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1

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment on YouTube  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is one of two large general-purpose particle physics detectors built on the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland and France. The CMS detector is located in an underground cavern at Cessy in France and studies many aspects of proton collisions at 14 TeV, the center-of-mass energy of the LHC particle accelerator. [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_Muon_Solenoid]. US groups have made significant contributions to nearly every aspect of the detector throughout all phases including construction, installation and now in the data-taking stage. The US collaboration also made major contributions to the construction and operation of the computing facilities needed to analyze the unprecedented amount of data to be generated by CMS. This work includes the software that allows physicists to operate the CMS detector, reconstruct the data, analyze it and extract new physics. The CMS channel on YouTube was established in 2009.

2

Multimedia Resources, including the CMS Eye, from the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment at CERN  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is one of two large general-purpose particle physics detectors built on the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland and France. The CMS detector is located in an underground cavern at Cessy in France. The CMS detector will study many aspects of proton collisions at 14 TeV, the center-of-mass energy of the LHC particle accelerator. [from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_Muon_Solenoid]

The US CMS collaboration, with 48 institutions, 420 Ph.D. physicists, over 100 graduate students, and nearly 200 engineers, technicians, and computer scientists is the largest national group in the CMS collaboration. US groups have made significant contributions to nearly every aspect of the detector throughout all phases including construction, installation and preparation for data-taking. The US collaboration also made major contributions to the construction and operation of the computing facilities needed to analyze the unprecedented amount of data to be generated by CMS. This work includes the software that allows physicists to operate the CMS detector, reconstruct the data, analyze it and extract new physics.

The CMS media website from CERN provides images, videos, presentations, and the CMS Eye, a system of webcams looking into the underground cavern at Cessy, into the control room, and even out of the window of the control room at the village of Cessy and the Jura Mountains. Many event displays are available in the image collections, as well as the CMS Photo Book covering 1998 û 2008 when CMS was being assembled, installed, and commissioned.

US-LHC and the International CMS Collaboration

3

Search for new physics in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment and the response of the CMS calorimeters to particles and jets  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo study of a generic search for new resonances beyond the Standard Model (SM) in the CMS experiment is presented. The resonances are axigluon, coloron, E{sub 6} diquark, excited quark, W{prime}, Z{prime}, and the Randall-Sundrum graviton which decay to dijets. The dijet resonance cross section that the CMS can expect to discover at a 5{sigma} significance or to exclude at 95% confidence level for integrated luminosities of 100 pb{sup -1}, 1 fb{sup -1}, and 10 fb{sup -1} is evaluated. It is shown that a 5{sigma} discovery of a multi-TeV dijet resonance is possible for an axigluon, excited quark, and E{sub 6} diquark. However, a 5{sigma} discovery can not be projected with confidence for a W{prime}, Z{prime} and the Randall-Sundrum graviton. On the other hand, 95% CL exclusion mass regions can be measured for all resonances at high luminosities. In the second part of this dissertation, the analyses of the 2006 test beam data from the combined electromagnetic and hadronic barrel calorimeters are presented. The CMS barrel calorimeters response to a variety of beam particles in a wide momenta range (1 to 350 GeV/c) is measured. Furthermore, using these beam data, the expected performance of the barrel calorimeters to jets is predicted.

Gumus, Kazim Ziya; /Texas Tech.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

High field solenoids for muon cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed cooling system for the muon collider will consist of a 200 meter long line of alternating field straight solenoids interspersed with bent solenoids. The muons are cooled in all directions using a 400 mm long section liquid hydrogen at high field. The muons are accelerated in the forward direction by about 900 mm long, 805 MHz RF cavities in a gradient field that goes from 6 T to -6 T in about 300 mm. The high field section in the channel starts out at an induction of about 2 T in the hydrogen. As the muons proceed down the cooling channel, the induction in the liquid hydrogen section increases to inductions as high as 30 T. The diameter of the liquid hydrogen section starts at 750 mm when the induction is 2 T. As the induction in the cooling section goes up, the diameter of the liquid hydrogen section decreases. When the high field induction is 30 T, the diameter of the liquid hydrogen section is about 80 mm. When the high field solenoid induction is below 8.5 T or 9T, niobium titanium coils are proposed for generating .the magnetic field. Above 8.5 T or 9 T to about 20 T, graded niobium tin and niobium titanium coils would be used at temperatures down to 1.8 K. Above 20 T, a graded bybrid magnet system is proposed, where the high field magnet section (above 20 T) is either a conventional water cooled coil section or a water cooled Bitter type coil. Two types of superconducting coils have been studied. They include; epoxy impregnated intrinsically stable coils, and cable in conduit conductor (CICC) coils with helium in the conduit.

Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.; Kenny, S.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.

1999-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

5

Muons in minimum bias events from the first CMS data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Muon signatures are extremely important in the challenging environment of collisions at the LHC. Understanding the observed muon yield from Standard Model processes is the first task for all analyses involving muons. Basic muon kinematical observables are presented for the first CMS data at s ?=?7? TeV and compared with Monte Carlo expectations. The muon sample composition is studied by using the MC truth in terms of muons from heavy flavours

Lucia Barbone; The CMS Collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Muon Collider Final Cooling in 30-50 T Solenoids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Muon ionization cooling to the required normalized rms emittance of 25 microns transverse, and 72 mm longitudinal, can be achieved with liquid hydrogen in high field solenoids, provided that the momenta are low enough. At low momenta, the longitudinal emittance rises from the negative slope of energy loss versus energy. Assuming initial emittances that have been achieved in six dimensional cooling simulations, optimized designs are given using solenoid fields limited to 30, 40, and 50 T. The required final emittances are achieved for the two higher field cases. Preliminary simulations of transverse cooling in hydrogen, at low energies, suggests that muon collider emittance requirements can be met using solenoid fields of 40 T or more. It might also be acceptable with 30 T. But these simulations did not include hydrogen windows,matching or reacceleration, whose performance, with one exception, was based on numerical estimates. Full simulations of more stages are planned. The design and simulation of hydrogen windows must be included, and space charge effects, and absorber heating, calculated.

Palmer, R.B.; Fernow, R.C.; Lederman, J.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

7

Investigation and simulation of muon cooling rings with tilted solenoids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alternating solenoid focused muon cooling ring without special bending magnets is considered and investigate in detail. Both fringe field between solenoid coils with opposite directed current, and an inclination of the coils in vertical plane are used to provide a bending and closing of the particle trajectories. Realistic (Maxwellian) magnetic field is calculated and used for a simulation. Methodic is developed and applied to find closed orbit at any energy, dispersion, region of stability, and other conventional accelerator characteristics. Earlier proposed RFOFO cooling ring with 200 MHz RF system and liquid hydrogen absorbers is investigated in detail. After an optimization, normalized 6D emittance about 20 mm{sup 3} and transmission 57% are obtained.

Valeri I. Balbekov

2003-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

A Test Stand for the Muon Trigger Development for the CMS Experiment at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the flagship experiments in particle physics operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). CMS was built to search for signatures of Higgs bosons, supersymmetry, and other new phenomena. The coming upgrade of the collider will increase the rate of collisions and expand the physics reach of CMS, but will also push the detector systems beyond their current capabilities. One critically affected element is the CMS trigger, a system responsible for making a fast decision if a particular event is of interest and trigger the readout of the detector. As saving the data from every collision would require a technically unattainable bandwidth and is not possible, triggering inefficiencies propagate into reduction of physics reach for the entire experiment. One proposal to handle the future increase in collision rates aims to combine the capabilities of the existing Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) with the newly proposed Gaseous Electron Multiplication (GEM) detectors to improve the efficiency and discriminating power of the electronics-based muon Level-1trigger. This project focuses on development of a test-stand to emulate operational conditions of such a system, taking into account geometries of the two detector elements. The results of this study will present a proof of principle that building a joint GEM-CSC trigger system is feasible and it can be used to improve trigger efficiency.

Lakdawala, Samir

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

CMS Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary Glossary CMS Outreach Glossary CMS Filter Farm Glossary CMS Trigger & DAQ Acronyms CMS Workbook Acronyms of High-Energy Physics ATLAS Glossary DZero DAQ Shifters' Glossary Fermilab Accelerator Glossary LHC Naming & Conventions Google / Wikipedia A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numbered Items Miscellaneous -A- ADC Analog to Digital Converter AFS Andrew File System AJAX Asynchronous JavaScript And XML API Application Program Interface ATM Asynchronous Transfer Mode -B- BER Bit Error Rate BMU Barrel Muon Group BX Beam Crossing -C- CLHEP Class Library for HEP CMKIN CMS Kinematics Package CMF Computer Management Framework CMS Compact Muon Solenoid CMSSW CMS Software CPT Computing, Physics and Trigger/DAQ Project CVS Concurrent Versions System

10

Standard Model Higgs Boson Discovery Potential in the Decay Channel H - > ZZ(*) - > 4 mu with the CMS Detector.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) currently under construction at CERN with start-up date in… (more)

Drozdetski, Alexei Alexandrovic

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Simulation analysis of data processing activities in Compact Muon Solenoid physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scale, complexity and worldwide geographical spread of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) computing and data analysis problems are unprecedented in scientific research. The complexity of processing and accessing this data is increased substantially ... Keywords: Compact Muon Solenoid, large-scale distributed systems, simulation model

Ciprian Dobre

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

AN IONIZATION COOLING CHANNEL FOR MUON BEAMS BASED ON ALTERNATING SOLENOIDS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The muon collider requires intense, cooled muon bunches to reach the required luminosity. Due to the limited life-time of the muon, the cooling process must take place very rapidly. Ionization cooling seems to be our only option, given the large emittances of the muon beam from pion decay. However, this ionization cooling method has been found quite difficult to implement in practice. We describe a scheme based on the use of liquid hydrogen absorbers followed by r.f. cavities (''pillbox'' or ''open iris'' type), embedded in a transport lattice based on high field solenoids. These solenoidal fields are reversed periodically in order to suppress the growth of the canonical angular momentum. This channel has been simulated in detail with independent codes, featuring conventional tracking in e.m. fields and detailed simulation of multiple scattering and straggling in the absorbers and windows. These calculations show that the 15 Tesla lattice cools in 6-D phase space by a factor {approx} 2 over a distance of 20 m.

GALLARDO,J.C.; FERNOW,R.C.; KIRK,H.G.; PALMER,R.B.; LEBRUN,P.; MORETTI,A.; TOLLESTRUP,A.T.; KAPLAN,D.M.; FUKUI,Y.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

13

First operational experience with the CMS Run Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Run Control System of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN's new Large Hadron Collider (LHC) controls the sub-detector and central data acquisition systems and the high-level trigger farm of the experiment. ...

Bauer, Gerry P.

14

A study of tau identification with the CMS detector at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I explore the identification of [tau] leptons from simulated reconstructed data that will be collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The two components ...

Ilten, Philip James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Searches for extra dimensions in the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predictions of multidimensonal theories are analyzed, and the possibility of detecting signals from extra spatial dimensions in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is studied.

Shmatov, S. V., E-mail: shmatov@cern.ch [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Collaboration: CMS Collaboration

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

CMS reconstruction improvement for the muon tracking by the RPC chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The contribution of Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) to muon reconstruction in CMS has been studied on a sample of muons collected in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV at the LHC in 2011. Muon reconstruction is performed using the all-silicon inner tracker and with up to four stations of gas-ionization muon detectors. Drift Tubes and Cathode Strip Chambers detect muons in the barrel and endcap regions, respectively, and are complemented by the RPC system. Measured distributions of reconstructed hits in the RPCs crossed by muons from Z decays with a transverse momentum pT above 20 GeV/c are well reproduced by the Monte Carlo simulation. From the samples of J/psi and Z events, the efficiencies for muons with and without the inclusion of the RPC hits in the muon track reconstruction are measured and compared with the simulation. Using RPC information in track reconstruction improves up to about 3% of offline reconstruction efficiency for the muons in the region of pT above 7 GeV/c, in good agreement with simulation.

Min Suk Kim on behalf of the CMS Collaboration

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

17

U.S. CMS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome Discoveries from the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, promise to revolutionize our understanding of the universe. More than 900 scientists from 48 institutions in the U.S. participate in the U.S. CMS collaboration, supported by the Department of Energy and National Science Foundation. (show more) U.S. CMS View from the CMS collision hall. (Courtesy Michael Hoch, Adventure Art) U.S. CMS consists of more than 400 physicists, 200 graduate students and 200 engineers, technicians and computer scientists, making it the largest national group in the international collaboration. The U.S. collaboration is making significant contributions to nearly every aspect of the detector throughout all phases, including construction, installation and preparation

18

Status and Commissioning of the CMS Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After a brief overview of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, the status of construction and installation is described in the first part of the note. The second part of the document is devoted to a discussion of the general commissioning strategy of the CMS experiment, with a particular emphasis on trigger, calibration and alignment. Aspects of b-physics, as well as examples for early physics with CMS are also presented. CMS will be ready for data taking in time for the first collisions in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in late 2007.

O. Buchmueller; F. -P. Schilling

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

19

Construction and Performance of Large-Area Triple-GEM Prototypes for Future Upgrades of the CMS Forward Muon System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, part of the forward RPC muon system of the CMS detector at the CERN LHC remains uninstrumented in the high-\\eta region. An international collaboration is investigating the possibility of covering the 1.6 radiation hardness, these micro-pattern gas detectors are an appealing option for simultaneously enhancing muon tracking and triggering capabilities in a future upgrade of the CMS detector. A general overview of this feasibility study will be presented. The design and construction of small (10\\times10 cm2) and full-size trapezoidal (1\\times0.5 m2) triple-GEM prototypes will be described. During detector assembly, different techniques for stretching the GEM foils were tested. Results from measurements with x-rays and from test beam campaigns at the CERN SPS will be shown for the small and large prototypes. Preliminary simulation studies on the expected muon reconstruction and trigger performances of this proposed upgraded muon system will be reported.

M. Tytgat; A. Marinov; N. Zaganidis; Y. Ban; J. Cai; H. Teng; A. Mohapatra; T. Moulik; M. Abbrescia; A. Colaleo; G. de Robertis; F. Loddo; M. Maggi; S. Nuzzo; S. A. Tupputi; L. Benussi; S. Bianco; S. Colafranceschi; D. Piccolo; G. Raffone; G. Saviano; M. G. Bagliesi; R. Cecchi; G. Magazzu; E. Oliveri; N. Turini; T. Fruboes; D. Abbaneo; C. Armagnaud; P. Aspell; S. Bally; U. Berzano; J. Bos; K. Bunkowski; J. P. Chatelain; J. Christiansen; A. Conde Garcia; E. David; R. De Oliveira; S. Duarte Pinto; S. Ferry; F. Formenti; L. Franconi; A. Marchioro; K. Mehta; J. Merlin; M. V. Nemallapudi; H. Postema; A. Rodrigues; L. Ropelewski; A. Sharma; N. Smilkjovic; M. Villa; M. Zientek; A. Gutierrez; P. E. Karchin; K. Gnanvo; M. Hohlmann; M. J. Staib

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Organized 1994  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organized Organized US groups interested in participation in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), a collaboration for an experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, met at Fermilab on April 6-7, 1994, with representatives of CMS management. The US groups organized to prepare a Letter of Intent (LOI) to be submitted to the US DOE, and defined a management structure for the US groups within CMS. Thomas Müller, UCLA, was elected chair of the US Institution Board, the governing body of the US CMS Collaboration. The US Institution Board Chair also serves as the US representative to the CMS Management Board. Dan Green, Fermilab, was elected Spokesperson to DOE for the US CMS Collaboration. The US Coordinators for the CMS subsystems in which US groups plan to participate, named at the April 6-7 meeting, are:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

CMS e-Lab Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CMS e-Lab Overview     CMS e-Lab Overview &nbsp&nbsp&nbsp With the CMS e-Lab students can join a scientific collaboration in this series of studies of high-energy collisions from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. We are collaborating with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment to produce a student-led, teacher-guided project. At the present, we have test beam, Monte Carlo (simulated) data and run data. We expect more data through 2010 and 2011. By using the web, students are able to analyze and share these data with fellow students and other researchers. Students write a researchable question and analyze data in much the same way as professional scientists. e-Lab tools facilitate collaboration among students as they develop their investigations and report their results.

22

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Doing Physics - User Software & Computing -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US CMS Tier-2 Computing Centers US CMS Tier-2 Computing Centers Introduction The USCMS Tier-2 sites are part of a global collaboration with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. The experiment is being conducted at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The Tier-2 sites provide needed infrastructure to meet the computational needs of the physicists working on the CMS experiment. The Tier-2 sites are active members of the Open Science Grid (OSG). Tier-2 Support Ticket Documentation Check http://www.uscms.org/uscms_at_work/physics/computing/grid/operations/SupportDocumentation.html for documentation detailing the process for handling tickets. Tier-2 Support Backup Schedules Tier-2 Administrators, please check http://www.uscms.org/uscms_at_work/physics/computing/grid/operations/SupportSchedule.html

23

The performance of the CMS muon detector in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of all subsystems of the CMS muon detector has been studied by using a sample of proton--proton collision data at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected at the LHC in 2010 that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 40 inverse picobarns. The measured distributions of the major operational parameters of the drift tube (DT), cathode strip chamber (CSC), and resistive plate chamber (RPC) systems met the design specifications. The spatial resolution per chamber was 80-120 micrometers in the DTs, 40-150 micrometers in the CSCs, and 0.8-1.2 centimeters in the RPCs. The time resolution achievable was 3 ns or better per chamber for all 3 systems. The efficiency for reconstructing hits and track segments originating from muons traversing the muon chambers was in the range 95-98%. The CSC and DT systems provided muon track segments for the CMS trigger with over 96% efficiency, and identified the correct triggering bunch crossing in over 99.5% of such events. The measured performance is well reproduced by Monte Carlo simulation of the muon system down to the level of individual channel response. The results confirm the high efficiency of the muon system, the robustness of the design against hardware failures, and its effectiveness in the discrimination of backgrounds.

The CMS Collaboration

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

24

Wire bond vibration of forward pixel tracking detector of CMS  

SciTech Connect

Wire bonds of the Forward Pixel (FPix) tracking detectors are oriented in the direction that maximizes Lorentz Forces relative to the 4 Tesla field of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Detector's magnet. The CMS Experiment is under construction at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. We were concerned about Lorentz Force oscillating the wires at their fundamental frequencies and possibly fracturing or breaking them at their heels, as happened with the CDF wire bonds. This paper reports a study to understand what conditions break such bonds.

Atac, M.; /Fermilab; Gobbi, B.; /Northwestern U.; Kwan, S.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab; Spencer, E.; /Northwestern U.; Sellberg, G.; Pavlicek, V.; /Fermilab

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Design, construction and commissioning of the Thermal Screen Control System for the CMS Tracker detector at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) laboratory is currently building the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Four international collaborations have designed (and are now constructing) detectors able to exploit the physics potential of this collider. Among them is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), a general purpose detector optimized for the search of Higgs boson and for physics beyond the Standard Model of fundamental interactions between elementary particles. This thesis presents, in particular, the design, construction, commissioning and test of the control system for a screen that provides a thermal separation between the Tracker and ECAL (Electromagnetic CALorimeter) detector of CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid experiment). Chapter 1 introduces the new challenges posed by these installations and deals, more in detail, with the Tracker detector of CMS. The size of current experiments for high energy physics is comparable to that of a small industrial plant: therefore, the techniques used for controls a...

Carrone, E; Tsirou, A

26

A GEM Detector System for an Upgrade of the High-eta Muon Endcap Stations GE1/1 + ME1/1 in CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the CMS Upgrade R&D Proposal RD10.02, we describe the motivation and main features of the CMS GEM Project for LS2 and propose the addition of a full GE1/12 detector station comprising Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers to the forward muon system of CMS. The limitations of the currently existing forward muon detector when operating at increasingly high luminosity expected after LS1 are laid out followed by a brief description of the anticipated performance improvements achievable with a GE1/1 station. The second part describes the detector system followed by an overview of electronics and associated services including a discussion of the schedule and cost of the project. Plans for a precursor demonstrator installation in LS1 are presented. This proposal is intended as a concise follow-up of the detailed document CMS-IN-2012-023. If approved, this is to be followed by a detailed Technical Design Report.

Abbaneo, D; Aspell, P; Bianco, S; Hoepfner, K; Hohlmann, M; Maggi, M; De Lentdecker, G; Safonov, A; Sharma, A; Tytgat, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Superconducting solenoids for the MICE channel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the channel of superconductingsolenoids for the proposed international Muon Ionization CoolingExperiment (MICE). MICE consists of two cells of a SFOFO cooling channelthat is similar to that studied in the level 2 study of a neutrinofactory[1]. MICE also consists of two detector solenoids at either end ofthe cooling channel section. The superconducting solenoids for MICEperform three functions. The coupling solenoids, which are largesolenoids around 201.25 MHz RF cavities, couple the muon beam between thefocusing sections as it passes along the cooling channel. The focusingsolenoids are around the liquid hydrogen absorber that reduces themomentum of the muons in all directions. These solenoids generate agradient field along the axis as they reduce the beta of the muon beambefore it enters the absorber. Each detector solenoid system consists offive coils that match the muon beam coming to or from an absorber to a4.0 T uniform solenoidal field section that that contains the particledetectors at the ends of the experiment. There are detector solenoids atthe beginning and at the end of the experiment. This report describes theparameters of the eighteen superconducting coils that make up the MICEmagnetic channel.

Green, M.A.; Barr, G.; Baynham, D.E.; Rockford, J.H.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinin, S.; Palmer, R.B.; Rey, J.M.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Bent solenoids for spectrometers and emittance exchange sections.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bent solenoids can be used to transport low energy beams as they provide both confinement and dispersion of particle orbits. Solenoids are being considered both as emittance exchange sections and spectrometers in the muon cooling system as part of the study of the muon collider. They present the results of a study of bent solenoids which considers the design of coupling sections between bent solenoids to straight solenoids, drift compensation fields, aberrations, and factors relating to the construction, such as field ripple, stored energy, coil forces and field errors.

Norem, J.

1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

29

An outlook of the user support model to educate the users community at the CMS Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment is one of the two large general-purpose particle physics detectors built at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The diverse collaboration combined with a highly distributed computing environment and Petabytes/year of data being collected makes CMS unlike any other High Energy Physics collaborations before. This presents new challenges to educate and bring users, coming from different cultural, linguistics and social backgrounds, up to speed to contribute to the physics analysis. CMS has been able to deal with this new paradigm by deploying a user support structure model that uses collaborative tools to educate about software, computing an physics tools specific to CMS. To carry out the user support mission worldwide, an LHC Physics Centre (LPC) was created few years back at Fermilab as a hub for US physicists. The LPC serves as a "brick and mortar" location for physics excellence for the CMS physicists where graduate and postgraduate scientists can find experts in all aspects of data analysis and learn via tutorials, workshops, conferences and gatherings. Following the huge success of LPC, a centre at CERN itself called LHC Physics Centre at CERN (LPCC) and Terascale Analysis Centre at DESY have been created with similar goals. The CMS user support model would also facilitate in making the non-CMS scientific community learn about CMS physics. A good example of this is the effort by HEP experiments, including CMS, to focus on data preservation efforts. In order to facilitate its use by the future scientific community, who may want to re-visit our data, and re-analyze it, CMS is evaluating the resources required. A detailed, good quality and well-maintained documentation by the user support group about the CMS computing and software may go a long way to help in this endeavour.

Sudhir Malik; Kati Lassila-Perini

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

30

Papers on Muon Colliders  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnets for Muon Collider and Neutrino Storage Ring Magnets for Muon Collider and Neutrino Storage Ring (and Open Midplane Dipole for LARP): R. Gupta, et al., "High Field HTS Solenoid for a Muon Collider – Demonstrations, Challenges and Strategies, MT23, July 2013", presented at MT23, (talk) R. Weggel et al., "Open Midplane Dipoles for Muon Collider", 2011 Particle Accelerator Conference, New York (POSTER).. R. Gupta, M. Anerella, A. Ghosh, H. Kirk, R. Palmer, S. Plate, W. Sampson, Y. Shiroyanagi, P. Wanderer, B. Brandt, D. Cline, A. Garren, J. Kolonko, R. Scanlan, R. Weggel, "High field HTS R&D solenoid for muon collider", 2010 Applied Superconductivity Conference, Washington, DC, August 2010 >> Y. Shiroyanagi, W. Sampson, A. Ghosh, R. Gupta, "The Construction and

31

Superconducting solenoids for the Muon collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Standard and Alternative Cooling Lattices as a Function135 to 175 MeV. The alternative cooling lattice shown inproblems with the alternative cooling lattice are: I) The

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

High field solenoids for muon cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10-12 December 1997, Brookhaven National Laboratory Report,Introduction and Status," Brookhaven National Laboratory

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

High field solenoids for muon cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on axis between the high field low beta coils and the fluxinverse of the field that produces the low beta pinch point.the high field section that creates the low beta pinch in

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Search for Gluino-Mediated Supersymmetry in Events With Bottom-Quark Jets and Missing Transverse Energy With the Compact Muon Solenoid Detector at the Large Hadron Collider With Proton-Proton Collisions at 8 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detector at the Large Hadron Collider With Proton-ProtonDetector at the Large Hadron Collider With Proton-Protonthe CMS detec- tor at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. The

Nguyen, Harold

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The CMS forward calorimeter prototype design studies and Omega(c)0 search at E781 experiment at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

In the fit part, the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) forward calorimeter design studies are presented. The forward calorimeter consists of quartz fibers embedded in a steel absorber. Radiation damage studies of the quartz fiber and the absorber as well as the results of the first pre-production prototype PPP-I are presented. In the second part, the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0}search studies at the SELEX (E781) experiment at FermiLab are presented. 107 {+-} 22 {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} events are observed in three decay modes. The relative branching ratio ({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/{Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) is measured as 2.00 {+-} 0.45(stat) {+-} 0.32(sys).

Ayan, Ahmet Sedat; /Iowa U.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Search for the Higgs boson in its decay into tau leptons at CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the H --> rr channel is presented. The search is performed on proton collision data collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid at the Large Hadron Collider. The data corresponds ...

Chan, Matthew Hans

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Simulation of measuring bottom quark flow in heavy ion collisions using the CMS detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I carried out a simulation study to characterize the measurement of bottom quark flow in relativistic Pb+Pb collisions using the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment. The Hydjet event generator is used to produce ...

Franke, Arthur James

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

US CMS Program Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USCMS US CMS Home US CMS @ Work US CMS Research Program Management Joel Butler, US CMS Research Program Manager E-mail: butler@fnal.gov Phone: (630) 840-3148, Fax: (630) 840-2194...

39

CMS: First Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the LHC and CMS detector performance is given and the first CMS results are presented. In particular

Paolo Checchia; The CMS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Helical FOFO snake for 6D ionization cooling of muons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A channel for 6D ionization cooling of muons is described which consists of periodically inclined solenoids of alternating polarity, liquid hydrogen absorbers placed inside solenoids and RF cavities between them. Important feature of such channel (called Helical FOFO snake) is that it can cool simultaneously muons of both signs. Theoretical considerations as well as results of simulations with G4Beamline are presented which show that 200MHz HFOFO snake has sufficient acceptance to be used for initial 6D cooling in muon colliders and neutrino factories.

Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Diborane Electrode Response in 3D Silicon Sensors for the CMS and ATLAS Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Unusually high leakage currents have been measured in test wafers produced by the manufacturer SINTEF containing 3D pixel silicon sensor chips designed for the ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) and CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiments. Previous data has shown the CMS chips as having a lower leakage current after processing than ATLAS chips. Some theories behind the cause of the leakage currents include the dicing process and the usage of copper in bump bonding, and with differences in packaging and handling between the ATLAS and CMS chips causing the disparity between the two. Data taken at SLAC from a SINTEF wafer with electrodes doped with diborane and filled with polysilicon, before dicing, and with indium bumps added contradicts this past data, as ATLAS chips showed a lower leakage current than CMS chips. It also argues against copper in bump bonding and the dicing process as main causes of leakage current as neither were involved on this wafer. However, they still display an extremely high leakage current, with the source mostly unknown. The SINTEF wafer shows completely different behavior than the others, as the FEI3s actually performed better than the CMS chips. Therefore this data argues against the differences in packaging and handling or the intrinsic geometry of the two as a cause in the disparity between the leakage currents of the chips. Even though the leakage current in the FEI3s overall is lower, the current is still significant enough to cause problems. As this wafer was not diced, nor had it any copper added for bump bonding, this data argues against the dicing and bump bonding as causes for leakage current. To compliment this information, more data will be taken on the efficiency of the individual electrodes of the ATLAS and CMS chips on this wafer. The electrodes will be shot perpendicularly with a laser to test the efficiency across the width of the electrode. A mask with pinholes has been made to focus the laser to a beam smaller than the width of an electrode in order to properly scan it. This will provide more information on whether something in the electrodes, such as the polysilicon filling, is contributing to the leakage current or if there is another cause to be found. It will also reveal whether the diborane doping method and the new polysilicon filling has increased the electrode efficiency as expected. Thus, the cause of these leakage currents on the wafers from SINTEF has yet to be definitively found.

Brown, Emily R.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

42

solenoid_web.DVI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Proposal for a Solenoidal Spectrometer to Study Reactions with Short-Lived Beams A. H. Wuosmaa 1 , B. B. Back 2 , C. J. Lister 2 , K. E. Rehm 2 , J. P. Schiffer 2 , and S. J. Freeman 3 1 Physics Department, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5252 2 Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne IL 60439 and 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Schuster Laboratory, Brunswick Street, Manchester, M13 9PL, England (Dated: November 22, 2005) Abstract We propose to construct a new type of spectrometer for the study of reactions in inverse kine- matics, built around a high-field magnetic solenoid. This device has significant advantages over more conventional approaches to measurements of key reactions, and is essential to the study of short-lived nuclei. The technique is directly applicable to the research programs at ATLAS,

43

Pulsing solenoid improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A control system improvement is disclosed. A high speed air bleed path and a low speed air bleed path respectively bleed air into the high speed and low speed fuel circuits of a carburetor through either fuel circuit at any one time. A solenoid responsive to a control signal opens and closes the air bleed to control the quantity of air bled into the high speed and low speed circuits. The solenoid includes an isolator for isolating the high speed air bleed path from the low speed air bleed path to prevent cross flow of air from one air bleed path to the other. Cross flow of air between the paths adversely affects the degree of control over the delivery of fuel through the high speed and low speed fuel circuits.

Tipton, L.J.

1982-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

44

Magnetic latching solenoid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention discloses a D.C. magnetic latching solenoid that retains a moving armature in a first or second position by means of a pair of magnets, thereby having a zero-power requirement after actuation. The first or second position is selected by reversing the polarity of the D.C. voltage which is enough to overcome the holding power of either magnet and transfer the armature to an opposite position. The coil is then de-energized.

Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Albano, Richard K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Morrison, Jr., John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

U.S. CMS - Endcap Muon Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Florida Florida Institute of Technology Northeastern University Northwestern University Ohio State University Purdue University Rice University Texas A&M Wayne State University...

46

LCLS Gun Solenoid Design Considerations  

SciTech Connect

The LCLS photocathode rf gun requires a solenoid immediately downstream for proper emittance compensation. Such a gun and solenoid have been operational at the SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) for over eight years. Based on magnetic measurements and operational experience with the GTF gun solenoid multiple modifications are suggested for the LCLS gun solenoid. The modifications include adding dipole and quadrupole correctors inside the solenoid, increasing the bore to accommodate the correctors, decreasing the mirror plate thickness to allow the solenoid to move closer to the cathode, cutouts in the mirror plate to allow greater optical clearance with grazing incidence cathode illumination, utilizing pancake coil mirror images to compensate the first and second integrals of the transverse fields and incorporating a bipolar power supply to allow for proper magnet standardization and quick polarity changes. This paper describes all these modifications plus the magnetic measurements and operational experience leading to the suggested modifications.

Schmerge, John

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

47

Effect of high solenoidal magnetic fields on breakdown voltages of high vacuum 805 MHz cavities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is an on going international collaboration studying the feasibility and cost of building a muon collider or neutrino factory [1,2]. An important aspect of this study is the full understanding of ionization cooling of muons by many orders of magnitude for the collider case. An important muon ionization cooling experiment, MICE [3], has been proposed to demonstrate and validate the technology that could be used for cooling. Ionization cooling is accomplished by passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF Cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal field. To determine the effect of very large solenoidal magnetic fields on the generation of dark current, x-rays and on the breakdown voltage gradients of vacuum RF cavities, a test facility has been established at Fermilab in Lab G. This facility consists of a 12 MW 805 MHz RF station and a large warm bore 5 T solenoidal superconducting magnet containing a pill box type cavity with thin removable window apertures. This system allows dark current and breakdown studies of different window configurations and materials. The results of this study will be presented. The study has shown that the peak achievable accelerating gradient is reduced by a factor greater than 2 when solenoidal field of greater than 2 T are applied to the cavity.

Moretti, A.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Qian, Z.; /Fermilab; Norem, J.; /Argonne; Li, D.; Zisman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Torun, Y.; /IIT, Chicago; Rimmer, R.; /Jefferson Lab; Errede,; /Illinois U., Urbana

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hollow Plasma in a Solenoid  

SciTech Connect

A ring cathode for a pulsed, high-current, multi-spot cathodic arc discharge was placed inside a pulsed magnetic solenoid. Photography is used to evaluate the plasma distribution. The plasma appears hollow for cathode positions close the center of the solenoid, and it is guided closer to the axis when the cathode is away from the center.

Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Commissioning of Particle ID at ATLAS and CMS with Early LHC Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes latest results on lepton (electron, muon and tau) and photon particle identification at the ATLAS and CMS experiments, with emphasis on how the particle identification can be validated and its performance determined using early LHC data.

T. Berger-Hryn'ova; for the ATLAS; CMS collaborations

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

50

U.S. CMS - CMS Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CMS Physics CMS Physics CMS is a general-purpose particle physics experiment. Designed to see a wide range of particles and phenomena produced in LHC collisions, each involves approximately 2,000 physicists from more than 30 countries. These scientists will use the data collected from the complex CMS detector to search for new phenomena including the Higgs boson, supersymmetry, and extra dimensions. They will also measure the properties of previously-discovered quarks and bosons with unprecedented precision, and be on the lookout for completely new, unpredicted phenomena. CMS@CERN CMS Outreach @ CERN LHC Physics Center (LPC) CMS Center at Fermilab Wikipedia Article How do they know what to look for? Physicists have spent decades developing the Standard Model, a set of theories that describe in detail the

51

e Lens Solenoid | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Lens Solenoid Electron Lens Solenoid To increase the proton beam luminosity in RHIC, an electron lens (e-lens) magnet system with two superconducting solenoids is being built at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Initial Design of 200 mm, 6T Superconducting Solenoid for e-lens (pdf), R. Gupta, 3/30/10 Iterated Design of 200 mm, 6T Superconducting Solenoid for e-lens (pdf), R. Gupta, 4/6/10 Corrector Designs for Superconducting Solenoid for e-lens (pdf), R. Gupta, 4/14/10 eLens Layout (pdf), P. Kovach, 5/25/10 eLens Main Solenoid (pdf), A. Marone, 5/25/10 Optimization in Corrector Design for Superconducting Solenoid for e-Lens (pdf), R. Gupta, 6/15/10 Main Solenoid Axial Force Retention (pdf), A. Marone 8/24/10 Superconducting Solenoid for e-lens with Fringe Field Coil (pdf), R.

