature. In particular, we find that errors deduced from fits using a Vector Meson Dominance ansatz are misleading, typically turning out to be much smaller than the actual discrepancy between the fit and exact model results. The use of a ...

Golterman, Maarten; Peris, Santiago

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Development of a GEM based detector for the CBM Muon Chamber (MUCH)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characteristics of triple GEM detectors have been studied systematically by using cosmic ray muons. The minimum ionizing particle (MIP) spectra has been taken for different GEM voltage setting. Efficiency of GEM detector has been measured for cosmic ray. At high rate operation of GEMs the value of the protection resistor influences the gain and the stability. This feature has been investigated varying both the rate and the value of the protection resistor. This measurement has been performed using both X-ray generator and Fe55 source. The ageing and long-term stability of GEM based detectors has been studied employing both X-ray generator and Fe55 source. The ageing study of one GEM module is performed by using a 8 keV Cu X-ray generator to verify the stability and integrity of the GEM detectors over a longer period of time. The accumulated charge on the detector is calculated from the rate of the X-ray and the average gain of the detector. The details of the measurement and results has been described in this article.

S. Biswas; D. J. Schmidt; A. Abuhoza; U. Frankenfeld; C. Garabatos; J. Hehner; V. Kleipa; T. Morhardt; C. J. Schmidt; H. R. Schmidt; J. Wiechula

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

291

A "Muon Mass Tree" with alpha-quantized Lepton, Quark and Hadron Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A "muon mass tree" is displayed that contains the excitation systematics for accurately reproducing the masses of the six Standard Model quarks (u,d,s,c,b,t); the heavy leptons; the proton; the phi, J/Psi and Upsilon vector meson thrshold states; the Bc meson; and the mass-averaged W and Z gauge bosons, using a unified mass formalism based on the electron ground state. Multiples of an alpha-quantized 105.04 MeV fermion mass quantum reproduce the states below 12 GeV, and multiples of a doubly-alpha-quantized 14,394 Mev fermion mass quantum reproduce the W-Z and t states above 12 GeV, where alpha ~ 1/137 is the fine structure constant. Masses are additive, and the overall mass accuracy for these states is in the 1% range. A similar "pion mass tree" based on an alpha-quantized 70.03 MeV boson mass quantum accurately reproduces the pseudoscalar meson masses. The mass alpha-quantization follows from a corresponding experimental alpha-spacing of the long-lived particle lifetimes, which occur in well-defined lifetime groups that are each determined by a dominant Standard Model quark substate.

Malcolm H. Mac Gregor

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

292

The Operational Experience of the Triple-GEM Detectors of the LHCb Muon System: Summary of 2 Years of Data Taking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb muon system consists of more than a thousand gas detectors, mostly MWPC, located in five different stations. The Muon detector is used to define the muon trigger and to identify muons at the high-level triger and at the recontruction stage. The first station of the muon detector, located in front of the calorimetric system, is made of 274 chambers. The 12 most irradiated chambers, the ones closer to the beam pipe, are double triple-GEM detectors with pad readout. These detectors have an active area of 200x240 mm$^2$ and are routinely operated at rates close to 300 kHz/cm$^2$. With the gas mixture used (Ar/CO$_2$/CF$_4$ at 45/15/40) these detectors have the requested efficiency (>96% in a 20 ns time window for the logical OR of the two sensitive gaps) when operated at gains of about 2300. In this presentation we will report on the performance of these 24 triple-GEM detectors after more than 2 years of operation in the harsh LHCb conditions. We will also show some problems occurred during data taking, ...

Cardini, Alessandro; De Simone, Patrizia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Influence of the geomagnetic field and of the uncertainties in the primary spectrum on the development of the muon flux in the atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we study the sensitivity of the flux of atmospheric muons to uncertainties in the primary cosmic ray spectrum and to the treatment of the geomagnetic field. We use the air shower simulation program AIRES to make the calculation for two different primary spectra and under several approximations to the propagation of charged particles in the geomagnetic field. The results illustrate the importance of accurate modeling of the geomagnetic field effects. We propose a high and a low fit of the proton and helium fluxes, and calculate the muon fluxes with these different inputs. Comparison with measurements of the muon flux by the CAPRICE experiment shows a slight preference for the higher primary cosmic ray flux parametrization.

Hansen, P.; Gaisser, T.K.; Stanev, T.; Sciutto, S.J. [Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Departamento de Fisica and IFLP/CONICET, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C. C. 67 - 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

The influence of the geomagnetic field and of the uncertainties in the primary spectrum on the development of the muon flux in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the sensitivity of the flux of atmospheric muons to uncertainties in the primary cosmic ray spectrum and to the treatment of the geomagnetic field in a calculation. We use the air shower simulation program AIRES to make the calculation for two different primary spectra and under several approximations to the propagation of charged particles in the geomagnetic field. The results illustrate the importance of accurate modelling of the geomagnetic field effects. We propose a high and a low fit of the proton and helium fluxes, and calculate the muon fluxes with these different inputs. Comparison with measurements of the muon flux by the CAPRICE experiment shows a slight preference for the higher primary cosmic ray flux parametrization.

P. Hansen; T. K. Gaisser; T. Stanev; S. J. Sciutto

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

295

RPCs as trigger detector for the ATLAS experiment performances, simulation and application to the level-1 di-muon trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the muon spectrometer different detectors are used to provide trigger functionality and precision momentum measurements. In the pseudorapidity range |eta|gas ionization detectors which are characterized by a fast response and an excellent time resolution (production chambers. The results of this test are presented in chapter 4. One of the most commonly used gases in RPCs operation is C2H2F4, which during the gas discharge can produce fluorine ions. Being F one of the most aggressive elements in nature, the presenc...

Di Simone, A; Di Ciaccio, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Limits on a muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the IceCube 22-string detector  

SciTech Connect

A search for muon neutrinos from neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the IceCube 22-string neutrino detector using data collected in 104.3 days of live-time in 2007. No excess over the expected atmospheric background has been observed. Upper limits have been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun and converted to limits on the WIMP-proton cross-sections for WIMP masses in the range 250-5000 GeV. These results are the most stringent limits to date on neutralino annihilation in the Sun.

IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

297

Coincident observation of air [hacek C]erenkov light by a surface array and muon bundles by a deep underground detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the simultaneous observation of atmospheric [hacek C]erenkov light by a prototype five telescope array, GRACE, (Gran Sasso Air [hacek C]erenkov Experiment) with deep underground muons in the MACRO (Monopole Astrophysics and Cosmic Ray Observatory). The telescope array was deployed at Campo Imperatore above the Gran Sasso Laboratory for a run completed in the fall of 1992. The total live time for the combined surface-underground operation was [similar to]100 h during which more than 300 events were seen in coincidence. The efficacy of this technique to monitor the electromagnetic and penetrating muon components of a cosmic-ray-induced cascade is discussed.

Ambrosio, M.; Antolini, R.; Auriemma, G.; Baker, R.; Baldini, A.; Bam, B.; Barbarino, G.C.; Barish, B.C.; Battistoni, G.; Bellotti, R.; Bemporad, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bilokon, H.; Bisi, V.; Bloise, C.; Bower, C.; Bussino, S.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Campana, D.; Carboni, M.; Corona, A.; Cecchini, S.; Cei, F.; Chiarella, V.; Cormack, R.; Coutu, S.; DeCataldo, G.; Dekhissi, H.; DeMarzo, C.; De Vincenzi, M.; Di Credico, A.; Diehl, E.; Erriquez, O.; Favuzzi, C.; Forti, C.; Fusco, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Giannini, G.; Giglietto, N.; Grassi, M.; Green, P.; Grillo, A.; Guarino, F.; Guarnaccia, P.; Gustavino, C.; Habig, A.; Heinz, R.; Hong, J.T.; Iarocci, E.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kearns, E.; Kertzman, M.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Lamanna, E.; Lane, C.; Lee, C.; Levin, D.S.; Lipari, P.; Liu, G.; Liu, R.; Longo, M.J.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, G.; Mancarella, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Margiotta-Neri, A.; Marin, A.; Marini, A.; Martello, D.; Marzari Chiesa, A.; Michael, D.G.; Mikheyev, S.; Miller, L.; Mittlebrunn, M.; Mon; (GRACE and MACRO Collaborations)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A Search for a Diffuse Flux of Astrophysical Muon Neutrinos with the IceCube 40-String Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is a 1 km$^{3}$ detector currently taking data at the South Pole. One of the main strategies used to look for astrophysical neutrinos with IceCube is the search for a diffuse flux of high-energy neutrinos from unresolved sources. A hard energy spectrum of neutrinos from isotropically distributed astrophysical sources could manifest itself as a detectable signal that may be differentiated from the atmospheric neutrino background by spectral measurement. This analysis uses data from the IceCube detector collected in its half completed configuration which operated between April 2008 and May 2009 to search for a diffuse flux of astrophysical muon neutrinos. A total of 12,877 upward going candidate neutrino events have been selected for this analysis. No evidence for a diffuse flux of astrophysical muon neutrinos was found in the data set leading to a 90 percent C.L. upper limit on the normalization of an $E^{-2}$ astrophysical $\

IceCube Collaboration; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; T. Abu-Zayyad; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; R. Bay; J. L. Bazo Alba; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. K. Becker; K. -H. Becker; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; J. Braun; A. M. Brown; S. Buitink; M. Carson; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; J. Clem; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; C. Colnard; D. F. Cowen; M. V. D'Agostino; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; L. Demirörs; T. Denger; O. Depaepe; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. Díaz-Vélez; M. Dierckxsens; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; R. Ehrlich; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegård; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; M. M. Foerster; B. D. Fox; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; M. Geisler; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; J. A. Goodman; D. Gora; D. Grant; T. Griesel; A. Groß; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Han; K. Hanson; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; P. Herquet; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; D. Hubert; W. Huelsnitz; J. -P. Hülß; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; H. Johansson; J. M. Joseph; K. -H. Kampert; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. L. Kelley; P. Kenny; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Köpke; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; T. Kowarik; M. Krasberg; T. Krings; G. Kroll; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; S. Lafebre; K. Laihem; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; P. Majumdar; A. Marotta; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Mészáros; T. Meures; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; S. M. Movit; R. Nahnhauer; J. W. Nam; U. Naumann; P. Nießen; D. R. Nygren; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; M. Ono; S. Panknin; L. Paul; C. Pérez de los Heros; J. Petrovic; A. Piegsa; D. Pieloth; R. Porrata; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; A. Rizzo; J. P. Rodrigues; P. Roth; F. Rothmaier; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; D. Rutledge; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; T. Schmidt; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; A. Schultes; O. Schulz; M. Schunck; D. Seckel; B. Semburg; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; A. Silvestri; A. Slipak; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; G. Stephens; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stössl; S. Stoyanov; E. A. Strahler; T. Straszheim; M. Stür; G. W. Sullivan; Q. Swillens; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; A. Tepe; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; D. Tosi; D. Tur?an; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; R. Wischnewski; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; X. W. Xu; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

299

Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-06ER86282 Development and Demonstration of 6-Dimensional Muon Beam Cooling  

SciTech Connect

The overarching purpose of this project was to prepare a proposal for an experiment to demonstrate 6-dimensional muon beam cooling. The technical objectives were all steps in preparing the proposal, which was successfully presented to the Fermilab Accelerator Advisory Committee in February 2009. All primary goals of this project have been met.

Muons, Inc.

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

300

Search for single production of scalar leptoquarks in p anti-p collisions decaying into muons and quarks with the D0 detector  

SciTech Connect

We report on a search for second generation leptoquarks (LQ{sub 2}) which decay into a muon plus quark in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the D0 detector using an integrated luminosity of about 300 pb{sup -1}. No evidence for a leptoquark signal is observed and an upper bound on the product of the cross section for single leptoquark production times branching fraction {beta} into a quark and a muon was determined for second generation scalar leptoquarks as a function of the leptoquark mass. This result has been combined with a previously published D0 search for leptoquark pair production to obtain leptoquark mass limits as a function of the leptoquark-muon-quark coupling, {lambda}. Assuming {lambda} = 1, lower limits on the mass of a second generation scalar leptoquark coupling to a u quark and a muon are m{sub LQ{sub 2}} > 274 GeV and m{sub LQ{sub 2}} > 226 GeV for {beta} = 1 and {beta} = 1/2, respectively.

Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Measurement of Muon Neutrino Quasi-Elastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at E_? ~ 3.5 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a study of muon neutrino charged-current quasi-elastic events in the segmented scintillator inner tracker of the MINERvA experiment running in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. The events were selected by requiring a {\\mu}^- and low calorimetric recoil energy separated from the interaction vertex. We measure the flux-averaged differential cross-section, d{\\sigma}/dQ^2, and study the low energy particle content of the final state. Deviations are found between the measured d{\\sigma}/dQ^2 and the expectations of a model of independent nucleons in a relativistic Fermi gas. We also observe an excess of energy near the vertex consistent with multiple protons in the final state.

The MINERvA collaboration; G. A. Fiorentini; D. W. Schmitz; P. A. Rodrigues; L. Aliaga; O. Altinok; B. Baldin; A. Baumbaugh; A. Bodek; D. Boehnlein; S. Boyd; R. Bradford; W. K. Brooks; H. Budd; A. Butkevich; D. A. Martinez Caicedo; C. M. Castromonte; M. E. Christy; H. Chung; J. Chvojka; M. Clark; H. da Motta; D. S. Damiani; I. Danko; M. Datta; M. Day; R. DeMaat; J. Devan; E. Draeger; S. A. Dytman; G. A. Díaz; B. Eberly; D. A. Edmondson; J. Felix; T. Fitzpatrick; L. Fields; A. M. Gago; H. Gallagher; C. A. George; J. A. Gielata; C. Gingu; B. Gobbi; R. Gran; N. Grossman; J. Hanson; D. A. Harris; J. Heaton; A. Higuera; I. J. Howley; K. Hurtado; M. Jerkins; T. Kafka; J. Kaisen; M. O. Kanter; C. E. Keppel; J. Kilmer; M. Kordosky; A. H. Krajeski; S. A. Kulagin; T. Le; H. Lee; A. G. Leister; G. Locke; G. Maggi; E. Maher; S. Manly; W. A. Mann; C. M. Marshall; K. S. McFarland; C. L. McGivern; A. M. McGowan; A. Mislivec; J. G. Morf?; J. Mousseau; D. Naples; J. K. Nelson; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; N. Ochoa; C. D. O'Connor; J. Olsen; B. Osmanov; J. Osta; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; J. Park; C. E. Patrick; G. N. Perdue; C. Peña; L. Rakotondravohitra; R. D. Ransome; H. Ray; L. Ren; C. Rude; K. E. Sassin; H. Schellman; R. M. Schneider; E. C. Schulte; C. Simon; F. D. Snider; M. C. Snyder; J. T. Sobczyk; C. J. Solano Salinas; N. Tagg; W. Tan; B. G. Tice; G. Tzanakos; J. P. Velásquez; J. Walding; T. Walton; J. Wolcott; B. A. Wolthuis; N. Woodward; G. Zavala; H. B. Zeng; D. Zhang; L. Y. Zhu; B. P. Ziemer

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

302

Measurement of Muon Antineutrino Quasi-Elastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at E_? ~ 3.5 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have isolated muon anti-neutrino charged-current quasi-elastic interactions occurring in the segmented scintillator tracking region of the MINERvA detector running in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. We measure the flux-averaged differential cross-section, d{\\sigma}/dQ^2, and compare to several theoretical models of quasi-elastic scattering. Good agreement is obtained with a model where the nucleon axial mass, M_A, is set to 0.99 GeV/c^2 but the nucleon vector form factors are modified to account for the observed enhancement, relative to the free nucleon case, of the cross-section for the exchange of transversely polarized photons in electron-nucleus scattering. Our data at higher Q^2 favor this interpretation over an alternative in which the axial mass is increased.