52

U.S. CMS - About U.S. CMS - Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to top CMS Images Click here to view & download CMS images. Back to top CMS Videos Higgs Boson video Back to top Not finding what you need? Contact Elizabeth Clements. U.S. CMS...

53

Muon Collider Papers and Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of muon collider papers and reports. Muon Collider Feasibilty Study ... Snowmass Book BNL Muon Collider Project Publication Index Fermilab Muon Collider Notes Muon Collider...

54

CMS Data Processing Workflows during an Extended Cosmic Ray Run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CMS Collaboration conducted a month-long data taking exercise, the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla, during October-November 2008, with the goal of commissioning the experiment for extended operation. With all installed detector systems participating, CMS recorded 270 million cosmic ray events with the solenoid at a magnetic field strength of 3.8 T. This paper describes the data flow from the detector through the various online and offline computing systems, as well as the workflows used for recording the data, for aligning and calibrating the detector, and for analysis of the data.

Not Available

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Muon ID at the ILC  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a new way to reconstruct and identify muons with high efficiency and high pion rejection. Since muons at the ILC are often produced with or in jets, for many of the physics channels of interest [1], an efficient algorithm to deal with the identification and separation of particles within jets is important. The algorithm at the core of the method accounts for the effects of the magnetic field and for the loss of energy by charged particles due to ionization in the detector. We have chosen to develop the analysis within the setup of one of the Linear Collider Concept Detectors adopted by the US. Within b-pair production jets, particles cover a wide range in momenta; however {approx}80% of the particles have a momentum below 30 GeV[2]. Our study, focused on bbar-b jets, is preceded by a careful analysis of single energy particles between 2 and 50 GeV. As medium energy particles are a substantial component of the jets, many of the particles lose part of their energy in the calorimeters and the solenoid coil before reaching the muon detector where they may have energy below 2 GeV. To deal with this problem we have implemented a Runge-Kutta correction of the calculated trajectory to better handle these lower energy particles. The multiple scattering and other stochastic processes, more important at lower energy, is addressed by a Kalman-filter integrated into the reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm provides a unique and powerful separation of muons from pions. The 5 Tesla magnetic field from a solenoid surrounds the hadron calorimeter and allows the reconstruction and precision.

Milstene, C.; Fisk, G.; Para, A.; /Fermilab

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

CMS ROC Talks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FNAL ROC Presentations & Notes FNAL ROC Presentations & Notes ROC Web Page CMS Agenda Server CMS Daily Mtgs LPC Talks LHC@FNAL Public Docs CMS Notes 2007-12-17: All Experimenters' Mtg - "CMS Status and GREN" [Kaori Maeshima] (ppt) (pdf) 2007-11-12: All Experimenters' Mtg - "CMS Installation and Commissioning" [Kaori Maeshima] (ppt) (pdf) 2007-11-08: Andreas Meyer's visit - "DCS WBM" [Zongru Wan] (pdf) 2007-10-05: All US CMS Mtg - "Commissioning, Global Runs & ROC" [Kaori Maeshima] (pdf) 2007-09-05: CHEP 2007 - "CMS Online Web-Based Monitoring and Remote Operations" [Bill Badgett] (ppt) (pdf) 2007-08-27: DQM Workshop - "DQM Output Archiving and Retrieval" [Bill Badgett, Kaori Maeshima] (ppt) (pdf) 2007-08-16: Kansas State DOE Review - "CMS Web-Based Monitoring" [Zongru Wan] (pdf)

57

Fermilab | Muon Collider | Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphics A chain of accelerators and other devices is necessary to produce and accelerate muons before scientists can make muons collide. Click image for larger version A muon...

58

Muon muon collider: Feasibility study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

NONE

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

59

A SUPERCONDUCTING-SOLENOID ISOTOPE SPECTROMETER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Pauli exclusion . . . . 61 4.7.3 Fermi gas model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 4.7.4 Termsanecke and Masson . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 V. Solenoid Ion Optics and Magnetic Dispersion . . . . . . . . . 88 5-aperture control of fractional magnetic dispersion with a solenoid

O'Donnell, Tom

60

MANX, a 6-D Muon Beam Cooling Experiment for RAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MANX is a six-dimensional muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment based on the concept of a helical cooling channel in which a beam of muons loses energy in a continuous helium or hydrogen absorber while passing through a special superconducting magnet called a helical solenoid. The goals of the experiment include tests of the theory of the helical cooling channel and the helical solenoid implementation of it, verification of the simulation programs, and a demonstration of effective six-dimensional cooling of a muon beam. We report the status of the experiment and in particular, the proposal to have MANX follow MICE at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) as an extension of the MICE experimental program. We describe the economies of such an approach which allow the MICE beam line and much of the MICE apparatus and expertise to be reused.

Yonehara, K.; Kashikhin, V.; Lamm, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab; Abrams, R.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Johnson, R.P.; Kahn, S.; /Muons Inc., Batavia; Maloney, J.; /Northern Illinois U.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Engineering Design of the 1.5 m Diameter Solenoid for the MICERFCC Modules  

SciTech Connect

The RF coupling coil (RFCC) module of MICE is where muonsthat have been cooled within the MICE absorber focus (AFC) modules arere-accelerated to their original longitudinal momentum. The RFCC moduleconsists of four 201.25 MHz RF cavities in a 1.4 meter diameter vacuumvessel. The muons are kept within the RF cavities by the magnetic fieldgenerated by a superconducting coupling solenoid that goes around the RFcavities. The coupling solenoid will be cooled using a pair of 4 K pulsetube cooler that will generate 1.5 W of cooling at 4.2 K. The magnet willbe powered using a 300 A two-quadrant power supply. This report describesthe ICST engineering design of the coupling solenoid forMICE.

Wang, L.; Green, M.A.; Xu, F.Y.; Wu, H.; Li, L.K.; Gou, C.S.; Liu, C.S.; Han, G.; Jia, L.X.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.O.; Virostek, S.P.

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

Commissioning of CMS and early standard model measurements with jets, missing transverse energy and photons at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the status and history of the CMS commissioning, together with selected results from cosmic-ray muon data. The second part focuses on strategies for optimizing the reconstruction of jets, missing transverse energy and photons for early standard model measurements at ATLAS and CMS with the first collision data from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN.

T. Christiansen

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Collaboration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US CMS Organization, Institutions, and Members See also the list of CMS institutes at CERN and the CERN Greybook Listing of CMS Institutions and Members. You may also interactively...

64

The CMS High-Level Trigger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the startup of the LHC, the CMS data acquisition is expected to be able to sustain an event readout rate of up to 100 kHz from the Level-1 trigger. These events will be read into a large processor farm which will run the 'High-Level Trigger'(HLT) selection algorithms and will output a rate of about 150 Hz for permanent data storage. In this report HLT performances are shown for selections based on muons, electrons, photons, jets, missing transverse energy, {tau} leptons and b quarks: expected efficiencies, background rates and CPU time consumption are reported as well as relaxation criteria foreseen for a LHC startup instantaneous luminosity.

Covarelli, R. [CERN, Geneva 1211 (Switzerland)

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Cold Mass Support System and the Helium Cooling System for theMICE Focusing Solenoid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The heart of the absorber focus coil (AFC) module for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is the two-coil superconducting solenoid that surrounds the muon absorber. The superconducting magnet focuses the muons that are cooled using ionization cooling, in order to improve the efficiency of cooling. The coils of the magnet may either be run in the solenoid mode (both coils operate at the same polarity) or the gradient (the coils operate at opposite polarity). The AFC magnet cold mass support system is designed to carry a longitudinal force up to 700 kN. The AFC module will be cooled using three pulse tube coolers that produce 1.5 W of cooling at 4.2 K. One of the coolers will be used to cool the liquid (hydrogen or helium) absorber used for ionization cooling. The other two coolers will cool the superconducting solenoid. This report will describe the MICE AFC magnet. The cold mass supports will be discussed. The reasons for using a pulsed tube cooler to cool this superconducting magnet will also be discussed.

Yang, Stephanie Q.; Green, Michael A.; Lau, Wing W.; Senanayake,Rohan S.; Witte, Holger

2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

66

Forward physics with CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physics potential of the forward physics project at CMS is very rich. Some of the diffraction and low-x physics channels are briefly discussed.

Marek Tasevsky

2004-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

67

Solenoid and monocusp ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion source which generates ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal magnetic field to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures.

Brainard, J.P.; Burns, E.J.T.; Draper, C.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Higgs searches at CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results are summarized from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 and 8 TeV in the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurements of mass, cross section, and properties of the narrow resonance recently observed are presented. The searches beyond standard model Higgs boson, in the CMS experiment at the LHC, are highlighted.

Roberto Salerno; for the CMS Collaboration

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle reactions which are open to a muon collider and the physics of such reactions - what one learns and the necessary luminosity to see interesting events - are described in detail. Most of the physics accesible to an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider could be studied in a muon collider. In addition the production of Higgs bosons in the s-channel will allow the measurement of Higgs masses and total widths to high precision; likewise, t{bar t} and W{sup +}W{sup -} threshold studies would yield m{sub t} and m{sub w} to great accuracy. These reactions are at low center of mass energy (if the MSSM is correct) and the luminosity and {Delta}p/p of the beams required for these measurements is detailed in the Physics Chapter. On the other hand, at 2 + 2 TeV, a luminosity of L {approx} 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is desirable for studies such as, the scattering of longitudinal W bosons or the production of heavy scalar particles. Not explored in this work, but worth noting, are the opportunities for muon-proton and muon-heavy ion collisions as well as the enormous richness of such a facility for fixed target physics provided by the intense beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons and spallation neutrons. To see all the interesting physics described herein requires a careful study of the operation of a detector in the very large background. Three sources of background have been identified. The first is from any halo accompanying the muon beams in the collider ring. Very carefully prepared beams will have to be injected and maintained. The second is due to the fact that on average 35% of the muon energy appears in its decay electron. The energy of the electron subsequently is converted into EM showers either from the synchrotron radiation they emit in the collider magnetic field or from direct collision with the surrounding material. The decays that occur as the beams traverse the low beta insert are of particular concern for detector backgrounds. A third source of background is e{sup +} - e{sup -} pair creation from {mu}{sup +} - {mu}{sup -} interaction. Studies of

Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

70

Ionization cooling in the muon collider  

SciTech Connect

The muon beams in a high luminosity muon collider are produced with a very large emittance. The process of ionization cooling offers a method for reducing the 6-dimensional normalized emittance of the beam by a factor of {approx} 10{sup 6}. A simple analytic theory has been developed that demonstrates the dependence of the net cooling on various experimental parameters. The simple theory has been checked and realistic arrangements have been examined using Monte Carlo simulations. Transverse cooling of the initial beam can be achieved using passive Li absorbers in a FOFO lattice. The last factor of 10 in transverse cooling probably requires the use of current-carrying Li lenses. Efficient longitudinal cooling requires the use of wedge shaped absorbers in a dispersive section of the beam line. An example, multi-stage cooling scenario has been developed that meets the requirements of the muon collider. Preliminary designs have been made of solenoids for use in the FOFO lattice and of solenoids and dipoles for use in the emittance exchange sections. Detailed simulation work, farther optimization, and preparations for experimental demonstrations of critical components are currently in progress.

Fernow, R.C.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Palmer, R.B. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Quench anaylsis of MICE spectrometer superconducting solenoid  

SciTech Connect

MICE superconducting spectrometer solenoids fabrication and tests are in progress now. First tests of the Spectrometer Solenoid discovered some issues which could be related to the chosen passive quench protection system. Both solenoids do not have heaters and quench propagation relied on the 'quench back' effect, cold diodes, and shunt resistors. The solenoids have very large inductances and stored energy which is 100% dissipated in the cold mass during a quench. This makes their protection a challenging task. The paper presents the quench analysis of these solenoids based on 3D FEA solution of coupled transient electromagnetic and thermal problems. The simulations used the Vector Fields QUENCH code. It is shown that in some quench scenarios, the quench propagation is relatively slow and some areas can be overheated. They describe ways of improving the solenoids quench protection in order to reduce the risk of possible failure.

Kashikhin, Vladimir; Bross, Alan; /Fermilab; Prestemon, Soren; / /LBL, Berkeley

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Study of HTS Insert Coils for High Field Solenoids  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab is currently working on the development of high field magnet systems for ionization cooling of muon beams. The use of high temperature superconducting materials (HTS) is being considered for these solenoids using Helium refrigeration. Several studies have been performed on insert coils made of BSCCO-2223 tapes and second generation (2G) YBCO coated conductors, which are tested at various temperatures and at external fields of up to 14 T. Critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of YBCO short samples are presented as a function of bending stress, magnetic field and field orientation with respect to the sample surface. An analytical fit of critical current data as a function of field and field orientation is also presented. Results from several single-layer and double-layer pancake coils are also discussed.

Lombardo, Vito; /Fermilab

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Solenoid transport for heavy ion fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport for Heavy Ion Fusion* Edward Lee** LawrenceHm Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Abstract Solenoid transport ofseveral stages of a heavy ion fusion driver. In general this

Lee, Edward

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

MUON ACCELERATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major motivations driving recent interest in FFAGs is their use for the cost-effective acceleration of muons. This paper summarizes the progress in this area that was achieved leading up to and at the FFAG workshop at KEK from July 7-12, 2003. Much of the relevant background and references are also given here, to give a context to the progress we have made.

BERG,S.J.

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

75

D0 Solenoid Upgrade Project: D0 Solenoid Current Leads  

SciTech Connect

This engineering note documents information gathered and design decisions made regarding the vapor cooled current leads for the D-Zero Solenoid. The decision was made during design group meetings that the D-Zero Solenoid, rated at 4825 amps, should use vapor cooled current leads rated at 6000 amps. CDF uses 6000 amp leads from American Magnetics Inc. (AMI) and has two spares in their storage lockers. Because of the spares situation and AMI's reputation, AMI would be the natural choice of vendor. The manufacturer's listed helium consumption is 19.2 liters/hr. From experience with these types of leads, more stable operation is acheived at an increased gas flow. See attached E-Mail message from RLS. We have decided to list the design flow rate at 28.8 liquid liters/hr in the design report. This corresponds to COFs operating point. A question was raised regarding how long the current leads could last at full current should the vapor cooling flow was stopped. This issue was discussed with Scott Smith from AMI. We do not feel that there is a problem for this failure scenario.

Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

1993-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

76

Central Solenoid Insert Technical Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for the ITER central solenoid (CS) contribution to the ITER project. The Central Solenoid Insert (CSI) project will allow ITER validation the appropriate lengths of the conductors to be used in the full-scale CS coils under relevant conditions. The ITER Program plans to build and test a CSI to verify the performance of the CS conductor. The CSI is a one-layer solenoid with an inner diameter of 1.48 m and a height of 4.45 m between electric terminal ends. The coil weight with the terminals is approximately 820 kg without insulation. The major goal of the CSI is to measure the temperature margin of the CS under the ITER direct current (DC) operating conditions, including determining sensitivity to load cycles. Performance of the joints, ramp rate sensitivity, and stability against thermal or electromagnetic disturbances, electrical insulation, losses, and instrumentation are addressed separately and therefore are not major goals in this project. However, losses and joint performance will be tested during the CSI testing campaign. The USIPO will build the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Japan. The industrial vendors (the Suppliers) will report to the USIPO (the Company). All approvals to proceed will be issued by the Company, which in some cases, as specified in this document, will also require the approval of the ITER Organization. Responsibilities and obligations will be covered by respective contracts between the USIPO, called Company interchangeably, and the industrial Prime Contractors, called Suppliers. Different stages of work may be performed by more than one Prime Contractor, as described in this specification. Technical requirements of the contract between the Company and the Prime Contractor will be covered by the Fabrication Specifications developed by the Prime Contractor based on this document and approved by the Company and ITER. The Fabrication Specifications may reflect some national requirements and regulations that are not fully provided here. This document presents the ITER CSI specifications.

Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL; Smirnov, Alexandre [ORNL

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

US CMS EMU IB  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tutorials, Documentation, How Tos CRAB Quota Policy and Usage Statistics CERN Quota and Stats System Status Downtimes Condor Ganglia Enstore dCache U.S. CMS Grid VO Data and...

78

Charge recombination in the muon collider cooling channel  

SciTech Connect

The final stage of the ionization cooling channel for the muon collider must transversely recombine the positively and negatively charged bunches into a single beam before the muons can be accelerated. It is particularly important to minimize any emittance growth in this system since no further cooling takes place before the bunches are collided. We have found that emittance growth could be minimized by using symmetric pairs of bent solenoids and careful matching. We show that a practical design can be found that has transmission {approx}99%, emittance growth less than 0.1%, and minimal dispersion in the recombined bunches.

Fernow, R. C.; Palmer, R. B. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

79

Experimental studies of helical solenoid model based on YBCO tape-bridge joints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Helical solenoids that provide solenoid, helical dipole and helical gradient field components are designed for a helical cooling channel (HCC) proposed for cooling of muon beams in a muon collider. The high temperature superconductor (HTS), 12 mm wide and 0.1 mm thick YBCO tape, is used as the conductor for the highest-field section of HCC due to certain advantages, such as its electrical and mechanical properties. To study and address the design, and technological and performance issues related to magnets based on YBCO tapes, a short helical solenoid model based on double-pancake coils was designed, fabricated and tested at Fermilab. Splicing joints were made with Sn-Pb solder as the power leads and the connection between coils, which is the most critical element in the magnet that can limit the performance significantly. This paper summarizes the test results of YBCO tape and double-pancake coils in liquid nitrogen and liquid helium, and then focuses on the study of YBCO splices, including the soldering temperatures and pressures, and splice bending test.

Yu, M.; Lombardo, V.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Flangan, G.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Lopes, M.L.; /Fermilab; Johnson, R.P.; /Fermilab

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design  

SciTech Connect

The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

R&D ERL: HTS Solenoid  

SciTech Connect

An innovative feature of the ERL project is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The HTS solenoid design offers many advantages because of several unique design features. Typically the solenoid is placed outside the cryostat which means that the beam gets significantly defused before a focusing element starts. In the current design, the solenoid is placed inside the cryostat which provides an early focusing structure and thus a significant reduction in the emittance of the electron beam. In addition, taking full advantage of the high critical temperature of HTS, the solenoid has been designed to reach the required field at {approx}77 K, which can be obtained with liquid nitrogen. This significantly reduces the cost of testing and allows a variety of critical pre-tests which would have been prohibitively expensive at 4 K in liquid helium because of the additional requirements of cryostat and associated facilities.

Gupta, R.; Muratore, J.; Plate, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

CMS ROC FAQ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ROC Frequently Asked Questions ROC Frequently Asked Questions What happened to the CMSUAF cluster? How does one organize a videoconference at CERN? Where can I find the pictures taken by Visual Media Services? How can I access GUIs and protected web pages from outside the .cms network? back to questions Q: What happened to the CMSUAF cluster? A: The CMSUAF interactive cluster was retired due to age and security issues. Users should now use the CMSLPC interactive cluster. Additional details can be found in the Computing Announcements presentation given by Jon Bakken at the US CMS Mtg on 25 Jan 2008. Also see the Connect to the LPC Cluster web page for instructions which are maintained by the CMS Tier-1 operations support group. [Added 10 Mar 2008 - Alan L. Stone] back to questions Q:How does one organize a videoconference at CERN?

83

Performance of the CMS Level-1 Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first level trigger of the CMS experiment is comprised of custom electronics that process data from the electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters and three technologies of muon detectors in order to select the most interesting events from LHC collisions, such as those consistent with the production and decay of the Higgs boson. The rate of events selected by this Level-1 trigger must be reduced from the beam crossing frequency to no more than 100 kHz further processing can occur, a major challenge since the LHC instantaneous luminosity has increased by six orders of magnitude since the start of operations to more than 6E33 cm-2s-1 today. The performance of the Level-1 trigger, in terms of rates and efficiencies of the main objects and trigger algorithms, as measured from LHC proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV center-of-mass energies is presented here.

J. Brooke; on behalf of the CMS Collaboration

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

84

Performance of the CMS Level-1 Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first level trigger of the CMS experiment is comprised of custom electronics that process data from the electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters and three technologies of muon detectors in order to select the most interesting events from LHC collisions, such as those consistent with the production and decay of the Higgs boson. The rate of events selected by this Level-1 trigger must be reduced from the beam crossing frequency to no more than 100 kHz further processing can occur, a major challenge since the LHC instantaneous luminosity has increased by six orders of magnitude since the start of operations to more than 6E33 cm-2s-1 today. The performance of the Level-1 trigger, in terms of rates and efficiencies of the main objects and trigger algorithms, as measured from LHC proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV center-of-mass energies is presented here.

Brooke, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Fabrication and test of short helical solenoid model based on YBCO tape  

SciTech Connect

A helical cooling channel (HCC) is a new technique proposed for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams. To achieve the optimal cooling rate, the high field section of HCC need to be developed, which suggests using High Temperature Superconductors (HTS). This paper updates the parameters of a YBCO based helical solenoid (HS) model, describes the fabrication of HS segments (double-pancake units) and the assembly of six-coil short HS model with two dummy cavity insertions. Three HS segments and the six-coil short model were tested. The results are presented and discussed.

Yu, M.; Lombardo, V.; Lopes, M.L.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Solenoid System for PRISM and COMET  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment of searching for coherent neutrino?less conversion of muons to electron conversion in muonic atom ? ? +N(A

Makoto Yoshida; PRISM working group

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Muon Collider History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colliders: A Brief History Below is a brief potted history of the muon collider concept. Click here for a one transparency summary. The muon collider concept is an idea dating back...

88

The intergration of liquid and solid muon absorbers into afocusing magnet of a muon cooling channel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes how one can integrate the muonabsorber with the focusing coils of a SFOFO muon cooling channel [1]. Theabsorber material must be a low Z material that reduces the muon momentumwith minimum scattering. The best materials to use for muon ionizationcooling absorbers are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium, andberyllium. Hydrogen or helium in an absorber would normally be in theliquid state. Lithium hydride, lithium, and beryllium would normally bein the solid state. This report limits the absorber materials discussedto hydrogen, helium, lithium, and beryllium. In order to achieve the samelevel of ionization cooling with a solid absorber as a liquid hydrogenabsorber, the beta of the muon beam must be reduced more than a factor oftwo. This affects both the designs of the absorber and the magnet aroundit. Reducing the beam beta reduces the momentum acceptance of thechannel. Integration of a liquid hydrogen absorber and solid absorberswith a superconducting focusing solenoid is discussed. The choice ofabsorber material affects the design of the superconducting focusingmagnet and the superconductor that is used to generate the magneticfield.

Green, M.A.; Black, E.L.; Cummings, M.A.; Kaplan, D.M.; Ishimoto,S.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.; Palmer, R.B.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Muon performance aspects and measurement of the inclusive ZZ production cross section through the four lepton final state with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The "Large Hadron Collider" (LHC) is currently the most powerful particle accelerator. It provides particle collisions at a center of mass energy in the Tera-electronvolt range, which had never been reached in a laboratory before. Thereby a new era in high energy particle physics has began. Now it is possible to test one of the most precise theories in physics, the Standard Model of particle physics, at these high energies. The purpose is particularly served by four large experiments installed at the LHC, namely "A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS" (ATLAS), the "Compact-Muon-Solenoid" (CMS), the "Large Hadron Collider beauty" (LHCb) and "A Large Ion Collider Experiment" (ALICE). Besides exploring the high energy behavior of the well-established portions of the Standard Model, one of the main objectives is to find the Higgs boson included in the model, but not discovered by any preceding effort. It is of tremendous importance since fermions and heavy electroweak gauge bosons acquire mass because of this boson. Although ...

Meyer, Jochen; Ströhmer, Raimund

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

90

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome IMPORTANT Safety at CERN LHC Safety Assessment Group Report Safety and access procedures for CMS - Updated 25 Feb. 2008 (pdf) Information for US Personnel (pdf) Police 117, Fire 118, Ambulance 144 Other emergency contact LHC Resources at Fermilab LPC ROC CMS Center Traveling Getting registered with the User's Office Map Visa information short term (< 3 months) long term Relocation Moving to CERN Car leasing CERN logistics CERN Shuttle Moving equipment CERN stores catalog Getting connected CERN Computer Services and Support Printing Life in Geneva "FAQ" for newcomers Quick Links CMS CMS@Work CMS Times CMSDOC CMS Result Archive LHC U.S. LHC Project Office U.S. LHC Communications U.S. LHC Users Organization (USLUO) Advisory Committee of CERN Users (ACCU) Atlas Fermilab

91

Advances in Beam Cooling for Muon Colliders  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas is the basis for the latest plans for muon colliders. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields, where emittance exchange is achieved by using a continuous homogeneous absorber. Momentum-dependent path length differences in the dense hydrogen energy absorber provide the required correlation between momentum and ionization loss to accomplish longitudinal cooling. Recent studies of an 800 MHz RF cavity pressurized with hydrogen, as would be used in this application, show that the maximum gradient is not limited by a large external magnetic field, unlike vacuum cavities. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, will be employed to further reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that is being developed for an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment. The status of the designs, simulations, and tests of the cooling components for a high luminosity, low emittance muon collider will be reviewed.

R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight new ideas are being developed under SBIR/STTR grants to cool muon beams for colliders, neutrino factories, and muon experiments. Analytical and simulation studies have confirmed that a six-dimensional (6D) cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas can provide effective beam cooling. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, helical quadrupole, and helical sextupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange and achieve 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m segment. Four such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse physical dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost five orders of magnitude. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, then can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that can be used as MANX, an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

Rolland P. Johnson; Mohammad Alsharo'a; Charles Ankenbrandt; Emanuela Barzi; Kevin Beard; S. Alex Bogacz; Yaroslav Derbenev; Licia Del Frate; Ivan Gonin; Pierrick M. Hanlet; Robert Hartline; Daniel M. Kaplan; Moyses Kuchnir; Alfred Moretti; David Neuffer; Kevin Paul; Milorad Popovic; Thomas J. Roberts; Gennady Romanov; Daniele Turrioni; Victor Yarba; and Katsuya Yonehara

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Neutrino Physics at a Muon Collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics at a Muon Collider The intense muon beams needed for high luminosity muon colliders produce intense beams of neutrinos. Dedicated muon storage rings with long straight...

94

The Mechanical and Thermal Design for the MICE Focusing SolenoidMagnet System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focusing solenoids for MICE surround energy absorbers that are used to reduce the transverse momentum of the muon beam that is being cooled within MICE. The focusing solenoids will have a warm-bore diameter of 470 mm. Within this bore is a flask of liquid hydrogen or a room temperature beryllium absorber. The focusing solenoid consists of two coils wound with a copper matrix Nb-Ti conductor originally designed for MRI magnets. The two coils have separate leads, so that they may be operated at the same polarity or at opposite polarity. The focusing magnet is designed so that it can be cooled with a pair of 1.5 W (at 4.2 K) coolers. The MICE cooling channel has three focusing magnets with their absorbers. The three focusing magnets will be hooked together in series for a circuit stored-energy of about 9.0 MJ. Quench protection for the focusing magnets is discussed. This report presents the mechanical and thermal design parameters for this magnet, including the results of finite element calculations of mechanical forces and heat flow in the magnet cold mass.

Yang, S.Q.; Green, M.A.; Barr, G.; Bravar, U.; Cobb, J.; Lau, W.; Senanayake, R.S.; White, A.E.; Witte, H.

2004-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

Study of gas purifiers for the CMS RPC detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CMS RPC muon detector utilizes a gas recirculation system called closed loop (CL) to cope with large gas mixture volumes and costs. A systematic study of CL gas purifiers has been carried out over 400 days between July 2008 and August 2009 at CERN in a low-radiation test area, with the use of RPC chambers with currents monitoring, and gas analysis sampling points. The study aimed to fully clarify the presence of pollutants, the chemistry of purifiers used in the CL, and the regeneration procedure. Preliminary results on contaminants release and purifier characterization are reported.

L. Benussi; S. Bianco; S. Colafranceschi; F. L. Fabbri; F. Felli; M. Ferrini; M. Giardoni; T. Greci; A. Paolozzi; L. Passamonti; D. Piccolo; D. Pierluigi; A. Russo; G. Saviano; S. Buontempo; A. Cimmino; M. de Gruttola; F Fabozzi d A. O. M. Iorio; L. Lista; P. Paolucci; P. Baesso; G. Belli; D. Pagano; S. P. Ratti; A. Vicini; P. Vitulo; C. Viviani; R. Guida; A. Sharma

2010-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

96

Muon Acceleration - RLA and FFAG  

SciTech Connect

Various acceleration schemes for muons are presented. The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and 'beam shaping' can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a non-scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. The RLAs offer very efficient usage of high gradient superconducting RF and ability to adjust path-length after each linac pass through individual return arcs with uniformly periodic FODO optics suitable for chromatic compensation of emittance dilution with sextupoles. However, they require spreaders/recombiners switchyards at both linac ends and significant total length of the arcs. The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring combines compactness with very large chromatic acceptance (twice the injection energy) and it allows for large number of passes through the RF (at least eight, possibly as high as 15).

Alex Bogacz

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Detector Maintenance and Operations Subproject  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HCAL Announcements, Documentation, and Resources HCAL Announcements, Documentation, and Resources Forward Pixels SiTracker ECAL HCAL Endcap Muon System TriDAS (This page last updated August 2000, although the 1997 version of the TDR was added in July 2010.) [See also HCAL web pages at Maryland and Boston.] HCAL Review Documents HCAL Project Organization Chart (13 Kb gif file) [ps: 46 Kb] HCAL Meeting Announcements, Agendas, and Minutes HCAL Technical Design Report HCAL Drawings: 3-D and perspective barrel HCAL views. HCAL Trigger: Calorimeter trigger algorithm specifications. HCAL Display Resources: transparencies, misc. figures, ... HCAL Documents: Technical Proposal, DRDC Notes, and Papers. CMS Technical Notes: HCAL, HCAL-HV. HCAL Page on CMSDOC WWW Server at CERN HCAL HF Document Server from the University of Iowa

98

U.S. CMS - 2007 News Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Fermilab Today CMS luminosity exceeds all expectations May 27, 2011 CMS Result Tempest in a pinpoint May 13, 2011 CMS Result The Higgs Boson: One might not be enough May 9,...

99

First experiment with the double solenoid RIBRAS system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A description of the double solenoid system (RIBRAS) operating since 2004 in one of the beam lines of the Pelletron Laboratory of the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo is presented. The recent installation of the secondary scattering chamber after the second solenoid is reported and the first experiment in RIBRAS using both solenoids is described.

Lichtenthaeler, R.; Condori, R. Pampa; Lepine-Szily, A.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morais, M. C.; Leistenschneider, E.; Scarduelli, V. B.; Gasques, L. R. [Instituto de Fisica da USP, Sao Paulo, Brazil, C.P. 66318, 05314-970 (Brazil); Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ, 24210-340 (Brazil); Shorto, J. M. B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Assuncao, M. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Campus Diadema, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

100

CMS Grid CCS task  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. CMS S&C PMG U.S. CMS S&C PMG 1 Mark Leininger Fermilab Project Office Project Office Iowa (DOE): Iowa (DOE): $25K SOW for FY04 complete; PO placed $25K SOW for FY04 complete; PO placed Minnesota (DOE): Minnesota (DOE): $52K SOW for FY04 complete, requisition in division $52K SOW for FY04 complete, requisition in division Virginia Tech (DOE): Virginia Tech (DOE): $65K SOW for FY04 at VT for review $65K SOW for FY04 at VT for review UCD (DOE): UCD (DOE): SOW for FY04 being discussed by Bob Clare and Winston Ko SOW for FY04 being discussed by Bob Clare and Winston Ko CERN/NEU: CERN/NEU: $32K $32K changeorder changeorder for for Guilio Eulisse Guilio Eulisse for July for July - - Dec '04 Dec '04 Web redesign project: Web redesign project: PO placed, PO placed, strawman strawman page by Christmas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

muon Collider Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Muon Collider Notes Muon Collider Notes MC-001 D. Neuffer, "Colliding Muon Beams at 90 GeV" Fermilab Note FN-319, July 1979. MC-002 D. Neuffer, "Principles and Applications of Muon Cooling" Proc. of the 12th International Conf. on High-Energy Accelerators, p. 481, 1983. MC-003 V.V. Parkhomchuk and A.N. Skrinsky, "Ionization Cooling: Physics and Applications" Proc. of the 12th International Conf. on High-Energy Accelerators, p. 485, 1983. MC-004 E.A. Perevedentsev and A.N. Skrinsky, "On the Proton Klystron" Proc. of the 12th International Conf. on High-Energy Accelerators, p. 508, 1983. MC-005 D. Neuffer, "Principles and Applications of Muon Cooling" Particle Accelerators, Vol. 14, p. 75, 1983. MC-006 D. Neuffer, "Multi-TeV Muon Colliders" Proc. of the Advanced

102

CMS FNAL Remote Operations Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LHC@FNAL Remote Operations Center (ROC) at Fermilab is located on the first floor of Wilson Hall. From the ROC, shifters perform real-time monitoring of the data recorded by the CMS Experiment. LHC@FNAL Remote Operations Center (ROC) at Fermilab is located on the first floor of Wilson Hall. From the ROC, shifters perform real-time monitoring of the data recorded by the CMS Experiment. ROC WBM / WBM Twiki FNAL ELog Mailing List Agendas / ROC Presentations & Notes WBM Publications Runs CVS SiTracker / MTCC AEM / AEM help Screen Snapshot Service FAQ Accounts & Nodes New User Instructions WebCams CMS Workbook Directories / Glossaries Photos Vidyo / EVO Google / Wikipedia LHC@FNAL Computing Console Map Documents Mailing List One East Mtg Schedule rocshare Telephones To Do List Video Conferencing CMS Shifter CSC DAQ DataOps DQM / FNAL ROC ECAL Event Display HCAL Pixel Trigger Global Run Calendar CMS Live Contact List DAQ Status DAS

103

Study of various photomultiplier tubes with muon beams and Cerenkov light produced in electron showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of various photomultiplier tubes with muon beams and Cerenkov light produced in electron beams and Cerenkov light produced in electron showers CMS HCAL collaboration E-mail: Burak their windows were traversed by energetic charged particles. This signal, which is due to Cerenkov light

Akgun, Ugur

104

Plasma Lens for Muon and Neutrino Beams  

SciTech Connect

The plasma lens is examined as an alternate to focusing horns and solenoids for use in a neutrino or muon beam facility. The plasma lens concept is based on a combined high-energy lens/target configuration. The current is fed at electrodes located upstream and downstream from the target where pion capturing is needed. The current flows primarily in the plasma, which has a lower resistivity than the target. A second plasma lens section, with an additional current feed, follows the target to provide shaping of the plasma for optimum focusing. The plasma lens is immersed in an additional solenoid magnetic field to facilitate the plasma stability. The geometry of the plasma is shaped to provide optimal pion capture. Simulations of this plasma lens system have shown a 25% higher neutrino production than the horn system. Plasma lenses have the additional advantage of negligible pion absorption and scattering by the lens material and reduced neutrino contamination during anti-neutrino running. Results of particle simulations using plasma lens will be presented.

Kahn,S.A.; Korenev, S.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M.; Gallardo, J.C.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B.M.

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

105

Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling and Prospects for Muon Colliders  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A six-dimensional(6D)cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas* is used to achieve the small transverse emittances demanded by a high-luminosity muon collider. This helical cooling channel**(HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange. Simulations verify the analytic predictions and have shown a 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m HCC segment. Using three such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost six orders of magnitude. After this, two new post-cooling ideas can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to one or two mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. In this report we discuss the status of and the plans for the HCC simulation and engineering efforts. We also describe the new post-cooling ideas and comment on the prospects for a Higgs factory or energy frontier muon collider using existing laboratory infrastructure.

R.P. Johnson; M. Alsharo'a; P.M. Hanlet; R. E. Hartline; M. Kuchnir; K. Paul; T.J. Roberts; C.M. Ankenbrandt; E. Barzi; L. DelFrate; I.G. Gonin; A. Moretti; D.V. Neuffer; M. Popovic; G. Romanov; D. Turrioni; V. Yarba; K. Beard; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev; D.M. Kaplan; K. Yonehara

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

106

Forward Physics at CMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of forward processes are important tests of the standard model and inputs for Monte Carlo tuning. A measurement of the energy flow in the forward pseudorapidity region of CMS 3.15<|?|<4.9 is presented for 3 values of the centre?of?mass energy s ?=?0.9? TeV 2.36 TeV and 7 TeV. The forward energy flow is measured for minimum bias events and for events with a central dijet system the transverse energy of which provides a hard scale. The energy flow is compared to various Monte Carlo models with different multiparton interaction schemes. A study of forward jets in the pseudorapidity range 3.2<|?|<4.7 is presented for s ?=?7? TeV .

Roland Benoît; The CMS Collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

CMS Computing: Performance and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After years of development, the CMS distributed computing system is now in full operation. The LHC continues to set records for instantaneous luminosity, and CMS continues to record data at 300 Hz. Because of the intensity of the beams, there are multiple proton-proton interactions per beam crossing, leading to larger and larger event sizes and processing times. The CMS computing system has responded admirably to these challenges. We present the current status of the system, describe the recent performance, and discuss the challenges ahead and how we intend to meet them.

Kenneth Bloom; for the CMS Collaboration

2011-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

108

G-2 and CMS Fast Optical Calorimetry  

SciTech Connect

Final report on CMS funding for the construction, tests and installation of the Forward Hadron Calorimeter.

Winn, David R

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

109

CMS_SC4_PMG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

week functionality rerun of of goals of SC3 * Demonstration and preparation for the 2006 Data Challenge CSA06 * July and August CMS will produce 25M events per month (roughly 1TB...

110

The CMS dataset bookkeeping service  

SciTech Connect

The CMS Dataset Bookkeeping Service (DBS) has been developed to catalog all CMS event data from Monte Carlo and Detector sources. It provides the ability to identify MC or trigger source, track data provenance, construct datasets for analysis, and discover interesting data. CMS requires processing and analysis activities at various service levels and the DBS system provides support for localized processing or private analysis, as well as global access for CMS users at large. Catalog entries can be moved among the various service levels with a simple set of migration tools, thus forming a loose federation of databases. DBS is available to CMS users via a Python API, Command Line, and a Discovery web page interfaces. The system is built as a multi-tier web application with Java servlets running under Tomcat, with connections via JDBC to Oracle or MySQL database backends. Clients connect to the service through HTTP or HTTPS with authentication provided by GRID certificates and authorization through VOMS. DBS is an integral part of the overall CMS Data Management and Workflow Management systems.

Afaq, Anzar,; /Fermilab; Dolgert, Andrew; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Guo, Yuyi; /Fermilab; Jones, Chris; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Kosyakov, Sergey; /Fermilab; Kuznetsov, Valentin; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Lueking, Lee; /Fermilab; Riley, Dan; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Sekhri, Vijay; /Fermilab

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Electromagnetic Design of RF Cavities for Accelerating Low-Energy Muons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-gradient linear accelerator for accelerating low-energy muons and pions in a strong solenoidal magnetic field has been proposed for homeland defense and industrial applications. The acceleration starts immediately after collection of pions from a target in a solenoidal magnetic field and brings decay muons, which initially have kinetic energies mostly around 15-20 MeV, to 200 MeV over a distance of {approx}10 m. At this energy, both ionization cooling and further, more conventional acceleration of the muon beam become feasible. A normal-conducting linac with external-solenoid focusing can provide the required large beam acceptances. The linac consists of independently fed zero-mode (TM{sub 010}) RF cavities with wide beam apertures closed by thin conducting edge-cooled windows. Electromagnetic design of the cavity, including its RF coupler, tuning and vacuum elements, and field probes, has been developed with the CST MicroWave Studio, and is presented.

Kurennoy, Sergey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

112

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mission Objectives and Organization of the CMS Research Program The mission of the US CMS Research Program is to realize the US investment in the construction of CMS by providing...

113

Perspectives of a Midrapidity Dimuon Program at RHIC: A Novel and Compact Muon Telescope Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) at mid-rapidity and for the next generation of detectors at a possible electron-ion collider. We utilize Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers with large modules and long readout strips (Long-MRPC) in the detector design. The results from cosmic ray and beam tests show the intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a Long-MRPC are 60-70 ps and $\\sim1$ cm, respectively. The prototype performance of such a novel muon telescope detector at STAR indicates that muon identification at the transverse momentum of a few GeV/$c$ can be achieved through the combined information of track matching with the MTD, ionization energy loss in the Time Projection Chamber, and time-of-flight measurements. A primary muon over secondary muon ratio of better than 1/3 can be achieved. This provides a promising device for future quarkonium programs and primordial dilepton measurements at RHIC. Simulations of the muon efficiency, the signal-to-background ratio of $J/\\psi$, the separation of $\\Upsilon$ 1S from 2S+3S states, and the electron-muon correlation from charm pair production in the RHIC environment are presented.

L. Ruan; G. Lin; Z. Xu; K. Asselta; H. F. Chen; W. Christie; H. J. Crawford; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; T. J. Hallman; C. Li; J. Liu; W. J. Llope; R. Majka; T. Nussbaum; J. Scheblein; M. Shao; R. Soja; Y. Sun; Z. Tang; X. Wang; Y. Wang

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

114

Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

Zisman, Michael S.

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

115

Links to Muon Collider Related Web Pages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Muon Collider related web pages: Muon Collider Feasibility Study ... Fermilab Page MUCOOL Collaboration: Ionization Cooling R&D Snowmass 1996 Feasibility Study Book Brookhaven Muon...

116

ATLAS Muon Detector Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS muon spectrometer consists of several major components: Monitored Drift Tubes (MDTs) for precision measurements in the bending plane of the muons, supplemented by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) in the high eta region; Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) and Thin Gap Chambers (TGCs) for trigger and second coordinate measurement in the barrel and endcap regions, respectively; an optical alignment system to track the relative positions of all chambers; and, finally, the world's largest air-core magnetic toroid system. We will describe the status and commissioning of the muon system with cosmic rays and plans for commissioning with early beams.

E. Diehl; for the ATLAS muon collaboration

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Planning Documents CMS Schedule and Milestones (from CMSDOC at CERN) Project Management Plans US CMS Research Program Reports NSF Research Program Costs MOU and Budget...

118

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Office Construction Project Maintenance and Operations Software and Computing SLHC Upgrade MOU and Financial Status Information US CMS Institutional Funding U.S. CMS is...

119

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IO documentation --New Persistency RTAG Final Report PPDG internal review on CMS PPDG work, MOP, CMS Grid Enabled Monte Carlo Production IGUANA User Guide Results of Previous...

120

Fermilab | Muon Collider | How Does a Muon Collider Work?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A muon collider complex would comprise several machines and many different A muon collider complex would comprise several machines and many different components. Scientists across the world are developing and testing them. View full graphic How Does a Muon Collider Work? A muon collider complex would comprise several machines and many different components. Scientists across the world are developing and testing them. Proton accelerator To create lots of muons, scientists use a high-intensity proton accelerator that steers protons into a target. The collisions create short-lived particles called pions. Within 50 meters the pions decay into muons and neutral particles called neutrinos. The muons have an energy of about 200 MeV. Capture cavities Magnets guide the muons into and through a set of radiofrequency cavities. The electric field inside the cavities increases the energy of slow muons

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A unidirectional rotary solenoid as applied to stronglinks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the design goals and results of an advanced development stronglink project with special emphasis on a new rotary solenoid concept. 10 figs.

Kenderdine, E.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The LHCb Muon System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to provide fast muon triggering and efficient offline muon identification is an essential feature of the LHCb experiment. The muon detector is required to have a high efficiency over a large area and an appropriate time resolution to identify the bunch crossing for level–0 triggers. The LHCb muon detector consists of five stations equipped with 1368 Multi Wire Proportional Chambers and 12 Gas Electron Multiplier chambers. The technical design of the chambers is briefly presented and the Quality Control procedures during the various construction steps are described. The method developed for gas gain uniformity measurement is also described together with the results on efficiency of detectors fully equipped with the front–end electronics, obtained from tests with cosmic rays.

Lenzi, Michela

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Electron cloud effects on an intense ion beam in a four solenoid lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

beam in a four solenoid lattice J.E. Coleman Department ofbeam in a two-solenoid lattice. Initial experiments showed aadded to the two-solenoid lattice in order to study electron

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Muon g - 2 anomaly and 125 GeV Higgs: Extra vector-like quark and LHC prospects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ATLAS and CMS collaborations recently reported indication of a Higgs boson around 125GeV. If we add extra vector-like quarks to the MSSM, such a relatively heavy Higgs can be naturally realized in the GMSB framework, simultaneously explaining the muon g - 2 anomaly. I will discuss LHC prospect of this attractive model.

Iwamoto, Sho [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

125

ITER Central Solenoid support structure analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) is comprised of six independent coils held together by a pre-compression support structure. This structure must provide enough preload to maintain sufficient coil-to-coil contact and interface load throughout the current pulse. End of burn (EOB) represents one of the most extreme time-points doing the reference scenario when the currents in the CS3 coils oppose those of CS1 & CS2. The CS structure is performance limited by the room temperature static yield requirements needed to support the roughly 180 MN preload to resist coil separation during operation. This preload is applied by inner and external tie plates along the length of the coil stack by mechanical fastening methods utilizing Superbolt technology. The preloading structure satisfies the magnet structural design criteria of ITER and will be verified during mockup studies. The solenoid is supported from the bottom of the toroidal field (TF) coil casing in both the vertical radial directions. The upper support of the CS coil structure maintains radial registration with the TF coil in the event of vertical disruptions (VDE) loads and earthquakes. All of these structure systems are analyzed via a global finite element analysis (FEA). The model includes a complete sector of the TF coil and the CS coil/structure in one self-consistent analysis. The corresponding results and design descriptions are described in this report.

Freudenberg, Kevin D [ORNL; Myatt, R. [Myatt Consulting, Norfolk, MA

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma confinement apparatus, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed.

Fowler, T. Kenneth (Walnut Creek, CA); Condit, William C. (Livermore, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Interface Control Document for the Interface between the Central Solenoid Insert Coil and the Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the interface definition and interface control between the Central Solenoid Insert Coil and the Central Solenoid Model Coil Test Facility in Japan.

Smirnov, Alexandre [ORNL; Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL; Nunoya, Yoshihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

ITER Central Solenoid Coil Insulation Qualification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4x4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL; Mann Jr, Thomas Latta [ORNL; Miller, John L [ORNL; Freudenberg, Kevin D [ORNL; Reed, Richard P [Cryogenic Materials, Inc.; Walsh, Robert P [Florida State University; McColskey, J D [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder; Evans, D [Advanced Cryogenic Materials

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

ITER CENTRAL SOLENOID COIL INSULATION QUALIFICATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4 x 4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

Martovetsky, N N; Mann, T L; Miller, J R; Freudenberg, K D; Reed, R P; Walsh, R P; McColskey, J D; Evans, D

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

130

JOB MONITORING IN AN INTERACTIVE GRID ANALYSIS ENVIRONMENT ,Ashiq Anjum4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.mcclatchey@uwe.ac.uk 4 National University of Sciences and Technology Rawalpindi, Pakistan Email: {arshad.ali, ashiq . Physicists working with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN

Low, Steven H.

131

Muon Astronomy with LVD Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analysed the arrival directions of single muons detected by the first LVD tower from November, 1994 till January, 1998. The moon shadowing effect has been observed. To search for point sources of high energy photons we have analysed muons crossing the rock thickness greater than 3, 5 and 7 km w.e., which corresponds to the mean muon energies 1.6, 3.9 and 8.4 TeV at the surface, respectively. Upper limits on steady muon fluxes for selected astrophysical sources for different muon energies are presented.

LVD Collaboration

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

132

The CMS integration grid testbed  

SciTech Connect

The CMS Integration Grid Testbed (IGT) comprises USCMS Tier-1 and Tier-2 hardware at the following sites: the California Institute of Technology, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of California at San Diego, and the University of Florida at Gainesville. The IGT runs jobs using the Globus Toolkit with a DAGMan and Condor-G front end. The virtual organization (VO) is managed using VO management scripts from the European Data Grid (EDG). Gridwide monitoring is accomplished using local tools such as Ganglia interfaced into the Globus Metadata Directory Service (MDS) and the agent based Mona Lisa. Domain specific software is packaged and installed using the Distribution After Release (DAR) tool of CMS, while middleware under the auspices of the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT) is distributed using Pacman. During a continuous two month span in Fall of 2002, over 1 million official CMS GEANT based Monte Carlo events were generated and returned to CERN for analysis while being demonstrated at SC2002. In this paper, we describe the process that led to one of the world's first continuously available, functioning grids.

Graham, Gregory E.

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

133

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Doing Physics - User Software & Computing -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Setup : Software Setup Setup : Software Setup General CMS Software Environment Platform specific setup Application runtime environment Accessing CERN CVS server References General CMS Software Environment The CMS software environment for csh and tcsh users is set by sourcing the environment setup script. In tcsh, csh: source /uscmst1/prod/sw/cms/cshrc [option] In bash, sh: . /uscmst1/prod/sw/cms/shrc [option] This will set general CMS software environment variables, extend the user's $PATH to include CMS specific utilities and tools, and define aliases used in the CMS software projects. User can set one of the environments by choosing the corresponding argument to the environment setup script. NOTE: if environment is already set, sourcing a script will not change the environment. A warning will be

134

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Ops Contact  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commissioning and Operations Contact Kaori Maeshima U.S. CMS Operations Coordinator Fermilab PO Box 500 Batavia, IL 60510 630-840-3917 maeshima@fnal.gov K. Maeshima U.S. CMS is...

135

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Fermilab Software and Computing Oversight Panel Review of the U.S. CMS Software and Computing Project October 25-27, 2001 Purpose: Review of the status the U.S. CMS Software and...

136

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electromagnetic Calorimeter Institution Board Electromagnetic Calorimeter Institution Board Ren-yuan Zhu, Chair Caltech Renyuan Zhu zhu@hep.caltech.edu Cornell Ritchie Paterson ritchie@lepp.cornell.edu Fermilab Jeffrey Berryhill berryhil@fnal.gov Florida State Yuri Gershtein gerstein@hep.fsu.edu Kansas State Yurii Maravin maravin@fnal.gov Minnesota Roger Rusack rusack@mnhep.hep.umn.edu Northeastern Steve Reucroft reucroft@neu.edu Notre Dame Colin Jessop jessop@slac.stanford.edu Princeton Pierre Piroue piroue@princeton.edu Virginia Brad Cox cox@uvahep.phys.virginia.edu U.S. CMS is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of

137

CMS Policy for the IS Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This policy sets the ground rules under which CMS ... reduce or eliminate any known vulnerability in the ... threatened (eg, due to a water leak) without ...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Searches for New Physics at CMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review the capability of the CMS experiment to address the experimental searches for New Physics at the LHC. In particular

Silvia Costantini

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

NK Muon Beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NK Muon Beam will be a modified version of the existing NT beam line. The decision to employ a modified version of the NT beam line was made based on considerations of cost and availability of the beam line. Preliminary studies considered use of other beam lines, e.g., the NW beam line, and even of moving the bubble chamber with its superconducting coils but were rejected for reasons such as cost, personnel limitations, and potential conflicts with other users.

Koizumi, G.

1988-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

140

Cryogenic Tests of the g-2 Superconducting Solenoid Magnet System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Snydstrup and T. Tallerico, Brookhaven National LaboratoryBerkeley Laboratory and at Brookhaven National LaboratoryMuon g-2 Design Report." Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Jia, L.X.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

muon_collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

muon_collider muon_collider muon_collider FridayMeetings MCTFmeetings MondayMeetings prstab texput.log #prstab.tex# last.kumac prstab.ps arxiv.tar.gz prstab.tar.gz referee_response_II.pdf prstab.pdf prstab.aux prstab.dvi prstab.end prstab.log prstab.tex prstab.tex~ accel-010307-f03.eps accel-010307-f28.eps old conclusions.tex higgsfact.tex introduction.tex mice.tex neufact.tex physics.tex prstab.tex r_and_d.tex authors_merged.tex buncher.tex temp.prt last.kumacold ringfig.eps MICE-fig.ps chgr_norm.ps chgr_merit.ps temp.csh temp.prt~ xupdn-a-model-view-iron5.eps site1-Layout1.eps rla2.eps phaserot.eps mole-hill.eps intoap.eps emit.eps cavity.eps allcount.eps MICE-88MHz-cooling.eps changes hh_ha_susy_rtsscan.eps letter_plots.eps scott33.eps scott32b.eps scott32a.eps MICE-200MHz-long.eps MICE-resolution.eps dipole_fields.eps

142

Muon Cooling R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International efforts are under way to design and test a muon ionization cooling channel. The present R&D program is described, and future plans outlined.

Steve Geer

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

U.S. CMS S&C PMG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sep 13, 2002 U.S. CMS S&C PMG 1 Lothar A T Bauerdick Fermilab Revised Project Plan Revised Project Plan for US CMS S&C for US CMS S&C LATBauerdick LATBauerdick Fermilab...

144

Solenoid-free startup experiments in DIII-D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of DIII-D experiments was performed to investigate the potential for initiating plasma current using only poloidal field coils located outside the DIII-D central solenoid, i.e. 'solenoid-free'. Plasma current to 166 kA was achieved using 2-3MW of electron cyclotron (EC) heating and was limited by coil and power supply constraints. Flux conversion to plasma current was similar to standard DIII-D startup with some degradation at higher plasma current associated with stray fields and vertical stability issues. In preliminary solenoid-free experiments, neutral beam (NB) current drive (CD) levels were small and attributed to reduced CD efficiency associated with low electron temperature produced by the low current, low confinement plasma. Lack of plasma radial position control also contributed to a reduction of NBCD. Similarly, ECCD was small owing to low plasma temperature and outside EC launch which is required in the solenoid-free scenario. Synergistic experiments were carried out using standard solenoid initiated plasmas in order to study noninductive CD in limited, Lmode plasmas, typical of that generated by solenoid-free startup. While substantial noninductive current can be driven, self-sustaining levels of noninductive current have not yet been achieved with our present six-source co-injection NB system combined with EC and fast wave systems. At low plasma current and high levels of localized EC heating, substantial MHD is generated and this was seen to severely limit plasma performance. Although further optimization is possible in the limited plasma regime, full noninductive, steady-state operation may require diverted plasma with H-mode quality confinement. Discharges obtained during the solenoid-free campaign are compared with results of previous DIII-D campaigns aimed at achieving a steady state, noninductive CD solution.

Leuer, J. A. [General Atomics, San Diego; Cunningham, G. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Mueller, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Brooks, N. H. [General Atomics, San Diego; Eldietis, N. W. [General Atomics, San Diego; Humphreys, D. A. [General Atomics, San Diego; Hyatt, A. W. [General Atomics, San Diego; Jackson, G. L. [General Atomics; Lohr, J. [General Atomics, San Diego; Politzer, P. A. [General Atomics, San Diego; Pinsker, R. I. [General Atomics, San Diego; Prater, R. [General Atomics; Taylor, P. L. [General Atomics, San Diego; Walker, M. L. [General Atomics, San Diego; Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Gates, D.A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Nagy, Alex [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hahn, S. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Oh, Y. K. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Yoon, S. W. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Yu, J.H. [University of California, San Diego; Murakami, Masanori [ORNL; Park, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sontag, A. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

ATLAS Muon Spectrometer | Brookhaven and the LHC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATLAS Muon Spectrometer small wheels Brookhaven National Laboratory led the development of the 32 muon detectors in the inner ring of the ATLAS detector's "small wheels." (A small...

146

Links to Muon Collider Related Web Pages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

useful nu-factory related web pages: Nu-FactoryMuon Collider Studies at Fermilab Neutrino Factory Design Study MUCOOL Collaboration: Ionization Cooling R&D Brookhaven Muon...

147

Imaging and sensing based on muon tomography  

SciTech Connect

Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons for imaging applications. Subtraction techniques are described to enhance the processing of the muon tomography data.

Morris, Christopher L; Saunders, Alexander; Sossong, Michael James; Schultz, Larry Joe; Green, J. Andrew; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Hengartner, Nicolas W; Smith, Richard A; Colthart, James M; Klugh, David C; Scoggins, Gary E; Vineyard, David C

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

148

CMS: Present status, limitations, and upgrade plans  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the CMS upgrade plans will be presented. A brief status of the CMS detector will be given, covering some of the issues we have so far experienced. This will be followed by an overview of the various CMS upgrades planned, covering the main motivations for them, and the various R&D efforts for the possibilities under study. The CMS detector has been working extremely well since the start of data-taking at the LHC as is evidenced by the numerous excellent results published by CMS and presented at this workshop and recent conferences. Less well documented are the various issues that have been encountered with the detector. In the spirit of this workshop I will cover some of these issues with particular emphasis on problems that motivate some of the upgrades to the CMS detector for this decade of data-taking. Though the CMS detector has been working extremely well and expectations are great for making the most of the LHC luminosity, there have been a number of issues encountered so far. Some of these have been described and while none currently presents a problem for physics performance, some of them are expected to become more problematic, especially at the highest Phase 1 luminosities for which the majority of the integrated luminosity will be collected. These motivate upgrades for various parts of the CMS detector so that the current excellent physics performance can be maintained or even surpassed in the realm of the highest Phase 1 luminosities.

Cheung, H.W.K.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

U.S. CMS - 2009 News Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 News Archive 9 News Archive In This Section: CMS in the News Press Releases Press Kit CMS Result of the Month Other News Sources: US LHC Interactions.org U.S. CMS Past News Archives: 2012 News Archive 2011 News Archive 2010 News Archive 2009 News Archive 2008 News Archive 2007 News Archive Current news archive December 18, 2009 Interactions News Wire LHC ends 2009 run on a high note December 18, 2009 ABC News Big Bang Collider sets new record December 16, 2009 symmetry breaking Burst of LHC collision data a welcome birthday gift December 11, 2009 Fermilab Today CMS Result of the Month: Simply smashing December 9, 2009 New York Times Collider sets record, and Europe takes U.S.'s lead December 9, 2009 Fermilab Today CMS says hello to the π0 January 2010 Vanity Fair The Genesis 2.0 Project December 7, 2009

150

Closed-cell 201.25 MHz RF structures for a muon cooling channel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on the research and development of high gradient low frequency closed-cell structures for possible use in a muon cooling channel. The presence of strong magnetic fields precludes the use of superconducting RF. These multi-cell structures have the ''beam iris'' closed by conducting oils, grids of tubes or other isolating structures. This greatly increases the shunt impedance and also allows the individually powered cells to be set independently to any phase. The isolating structure must be made using a very small amount of low-Z material to avoid unacceptable scattering of the muon beam. Various cell designs and methods of closure are presented and compared. The problems of RF heating and breakdown at high gradient are discussed with regard to the vulnerable isolating structures. RF, thermal and stress analyses are presented and the integration of the RF with the solenoid cryostat and liquid hydrogen absorbers is considered.

Rimmer, R.; Hartman, N.; Ladran, A.; Li, D.; Moretti, A.; Jurgens, T.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Research and Development of Future Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect

Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next generation high-energy lepton collider machine. A novel accelerator technology must be developed to overcome several intrinsic issues of muon acceleration. Recent research and development of critical beam elements for a muon accelerator, especially muon beam phase space ionization cooling channel, are reviewed in this paper.

Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

CMS centres worldwide: A new collaborative infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CMS Experiment at the LHC is establishing a global network of inter-connected 'CMS Centres' for controls, operations and monitoring. These support: (1) CMS data quality monitoring, detector calibrations, and analysis; and (2) computing operations for the processing, storage and distribution of CMS data. We describe the infrastructure, computing, software, and communications systems required to create an effective and affordable CMS Centre. We present our highly successful operations experiences with the major CMS Centres at CERN, Fermilab, and DESY during the LHC first beam data-taking and cosmic ray commissioning work. The status of the various centres already operating or under construction in Asia, Europe, Russia, South America, and the USA is also described. We emphasise the collaborative communications aspects. For example, virtual co-location of experts in CMS Centres Worldwide is achieved using high-quality permanently-running 'telepresence' video links. Generic Web-based tools have been developed and deployed for monitoring, control, display management and outreach.

Taylor, Lucas; /Northeastern U.; Gottschalk, Erik; /Fermilab

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Simulations of a Gas-Filled Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A helical cooling channel (HCC) has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. The HCC is composed of a series of RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas that acts as the energy absorber for ionization cooling and suppresses RF breakdown in the cavities. Magnetic solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole coils outside of the RF cavities provide the focusing and dispersion needed for the emittance exchange for the beam as it follows a helical equilibrium orbit down the HCC. In the work presented here, two Monte Carlo programs have been developed to simulate a HCC to compare with the analytic predictions and to begin the process of optimizing practical designs that could be built in the near future. We discuss the programs, the comparisons with the analytical theory, and the prospects for a HCC design with the capability to reduce the six-dimensional phase space emittance of a muon beam by a factor of over five orders of magnitude in a linear channel less than 100 meters long.

K. Yonehara; D.M. Kaplan; K. Beard; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev; R.P. Johnson; K. Paul; T.J. Roberts

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

154

Studies of a Gas-filled Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A helical cooling channel (HCC) can quickly reduce the six dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. The HCC is composed of solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields to provide the focusing and dispersion needed for emittance exchange as the beam follows an equilibrium helical orbit through a continuous homogeneous absorber. We consider liquid helium and liquid hydrogen absorbers in HCC segments that alternate with RF accelerating sections and we also consider gaseous hydrogen absorber in pressurized RF cavities imbedded in HCC segments. In the case of liquid absorber, the possibility of using superconducting RF in low magnetic field regions between the HCC segments may provide a cost effective solution to the high repetition rate needed for an intense neutrino factory or high average luminosity muon collider. In the gaseous hydrogen absorber case, the pressurized RF cavities can be operated at low temperature to improve their efficiency for higher repetition rates. Numerical simulations are used to optimize and compare the liquid and gaseous HCC techniques.

R.P. Johnson; K. Paul; T.J. Roberts; Y.S. Derbenev; K. Yonehara

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

155

Stochastic cooling in muon colliders  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10{sup 30} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to {approximately}10{sup 3} for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW.

Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Detector Commissioning and Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USCMS Detector Ops USCMS Detector Ops Detector Commissioning and Operations In This Section: LHC@ FNAL Remote Operations Center Remote Operations Center at Fermilab Global Run Contact The US CMS Operations Group works very closely with the main CMS commissioning and operations team to develop and maintain the many online detector monitoring tools that make remote operations possible for hundreds of collaborators. One of the group's major roles focuses on coordinating the operation of the Remote Operations Center (ROC) at Fermilab with CMS operations at CERN. The main CMS control room resides at Point 5. Because this is a half-hour drive from the main laboratory campus in Meyrin, the experiment built the CMS Centre, a remote operations center on CERN's main site. The US CMS group therefore makes sure that operations remain seamless between the ROC

157

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Software and Computing Subproject...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

here for further information about Tier-2 computing centers and their role in US CMS user analysis, data hosting and simulations Instructions for Remote Job Submission Information...

158

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Doing Physics - User Software &...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the required Roles in the US CMS VO, as well as a suggested GUMS template. VOMS String "uscms" "voms.fnal.gov" "15019" "DCorgDCdoegridsOUServicesCNhost...

159

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Computing: Project Execution Team (PET) The page for the U.S. CMS Project Execution Team. (Currently under development) Results of Census Broken Down by Category Management...

160

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Doing Physics - User Software &...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

File Transfer Batch Systems CRAB Quota and Usage Statistics CERN Bluearc Quota and Stats System Status U.S. CMS Grid Computing Environment Resources Setup Software Tutorials,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CAT Guide to the ANL CMS system  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS CAT Guide to Using the ANL Chemical Management System APS CAT Guide to Using the ANL Chemical Management System (August 30, 2000) The Argonne Chemical Management System (CMS) is a database used to track the ownership and location of primary (original) containers1 of hazardous chemicals. It provides for a current listing of hazardous chemicals to which individuals working at Argonne might be exposed and it provides for automated generation of reports required by the EPA and OSHA. Finally, each inventory entry is linked to the MSDS for the product. Applicability APS CATs should use the Chemical Management System (CMS) as described below: Container Description Barcode & CMS Record Creation Required? Comments Any container received with an Argonne barcode. Yes, label already present. The corresponding CMS record must be updated when the container is permanently moved to a new location, when ownership changes, or when the container is emptied and discarded.

162

U.S. CMS - 2008 News Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 News Archive 8 News Archive In This Section: CMS in the News Press Releases Press Kit CMS Result of the Month Other News Sources: US LHC Interactions.org U.S. CMS Past News Archives: 2012 News Archive 2011 News Archive 2010 News Archive 2009 News Archive 2008 News Archive 2007 News Archive Current news archive 16 December 2008 - Fermilab Today The doctor is in 8 December 2008 - Caltech Press Release High Energy Physics Team Sets New Data-Transfer World Records 5 December 2008 - The New York Times After Repairs, Summer Start-Up Planned for Collider 5 December 2008 - BBC Collider 'needs warning system' 5 December 2008 - Science News First LHC proton collisions postponed further 5 December 2008 - Interactions News Wire LHC to restart in 2009 3 December 2008 - Fermilab Today No quiet time for CMS

163

Heavy-Ion Physics with CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a brief overview of the CMS experiment capabilities to study the hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The CERN Large Hadron Collider will provide collisions of Pb nuclei at 5.5 TeV per nucleon. The CMS heavy ion group has developed a plethora of physics analyses addressing many important aspects of heavy-ion physics in preparation for a competitive and successful program.

Aneta Iordanova

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

164

The Trigger System of the CMS Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an overview of the main features of the CMS trigger and data acquisition (DAQ) system. Then, we illustrate the strategies and trigger configurations (trigger tables) developed for the detector calibration and physics program of the CMS experiment, at start-up of LHC operations, as well as their possible evolution with increasing luminosity. Finally, we discuss the expected CPU time performance of the trigger algorithms and the CPU requirements for the event filter farm at start-up.

Felcini, Marta

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Trigger System of the CMS Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an overview of the main features of the CMS trigger and data acquisition (DAQ) system. Then, we illustrate the strategies and trigger configurations (trigger tables) developed for the detector calibration and physics program of the CMS experiment, at start-up of LHC operations, as well as their possible evolution with increasing luminosity. Finally, we discuss the expected CPU time performance of the trigger algorithms and the CPU requirements for the event filter farm at start-up.

Marta Felcini; for the CMS Collaboration

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

166

Possible demonstration of ionization cooling using absorbers in a solenoidal field  

SciTech Connect

Ionization cooling may play an important role in reducing the phase space volume of muons for a future muon-muon collider. We describe a possible experiment to demonstrate transverse emittance cooling using a muon beam at the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The experiment uses device dimensions and parameters and beam conditions similar to what is expected in an actual muon-muon collider.

Fernow, R.C.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The Helium Cooling System and Cold Mass Support System for the MICE Coupling Solenoid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

magnetic field is to produce a low muon beam beta functionmagnetic field is to produce a low muon beam beta function

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Focusing solenoid for the front end of a linear RF accelerator  

SciTech Connect

A prototype of a superconducting focusing solenoid for use in an RF linac has been built and tested at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The solenoid is comprised of the main coil, two bucking coils, two dipole corrector windings, and a low carbon steel flux return. At the excitation current of 250 A, the magnetic field reaches 7.2 T in the center of the solenoid and is less than 5 G on the axis at a distance of 150 mm from the center. The length of the solenoid is 150 mm; the length of a cryovessel for the solenoid with a 20 mm diameter 'warm' bore is 270 mm. This paper presents the main design features of the focusing solenoid and discusses results from tests of the solenoid.

Terechkine, I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 1998 Baseline Review Subsystem MOUs and SOWs Subsystem MOUs for M&O Institution Budget Reports Subsystem MS Project Files and Reports Endcap Muon Hadron Calorimeter Trigger...