The MINERvA collaboration; L. Fields; J. Chvojka; L. Aliaga; O. Altinok; B. Baldin; A. Baumbaugh; A. Bodek; D. Boehnlein; S. Boyd; R. Bradford; W. K. Brooks; H. Budd; A. Butkevich; D. A. Martinez Caicedo; C. M. Castromonte; M. E. Christy; H. Chung; M. Clark; H. da Motta; D. S. Damiani; I. Danko; M. Datta; M. Day; R. DeMaat; J. Devan; E. Draeger; S. A. Dytman; G. A. Díaz; B. Eberly; D. A. Edmondson; J. Felix; T. Fitzpatrick; G. A. Fiorentini; A. M. Gago; H. Gallagher; C. A. George; J. A. Gielata; C. Gingu; B. Gobbi; R. Gran; N. Grossman; J. Hanson; D. A. Harris; J. Heaton; A. Higuera; I. J. Howley; K. Hurtado; M. Jerkins; T. Kafka; J. Kaisen; M. O. Kanter; C. E. Keppel; J. Kilmer; M. Kordosky; A. H. Krajeski; S. A. Kulagin; T. Le; H. Lee; A. G. Leister; G. Locke; G. Maggi; E. Maher; S. Manly; W. A. Mann; C. M. Marshall; K. S. McFarland; C. L. McGivern; A. M. McGowan; A. Mislivec; J. G. Morfín; J. Mousseau; D. Naples; J. K. Nelson; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; N. Ochoa; C. D. O'Connor; J. Olsen; B. Osmanov; J. Osta; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; J. Park; C. E. Patrick; G. N. Perdue; C. Peña; L. Rakotondravohitra; R. D. Ransome; H. Ray; L. Ren; P. A. Rodrigues; C. Rude; K. E. Sassin; H. Schellman; D. W. Schmitz; R. M. Schneider; E. C. Schulte; C. Simon; F. D. Snider; M. C. Snyder; J. T. Sobczyk; C. J. Solano Salinas; N. Tagg; W. Tan; B. G. Tice; G. Tzanakos; J. P. Velásquez; J. Walding; T. Walton; J. Wolcott; B. A. Wolthuis; N. Woodward; G. Zavala; H. B. Zeng; D. Zhang; L. Y. Zhu; B. P. Ziemer

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

303

Discriminators of 2 Higgs Doublets at the LHC14, ILC and MuonCollider(125): A Snowmasss White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The historic LHC discovery of the 125 GeV particle with properties that closely resemble the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson verifies our understanding of electroweak symmetry breaking, but solidifies the need for a resolution to the hierarchy problem. Many extensions of the SM that address the hierarchy problem contain a non-minimal Higgs sector. Therefore, as a benchmark alternative to the SM Higgs mechanism, we study a general 2 Higgs doublet model (2HDM-G) framework for evaluating future sensitivity to Higgs couplings. We study how well it can be distinguished from the SM Higgs boson by future measurements at LHC14, ILC (250, 500,1000 GeV) and a Muon Collider (125 GeV). Additionally, our study bears on singlet Higgs extensions of two Higgs doublet models through predicted coupling relationships.

Vernon Barger; Lisa L. Everett; Heather E. Logan; Gabe Shaughnessy

2013-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

304

Performance of a Remotely Located Muon Radiography System to Identify the Inner Structure of a Nuclear Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of a muon radiography system designed to image the inner structure of a nuclear plant located at a distance of 64 m was evaluated. We concluded absence of the fuel in the pressure vessel during the measurement period and succeeded in profiling the fuel material placed in the storage pool. The obtained data also demonstrated the sensitivity of the system to water level changes in the reactor well and the dryer-separator pool. It is expected that the system could reconstruct a 2 m cubic fuel object easily. By operating multiple systems, typically four identical systems, viewing the reactor from different directions simultaneously, detection of a 1 m cubic object should also be achievable within a few month period.

Fujii, H; Hashimoto, S; Ito, F; Kakuno, H; Kim, S H; Kochiyama, M; Nagamine, K; Suzuki, A; Takada, Y; Takahashi, Y; Takasaki, F; Yamashita, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Performance of a Remotely Located Muon Radiography System to Identify the Inner Structure of a Nuclear Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of a muon radiography system designed to image the inner structure of a nuclear plant located at a distance of 64 m was evaluated. We concluded absence of the fuel in the pressure vessel during the measurement period and succeeded in profiling the fuel material placed in the storage pool. The obtained data also demonstrated the sensitivity of the system to water level changes in the reactor well and the dryer-separator pool. It is expected that the system could reconstruct a 2 m cubic fuel object easily. By operating multiple systems, typically four identical systems, viewing the reactor from different directions simultaneously, detection of a 1 m cubic object should also be achievable within a few month period.

H. Fujii; K. Hara; S. Hashimoto; F. Ito; H. Kakuno; S. H. Kim; M. Kochiyama; K. Nagamine; A. Suzuki; Y. Takada; Y. Takahashi; F. Takasaki; S. Yamashita

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

PRECURSORS OF THE FORBUSH DECREASE ON 2006 DECEMBER 14 OBSERVED WITH THE GLOBAL MUON DETECTOR NETWORK (GMDN)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the precursor of a Forbush decrease (FD) observed with the Global Muon Detector Network on 2006 December 14. An intense geomagnetic storm is also recorded during this FD with the peak Kp index of 8+. By using the 'two-dimensional map' of the cosmic ray intensity produced after removing the contribution from the diurnal anisotropy, we succeed in extracting clear signatures of the precursor. A striking feature of this event is that a weak loss-cone (LC) signature is first recorded more than a day prior to the storm sudden commencement (SSC) onset. This suggests that the LC precursor appeared only 7 hr after the coronal mass ejection eruption from the Sun, when the interplanetary (IP) shock driven by the interplanetary coronal mass ejection was located at 0.4 AU from the Sun. We find the precursor being successively observed with multiple detectors in the network according to the Earth's spin and confirmed that the precursor continuously exists in space. The long lead time (15.6 hr) of this precursor which is almost twice the typical value indicates that the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was more quiet in this event than a typical power spectrum assumed for the IMF turbulence. The amplitude (-6.45%) of the LC anisotropy at the SSC onset is more than twice the FD size, indicating that the maximum intensity depression behind the IP shock is much larger than the FD size recorded at the Earth in this event. We also find the excess intensity from the sunward IMF direction clearly observed during {approx}10 hr preceding the SSC onset. It is shown that this excess intensity is consistent with the measurement of the particles accelerated by the head-on collisions with the approaching shock. This is the first detailed observation of the precursor due to the shock reflected particles with muon detectors.

Fushishita, A.; Kato, C.; Yasue, S.; Munakata, K. [Physics Department, Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Kuwabara, T.; Bieber, J. W.; Evenson, P. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Da Silva, M. R.; Lago, A. Dal [National Institute for Space Research (INPE), 12227-010 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Schuch, N. J. [Southern Regional Space Research Center (CRS/INPE), P.O. Box 5021, 97110-970, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Tokumaru, M. [Solar Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Duldig, M. L. [Australian Antarctic Division, Kingston, Tasmania 7050 (Australia); Humble, J. E. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); Sabbah, I. [Astronomy Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Al Jassar, H. K.; Sharma, M. M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Kuwait University, Kuwait City (Kuwait)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Measurement of the w boson mass at the Collider Detector at Fermilab from a fit to the transverse momentum spectrum of the muon  

SciTech Connect

This thesis describes a measurement of the W boson mass from a fit to the transverse momentum spectrum of the muon in W decay. In past measurements this technique was used as a cross-check, however, now presents the best method in terms of systematic uncertainty. We discuss all sources of systematic uncertainty with emphasis on those to which the muon p{sub T} measurement is particularly sensitive, specifically, those associated with modeling the production and decay of W bosons. The data were collected with the CDF II detector between March 2002 and September 2003 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of (191 {+-} 11) pb{sup -1}. We measure the W mass to be (80.316 {+-} 0.066{sub stat.} {+-} 0.051{sub syst.}) GeV/c{sup 2} = (80.316 {+-} 0.083) GeV/c{sup 2}.

Vollrath, Ian Eberhard; /Toronto U.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Accurate alpha sticking fractions from improved three-body calculations relevant for muon catalyzed fusion. Progress report, September 1, 1985-August 31, 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solution of the Coulomb three-body problem is the beginning point for calculations of sticking fractions in muon catalyzed fusion. The basis set is constructed from the following functions xi/sup r/n/sup s/e/sup - ..cap alpha..xi - ..beta.. n/R/sup /sup -3//2//H/sub eta/(x)exp(-x/sup 2//2), where xi and eta are elliptic coordinates of muon, R is the internuclear distance, H/sub eta/ is the nth Hermite polynomial, and x = ..gamma.. (R-R/sub e/). The nonlinear parameters ..cap alpha.., ..beta.., ..gamma.., and R/sub e/ are to be optimized. 21 refs., 1 tab.

Szalewicz, K.; Monkhorst, H.J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A Measurement of the muon neutrino charged current quasielastic interaction and a test of Lorentz violation with the MiniBooNE experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Mini-Booster neutrino experiment (MiniBooNE) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is designed to search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance neutrino oscillations. Muon neutrino charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) interactions ({nu}{sub {mu}} + n {yields} {mu} + p) make up roughly 40% of our data sample, and it is used to constrain the background and cross sections for the oscillation analysis. Using high-statistics MiniBooNE CCQE data, the muon-neutrino CCQE cross section is measured. The nuclear model is tuned precisely using the MiniBooNE data. The measured total cross section is {sigma} = (1.058 {+-} 0.003 (stat) {+-} 0.111 (syst)) x 10{sup -38} cm{sup 2} at the MiniBooNE muon neutrino beam energy (700-800 MeV). {nu}{sub e} appearance candidate data is also used to search for Lorentz violation. Lorentz symmetry is one of the most fundamental symmetries in modern physics. Neutrino oscillations offer a new method to test it. We found that the MiniBooNE result is not well-described using Lorentz violation, however further investigation is required for a more conclusive result.

Katori, Teppei; /Indiana U.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A Measurement of the ATLAS Di-Muon Trigger Efficiency in Proton-Proton Collision at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The B physics programme of the ATLAS experiment includes measurements of production cross sections, searches for rare B-decay signatures which are sensitive to new physics at the TeV energy scale and studies of CP violation effects in B-events, such as $B_{s}^{0}\\rightarrow J/\\psi \\phi$ and $B_{d}^{0}\\rightarrow J/\\psi K_{s}^{0}$. The key to the detection of these B signals in ATLAS is to achieve a high trigger efficiency for low-$p_{T}$ di-muon events, whilst keeping an acceptable trigger rate. ATLAS developed two separate approaches for triggering on di-muon events from resonances such as $J/\\psi$ and Upsilon ($\\Upsilon$). The first approach is to start from a di-muon trigger selected at Level-1 while the second is based on dedicated Level-2 algorithms. The performance for these triggers has been studied using collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV collected in 2011.

A. Picazio; On Behalf of the ATLAS Collaboration

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Measurement of the ATLAS Di-Muon Trigger Efficiency in Proton-Proton Collision at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The B physics programme of the ATLAS experiment includes measurements of production cross sections, searches for rare B-decay signatures which are sensitive to new physics at the TeV energy scale and studies of CP violation effects in B-events, such as $B_{s}^{0}\\rightarrow J/\\psi \\phi$ and $B_{d}^{0}\\rightarrow J/\\psi K_{s}^{0}$. The key to the detection of these B signals in ATLAS is to achieve a high trigger efficiency for low-$p_{T}$ di-muon events, whilst keeping an acceptable trigger rate. ATLAS developed two separate approaches for triggering on di-muon events from resonances such as $J/\\psi$ and Upsilon ($\\Upsilon$). The first approach is to start from a di-muon trigger selected at Level-1 while the second is based on dedicated Level-2 algorithms. The performance for these triggers has been studied using collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV collected in 2011.

Picazio, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A Measurement of Neutrino Charged Current Interactions and a Search for Muon Neutrino Disappearance with the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam  

SciTech Connect

In this thesis, we report on a measurement of muon neutrino inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in the few GeV region, using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. The all neutrino mode data collected in the SciBooNE experiment is used for this analysis. We collected high-statistics CC interaction sample at SciBooNE, and extracted energy dependent inclusive charged current interaction rates and cross sections for a wide energy range from 0.25 GeV to {approx}3 GeV. We measure the interaction rates with 6-15% precision, and the cross sections with 10-30% precision. We also made an energy integrated measurements, with the precisions of 3% for the rate, and 8% for the cross section measurements. This is the first measurement of the CC inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. This inclusive interaction measurement is nearly free from effects of hadron re-interactions in the nucleus. Hence, it is complementary to other exclusive cross section measurements, and essential to understand the neutrino interaction cross sections in the few GeV region, which is relevant to ongoing and future neutrino oscillation experiments. This analysis also provides the normalization for SciBooNE's previous cross section ratio measurements for charged current coherent pion production and neutral current neutral pion production. Then, a precise comparison between our previous measurements and the model predictions becomes possible. The result of the interaction rate measurement is used to constrain the product of the neutrino flux and the cross section at the other experiment on the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam: Mini-BooNE. We conducted a search for short-baseline muon neutrino disappearance using data both from SciBooNE and MiniBooNE, to test a possible neutrino oscillation with sterile neutrinos which is suggested by the LSND experiment. With this constraint by SciBooNE, we significantly reduced the flux and the cross section uncertainties at MiniBooNE, and achieved the world best sensitivity for the {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance at 0.5 < {Delta}m{sup 2} < 30 (eV{sup 2}). We found no significant oscillation signal, and set one of the world strongest limits for the sterile neutrino models.

Nakajima, Yasuhiro; /Kyoto U.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A Measurement of Neutrino Charged Current Interactions and a Search for Muon Neutrino Disappearance with the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam  

SciTech Connect

In this thesis, we report on a measurement of muon neutrino inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in the few GeV region, using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. The all neutrino mode data collected in the SciBooNE experiment is used for this analysis. We collected high-statistics CC interaction sample at SciBooNE, and extracted energy dependent inclusive charged current interaction rates and cross sections for a wide energy range from 0.25 GeV to {approx}3 GeV. We measure the interaction rates with 6-15% precision, and the cross sections with 10-30% precision. We also made an energy integrated measurements, with the precisions of 3% for the rate, and 8% for the cross section measurements. This is the first measurement of the CC inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. This inclusive interaction measurement is nearly free from effects of hadron re-interactions in the nucleus. Hence, it is complementary to other exclusive cross section measurements, and essential to understand the neutrino interaction cross sections in the few GeV region, which is relevant to ongoing and future neutrino oscillation experiments. This analysis also provides the normalization for SciBooNE's previous cross section ratio measurements for charged current coherent pion production and neutral current neutral pion production. Then, a precise comparison between our previous measurements and the model predictions becomes possible. The result of the interaction rate measurement is used to constrain the product of the neutrino flux and the cross section at the other experiment on the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam: Mini-BooNE. We conducted a search for short-baseline muon neutrino disappearance using data both from SciBooNE and MiniBooNE, to test a possible neutrino oscillation with sterile neutrinos which is suggested by the LSND experiment. With this constraint by SciBooNE, we significantly reduced the flux and the cross section uncertainties at MiniBooNE, and achieved the world best sensitivity for the {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance at 0.5 < {Delta}m{sup 2} < 30 (eV{sup 2}). We found no significant oscillation signal, and set one of the world strongest limits for the sterile neutrino models.

Nakajima, Yasuhiro; /Kyoto U.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A study of muon neutrino disappearance with the MINOS detectors and the NuMI neutrino beam  

SciTech Connect

This thesis presents the results of an analysis of {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance with the MINOS experiment, which studies the neutrino beam produced by the NuMI facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The rates and energy spectra of charged current {nu}{sub {mu}} interactions are measured in two similar detectors, located at distances of 1 km and 735 km along the NuMI beamline. The Near Detector provides accurate measurements of the initial beam composition and energy, while the Far Detector is sensitive to the effects of neutrino oscillations. The analysis uses data collected between May 2005 and March 2007, corresponding to an exposure of 2.5 x 10{sup 20} protons on target. As part of the analysis, sophisticated software was developed to identify muon tracks in the detectors and to reconstruct muon kinematics. Events with reconstructed tracks were then analyzed using a multivariate technique to efficiently isolate a pure sample of charged current {nu}{sub {mu}} events. An extrapolation method was also developed, which produces accurate predictions of the Far Detector neutrino energy spectrum, based on data collected at the Near Detector. Finally, several techniques to improve the sensitivity of an oscillation measurement were implemented, and a full study of the systematic uncertainties was performed. Extrapolating from observations at the Near Detector, 733 {+-} 29 Far Detector events were expected in the absence of oscillations, but only 563 events were observed. This deficit in event rate corresponds to a significance of 4.3 standard deviations. The deficit is energy dependent and clear distortion of the Far Detector energy spectrum is observed. A maximum likelihood analysis, which fully accounts for systematic uncertainties, is used to determine the allowed regions for the oscillation parameters and identifies the best fit values as {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} = 2.29{sub -0.14}{sup +0.14} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} > 0.953 (68% confidence level). The models of neutrino decoherence and decay are disfavored at the 5.0{sigma} and 3.2{sigma} levels respectively, while the no oscillation model is excluded at the 9.4{sigma} level.

Marshall, John Stuart; /Cambridge U.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A GEM Detector System for an Upgrade of the High-eta Muon Endcap Stations GE1/1 + ME1/1 in CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the CMS Upgrade R&D Proposal RD10.02, we describe the motivation and main features of the CMS GEM Project for LS2 and propose the addition of a full GE1/12 detector station comprising Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers to the forward muon system of CMS. The limitations of the currently existing forward muon detector when operating at increasingly high luminosity expected after LS1 are laid out followed by a brief description of the anticipated performance improvements achievable with a GE1/1 station. The second part describes the detector system followed by an overview of electronics and associated services including a discussion of the schedule and cost of the project. Plans for a precursor demonstrator installation in LS1 are presented. This proposal is intended as a concise follow-up of the detailed document CMS-IN-2012-023. If approved, this is to be followed by a detailed Technical Design Report.

Abbaneo, D; Aspell, P; Bianco, S; Hoepfner, K; Hohlmann, M; Maggi, M; De Lentdecker, G; Safonov, A; Sharma, A; Tytgat, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Muon Collider Backgrounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

then, further improvements to the final focus have reduced the backgrounds by about an order of magnitude. Although challenging, in many ways the predicted background levels are...

317

Muon Collider Collaboration Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

place at the Hampton Inn in Orange Beach, Alabama, which is a beachfront location on the Gulf of Mexico. More information will be posted soon, but if there are urgent questions...

318

A Measurement of the t anti-t Production Cross Section in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using Soft Muon Tagging  

SciTech Connect

I present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 2034 pb{sup -1} of CDF Run II data using events with a high transverse momentum electron or muon, three or more jets, and missing transverse energy. The measurement assumes a t {yields} Wb branching fraction of 100 percent. Events consistent with t{bar t} decay are found by identifying jets containing heavy-flavor semileptonic decays to muons. The dominant backgrounds are evaluated directly from the data. Based on 248 candidate events and an expected background of 86.8 {+-} 5.6 events, I measure a production cross section of 8.7 {+-} 1.1{sub -0.8}{sup +0.9} {+-} 0.6 pb, in agreement with the Standard Model.

Grundler, Ulysses A.; /Illinois U., Urbana

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A measurement of hadron production cross sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in the delta m**2 about equals 1-eV**2 region  

SciTech Connect

A measurement of hadron production cross-sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx} 1 eV{sup 2} region. This dissertation presents measurements from two different high energy physics experiments with a very strong connection: the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment located at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, and the Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (Mini-BooNE) located at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois.

Schmitz, David W.; /Columbia U.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A Wire Position Monitor System for the 1.3 FHZ Tesla-Style Cryomodule at the Fermilab New-Muon-Lab Accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first cryomodule for the beam test facility at the Fermilab New-Muon-Lab building is currently under RF commissioning. Among other diagnostics systems, the transverse position of the helium gas return pipe with the connected 1.3 GHz SRF accelerating cavities is measured along the {approx}15 m long module using a stretched-wire position monitoring system. An overview of the wire position monitor system technology is given, along with preliminary results taken at the initial module cooldown, and during further testing. As the measurement system offers a high resolution, we also discuss options for use as a vibration detector. An electron beam test facility, based on superconducting RF (SRF) TESLA-style cryomodules is currently under construction at the Fermilab New-Muon-Lab (NML) building. The first, so-called type III+, cryomodule (CM-1), equipped with eight 1.3 GHz nine-cell accelerating cavities was recently cooled down to 2 K, and is currently under RF conditioning. The transverse alignment of the cavity string within the cryomodule is crucial for minimizing transverse kick and beam break-up effects, generated by the high-order dipole modes of misaligned accelerating structures. An optimum alignment can only be guaranteed during the assembly of the cavity string, i.e. at room temperatures. The final position of the cavities after cooldown is uncontrollable, and therefore unknown. A wire position monitoring system (WPM) can help to understand the transverse motion of the cavities during cooldown, their final location and the long term position stability after cryo-temperatures are settled, as well as the position reproducibility for several cold-warm cycles. It also may serve as vibration sensor, as the wire acts as a high-Q resonant detector for mechanical vibrations in the low-audio frequency range. The WPM system consists out of a stretched-wire position detection system, provided with help of INFN-Milano and DESY Hamburg, and RF generation and read-out electronics, developed at Fermilab.

Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Prieto, P.; Semenov, A.; Voy, D.C.; Wendt, M.; /Fermilab

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

SOLAR CYCLE DEPENDENCE OF THE DIURNAL ANISOTROPY OF 0.6 TeV COSMIC-RAY INTENSITY OBSERVED WITH THE MATSUSHIRO UNDERGROUND MUON DETECTOR  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the temporal variation of the diurnal anisotropy of sub-TeV cosmic-ray intensity observed with the Matsushiro (Japan) underground muon detector over two full solar activity cycles in 1985-2008. We find an anisotropy component in the solar diurnal anisotropy superimposed on the Compton-Getting anisotropy due to Earth's orbital motion around the Sun. The phase of this additional anisotropy is almost constant at {approx}15:00 local solar time corresponding to the direction perpendicular to the average interplanetary magnetic field at Earth's orbit, while the amplitude varies between a maximum (0.043% +- 0.002%) and minimum ({approx}0.008% +- 0.002%) in a clear correlation with the solar activity. We find a significant time lag between the temporal variations of the amplitude and the sunspot number (SSN) and obtain the best correlation coefficient of +0.74 with the SSN delayed for 26 months. We suggest that this anisotropy might be interpreted in terms of the energy change due to the solar-wind-induced electric field expected for galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) crossing the wavy neutral sheet. The average amplitude of the sidereal diurnal variation over the entire period is 0.034% +- 0.003%, which is roughly one-third of the amplitude reported from air shower and deep-underground muon experiments monitoring multi-TeV GCR intensity suggesting a significant attenuation of the anisotropy due to the solar modulation. We find, on the other hand, only a weak positive correlation between the sidereal diurnal anisotropy and the solar activity cycle in which the amplitude in the 'active' solar activity epoch is about twice the amplitude in the 'quiet' solar activity epoch. This implies that only one-fourth of the total attenuation varies in correlation with the solar activity cycle and/or the solar magnetic cycle. We finally examine the temporal variation of the 'single-band valley depth' (SBVD) quoted by the Milagro experiment and, in contrast with recent Milagro's report, we find no steady increase in the Matsushiro observations in a seven-year period between 2000 and 2007. We suggest, therefore, that the steady increase of the SBVD reported by the Milagro experiment is not caused by the decreasing solar modulation in the declining phase of the 23rd solar activity cycle.

Munakata, K.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Kato, C.; Yasue, S.; Mori, S. [Department of Physics, Shinshu University, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Takita, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Kota, J., E-mail: kmuna00@shinshu-u.ac.j [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 87721 (United States)

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Heavy-flavor electron-muon correlations in $p$$+$$p$ and $d$+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ = 200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report $e^\\pm-\\mu^\\mp$ pair yield from charm decay measured between midrapidity electrons ($|\\eta|0.5$ GeV/$c$) and forward rapidity muons ($1.41.0$ GeV/$c$) as a function of $\\Delta\\phi$ in both $p$$+$$p$ and in $d$+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV. Comparing the $p$$+$$p$ results with several different models, we find the results are consistent with a total charm cross section $\\sigma_{c\\bar{c}} =$ 538 $\\pm$ 46 (stat) $\\pm$ 197 (data syst) $\\pm$ 174 (model syst) $\\mu$b. These generators also indicate that the back-to-back peak at $\\Delta\\phi = \\pi$ is dominantly from the leading order contributions (gluon fusion), while higher order processes (flavor excitation and gluon splitting) contribute to the yield at all $\\Delta\\phi$. We observe a suppression in the pair yield per collision in $d$+Au. We find the pair yield suppression factor for $2.7cold nuclear matter modification of $c\\bar{c}$ pairs.

A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; N. Apadula; L. Aphecetche; Y. Aramaki; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; C. Baumann; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; J. H. Bhom; A. A. Bickley; D. S. Blau; J. G. Boissevain; J. S. Bok; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; S. Butsyk; C. M. Camacho; S. Campbell; A. Caringi; B. S. Chang; W. C. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; C. -H. Chen; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; B. A. Cole; Z. Conesa del Valle; M. Connors; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; K. Das; A. Datta; G. David; M. K. Dayananda; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; V. Dzhordzhadze; L. D'Orazio; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; F. Ellinghaus; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; B. Fadem; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; T. Fusayasu; I. Garishvili; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; G. Grim; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H. -Å. Gustafsson; A. Hadj Henni; J. S. Haggerty; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; R. Han; J. Hanks; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; E. Haslum; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. C. Hill; M. Hohlmann; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; S. Huang; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; H. Iinuma; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; J. Imrek; M. Inaba; D. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanischev; Y. Iwanaga; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; B. M. Johnson; T. Jones; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; J. H. Kang; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; T. Kempel; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; A. Kim; B. I. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; E. -J. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. -J. Kim; E. Kinney; K. Kiriluk; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; D. Kleinjan; L. Kochenda; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; G. J. Kunde; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; D. Layton; A. Lebedev; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; X. Li; P. Lichtenwalner; P. Liebing; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; L. Mašek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; D. McGlinchey; N. Means; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; A. C. Mignerey; P. Mikeš; K. Miki; A. Milov; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; A. K. Mohanty; H. J. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; T. Murakami; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; S. Nam; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; M. Nihashi; T. Niida; R. Nouicer; A. S. Nyanin; C. Oakley; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; M. Oka; K. Okada; Y. Onuki; A. Oskarsson; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; I. H. Park; J. Park; S. K. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; R. Petti; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. Proissl; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; E. Richardson; D. Roach; G. Roche; S. D. Rolnick; M. Rosati; C. A. Rosen; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; P. Ruži?ka; V. L. Rykov; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; S. Sakai; K. Sakashita; V. Samsonov; S. Sano; T. Sato; S. Sawada; K. Sedgwick; J. Seele; R. Seidl; A. Yu. Semenov; V. Semenov; R. Seto; D. Sharma; I. Shein; T. -A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; M. Shimomura; K. Shoji; P. Shukla; A. Sickles; C. L. Silva; D. Silvermyr; C. Silvestre; K. S. Sim; B. K. Singh; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; M. Slune?ka; A. Soldatov; R. A. Soltz; W. E. Sondheim; S. P. Sorensen; I. V. Sourikova; F. Staley; P. W. Stankus; E. Stenlund; M. Stepanov; A. Ster; S. P. Stoll; T. Sugitate; C. Suire; A. Sukhanov; J. Sziklai; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; R. Tanabe; Y. Tanaka; S. Taneja; K. Tanida

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

323

Muon performance aspects and measurement of the inclusive ZZ production cross section through the four lepton final state with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The "Large Hadron Collider" (LHC) is currently the most powerful particle accelerator. It provides particle collisions at a center of mass energy in the Tera-electronvolt range, which had never been reached in a laboratory before. Thereby a new era in high energy particle physics has began. Now it is possible to test one of the most precise theories in physics, the Standard Model of particle physics, at these high energies. The purpose is particularly served by four large experiments installed at the LHC, namely "A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS" (ATLAS), the "Compact-Muon-Solenoid" (CMS), the "Large Hadron Collider beauty" (LHCb) and "A Large Ion Collider Experiment" (ALICE). Besides exploring the high energy behavior of the well-established portions of the Standard Model, one of the main objectives is to find the Higgs boson included in the model, but not discovered by any preceding effort. It is of tremendous importance since fermions and heavy electroweak gauge bosons acquire mass because of this boson. Although ...

Meyer, Jochen; Ströhmer, Raimund

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

324

DIMUON PRODUCTION BY PIONS AND PROTONS IN IRON AND A SEARCH FOR THE PRODUCTION IN HYDROGEN OF NEW PARTICLES WHICH DECAY INTO MUONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dimuon production cross sections have been measured with a 200 GeV {pi}{sup -} beam and a 240 GeV proton (p) beam. The dimuon mass spectra produced by {pi} and p have essentially the same shape. The dimuon transverse momentum behavior is essentially the same for vector mesons produced by {pi} or by p. For {rho} + {rho} or {upsilon} production the x (Feynman) behavior is approximately independent of the mass of the dimuon produced. The dimuon {pi} production cross section is approximately 6 times greater than that of the p for x > .5. Using a missing mass (M{sub m}) technique, the same pion and proton beams were used to search for the production in hydrogen of new particles which decay with muon emission. Model dependent upper limits (50 to 7000 nanobarns) for the production of such objects with 2.5 < M{sub m} < 7. GeV are given (for charmed meson pair production M{sub m} is the mass of the D{bar D} system).

Blanar, G.J.; Boyer, C.F.; Faissler, W.L.; Garelick, D.A.; Gettner, M.W.; Glaubman, M.J.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnstad, H.; Mallary, M.L.; Pothier, E.L.; Potter, D.M.; /Northeastern U.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Measurement of the cross-section ratio {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} in inelastic muon-nucleon scattering at very low x and Q{sup 2}  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results are presented on the measurement of the cross-section ratio {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} inelastic {mu}N scattering obtained by the E-665 experiment using the Fermilab 490 GeV/c muon beam and liquid H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} targets. The results extend the previously measured x range by two orders of magnitude, down to 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}, at Q{sup 2} > 10{sup {minus}2} GeV{sup 2}/C{sup 2}. The ratio is consistent with 1 throughout the new range.