170

Muon Collaboration Friday Meetings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaboration Friday Meetings Collaboration Friday Meetings Muon Collaboration Friday Meetings are held at Fermilab, in the Snakepit (WH 2E), at 1:30 pm CDT/CST on most Fridays. An audio bridge is available, details are in the meeting notice. To receive the weekly meeting notice, either join the NuMu-Collaboration-l mailing list or send email to Terry Hart (look me up in the FNAL Phonebook). 13-NOV-2009 Agenda Zisman.pdf 30-OCT-2009 Agenda Bross.ppt Ankenbrandt.ppt 22-OCT-2009 Agenda Fernow_1.pdf Fernow_2.pdf Snopok.pdf Palmer.pdf 16-OCT-2009 Agenda News Alexahin.ppt Alexakhin.pdf 9-OCT-2009 Agenda Yonehara.ppt 8-OCT-2009 Agenda Kirk.pdf 1-OCT-2009 Agenda Lamm.pdf 25-SEP-2009 Agenda Fernow.pdf 24-SEP-2009 Agenda 18-SEP-2009 Derun.pptx 17-SEP-2009 popovic.ppt 10-SEP-2009 Action_items.doc Bross.ppt Agenda 4-SEP-2009 Kaplan.pdf

171

Muon - proton inelastic scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This experiment will examine muon-proton inelastic scattering for virtual-photon energies of 10 to 110 GeV and for |q{sup 2}| values of 0.2 to 20.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The virtual-photon total cross sections {sigma}{sub t} + {epsilon}{sigma}{sub s}, or the equivalent expression in W{sub 1} and W{sub 2}, will be measured over this range of virtual-photon energies and q{sup 2} values. Some separation of {sigma}{sub T} and {sigma}{sub S}, or equivalently W{sub 1} and W{sub 2}, will be made. The multiplicity, momentum spectra and angular spectra of the charged hadrons produced in this reaction will be measured. Some channels such as {mu} + P {yields} {mu} + P + P{sup 0} will be isolated and completely analyzed. The experiment uses a hydrogen target, wire spark chambers and an analyzing magnet of conventional design.

Dieterle, B.; Lakin, W.; Martin, F.; Perl, M.; Petraske, E.; Tenebaum, J.; Toner, W.; Zipf, T.; /SLAC

1970-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Design of High Field Solenoids made of High Temperature Superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis starts from the analytical mechanical analysis of a superconducting solenoid, loaded by self generated Lorentz forces. Also, a finite element model is proposed and verified with the analytical results. To study the anisotropic behavior of a coil made by layers of superconductor and insulation, a finite element meso-mechanic model is proposed and designed. The resulting material properties are then used in the main solenoid analysis. In parallel, design work is performed as well: an existing Insert Test Facility (ITF) is adapted and structurally verified to support a coil made of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS). Finally, a technological winding process was proposed and the required tooling is designed.

Bartalesi, Antonio; /Pisa U.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Magnetic Alignment of Pulsed Solenoids Using the Pulsed Wire Method  

SciTech Connect

A unique application of the pulsed-wire measurement method has been implemented for alignment of 2.5 T pulsed solenoid magnets. The magnetic axis measurement has been shown to have a resolution of better than 25 {micro}m. The accuracy of the technique allows for the identification of inherent field errors due to, for example, the winding layer transitions and the current leads. The alignment system is developed for the induction accelerator NDCX-II under construction at LBNL, an upgraded Neutralized Drift Compression experiment for research on warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion. Precise alignment is essential for NDCX-II, since the ion beam has a large energy spread associated with the rapid pulse compression such that misalignments lead to corkscrew deformation of the beam and reduced intensity at focus. The ability to align the magnetic axis of the pulsed solenoids to within 100 pm of the induction cell axis has been demonstrated.

Arbelaez, D.; Madur, A.; Lipton, T.M.; Waldron, W.L.; Kwan, J.W.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

First Generation Final Focusing Solenoid For NDCX-I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the prototype final focus solenoid (FFS-1G), or 1st generation FFS. In order to limit eddy currents, the solenoid winding consists of Litz wire wound on a non-conductive G-10 tube. For the same reason, the winding pack was inserted into an electrically insulating, but thermally conducting Polypropylene (Cool- Poly© D1202) housing and potted with highly viscous epoxy (to be able to wick the single strands of the Litz wire). The magnet is forced-air cooled through cooling channels. The magnet was designed for water cooling, but he cooling jacket cracked, and therefore cooling (beyond natural conduction and radiation) was exclusively by forced air. Though the design operating point was 8 Tesla, for the majority of running on NDCX-1 it operated up to about 5 Tesla. This was due mostly from limitations of voltage holding at the leads, where discharges at higher pulsed current damaged the leads. Generation 1 was replaced by the 2nd generation solenoid (FFS-2G) about a year later, which has operated reliably up to 8 Tesla, with a better lead design and utilizes water cooling. At this point, FFS-1G was used for plasma source R&D by LBNL and PPPL. The maximum field for those experiments was reduced to 3 Tesla due to continued difficulty with the leads and because higher field was not essential for those experiments. The pulser for the final focusing solenoid is a SCR-switched capacitor bank which produces a half-sine current waveform. The pulse width is ~800us and a charge voltage of 3kV drives ~20kA through the magnet producing ~8T field.

Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W.

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

175

Worcester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

SciTech Connect

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as Integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air in leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting.

VAN KATWIJK, C.

2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

176

Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CWF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air In-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

177

Worcester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

178

Worcester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air in leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

179

Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves  

SciTech Connect

1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fail closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

180

Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves  

SciTech Connect

1 inch Gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fall closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated.

VAN KATWIJK, C.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves  

SciTech Connect

1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fail closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

182

Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves  

SciTech Connect

1 inch Gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fail closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated.

VAN KATWIJK, C.

2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

183

Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

SciTech Connect

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air in-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting.

VAN KATWIJK, C.

2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Physics of the CMS Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will start running 2008 producing proton-proton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. Four large experiments will operate together with this accelerator: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. The main scientific goal of this project is to understand in detail the mechanism for electro-weak symmetry breaking and to search for physics beyond the standard model of particles. ATLAS and CMS are general purpose detectors designed for search and discovery of new physics, and optimized to search for Higgs and signals of supersymmetric matter (SUSY). In this paper the main features of the CMS detector will be presented and its potential for Higgs and SUSY discoveries will be discussed.

Sanabria, J. C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de los Andes, A.A. 4976, Bogota (Colombia)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

185

Law of Conservation of Muons  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A multiplicative selection rule for mu meson-electron transitions is proposed. A "muon parity" = -1 is considered for the muon and its neutrino, while the "muon parity" for all other particles is +1. The selection rule then states that (-1) exp(no. of initial (-1) parity particles) = (-1) exp(no. of final (-1) parity particles). Several reactions that are forbidden by an additive law but allowed by the multiplicative law are suggested; these reactions include mu{sup +} .> e{sup +} + nu{sub mu} + {ovr nu}{sub e}, e{sup -} + e{sup -} .> mu{sup -} + mu{sup -}, and muonium .> antimuonium (mu{sup +} + e{sup -} .> mu{sup -} + e{sup +}). An intermediate-boson hypothesis is suggested. (T.F.H.)

Feinberg, G.; Weinberg, S.

1961-02-00T23:59:59.000Z

186

Novel linac structures for low-beta ions and for muons  

SciTech Connect

Development of two innovative linacs is discussed. (1) High-efficiency normal-conducting accelerating structures for ions with beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Two existing accelerator technologies - the H-mode resonator cavities and transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ) - are merged to create efficient structures for light-ion beams of considerable currents. The inter-digital H-mode accelerator with PMQ focusing (IH-PMQ) has the shunt impedance 10-20 times higher than the standard drift-tube linac. Results of the combined 3-D modeling for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank - electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations, and thermal-stress analysis - are presented. H-PMQ structures following a short RFQ accelerator can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications like a compact mobile deuteron-beam accelerator up to a few MeV. (2) A large-acceptance high-gradient linac for accelerating low-energy muons in a strong solenoidal magnetic field. When a proton beam hits a target, many low-energy pions are produced almost isotropically, in addition to a small number of high-energy pions in the forward direction. We propose to collect and accelerate copious muons created as the low-energy pions decay. The acceleration should bring muons to a kinetic energy of {approx}200 MeV in about 10 m, where both an ionization cooling of the muon beam and its further acceleration in a superconducting linac become feasible. One potential solution is a normal-conducting linac consisting of independently fed O-mode RF cavities with wide apertures closed by thin metal windows or grids. The guiding magnetic field is provided by external superconducting solenoids. The cavity choice, overall linac design considerations, and simulation results of muon acceleration are presented. Potential applications range from basic research to homeland defense to industry and medicine.

Kurennoy, Sergey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Experience with the CMS Event Data Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The re-engineered CMS EDM was presented at CHEP in 2006. Since that time we have gained a lot of operational experience with the chosen model. We will present some of our findings, and attempt to evaluate how well it is meeting its goals. We will discuss some of the new features that have been added since 2006 as well as some of the problems that have been addressed. Also discussed is the level of adoption throughout CMS, which spans the trigger farm up to the final physics analysis. Future plans, in particular dealing with schema evolution and scaling, will be discussed briefly.

Elmer, P.; /Princeton U.; Hegner, B.; /CERN; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; /Fermilab

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Six-dimensional muon beam cooling in a continuous, homogeneous, gaseous hydrogen absorber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fast reduction of the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams is required for muon colliders and is also of great importance for neutrino factories based on accelerated muon beams. Ionization cooling, where all momentum components are degraded by an energy absorbing material and only the longitudinal momentum is restored by RF cavities, provides a means to quickly reduce transverse beam sizes. However, the beam momentum spread cannot be reduced by this method unless the longitudinal emittance can be transformed or exchanged into the transverse emittance. The best emittance exchange plans up to now have been accomplished by using magnets to disperse the beam along the face of a wedge-shaped absorber such that higher momentum particles pass through thicker parts of the absorber and thus suffer larger ionization energy loss. In the scheme advocated in this paper, it is noted that one can generate a magnetic channel filled with absorber where higher momentum corresponds to a longer path length and therefore larger ionization energy loss. Thus a homogeneous absorber, without any special edge shaping, can provide the desired emittance exchange. An attractive example of a cooling channel based on this principle involves the use of RF cavities filled with a continuous gaseous hydrogen absorber in a magnetic channel composed of a solenoidal field with superimposed helical transverse dipole, quadrupole, and octupole fields. The theory of this helical channel is described to support the analytical prediction of a million-fold reduction in phase space volume in a channel 150 m long.

Yaroslav Derbenev; Rolland P. Johnson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

CMS PAPER CFT-09-005 Measurement of the Muon Stopping Power in Lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be resolved regarding the mechanism of cosmic rays - cloud cover variations due to solar (magnetic) activity-index, a measure of the Earth's magnetic field, or derivatives to be potentially important for variations in global

Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

190

Prompt muon contribution to the flux underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present high energy spectra and zenith-angle distributions of the atmospheric muons computed for the depths of the locations of the underwater neutrino telescopes. We compare the calculations with the data obtained in the Baikal and the AMANDA muon experiments. The prompt muon contribution to the muon flux underwater due to recent perturbative QCD-based models of the charm production is expected to be observable at depths of the large underwater neutrino telescopes. This appears to be probable even at rather shallow depths (1-2 km), provided that the energy threshold for muon detection is raised above $\\sim 100$ TeV.

T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky

2000-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

191

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management - Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-01 5-01 Fermilab Software and Computing Oversight Panel (SCOP) Review of the U.S. CMS Software and Computing Project January 13-14, 2005 Charge to the SCOP Agenda | Logistics | Attendees | Documentation Agenda: Copies of the slides presented will be available for the meeting. Thursday, January 13, 2005 Start of Meeting 9:00 am Chicago Time (other time zones) Time Title Speaker Duration 8:30 AM Video Setup 9:00 AM Executive Session (closed) Panel 30' 9:30 AM Introduction LAT Bauerdick 5' 9:35 AM CMS Status and U.S. CMS Research Program [slides] Dan Green 20' + 10' 10:05 AM Needs of and interactions with the LPC [slides] Avi Yagil 20' + 5' 10:30 AM Coffee 20' 10:50 AM Project Overview [slides] LAT Bauerdick 50' + 10' 11:50 AM CMS Computing and Core Software Status [slides] Bob Clare 15' + 5'

192

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Room: Beauty Parlor WH12NW and Neptune VR 9:30 am Project Organization Planning and Budget (pdf) LATBauerdick Breakout Session CMS Core Software Room: West Wing WH10NW and Sun...

193

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization Research Program: Organization Chart Click on image for larger view U.S. CMS is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy and the National...

194

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7-09 U.S. CMS is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation National Science Foundation. Webmaster | Last modified:...

195

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Software and Computing Subproject...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

File Transfer Batch Systems CRAB Quota and Usage Statistics CERN Bluearc Quota and Stats System Status U.S. CMS Grid Access to Mass Storage EOS EOS is a disk based mass...

196

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Data and Computing - Facility Operations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

File Transfer Batch Systems CRAB Quota and Usage Statistics CERN Bluearc Quota and Stats System Status U.S. CMS Grid CERN Bluearc Quota and Usage Statistics The Tier 1...

197

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Data and Computing - Facility Operations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

File Transfer Batch Systems CRAB Quota and Usage Statistics CERN Bluearc Quota and Stats System Status U.S. CMS Grid Facility Operations: Batch System Batch Systems: The batch...

198

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Data and Computing - Facility Operations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

File Transfer Batch Systems CRAB Quota and Usage Statistics CERN Bluearc Quota and Stats System Status U.S. CMS Grid Quota Policy and Usage Statistics Tier 1 Facility provides...

199

Results from ATLAS, Results from CMS  

SciTech Connect

This year CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) commenced data taking with pp collisions at 7 TeV in the center of mass. The accelerator and detectors have performed well. In these two talks, we present the status and highlights of the first several months' running, focusing on the big central detectors ATLAS (talk by Torrence) and CMS (talk by Green).

Torrence, Eric (University of Oregon); Green, Dan (Fermilab(

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

200

Commissioning of the CMS High Level Trigger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CMS experiment will collect data from the proton-proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a centre-of-mass energy up to 14 TeV. The CMS trigger system is designed to cope with unprecedented luminosities and LHC bunch-crossing rates up to 40 MHz. The unique CMS trigger architecture only employs two trigger levels. The Level-1 trigger is implemented using custom electronics, while the High Level Trigger (HLT) is based on software algorithms running on a large cluster of commercial processors, the Event Filter Farm. We present the major functionalities of the CMS High Level Trigger system as of the starting of LHC beams operations in September 2008. The validation of the HLT system in the online environment with Monte Carlo simulated data and its commissioning during cosmic rays data taking campaigns are discussed in detail. We conclude with the description of the HLT operations with the first circulating LHC beams before the incident occurred the 19th September 2008.

Agostino, L.; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Bauer, G.; /MIT, LNS; Beccati, B.; /CERN; Behrens, U.; /DESY; Berryhil, J.; Biery, K.; /Fermilab; Bose, T.; /Boston U.; Brett, A.; /Fermilab; Branson, J.; /UC, San Diego; Cano, E.; /CERN; Cheung, H.; /Fermilab /CERN /LLNL, Livermore /Minnesota U.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON-STORAGE-RINGS TO MUON COLLIDERS: PHYSICS AND FACILITIES.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams ({nu} factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both {+-} {mu}. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider.

PARSA,Z.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

202

Muon capture on Chlorine-35  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report measurements of $\\gamma$--ray spectra from muon capture on $^{35}$Cl. For the allowed Gamow--Teller transitions to the $^{35}$S$(2939, 3/2^+)$ state and the $^{35}$S$(3421, 5/2^+)$ state we obtained their capture rates, hyperfine dependences and $\\gamma$--$\

S. Arole; D. S. Armstrong; T. P. Gorringe; M. D. Hasinoff; M. A. Kovash; V. Kuzmin; B. A. Moftah; R. Sedlar; T. J. Stocki; T. Tetereva

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Test Results for HINS Focusing Solenoids at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

A focusing lens R&D program is close to completion and industrial production of magnets has begun. Two types of magnets are being built for use in the room temperature RF section at the front end of a superconducting H-minus linac of a High Intensity Neutrino Source. All of the magnets are designed as a solenoid with bucking coils to cancel the field in the vicinity of adjacent RF cavities, and one type incorporates steering dipole corrector coils. We present a summary of the predicted and measured quench and magnetic properties for both R&D and production device samples that have been tested at Fermilab.

Tartaglia, M.A.; Orris, D.F.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Optimization of muon timing and searches for heavy long-lived charged particles with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS detectorto be found that is predicted by the SM is the Higgs Boson.The discovery of the Higgs Boson is one of the reasons the

Farrell, Christopher Patrick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Optimization of muon timing and searches for heavy long-lived charged particles with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large Hadron Collider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .detector at the Large Hadron Collider A dissertationdetector at the Large Hadron Collider by Christopher Patrick

Farrell, Christopher Patrick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Optimization of muon timing and searches for heavy long-lived charged particles with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loss in efficiency to trigger events containing an HSCP duethe probability to pre-trigger the event can be written as Pthe rate of events collected by the trigger. The momentum

Farrell, Christopher Patrick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Qualification of the Joints for the ITER Central Solenoid  

SciTech Connect

The ITER Central Solenoid has 36 interpancake joints, 12 bus joints, and 12 feeder joints in the magnet. The joints are required to have resistance below 4 nOhm at 45 kA at 4.5 K. The US ITER Project Office developed two different types of interpancake joints with some variations in details in order to find a better design, qualify the joints, and establish a fabrication process. We built and tested four samples of the sintered joints and two samples with butt-bonded joints (a total of eight joints). Both designs met the specifications. Results of the joint development, test results, and selection of the baseline design are presented and discussed in the paper. The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) consists of six modules. Each module is composed of six wound hexapancakes and one quadrapancake. The multipancakes are connected electrically and hydraulically by in-line interpancake joints. The joints are located at the outside diameter (OD) of the module. Cable in conduit conductor (CICC) high-current joints are critical elements in the CICC magnets. In addition to low resistivity, the CS joints must fit a space envelope equivalent to the regular conductor cross section and must have low hydraulic impedance and enough structural strength to withstand the hoop and compressive forces during operation, including cycling. This paper is the continuation of the work reported on the intermodule joints.

Martovetsky, N; Berryhill, A; Kenney, S

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Cosmic Solenoids: Minimal Cross-Section and Generalized Flux Quantization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A self-consistent general relativistic configuration describing a finite cross-section magnetic flux tube is constructed. The cosmic solenoid is modeled by an elastic superconductive surface which separates the Melvin core from the surrounding flat conic structure. We show that a given amount $\\Phi$ of magnetic flux cannot be confined within a cosmic solenoid of circumferential radius smaller than $\\frac{\\sqrt{3G}}{2\\pi c^2}\\Phi$ without creating a conic singularity. Gauss-Codazzi matching conditions are derived by means of a self-consistent action. The source term, representing the surface currents, is sandwiched between internal and external gravitational surface terms. Surface superconductivity is realized by means of a Higgs scalar minimally coupled to projective electromagnetism. Trading the 'magnetic' London phase for a dual 'electric' surface vector potential, the generalized quantization condition reads: $e/{hc} \\Phi + 1/e Q=n$ with $Q$ denoting some dual 'electric' charge, thereby allowing for a non-trivial Aharonov-Bohm effect. Our conclusions persist for dilaton gravity provided the dilaton coupling is sub-critical.

Aharon Davidson; David Karasik

1999-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

209

26 July 2000 TESLA Report 2000-13 Compensation of Solenoid Effects at the TESLA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

26 July 2000 TESLA Report 2000-13 Compensation of Solenoid Effects at the TESLA Interaction Point at the TESLA interaction point is 5 nm. The long solenoid encompassing the detector introduces coupling effects along the beam line. This is a concern for a linear collider such as TESLA, where the vertical beam size

210

Method and apparatus for monitoring armature position in direct-current solenoids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for determining the position of an armature of a dc-powered solenoid. Electrical circuitry is provided to introduce a small alternating current flow through the coil. As a result, the impedance and resistance of the solenoid coil can be measured to provide information indicative of the armature's position.

Moyers, John C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

211

Multi-purpose 805 MHz Pillbox RF Cavity for Muon Acceleration Studies  

SciTech Connect

An 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity has been designed and constructed to investigate potential muon beam acceleration and cooling techniques. The cavity can operate at vacuum or under pressure to 100 atmospheres, at room temperature or in a liquid nitrogen bath at 77 K. The cavity is designed for easy assembly and disassembly with bolted construction using aluminum seals. The surfaces of the end walls of the cavity can be replaced with different materials such as copper, aluminum, beryllium, or molybdenum, and with different geometries such as shaped windows or grid structures. Different surface treatments such as electro polished, high-pressure water cleaned, and atomic layer deposition are being considered for testing. The cavity has been designed to fit inside the 5-Tesla solenoid in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. Current status of the cavity prepared for initial conditioning and operation in the external magnetic field is discussed.

Kurennoy, Sergey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chan, Kwok-Chi Dominic [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jason, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turchi, Peter J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Single top quark measurements with CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of single top quark production are presented, performed using CMS data collected in 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The cross sections for the electroweak production of single top quarks in the t-channel and in association with W-bosons is measured and the results are used to place constraints on the CKM matrix element |V_tb|.

Jeannine Wagner-Kuhr

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

213

The US Muon Accelerator Program (MAP)  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy Office of High Energy Physics has recently approved a Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). The primary goal of this effort is to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for a Muon Collider after a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a brief physics motivation for, and the description of, a Muon Collider facility and then gives an overview of the program. I will then describe in some detail the primary components of the effort.

Bross, Alan D.; /Fermilab

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Trigger Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of the three-level ATLAS muon trigger as evaluated by using LHC data is presented. Events have been selected by using only the hardware-based Level-1 trigger in order to commission and to subsequently enable the (software-based) selections of the High Level Trigger. Studies aiming at selecting prompt muons from J/{\\psi} and at reducing non prompt muon contamination have been performed. A brief overview on how the muon triggers evolve with increasing luminosity is given.

Musto, Elisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Trigger Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of the three-level ATLAS muon trigger as evaluated by using LHC data is presented. Events have been selected by using only the hardware-based Level-1 trigger in order to commission and to subsequently enable the (software-based) selections of the High Level Trigger. Studies aiming at selecting prompt muons from J/{\\psi} and at reducing non prompt muon contamination have been performed. A brief overview on how the muon triggers evolve with increasing luminosity is given.

Elisa Musto

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Data and Computing - Data Operations - Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Space at US CMS Tier-2 Centers and the FNAL LPC User Space at US CMS Tier-2 Centers and the FNAL LPC Overview When running jobs on large amounts of data, many users will need to write output files of substantial size -- larger than can be accommodated by the grid output sandbox. Additionally, it can be very useful to write this output in a way that it can be read back in easily by subsequent grid jobs. CMS has a mechanism for this. Computing sites will support a /store/user area in their storage systems to host user-generated data. CRAB can be instructed to write job outputs to this area through the SRM interface. Through the magic of the grid, no matter where your job actually runs, and no matter where the output is created, the output can be automatically transferred to whatever system is hosting your own /store/user area. Then,

217

Qualification of the Joints for ITER Central Solenoid  

SciTech Connect

The ITER Central Solenoid has 36 interpancake joints, 12 bus joints, and 12 feeder joints in the magnet. The joints are required to have resistance below 4 nOhm at 45 kA at 4.5 K. The US ITER Project Office developed two different types of interpancake joints with some variations in details in order to find a better design, qualify the joints, and establish a fabrication process. We built and tested four samples of the sintered joints and two samples with butt-bonded joints (a total of eight joints). Both designs met the specifications. Results of the joint development, test results, and selection of the baseline design are presented and discussed in the paper.

Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL; Berryhill, Adam B [Cryomagnetics, Inc.; Kenney, Steven J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Model NbTi Helical Solenoid Fabrication and Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A program to develop model magnets for a helical cooling channel is under way at Fermilab. In the first steps of a planned sequence of magnets, two four-coil helical solenoid models with 300 mm aperture have been fabricated and tested. These two models, HSM01 and HSM02, used insulated NbTi Rutherford cable wound onto stainless steel rings with spliceless transitions between coils. Strip heaters were included for quench protection of each coil, and the coils were epoxy-impregnated after winding inside the support structures. Based on the results of the first model the second model was made using a cable with optimized cross-section, improved winding and epoxy-impregnation procedures, enhanced ground insulation, and included heat exchange tubing for a test of conduction cooling. We report on the results and lessons learned from fabrication and tests of these two models.

Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Chlachidze, G.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Makarov, A.; Novitski, I.; Orris, D.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

CMS Energy Resource Management Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Resource Management Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name CMS Energy Resource Management Corp Place Michigan Utility Id 3991 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location...

220

Design Construction and Test Results of a HTS Solenoid For Energy Recovery Linac  

SciTech Connect

An innovative feature of the proposed Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The use of HTS allows solenoid to be placed in close proximity to the cavity and thus provides early focusing of the electron beam. In addition, cryogenic testing at {approx}77 K is simpler and cheaper than 4 K testing. This paper will present the design, construction and test results of this HTS solenoid. The HTS solenoid in the proposed ERL will be situated in the transition region between the superconducting cavity at {approx}4 K and the cryostat at the room temperature. Solenoid inside the cryogenic structure provides an early focusing and hence low emittance beam. The temperature in the transition region will be too high for a conventional low temperature superconductor and resistive heat load from copper coils will be too high on cryogenic system. HTS coils also allow much higher current density and significant reduction in size as compared to copper coils. Hence HTS solenoid provide a unique and technically superior solution. The use of a HTS solenoid with superconducting cavity offers a unique option as it can be placed in a cold to warm transition region to provide early focussing without using additional space. Construction and test results so far are very encouraging for its use in the ERL project.

Anerella, M; Ben-Zvi, I; Kayran, D; McIntyre, G; Muratore, J; Plate, S; Sampson, W; Cole, M

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes are microporous carbon membranes formed by pyrolysis of polymers. CMS membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes are microporous carbon membranes formed by pyrolysis mixtures such as carbon dioxide / methane and ethane / ethylene separations. While there are many reports including carbon dioxide, methane, ethane and ethylene and also with selected two-component mixtures

McQuade, D. Tyler

222

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0-11 November 14-17, 2000 at BNL The written report can be found here U.S. CMS is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science...

223

Cold fusion catalyzed by muons and electrons  

SciTech Connect

Two alternative methods have been suggested to produce fusion power at low temperature. The first, muon catalyzed fusion or MCF, uses muons to spontaneously catalyze fusion through the muon mesomolecule formation. Unfortunately, this method fails to generate enough fusion energy to supply the muons, by a factor of about ten. The physics of MCF is discussed, and a possible approach to increasing the number of MCF fusions generated by each muon is mentioned. The second method, which has become known as Cold Fusion,'' involves catalysis by electrons in electrolytic cells. The physics of this process, if it exists, is more mysterious than MCF. However, it now appears to be an artifact, the claims for its reality resting largely on experimental errors occurring in rather delicate experiments. However, a very low level of such fusion claimed by Jones may be real. Experiments in cold fusion will also be discussed.

Kulsrud, R.M.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A ROTATING METAL BAND TARGET FOR PION PRODUCTION AT MUON COLLIDERS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual design is presented for a high power pion production target for muon colliders that is based on a rotating metal band. Three candidate materials are considered for the target band: inconel alloy 718, titanium alloy 6Al-4V grade 5 and nickel. A pulsed proton beam tangentially intercepts a chord of the target band that is inside a 20 Tesla tapered solenoidal magnetic pion capture channel similar to designs previously considered for muon colliders and neutrino factories. The target band has a radius of 2.5 meters and is continuously rotated at approximately 1 m/s to carry heat away from the production region and through a water cooling tank. The mechanical layout and cooling setup of the target are described, including the procedure for the routine replacement of the target band. A rectangular band cross section is assumed, optionally with I-beam struts to enhance stiffness and minimize mechanical vibrations. Results are presented from realistic MARS Monte Carlo computer simulations of the pion yield and energy deposition in the target and from ANSYS finite element calculations for the corresponding shock heating stresses. The target scenario is found to perform satisfactorily and with conservative safety margins for multi-MW pulsed proton beams.

KING,B.J.; SIMOS,N.; WEGGEL,R.V.; MOKHOV,N.V.

2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

225

Design Construction and Test Results of a HTS Solenoid for Energy Recovery Linac  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DESIGN CONSTRUCTION AND TEST RESULTS OF A HTS SOLENOID DESIGN CONSTRUCTION AND TEST RESULTS OF A HTS SOLENOID FOR ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC* R. Gupta # , M. Anerella, I. Ben-Zvi, G. Ganetis, D. Kayran, G. McIntyre, J. Muratore, S. Plate and W. Sampson, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 USA and M. Cole and D. Holmes, Advanced Energy Systems, Inc., Medord, NY, 11763 USA Abstract An innovative feature of the proposed Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The use of HTS allows solenoid to be placed in close proximity to the cavity and thus provides early focusing of the electron beam. In addition, cryogenic testing at ~77 K is simpler and cheaper than 4 K testing. This paper will present the

226

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management - Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

05 05 Fermilab Software and Computing Oversight Panel Review of the U.S. CMS Software and Computing Project October 25-27, 2001 Purpose: Review of the status the U.S. CMS Software and Computing Project Report to Fermilab Project Oversight and Project Management See Charge to the SCOP Agenda Logistics Attendees Documentation Summary Tentative Agenda: (email suggestions to bauerdick@fnal.gov) Copies of the slides presented will be available for the meeting. Thursday October 25, 2001 Start of Meeting 3pm Chicago Time (other time zones) , 2:45pm Video Setup Time Topic Speaker or Discussion Coordinator 3:00 pm Executive Session: Initial discussion, reading session (see Documentation) Chair 60' 4:00 pm Welcome, Charge to Committee Mike Shaevitz 15' 4:15 pm Project Overview and

227

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management - Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2-10 2-10 Fermilab Software and Computing Oversight Panel Review of the U.S. CMS Software and Computing Project October 24-25, 2002 Purpose: Review of the status the U.S. CMS Software and Computing Project Report to Fermilab Project Oversight and Project Management. See Charge to the SCOP Agenda Logistics Attendees Documentation Report Agenda: (email suggestions to Bakul Banerjee) The meeting will be held Conference Room: Black Hole, WH2W on both days. Copies of the slides presented will be available for the meeting. Thursday October 24, 2002 Start of Meeting 8:30am Chicago Time (other time zones) , 8:00am Video Setup Time Title Speaker Duration 8:00 AM Setup of Video 8:30 AM Executive Session (closed) Panel 15' 8:45 AM Welcome / Charge H.Montgomery 15'

228

A 125GeV Higgs Boson and Muon g-2 in More Generic Gauge Mediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations reported exciting hints of a Standard Model-like Higgs boson with a mass around 125GeV. A Higgs boson this heavy is difficult to realize in conventional models of gauge mediation. Here we revisit the lightest Higgs boson mass in "more generic gauge mediation," where the Higgs doublets mix with the messenger doublets. We show that a Higgs boson mass around 125GeV can be realized in more generic gauge mediation models, even for a relatively light gluino mass ~1TeV. We also show that the muon anomalous magnetic moment can be within 1sigma of the experimental value for these models, even when the Higgs boson is relatively heavy. We also discuss the LHC constraints and the prospects of discovery.

Evans, Jason L; Shirai, Satoshi; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management - Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4-01 4-01 Fermilab Software and Computing Oversight Panel (SCOP) Review of the U.S. CMS Software and Computing Project January 6, 2004 Charge to the SCOP Agenda Logistics Attendees Documentation Agenda: Copies of the slides presented will be available for the meeting. Tuesday, January 6, 2004 Start of Meeting 8:30am Chicago Time (other time zones) Time Title Speaker Duration 8:00 AM Video Setup 8:30 AM Executive Session (closed) Panel 30' 9:00 AM CMS status and US CMS Research Program [slides] Dan Green 15'+5' 9:20 AM Project overview [slides] Lothar Bauerdick 40'+10' 10:10 AM Coffee 20' 10:30 AM CAS report and CCS [slides] Bob Clare 40'+10 11:20 AM UF report [slides] Ian Fisk 40'+10' 12:10 PM Grid2003 report [slides] Ruth Pordes 20'+5' 12:35 PM Lunch 2:00 PM Executive Session (closed) Panel

230

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

E. -I. Esch; T. J. Bowles; A. Hime; A. Pichlmaier; R. Reifarth; H. Wollnik

2004-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

231

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to ?vert = (3.10 +0.05 ?0.07) 10?7 s ?1 cm ?2 sr ?1.

E. -i. Esch A; T. J. Bowles A; A. Hime A; A. Pichlmaier A; R. Reifarth A; H. Wollnik B

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

Esch, E I; Hime, A; Pichlmaier, A; Reifarth, R; Wollnik, H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Preparations for Muon Experiments at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

The use of existing Fermilab facilities to provide beams for two muon experiments--the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) and the New g-2 Experiment--is under consideration. Plans are being pursued to perform these experiments following the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration.

Syphers, M.J.; Popovic, M.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Improving scintillation crystals using muon tomography  

SciTech Connect

The cosmic ray muon scanning array provides information on NaI(T1) crystals using some 65,536 trajectories, each measuring the NaI(T1) response to high energy muons. With this information, it is possible to use established computer-aided-tomography techniques to deconvolute these integrated responses and produce a detailed picture of the detector's interior.

Dowell, D.H.; Fineman, B.J.; Sandorfi, A.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Search for the Light Charged Higgs in CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this report the CMS potential for the light charged Higgs boson discovery in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model is presented. First the latest results of the Tevatron and LEP experiments on the light charged Higgs search are reminded. In the rest of the report the perspectives of CMS for the light charged Higgs search are presented with description of some details of the analysis. The results are based on the full simulation and reconstruction of the CMS detector including the systematic uncertainties on the background determination. Finally the $\\rm 5\\sigma$ discovery contour for an integrated luminosity of $\\rm 30fb^{-1}$ is shown.

M. Hashemi

2006-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

236

Development of the bus joint for the ITER Central Solenoid  

SciTech Connect

The terminations of the Central Solenoid (CS) modules are connected to the bus extensions by joints located outside the CS in the gap between the CS and Torodial Field (TF) assemblies. These joints have very strict space limitations. Low resistance is a common requirement for all ITER joints. In addition, the CS bus joints will experience and must be designed to withstand significant variation in the magnetic field of several tenths of a Tesla per second during initiation of plasma. The joint resistance is specified to be less than 4 nOhm. The joints also have to be soldered in the field and designed with the possibility to be installed and dismantled in order to allow cold testing in the cold test facility. We have developed coaxial joints that meet these requirements and have demonstrated the feasibility to fabricate and assemble them in the vertical configuration. We introduced a coupling cylinder with superconducting strands soldered to the surface of the cable that can be installed in the ITER assembly hall and at the Cold Test Facility. This cylinder serves as a transition area between the CS module and the bus extension. We made two racetrack samples and tested four bus joints in our Joint Test Apparatus. Resistance of the bus joints was measured by a decay method and by a microvoltmeter; the value of the current was measured by the Hall probes. This measurement method was verified in the previous tests. The resistance of the joints varied insignificantly from 1.5 to 2 nOhm. One of the challenges associated with a soldered joint is the inability to use corrosive chemicals that are difficult to clean. This paper describes our development work on cable preparation, chrome removal, compaction, soldering, and final assembly and presents the test results.

Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL] [ORNL; Irick, David Kim [ORNL] [ORNL; Kenney, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering work for the solenoidal detector collaboration  

SciTech Connect

The silicon tracking system (STS) for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) represented an order of magnitude increase in size over any silicon system that had been previously built or even planned. In order to meet its performance requirements, it could not simply be a linear scaling of earlier systems, but instead required completely new concepts. The small size of the early systems made it possible to simply move the support hardware and services largely outside the active volume of the system. For a system five meters long, that simply is not an option. The design of the STS for the SDC experiment was the result of numerous compromises between the capabilities required to do the physics and the limitations imposed by cost, material properties, and silicon strip detector characteristics. From the point of view of the physics, the silicon system should start as close to the interaction point as possible. In addition, the detectors should measure the position of particles passing through them with no errors, and should not deflect or interact with the particles in any way. However, cost, radiation damage, and other factors limiting detector performance dictated, other, more realistic values. Radiation damage limited the inner radius of the silicon detectors to about 9 cm, whereas cost limited the outer radius of the detectors to about 50 cm. Cost also limits the half length of the system to about 250 cm. To control the effects of radiation damage on the detectors required operating the system at a temperature of 0{degrees}C or below, and maintaining that temperature throughout life of the system. To summarize, the physics and properties of the silicon strip detectors requires that the detectors be operated at or below 0{degrees}C, be positioned very accurately during assembly and remain positionally stable throughout their operation, and that all materials used be radiation hard and have a large thickness for one radiation length.

Miller, W.O.; Barney, M.; Byrd, D.; Christensen, R.W.; Dransfield, G.; Elder, M.; Gamble, M.; Crastataro, C.; Hanlon, J.; Jones, D.C. [and others

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Proceedings of the International Workshop on Low Energy Muon Science: LEMS`93  

SciTech Connect

This report contains papers on research with low energy muons. Topics cover fundamental electroweak physics; muonic atoms and molecules, and muon catalyzed fusion; muon spin research; and muon facilities. These papers have been indexed and cataloged separately.

Leon, M. [comp.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress has been made in recent years in R&D towards a neutrino factory and muon collider. The U.S. Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) has been formed recently to expedite the R&D efforts. This paper will review the U.S. MAP R&D programs for a neutrino factory and muon collider. Muon ionization cooling research is the key element of the program. The first muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment, MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment), is under construction now at RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) in the UK. The current status of MICE will be described.

Zisman, Michael S

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

Passive Imaging of Warhead-Like Configurations Using Cosmic-Ray Muons  

SciTech Connect

Cosmic-Muon-Based Interrogation has untapped potential for national security. This presentation describes muons-based passive interrogation techniques.

Schwellenbach, D.

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EA-223-A CMS Marketing, Services and Trading Company | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trading Company More Documents & Publications EA-220-B NRG Power Marketing, Inc EA-223 CMS Marketing, Services and Trading Company EA-166-A Duke Energy Trading and Marketing, L.L.C...

242

Studies of the CMS tracker at high trigger rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the latter months of 2006 and the first half of 2007, the CMS Tracker was assembled and operated at the Tracker Integration Facility at CERN. During this period the performance of the tracker at trigger rates up to ...

Chan, M.

243

CMS experiment at the LHC: Commissioning and early physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CMS collaboration used the past year to greatly improve the level of detector readiness for the first collisions data. The acquired operational experience over this year, large gains in understanding the detector and improved preparedness for early physics will be instrumental in minimizing the time from the first collisions to first LHC physics. The following describes the status of the CMS experiment and outlines early physics plans with the first LHC data.

A. Safonov

2010-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

244

Muon ring cooler for the MUCOOL experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A possibility to use a ring cooler for the MUCOOL experiment is considered. The cooler is a ring accelerator of about 37 m in circumference consisting of 8 dipole magnets, 4 short solenoids with a field flip of {+-} 2:5 T, and 4 long solenoids with adiabatic field 2-5 T. The 201.25 MHz linacs provide accelerating gradient 15 MV/min in the long straight sections. Four 1.3 m long liquid hydrogen absorbers are put between the linacs for transverse cooling, and LiH wedge absorbers in the short SS are used for the emittance exchange. To simplify the injection problem, {pi}-{mu}-production on an internal target is considered as an option for the MUCOOL experiment.

Valeri Balbekov et al.

2001-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

Muon spin depolarization in nonmagnetic metals doped with paramagnetic impurities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diffusion of muons and their magnetic interactions are treated by describing the physics to be learned from experiments which measure muon depolarization in metallic hosts doped with dilute concentrations of magnetic impurities. (GHT)

Heffner, R.H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Use of dielectric material in muon accelerator RF cavities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The building of a muon collider is motivated by the desire to collide point-like particles while reducing the limitations imposed by synchrotron radiation. The many challenges unique to muon accelerators are derived from ...

French, Katheryn Decker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Optimization of a Mu2e production solenoid heat and radiation shield using MARS15  

SciTech Connect

A Monte-Carlo study of several Mu2e Production Solenoid (PS) absorber (heat shield) versions using the MARS15 code has been performed. Optimizations for material as well as cost (amount of tungsten) have been carried out. Studied are such quantities as the number of displacements per atom (DPA) in the helium-cooled solenoid superconducting coils, power density and dynamic heat load in various parts of the PS and its surrounding structures. Prompt dose, residual dose, secondary particle flux are also simulated in the PS structures and the experimental hall. A preliminary choice of the PS absorber design is made on the ground of these studies.

Pronskikh, V.S.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Progress in Absorber R&D for Muon Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stored-muon-beam neutrino factory may require transverse ionization cooling of the muon beam. We describe recent progress in research and development on energy absorbers for muon-beam cooling carried out by a collaboration of university and laboratory groups.

D. M. Kaplan; E. L. Black; M. Boghosian; K. W. Cassel; R. P. Johnson; S. Geer; C. J. Johnstone; M. Popovic; S. Ishimoto; K. Yoshimura; L. Bandura; M. A. Cummings; A. Dyshkant; D. Hedin; D. Kubik; C. Darve; Y. Kuno; D. Errede; M. Haney; S. Majewski; M. Reep; D. Summers

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

A Moment Equation Approach to a Muon Collider Cooling Lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Muon Collider Cooling Lattice C.M. Celata, A.M. Sessler,a Muon Collider Cooling Lattice C.M. Celata and A.M. SesslerMUON COLLIDER COOLING LATTICE eM. Celata and A. M. Sessler,

Celata, C.M.; Sessler, A.M.; Lee, P.B.; Shadwick, B.A.; Wurtele, S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Higgs boson and Z physics at the first muon collider  

SciTech Connect

The potential for the Higgs boson and Z-pole physics at the first muon collider is summarized, based on the discussions at the ``Workshop on the Physics at the First Muon Collider and at the Front End of a Muon Collider``.

Demarteau, M.; Han, T.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Fermilab | Muon Collider | Reports and Papers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports and Papers Reports and Papers Comprehensive Reports J. Gallardo, R. Palmer, A. Tollestrup, A. Sessler, A. Skrinsky et al., "μ+ μ- Collider: A Feasibility Study," DPF/DPB Summer Study on New Directions for High Energy Physics, Snow- mass, Colorado, 25 Jun - 12 Jul 1996, BNL - 52503, Fermilab - Conf - 96 - 092, LBNL - 38946, http://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/pubs/snowmass96.html C. Ankenbrandt et al.,"Status of muon collider research and development and future plans," Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2 (1999) 081001, http://prst-ab.aps.org/abstract/PRSTAB/v2/i8/e081001 M. M. Alsharo'a et al., "Recent progress in neutrino factory and muon collider research within the Muon Collaboration," Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 6 (2003) 081001, http://prst-ab.aps.org/abstract/PRSTAB/v6/i8/e081001

252

Polarized photons in radiative muon capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the measurement of polarized photons arising from radiative muon capture. The spectrum of left circularly polarized photons or equivalently the circular polarization of the photons emitted in radiative muon capture on hydrogen is quite sensitive to the strength of the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant $g_P$. A measurement of either of these quantities, although very difficult, might be sufficient to resolve the present puzzle resulting from the disagreement between the theoretical prediction for $g_P$ and the results of a recent experiment. This sensitivity results from the absence of left-handed radiation from the muon line and from the fact that the leading parts of the radiation from the hadronic lines, as determined from the chiral power counting rules of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory, all contain pion poles.

Shung-ichi Ando; Harold W. Fearing; Dong-Pil Min

2001-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

Neuffer, D.V.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Johnson, R.P.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Derbenev, Y.S.; Morozov, V.S.; /Jefferson Lab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

C. Y. Yoshikawa, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov, D.V. Neuffer, K. Yonehara

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Muon interactions at 490 GeV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

E665 is a new, high-energy muon scattering experiment at Fermilab. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on deuterium, hydrogen, and xenon targets during the 1987--88 fixed target run. These data are being analyzed with various physics objectives in mind, and a number of preliminary results have been obtained. This paper presents four of results, specifically the small {chi}{sub Bj} ratio of xenon and deuterium cross sections, inclusive hadron distributions, two jet signals, and exclusive {rho}{sup 0} production.

Schmitt, M. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA) Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Alpha-muon sticking and chaos in muon-catalysed "in flight" d-t fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the alpha-muon sticking coefficient in the muon-catalysed ``in flight" d-t fusion in the framework of the Constrained Molecular Dynamics model. Especially the influence of muonic chaotic dynamics on the sticking coefficient is brought into focus. The chaotic motion of the muon affects not only the fusion cross section but also the $\\mu-\\alpha$ sticking coefficient. Chaotic systems lead to larger enhancements with respect to regular systems because of the reduction of the tunneling region. Moreover they give smaller sticking probabilities than those of regular events. By utilizing a characteristic of the chaotic dynamics one can avoid losing the muon in the $\\mu$CF cycle. We propose the application of the so-called ``microwave ionization of a Rydberg atom" to the present case which could lead to the enhancement of the reactivation process by using X-rays.

Sachie Kimura; Aldo Bonasera

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

257

Three-solenoid windings transformer baluns on CMOS-grade silicon substrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several novel on-chip three-solenoid windings transformer baluns were designed and fabricated using post-CMOS compatible concave-suspending micromachining process, which are applicable in the design of radio-frequency integrated circuits (RFICs). A generalized ... Keywords: CMOS compatible micromachining, Impedance matching, Lumped element circuit model (LECM), Partial element equivalent circuit (PEEC) method, S-parameters, Transformer baluns

Zhengzheng Wu; Xin Wang; Wen-Yan Yin; Xinxin Li

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

NMR Detection with Multiple Solenoidal Microcoils for Continuous-Flow Capillary Electrophoresis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NMR Detection with Multiple Solenoidal Microcoils for Continuous-Flow Capillary Electrophoresis of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy repre- sents a promising on-line detector for capillary electro- phoresis (CE). The inherent poor sensitivity of NMR mandates the use of NMR

Andrews, Anne M.

259

Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated VPS System Ball Valve  

SciTech Connect

1 inch Gas-operated full-port ball valve incorporates a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. The valve is normally open and fails safe to the closed position. The associated valve position switch is class GS.

VAN KATWIJK, C.

2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

260

Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated VPS System Ball Valve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

1 inch Gas-operated full-pod ball valve incorporates a solenoid and limit switches as integral park of the actuator. The valve is normally open and fails safe to the closed position. The associated valve position switch is class GS.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Data and Computing - Facility Operations -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data and Computing Facility Operations Data and Computing Facility Operations In This Section: Getting Started Computing Environment Resources Setup Software Tutorials, Documentation, How Tos Mass Storage File Transfer Batch Systems CRAB Quota and Usage Statistics CERN Bluearc Quota and Stats System Status U.S. CMS Grid Data Transfer to and from UAF At Fermilab, access to User Analysis Farm (UAF) goes through cmsuaf.fnal.gov. This can be accessed using Secure Copy (scp) or sftp. The following storage areas on NFS are available for users: /uscms/home/username /uscms_data/d1/username To transfer a file to UAF: Usage: scp file_name username@cmsuaf.fnal.gov:/uscms/home/username e.g. $ scp zprime705.jdf wenzel@cmsuaf.fnal.gov:/uscms/home/wenzel zprime705.jdf 100% |*****************************| 286 00:00

262

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Data and Computing - Facility Operations - How  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data and Computing Facility Operations Data and Computing Facility Operations In This Section: Getting Started Computing Environment Resources Setup Software Tutorials, Documentation, How Tos Mass Storage File Transfer Batch Systems CRAB Quota and Usage Statistics CERN Bluearc Quota and Stats System Status U.S. CMS Grid How to use SRM on the UAF Introduction Prerequisites Prepare your UAF account to use srmcp Transfering a file Monitoring SRM Gettin Help Introduction SRM (Storage Resource Management) is a grid-service available on the UAF. The srmcp command allows for file transfers between sites and mass storage systems. Here we will show examples to transfer files from CASTOR at CERN to Fermilab. Since it is a grid service there are two prerequisites: Prerequisites The whole procedure will probaly take a few days but you might want to

263

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Doing Physics - User Software & Computing -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Downtimes Downtimes USCMS Tier-1 Facilities Downtimes Information on upcoming USCMS Tier-1 Facilities downtimes will be posted on this downtime webpage and on the mailing list uscmst1-downtime@fnal.gov. During data taking, we are trying to limit our downtimes to as infrequently as possible. When necessary, the downtime will generally be on a Thursday. Mon Nov 8, 2010 6 AM to midnight - Chicago time U.S. CMS at FNAL Site outage Almost all of the USCMS facility at FNAL will be affected by work we will be performing on Monday morning. Most services will be intermittent throughout the morning. This includes: Catalin/Andrey - Convert 5 cmslpc SL4 nodes into SL5 cmslpc-sl5 nodes. Configure remaining 2 SL4 nodes as direct access nodes. Lisa - Configure BlueArc scratch disk as a 6-month max lifetime

264

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Doing Physics - User Software & Computing -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Resources Personal Web Pages You can set up personal web pages in two locations on the cmslpc cluster. Publicly visible web pages: You need to create a public_html subdir in your afs area /afs/fnal.gov/files/home/room/{1,2or3}/username/public_html This will then be visible to http://home.fnal.gov/~username You can use up to your afs quota, usually 500MB. Private web pages: We added the ability to make directories in /uscms/home and /uscms_data accessible through a web link ➨ You need either * /uscms_data/d1/your_name/public_html * /uscms/home/your_name/public_html ➨ These will then be visible to * https://cmslpcweb.fnal.gov/uscms_data/your_name/ * https://cmslpcweb.fnal.gov/uscms/your_name/ * (Trailing slash is important) ➨ You need a CMS registered grid certificate loaded into

265

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Working at CERN - Computers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computers Computers User accounts on CERN central computer services CERN has various "central services" (LXPLUS - Linux, NICE - MS Windows, etc...) which provide centralized file backup and a set of standard applications. All Unix services use AFS (Andrew File System) which allows users to access all Unix hardware platforms with the same username and password - accounts must be specifically added for each platform on which you wish to work. You must first register with the CERN User's Office before an account on the CERN central Services can be created for you. Once you are a registered CERN User, you'll need to fill out a CERN Computer Center Registration Form (available in the US CMS Project Office) which should be signed by your computer group administrator. The computer group

266

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Software and Computing Subproject - Access to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In This Section: In This Section: Data Operations Facility Operations Tier-1 Access to Mass Storage EOS EOS is a disk based mass storage system being evaulated on the LPC cluster. It is mounted on the LPC interactive nodes and the LPC batch nodes at the path /eos/uscms/store/user/ Users may request a directory there by sending email to cms-t1@fnal.gov. Unix file commands (cp and mv) work to move files into and out of EOS (which is different from dcache). Running cp between two paths in EOS however does not work. You should also be able to read and write files from programs like Root and CMSSW as well. SRM access - there is also an SRM endpoint available at srm://cmseos.fnal.gov:8443/srm/v2/server?SFN=/eos/uscms and the command to use is: srmcp -2 -debug file:////uscms/home/catalind/eos-a

267

Multi-muon events at CDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a study of multi-muon events produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider and recorded by the CDF II detector. In a data set acquired with a dedicated dimuon trigger and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2100 pb$^{-1}$, we isolate a significant sample of events in which at least one of the identified muons has large impact parameter and is produced outside the beam pipe of radius 1.5 cm. We are unable to fully account for the number and properties of the events through standard model processes in conjunction with our current understanding of the CDF II detector, trigger and event reconstruction. Several topological and kinematic properties of these events are also presented. In contrast, the production cross section and kinematics of events in which both muon candidates are produced inside the beam pipe are successfully modeled by known QCD processes which include heavy flavor production. The presence of these anomalous multi-muon events offers a plausible resolution to long-standing inconsistencies related to $b\\bar{b}$ production and decay.

F. Ptochos

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Multi-muon events at CDF  

SciTech Connect

We report a study of multi-muon events produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider and recorded by the CDF II detector. In a data set acquired with a dedicated dimuon trigger and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2100 pb{sup -1}, we isolate a significant sample of events in which at least one of the identified muons has large impact parameter and is produced outside the beam pipe of radius 1.5 cm. We are unable to fully account for the number and properties of the events through standard model processes in conjunction with our current understanding of the CDF II detector, trigger and event reconstruction. Several topological and kinematic properties of these events are also presented. In contrast, the production cross section and kinematics of events in which both muon candidates are produced inside the beam pipe are successfully modeled by known QCD processes which include heavy flavor production. The presence of these anomalous multi-muon events offers a plausible resolution to long-standing inconsistencies related to b{bar b} production and decay.

Ptochos, F.; /Cyprus U.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Muon Collider Machine-Detector Interface  

SciTech Connect

In order to realize the high physics potential of a Muon Collider (MC) a high luminosity of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-collisions at the Interaction Point (IP) in the TeV range must be achieved ({approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). To reach this goal, a number of demanding requirements on the collider optics and the IR hardware - arising from the short muon lifetime and from relatively large values of the transverse emittance and momentum spread in muon beams that can realistically be obtained with ionization cooling should be satisfied. These requirements are aggravated by limitations on the quadrupole gradients as well as by the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. The overall detector performance in this domain is strongly dependent on the background particle rates in various sub-detectors. The deleterious effects of the background and radiation environment produced by the beam in the ring are very important issues in the Interaction Region (IR), detector and Machine-Detector Interface (MDI) designs. This report is based on studies presented very recently.

Mokhov, Nikolai V.; /Fermilab

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

U.S. CMS S&C PMG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

has chosen CDF has chosen dCache dCache as their base-line storage solution as their base-line storage solution 6 Sep 13, 2002 U.S. CMS S&C PMG 11 Lothar A T Bauerdick Fermilab...

271

Commissioning of the CMS zero degree calorimeter using LHC beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on the commissioning and first running experience of the CMS Zero Degree Calorimeters during December 2009. All channels worked correctly. The ZDCs were timed into the data acquisition system using beam splash events. These data also allowed us to make a first estimate of channel-by-channel variations in gain.

O. Grachov; M. Murray; J. Wood; Y. Onel; S. Sen; T. Yetkin

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

272

Search for higgs boson diphoton decay with CMS at LHC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have carried out a detailed study of the inclusive search for the Higgs boson in diphoton decay channel with CMS detector at LHC. The analysis is based on full Monte Carlo simulation. Though for the moment we have only simulated data to work with, ...

Harvey Newman

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Study of Bs->mu+mu- in CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a Monte Carlo simulation study of measuring the rare leptonic decay Bs->mu+mu- with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The study is based on a full detector simulation for signal and background events. We discuss the high-level trigger algorithm and the offline event selection.

Urs Langenegger

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

274

The ATLAS Muon Trigger vertical slice at LHC startup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS trigger system has a three-levels structure, implemented to retain interesting physics events, here described for the muon case ("Muon Vertical Slice"). The first level, implemented in a custom hardware, uses measurements from the trigger chambers of the Muon Spectrometer to select muons with high transverse momentum and defines a Region of Interest (RoI) in the detector. RoIs are then processed by a second trigger level, in which fast algorithms run on an online software architecture. Full granularity information from precision chambers is accessed inside RoIs. A third trigger level (Event Filter), using offline-like algorithms and accessing the full event, provide the best possible muon reconstruction/identification and finally confirm or discard the trigger hypothesis formed at earlier levels. Implementation and performance of the full muon trigger slice, together with first events triggered with LHC beams on, are presented.

Grancagnolo, Sergio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Performance study of the level-1 di-muon trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An event with two muons in the final state is a distinctive signal and can be triggered efficiently with the use of the level-1 di-muon trigger. Nevertheless triggering is still an issue if these muon tracks are fairly soft and fake di-muon triggers originating from muons that traverse more than one region of the trigger chambers increase the trigger rate. It is important to provide an acceptable trigger rate, while keeping high trigger efficiency to study low-pt $B$-physics such as rare $B$ hadron decays or CP violation in the $B$-events, especially in a multi-purpose experiment like ATLAS. In this note, the level-1 di-muon trigger and its expected performance are described.

The ATLAS Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Search for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCube neutrino telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the University of California. Search for muon neutrinos fromSearch for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with theWe present the results of searches for high-energy muon

Abbasi, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Muon Application to Advanced Bio- and Nano-Sciences  

SciTech Connect

Among present and future applications of the muon to various fields of sciences, there are several examples where research accomplishments can only be done by using muons. Here we would like to explain the selected two examples representing bio- and nano-sciences, namely, muon spin imaging of human brain for new brain function studies and muonium spin-exchange scattering spectroscopy for the development of spintronics materials.

Nagamine, Kanetada [Muon Science Laboratory, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0081 (Japan); Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA92521 (United States)

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

278

Jet production in muon scattering at Fermilab E665  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of multi-jet production rates from Muon-Nucleon and Muon-Nuclei scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates are defined by the JADE clustering algorithm. Rates in Muon-Nucleon deep-inelastic scattering are compared to Monte Carlo model predictions. Preliminary results from jet production on heavy targets, in the shadowing region, show a higher suppression of two-forward jets as compared to one-forward jet production.

Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Jack Steinberger and the Muon-Neutrino  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Jack Steinberger and the Muon-Neutrino Resources with Additional Information Jack Steinberger Photograph by Harry Sticker, courtesy AIP Emilio Segre Visual Archives, Physics Today Collection In an interview, Jack Steinberger spoke about his 1988 Nobel Prize winning research. He states "I did an experiment, together with several other people at Brookhaven National Laboratory ... which showed that there is a second kind of neutrino. The neutrino has elementary particles. Elementary particles exist in families of particles ... . At the time, the elementary particles which were involved were the electrons and the neutrino. ... [W]e required the [BNL] accelerator, which was the effort of very many people, ... and this allowed [us] to make a beam of these neutrinos, and we were able to convince ourselves that these neutrinos were not the same kind of neutrinos as those which had been seen before. They were associated with not electrons, but with something called [muons]. So we were able to understand that there is a different neutrino associated with the [muon] than with the electron.

280

Hydrogen Cryostat for Muon Beam Cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project was to develop cryostat designs that could be used for muon beam cooling channels where hydrogen would circulate through refrigerators and the beam-cooling channel to simultaneously refrigerate 1) high-temperature-superconductor (HTS) magnet coils, 2) cold copper RF cavities, and 3) the hydrogen that is heated by the muon beam. In an application where a large amount of hydrogen is naturally present because it is the optimum ionization cooling material, it was reasonable to explore its use with HTS magnets and cold, but not superconducting, RF cavities. In this project we developed computer programs for simulations and analysis and conducted experimental programs to examine the parameters and technological limitations of the materials and designs of Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) components (magnet conductor, RF cavities, absorber windows, heat transport, energy absorber, and refrigerant).The project showed that although a hydrogen cryostat is not the optimum solution for muon ionization cooling channels, the studies of the cooling channel components that define the cryostat requirements led to fundamental advances. In particular, two new lines of promising development were opened up, regarding very high field HTS magnets and the HS concept, that have led to new proposals and funded projects.

Johnson, Rolland P.

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector are described in this paper. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

Bonanos, P.

1990-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

Bonanos, P.

1992-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

283

Imaging and sensing based on muon tomography - Energy Innovation ...  

Subtraction techniques are described to enhance the processing of the muon tomography data. Skip to Content. ... Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies ...

284

Normal zone propagation in superconducting focusing solenoids and related quench protection issues  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting solenoids are increasingly used as focusing lenses in transport channels of proton linear RF accelerators. If these accelerators employ superconducting RF cavities, each focusing lens is usually comprised of three coils connected in series: a main coil, which provides the needed focusing strength, and two bucking coils, that help to reduce magnetic field outside the lens. When a normal zone develops in any of the coils in a focusing lens, it propagates with a direction and a rate which depends on the coil and the specific part of the coil in which the quench first occurred. As a result of this propagation process (quenching), the temperature and/or voltage of parts of the lens can exceed safe limits, thus compromising lens reliability. On the other hand, the negative impact of quench events can be significantly mitigated if an external resistor is used to absorb a part of the energy stored in the magnetic field. This paper presents the main results of a solenoid quench protection study based on computational modeling of normal zone propagation in solenoid lenses being built for a superconducting linear RF accelerator under development at Fermilab.

Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

RELIABILITY CONSIDERATIONS OF ELECTRONICS COMPONENTS FOR THE DEEP UNDERWATER MUON AND NEUTRINO DETECTION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerations for the Dtep Underwater Muon and NeutrinoPresented at the Deep Underwater Huon and Neutrino DetectionCOMPONENTS FOR THE DEEP UNDERWATER MUON AND NEUTRINO

Leskovar, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Triggering on hard probes in heavy ion collisions with CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a study of the CMS trigger system in heavy-ion collisions. Concentrating on two physics channels, dimuons from decays of quarkonia and single jets, we evaluate a possible trigger strategy for Pb+Pb running that relies on event selection solely in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The study is based on measurements of the timing performance of the offline algorithms and event-size distributions using full simulations. Using a trigger simulation chain, we compare the physics reach for the jet and dimuon channels using online selection in the HLT to minimum bias running. The results demonstrate the crucial role the HLT will play for CMS heavy-ion physics.

G. Roland; for the CMS Collaboration

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

287

First Results of the CMS Experiment at the LHC  

SciTech Connect

The 2010 proton-proton run of LHC has been very successful delivering an integrated luminosity in excess of 45 pb-1. The quality of the data collected by CMS is very high and most of the detector has been promptly calibrated close to design specifications. Many analyses are being performed on this data set. The results of few of them will be reported, including searches beyond the standard model and measurements of standard model cross sections.

Rolandi, Gigi (CERN)

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

288

Snowmass White Paper CMS Upgrade: Forward Lepton-Photon System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This White Paper outlines a proposal for an upgraded forward region to extend CMS lepton (e, mu) and photon physics reach out to 2.2

Bilki, Burak; Onel, Yasar; Winn, David R; Yetkin, Taylan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Prospects for the Higgs Boson Searches with CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An overview on the prospects for Higgs Boson searches with the CMS detector is presented. Projections have been made to estimate the potential to a possible discovery or exclusion of the Higgs Boson during the run at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV at the LHC, with a recorded integrated luminosity of approximately 1 fb-1, conditions expected by the end of 2011

Matteo Sani

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Atmospheric Muon Flux at Sea Level, Underground, and Underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vertical sea-level muon spectrum at energies above 1 GeV and the underground/underwater muon intensities at depths up to 18 km w.e. are calculated. The results are particularly collated with a great body of the ground-level, underground, and underwater muon data. In the hadron-cascade calculations, the growth with energy of inelastic cross sections and pion, kaon, and nucleon generation in pion-nucleus collisions are taken into account. For evaluating the prompt muon contribution to the muon flux, we apply two phenomenological approaches to the charm production problem: the recombination quark-parton model and the quark-gluon string model. To solve the muon transport equation at large depths of homogeneous medium, a semi-analytical method is used. The simple fitting formulas describing our numerical results are given. Our analysis shows that, at depths up to 6-7 km w. e., essentially all underground data on the muon intensity correlate with each other and with predicted depth-intensity relation for conventional muons to within 10%. However, the high-energy sea-level data as well as the data at large depths are contradictory and cannot be quantitatively decribed by a single nuclear-cascade model.

E. V. Bugaev; A. Misaki; V. A. Naumov; T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky; N. Takahashi

1998-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

Chromaticity correction for a muon collider optics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Muon Collider (MC) is a promising candidate for the next energy frontier machine. However, in order to obtain peak luminosity in the 10{sup 34} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} range the collider lattice designmust satisfy a number of stringent requirements. In particular the expected large momentum spread of the muon beam and the very small {beta}* call for a careful correction of the chromatic effects. Here we present a particular solution for the interaction region (IR) optics whose distinctive feature is a three-sextupole local chromatic correction scheme. The scheme may be applied to other future machines where chromatic effects are expected to be large. The expected large muon energy spread requires the optics to be stable over a wide range of momenta whereas the required luminosity calls for {beta}* in the mm range. To avoid luminosity degradation due to hour-glass effect, the bunch length must be comparatively small. To keep the needed RF voltage within feasible limits the momentum compaction factor must be small over the wide range of momenta. A low {beta}* means high sensitivity to alignment and field errors of the Interaction Region (IR) quadrupoles and large chromatic effects which limit the momentum range of optics stability and require strong correction sextupoles, which eventually limit the Dynamic Aperture (DA). Finally, the ring circumference should be as small as possible, luminosity being inversely proportional to the collider length. A promising solution for a 1.5 TeV center of mass energy MC with {beta}* = 1 m in both planes has been proposed. This {beta}* value has been chosen as a compromise between luminosity and feasibility based on the magnet design and energy deposition considerations. The proposed solution for the IR optics together with a new flexible momentum compaction arc cell design allows to satisfy all requirements and is relatively insensitive to the beam-beam effect.

Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Combined Analysis of GRIDICE and BOSS Information Recorded During CMS-LCG0 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Input parameters needed to a CMS data analysis computing model simulation were determined by a combined analysis of the data stored by the GridICE and BOSS monitoring systems from July to October 2003 when simulating two million events for CMS data challenge 2004, in a Grid distributed environment on a dedicated CMS testbed (CMS-LCG0). During the production, the two monitoring systems were taking records of complementary information for each submitted job. In particular, by integrating data from both monitoring system databases, the measurements of the job execution performance on different processors used in the CMS-LCG0 testbed, were obtained. First results about the simulation of the CMS-LCG0 testbed using the Ptolemy program were also reported.

Coviello, Tommaso; Donvito, Giacinto; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Pierro, A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Effect of muon-nuclear inelastic scattering on high-energy atmospheric muon spectrum at large depth underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectra of hadron cascade showers produced by the cosmic ray muons travelling through water as well as the muon energy spectra underwater at the depth up to 4 km are calculated with two models of muon inelastic scattering on nuclei, the recent hybrid model (two-component, 2C) and the well-known generalized ector-meson-dominance model for the comparison. The 2C model involves photonuclear interactions at low and moderate virtualities as well as the hard scattering including the weak neutral current processes. For the muon scattering off nuclei substantial uclear effects, shadowing, nuclear binding and Fermi motion of nucleons are taken into account. It is shown that deep nderwater muon energy spectrum calculated with the 2C model are noticeably distorted at energies above 100 TeV as compared to that obtained with the GVMD model.

Sinegovsky, S I; Lokhtin, K S; Takahashi, N

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Effect of muon-nuclear inelastic scattering on high-energy atmospheric muon spectrum at large depth underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectra of hadron cascade showers produced by the cosmic ray muons travelling through water as well as the muon energy spectra underwater at the depth up to 4 km are calculated with two models of muon inelastic scattering on nuclei, the recent hybrid model (two-component, 2C) and the well-known generalized ector-meson-dominance model for the comparison. The 2C model involves photonuclear interactions at low and moderate virtualities as well as the hard scattering including the weak neutral current processes. For the muon scattering off nuclei substantial uclear effects, shadowing, nuclear binding and Fermi motion of nucleons are taken into account. It is shown that deep nderwater muon energy spectrum calculated with the 2C model are noticeably distorted at energies above 100 TeV as compared to that obtained with the GVMD model.

S. I. Sinegovsky; A. Misaki; K. S. Lokhtin; N. Takahashi

2007-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

295

Extended Air Showers and Muon Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to report on the influence of muon interactions on the development of air showers initiated by astroparticles. We make a comparative study of the different theoretical approaches to muon bremsstrahlung and muonic pair production interactions. A detailed algorithm that includes all the relevant characteristics of such processes has been implemented in the AIRES air shower simulation system. We have simulated ultra high energy showers in different conditions in order to measure the influence of these muonic electromagnetic interactions. We have found that during the late stages of the shower development (well beyond the shower maximum) many global observables are significantly modified in relative terms when the mentioned interactions are taken into account. This is most evident in the case of the electromagnetic component of very inclined showers. On the other hand, our simulations indicate that the studied processes do not induce significant changes either in the position of the shower maximum or the structure of the shower front surface.

A. N. Cillis; S. J. Sciutto

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

EPIC Muon Cooling Simulations using COSY INFINITY  

SciTech Connect

Next gen­er­a­tion mag­net sys­tems need­ed for cool­ing chan­nels in both neu­tri­no fac­to­ries and muon col­lid­ers will be in­no­va­tive and com­pli­cat­ed. De­sign­ing, sim­u­lat­ing and op­ti­miz­ing these sys­tems is a chal­lenge. Using COSY IN­FIN­I­TY, a dif­fer­en­tial al­ge­bra-based code, to sim­u­late com­pli­cat­ed el­e­ments can allow the com­pu­ta­tion and cor­rec­tion of a va­ri­ety of high­er order ef­fects, such as spher­i­cal and chro­mat­ic aber­ra­tions, that are dif­fi­cult to ad­dress with other sim­u­la­tion tools. As an ex­am­ple, a he­li­cal dipole mag­net has been im­ple­ment­ed and sim­u­lat­ed, and the per­for­mance of an epicyclic para­met­ric ion­iza­tion cool­ing sys­tem for muons is stud­ied and com­pared to sim­u­la­tions made using G4Beam­line, a GEAN­T4 toolk­it.

J.A. Maloney, B. Erdelyi, A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Studies of space-charge-dominated multispecies beam in a solenoid based beam transport line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self-consistent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is used to study the transport properties of a space-charge-dominated multispecies beam propagating through a solenoid-based low energy beam transport line. The evolution of the beam radius and emittance growth of each species arising due to the nonlinear space-charge forces has been investigated. The self-consistent PIC simulation shows the formation of hollow density profiles of subdominant unwanted species around the primary beam, downstream of the transport line. We have utilized this effect for efficient removal of unwanted species by making use of a slit at a suitable location in the beam line.

Sing Babu, P.; Goswami, A.; Pandit, V. S. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Positive muon and the positron as probes of defects  

SciTech Connect

The positive muon and the positron are each being used nowadays to investigate defects in condensed matter. A brief summary of the experimental methods employed with each particle is given in this paper. Similarities and differences between the behavior of the two leptons when implanted in consensed matter are pointed out, and by means of a comparison between muon and positron data in Al it is shown that the combination of muon and positron experiments can serve as a useful new probe of defects in solids.