Papavassiliou, V.; Fermilab E-665 Collaboration

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Measurement of the cross-section ratio [sigma][sub n]/[sigma][sub p] in inelastic muon-nucleon scattering at very low x and Q[sup 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results are presented on the measurement of the cross-section ratio [sigma][sub n]/[sigma][sub p] inelastic [mu]N scattering obtained by the E-665 experiment using the Fermilab 490 GeV/c muon beam and liquid H[sub 2] and D[sub 2] targets. The results extend the previously measured x range by two orders of magnitude, down to 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]5], at Q[sup 2] > 10[sup [minus]2] GeV[sup 2]/C[sup 2]. The ratio is consistent with 1 throughout the new range.

Papavassiliou, V.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Enabling Intensity and Energy Frontier Science with a Muon Accelerator Facility in the U.S.: A White Paper Submitted to the 2013 U.S. Community Summer Study of the Division of Particles and Fields of the American Physical Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A staged approach towards muon based facilities for Intensity and Energy Frontier science, building upon existing and proposed facilities at Fermilab, is presented. At each stage, a facility exploring new physics also provides an R&D platform to validate the technology needed for subsequent stages. The envisioned program begins with nuSTORM, a sensitive sterile neutrino search which also provides precision neutrino cross-section measurements while developing the technology of using and cooling muons. A staged Neutrino Factory based upon Project X, sending beams towards the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), which will house the LBNE detector, could follow for detailed exploration of neutrino properties at the Intensity Frontier, while also establishing the technology of using intense bunched muon beams. The complex could then evolve towards Muon Colliders, starting at 126 GeV with measurements of the Higgs resonance to sub-MeV precision, and continuing to multi-TeV colliders for the exploration of physics beyond the Standard Model at the Energy Frontier. An Appendix addresses specific questions raised by the Lepton Colliders subgroup of the CSS2013 Frontier Capabilities Study Group.

J-P. Delahaye; C. Ankenbrandt; A. Bogacz; S. Brice; A. Bross; D. Denisov; E. Eichten; P. Huber; D. M. Kaplan; H. Kirk; R. Lipton; D. Neuffer; M. A. Palmer; R. Palmer; R. Ryne; P. Snopok

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

MUON SCATTERING INTO 1-5 MUON FINAL STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

column SA. Bodek et aZ. , SLAC-PUB-2248 (submitted to Phys.Phys. Lett. 64B, 497 (1976); W.B. Atwood, SLAC Report No.SLAC-185, Stanford Ph.D. Thesis, 1975 (unpublished); A.

Clark, A.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Muon Collider Collaboration Meeting Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

schemes 9. Beam halo and scraping 10. Beam instabilities 11. Large aperture magnets 12. Resonant power supplies 6. Lattice C. Johnstone, FNAL; A. Garren, LBL *** 1....

330

Fermilab | Muon Collider | Research Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

website: Quantum Universe Report Quantum Universe Report Research Goals What is the nature of the universe and what is it made of? What are matter, energy, space and time? How did...

331

Muon-spin-relaxation measurements of magnetic penetration depth in organic superconductors (BEDT-TTF) sub 2 - X : X =Cu(NCS) sub 2 and Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Br  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic-field penetration depth {lambda} in the organic superconductors {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2} Cu(NCS){sub 2} and {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2} Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br has been measured over a wide temperature region 20 mK{le}{ital T}{le}15 K via the muon-spin-relaxation technique. Linear variation of {lambda} with {ital T} at low temperatures, found in both systems, is consistent with anisotropic superconducting pairings with line nodes in the energy gap. In the latter compound, we observe flux depinning at {ital T}{similar to}5 K, well below {ital T}{sub {ital c}}=12 K.

Le, L.P.; Luke, G.M.; Sternlieb, B.J.; Wu, W.D.; Uemura, Y.J. (Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)); Brewer, J.H.; Riseman, T.M. (Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada)); Stronach, C.E. (Department of Physics, Virginia State University, Petersburg, Virginia 23803 (United States)); Saito, G.; Yamochi, H. (Department of Chemistry, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606 (Japan)); Wang, H.H.; Kini, A.M.; Carlson, K.D.; Williams, J.M. (Chemistry and Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States))

1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

332

Feasibility for p+/p- flow-ratio evaluation in the 0.5 - 1.5 TeV primary energy range, based on Moon-shadow muon measurements, to be carried out in the Pyramid of the Sun, Teotihuacan, Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculations are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of Moon shadow observations for mean primary energies in the region 0.5-1.5 TeV using a muon detector operating under the Pyramid of the Sun at Teotihuacan, Mexico. Due to the small height of that monument (65 m), the experiment is capable of providing considerably high statistics, although with reduced angular accuracy for primary particle direction reconstruction. Our estimates are based on simulations of muon production and transport in the atmosphere by CORSIKA and along the body of the pyramid by GEANT4. The deflection of primaries in the earth magnetic field is calculated using the IGRF model. The statistics for the Moon shadow observations, which depends on different factors affecting the accuracy of the primary particle direction reconstruction, are analyzed in detail.

Grabskii, V; Reche, R; Orozco, O

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Measurement of the muon charge asymmetry in inclusive pp to WX production at sqrt(s)=7 TeV and an improved determination of light parton distribution functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of the muon charge asymmetry in inclusive pp to WX production at sqrt(s)=7 TeV are presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 inverse femtobarns recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. With a sample of more than twenty million W to mu nu events, the statistical precision is greatly improved in comparison to previous measurements. These new results provide additional constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton in the range of the Bjorken scaling variable x from 10E-3 to 10E-1. These measurements and the recent CMS measurement of associated W + charm production are used together with the cross sections for inclusive deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA in a next-to-leading-order QCD analysis. The determination of the valence quark distributions is improved, and the strange-quark distribution is probed directly through the leading-order process g + s to W + c in proton-proton collisions at the LHC.

CMS Collaboration

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

334

Superconducting solenoids for the Muon collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Standard and Alternative Cooling Lattices as a Function135 to 175 MeV. The alternative cooling lattice shown inproblems with the alternative cooling lattice are: I) The

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

High field solenoids for muon cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10-12 December 1997, Brookhaven National Laboratory Report,Introduction and Status," Brookhaven National Laboratory

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Muon ring cooler for the MUCOOL experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A possibility to use a ring cooler for the MUCOOL experiment is considered. The cooler is a ring accelerator of about 37 m in circumference consisting of 8 dipole magnets, 4 short solenoids with a field flip of {+-} 2:5 T, and 4 long solenoids with adiabatic field 2-5 T. The 201.25 MHz linacs provide accelerating gradient 15 MV/min in the long straight sections. Four 1.3 m long liquid hydrogen absorbers are put between the linacs for transverse cooling, and LiH wedge absorbers in the short SS are used for the emittance exchange. To simplify the injection problem, {pi}-{mu}-production on an internal target is considered as an option for the MUCOOL experiment.

Valeri Balbekov et al.

2001-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

337

U.S. CMS - Endcap Muon Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Florida Florida Institute of Technology Northeastern University Northwestern University Ohio State University Purdue University Rice University Texas A&M Wayne State University...

338

Neutrinos from STORed Muons Letter of Intent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clusters of Microspheres from Water-in- Oil Emulsions," Chem. Mater. 17, 5006 (2005). 12. D. Psaltis, S. R, 6073 (1998). 15. O. N. Singh and A. Lakhtakia, eds., Electromagnetic Waves in Unconventional Materials isotropic 6-particle "octamers" and 12-particle "icosamers", is particle clustering in an oil- in

339

High field solenoids for muon cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on axis between the high field low beta coils and the fluxinverse of the field that produces the low beta pinch point.the high field section that creates the low beta pinch in

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Superconducting Magnets for a Muon Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

support of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics,support of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics,support of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics,

Green, M.A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Critical Issues and MUON Colliders - A Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, High EnergyOffice of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, High Energy

Chattopadhyay, S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Muon Collider Collaboration Meeting Hotel Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

meeting will take place at the Hampton Inn in Orange Beach, AL. This is located on the Gulf of Mexico and is a beachfront resort style setting. The room rate will be 70 per day...

343

Princeton University, Physics 311/312 Lifetime of the Muon, Page 1 LIFETIME OF THE MUON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Discriminators, Logic Gates, Attenuators (small brass BNC connectors with attenuation factor stamped on it

344

Structure function measurements in muon?iron and muon?proton scattering, and a QCD analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure function F2 has been measured in the range 3.0

The European Muon Collaboration

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

CALCULATION OF MUON FINAL PROBABILITIES AFTER MUON-INDUCED FISSION IN FOUR-STATE BASIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics ofPhysics of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics ofthe Director, Office of Energy Research, Division of Nuclear

Zhong-yu, Ma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

CALCULATION OF MUON FINAL PROBABILITIES AFTER MUON-INDUCED FISSION IN FOUR-STATE BASIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between heavy and light fission fragments is extended byenergies in actinides exceed the fission barrier height,so that prompt fission becomes possible,(l) The

Zhong-yu, Ma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

LANL | TT | R&D 100 Awards | 2007 Summaries  

Muon tomography scanners will greatly increase border security against nuclear ... the fuel efficiency of commercial ... and hydrological cycle ;

348

A Comparative Study of RF and Induction Linac Approaches to Phase Rotation of a Muon Bunch in the Production Region of a muon + - muon- Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Berkeley, California 94720 **Brookhaven National LaboratoryAC03- 76SF00098 and by Brookhaven National Laboratory underCA 94720 and Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory

Turner, W.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

OPTIMIZING THE MUON COLLIDER CAPTURE TARGET & FRONT END  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[T] Field map calculated from coil current densiUes using Icool grid rou Transmission: Constant 1.5 Solenoid Field %67 Field map from realisUc coils taper length =7 m- B=20-1.5 T Target SC Magnets Field Map 0 5 10 15 20 25 Z [m

McDonald, Kirk

350

R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for. A second alternative for final cooling uses a solenoidcooling in a straight lattice, and investigate alternativethe 6D cooling channels. Two main alternatives are being

Zisman, Michael S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the required 5-year R&D effort has been submitted tofunding decision soon. This R&D effort must be pursuedfor carrying out the R&D efforts described here. Their

Zisman, Michael S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TM-2459-APC LBNL-xxxxx R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUONprogram in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recentlyadvanced accelerator R&D proposal: https://mctf.fnal.gov/

Zisman, Michael S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Electron muon scattering in the exotic Z(0)' pole  

SciTech Connect

The search for new physics in the future Internacional Linear Collider ILC, implies the existence of new particles, among them, the Z(0)' particle. In this regard, we calculate the e{sup +}+e{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sup +}+{mu}{sup -} scattering cross section near the Z(0)' pole, whitin the contex of the SU(3){sub L}xU(1){sub Y} weak model, which contains exotic leptons, quarks, and bosons (E,J,U,V) with the finality of obtain constraints in the parameters of the model.

Diaz, H.; Ravinez, O.; Romero, D.; Reyes, J. [Instituto de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria (Peru)

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

354

R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the shielding, and the remote handling system, along withdefining a workable remote-handling scheme for changing

Zisman, Michael S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A 3 TeV Muon Collider Lattice Design  

SciTech Connect

A new lattice for 3 TeV c.o.m. energy with {beta}* = 5mm was developed which follows the basic concept of the earlier 1.5 TeV design but uses quad triplets for the final focus in order to keep the maximum magnet strength and aperture close to those in 1.5 TeV case. Another difference is employment of combined-function magnets with the goal to lower heat deposition in magnet cold mass and to eliminate bending field free regions which produce 'hot spots' of neutrino radiation that can be an issue at higher energy. The proposed lattice is shown to satisfy the requirements on luminosity, dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance.

Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

A Compact 20 GeV Muon Storage Ring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 8 10 0 10 20 30 40 50 s m for Eigenmodes (A,B) m and Dispersion (X,Y) m BetaB BetaA DX DY C e l l 1 C e l l 2 C e l l 3 C e l l 4 C e l l 5 C e l l 6 C e l...

357

Muon-catalyzed fusion in "warm-fusion"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper formulate the hypothesis that in a molecule $D_2 O$ (in a cluster of heavy water $(D_2 O)_N)$ when its specific energy is of the order of 150 eV one of the molecular bonds $O - D$ is changed into $O - D_{\\mu}$ i.e. a molecule $D_2 O$ transforms into a muonic molecule. This postulate is necessary to explain the experiment which was carried out in Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA).

K. B. Korotchenko

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Neutrinos from Stored Muons STORM Target Station Conceptualg p  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) systems · Work cell for hot handling and failed component repair/replacementWork cell for hot handling and failed component repair/replacement · Remote handling fixtures and camera system · Hot component storageDesign Approach · Utilize NuMI style target chase and positioning modules · Utilize NuMI style hot handling

McDonald, Kirk

359

An In-Situ Tritium-Deuterium Gas-Purification System for Muon Catalyzed Fusion Experiments at the RIKEN-RAL Muon Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purification and Chemical Process / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

T. Matsuzaki; K. Nagamine; K. Ishida; M. Kato; H. Sugai; M. Tanase; G.H. Eaton

360

Optimization of muon timing and searches for heavy long-lived charged particles with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS detectorto be found that is predicted by the SM is the Higgs Boson.The discovery of the Higgs Boson is one of the reasons the

Farrell, Christopher Patrick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Optimization of muon timing and searches for heavy long-lived charged particles with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large Hadron Collider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .detector at the Large Hadron Collider A dissertationdetector at the Large Hadron Collider by Christopher Patrick

Farrell, Christopher Patrick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Optimization of muon timing and searches for heavy long-lived charged particles with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loss in efficiency to trigger events containing an HSCP duethe probability to pre-trigger the event can be written as Pthe rate of events collected by the trigger. The momentum

Farrell, Christopher Patrick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Tritium Fuel Cycle for Muon-Catalyzed Intense Neutron Source (MC INS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design and Model / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Arkadiy A. Yukhimchuk; Vladimyr A. Arkhangel'sky

364

Performances of linseed oil-free bakelite RPC prototypes with cosmic ray muons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparative study has been performed on Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) made of two different grades of bakelite paper laminates, produced and commercially available in India. The chambers, operated in the streamer mode using argon, tetrafluroethane and isobutane in 34:59:7 mixing ratio, are tested for the efficiency and the stability with cosmic rays. A particular grade of bakelite (P-120, NEMA LI-1989 Grade XXX), used for high voltage insulation in humid conditions, was found to give satisfactory performance with stable efficiency of > 96% continuously for more than 130 days. A thin coating of silicone fluid on the inner surfaces of the bakelite RPC is found to be necessary for operation of the detector.