Lynn, K G

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Novel Muon Beam Facilities for Project X at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

Innovative muon beam concepts for intensity-frontier experiments such as muon-to-electron conversion are described. Elaborating upon a previous single-beam idea, we have developed a design concept for a system to generate four high quality, low-energy muon beams (two of each sign) from a single beam of protons. As a first step, the production of pions by 1 and 3 GeV protons from the proposed Project X linac at Fermilab is being simulated and compared with the 8-GeV results from the previous study.

Neuffer, D.V.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Abrams, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Power Distribution in a CMS Tracker for the SLHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An upgraded tracker for CMS will need a new architecture for powering to keep the power dissipated in the power cables to acceptable levels. Inductor topologies to reduce the stray magnetic field are discussed together with measurements of the magnetic field produced by prototype inductors. A transformer based DC-DC converter has the potential to produce a high stepdown ratio whilst producing a low stray field and retaining high efficiency. The relative merits of buck configuration and transformer based DC-DC converters are discussed.

Cussans, D G; Hill, C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ATLAS and CMS hints for a mirror Higgs boson  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ATLAS and CMS have provided hints for the existence of a Higgs-like particle with mass of about 144 GeV with production cross section into standard decay channels which is about 50% that of the standard model Higgs boson. We show that this 50% suppression is exactly what the mirror matter model predicts when the two scalar mass eigenstates, each required to be maximal admixtures of a standard and mirror-Higgs boson, are separated in mass by more than their decay widths but less than the experimental resolution. We discuss prospects for the future confirmation of this interesting hint for nonstandard Higgs physics.

Foot, Robert; Kobakhidze, Archil; Volkas, Raymond R. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Muon Acceleration in Cosmic-ray Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in Gamma-Ray Bursts magnetars, or other sources. These source models require very high accelerating gradients, $10^{13}$ keV/cm, with the minimum gradient set by the length of the source. At gradients above 1.6 keV/cm, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. We rule out many models of linear acceleration, setting strong constraints on plasma wakefield accelerators and on models for sources like Gamma Ray Bursts and magnetars.

Spencer R. Klein; Rune Mikkelsen; Julia K. Becker Tjus

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

303

New results for rare muon decays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Branching-ratio limits obtained with the Crystal Box detector are presented for the rare muon decays ..mu.. ..-->.. eee, ..mu.. ..-->.. e..gamma.., and ..mu.. ..-->.. e..gamma gamma... These decays, which violate the conservation of separate lepton-family numbers, are expected to occur in many extensions to the standard model. We found no candidates for the decay ..mu.. ..-->.. eee, yielding an upper limit for the branching ratio of B/sub ..mu..3e/ .. e..gamma.. candidates yields an upper limit of B/sub ..mu..e..gamma../ .. e..gamma gamma.. candidates gives an upper limit of B/sub ..mu..e..gamma gamma../ < 7.2 x 10/sup -11/. These results strengthen the constraints on models that allow transitions between lepton families.

Mischke, R.E.; Bolton, R.D.; Bowman, J.D.; Cooper, M.D.; Frank, J.S.; Hallin, A.L.; Heusi, P.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; Hogan, G.E.; Mariam, F.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Ordinary Muon Capture in Hydrogen Reexamined  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rate of muon capture in a muonic hydrogen atom is calculated in heavy-nucleon chiral perturbation theory up to next-to-next-to leading order. To this order, we present the systematic evaluation of all the corrections due to the QED and electroweak radiative corrections and the proton-size effect. Since the low-energy constants involved can be determined from other independent sources of information, the theory has predictive power. For the hyperfine-singlet $\\mu p$ capture rate $\\Gamma_0$, our calculation gives $\\Gamma_0=710 \\,\\pm 5\\,s^{-1}$, which is in excellent agreement with the experimental value obtained in a recent high-precision measurement by the MuCap Collaboration.

U. Raha; F. Myhrer; K. Kubodera

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

305

OPTIMIZING THE MUON COLLIDER CAPTURE TARGET & FRONT END  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[T] Field map calculated from coil current densiUes using Icool grid rou Transmission: Constant 1.5 Solenoid Field %67 Field map from realisUc coils taper length =7 m- B=20-1.5 T Target SC Magnets Field Map 0 5 10 15 20 25 Z [m

McDonald, Kirk

306

When will we know a muon collider is feasible? Status and directions of muon accelerator R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following the LHC discoveries. This article briefly reviews the status of the accelerator R&D, addresses the question of the feasibility of a Muon Collider, what needs to be done to prove it and presents projected timeline of the project.

Vladimir Shiltsev

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Energy Frontier |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics Physics Energy Frontier Fermilab's Contribution to LHC Physics Physics Fermilab is involved in most aspects of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment. The CMS detector is designed to detect objects physicists identify as fundamental: electrons, muons, tau leptons, photons, quark jets and missing energy due to weakly interacting particles such as neutrinos. Massive particles, such as the theorized Higgs boson, will decay into these fundamental particles, and the CMS detector will measure their properties. Fermilab functions as the host laboratory for U.S. efforts in the CMS experiment through its LHC Physics Center, Remote Operations Center and the largest CMS computing center outside of CERN. About 120 Fermilab scientists, postdocs, visiting students, engineers and technicians

308

Melvin Schwartz and the Discovery of the Muon Neutrino  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Melvin Schwartz and the Discovery of the Muon Neutrino Melvin Schwartz and the Discovery of the Muon Neutrino Resources with Additional Information Melvin Schwartz Courtesy Brookhaven National Laboratory Melvin Schwartz was the co-winner of the 1988 Nobel Prize in Physics "for the neutrino beam method and the demonstration of the doublet structure of the leptons through the discovery of the muon neutrino". 'In 1962, Schwartz, with Leon Lederman and Jack Steinberger ... discovered the muon neutrino at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), the then brand-new accelerator at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. ... First coming to Brookhaven in 1955, Schwartz performed his Ph.D. thesis research through 1956 at the Laboratory's first accelerator, the Cosmotron. While finishing his thesis, he was employed by the Laboratory from 1956-58.

309

Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European, Japanese, and US Neutrino Factory designs are presented. The main R&D issues and associated R&D programs, future prospects, and the additional issues that must be addressed to produce a viable Muon Collider design, are discussed.

Steve Geer

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

310

Asymmetry of Charge Ratio for Low Energetic Muons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The WILLI calorimeter, installed in NIPNE Bucharest, is operated since several years for measuring charge ratio of atmospheric muons at low energies (Egeomagnetic field and also on features of the hadronic interaction.

Mitrica, Bogdan [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Horia Hulubei, Bucharest (Romania)

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

311

Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer with Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider has collected several hundred million cosmic ray events during 2008 and 2009. These data were used to commission the Muon Spectrometer and to study the performance of the trigger and tracking chambers, their alignment, the detector control system, the data acquisition and the analysis programs. We present the performance in the relevant parameters that determine the quality of the muon measurement. We discuss the single element efficiency, resolution and noise rates, the calibration method of the detector response and of the alignment system, the track reconstruction efficiency and the momentum measurement. The results show that the detector is close to the design performance and that the Muon Spectrometer is ready to detect muons produced in high energy proton-proton collisions.

The ATLAS Collaboration

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

312

On the parametrization of atmospheric muon angular flux underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analytical expression for angular integral flux of atmospheric muons in matter with the explicit relation of its parameters with those of the sea level spectrum is obtained. The fitting formula for the sea level muon spectrum at different zenith angles for spherical atmosphere is proposed. The concrete calculations for pure water are presented. Fluctuations of muon energy losses are taken into account by means of parametrized correction factor calculated using survival probabilities resulted from Monte Carlo simulations. Parametrizations of all continuous energy losses are obtained with using the most recent expressions for muon interaction cross-sections. The corresponding parametrization errors and field of method application are comprehensively discussed. The proposed formulae could be useful primarily for experimentalists processing data of arrays located deep under water or under ice.

S. I. Klimushin; E. V. Bugaev; I. A. Sokalski

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

313

Expected Muon Energy Spectra and Zenithal Distributions Deep Underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy spectra and zenith angle distributions of atmospheric muons are calculated for the depths of operation of large underwater neutrino telescopes. The estimation of the prompt muon contribution is performed with three approaches to charm hadroproduction: recombination quark-parton model, quark-gluon string model, and perturbative QCD based models. Calculations show that the larger are zenith angles and water thickness above the detector, the lower is the energy at which the prompt muon flux becomes equal to conventional one (``crossing energy'') . For instance, for the depth of the Baikal Neutrino Telescope and for zenith angle of 78 degrees the crossing energy is about 300 TeV, whereas it is only 8 TeV for the NESTOR depth. Nevertheless, the muon flux of the crossing energy at NESTOR depth is in order of magnitude lower in comparison with the Baikal depth.

A. Misaki; V. A. Naumov; T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky; N. Takahashi

1999-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

314

Muon Acceleration with RLA and Non-scaling FFAG Arcs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are the most likely means to achieve the rapid acceleration of shortlived muons to multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. In this paper, we present a novel return-arc optics design based on a Non Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS-FFAG) lattice that allows 5 and 9 GeV/c muons of both charges to be transported in the same string of magnets. The return arcs are made up of super cells with each super cell consisting of three triplets. By employing combined function magnets with dipole, quadrupole, sextupole and octupole magnetic field components, each super cell is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both 5 and 9 GeV/c muon momenta. This solution would reduce the number of arcs by a factor of 2, simplifying the overall design.

Vasiliy Morozov,Alex Bogacz,Dejan Trbojevic

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Final Technical Report Ã?¢Ã?Â?Ã?Â? CMS FAST OPTICAL CALORIMETRY  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of CMS FAST OPTICAL CALORIMETRY, a grant to Fairfield University for development, construction, installation and operation of the forward calorimeter on CMS, and for upgrades of the forward and endcap calorimeters for higher luminosity and radiation damage amelioration.

David R Winn

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

316

Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of [mu][sup [minus]p] atoms in each target. The rates [lambda][sub pp[mu

Jacot-Guillarmod, R. (Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique); Bailey, J.M. (Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom)); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. (Victoria Univ., BC (Canada)); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Huber, T.M. (Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States)); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The charge ratio of the atmospheric muons at low energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the nature of the muon production processes, it can be seen that the ratio of positive to negative cosmic muons has important information in both 'the atmospheric neutrino problem', and 'the hadronic interactions'. We have carried out an experiment for the measurement of the muon charge ratio in the cosmic ray flux in momentum range 0.112-0.178 GeV/c. The muon charge ratio is found to be 1.21{+-}0.01 with a mean zenith angle of 32 deg. {+-}5 deg. . From the measurements it has been obtained a zenithal angle distribution of muons as I({theta})=I(0)cos{sup n}{theta} with n=1.95{+-}0.13. An asymmetry has been observed in East-West directions because of the geomagnetic field. Meanwhile, in about the same momentum range, positive and negative muons have been studied on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations of the extensive air shower developement (Cosmic Ray Simulations for Kascade), using the Quark Gluon String model with JETs model as generator.

Bahmanabadi, M.; Samimi, J. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); ALBORZ Observatory, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sheidaei, F. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghomi, M. Khakian [ALBORZ Observatory, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Failure Scenarios and Mitigations and for the BaBar Superconducting Solenoid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cryogenic department at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is responsible for the operation, troubleshooting, and upgrade of the 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid detector for the BABAR B-factory experiment. Events that disable the detector are rare but significantly impact the availability of the detector for physics research. As a result, a number of systems and procedures have been developed over time to minimize the downtime of the detector, for example improved control systems, improved and automatic backup systems, and spares for all major components. Together they can prevent or mitigate many of the failures experienced by the utilities, mechanical systems, controls and instrumentation. In this paper we describe various failure scenarios, their effect on the detector, and the modifications made to mitigate the effects of the failure. As a result of these modifications the reliability of the detector has increased significantly with only 3 shutdowns of the detector due to cryogenics systems over the last 2 years.

Thompson, EunJoo; Candia, A.; Craddock, W.W.; Racine, M.; Weisend, J.G., II; /SLAC

2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

319

Refurbishment and Testing of the 1970's Era LASS Solenoid Coils for JLab's Hall D  

SciTech Connect

JLab refurbished the LASS1, 1.85 m bore Solenoid, consisting of four superconducting coils to act as the principal analysis magnet for nuclear physics in the newly constructed, Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The coils, built in 1971 at Stanford Linier Accelerator Center and used a second time at the MEGA Experiment at Los Alamos, had electrical shorts and leaks to the insulating vacuum along with deteriorated superinsulation & instrumentation. Root cause diagnosis of the problems and the repair methods are described along with the measures used to qualify the vessels and piping within the Laboratory's Pressure Safety Program (mandated by 10CFR851). The extraordinary refrigerator operational methods used to utilize the obsolete cryogenic apparatus gathered for the off-line, single coil tests are described.

Anumagalla, Ravi; Biallas, George; Brindza, Paul; Carstens, Thomas; Creel, Jonathan; Egiyan, Hovanes; Martin, Floyd; Qiang, Yi; Spiegel, Scot; Stevens, Mark; Wissmann, Mark

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Searches for MSSM Higgs bosons at ATLAS and CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) predicts the existence of three neutral and two charged Higgs bosons. Searches for these MSSM Higgs bosons are presented, based on proton-proton collisions recorded in 2011 and 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC. The neutral Higgs bosons are searched through their decays into pairs of oppositely charged tau leptons. The exclusion limits at 95% confidence level are shown as a function of the $m_A$ and $\\tan\\beta$ parameters. The search for the charged Higgs bosons is based on their production through the decays of top quarks in the $t\\bar{t}$ process, $t \\to bH^+$. The Higgs bosons subsequently decay predominantly into a tau lepton and a neutrino. Upper limits are set on the branching fraction $B(t \\to bH^+)$, combining the final states with leptonic and hadronic tau decay modes.

Stan Lai

2013-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

RF, Thermal and Structural Analysis of the 201.25 MHz Muon Ionization Cooling Cavity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMAL AND STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE 201.25 MHZ MUON IONIZATION COOLINGthe thermal performance of the cavity, including the coolingthermal and structural behavior of the prototype 201.25 MHz cavity for a muon ionization cooling

Virostek, S.; Li, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

MANX, A 6-D Muon Cooling Demonstration Experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most ionization cooling schemes now under consideration are based on using many large flasks of liquid hydrogen energy absorber. One important example is the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which has recently been approved to run at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). In the work reported here, a potential muon cooling demonstration experiment based on a continuous liquid energy absorber in a helical cooling channel (HCC) is discussed. The original HCC used a gaseous energy absorber for the engineering advantage of combining the energy absorption and RF energy regeneration in hydrogen-filled RF cavities. In the Muon And Neutrino eXperiment (MANX) that is proposed here, a liquid-filled HCC is used without RF energy regeneration to achieve the largest possible cooling rate in six dimensions. In this case, the magnetic fields of the HCC must diminish as the muons lose momentum as they pass through the liquid energy absorber. The length of the MANX device is determined by the maximum momentum of the muon test beam and the maximum practical field that can be sustained at the magnet coils. We have studied a 3 meter-long HCC example that could be inserted between the MICE spectrometers at RAL.

Roberts,Thomas; Alsharo'a, Mohammad; Hanlet, Pierrick M; Johnson, Rolland P; Kuchnir, Moyses; Paul, Kevin; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Moretti, Alfred; Popovic, Milorad; Yarba, Victor; Kaplan, Daniel; Yonehara, Katsuya

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Counting muons to probe the neutrino mass spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experimental evidence that \\theta_{13} is large opens new opportunities to identify the neutrino mass spectrum. We outline a possibility to investigate this issue by means of conventional technology. The ideal setup turns out to be long baseline experiment: the muon neutrino beam, with 10^{20} protons on target, has an average energy of 6 (8) GeV; the neutrinos, after propagating 6000 (8000) km, are observed by a muon detector of 1 Mton and with a muon energy threshold of 2 GeV. The expected number of muon events is about 1000, and the difference between the two neutrino spectra is sizeable, about 30%. This allows the identification of the mass spectrum just counting muon tracks. The signal events are well characterized experimentally by their time and direction of arrival, and 2/3 of them are in a region with little atmospheric neutrino background, namely, between 4 GeV and 10 GeV. The distances from CERN to Baikal Lake and from Fermilab to KM3NET, or ANTARES, fit in the ideal range.

Carolina Lujan-Peschard; Giulia Pagliaroli; Francesco Vissani

2013-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

324

Particle Physics at Discovery's Horizon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uslhc.us uslhc.us Particle Physics at Discovery's Horizon September 2012 Discoveries from the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, promise to rev- olutionize our understanding of the universe. With more than 1000 participants from 49 institutions across the country, US CMS is the largest national group in the 3,600-member international CMS collaboration. Supported by the US Department of Energy's Office of Science and the National Science Foundation, the US CMS collaboration consists of more than 430 physicists, nearly 200 graduate students and more than 300 engineers, tech- nicians and computer scientists. The US CMS collaboration plays a vital role in the operation of the CMS detector and analysis of data from LHC collisions. US groups

325

A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new parameterisation of atmospheric muons deep underwater (or ice) is presented. It takes into account the simultaneous arrival of muons in bundle giving the multiplicity of the events and the muon energy spectrum as a function of their lateral distribution in a shower.

Annarita Margiotta

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Multiple Muons From Neutrino-Initiated Multi-W(Z) Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current underground detectors can search for multiple muons from multi-W(Z) production initiated by ultrahigh energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei. O($\\mu$b) cross sections give rise to downward going muon bundles whose features differ from those of atmospheric muon bundles.

D. A. Morris; A. Ringwald

1993-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

327

The LHCb Muon detector commissioning and first running scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb muon detector, part of the first LHCb trigger level (L0), has been built to provide a fast and efficient identification of the muons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The expected performances are: 95% L0 trigger efficiency within a 25 ns time window and muon identification in L0 with a Pr resolution of 20%. The detector has been built using Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers and Gas Electron Multiplier technology. The chambers are arranged in five stations, interspersed with iron filter placed along the beam pipe. The results obtained in the commissioning of all the installed chambers and the measured performances are presented. The strategies foreseen for the detector calibration, the results of the space and time alignment efforts and few first running scenarios are discussed.

Furcas, S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Measurement of Ground Level Muon Charge Ratio Using ECRS Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Muon charge ratio at the Earth's surface has been studied with a Geant4 based simulation for two different geomagnetic locations: Atlanta and Lynn Lake. The simulation results are shown in excellent agreement with the data from NMSU-WIZARD/CAPRICE and BESS experiments at Lynn Lake, At low momentum, ground level muon charge ratios show latitude dependent geomagnetic effects for both Atlanta and Lynn Lake from the simulation. The simulated charge ratio is 1.20 {+-} 0.05 (without geomagnetic field), 1.12 {+-} 0.05 (with geomagnetic field) for Atlanta and 1.22 {+-} 0.04 (with geomagnetic field) for Lynn Lake. These types of studies are very important for analyzing secondary cosmic ray muon flux distribution at Earth's surface and can be used to evaluate the parameter of atmospheric neutrino oscillations.

Sanjeewa, Hakmana; He Xiaochun; Cleven, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

329

Nuclear Waste Imaging and Spent Fuel Verification by Muon Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the use of cosmic ray muons to image the contents of shielded containers and detect high-Z special nuclear materials inside them. Cosmic ray muons are a naturally occurring form of radiation, are highly penetrating and exhibit large scattering angles on high Z materials. Specifically, we investigated how radiographic and tomographic techniques can be effective for non-invasive nuclear waste characterization and for nuclear material accountancy of spent fuel inside dry storage containers. We show that the tracking of individual muons, as they enter and exit a structure, can potentially improve the accuracy and availability of data on nuclear waste and the contents of Dry Storage Containers (DSC) used for spent fuel storage at CANDU plants. This could be achieved in near real time, with the potential for unattended and remotely monitored operations. We show that the expected sensitivity, in the case of the DSC, exceeds the IAEA detection target for nuclear material accountancy.

Jonkmans, G; Jewett, C; Thompson, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Optics for Phase Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The realization of a muon collider requires a reduction of the 6D normalized emittance of an initially generated muon beam by a factor of more than 106. Analytical and simulation studies of 6D muon beam ionization cooling in a helical channel filled with pressurized gas or liquid hydrogen absorber indicate that a factor of 106 is possible. Further reduction of the normalized 4D transverse emittance by an additional two orders of magnitude is envisioned using Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC). To realize the phase shrinkage effect in the parametric resonance method, one needs to design a focusing channel free of chromatic and spherical aberrations. We report results of our study of a concept of an aberration-free wiggler transport line with an alternating dispersion function. Resonant beam focusing at thin beryllium wedge absorber plates positioned near zero dispersion points then provides the predicted PIC effect.

R.P. Johnson; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

331

Commissioning and early physics analysis with the ATLAS and CMS experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

These lecture notes for graduate students and young postdocs introduce the commissioning and early physics programme of the high-transverse-momentum experiments ATLAS and CMS, operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

Andreas Hoecker

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

R&D Proposal for the National Muon Acccelerator Program  

SciTech Connect

This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons - the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently indicated, is essential for the long-term health of high-energy physics.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons--the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently indicated, is essential for the long-term health of high-energy physics.

Muon Accelerator Program; Zisman, Michael S.; Geer, Stephen

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

334

Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of {mu}{sup {minus}p} atoms in each target. The rates {lambda}{sub pp{mu}} and {lambda}{sub pd} can be extracted.

Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique; Bailey, J.M. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Mittelenergiephysik; Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Muon Bremsstrahlung and Muonic Pair Production in Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to report on the modifications in air shower development due to muon bremsstrahlung and muonic pair production. In order to do that we have implemented new muon bremsstrahlung and muonic pair production procedures in the AIRES air shower simulation system, and have used it to simulate ultra high energy showers in different conditions. The influence of the mentioned processes in the global development of the air shower is important for primary particles of large zenith angles, while they do not introduce significant changes in the position of the shower maximum.

A. Cillis; S. J. Sciutto

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

336

Doped H(2)-Filled RF Cavities for Muon Beam Cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

RF cavities pressurized with hydrogen gas may provide effective muon beam ionization cooling needed for muon colliders. Recent 805 MHz test cell studies reported below include the first use of SF{sub 6} dopant to reduce the effects of the electrons that will be produced by the ionization cooling process in hydrogen or helium. Measurements of maximum gradient in the Paschen region are compared to a simulation model for a 0.01% SF{sub 6} doping of hydrogen. The observed good agreement of the model with the measurements is a prerequisite to the investigation of other dopants.

Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Hu, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; /Fermilab; Alsharo'a, M.; Johnson, R.P.; Neubauer, M.; Sah, R.; /Muons Inc., Batavia; Rose, D.V.; /Voss Sci., Albuquerque

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Study of the B s meson with forthcoming LHC data at CMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the properties of the B s meson decays has been done using a full Monte Carlo simulation of the CMS detector. The CMS pixel detector allows a precise measurement of the B s decay vertices which are displaced from the proton?proton interaction point. This facilitates a time dependent analysis of the angular correlations between the B s decay products. In particular

B. Millán Mejías; On behalf of the CMS Collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Recent Results on Muon Capture for a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect

Scenarios for capture, bunching and phase-energy rotation of {mu}'s from a proton source have been developed. The goal is capture of a maximal number of muons in a string of rf bunches with applications in neutrino factories and {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} colliders. In this note we begin with the bunching, phase rotation and cooling scenario used in neutrino factory study 2B and adapted by R. Palmer as the initial stage of a {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} collider scenario. However the scenario produces a relatively large number of bunches that must be recombined for maximal collider luminosity. In this paper we modify the scenario to obtain a smaller number of bunches, and, after some optimization, obtain cases that are better for both n-factory and collider scenarios. We describe these examples and consider some variations toward an optimal {nu}-factory + collider scenario.

Neuffer, David; /Fermilab

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Modeling H2 formation in the turbulent ISM: Solenoidal versus compressive turbulent forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of the turbulent interstellar medium that study the influence of the nature of the turbulence on the formation of molecular hydrogen. We have examined both solenoidal (divergence-free) and compressive (curl-free) turbulent driving, and show that compressive driving leads to faster H2 formation, owing to the higher peak densities produced in the gas. The difference in the H2 formation rate can be as much as an order of magnitude at early times, but declines at later times as the highest density regions become fully molecular and stop contributing to the total H2 formation rate. We have also used our results to test a simple prescription suggested by Gnedin et al. (2009) for modeling the influence of unresolved density fluctuations on the H2 formation rate in large-scale simulations of the ISM. We find that this approach works well when the H2 fraction is small, but breaks down once the highest density gas becomes fully molecular.

Milosavljevic, Milica; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Solenoid-free Plasma Start-up in NSTX using Transient CHI  

SciTech Connect

Experiments in NSTX have now demonstrated the coupling of toroidal plasmas produced by the technique of Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) to inductive sustainment and ramp-up of the toroidal plasma current. In these discharges, the central Ohmic transformer was used to apply an inductive loop voltage to discharges with a toroidal current of about 100 kA created by CHI. The coupled discharges have ramped up to >700 kA and transitioned into an H-mode demonstrating compatibility of this startup method with conventional operation. The electron temperature in the coupled discharges reached over 800 eV and the resulting plasma had low inductance, which is preferred for long-pulse high performance discharges. These results from NSTX in combination with the previously obtained record 160 kA non-inductively-generated startup currents in an ST or tokamak in NSTX demonstrate that CHI is a viable solenoid-free plasma startup method for future STs and tokamaks.

Raman, R; Jarboe, T; Nelson, B; Mueller, D; Soukhanovskii, V A

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Status of Neutrino Factory R&D within the Muon Collaboration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the current status of the research within the Muon Collaboration towards realizing a Neutrino Factory. We describe briefly the physics motivation behind the neutrino factory approach to studying neutrino oscillations and the longer term goal of building the Muon Collider. The benefits of a step by step staged approach of building a proton driver, collecting and cooling muons followed by the acceleration and storage of cooled muons are emphasized. Several usages of cooled muons open up at each new stage in such an approach and new physics opportunites are realized at the completion of each stage.

Rajendran Raja

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

342

Status of Neutrino Factory R&D within the Muon Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe the current status of the research within the Muon Collaboration towards realizing a Neutrino Factory. The authors describe briefly the physics motivation behind the neutrino factory approach to studying neutrino oscillations and the longer term goal of building the Muon Collider. The benefits of a step by step staged approach of building a proton driver, collecting and cooling muons followed by the acceleration and storage of cooled muons are emphasized. Several usages of cooled muons open up at each new stage in such an approach and new physics opportunities are realized at the completion of each stage.

Rajendran Raja

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

343

Jet Performance and Jet Energy Scale Determination at CMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the jet response of the CMS calorimeter which will be used to study pp collisions at Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland at {radical}(s) = 14 TeV. The electromagnetic section of calorimeter consists of lead tungstate crystals which gives an excellent resolution for electrons. The hadron section is brass-scintillator sampling calorimeter read by wavelength shifting fibers in the central region (vertical bar {eta} vertical bar < 3.0) and steel/quartz-fibers in the forward (3.0 < vertical bar {eta} vertical bar < 5.0) region. Extensive test beam calibration data has been collected. A GEANT-based calorimeter simulation has been tuned to reproduce the test beam measurements. The calorimeter response to jets has been determined using this tuned simulation. We describe the calorimeter response to jets, the jet energy resolution, and the procedure we plan to use to establish the jet energy scale from a combination of test beam and pp data when we start taking data in September 2007.

Bhatti, Anwar A. [Experimental Physics Laboratory, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Ave, New York NY 10021 (United States)

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

344

Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We searched for the standard model Higgs boson in many different channels using approximately 5 fb-1 of 7 TeV pp collisions data collected with the CMS detector at LHC. Combining the results of the different searches we exclude at 95% confidence level a standard model Higgs boson with mass between 127.5 and 600 GeV. The expected 95% confidence level exclusion if the Higgs boson is not present is from 114.5 and 543 GeV. The observed exclusion is weaker than expected at low mass because of some excess that is observed below about 128 GeV. The most significant excess is found at 125 GeV with a local significance of 2.8 sigma. It has a global significance of 0.8 sigma when evaluated in the full search range and of 2.1 sigma when evaluated in the range 110-145 GeV. The excess is consistent both with background fluctuation and a standard model Higgs boson with mass of about 125 GeV, and more data are needed to investigate its origin.

Marco Pieri; for the CMS Collaboration

2012-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

345

The ATLAS Muon Trigger - Experience and Performance in the first 3 years of LHC pp runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) deploys three-levels processing scheme for the trigger system. The level-1 muon trigger system gets its input from fast muon trigger detectors. Fast sector logic boards select muon candidates, which are passed via an interface board to the central trigger processor and then to the High Level Trigger (HLT). The muon HLT is purely software based and encompasses a level-2 trigger followed by an event filter for a staged trigger approach. It has access to the data of the precision muon detectors and other detector elements to refine the muon hypothesis. The ATLAS experiment has taken data with high efficiency continuously over entire running periods form 2010 to 2012, for which sophisticated triggers to guard the highest physics output while reducing effectively the event rate were mandatory. The ATLAS Muon trigger has successfully adapted to this changing environment. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analysis involving mu...

Ventura, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Standard Model Predictions for the Muon $(g-2)/2$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current status of the Standard Model predictions for the muon anomalous magnetic moment is described. Various contributions expected in the Standard Model are discussed. After the reevaluation of the leading-order hadronic term based on the new \\ep data, the theoretical prediction is more than three standard deviations lower than the experimental value.

S. I. Eidelman

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

347

OPTIMIZING THE MUON COLLIDER CAPTURE TARGET & FRONT END  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[T] Field map calculated from coil current densiUes using Icool grid rou length =5-7 m- B=20-1.5 & 2.5 T Target SC Magnets Field Map 0 5 10 15 20 25 Z/25/13 6 Tracking 1E5 muons through decay channel -10 cells (50 m) Transmission

McDonald, Kirk

348

Integration and commissioning of the ATLAS Muon spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is currently waiting to record the first collision data in spring 2009. Its muon spectrometer is designed to achieve a momentum resolution of 10% pT(mu) = 1 TeV/c. The spectrometer consists of a system of three superconducting air-core toroid magnets and is instrumented with three layers of Monitored Drift Tube chambers (Cathode Strip Chambers in the extreme forward region) as precision detectors. Resistive Plate Chambers in the barrel and Thin Gap Chambers in the endcap regions provide a fast trigger system. The spectrometer passed important milestones in the last year. The most notable milestone was the installation of the inner layer of endcap muon chambers, which constituted the last big piece of the ATLAS detector to be lowered in the ATLAS cavern. In addition, during the last two years most of the muon detectors were commissioned with cosmic rays while being assembled in the underground experimental cavern. We will report on our experience with the precision and trigger chambers, the optical spectrometer alignment system, the level-1 trigger, and the ATLAS data acquisition system. Results of the global performance of the muon system from data with magnetic field will also be presented.

Alberto Belloni; for the ATLAS collaboration

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

349

Muon and Tau Neutrinos Spectra from Solar Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar neutrino flares and mixing are considered. Most power-full solar flare as the ones occurred on 23th February 1956, September 29th 1989, 28th October and on 2nd-4th November 2003 are sources of cosmic rays, X, gamma and neutrino bursts. These flares took place both on front or in the edge and in the hidden solar disk. The observed and estimated total flare energy should be a source of a prompt secondary neutrino burst originated, by proton-proton-pion production on the sun itself; a more delayed and spread neutrino flux signal arise by the solar charged flare particles reaching the terrestrial atmosphere. Our first estimates of neutrino signals in largest underground detectors hint for few events in correlation with, gamma,radio onser. Our approximated spectra for muons and taus from these rare solar eruption are shown over the most common background. The muon and tau signature is very peculiar and characteristic over electron and anti-electron neutrino fluxes. The rise of muon neutrinos will be detectable above the minimal muon threshold of 113 MeV. The rarest tau appearence will be possible only for hardest solar neutrino energies above 3.471 GeV

D. Fargion; F. Moscato

2004-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

350

MERCURY HANDLING FOR THE TARGET SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cryostat 1. Remote handling The high radiation levels and presence of hazardous, ac- tivated mercury vaporsMERCURY HANDLING FOR THE TARGET SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER Van Graves , ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 placement within the Shielding Module in a remote environment. · Providing double containment of the mercury

McDonald, Kirk

351

Neutrinos from Stored Muons nuSTORM: Expression of Interest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuSTORM facility has been designed to deliver beams of electron and muon neutrinos from the decay of a stored muon beam with a central momentum of 3.8 GeV/c and a momentum spread of 10%. The facility is unique in that it will: serve the future long- and short-baseline neutrino-oscillation programmes by providing definitive measurements of electron-neutrino- and muon-neutrino-nucleus cross sections with percent-level precision; allow searches for sterile neutrinos of exquisite sensitivity to be carried out; and constitute the essential first step in the incremental development of muon accelerators as a powerful new technique for particle physics. Of the world's proton-accelerator laboratories, only CERN and FNAL have the infrastructure required to mount nuSTORM. Since no siting decision has yet been taken, the purpose of this Expression of Interest (EoI) is to request the resources required to: investigate in detail how nuSTORM could be implemented at CERN; and develop options for decisive European contributions to the nuSTORM facility and experimental programme wherever the facility is sited. The EoI defines a two-year programme culminating in the delivery of a Technical Design Report.

D. Adey; S. K. Agarwalla; C. M. Ankenbrandt; R. Asfandiyarov; J. J. Back; G. Barker; E. Baussan; R. Bayes; S. Bhadra; V. Blackmore; A. Blondel; S. A. Bogacz; C. Booth; S. B. Boyd; A. Bravar; S. J. Brice; A. D. Bross; F. Cadoux; H. Cease; A. Cervera; J. Cobb; D. Colling; L. Coney; A. Dobbs; J. Dobson; A. Donini; P. J. Dornan; M. Dracos; F. Dufour; R. Edgecock; J. Evans; M. A. George; T. Ghosh; A. deGouvea; J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; A. Haesler; G. Hanson; M. Geelhoed; P. F. Harrison; M. Hartz; P. Hernandez; J. A. Hernando-Morata; P. J. Hodgson; P. Huber; A. Izmaylov; Y. Karadhzov; T. Kobilarcik; J. Kopp; L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; A. Kurup; Y. Kuno; P. Kyberd; J. P. Lagrange; A. M. Laing; J. Link; A. Liu; K. R. Long; N. McCauley; K. T. McDonald; K. Mahn; C. Martin; J. Martin; O. Mena; S. R. Mishra; N. Mokhov; J. Morfin; Y. Mori; W. Murray; D. Neuffer; R. Nichol; E. Noah; M. A. Palmer; S. Parke; S. Pascoli; J. Pasternak; M. Popovic; P. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; S. Ricciardi; C. Rogers; P. Rubinov; E. Santos; A. Sato; E. Scantamburlo; J. K. Sedgbeer; D. R. Smith; P. J. Smith; J. T. Sobczyk; S. Soldner-Rembold; F. J. P. Soler; M. Sorel; A. Stahl; L. Stanco; P. Stamoulis; S. Striganov; H. Tanaka; I. J. Taylor; C. Touramanis; C. D. Tunnel; Y. Uchida; N. Vassilopoulos; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; E. Wildner; M. J. Wilking; W. Winter; U. K. Yang

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

352

What does the muon-neutrino oscillate into?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The favoured resolution of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly involves an oscillation of the muon neutrino to a different state. Current experiments allow for the latter to contain a significantly large fraction of a non-standard flavour. We demonstrate how the next generation of experiments may take advantage of matter effects to resolve this issue.

Debajyoti Choudhury; Anindya Datta

2006-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

353

High-energy cosmic ray muons in the Earth's atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the calculations of the atmospheric muon fluxes at energies 10-10{sup 7} GeV based on a numerical-analytical method for solving the hadron-nucleus cascade equations. It allows the non-power-law behavior of the primary cosmic ray (PCR) spectrum, the violation of Feynman scaling, and the growth of the total inelastic cross sections for hadron-nucleus collisions with increasing energy to be taken into account. The calculations have been performed for a wide class of hadron-nucleus interaction models using directly the PCR measurements made in the ATIC-2 and GAMMA experiments and the parameterizations of the primary spectrum based on a set of experiments. We study the dependence of atmospheric muon flux characteristics on the hadronic interaction model and the influence of uncertainties in the PCR spectrum and composition on the muon flux at sea level. Comparison of the calculated muon energy spectra at sea level with the data from a large number of experiments shows that the cross sections for hadron-nucleus interactions introduce the greatest uncertainty in the energy region that does not include the knee in the primary spectrum.

Kochanov, A. A., E-mail: kochanov@iszf.irk.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russian Federation); Sinegovskaya, T. S. [Irkutsk State Railway University (Russian Federation)] [Irkutsk State Railway University (Russian Federation); Sinegovsky, S. I., E-mail: sinegovsky@api.isu.ru [Irkutsk State University (Russian Federation)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Press Pass - Press Release - CDF B_s  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 September 13, 2006 Media Contacts: Fermilab - Mike Perricone, mikep@fnal.gov, 630-840-3351 CERN - James Gillies, James.gillies@cern.ch, + 41 22 76 74101 For immediate release Fermilab contributions help CMS magnet reach full field at CERN Tests show CMS detector will be ready for data at European particle physics laboratory BATAVIA, Illinois - Scientists of the U.S. Department of Energy/Office of Science's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and collaborators of the US/CMS project have joined colleagues from around the world in announcing that the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet has reached full field strength in tests at CERN, the European Particle Physics Laboratory. Weighing in at more than 13,000 tons, the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment's magnet is built around a 20-foot-diameter, nearly 43-foot-long superconducting solenoid - a wire coil with multiple loops, which generates a magnetic field when electricity passes through it. The CMS solenoid generates a magnetic field of 4 Tesla, some 100,000 times stronger than the Earth's magnetic field, and stores 2.5 gigajoules of energy, enough to melt nearly 20 tons of gold. Superconductivity is achieved by chilling the coil to a temperature near absolute zero, where virtually all electrical resistance vanishes. Extremely high electrical current can then be used to generate a powerful magnetic field.

355

The CMS Level-1 Trigger at LHC and Super-LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Level-1 trigger of the CMS experiment at CERN has been designed to select proton-proton interactions whose final state includes signatures of new physics in the form of high transverse energy electrons, photons, jets, or high missing transverse energy. The Level-1 trigger system process data in a pipeline fashion at a rate of 40 MHz, has a design latency of 128 bunch crossings and an output rate of 100 KHz. The design of this system is presented with emphasis on the calorimeter triggers. After a long period of testing and validation of its performance the Level-1 trigger system has been installed and commissioned at the CMS experiment at CERN. Cosmic ray data and Monte Carlo events have been used to compare the actual performance of the trigger with expectations from off-line emulation models. Results from these studies are presented here. The limitations of this system to cope with future luminosity upgrades of the LHC, the Super-LHC, are discussed. The current CMS plan for a new CMS Level-1 trigger system at the Super-LHC is presented. The center point of the new system is a Level-1 tracking trigger which uses data from a new CMS silicon tracking detector.

C. Foudas

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

356

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT FOR A FAST MUON TRIGGER  

SciTech Connect

This document is a Conceptual Design Report for a fast muon trigger for the PHENIX experiment that will enable the study of flavor separated quark and anti-quark spin polarizations in the proton. A powerful way of measuring these polarizations is via single spin asymmetries for W boson production in polarized proton-proton reactions. The measurement is done by tagging W{sup +} and W{sup -} via their decay into high transverse momentum leptons in the forward directions. The PHENIX experiment is capable of measuring high momentum muons at forward rapidity, but the current online trigger does not have sufficient rejection to sample the rare leptons fromW decay at the highest luminosities at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This Report details the goals, design, R&D, and schedule for building new detectors and trigger electronics to use the full RHIC luminosity to make this critical measurement. The idea for W boson measurements in polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC was first suggested by Jacques Soffer and Claude Bourrely in 1995. This prompted the RIKEN institute in Japan to supply funds to build a second muon arm for PHENIX (south muon arm). The existence of both a north and south muon arm makes it possible to utilize a Z{sup 0} sample to study and control systematic uncertainties which arise in the reconstruction of high momentum muons. This document has its origins in recommendations made by a NSAC Subcommittee that reviewed the U.S. Heavy Ion Physics Program in June 2004. Part of their Recommendation 1 was to 'Invest in near-term detector upgrades of the two large experiments, PHENIX and STAR'. In Recommendation 2 the subcommittee stated '- detector improvements proceed at a rate that allows a timely determination of the flavor dependence of the quark-antiquark sea polarization through W-asymmetry measurements' as we are proposing here. On September 13, 2004 DOE requested from BNL a report articulating a research plan for the RHIC spin physics program. The document was submitted to DOE on January 31, 2005. It pointed out that one of three top priorities for the program lies in the clean and elegant measurement of the quark and anti-quark polarizations sorted by quark flavor through the parity-violating production of W bosons.

OBRIEN,E.; BASYE, A.; ISENHOWER, D.; JUMPER, D.; SPARKS, N.; TOWELL, R.; WATTS, C.; WOOD, J.; WRIGHT, R.; HAGGERTY, J.; LYNCH, D.; BARISH, K.; EYSER, K.O.; SETO, R.; HU, S.; LI, X.; ZHOU, S.; GLENN, A.; KINNEY, E.; KIRILUK, K.; NAGLE, J.; CHI, C.Y.; SIPPACH, W.; ZAJC. W.; BUTLER, C.; HE, X.; OAKLEY, C.; YING, J.; BLACKBURN, J.; CHIU, M.; PERDEKAMP, M.G.; KIM, Y.J.; KOSTER, J.; LAYTON, D.; MAKINS, N.; MEREDITH, B.; NORTHACKER, D.; PENG, J.-C.; SEIDL, R.; THORSLAND, E.; WADHAMS, S.; WILLIAMSON, S.; YANG, R.; HILL, J.; KEMPEL, T.; LAJOIE, J.; SLEEGE, G.; VALE, C.; WEI, F.; SAITO, N.; HONG, B.; KIM, B.; LEE, K.; LEE, K.S.; PARK, S.; SIM, K.-S.; AOKI, K.; DAIRAKU, S.; IMAI, K.; KARATSU, K.; MURAKAMI, T.; SATO, A.; SENZAKA, K.; SHOJI, K.; TANIDA, K.; BROOKS, M.; LEITCH, M.; ADAMS, J.; CARINGI, A.; FADEM, B.; IDE, J.; LICHTENWALNER, P.; FIELDS, D.; MAO, Y.; HAN, R.; BUNCE, G.; XIE, W.; FUKAO, Y.; TAKETANI, A.; KURITA, K.; MURATA, J.; (PHENIX COLLABORATION)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

LATBauerdick, Project Manager U.S. CMS S&C PMG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. CMS S&C PMG U.S. CMS S&C PMG February 14, 2003 Lothar A T Bauerdick Fermilab PMG Meeting Feb. 14, 2003 2 Countdown to submitting the "Large ITR" proposal Ë March 24, 2003 (37 days) Next PMG meeting Ë next slot would be April 11 Dates etc. Lothar A T Bauerdick Fermilab PMG Meeting Feb. 14, 2003 3 David Stickland's summary: The final closeout was extremely positive for US CMS The panel expressed full support both at the stategic level Ë for example issues related to the transition to the Research program and balance between Detector, M&O, Software and Computing; and at the technical level Ë where the status and project plans received their congratulations and support. The USCMS SWC managers were roundly congratulated for their project management And the USCMS SWC team for their technical excellence.

358

Fast Beam Conditions Monitor BCM1F for the CMS Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CMS Beam Conditions and Radiation Monitoring System, BRM, will support beam tuning, protect the CMS detector from adverse beam conditions, and measure the accumulated dose close to or inside all sub-detectors. It is composed of different sub-systems measuring either the particle flux near the beam pipe with time resolution between nano- and microseconds or the integrated dose over longer time intervals. This paper presents the Fast Beam Conditions Monitor, BCM1F, which is designed for fast flux monitoring measuring both beam halo and collision products. BCM1F is located inside the CMS pixel detector volume close to the beam-pipe. It uses sCVD diamond sensors and radiation hard front-end electronics, along with an analog optical readout of the signals. The commissioning of the system and its successful operation during the first be ams of the LHC are described.

Bell, A; Hall-Wilton, R; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Macpherson, A; Ohlerich, M; Rodriguez, N; Ryjov, V; Schmidt, R S; Stone, R L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Discussion - Next Step for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Specification of Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography (FMT): (1) 18-feet (5.5-m) drift tube, 2-inch (5-cm) diameter; (2) 108 tubes per layer; (3) Unit layer = 2 layer (detection efficiency: 0.96 x 0.96 = 92%); (4) 12 or 16 layer per module; (5) 16 layers allows momentum analysis at 30% level; (6) 2 module per super module (5.5 x 11 m{sup 2}); and (7) FMT = 2 super module. By deploying MMT next to a research reactor, we will be able to measure the impact of low level radiation fields on muon tomography and reconstruction processes. Radiation level during reactor operation is {approx}50 {micro}Sv/h which provides similar radiation environment of inside the FMT radiation shield at Fukushima Daiichi. We will implement coincidence algorithm on the FPGA board.

Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

360

Energy Spectra, Altitude Profiles and Charge Ratios of Atmospheric Muons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new measurement of air shower muons made during atmospheric ascent of the High Energy Antimatter Telescope balloon experiment. The muon charge ratio mu+ / mu- is presented as a function of atmospheric depth in the momentum interval 0.3-0.9 GeV/c. The differential mu- momentum spectra are presented between 0.3 and about 50 GeV/c at atmospheric depths between 13 and 960 g/cm^2. We compare our measurements with other recent data and with Monte Carlo calculations of the same type as those used in predicting atmospheric neutrino fluxes. We find that our measured mu- fluxes are smaller than the predictions by as much as 70% at shallow atmospheric depths, by about 20% at the depth of shower maximum, and are in good agreement with the predictions at greater depths. We explore the consequences of this on the question of atmospheric neutrino production.

S. Coutu; J. J. Beatty; M. A. DuVernois; S. W. Barwick; E. Schneider; A. Bhattacharyya; C. R. Bower; J. A. Musser; A. Labrador; D. Muller; S. P. Swordy; E. Torbet; C. Chaput; S. McKee; G. Tarle; A. D. Tomasch; S. L. Nutter; G. A. deNolfo

2000-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

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361

FEASIBILITY STUDY II OF A MUON BASED NEUTRINO SOURCE.  

SciTech Connect

The concept of using a muon storage ring to provide a well characterized beam of muon and electron neutrinos (a Neutrino Factory) has been under study for a number of years now at various laboratories throughout the world. The physics program of a Neutrino Factoryis focused on the relatively unexplored neutrino sector. In conjunction with a detector located a suitable distance from the neutrino source, the facility would make valuable contributions to the study of neutrino masses and lepton mixing. A Neutrino Factory is expected to improve the measurement accuracy of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) and {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32} and provide measurements of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) and the sign of {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}. It may also be able to measure CP violation in the lepton sector.

GALLARDO,J.C.; OZAKI,S.; PALMER,R.B.; ZISMAN,M.

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Implementation of the Control System for the LHCb Muon Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Muon Detector of LHCb will be equipped with 1368 Multi- Wire Proportional Chambers and 24 Triple-GEM Detectors. Within the Framework of the CERN Control System Project, using PVSS as the main tool, we are developing an instrument to manage the Muon System of LHCb. Adjustment and monitoring of High and Low Voltage power supplies, on-line diagnostics and ne tuning of the Front-End read-out devices, data acquisition from the gas system and the monitoring of pressure and temperature of the experimental hall are being implemented. The system will also look after long term data archiving and alert handling. The Control System performance is currently under evaluation in a cosmic ray station. Built as a nal quality control of the LHCb Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers, allowing acquisition of data from as many as 600 Front-End readout channels, the cosmic ray station is fully managed by means of a Control System prototype.

Pinci, Davide; Chiodi, Giacomo; Iacoangeli, Francesco; Nobrega, Rafael; Rinaldi, Walter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

RECENT PROGRESS TOWARD A MUON RECIRCULATING LINEAR ACCELERATOR  

SciTech Connect

Both Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require very rapid acceleration due to the short lifetime of muons. After a capture and bunching section, a linac raises the energy to about 900 MeV, and is followed by one or more Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA), possibly followed by a Rapid Cycling Synchnotron (RCS) or Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring. A RLA reuses the expensive RF linac section for a number of passes at the price of having to deal with different energies within the same linac. Various techniques including pulsed focusing quadruopoles, beta frequency beating, and multipass arcs have been investigated via simulations to improve the performance and reduce the cost of such RLAs.

Slawomir Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin, Kevin Beard

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The scattering of muons in low Z materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the measurement of the scattering of 172 MeV/c muons in assorted materials, including liquid hydrogen, motivated by the need to understand ionization cooling for muon acceleration. Data are compared with predictions from the Geant 4 simulation code and this simulation is used to deconvolute detector effects. The scattering distributions obtained are compared with the Moliere theory of multiple scattering and, in the case of liquid hydrogen, with ELMS. With the exception of ELMS, none of the models are found to provide a good description of the data. The results suggest that ionization cooling will work better than would be predicted by Geant 4.7.0p01.

D. Attwood; P. Bell; S. Bull; T. McMahon; J. Wilson; R. Fernow; P. Gruber; A. Jamdagni; K. Long; E. McKigney; P. Savage; M. Curtis-Rouse; T. R. Edgecock; M. Ellis; J. Lidbury; W. J. Murray; P. Norton; K. Peach; K. Ishida; Y. Matsuda; K. Nagamine; S. Nakamura; G. M. Marshall; S. Benveniste; D. Cline; Y. Fukui; K. Lee; Y. Pischalnikov; S. Holmes; A. Bogacz

2005-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

365

Baseline scenario(s) for muon collider proton driver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper gives an overview of the various muon collider scenarios and the requirements they put on the Proton Driver. The required proton power is about 4-6MW in all the scenarios, but the bunch repetition rate varies between 12 and 65Hz. Since none of the muon collider scenarios have been simulated end-to-end, it would be advisable to plan for an upgrade path to around 10MW. Although the proton driver energy is flexible, cost arguments seems to favor a relatively low energy. In particular, at Fermilab 8GeV seems most attractive, partly due to the possibility of reusing the three existing fixed energy storage rings for bunch manipulations.

Jansson, Andreas; /Fermilab

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect

From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size, and their partial or total evaporation in the expanding flow.

Armijo, Julien

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Measurement of the muon charge asymmetry in inclusive pp to WX production at sqrt(s)=7 TeV and an improved determination of light parton distribution functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of the muon charge asymmetry in inclusive pp to WX production at sqrt(s)=7 TeV are presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 inverse femtobarns recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. With a sample of more than twenty million W to mu nu events, the statistical precision is greatly improved in comparison to previous measurements. These new results provide additional constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton in the range of the Bjorken scaling variable x from 10E-3 to 10E-1. These measurements and the recent CMS measurement of associated W + charm production are used together with the cross sections for inclusive deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA in a next-to-leading-order QCD analysis. The determination of the valence quark distributions is improved, and the strange-quark distribution is probed directly through the leading-order process g + s to W + c in proton-proton collisions at the LHC.

CMS Collaboration

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

368

Photon-tagged jet measurements in Pb+Pb collisions with the CMS detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented are the results of a detailed study for a complete simulation of the CMS detectors at the LHC in view of the expected modification of jet fragmentation functions in central Pb+Pb collisions at (s_NN)**0.5=5.5 TeV compared to the vacuum (p+p) case. The study is based on photon-jet events, using the correlation between isolated high-transverse energy (E_T>70 GeV) photons and fully reconstructed jets, based on the information provided by the CMS calorimeters and silicon tracker.

C Loizides; for the CMS Collaboration

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

369

Press Pass | Press Release | July 4, 2012: Search for Higgs boson at Large  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 July 4, 2012 For immediate release Media Contact: Kathryn Jepsen, Fermilab Office of Communication, 630-659-6403, media@fnal.gov Experts available for comment on the Higgs search results: Dan Green, Fermilab (CMS)--773-414-2852 Patty McBride, Fermilab (CMS)--312-375-6825 Joel Butler, Fermilab (CMS, at ICHEP in Australia) - 630 651 4619 Fact sheet, images, graphics and videos available here Editor's note: The following US LHC news release was jointly issued by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Fermilab serves as the U.S. hub for the nearly 1,000 scientists and engineers from U.S. universities and laboratories who participate in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. Fermilab hosts the LHC Physics

370

Spontaneous Muon Emission during Fission, a New Nuclear Radioactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper the essential theoretical predictions for the nuclear muonic radioactivity are presented by using a special fission-like model similar with that used in description of the pionic emission during fission. Hence, a fission-like model for the muonic radioactivity takes into account the essential degree of freedom of the system: muon-fissility, muon-fission barrier height, etc. Using this model it was shown that most of the SHE-nuclei lie in the region where the muonic fissility parameters attain their limiting value X=1. Hence, the SHE-region is characterized by the absence of a classical barrier toward spontaneous muon and pion emissions. Numerical estimations on the yields for the natural muonic radioactivities of the transuranium elements as well numerical values for barrier heights are given only for even-even parent nuclei. Some experimental results from LCP-identification emission spectrum are reviewed. Also, the experimental results obtained by Khryachkov et al, using new spectrometer for investigation of ternary nuclear fission, are presented. The OPERA-experiment proposed to perform search for muonic radioactivity from lead nuclei, in the low background conditions offered by the Gran Sasso underground Laboratory (LNGS), is discussed.

D. B. Ion; M. L. D. Ion; Reveica Ion-Mihai

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

371

Status of the Fermilab Muon (g-2) Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New Muon (g-2) Collaboration at Fermilab has proposed to measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a{sub {mu}}, a factor of four better than was done in E821 at the Brookhaven AGS, which obtained a{sub {mu}} = [116592089(63)] x 10{sup -11} {+-} 0.54 ppm. The last digit of a{sub {mu}} is changed from the published value owing to a new value of the ratio of the muon-to-proton magnetic moment that has become available. At present there appears to be a difference between the Standard-Model value and the measured value, at the {approx}= 3 standard deviation level when electron-positron annihilation data are used to determine the lowest-order hadronic piece of the Standard Model contribution. The improved experiment, along with further advances in the determination of the hadronic contribution, should clarify this difference. Because of its ability to constrain the interpretation of discoveries made at the LHC, the improved measurement will be of significant value, whatever discoveries may come from the LHC.

Roberts, B.Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Our Next Two Steps for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography  

SciTech Connect

After the vast disasters caused by the great earthquake and tsunami in eastern Japan, we proposed applying our Muon Tomography (MT) technique to help and improve the emergency situation at Fukushima Daiichi using cosmic-ray muons. A reactor-tomography team was formed at LANL which was supported by the Laboratory as a response to a request by the former Japanese Prime Minister, Naoto Kan. Our goal is to help the Japanese people and support remediation of the reactors. At LANL, we have carried out a proof-of-principle technical demonstration and simulation studies that established the feasibility of MT to image a reactor core. This proposal covers the next two critical steps for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Imaging: (1) undertake case study mock-up experiments of Fukushima Daiichi, and (2) system optimization. We requested funding to the US and Japanese government to assess damage of reactors at Fukushima Daiichi. The two steps will bring our project to the 'ready-to-go' level.

Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

373

Open-Midplane Dipoles for a Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect

For a muon collider with copious decay particles in the plane of the storage ring, open-midplane dipoles (OMD) may be preferable to tungsten-shielded cosine-theta dipoles of large aperture. The OMD should have its midplane completely free of material, so as to dodge the radiation from decaying muons. Analysis funded by a Phase I SBIR suggests that a field of 10-20 T should be feasible, with homogeneity of 1 x 10{sup -4} and energy deposition low enough for conduction cooling to 4.2 K helium. If funded, a Phase II SBIR would refine the analysis and build and test a proof-of-principle magnet. A Phase I SBIR has advanced the feasibility of open-midplane dipoles for the storage ring of a muon collider. A proposed Phase II SBIR would refine these predictions of stresses, deformations, field quality and energy deposition. Design optimizations would continue, leading to the fabrication and test, for the first time, of a proof-of-principle dipole of truly open-midplane design.

Weggel, R.; Gupta, R.; Kolonko, J., Scanlan, R., Cline, D., Ding, X., Anerella, M., Kirk, H., Palmer, B., Schmalzle, J.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

374

LHCb: The LHCb Muon detector commissioning and first running scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb Muon detector, being part of the first trigger level (L0), has been optimized in order to provide a fast and efficient identification of the muons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The expected performances are: 95% L0 trigger efficiency within a 25ns time window and muon identification in L0 with a pT resolution of ~20%. The detector has been built, to met those stringent requirements, using Multi Wire Proportional Chambers and Gas Electron Multiplier (in the innermost region, closest to the IP) technology. The chambers (1368 MWPC + 12 GEM) are arranged in 5 detector stations, interspersed with iron filters placed along the beam pipe. While the installation of chambers in stations 2 to 5 has already been completed, the work on the first and most challenging station is still ongoing and expected to end by July 09. The results obtained in the commissioning of all the installed chambers as well as the performances measured by means of data acquired during cosmics runs since September 08 are reviewe...

Furcas, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

MaxEnt-Burg Application to Muon-Spin Resonance  

SciTech Connect

Muon-Spin Rotation ({mu}SR) is an experimental technique similar to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). {mu}SR data are recorded as a set of time-series histograms of muon-decay events. Both {mu}SR and NMR regularly produce signals that are overlapping, weak and/or broadened in frequency space. These {mu}SR histograms are usually analyzed by curve fitting and Fourier transformations. However, several NMR and {mu}SR groups have developed Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt, ME) applications to improve the sensitivity of the time series analysis. We have focused on the application of the ME-Burg algorithm. The optimal number of autoregression coefficients is between N/3 and N/5 where N is the total number of data points. Selected results for simulated data and real data ME-{mu}SR applications are reported. Most of our {mu}SR work is for cuprate superconductor studies. The strength of the ME-Burg algorithm is fully used, as there is a clear relationship between the muon-spin signal S(i) at any time i and the signals S(i-k) at earlier times. ME-Burg has the major advantage of producing in the frequency transform only structure for which sufficient statistical evidence is present.

Boekema, C.; Browne, M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose CA 95192-0106 (United States)

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

376

Lateral Distribution for Aligned Events in Muon Groups Deep Underground  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper concerns the so-called aligned events observed in cosmic rays. The phenomenon of the alignment of the most energetic subcores of gamma-ray--hadron ($\\gamma-h$) families (particles of the highest energies in the central EAS core) was firstly found in the "Pamir" emulsion chamber experiment and related to a coplanar particle production at $E_0>10^{16}$ eV. Here a separation distribution (distances between pairs of muons) for aligned events has been analyzed throughout muon groups measured by Baksan Underground Scintillation Telescope (BUST) for threshold energies $0.85 \\div 3.2$ TeV during a period of 7.7 years. Only muon groups of multiplicity $m\\geq 4$ with inclined trajectories for an interval of zenith angles $50^\\circ - 60^\\circ$ were selected for the analysis. The analysis has revealed that the distribution complies with the exponential law. Meanwhile the distributions become steeper with the increase of threshold energy. There has been no difference between the lateral distribution of all the groups and the distribution of the aligned groups.

A. L. Tsyabuk; R. A. Mukhamedshin; Yu. V. Stenkin

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

377

An Improved Limit on the Electric Dipole Moment of the Muon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data from the muon g-2 experiment at Brookhaven National Lab has been analyzed to search for a muon electric dipole moment(EDM), which would violate parity and time reversal symmetries. An EDM would cause a tilt in the spin precession plane of the muons, resulting in a vertical oscillation in the position of electrons hitting the detectors. No signal has been observed. Based on this analysis, an improved limit of $2.8 \\times 10^{-19} e-cm(95% CL) is set on the muon EDM.

Ronald McNabb

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Muon Charge Information from Geomagnetic Deviation in Inclined Extensive Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose to extract the charge information of high energy muons in very inclined extensive air showers by analyzing their relative lateral positions in the shower transverse plane. We calculate the muon lateral deviation under the geomagnetic field and compare it to dispersive deviations from other causes. By our criterion of resolvability, positive and negative muons with energies above $10^4$ GeV will be clearly separated into two lobes if the shower zenith angle is larger than $70^\\circ$. Thus we suggest a possible approach to measure the $\\mu^+ / \\mu^-$ ratio for high energy muons.

BingKan Xue; Bo-Qiang Ma

2006-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

379

Hadronic Light-by-Light Contribution to Muon g-2: Status and Prospects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review the recent calculations and present status of the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the muon g-2.

Joaquim Prades

2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

380

A Search For the Higgs Boson in CMS in the Two Photon Decay Channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a search for SM Higgs Boson in the two photon decay mode conducted by the CMS experiment with the data accumulated during the 2010 & 2011 running of the LHC at center of mass collision energy of 7 TeV.

Palmer, Christopher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A Search For the Higgs Boson in CMS in the Two Photon Decay Channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a search for SM Higgs Boson in the two photon decay mode conducted by the CMS experiment with the data accumulated during the 2010 & 2011 running of the LHC at center of mass collision energy of 7 TeV.

Christopher Palmer

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

Radiation-Hard Quartz Cerenkov Calorimeters U. Akgun and Y. Onel (for CMS Collaboration)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation-Hard Quartz Cerenkov Calorimeters U. Akgun and Y. Onel (for CMS Collaboration) Department identified as a radiation-hard material that can be used for Cerenkov calorimeters of the future experiments as the characteristics of the quartz fiber and plate Cerenkov calorimeters that have been built, designed, and proposed

Akgun, Ugur

383

Soft physics capabilities of CMS in p-p and Pb-Pb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CMS experiment will provide good quality measurements of yields and spectra of identified charged and neutral particles, both in p-p and heavy-ion collisions, thus contributing to the study of soft hadronic physics at the LHC energies.

Ferenc Sikler; for the CMS Collaboration

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

CMS validation Experience: Test-beam 2004 data vs Geant4  

SciTech Connect

A comparison between the Geant4 Monte-Carlo simulation of CMS Detector's Calorimetric System and data from the 2004 Test-Beam at CERN's SPS H2 beam-line is presented. The overall simulated response agrees quite well with the measured response. Slight differences in the longitudinal shower profiles between the MC predictions made with different Physics Lists are observed.

Piperov, Stefan [Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois (United States); INRNE-BAS, Sofia (Bulgaria)

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

385

Search for narrow resonances in the lepton final state at CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the results of searches for high-mass narrow resonances decaying into pairs of leptons using pp collisions at 7 TeV delivered by LHC and collected with the CMS detector in 2010 and 2011. These include searches for the Z' bosons and RS gravitons.

Gennadiy Kukartsev; for the CMS Collaboration

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

386

Search for narrow resonances in the lepton final state at CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the results of searches for high-mass narrow resonances decaying into pairs of leptons using pp collisions at 7 TeV delivered by LHC and collected with the CMS detector in 2010 and 2011. These include searches for the Z' bosons and RS gravitons.

Kukartsev, Gennadiy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

THERMAL SHOCK ANALYSIS OF WINDOWS INTERACTING WITH ENERGETIC, FOCUSED BEAM OF THE BNL MUON TARGET EXPERIMENT*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMAL SHOCK ANALYSIS OF WINDOWS INTERACTING WITH ENERGETIC, FOCUSED BEAM OF THE BNL MUON TARGET In this paper, issues associated with the interaction of a proton beam with windows designed for the muon to maintain an enclosed environment around the target implies the use of beam windows that will survive

McDonald, Kirk

388

Study of single muons with the Large Volume Detector at Gran Sasso Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present study is based on the sample of about 3 mln single muons observed by LVD at underground Gran Sasso Laboratory during 36500 live hours from June 1992 to February 1998. We have measured the muon intensity at slant depths from 3 km w.e. to 20 km w.e. Most events are high energy downward muons produced by meson decay in the atmosphere. The analysis of these muons has revealed the power index of pion and kaon spectrum: 2.76 \\pm 0.05. The reminders are horizontal muons produced by the neutrino interactions in the rock surrounding LVD. The value of this flux is obtained. The results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations and the world data.

Aglietta, M; Antonioli, P; Badino, G; Bari, G; Basile, M; Berezinsky, Veniamin Sergeevich; Bersani, F; Bertaina, M; Bertoni, R; Bruni, G; Cara Romeo, G; Castagnoli, C; Castellina, A; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Dadykin, V L; Dos Santos, L G; Enikeev, R I; Fulgione, W; Galeotti, P; Ghia, P; Giusti, P; Gómez, F; Granella, R; Grianti, F; Gurentsov, V I; Iacobucci, G; Inoue, N; Kemp, E; Khalchukov, F F; Korolkova, E V; Korchaguin, P V; Korchaguin, V B; Kudryavtsev, V A; Luvisetto, Marisa L; Malguin, A S; Massam, Thomas; Mengotti-Silva, N; Morello, C; Nania, R; Navarra, G; Periale, L; Pesci, A; Picchi, P; Pless, I A; Ryasny, V G; Ryazhskaya; Saavedra, O; Saitoh, K; Sartorelli, G; Selvi, M; Taborgna, N; Talochkin, P; Trinchero, G C; Tsuji, S; Turtelli, A; Vallania, P; Vernetto, S; Vigorito, C; Votano, L; Wada, T; Weinstein, R; Widgoff, M; Yakushev, V F; Yamamoto, I; Zatsepin, G T; Zichichi, A

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Contributions to the muon's anomalous magnetic moment from a hidden sector  

SciTech Connect

Research Highlights: > Described scenario involving hidden and connector particles that couple to the standard model which could be relevant for dark matter. > Examined constraints on such particles in the case that the SM particle they couple to is the muon. > Found regions of couplings which could explain the discrepancy in the muon's anomalous magnetic moment which differ for different hidden and connector particles' spins. - Abstract: The measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon provides a stringent test of the standard model and of any physics that lies beyond it. There is currently a deviation of 3.1{sigma} between the standard model prediction for the muon's anomalous magnetic moment and its experimental value. We calculate the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment in theories where the muon couples to a particle in a hidden sector (that is, uncharged under the standard model) and a connector (which has nontrivial standard model gauge and hidden sector quantum numbers).

McKeen, David, E-mail: mckeen@uvic.ca [Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

The Observation of Up-going Charged Particles Produced by High Energy Muons in Underground Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study of the production of up-going charged particles in inelastic interactions of down-going underground muons is reported, using data obtained from the MACRO detector at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. In a sample of 12.2 10^6 single muons, corresponding to a detector livetime of 1.55 y, 243 events are observed having an up-going particle associated with a down-going muon. These events are analysed to determine the range and emission angle distributions of the up-going particle, corrected for detection and reconstruction efficiency. Measurements of the muon neutrino flux by underground detectors are often based on the observation of through-going and stopping muons produced in $\

The MACRO Collaboration; M. Ambrosio et al

1998-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Cosmic Ray Sun Shadow in Soudan 2 Underground Muon Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The absorption of cosmic rays by the sun produces a shadow at the earth. The angular offset and broadening of the shadow are determined by the magnitude and structure of the interplanetary magnetic field (IPMF) in the inner solar system. We report the first measurement of the solar cosmic ray shadow by detection of deep underground muon flux in observations made during the entire ten-year interval 1989 to 1998. The sun shadow varies significantly during this time, with a $3.3\\sigma$ shadow observed during the years 1995 to 1998.

Soudan 2 Collaboration

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

392

Enhanced collective focusing of intense neutralized ion beam pulses in the presence of weak solenoidal magnetic fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of ion drivers for warm dense matter and high energy density physics applications and heavy ion fusion involves transverse focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams to a small spot size on the target. To facilitate the process, the compression occurs in a long drift section filled with a dense background plasma, which neutralizes the intense beam self-fields. Typically, the ion bunch charge is better neutralized than its current, and as a result a net self-pinching (magnetic) force is produced. The self-pinching effect is of particular practical importance, and is used in various ion driver designs in order to control the transverse beam envelope. In the present work we demonstrate that this radial self-focusing force can be significantly enhanced if a weak (B {approx} 100 G) solenoidal magnetic field is applied inside the neutralized drift section, thus allowing for substantially improved transport. It is shown that in contrast to magnetic self-pinching, the enhanced collective self-focusing has a radial electric field component and occurs as a result of the overcompensation of the beam charge by plasma electrons, whereas the beam current becomes well-neutralized. As the beam leaves the neutralizing drift section, additional transverse focusing can be applied. For instance, in the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX) a strong (several Tesla) final focus solenoid is used for this purpose. In the present analysis we propose that the tight final focus in the NDCX experiments may possibly be achieved by using a much weaker (few hundred Gauss) magnetic lens, provided the ion beam carries an equal amount of co-moving neutralizing electrons from the preceding drift section into the lens. In this case the enhanced focusing is provided by the collective electron dynamics strongly affected by a weak applied magnetic field.