S. Biswas; S. Bhattacharya; S. Bose; S. Chattopadhyay; S. Saha; M. K. Sharan; Y. P. Viyogi

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

Estimation of Radiative Corrections to the Process of Muon-Electron Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In detection of electrons from $\\mu \\to e $ conversion process the monochromatic electron spectrum is transformed due to a photon emission and fluctuations of energy loss in a target. The selection criterion of $\\mu \\to e (\\gamma)$ conversion events is an electron momentum above the threshold momentum of 103.5 MeV/c, which corresponds to the maximum energy loss of 1.5 MeV. Radiative corrections including a virtual photon correction and soft photon emission below 1.5 MeV lead to a reduction by about 10% in the probability of $\\mu \\to e $ conversion process calculated without radiative corrections. The soft photons emission below 1.5 MeV contributes to a change of electron spectrum from monoenergetic one at 105 MeV to a spectrum with a low energy tail for the process of $\\mu \\to e (\\gamma)$ conversion. However the effect of smearing of the initial momentum distribution due to the soft photon emission is small in comparison with a smearing due to energy loss fluctuations in a target. The average energy of soft photons emitted below 1.5 MeV is found to be 40 keV. The soft photon approximation is a good description for $\\mu \\to e (\\gamma)$ conversion process with photons emitted below 1.5 MeV.

Rashid M. Djilkibaev; Rostislav V. Konoplich

2009-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

366

Electron to Muon Conversion in Electron-Nucleus Scattering as a Probe of Supersymmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest that $e\\to \\mu$ conversion in low-energy electron-nucleus scattering is a new and potentially observable indirect signal of supersymmetry and should be searched for in experiment. We estimate the rate for this process in a straightforward calculation taking into account the existing constraint from non-observation of the $\\mu\\to e\\gamma$ decay and find the cross-section to be $\\sigma < 10^{-8} $fb.

T. Blazek; S. F. King

2004-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

367

Constraints on Explicit CP Violation from the Brookhaven Muon g-2 Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the recently derived CP phase dependent analytic results for the supersymmetric electro-weak correction to $g_{\\mu}-2$ to constrain the explicit CP phases in softly broken supersymmetry using the new physics effect seen in the g-2 Brookhaven measurement. It is shown that the BNL data strongly constrains the CP violating phase $\\theta_{\\mu}$ (the phase of the Higgs mixing parameter $\\mu$) and $\\xi_2$ (the phase of the SU(2) gaugino mass $\\tilde m_2$) and as much as 60-90% of the region in the $\\xi_2-\\theta_{\\mu}$ plane is eliminated over a significant region of the MSSM parameter space by the BNL constraint. The region of CP phases not excluded by the BNL experiment allows for large phases and for a satisfaction of the EDM constraints via the cancellation mechanism. We find several models with large CP violation which satisfy the EDM constraint via the cancellation mechanism and produce an $a_{\\mu}^{SUSY}$ consistent with the new physics signal seen by the Brookhaven experiment. The sparticle spectrum of these models lies within reach of the planned accelerator experiments.

Tarek Ibrahim; Utpal Chattopadhyay; Pran Nath

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

368

A search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS Experiment  

SciTech Connect

We perform a search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, a process which would manifest a nonzero value of the {theta}{sub 13} mixing angle, in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The analysis consists of searching for an excess of {nu}{sub e} charged-current candidate events over the predicted backgrounds, made mostly of neutral-current events with high electromagnetic content. A novel technique to select electron neutrino events is developed, which achieves an improved separation between the signal and the backgrounds, and which consequently yields a better reach in {theta}{sub 13}. The backgrounds are predicted in the Far Detector from Near Detector measurements. An excess is observed in the Far Detector data over the predicted backgrounds, which is consistent with the background-only hypothesis at 1.2 standard deviations.

Ochoa Ricoux, Juan Pedro; /Caltech

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Mechanical and thermal analysis of beryllium windows for RF cavities in a muon cooling channel  

SciTech Connect

Thin beryllium windows (foils) may be utilized to increase shunt impedance of closed-cell RF cavities. These windows are subject to ohmic heating from RF currents. The resulting temperature gradients in the windows can produce out of plane displacements that detune the cavity frequency. The window displacement can be reduced or eliminated by pre-stressing the foils in tension. Because of possible variations during manufacture, it is important to quantify the actual prestress of a Be window before it is put into service. We present the thermal and mechanical analyses of such windows under typical operating conditions and describe a simple non-destructive means to quantify the pre-stress using the acoustic signature of a window. Using finite element analysis, thin plate theory and physical measurements of the vibration modes of a window we attempted to characterize the actual Be window pre-stress in a small number of commercially sourced windows (30% of yield strength is typical). This method can be used for any window material and size, but this study focused on 16 cm diameter Be Windows ranging in thickness from 125 microns to 508 microns and with varying pre-stresses. The method can be used to nondestructively test future Be windows for the desired prestress.

Li, Derun; Ladran, A.; Lozano, D.; Rimmer, R.

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

RELIABILITY CONSIDERATIONS OF ELECTRONICS COMPONENTS FOR THE DEEP UNDERWATER MUON AND NEUTRINO DETECTION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standardization Handbook, HIL-HDBK-217B, ReliabilityMilitary Standardization Handbook MIL-HDBK-217B-Reliabilitycoefficients are given in MIL-HDBK-217B Handbook for various

Leskovar, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

A pre- and post-processor for the ICOOL muon transport code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIME) written in the Tcl/TK[3] to permit users to write andNIME is a relatively simple Tcl/TK[3] script which accepts ato produce a ?nal output ?le. Tcl/TK was chosen (e.g. over

Fawley, W.M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

"MECHANICAL STRUCTURE & FRONT END ELECTRONICS FOR THE RUN-9 STAR MUON TELESCOPE PROTOTYPE "  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-metallic internal LMRPC support pieces The project costs are estimated to be: Tray Mechanical Hardware $ 3,800.00 Shipping Crate + Shipping Cost $ 600.00 Engineering Support $ 600.00 Total Project Cost: $ 5,000.00 Any before delivery. The engineering support in the proposed project cost includes project administration

Llope, William J.

373

A combined muon-neutrino and electron-neutrino oscillation search at MiniBooNE  

SciTech Connect

MiniBooNE seeks to corroborate or refute the unconfirmed oscillation result from the LSND experiment. If correct, the result implies that a new kind of massive neutrino, with no weak interactions, participates in neutrino oscillations. MiniBooNE searches for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations with the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 8 GeV beam line, which produces a {nu}{sub {mu}} beam with an average energy of {approx} 0.8 GeV and an intrinsic {nu}{sub e} content of 0.4%. The neutrino detector is a 6.1 m radius sphere filled with CH{sub 2}, viewed by 1540 photo-multiplier tubes, and located 541 m downstream from the source. This work focuses on the estimation of systematic errors associated with the neutrino flux and neutrino interaction cross section predictions, and in particular, on constraining these uncertainties using in-situ MiniBooNE {nu}{sub {mu}} charged current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering data. A data set with {approx} 100,000 events is identified, with 91% CCQE purity. This data set is used to measure several parameters of the CCQE cross section: the axial mass, the Fermi momentum, the binding energy, and the functional dependence of the axial form factor on four-momentum transfer squared. Constraints on the {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub e} fluxes are derived using the {nu}{sub {mu}} CCQE data set. A Monte Carlo study of a combined {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance and {nu}{sub e} appearance oscillation fit is presented, which improves the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillation sensitivity of MiniBooNE with respect to a {nu}{sub e} appearance-only fit by 1.2-1.5{sigma}, depending on the value of {Delta}m{sup 2}.

Monroe, Jocelyn R.; /Columbia U.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Multi-year search for a diffuse flxu of muon neutrinos with AMANDA-II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the inverted analysis, all event quality requirementsnal stages of the analysis, the event sample is expected toinverted analysis to study high energy events and the bias

Achterberg, A.; IceCube Collaboration

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The \\c{hi}2-test, the Muon AMM and Karl R. Popper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this very brief note, we only wish to identify a simple but notable epistemological basis, concerning the Karl R. Popper philosophy of science thought, into the realm of the experimental proves of Fundamental Physics.

Giuseppe Iurato

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Search for Muon Neutrinos from Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

see also the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission Page: http://from Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA A.Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA The IceCube

Achterberg, A.; IceCube Collaboration

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Search for pair production of the scalar top quark in muon+tau final states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for the pair production of scalar top quarks ($\\tilde{t}_{1}$), the lightest supersymmetric partners of the top quarks, in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of {7.3 $fb^{-1}$} collected with the \\dzero experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Each scalar top quark is assumed to decay into a $b$ quark, a charged lepton, and a scalar neutrino ($\\tilde{\

D0 Collaboration; V. M. Abazov; B. Abbott; B. S. Acharya; M. Adams; T. Adams; G. D. Alexeev; G. Alkhazov; A. Alton; G. Alverson; M. Aoki; A. Askew; B. Asman; S. Atkins; O. Atramentov; K. Augsten; C. Avila; J. BackusMayes; F. Badaud; L. Bagby; B. Baldin; D. V. Bandurin; S. Banerjee; E. Barberis; P. Baringer; J. Barreto; J. F. Bartlett; U. Bassler; V. Bazterra; A. Bean; M. Begalli; C. Belanger-Champagne; L. Bellantoni; S. B. Beri; G. Bernardi; R. Bernhard; I. Bertram; M. Besancon; R. Beuselinck; V. A. Bezzubov; P. C. Bhat; S. Bhatia; V. Bhatnagar; G. Blazey; S. Blessing; K. Bloom; A. Boehnlein; D. Boline; E. E. Boos; G. Borissov; T. Bose; A. Brandt; O. Brandt; R. Brock; G. Brooijmans; A. Bross; D. Brown; J. Brown; X. B. Bu; M. Buehler; V. Buescher; V. Bunichev; S. Burdin; T. H. Burnett; C. P. Buszello; B. Calpas; E. Camacho-Perez; M. A. Carrasco-Lizarraga; B. C. K. Casey; H. Castilla-Valdez; S. Chakrabarti; D. Chakraborty; K. M. Chan; A. Chandra; E. Chapon; G. Chen; S. Chevalier-Thery; D. K. Cho; S. W. Cho; S. Choi; B. Choudhary; S. Cihangir; D. Claes; J. Clutter; M. Cooke; W. E. Cooper; M. Corcoran; F. Couderc; M. -C. Cousinou; A. Croc; D. Cutts; A. Das; G. Davies; S. J. de Jong; E. De La Cruz-Burelo; F. Deliot; R. Demina; D. Denisov; S. P. Denisov; S. Desai; C. Deterre; K. DeVaughan; H. T. Diehl; M. Diesburg; P. F. Ding; A. Dominguez; T. Dorland; A. Dubey; L. V. Dudko; D. Duggan; A. Duperrin; S. Dutt; A. Dyshkant; M. Eads; D. Edmunds; J. Ellison; V. D. Elvira; Y. Enari; H. Evans; A. Evdokimov; V. N. Evdokimov; G. Facini; T. Ferbel; F. Fiedler; F. Filthaut; W. Fisher; H. E. Fisk; M. Fortner; H. Fox; S. Fuess; A. Garcia-Bellido; G. A. Garcia-Guerra; V. Gavrilov; P. Gay; W. Geng; D. Gerbaudo; C. E. Gerber; Y. Gershtein; G. Ginther; G. Golovanov; A. Goussiou; P. D. Grannis; S. Greder; H. Greenlee; Z. D. Greenwood; E. M. Gregores; G. Grenier; Ph. Gris; J. -F. Grivaz; A. Grohsjean; S. Grunendahl; M. W. Grunewald; T. Guillemin; G. Gutierrez; P. Gutierrez; A. Haas; S. Hagopian; J. Haley; L. Han; K. Harder; A. Harel; J. M. Hauptman; J. Hays; T. Head; T. Hebbeker; D. Hedin; H. Hegab; A. P. Heinson; U. Heintz; C. Hensel; I. Heredia-De La Cruz; K. Herner; G. Hesketh; M. D. Hildreth; R. Hirosky; T. Hoang; J. D. Hobbs; B. Hoeneisen; M. Hohlfeld; Z. Hubacek; V. Hynek; I. Iashvili; Y. Ilchenko; R. Illingworth; A. S. Ito; S. Jabeen; M. Jaffre; D. Jamin; A. Jayasinghe; R. Jesik; K. Johns; M. Johnson; A. Jonckheere; P. Jonsson; J. Joshi; A. W. Jung; A. Juste; K. Kaadze; E. Kajfasz; D. Karmanov; P. A. Kasper; I. Katsanos; R. Kehoe; S. Kermiche; N. Khalatyan; A. Khanov; A. Kharchilava; Y. N. Kharzheev; J. M. Kohli; A. V. Kozelov; J. Kraus; S. Kulikov; A. Kumar; A. Kupco; T. Kurca; V. A. Kuzmin; S. Lammers; G. Landsberg; P. Lebrun; H. S. Lee; S. W. Lee; W. M. Lee; J. Lellouch; H. Li; L. Li; Q. Z. Li; S. M. Lietti; J. K. Lim; D. Lincoln; J. Linnemann; V. V. Lipaev; R. Lipton; Y. Liu; A. Lobodenko; M. Lokajicek; R. Lopes de Sa; H. J. Lubatti; R. Luna-Garcia; A. L. Lyon; A. K. A. Maciel; D. Mackin; R. Madar; R. Magana-Villalba; S. Malik; V. L. Malyshev; Y. Maravin; J. Martinez-Ortega; R. McCarthy; C. L. McGivern; M. M. Meijer; A. Melnitchouk; D. Menezes; P. G. Mercadante; M. Merkin; A. Meyer; J. Meyer; F. Miconi; N. K. Mondal; G. S. Muanza; M. Mulhearn; E. Nagy; M. Naimuddin; M. Narain; R. Nayyar; H. A. Neal; J. P. Negret; P. Neustroev; S. F. Novaes; T. Nunnemann; G. Obrant; J. Orduna; N. Osman; J. Osta; G. J. Otero y Garzon; M. Padilla; A. Pal; N. Parashar; V. Parihar; S. K. Park; R. Partridge; N. Parua; A. Patwa; B. Penning; M. Perfilov; Y. Peters; K. Petridis; G. Petrillo; P. Petroff; R. Piegaia; M. -A. Pleier; P. L. M. Podesta-Lerma; V. M. Podstavkov; P. Polozov; A. V. Popov; M. Prewitt; D. Price; N. Prokopenko; J. Qian; A. Quadt; B. Quinn; M. S. Rangel; K. Ranjan; P. N. Ratoff; I. Razumov; P. Renkel; M. Rijssenbeek; I. Ripp-Baudot; F. Rizatdinova; M. Rominsky; A. Ross; C. Royon; P. Rubinov; R. Ruchti; G. Safronov; G. Sajot; P. Salcido; A. Sanchez-Hernandez; M. P. Sanders; B. Sanghi; A. S. Santos; G. Savage; L. Sawyer; T. Scanlon; R. D. Schamberger; Y. Scheglov; H. Schellman; T. Schliephake; S. Schlobohm; C. Schwanenberger; R. Schwienhorst; J. Sekaric; H. Severini; E. Shabalina; V. Shary; A. A. Shchukin; R. K. Shivpuri; V. Simak; V. Sirotenko; P. Skubic; P. Slattery; D. Smirnov; K. J. Smith; G. R. Snow; J. Snow; S. Snyder; S. Soldner-Rembold; L. Sonnenschein; K. Soustruznik; J. Stark; V. Stolin; D. A. Stoyanova; M. Strauss; D. Strom; L. Stutte; L. Suter; P. Svoisky; M. Takahashi; A. Tanasijczuk; M. Titov; V. V. Tokmenin; Y. -T. Tsai; K. Tschann-Grimm; D. Tsybychev; B. Tuchming; C. Tully; L. Uvarov; S. Uvarov; S. Uzunyan; R. Van Kooten; W. M. van Leeuwen; N. Varelas; E. W. Varnes; I. A. Vasilyev; P. Verdier; L. S. Vertogradov; M. Verzocchi; M. Vesterinen; D. Vilanova; P. Vokac

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

378

Search for pair production of the scalar top quark in the electron-muon final state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the result of a search for the pair production of the lightest supersymmetric partner of the top quark ($\\tilde{t}_1$) in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb$^{-1}$. The scalar top quarks are assumed to decay into a $b$ quark, a charged lepton, and a scalar neutrino ($\\tilde{\

V. M. Abazov; B. Abbott; M. Abolins; B. S. Acharya; M. Adams; T. Adams; G. D. Alexeev; G. Alkhazov; A. Altona; G. Alverson; G. A. Alves; L. S. Ancu; M. Aoki; Y. Arnoud; M. Arov; A. Askew; B. Åsman; O. Atramentov; C. Avila; J. BackusMayes; F. Badaud; L. Bagby; B. Baldin; D. V. Bandurin; S. Banerjee; E. Barberis; P. Baringer; J. Barreto; J. F. Bartlett; U. Bassler; V. Bazterra; S. Beale; A. Bean; M. Begalli; M. Begel; C. Belanger-Champagne; L. Bellantoni; S. B. Beri; G. Bernardi; R. Bernhard; I. Bertram; M. Besançon; R. Beuselinck; V. A. Bezzubov; P. C. Bhat; V. Bhatnagar; G. Blazey; S. Blessing; K. Bloom; A. Boehnlein; D. Boline; T. A. Bolton; E. E. Boos; G. Borissov; T. Bose; A. Brandt; O. Brandt; R. Brock; G. Brooijmans; A. Bross; D. Brown; J. Brown; X. B. Bu; D. Buchholz; M. Buehler; V. Buescher; V. Bunichev; S. Burdinb; T. H. Burnett; C. P. Buszello; B. Calpas; E. Camacho-Pérez; M. A. Carrasco-Lizarraga; B. C. K. Casey; H. Castilla-Valdez; S. Chakrabarti; D. Chakraborty; K. M. Chan; A. Chandra; G. Chen; S. Chevalier-Théry; D. K. Cho; S. W. Cho; S. Choi; B. Choudhary; T. Christoudias; S. Cihangir; D. Claes; J. Clutter; M. Cooke; W. E. Cooper; M. Corcoran; F. Couderc; M. -C. Cousinou; A. Croc; D. Cutts; M. ?wiok; A. Das; G. Davies; K. De; S. J. de Jong; E. De La Cruz-Burelo; F. Déliot; M. Demarteau; 47 R. Demina; D. Denisov; S. P. Denisov; S. Desai; K. DeVaughan; H. T. Diehl; M. Diesburg; A. Dominguez; T. Dorland; A. Dubey; L. V. Dudko; D. Duggan; A. Duperrin; S. Dutt; A. Dyshkant; M. Eads; D. Edmunds; J. Ellison; V. D. Elvira; Y. Enari; S. Eno; H. Evans; A. Evdokimov; V. N. Evdokimov; G. Facini; T. Ferbel; F. Fiedler; F. Filthaut; W. Fisher; H. E. Fisk; M. Fortner; H. Fox; S. Fuess; T. Gadfort; A. Garcia-Bellido; V. Gavrilov; P. Gay; W. Geist; W. Geng; D. Gerbaudo; C. E. Gerber; Y. Gershtein; G. Ginther; G. Golovanov; A. Goussiou; P. D. Grannis; S. Greder; H. Greenlee; Z. D. Greenwood; E. M. Gregores; G. Grenier; Ph. Gris; J. -F. Grivaz; A. Grohsjean; S. Grünendahl; M. W. Grünewald; F. Guo; J. Guo; G. Gutierrez; P. Gutierrez; A. Haasc; S. Hagopian; J. Haley; L. Han; K. Harder; A. Harel; J. M. Hauptman; J. Hays; T. Head; T. Hebbeker; D. Hedin; H. Hegab; A. P. Heinson; U. Heintz; C. Hensel; I. Heredia-De La Cruz; K. Herner; G. Hesketh; M. D. Hildreth; R. Hirosky; T. Hoang; J. D. Hobbs; B. Hoeneisen; M. Hohlfeld; S. Hossain; Z. Hubacek; N. Huske; V. Hynek; I. Iashvili; R. Illingworth; A. S. Ito; S. Jabeen; M. Jaffré; S. Jain; D. Jamin; R. Jesik; K. Johns; M. Johnson; D. Johnston; A. Jonckheere; P. Jonsson; J. Joshi; A. Justed; K. Kaadze; E. Kajfasz; D. Karmanov; P. A. Kasper; I. Katsanos; R. Kehoe; S. Kermiche; N. Khalatyan; A. Khanov; A. Kharchilava; Y. N. Kharzheev; D. Khatidze; M. H. Kirby; J. M. Kohli; A. V. Kozelov; J. Kraus; A. Kumar; A. Kupco; T. Kur?a; V. A. Kuzmin; J. Kvita; S. Lammers; G. Landsberg; P. Lebrun; H. S. Lee; S. W. Lee; W. M. Lee; J. Lellouch; L. Li; Q. Z. Li; S. M. Lietti; J. K. Lim; D. Lincoln; J. Linnemann; V. V. Lipaev; R. Lipton; Y. Liu; Z. Liu; A. Lobodenko; M. Lokajicek; P. Love; H. J. Lubatti; R. Luna-Garciae; A. L. Lyon; A. K. A. Maciel; D. Mackin; R. Madar; R. Magaña-Villalba; S. Malik; V. L. Malyshev; Y. Maravin; J. Martínez-Ortega; R. McCarthy; C. L. McGivern; M. M. Meijer; A. Melnitchouk; D. Menezes; P. G. Mercadante; M. Merkin; A. Meyer; J. Meyer; N. K. Mondal; G. S. Muanza; M. Mulhearn; E. Nagy; M. Naimuddin; M. Narain; R. Nayyar; H. A. Neal; J. P. Negret; P. Neustroev; S. F. Novaes; T. Nunnemann; G. Obrant; J. Orduna; N. Osman; J. Osta; G. J. Otero y Garzón; M. Owen; M. Padilla; M. Pangilinan; N. Parashar; V. Parihar; S. K. Park; J. Parsons; R. Partridgec; N. Parua; A. Patwa; B. Penning; M. Perfilov; K. Peters; Y. Peters; G. Petrillo; P. Pétroff; R. Piegaia; J. Piper; M. -A. Pleier; P. L. M. Podesta-Lermaf; V. M. Podstavkov; M. -E. Pol; P. Polozov; A. V. Popov; M. Prewitt; D. Price; S. Protopopescu; J. Qian; A. Quadt; B. Quinn; M. S. Rangel; K. Ranjan; P. N. Ratoff; I. Razumov; P. Renkel; P. Rich; M. Rijssenbeek; I. Ripp-Baudot; F. Rizatdinova; M. Rominsky; C. Royon; P. Rubinov; R. Ruchti; G. Safronov; G. Sajot; A. Sánchez-Hernández; M. P. Sanders; B. Sanghi; A. S. Santos; G. Savage; L. Sawyer; T. Scanlon; R. D. Schamberger; Y. Scheglov; H. Schellman; T. Schliephake; S. Schlobohm; C. Schwanenberger; R. Schwienhorst; J. Sekaric; H. Severini; E. Shabalina; V. Shary; A. A. Shchukin; R. K. Shivpuri; V. Simak; V. Sirotenko; P. Skubic; P. Slattery; D. Smirnov; K. J. Smith; G. R. Snow; J. Snow; S. Snyder; S. Söldner-Rembold; L. Sonnenschein; A. Sopczak; M. Sosebee; K. Soustruznik; B. Spurlock; J. Stark; V. Stolin; D. A. Stoyanova; E. Strauss; M. Strauss; D. Strom; L. Stutte; P. Svoisky; M. Takahashi; A. Tanasijczuk; W. Taylor; M. Titov; V. V. Tokmenin; D. Tsybychev; B. Tuchming; C. Tully; P. M. Tuts; L. Uvarov

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

379

Aging Study of RPC's for the SiD Hcal and Muon System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preliminary test results on microscope investigation and BESIII-type RPC aging performance have revealed interesting aging phenomena that had not been seen before in Linseed oil coated Italian-type RPC. We report here on the aging performance of BESIII-type and its variant RPC, and on microscopic surface characterization of BESIII-type Bakelite electrodes.

Changguo Lu; Kirk McDonald; A. J. S. Smith; Jiawen Zhang

2010-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

380

Search for pair production of the scalar top quark in muon plus tau final states  

SciTech Connect

We present a search for the pair production of scalar top quarks ({tilde t}{sub 1}), the lightest supersymmetric partners of the top quarks, in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Each scalar top quark is assumed to decay into a b quark, a charged lepton, and a scalar neutrino ({tilde {nu}}). We investigate final states arising from {tilde t}{sub 1}{ovr {tilde t}{sub 1}} {yields} b{bar b}{mu}{tau}{tilde {nu}}{tilde {nu}} and {tilde t}{sub 1}{ovr {tilde t}{sub 1}} {yields} b{bar b}{tau}{tau}{tilde {nu}}{tilde {nu}}. With no significant excess of events observed above the background expected from the standard model, we set exclusion limits on this production process in the (M{sub {tilde t}{sub 1}}, M{sub {tilde {nu}}}) plane.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; Lopes de Sa R.; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Detection of Atmospheric Muon Neutrinos with the IceCube 9-String Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutrinos with the IceCube 9-String Detector A. Achterberg,Neutrinos with the IceCube 9-String Detector The IceCube17 me- ters apart in strings of 60. Strings are arranged on

Achterberg, A.; IceCube Collaboration

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Muon identification with the event filter of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC's  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Large Hadron Collider at CERN offers unprecedented challenges to the design and construction of detectors and trigger/data acquisition systems. For ATLAS, a three level trigger system has been developed to extract interesting physics signatures with ...

Gabriella Cataldi

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A proposed method for reducing the sticking constant in muon catalyzed fusion  

SciTech Connect

We present a method of reducing the effective sticking coefficient involving reacceleration of the He..mu.. ion-by-ion cyclotron resonance. It is necessary to work with the target D--T in solid or liquid form, and the target has to be divided into many thin rods or pellets of order 100 microns in radius. The idea is to impose a magnetic field and a rotating electric field. A balance is achieved between drag in the rods or pellets and acceleration in the region between, so that the He..mu.. ion is held at a constant velocity until stripping occurs. Although stripping is greatly reduced, the idea is not practical as it stands because of the large alpha particle heat produced in the target. 2 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Kulsrud, R.M.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Measurement of the cosmic ray and neutrino-induced muon flux at the Sudbury neutrino observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. G. Van de Water,9,13 B. A. VanDevender,19 C. J. Virtue,6 D. Waller,4 C. E. Waltham,2 H. Wan Chan. Wouters,9 A. Wright,14 M. Yeh,3 F. Zhang,4 and K. Zuber12,s (SNO Collaboration) 1 Department of Physics

385

CMS PAPER CFT-09-005 Measurement of the Muon Stopping Power in Lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be resolved regarding the mechanism of cosmic rays - cloud cover variations due to solar (magnetic) activity-index, a measure of the Earth's magnetic field, or derivatives to be potentially important for variations in global

Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

386

FISSION YIELDS AND LIFETIMES FOR MUON INDUCED FISSION IN 235U AND 238U  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California. FISSION YIELDS AL\\JD LIFETIMES FORfor his assistance in the fission chamber calibrations andCl8 (1978) 1452. Table 1 Fission yields yf Nucleus 23su 23Su

Ahmad, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Measurement of muon neutrino and antineutrino induced single neutral pion production cross sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the efforts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive signal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understanding. Searches for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillation - a channel that may yield insight into the vanishingly small mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13}, CP violation, and the neutrino mass hierarchy - are particularly susceptible to contamination from neutral current single {pi}{sup 0} (NC 1{pi}{sup 0}) production. Unfortunately, the available data concerning NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production are limited in scope and statistics. Without satisfactory constraints, theoretical models of NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production yield substantially differing predictions in the critical E{sub {nu}} {approx} 1 GeV regime. Additional investigation of this interaction can ameliorate the current deficiencies. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) is a short-baseline neutrino oscillation search operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). While the oscillation search is the principal charge of the MiniBooNE collaboration, the extensive data ({approx} 10{sup 6} neutrino events) offer a rich resource with which to conduct neutrino cross section measurements. This work concerns the measurement of both neutrino and antineutrino NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production cross sections at MiniBooNE. The size of the event samples used in the analysis exceeds that of all other similar experiments combined by an order of magnitude. We present the first measurements of the absolute NC 1{pi}{sup 0} cross section as well as the first differential cross sections in both neutrino and antineutrino mode. Specifically, we measure single differential cross sections with respect to pion momentum and pion angle. We find the flux-averaged, total cross sections for NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production on CH{sub 2} to be (4.76 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.76{sub sys}) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}/nucleon at = 808 MeV for neutrino induced production and (1.48 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.23{sub sys}) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}/nucleon at = 664 MeV for antineutrino induced production.

Anderson, Colin; /Yale U.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Measurement of muon neutrino and antineutrino induced single neutral pion production cross sections  

SciTech Connect

Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the efforts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive signal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understanding. Searches for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillation - a channel that may yield insight into the vanishingly small mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13}, CP violation, and the neutrino mass hierarchy - are particularly susceptible to contamination from neutral current single {pi}{sup 0} (NC 1{pi}{sup 0}) production. Unfortunately, the available data concerning NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production are limited in scope and statistics. Without satisfactory constraints, theoretical models of NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production yield substantially differing predictions in the critical E{sub {nu}} {approx} 1 GeV regime. Additional investigation of this interaction can ameliorate the current deficiencies. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) is a short-baseline neutrino oscillation search operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). While the oscillation search is the principal charge of the MiniBooNE collaboration, the extensive data ({approx} 10{sup 6} neutrino events) offer a rich resource with which to conduct neutrino cross section measurements. This work concerns the measurement of both neutrino and antineutrino NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production cross sections at MiniBooNE. The size of the event samples used in the analysis exceeds that of all other similar experiments combined by an order of magnitude. We present the first measurements of the absolute NC 1{pi}{sup 0} cross section as well as the first differential cross sections in both neutrino and antineutrino mode. Specifically, we measure single differential cross sections with respect to pion momentum and pion angle. We find the flux-averaged, total cross sections for NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production on CH{sub 2} to be (4.76 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.76{sub sys}) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}/nucleon at = 808 MeV for neutrino induced production and (1.48 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.23{sub sys}) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}/nucleon at = 664 MeV for antineutrino induced production.

Anderson, Colin; /Yale U.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

A search for muon neutrino and antineutrino disappearance in the Booster Neutrino Beam  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation presents a search for {mu}{sub {nu}} and {bar {mu}{sub {nu}}} disappearance with the MiniBooNE experiment in the {Delta}m{sup 2} region of a few eV{sup 2}. Disappearance measurements in this oscillation region constrain sterile neutrino models and CPT violation in the lepton sector. Fits to the shape of the {mu}{sub {nu}} and {bar {mu}{sub {nu}}} energy spectra reveal no evidence for disappearance in either mode. This is the first test of {bar {mu}{sub {nu}}} disappearance between {Delta}m{sup 2} = 0:1 -- 10 eV2. In addition, prospects for performing a joint analysis using the SciBooNE detector in conjunction with MiniBooNE are discussed.

Mahn, Kendall Brianna McConnel; /Columbia U.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Sensitivity of the icecube detector to astrophysical sources of high energy muon neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts. We study the e?ectivein coincidence with gamma-ray burst observations. Aftercm ?2 s ?1 sr ?1 GeV. A gamma-ray burst model following the

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

STUDY OF RARE PROCESSES INDUCED BY 209-GeV MUONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contributing to the event trigger. The inelastic calorimetercontributing to the event trigger. After all track findingcontribute to the event trigger. As an additional precaution

Smith, W.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

PHOTOMULTIPLIER CHARACTERISTICS CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEEP UNDERWATER MUON AND NEUTRINO DETECTION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented at the Deep Underwater Huon and Neutrino DetectionCONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEEP UNDERWATER HUON AND NEUTRINOPresented at the Deep Underwater Huon and Neutrino Detection

Leskovar, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Physical model of leptons : Massive electrons, muons, tauons and their massless neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical model (PhsMdl) of the leptons is offered by means of the PhsMdls of the vacuum and electron,described in our recent works. It is assumed that the vacuum is consistent by dynamides, streamlined in junctions of some tight crystalline lattice. Every dynamide contains a neutral pair of massless point-like (PntLk) contrary elementary electric charges (ElmElcChrgs): electrino $(-)$ and positrino $(+)$. The PntLk ElmElcChrgs of the massless electrino and positrino of some dynamide in the fluctuated vacuum may been excited or deviated by means of some energy, introduced by some photon or other micro particles (MicrPrts). The massless leptons (neutrinos) are neutral long-living solitary spherical vortical oscillation excitations of the uncharged fluctuating vacuum. The massive leptons are charged long-living solitary spherical vortical excitations of its fine spread (FnSpr) elementary electric charge (ElmElcChrg). So-called zitterbewegung is self-consistent strong-correlated vortical harmonic oscillation motion of the FnSpr ElmElcChrg of massive leptons. Different leptons have different self-consistent strong-correlated vortical harmonic oscillation motion of different sizes of their FnSpr ElmElcChrg, which is determined by their Kompton length $\\lambda =\\frac{h}{m C} $, where $m$ is the mass of the massive leptons. At mutual transition of one massive lepton into another massive lepton its PntLk ElmElcChrg move up by dint of weak interaction in the form of the charged intermediate vector meson $W$ from one self-consistent strong-correlated vortical harmonic oscillation motion of one size into another self-consistent strong-correlated vortical harmonic oscillation motion of another size.

Josiph Mladenov Rangelov

2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

394

Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth J. Busenitz,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SNSsiteincludingsupport facilitiesandtheCenter forNanophaseMaterials Sciences. SpallationNeutronSource The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based science fa- cility that will provide neutron beams, magnetic materials, polymers and complex fluids, chemistry, and biology. What is the importance of neutron

Gratta, Giorgio

395

Muon Radiography at LANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

via multiple modes including aircraft, trucks, and containers. It is impossible to search all of them. A zero-dose means of cargo and vehicle inspection that scans every...

396

Search for a Possible Spontaneous Emission of Muons from Heavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for an exotic natural radioactivity of lead nuclei, using nuclear emulsion sheets as detector, is described. We discuss the experimental set-up of a test performed at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (Italy), the event simulation, data analysis and preliminary results.

M. Giorgini

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

Securing the metal recycling chain for the steel industry by detecting orphan radioactive sources in scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

Experimental tests are reported for the detection of the heavy metal shielding of orphan sources hidden inside scrap metal by using a recently developed muon tomography system. Shielded sources do not trigger alarm in radiation portal commonly employed at the entrance of steel industry using scrap metal. Future systems integrating radiation portals with muon tomography inspection gates will substantially reduce the possibility of accidental melting of radioactive sources securing the use of recycled metal.

Pesente, S.; Benettoni, M.; Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; Gonella, F.; Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zumerle, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); University of Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); Bonomi, G.; Zenoni, A. [University of Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia and INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Calvini, P.; Squarcia, S. [University of Genova and INFN Sezione di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

398

ATLAS RPC Quality Assurance results at INFN Lecce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main results of the quality assurance tests performed on the Resistive Plate Chamber used by the ATLAS experiment at LHC as muon trigger chambers are reported and discussed. Since July 2004, about 270 RPC units has been certified at INFN Lecce site and delivered to CERN, for being integrated in the final muon station of the ATLAS barrel region. We show the key RPC characteristics which qualify the performance of this detector technology as muon trigger chamber in the harsh LHC enviroments. These are dark current, chamber efficiency, noise rate, gas volume tomography, and gas leakage.

Bianco, M; Cataldi, G; Cazzato, A; Chiodini, G; Coluccia, M R; Creti, P; Grancagnolo, F; Perrino, R; Primavera, M; Spagnolo, S; Tassielli, G F; Ventura, A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

An Induction Linac Approach to Phase Rotation of a Muon Bunch in the Production Region of a mu+ - mu- Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geometry and voltage waveshape requirements. We now turn tocell and voltage insulation requirements. An induction cellgap region. The requirements of voltage insulation and

Turner, W.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Perspectives of a mid-rapidity dimuon program at the RHIC: a novel and compact muon telescope detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Telescope Detector L. Ruan Brookhaven National Laboratory,Connecticut 06520 Z. Xu Brookhaven National Laboratory,York 11973 K. Asselta Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton,

Ruan, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Regenerative Amplification of Femtosecond Pulses: Design andConstruction of a sub-100fs, muon J Laser System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Femtosecond lasers are a powerful tool for a wealth of applications in physics, chemistry and biology. In most cases, however, their use is fundamentally restricted to a rather narrow spectral range. This thesis deals with the construction and characterization of a femtosecond light source for spectroscopic applications which overcomes that restriction. It is demonstrated how the output of a continuously pumped Ti:sapphire femtosecond oscillator is amplified to the {mu}J level,while the pulse duration remains below 100 fs. A combination of continuous pumping, acousto-optic switching and Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a gain medium allows amplification at high repetition rates. By focusing the high energy pulses into a sapphire crystal, a broad-band continuum can be generated, extended in wavelengths over several hundred nanometers. To accomplish amplification of three orders of magnitude while maintaining the pulse length, a regenerative multipass amplifier system was built. The thesis describes theoretical design, realization and characterization of the system. Theoretical calculations and preliminary measurements were carried out and allow a critical evaluation of the final performance.

Schumacher, Andreas B.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

An Induction Linac Approach to Phase Rotation of a Muon Bunch in the Production Region of a mu+ - mu- Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.71 MV/m etc .. The integrated volt-seconds/m for the three5 are .055, .122 and . 134 volt-seconds/m at z = O. 0.2 andcell axial length. (2) the volt-seconds of the magnetic core

Turner, W.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Limits on a muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the IceCube 22-string detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Sun with the IceCube 22-string detector R. Abbasi, 24 Y.in the Sun with the IceCube 22-string detector The IceCubeperformed with the IceCube 22-string neutrino detector using

Klein, Spencer; IceCube Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Design Issues for the Superconducting Magnet that Goes Around the Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3) the size of the heat exchanger around the liquid hydrogendo not require a large heat exchanger to get the heat out ofMICE hydrogen absorber heat exchanger was designed to remove

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Developing ab-tagging algorithm using soft muons at level-3 for the do detector at fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current data-taking phase of the DØ detector at Fermilab, called Run II, is designed to aid the search for the Higgs Boson. The neutral Higgs is postulated to have a mass of 117 GeV. One of the channels promising the presence of this hypothetical ...

Mayukh Das / Neeti Parashar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

PHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 025807 (2010) Production of radioactive isotopes through cosmic muon spallation in KamLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as the KamLAND (Kamioka liquid-scintillator antineutrino detector), Borexino [1­3], CANDLES IV (calcium fluoride for studies of neutrino and dark matters by low-energy spectrometer) [4,5], SNO+ (Sudbury Neutrino.-diameter PMTs reused from the Kamiokande experiment [21]--are mounted on the inner surface of the outer

Gratta, Giorgio

407

Limits on a muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the IceCube 22-string detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the IceCube 22-neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the IceCube 22-neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with

Klein, Spencer; IceCube Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Design Issues for the Superconducting Magnet that Goes Around the Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the absorber body and pipes and the heat conduction down theheat transfer into the absorber to about 19 kW. The absorber vent pipeheat transfer into the liquid hydrogen to about 54 kW. The vent pipes

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Investigations and calculations toward increasing the efficiency of muon catalyzed fusion. Final report, May 1, 1989--November 30, 1989  

SciTech Connect

A brief summary of results during this report period is given. Some of the topics investigated includes: (1) calculations of sticking fractions and d-t fusion from dt{mu}(JV) states, (2) dd{mu} sticking fractions, (3) the reactivation coefficient in d-t fusion, (4) fusion rates for all XY{mu}(JV)(JV=0,1), (5) nuclear effects on energy shifts and fusion rates for (J=O) states of dt{mu}, (6) and some comments on cold fusion.

Monkhorst, H.J.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

KT McDonald Muon Accelerator Program DoE Review (FNAL) August 30, 2012 1 Target and Absorbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cryogenics Diagnostics Controls and Interlocks Health and Safety Mechanical Decommissioning Remote Handling and Hot Cells ######## UScaled from LBNE Buildings, tunnels and Infrastructure ######## Scaled from LBNE Utility Systems 10,730,099 1.06.07 - Remote Handling Systems 14,348,362 1.06.08 - Controls 3,076,899 1

McDonald, Kirk

411

Possible demonstration of ionization cooling using absorbers in a solenoidal field  

SciTech Connect

Ionization cooling may play an important role in reducing the phase space volume of muons for a future muon-muon collider. We describe a possible experiment to demonstrate transverse emittance cooling using a muon beam at the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The experiment uses device dimensions and parameters and beam conditions similar to what is expected in an actual muon-muon collider.

Fernow, R.C.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The Helium Cooling System and Cold Mass Support System for the MICE Coupling Solenoid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

magnetic field is to produce a low muon beam beta functionmagnetic field is to produce a low muon beam beta function

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Range tomography: combining the practicality of boolean tomography with the resolution of analog tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of early network tomography approaches was to produce a point estimate for the performance of each network link (Analog tomography). When it became clear that the previous approach is error-prone in practice, research shifted to Boolean ... Keywords: Network tomography, localization, performance metric

Sajjad Zarifzadeh; Madhwaraj Gowdagere; Constantine Dovrolis

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Computed Tomography Status  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

Hansche, B. D.

1983-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

415

Computed tomography status  

SciTech Connect

Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

Hansche, B.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Experimental Adaptive Bayesian Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report an experimental realization of an adaptive quantum state tomography protocol. Our method takes advantage of a Bayesian approach to statistical inference and is naturally tailored for adaptive strategies. For pure states we observe close to 1/N scaling of infidelity with overall number of registered events, while best non-adaptive protocols allow for $1/\\sqrt{N}$ scaling only. Experiments are performed for polarization qubits, but the approach is readily adapted to any dimension.

Konstantin Kravtsov; Stanislav Straupe; Igor Radchenko; Neil Houlsby; Sergey Kulik

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

417

Positron Emission Tomography (PET)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

Welch, M. J.

1990-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

418

Measurement of single pi0 production in neutral current neutrino interactions with water by a 1.3 GeV wide band muon neutrino beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutral current single pi0 production induced by neutrinos with a mean energy of 1.3 GeV is measured at a 1000 ton water Cherenkov detector as a near detector of the K2K long baseline neutrino experiment. The cross section for this process relative to the total charged current cross section is measured to be 0.064 +- 0.001 (stat.) +- 0.007 (sys.). The momentum distribution of produced pi0s is measured and is found to be in good agreement with an expectation from the present knowledge of the neutrino cross sections.

K2K Collaboration; S. Nakayama

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

419

Neutrino Data from the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA), the Predecessor of IceCube at the South Pole  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

IceCube is a neutrino observatory for astrophysics with parts buried below the surface of the ice at the South Pole and an air-shower detector array exposed above. The international group of sponsors, led by the National Science Foundation (NSF), that designed and implemented the experiment intends for IceCube to operate and provide data for 20 years. Beginning in 2011, IceCube will record the interactions produced by astrophysical neutrinos with energies above 100 GeV, observing the Cherenkov radiation from charged particles produced in neutrino interactions. Its goal is to discover the sources of high-energy cosmic rays. These sources may be active galactic nuclei (AGNs) or massive, collapsed stars where black holes have formed.[Taken from http://www.icecube.wisc.edu/] The data currently available are from AMANDA, IceCube’s predecessor detector and experiment. AMANDA pioneered neutrino detection in ice. Over a period of years in the 1990s, detecting “strings” were buried and activated and by 2000, AMANDA was successfully recording an average of 1,000 neutrino events per year. IceCube will be a bigger and better version of AMANDA. Collected data have to be analyzed and processed, including a challenging process known as event reconstruction. The publicly available data are released after the main analyses are completed and results are published by the international AMANDA/IceCube Collaboration. The first set of data are from 2000 – 2006 and contain 6595 neutrino events.

Abbasi, R. et al

420

Muon Collider / Neutrino Factory Targetry R&D 2009-2012 V.B. Graves, H.G. Kirk, K.T. McDonald  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

handling General concepts for the remote handling and maintenance of the main cryostat were developed assembly will include beamline components, remote handling systems, maintenance areas, and utility systems be considered as a system rather than separate components. Remote replacement and/or maintenance of the loop

McDonald, Kirk

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Limits on a muon flux from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-string detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sun from the IceCube 22-string detector R. Abbasi,etal 1III.the Sun from the IceCube 22-string detector R. Abbasi, 26 Y.performed with the 22-string con?guration of the IceCube

Abbasi, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Search for High Mass Resonances Decaying to Muon Pairs in $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions  

SciTech Connect

We present a search for a new narrow, spin-1, high mass resonance decaying to {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} + X, using a matrix element based likelihood and a simultaneous measurement of the resonance mass and production rate. In data with 4.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1960 GeV, the most likely signal cross section is consistent with zero at 16% confidence level. We therefore do not observe evidence for a high mass resonance, and place limits on models predicting spin-1 resonances, including M > 1071 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level for a Z{prime} boson with the same couplings to fermions as the Z boson.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Search for the Higgs boson in the ZH->nunubb channel: Development of a b-tagging method based on soft muons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Standard Model of particle physics, the Higgs boson generates elementary particle masses. Current theoretical and experimental constraints lead to a Higgs boson mass between 114.4 and 158 GeV with 95% confidence level. Moreover, Tevatron has recently excluded the mass ranges between 100 and 109 GeV, 158 and 175 GeV with 95% confidence level. These results gives a clear indication to search for a Higgs boson at low mass. The D0 detector is located near Chicago, at the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider with an energy in the center of mass of 1.96 TeV. The topic of this thesis is the search for a Higgs boson in association with a Z boson. This channel is sensitive to low mass Higgs boson (Higgs boson search analysis was performed with 3 fb{sup -1} of data. The use of SLTNN increases by 10% the Higgs boson signal efficiency. The global analysis sensitivity improvement, however, is rather low (<1%) after taking into account the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties.

Jamin, David; /Marseille, CPPM

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Search for high-energy muon neutrinos from the "naked-eye" GRB080319B with the IceCube neutrino telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

one of the brightest gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) ever observed.cosmic high-energy neutrinos, gamma-ray-burst, GRB 080319BLong duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to

Abbasi, R.; IceCube Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Search for new physics in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment and the response of the CMS calorimeters to particles and jets  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo study of a generic search for new resonances beyond the Standard Model (SM) in the CMS experiment is presented. The resonances are axigluon, coloron, E{sub 6} diquark, excited quark, W{prime}, Z{prime}, and the Randall-Sundrum graviton which decay to dijets. The dijet resonance cross section that the CMS can expect to discover at a 5{sigma} significance or to exclude at 95% confidence level for integrated luminosities of 100 pb{sup -1}, 1 fb{sup -1}, and 10 fb{sup -1} is evaluated. It is shown that a 5{sigma} discovery of a multi-TeV dijet resonance is possible for an axigluon, excited quark, and E{sub 6} diquark. However, a 5{sigma} discovery can not be projected with confidence for a W{prime}, Z{prime} and the Randall-Sundrum graviton. On the other hand, 95% CL exclusion mass regions can be measured for all resonances at high luminosities. In the second part of this dissertation, the analyses of the 2006 test beam data from the combined electromagnetic and hadronic barrel calorimeters are presented. The CMS barrel calorimeters response to a variety of beam particles in a wide momenta range (1 to 350 GeV/c) is measured. Furthermore, using these beam data, the expected performance of the barrel calorimeters to jets is predicted.

Gumus, Kazim Ziya; /Texas Tech.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Limits on a muon flux from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-string detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

matter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-stringmatter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-stringmatter annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the

Abbasi, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Search for the Higgs boson in the ZH->nunubb channel: Development of a b-tagging method based on soft muons  

SciTech Connect

In the Standard Model of particle physics, the Higgs boson generates elementary particle masses. Current theoretical and experimental constraints lead to a Higgs boson mass between 114.4 and 158 GeV with 95% confidence level. Moreover, Tevatron has recently excluded the mass ranges between 100 and 109 GeV, 158 and 175 GeV with 95% confidence level. These results gives a clear indication to search for a Higgs boson at low mass. The D0 detector is located near Chicago, at the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider with an energy in the center of mass of 1.96 TeV. The topic of this thesis is the search for a Higgs boson in association with a Z boson. This channel is sensitive to low mass Higgs boson (<135 GeV) which has a branching ratio H {yields} bb varies between 50% and 90% in this mass range. The decay channel ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} studied has in the final state 2 heavy-flavor jets and some missing transverse energy due to escaping neutrinos. The heavy-flavor jets identification ('b-tagging') is done with a new algorithm (SLTNN) developped specifically for semi-leptonic decay of b quarks. The Higgs boson search analysis was performed with 3 fb{sup -1} of data. The use of SLTNN increases by 10% the Higgs boson signal efficiency. The global analysis sensitivity improvement, however, is rather low (<1%) after taking into account the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties.

Jamin, David; /Marseille, CPPM

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Muon Collider Target System H.G. Kirk, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and K.T. McDonald, Princeton University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equipment. The infrastructure associated with the target hall, with its remote-handling equipment, and hot-cells activation, such that once beam has arrived on target all subsequent maintenance must be performed by remote-handling

McDonald, Kirk

429

The Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory Target System H.G. Kirk (BNL) and K.T. McDonald (Princeton U.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, with its remote-handling equipment, and hot-cells for eventual processing of activated materials must be performed by remote-handling equipment. The infrastructure associated with the target hall Loop, Remote Handling Maintenance Systems, Target Hall When it comes time to build a target system

McDonald, Kirk

430

Proton computed tomography  

SciTech Connect

The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible.

Hanson, K.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Resistivity Tomography | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resistivity Tomography Resistivity Tomography Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Resistivity Tomography Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Resistivity Log Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 60.986,098 centUSD 0.061 kUSD 6.098e-5 MUSD 6.098e-8 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 76.227,622 centUSD 0.0762 kUSD 7.622e-5 MUSD 7.622e-8 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 106.7110,671 centUSD 0.107 kUSD 1.0671e-4 MUSD 1.0671e-7 TUSD / foot Time Required Low-End Estimate: 1 days0.00274 years

432

The 1981 ocean tomography experiment: Preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results from a 1981 test ocean acoustic tomography experiment are presented. The system deployed in the southern North Atlantic

The Ocean Tomography Group; R. C. Spindel

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Obtaining material identification with cosmic ray radiography  

SciTech Connect

The passage of muons through matter is dominated by the Coulomb interaction with electrons and nuclei in the matter. The muon interaction with the electrons leads to continuous energy loss and stopping of the muons. The muon interaction with nuclei leads to angular diffusion. Using both stopped muons and angle diffusion interactions allows us to determine density and identify materials. Here we demonstrate material identification using data taken at Los Alamos with a particle tracker built from a set of sealed drift tubes with commercial electronics and software, the Mini Muon Tracker (MMT).

Morris, C. L.; Borozdin, Konstantin; Bacon, Jeffrey; Chen, Elliott; Lukic, Zarija; Milner, Edward; Miyadera, Haruo; Perry, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Schwellenbach, Dave; Aberle, Derek; Dreesen, Wendi; Green, J. Andrew; McDuff, George G. [National Security Technologies, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Nagamine, Kanetada [KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan) and UC-Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Sossong, Michael [Decision Sciences, 12345 First American Way, Suite 130, Poway, CA 92064 (United States); Spore, Candace; Toleman, Nathan [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Earthquake Forecast via Neutrino Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the possibility of forecasting earthquakes by means of (anti)neutrino tomography. Antineutrinos emitted from reactors are used as a probe. As the antineutrinos traverse through a region prone to earthquakes, observable variations in the matter effect on the antineutrino oscillation would provide a tomography of the vicinity of the region. In this preliminary work, we adopt a simplified model for the geometrical profile and matter density in a fault zone. We calculate the survival probability of electron antineutrinos for cases without and with an anomalous accumulation of electrons which can be considered as a clear signal of the coming earthquake, at the geological region with a fault zone, and find that the variation may reach as much as 3% for $\\bar \

Bin Wang; Ya-Zheng Chen; Xue-Qian Li

2010-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

435

Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Atom probe tomography (APT) and analytical transmission .... of a Leaking Type 316 Socket Weld in a Boron Injection Tank Sampling Line.

436

Crosswell Seismic Tomography | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Crosswell Seismic Tomography Citation Schlumberger. Crosswell Seismic...

437

Prospects for Atomic-Scale Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Atomic-scale tomography (AST) may be defined as any technique that ... Initial Age Hardening and Nanostructural Evolution in a Cu-Ni-P Alloy.

438

Radiation interactions for tomography. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

There are new requirements emerging in the field of tomography: the need for spatial resolution in the micrometre range, atomic species specificity, and quantitative density discrimination.

Zolnay, A.S.

1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

439

MUCOOL: Ionization Cooling R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Laboratory MUCOOL Muon Ionization Cooling R&D Welcome to the muon ionization cooling experimental R&D page. The MuCool collaboration has been formed to pursue the development of a muon ionization cooling channel for a high luminosity muon collider. For more information please contact Alan Bross (Spokesperson: bross@fnal.gov), Rick Fernow (BNL Contact person: fernow1@bnl.gov), or Mike Zisman (LBNL Contact person: mszisman@lbl.gov). General MUCOOL Telephone Book MUCOOL Notes MUCOOL Collaborating Institutes and Interests Useful Links Link to IIT MUCOOL page Meetings Muon Collaboration Friday Meetings Fermilab Muon Group Monday Meetings MTA RF Workshop (August 22, 2007 - Fermilab) Low Emittance Muon Collider Workshop (February 12-16, 2007, Fermilab) Low Emittance Muon Collider Workshop (February 6-10, 2006, Fermilab)

440

MUCOOL: Ionization Cooling R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory MUCOOL Muon Ionization Cooling R&D Welcome to the muon ionization cooling experimental R&D page. The MuCool collaboration has been formed to pursue the development of a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon tomography muon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

??e??MEG  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MEG experiment started a search for a lepton violating (LFV) muon decay ? + ?e + ? at Paul Scherrer Institut(PSI) in Switzerland. The LFV muon decay does not occur in the standard model while new theories

Ryu Sawada; the MEG collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Addressing the software and hardware trade-offs of an embedded distributed system: the case of the ANTARES data acquisition and detector control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ANTARES is an astroparticle project featuring a neutrino telescope for the observation of violent phenomena in the universe. It is based on 900 photomultipliers detecting the Cerenkov light emitted by upward going muons as a signature of muon-neutrino ...

Shebli Anvar

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Timelike Momenta In Quantum Electrodynamics  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

In this note we discuss the possibility of studying the quantum electrodynamics of timelike photon propagators in muon or electron pair production by incident high energy muon or electron beams from presently available proton or electron accelerators.

Brodsky, S. J.; Ting, S. C. C.

1965-12-00T23:59:59.000Z

444

Microsoft PowerPoint - BiontaComissioningFinal.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bionta1@llnl.gov September 22, 2004 UCRL-PRES-206663 Fast close valve Slit A 13' Muon shield Gas Attenuator Solid Attenuator Slit B PPS 4' Muon shield Direct Imager Indirect...

445

NEUTRON IMAGING, RADIOGRAPHY AND TOMOGRAPHY.  

SciTech Connect

Neutrons are an invaluable probe in a wide range of scientific, medical and commercial endeavors. Many of these applications require the recording of an image of the neutron signal, either in one-dimension or in two-dimensions. We summarize the reactions of neutrons with the most important elements that are used for their detection. A description is then given of the major techniques used in neutron imaging, with emphasis on the detection media and position readout principle. Important characteristics such as position resolution, linearity, counting rate capability and sensitivity to gamma-background are discussed. Finally, the application of a subset of these instruments in radiology and tomography is described.

SMITH,G.C.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Neutrino Factory Physics Study Sub-Group 5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

structure functions, heavy quarks and couplings, exotic searches) versus beam energy, intensity, baseline length, muon polarization, detector details, etc. Contact...

447

Cryogenic Technology Development For The MEG Liquid Xenon Calorimeter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryogenic key technologies have been developed for the muon rare decay experiment (MEG) at the Paul Scherrer Institute

Tomiyoshi Haruyama; MEG Calorimeter Group

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

PHENIX REPORTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains individual progress reports for the months of December 1997 through May 1998 on the Phenix program at Hytec. Topics include the Phenix muon detector chamber flow analysis; the Phenix Muon detector deformation and motion/tolerance study of Stations 1, 2, and 3; finite element mount/electron shield structural analysis; South Station 3 muon detector deformation analysis; and Station 1 muon detector panel assembly and fabrication sequences.

TIMOTHY C. THOMPSON - HYTEC, INC.

1998-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

Hydrogen Safety Issues Compared to Safety Issues with Methane and Propane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE funding for the US Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration is also gratefully acknowledged. REFERENCES Handbook

Green, Michael A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Undergraduate Research at Jefferson Lab - Light Yield Measurements...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emission Characteristics) Field Emission Characteristics Light Yield Measurements of Heavy Photon Search (HPS) Muon Scintillator Hodoscopes Student: Marianne Skolnik School:...

451

Application of Computed Tomography to Microgravity Combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes applications of computed tomography (CT) to combustion phenomena under microgravity conditions. Infrared Thermography (IT) has been considered as a promising method for two-dimensional measurement of flames. We have applied IT to ... Keywords: computed tomography, diffusion flame, infrared thermography, microgravity combustion, spectroscopy

H. Sato; K. Itoh; M. Shimizu; S. Hayashi; Y. Fujimori; K. Maeno

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors - Energy ...  

A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a ...

453

Project Data Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Muons 10 GeV Muons 20 GeV Muons 50 GeV Collider Run Data Run 1A Run 1B Run 1C Run 1D Project Contact: Tom Jordan Web Maintainer: qnet-webmaster@fnal.gov Last Update: October 27...

454

Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

1985-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

455

Axial tomography from digitized real time radiography  

SciTech Connect

Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

Zolnay, A.S.; McDonald, W.M.; Doupont, P.A.; McKinney, R.L.; Lee, M.M.

1985-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

456

Buried Interface Analysis Using Atom Probe Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contributions of Atom Probe Tomography to the Understanding of Steels · Control of p-n ... Relationships in a Series of Co-Cr-Cu-Fe-Ni-Al High Entropy Alloys.

457

Atom Probe Tomography for Industrial Applications - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contributions of Atom Probe Tomography to the Understanding of Steels · Control of p-n ... Relationships in a Series of Co-Cr-Cu-Fe-Ni-Al High Entropy Alloys.

458

Mathematical Problems of Thermoacoustic Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) is a newly emerging modality in biomedical imaging. It combines the good contrast of electromagnetic and good resolution of ultrasound imaging. The mathematical model of TAT is the observability problem for the wave equation: one observes the data on a hyper-surface and reconstructs the initial perturbation. In this dissertation, we consider several mathematical problems of TAT. The first problem is the inversion formulas. We provide a family of closed form inversion formulas to reconstruct the initial perturbation from the observed data. The second problem is the range description. We present the range description of the spherical mean Radon transform, which is an important transform in TAT. The next problem is the stability analysis for TAT. We prove that the reconstruction of the initial perturbation from observed data is not H¨older stable if some observability condition is violated. The last problem is the speed determination. The question is whether the observed data uniquely determines the ultrasound speed and initial perturbation. We provide some initial results on this issue. They include the unique determination of the unknown constant speed, a weak local uniqueness, a characterization of the non-uniqueness, and a characterization of the kernel of the linearized operator.

Nguyen, Linh V.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Jet Jet Jet Jet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

protons protons top quark bottom quark muon top quark antiprotons bottom quark low energy muon quark quark - W boson + Jet Jet Jet Jet neutrino W boson particles antiparticles A Top Antitop Quark Event from the D-Zero Detector at Fermilab muon low energy muon Jet Jet Jet Jet particles antiparticles Particles Seen by the D-Zero Detector at Fermilab in a Top Antitop Quark Event. DST LEGO 16-JUL-1996 15:32 Run 92704 Event 14022 9-JUL-1995 13:17 MUON MUON Miss ET ET DST ETA-PHI 4 MUON 1 MISS ET 4 JET (HAD) (EM) D-Zero Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lego Plot CAL+TKS END VIEW 16-JUL-1996 15:33 Run 92704 Event 14022 9-JUL-1995 13:17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

460

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE R&D Accomplishments DOE R&D Accomplishments Search All Database Web Pages for Go The Basics Home About What's New FAQ Contact Us Laureates Nobel Laureates Fermi Laureates Nobel Physicists Nobel Chemists Medicine Nobels Explore Insights SC Stories Snapshots R&D Nuggets Database Search Browse Reports Database Help Finding Aids Site Map A - Z Index Menu Synopsis Blog Archive QR Code RSS Archive Tag Cloud Videos Widget XML Bookmark and Share Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning Resources with Additional Information Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scanner Courtesy Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 'Positron Emission Tomography ... [is a medical imaging technique that] can track chemical reactions in living tissues and merges chemistry with biological imaging. Its strength has been in studies of the brain where there has been significant progress in investigations of drug addiction, aging, mental illness, and neurogenic disorders. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) had its genesis in hot-atom chemical research supported by the Chemical Sciences Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Through this research it was learned, over many years, how to prepare short-lived positron emitters such as 18F whose half-life is 110 minutes. In 1975, the molecule [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose was successfully synthesized at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and set the stage for Positron Emission Tomography of the human brain.'