Dorf, Mikhail A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Design report for an indirectly cooled 3-m diameter superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Fermilab Collider Detector Facility (CDF) is a large detector system designed to study anti pp collisions at very high center of mass energies. The central detector for the CDF shown employs a large axial magnetic field volume instrumented with a central tracking chamber composed of multiple layers of cylindrical drift chambers and a pair of intermediate tracking chambers. The purpose of this system is to determine the trajectories, sign of electric charge, and momenta of charged particles produced with polar angles between 10 and 170 degrees. The magnetic field volume required for tracking is approximately 3.5 m long an 3 m in diameter. To provide the desired ..delta..p/sub T/p/sub T/ less than or equal to 1.5% at 50 GeV/c using drift chambers with approx. 200..mu.. resolution the field inside this volume should be 1.5 T. The field should be as uniform as is practical to simplify both track finding and the reconstruction of particle trajectories with the drift chambers. Such a field can be produced by a cylindrical current sheet solenoid with a uniform current density of 1.2 x 10/sup 6/ A/m (1200 A/mm) surrounded by an iron return yoke. For practical coils and return yokes, both central electromagnetic and central hadronic calorimetry must be located outside the coil of the magnet. This geometry requires that the coil and the cryostat be thin both in physical thickness and in radiation and absorption lengths. This dual requirement of high linear current density and minimal coil thickness can only be satisfied using superconducting technology. In this report we describe the design for an indirectly cooled superconducting solenoid to meet the requirements of the Fermilab CDF. The components of the magnet system are discussed in the following chapters, with a summary of parameters listed in Appendix A.

Fast, R.; Grimson, J.; Kephart, R.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Muon Collider interaction region and machine-detector interface design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the key systems of a Muon Collider (MC) - seen as the most exciting option for the energy frontier machine in the post-LHC era - is its interaction region (IR). Designs of its optics, magnets and machine-detector interface are strongly interlaced and iterative. As a result of recent comprehensive studies, consistent solutions for the 1.5-TeV c.o.m. MC IR have been found and are described here. To provide the required momentum acceptance, dynamic aperture and chromaticity, an innovative approach was used for the IR optics. Conceptual designs of large-aperture high-field dipole and high-gradient quadrupole magnets based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor were developed and analyzed in terms of the operating margin, field quality, mechanics, coil cooling and quench protection. Shadow masks in the interconnect regions and liners inside the magnets are used to mitigate the unprecedented dynamic heat deposition due to muon decays ({approx}0.5 kW/m). It is shown that an appropriately designed machine-detector interface (MDI) with sophisticated shielding in the detector has a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector.

Mokhov, N.V.; Alexahin, Y.I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Striganov, S.I.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics should allow an order of magnitude smaller final equilibrium transverse beam emittances than conventional ionization cooling alone. In this scheme, a half-integer parametric resonance is induced in a cooling channel causing the beam to be naturally focused with the period of the channel?s free oscillations. Thin absorbers placed at the focal points then cool the beam?s angular divergence through the usual ionization cooling mechanism where each absorber is followed by RF cavities. A special continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion was developed for PIC. We present the results of modeling PIC in such a channel using GEANT4/ G4beamline. We discuss the challenge of precise beam aberration control from one absorber to another over a wide angular spread.

V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, B. Erdelyi, J.A. Maloney

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Parametric-resonance ionization cooling of muon beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics should allow an order of magnitude smaller final equilibrium transverse beam emittances than conventional ionization cooling alone. In this scheme, a half-integer parametric resonance is induced in a cooling channel causing the beam to be naturally focused with the period of the channel's free oscillations. Thin absorbers placed at the focal points then cool the beam's angular divergence through the usual ionization cooling mechanism where each absorber is followed by RF cavities. A special continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion was developed for PIC. We present the results of modeling PIC in such a channel using GEANT4/G4beamline. We discuss the challenge of precise beam aberration control from one absorber to another over a wide angular spread.

Morozov, V. S.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Afanasev, A.; Johnson, R. P.; Erdelyi, B.; Maloney, J. A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Muons, Inc., Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States) and George Washington University, Washington, D.C. 20052 (United States); Muons, Inc., Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

Status of Testing and Characterization of CMS Alloy 617 and Alloy 230  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status and progress in testing and characterizing CMS Alloy 617 and Alloy 230 tasks in FY06 at ORNL and INL are described. ORNL research has focused on CMS Alloy 617 development and creep and tensile properties of both alloys. In addition to refurbishing facilities to conduct tests, a significant amount of creep and tensile data on Alloy 230, worth several years of research funds and time, has been located and collected from private enterprise. INL research has focused on the creep-fatigue behavior of standard chemistry Alloy 617 base metal and fusion weldments. Creep-fatigue tests have been performed in air, vacuum, and purified Ar environments at 800 and 1000 C. Initial characterization and high-temperature joining work has also been performed on Alloy 230 and CCA Alloy 617 in preparation for creep-fatigue testing.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Battiste, Rick [ORNL; Terry, Totemeier [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Denis, Clark [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Observation of diffraction with the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A clear evidence of inclusive diffraction observed by the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in minimum bias events at $\\sqrt{s}=$0.9 TeV, 2.36 TeV is presented. The observed diffractive signal is dominated by inclusive single-diffractive dissociation and can be identified by the presence of a Large Rapidity Gap that extends over the forward region of the CMS detector. A comparison of the data with Monte Carlo predictions provided by PYTHIA6 and PHOJET generators is given. In addition, first observation of the single-diffractive production of di-jets at $\\sqrt{s}=$7 TeV is presented.

Dmytro Volyanskyy

2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

399

High Level Trigger Configuration and Handling of Trigger Tables in the CMS Filter Farm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is currently being commissioned and is scheduled to collect the first pp collision data in 2008. CMS features a two-level trigger system. The Level-1 trigger, based on custom hardware, is designed to reduce the collision rate of 40 MHz to approximately 100 kHz. Data for events accepted by the Level-1 trigger are read out and assembled by an Event Builder. The High Level Trigger (HLT) employs a set of sophisticated software algorithms, to analyze the complete event information, and further reduce the accepted event rate for permanent storage and analysis. This paper describes the design and implementation of the HLT Configuration Management system. First experiences with commissioning of the HLT system are also reported.

Bauer, G; Behrens, U; Boyer, V; Branson, J; Brett, A; Cano, E; Carboni, A; Ciganek, M; Cittolin, S; O'dell, V; Erhan, S; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino, R; Gulmini, M; Gutleber, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Kim, J C; Klute, M; Lipeles, E; Perez, J L; Maron, G; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Moser, R; Mlot, E G; Murray, S; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Paus, C; Petrucci, A; Pieri, M; Pollet, L; Racz, A; Sakulin, H; Sani, M; Schieferdecker, P; Schwick, C; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, I; Tsirigkas, D; Varela, J

2009-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

400

A parameterisation of the flux and energy spectrum of single and multiple muons in deep water/ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper parametric formulas are presented to evaluate the flux of atmospheric muons in the range of vertical depth between 1.5 to 5 km of water equivalent (km w.e.) and up to 85^o for the zenith angle. We take into account their arrival in bundles with different muon multiplicities. The energy of muons inside bundles is then computed considering the muon distance from the bundle axis. This parameterisation relies on a full Monte Carlo simulation of primary Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions, shower propagation in the atmosphere and muon transport in deep water [1]. The primary CR flux and interaction models, in the range in which they can produce muons which may reach 1.5 km w.e., suffer from large experimental uncertainties. We used a primary CR flux and an interaction model able to correctly reproduce the flux, the multiplicity distribution, the spatial distance between muons as measured by the underground MACRO experiment.

M. Bazzotti; S. Biagi; G. Carminati; S. Cecchini; T. Chiarusi; G. Giacomelli; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Abstract Performance of the CMS Pixel Detector at an upgraded LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CMS experiment will include a pixel detector for pattern recognition and vertexing. It will consist of three barrel layers and two endcaps on each side, providing three space-points up to a pseudorapidity of 2.1. Taking into account the expected limitations of its performance in the LHC environment an 8-9 layer pixel detector for an upgraded LHC is discussed.

R. Horisberger; D. Kotli?ski; T. Rohe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Reconstruction and selection of Z ?????+?? jet +?’ s decays at the CMS experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the LHC tau leptons are expected in final states of many important physics processes including Supersymmetry and the production of Higgs boson(s) and other exotic particles. An efficient and accurate ? reconstruction and identification are therefore an important part of the CMS physics programme. Z 0 ?? + ? ? decays are often considered the “standard candle” of tau reconstruction as they validate tau lepton identification and provide a test bench for Higgs searches (for which they constitute the main irreducible background).

Letizia Lusito; The CMS Collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

System Tests with DC-DC Converters for the CMS Silicon Strip Tracker at SLHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The delivery of power is considered to be one of the major challenges for the upgrade of the CMS silicon strip tracker for SLHC. The inevitable increase in granularity and complexity of the device is expected to result in a power consumption comparable or even higher than the power consumption of todays' strip tracker. However, the space available for cables will remain the same. In addition, a further increase of the tracker material budget due to cables and cooling is considered inacceptable, as the performance of the CMS detector must not be compromised for the upgrade. Novel powering schemes such as serial powering or usage of DC-DC converters have been proposed to solve the problem. To test the second option, substructures of the current CMS silicon strip tracker have been operated for the first time with off-the-shelf DC-DC buck converters as well as with first prototypes of custom-designed DC-DC converters. The tests are described and the results are discussed.

Klein, K; Karpinski, W; Merz, J; Sammet, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

20 years of cosmic muons research performed in IFIN-HH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last two decades a modern direction in particle physics research has been developed in IFIN-HH Bucharest, Romania. The history started with the WILLI detector built in IFIN-HH Bucharest in collaboration with KIT Karlsruhe (formerly Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe). The detector was designed for measurements of the low energy muon charge ratio (geomagnetic field on the trajectories of positive and negative muons in air. In parallel, flux measurement, taking into account muon events with nergies > 0.4GeV, show a diurnal modulation of the muon flux. The analysis of the muon events for energies geomagnetic field, depending, in particular, of the primary mass. Based on the results, we can say that WILLI-EAS experiment could be used for testing the hadronic interaction models. Measurements of the high energy muon flux in underground of the salt mine from Slanic Prahova, Romania was performed using a new mobile detector developed in IFIN-HH, Bucharest. Consisting of 2 scintillator plates measuring in coincidence, the detector is installed on a van which facilitates measurements on different positions at surface or in underground. The detector was used to measure muon fluxes in different locations at surface or in underground. The detector was used to measure muon fluxes at different sites of Romania and in the underground of the salt mines from Slanic Prahova, Romania where IFIN-HH has a modern underground laboratory. New methods for the detection of cosmic ray muons are investigated in our institute based on scintillator techniques using optical fiber and MPPC photodyodes.

Mitrica, Bogdan [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH, Bucharest, P.O.B.MG-6 (Romania)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

405

Search for Gluino-Mediated Supersymmetry in Events With Bottom-Quark Jets and Missing Transverse Energy With the Compact Muon Solenoid Detector at the Large Hadron Collider With Proton-Proton Collisions at 8 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and H. E. Haber. Higgs Boson Theory and Phenomenology.et al. , The LEP Working Group for Higgs Boson Searches.for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at LEP. Phys.Lett. ,

Nguyen, Harold

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Search for Gluino-Mediated Supersymmetry in Events With Bottom-Quark Jets and Missing Transverse Energy With the Compact Muon Solenoid Detector at the Large Hadron Collider With Proton-Proton Collisions at 8 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ZL QCD-dominated events, the trigger efficiencies are splitobserved number of events (assuming 100% trigger efficiency)not all events passing the prescaled trigger are actually

Nguyen, Harold

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Vertical muon intensity measured with MACRO at the Gran Sasso laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical underground muon intensity has been measured in the slant depth range 3200--7000 hg cm{sup {minus}2} (standard rock) with the completed lower part of the MACRO detector at the Gran Sasso laboratory, using a large sample of data. These observations are used to compute the surface muon flux and the primary ``all-nucleon`` spectrum. An analysis of systematic uncertainties introduced by the interaction models in the atmosphere and the underground propagation of muons is presented. A comparison of our results with published data is also presented.

Ambrosio, M.; Antolini, R.; Auriemma, G.; Baker, R.; Baldini, A.; Barbarino, G.C.; Barish, B.C.; Battistoni, G.; Bellotti, R.; Bemporad, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bilokon, H.; Bisi, V.; Bloise, C.; Bower, C.; Bussino, S.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Campana, D.; Carboni, M.; Castellano, M.; Cecchini, S.; Cei, F.; Celio, P.; Chiarella, V.; Corona, A.; Coutu, S.; De Cataldo, G.; Dekhissi, H.; De Marzo, C.; De Mitri, I.; De Vincenzi, M.; Di Credico, A.; Erriquez, O.; Favuzzi, C.; Forti, C.; Fusco, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Giannini, G.; Giglietto, N.; Grassi, M.; Grillo, A.; Guarino, F.; Guarnaccia, P.; Gustavino, C.; Habig, A.; Hanson, K.; Hawthorne, A.; Heinz, R.; Hong, J.T.; Iarocci, E.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kearns, E.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Lamanna, E.; Lane, C.; Levin, D.S.; Lipari, P.; Liu, R.; Longley, N.P.; Longo, M.J.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, G.; Mancarella, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Margiotta-Neri, A.; Marini, A.; Martello, D.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Michael, D.G.; Mikheyev, S.; Miller, L.; Mittelbrunn, M.; Monacelli, P.; Montaruli, T.; Monteno, M.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nicolo, D.; Nolty, R.; Okada, C.; Orth, C.; Osteria, G.; Palamara, O.; Parlati, S.; Patera, V.; Patrizii, L.; Pazzi, R.; Peck, C.W.; Petrera, S.; Pignatano, N.D.; Pistilli, P.; Popa, V.; Raino, A.; Reynoldson, J.; Ronga, F.; Sanzgiri, A.; Sartogo, F.; Satriano, C.; Satta, L.; Scapparone, E.; Scholberg, K.; Sciubba, A.; Serra-Lugaresi, P.; Severi, M.; Sitta, M.; Spinelli, P.; Spinetti, M.; Spurio, M.; Steinberg, R.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Surdo, A.; Tarle, G.; Tassoni, F.; Togo, V.; Valente, V.; Walter, C.W.; Webb, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita di Bari and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 70126 Bari (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita di Bologna and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 40126 Bologna (Italy)]|[Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)]|[California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)...

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Alternative Muon Front-end for the International Design Study (IDS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss alternative designs of the muon capture front end of the Neutrino Factory International Design Study (IDS). In the front end, a proton bunch on a target creates secondary pions that drift into a capture channel, decaying into muons. A sequence of RF cavities forms the resulting muon beams into strings of bunches of differing energies, aligns the bunches to (nearly) equal central energies, and initiates ionization cooling. This design is affected by limitations on accelerating gradients within magnetic fields. The effects of gradient limitations are explored, and mitigation strategies are presented

Alekou, A; Martini, M; Prior, G; Rogers, C; Stratakis, D; Yoshikawa, C; Zisman, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron interaction cross sections for boron. While corrections to the data files themselves are simple to implement and distribute, it is quite possible, however, that coding changes may be required in G4beamline or even in GEANT4 to fully correct nuclear interactions. Regardless, these studies are ongoing and future results will be reflected in updated releases of G4beamline.

Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Measurement of muon neutrino quasi-elastic scattering on carbon  

SciTech Connect

Low energy (200 < E{sub v} < 2000 MeV) neutrino oscillation experiments, including MiniBooNE, require a model of charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino interactions to predict signal samples. Using a high-statistics sample of muon neutrino CCQE events, MiniBooNE finds that a simple Fermi gas model, with appropriate adjustments, accurately characterizes the CCQE events observed in a carbon-based detector. The extracted parameters include an effective axial mass, M{sub A} = 1.23 {+-} 0.20 GeV, used to describe the four-momentum dependence of the axial-vector form factor of the nucleon; and a Pauli-suppression parameter, {kappa} = 1.019 {+-} 0.011.

Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; Djurcic, Z.; /Alabama U. /Bucknell

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Mercury Handling for the Target System for a Muon Collider  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The baseline target concept for a Muon Collider or Neutrino Factory is a free-stream mercury jet being impacted by an 8-GeV proton beam. The target is located within a 20-T magnetic field, which captures the generated pions that are conducted to a downstream decay channel. Both the mercury and the proton beam are introduced at slight downward angles to the magnetic axis. A pool of mercury serves as a receiving reservoir for the mercury and a dump for the unexpended proton beam. The impact energy of the remaining beam and jet are substantial, and it is required that splashes and waves be controlled in order to minimize the potential for interference of pion production at the target. Design issues discussed in this paper include the nozzle, splash mitigation in the mercury pool, the mercury containment vessel, and the mercury recirculation system.

Graves, Van B [ORNL; Mcdonald, K [Princeton University; Kirk, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Weggel, Robert [Particle Beam Laser, Inc.; Souchlas, Nicholas [Particle Beam Laser, Inc.; Sayed, H [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Ding, X [University of California, Los Angeles

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

INTERACTION OF MUON BEAM WITH PLASMA DEVELOPED DURING IONIZATION COOLING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle-in-cell simulations involving the interaction of muon beam (peak density 10{sup 18} m{sup 3}) with Li plasma (ionized medium) of density 10{sup 16}-10{sup 22} m{sup -3} have been performed. This study aimed to understand the effects of plasma on an incoming beam in order to explore scenario developed during the process of ionization cooling. The computer code takes into account the self-consistent electromagnetic effects of beam interacting with plasma. This study shows that the beam can pass through the plasma of densities four order of magnitude higher than its peak density. The low density plasmas are wiped out by the beam, however, the resonance is observed for densities of similar order. Study reveals the signature of plasma wakefield acceleration.

S. Ahmed, D. Kaplan, T. Roberts, L. Spentzouris, K. Beard

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Proposal to the Fermilab PAC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuSTORM facility has been designed to deliver beams of electron neutrinos and muon neutrinos (and their anti-particles) from the decay of a stored muon beam with a central momentum of 3.8 GeV/c and a momentum acceptance of 10%. The facility is unique in that it will: 1. Allow searches for sterile neutrinos of exquisite sensitivity to be carried out; 2. Serve future long- and short-baseline neutrino-oscillation programs by providing definitive measurements of electron neutrino and muon neutrino scattering cross sections off nuclei with percent-level precision; and 3. Constitutes the crucial first step in the development of muon accelerators as a powerful new technique for particle physics. The document describes the facility in detail and demonstrates its physics capabilities. This document was submitted to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee in consideration for Stage I approval.

D. Adey; S. K. Agarwalla; C. M. Ankenbrandt; R. Asfandiyarov; J. J. Back; G. Barker; E. Baussan; R. Bayes; S. Bhadra; V. Blackmore; A. Blondel; S. A. Bogacz; C. Booth; S. B. Boyd; A. Bravar; S. J. Brice; A. D. Bross; F. Cadoux; H. Cease; A. Cervera; J. Cobb; D. Colling; P. Coloma; L. Coney; A. Dobbs; J. Dobson; A. Donini; P. Dornan; M. Dracos; F. Dufour; R. Edgecock; J. Evans; M. Geelhoed; M. A. George; T. Ghosh; J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; A. de Gouvea; A. Haesler; G. Hanson; P. F. Harrison; M. Hartz; P. Hernandez; J. A. Hernando Morata; P. Hodgson; P. Huber; A. Izmaylov; Y. Karadzhov; T. Kobilarcik; J. Kopp; L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; Y. Kuno; A. Kurup; P. Kyberd; J. B. Lagrange; A. Laing; A. Liud; J. M. Link; K. Long; K. Mahn; C. Mariani; C. Martin; J. Martin; N. McCauley; K. T. McDonald; O. Mena; S. R. Mishra; N. Mokhov; J. Morfin; Y. Mori; W. Murray; D. Neuffer; R. Nichol; E. Noah; M. A. Palmer; S. Parke; S. Pascoli; J. Pasternak; M. Popovic; P. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; S. Ricciardi; C. Rogers; P. Rubinov; E. Santos; A. Sato; T. Sen; E. Scantamburlo; J. K. Sedgbeer; D. R. Smith; P. J. Smith; J. T. Sobczyk; L. Soby; F. J. P. Soler; S. Soldner-Rembold; M. Sorel; P. Snopok; P. Stamoulis; L. Stanco; S. Striganov; H. A. Tanaka; I. J. Taylor; C. Touramanis; C. D. Tunnell; Y. Uchida; N. Vassilopoulos; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; M. J. Wilking; E. Wildner; W. Winter; U. K. Yang

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Muon Radiography at LANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Muon Radiography at LANL Muon Radiography at LANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Muon Radiography at LANL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Application of tracking chambers and algorithms to observe deflections of cosmic ray muons as they pass through heavy materials Developed at: Los Alamos National Laboratory

415

Search for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCube neutrino telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009, GCN: The Gamma ray bursts Coordinates Network, http://for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCubeMereghetti, S. 2004, in Gamma-ray Bursts: 30 Years of

Abbasi, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric muons play an important role in underwater/ice neutrino detectors. In this paper, a parameterisation of the flux of single and multiple muon events, their lateral distribution and of their energy spectrum is presented. The kinematics parameters were modelled starting from a full Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of primary cosmic rays with atmospheric nuclei; secondary muons reaching the sea level were propagated in the deep water. The parametric formulas are valid for a vertical depth of 1.5-5 km w.e. and up to 85 deg for the zenith angle, and can be used as input for a fast simulation of atmospheric muons in underwater/ice detectors.

Y. Becherini; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

417

Measurement of the cosmic ray and neutrino-induced muon flux at the Sudbury neutrino observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth’s surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring ...

Formaggio, Joseph A.

418

Strong WW scattering physics: A comparative study for the LHC, NLC and a Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the model independent parameterization for a strongly interacting electroweak sector. Phenomenological studies are made to probe such a sector for future colliders such as the LHC, e{sup +}e{sup -} Linear collider and a muon collider.

Han, Tao

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The Target System and Support Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off in a hot cell. Kirk T. McDonald May 4, 2001 12 #12;The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Target System Support Facility Extensive shielding; remote handling capability. Kirk T. Mc

McDonald, Kirk

420

The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The R&D Program for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off in a hot cell. Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 18 #12;The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Target System Support Facility Extensive shielding; remote handling capability. Kirk T. Mc

McDonald, Kirk

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The Target System and Support Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off in a hot cell. Kirk T. McDonald May 4, 2001 12 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Target System Support Facility Extensive shielding; remote handling capability. Kirk T. Mc

McDonald, Kirk

422

The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The R&D Program for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

products can be distilled off in a hot cell. Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 17 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Target System Support Facility Extensive shielding; remote handling

McDonald, Kirk

423

Sleptons at post-WMAP benchmark points at LHC(CMS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a possibility to detect sleptons at post-WMAP benchmark points at LHC(CMS). We find that at $L_{tot}=30 fb^{-1}$ it would be possible to detect sleptons at points A, B, C, D, G. We also investigate the production and decays of right and left sleptons separately. We find that at $L_{tot}=30 fb^{-1}$ it would be possible to detect right sleptons with a mass up to 200 GeV and left ones with a mass up to 300 GeV.

Yu. M. Andreev; S. I. Bityukov; N. V. Krasnikov

2004-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Need for an R&D and Upgrade Program for CMS Software and Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the next ten years, the physics reach of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) will be greatly extended through increases in the instantaneous luminosity of the accelerator and large increases in the amount of collected data. Due to changes in the way Moore's Law computing performance gains have been realized in the past decade, an aggressive program of R&D is needed to ensure that the computing capability of CMS will be up to the task of collecting and analyzing this data.

Peter Elmer; Salvatore Rappoccio; Kevin Stenson; Peter Wittich

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

425

Channel control ASIC for the CMS hadron calorimeter front end readout module  

SciTech Connect

The Channel Control ASIC (CCA) is used along with a custom Charge Integrator and Encoder (QIE) ASIC to digitize signals from the hybrid photo diodes (HPDs) and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in the CMS hadron calorimeter. The CCA sits between the QIE and the data acquisition system. All digital signals to and from the QIE pass through the CCA chip. One CCA chip interfaces with two QIE channels. The CCA provides individually delayed clocks to each of the QIE chips in addition to various control signals. The QIE sends digitized PMT or HPD signals and time slice information to the CCA, which sends the data to the data acquisition system through an optical link.

Ray Yarema et al.

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

426

Results on the search for the standard model Higgs boson at CMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the results from searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the CMS experiment at LHC with data collected from proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 7TeV is presented. The Higgs boson is searched in a multiplicity of decay channels using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities in the range 4.6 - 4.8 fb{sup -1}. The investigated mass range is 110 - 600 GeV. Results are reported for each channel as well as for their combination.

Fabozzi, Francesco [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Univ. di Monte S. Angelo Via Cintia - 80126 Napoli (Italy) and Universita della Basilicata, Viale dell'Ateneo Lucano 10 - 85100 Potenza (Italy); Collaboration: CMS Collaboration

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

427

On the order of magnitude of 8th order corrections to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the 8th order contribution to the muon anomaly can be as large as 100-200*( alpha / pi )/sup 4/. (10 refs).

Lautrup, B

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

On inconsistency of experimental data on primary nuclei spectra with sea level muon intensity measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the first time a complete set of the most recent direct data on primary cosmic ray spectra is used as input into calculations of muon flux at sea level in wide energy range $E_\\mu=1-3\\cdot10^5$ GeV. Computations have been performed with the CORSIKA/QGSJET and CORSIKA/VENUS codes. The comparison of the obtained muon intensity with the data of muon experiments shows, that measurements of primary nuclei spectra conform to sea level muon data only up to several tens of GeV and result in essential deficit of muons at higher energies. As it follows from our examination, uncertainties in muon flux measurements and in the description of nuclear cascades development are not suitable to explain this contradiction, and the only remaining factor, leading to this situation, is underestimation of primary light nuclei fluxes. We have considered systematic effects, that may distort the results of the primary cosmic ray measurements with the application of the emulsion chambers. We suggest, that re-examination of these measurements is required with the employment of different hadronic interaction models. Also, in our point of view, it is necessary to perform estimates of possible influence of the fact, that sizable fraction of events, identified as protons, actually are antiprotons. Study of these cosmic ray component begins to attract much attention, but today nothing definite is known for the energies $>40$ GeV. In any case, to realize whether the mentioned, or some other reasons are the sources of disagreement of the data on primaries with the data on muons, the indicated effects should be thoroughly analyzed.

A. A. Lagutin; A. G. Tyumentsev; A. V. Yushkov

2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

429

A Search for Higgs Boson in $H \\rightarrow W^{+}W^{-}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for the Higgs boson decaying to $W^+W^-$ has been performed on $1.1\\:$fb$^{-1}$ of pp collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\:$TeV collected with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector in 2011. No significant excess above Standard Model background expectation is observed, and upper limits on Higgs boson cross section production are derived, excluding the presence of a Higgs boson with mass in the range of $[150, 193]\\:$GeV$/c^{2}$ at 95% confidence level.

Sung, Kevin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A Search for Higgs Boson in $H\\rightarrow W^+W^-$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for the Higgs boson decaying to $W^+W^-$ has been performed on $1.1\\:$fb$^{-1}$ of pp collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\:$TeV collected with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector in 2011. No significant excess above Standard Model background expectation is observed, and upper limits on Higgs boson cross section production are derived, excluding the presence of a Higgs boson with mass in the range of $[150, 193]\\:$GeV$/c^{2}$ at 95% confidence level.

Kevin Sung; for the CMS Collaboration

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

431

Trigger Algorithm Design for a SUSY Lepton Trigger based on Forward Proton Tagging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) pair production of SUSY leptons in gamma-gamma interactions will often include intact off-energy protons. Including detectors in the beampipe to measure these protons can give additional information to separate these events from background. We report on expected event rates and background rejection for a slepton trigger design in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment incorporating forward proton information. We conclude that a trigger that can observe an interesting number of events is feasible with the appropriate detector hardware.

Gronberg, J; Hollar, J

2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

432

CMS Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and enhancement. It is boiler plate language and must not be changed. Baseline and Enhancement Controls. The Controls ...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

CMS Runs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Runs Runs Web Based Monitoring Run Summary DQM Run Registry Commissioning & Run Coordination Online WorkBook Global Run Data Analysis FNAL ROC Process Summary [May-Dec 2007] Text output of Run Summary Global File List in dCache Directory Index DBS Discovery Aug 2008: ROOT Jul 2008: ROOT Jun 2008: ROOT May 2008: ROOT Mar 2008: ROOT Nov/Dec 2007: Streamer ROOT Sep 2007: Streamer ROOT Aug 2007: Streamer ROOT Jul 2007: Streamer ROOT Jun 2007: Streamer ROOT DQM May 2007: Streamer ROOT DQM PhEDEx Transfer State Cruzet4 Files Transferred Cruzet3 Files Transferred Cruzet2 Files Transferred GlobalCruzet1 Files Transferred GlobalMar08 Files Transferred to FNAL GlobalNov07 Files Transferred to FNAL GlobalSep07 Files Transferred to FNAL GlobalAug07 Files Transferred to FNAL

434

CMS Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Try a 3-D view? (works with IE 9 or another browser) Need help? Intro - More Features Project Contact: Tom Jordan Web Maintainer: qnet-webmaster@fnal.gov Last Update: May 31, 2011...

435

CMS Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tabletop Exercise. Tailoring. Tape Management System. Technical Safeguard. Tempest. Test Plan. Test. Threat Agent. Threat Analysis. ...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

CMS MTCC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MTCC MTCC ELog Page 1 DAQ Shifts Online Workbook Run Meetings MTCC Expert DAQ Run History Trigger DQM IGUANA GUI User Manual Live Event Display WebCams 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...

437

The Muon (g-2) Theory Value: Present and Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This White Paper briefly reviews the present status of the muon (g-2) Standard-Model prediction. This value results in a 3 - 4 standard-deviation difference with the experimental result from Brookhaven E821. The present experimental uncertainty is $\\pm 63 \\times 10^{-11}$ (0.54~ppm), and the Standard-Model uncertainty is $\\simeq \\pm 49 \\times 10^{-11}$. Fermilab experiment E989 has the goal to reduce the experimental error to $\\pm 16 \\times 10^{-11}$. Improvements in the Standard-Model value, which should be achieved between now and when the first results from Fermilab E989 could be available, should lead to a Standard-Model uncertainty of $\\sim \\,\\pm 35 \\times 10^{-11}$. These improvements would halve the uncertainty on the difference between experiment and theory, and should clarify whether the current difference points toward New Physics, or to a statistical fluctuation. At present, the (g-2) result is arguably the most compelling indicator of physics beyond the Standard Model and, at the very least, it represents a major constraint for speculative new theories such as supersymmetry, dark gauge bosons or extra dimensions.

Thomas Blum; Achim Denig; Ivan Logashenko; Eduardo de Rafael; B. Lee Roberts; Thomas Teubner; Graziano Venanzoni

2013-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

438

Progress on muon parametric-resonance ionization cooling channel development  

SciTech Connect

Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is intended as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. To implement PIC, a continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel was developed. A 6D cooling with stochastic effects off is demonstrated in a GEANT4/G4beamline model of a system where wedge-shaped Be absorbers are placed at the appropriate dispersion points in the twin-helix channel and are followed by short rf cavities. To proceed to cooling simulations with stochastics on, compensation of the beam aberrations from one absorber to another is required. Initial results on aberration compensation using a set of various-order continuous multipole fields are presented. As another avenue to mitigate the aberration effect, we optimize the cooling channel's period length. We observe a parasitic parametric resonance naturally occurring in the channel's horizontal plane due to the periodic beam energy modulation caused by the absorbers and rf. We discuss options for compensating this resonance and/or properly combining it with the induced half-integer parametric resonance needed for PIC.

V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, K.B. Beard, R.P. Johnson, B. Erdelyi, J.A. Maloney

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Improving Higgs Sensitivity at CDF by Introducing New Muon Triggers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A search for Standard Model Higgs boson production in the H {yields} WW {yields} {ell}{nu}jj channel using 5.7 fb{sup -1} of CDF II data is presented. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which event probability densities for the signal and background hypotheses are calculated and used to create a powerful disciminator (called the event probability discriminant, EPD). The EPD distributions for signal and background are fit to the data using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. To improve the limits on the H production cross section, a new muon category, CMP, is added. No evidence for a Higgs boson signal is observed, and 95% confidence level upper limits on the H cross section times the branching ratio of the Higgs boson to decay to two W of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} H) x BR(H {yields} WW)/SM Higgs boson masses of between m{sub H} = 150 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub H} = 200 GeV/c{sup 2} are found. The expected (median) limit estimated in pseudo-experiments is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} H) x BR(H {yields} WW)/SM < 12.5 to 41.0 at 95% C.L. The inclusion of the phi gap trigger lead to improvements in the sensitivity of up to 7.3%; on average, the improvement in the sensitivity was 3.3%.

Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; /Zurich, ETH

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Anomalous Lagrangians and the radiative muon capture in hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of an anomalous Lagrangian of the pi-rho-omega-a_1 system is investigated within the hidden local SU(2)_R x SU(2)_L symmetry approach. The interaction of the external electromagnetic and weak vector and axial-vector fields with the above hadron system is included. The Lagrangian of interest contains the anomalous Wess-Zumino term following from the well known Wess-Zumino-Witten action and six independent homogenous terms. It is characterized by four constants that are to be determined from a fit to the data on various elementary reactions. Present data allows one to extract the constants with a good accuracy. The homogenous part of the Lagrangian has been applied in the study of anomalous processes that could enhance the high energy tail of the spectrum of photons, produced in the radiative muon capture in hydrogen. It should be noted that recently, an intensive search for such enhancement processes has been carried in the literature, in an attempt to resolve the so called "g_P puzzle": an about 50 % difference between the theoretical prediction of the value of the induced pseudoscalar constant g_P and its value extracted from the high energy tail of the photon spectrum, measured in the precision TRIUMF experiment. Here, more details on the studied material are presented and new results, obtained by using the Wess-Zumino term, are provided.

J. Smejkal; E. Truhlik; F. C. Khanna

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Deploying perfSONAR-based End-2-End monitoring for production US CMS networking  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab is the US Tier-1 Center for CMS data storage and analysis. End-2-End (E2E) circuits are utilized to support high impact data movement into and out of the Tier-1 Center. E2E circuits have been implemented to facilitate the movement of raw experiment data from the Tier-0 Center at CERN, as well as processed data to a number of the US Tier-2 sites. Troubleshooting and monitoring of those circuits presents a significant challenge, since the circuits typically cross multiple research & education networks, each with its own management domain and customized monitoring capabilities. The perfSONAR Monitoring Project was established to facilitate development and deployment of a common monitoring infrastructure across multiple network management domains. Fermilab has deployed perfSONAR across its E2E circuit infrastructure and enhanced the product with several tools that ease the monitoring and management of those circuits. This paper will present the current state of perfSONAR monitoring at Fermilab and detail our experiences using perfSONAR to manage our current E2E circuit infrastructure. We will describe how production network circuits are monitored by perfSONAR E2E Monitoring Points (MPs), and the benefits it has brought to production US CMS networking support.

Grigoriev, Maxim; Bobyshev, Andrey; Crawford, Matt; DeMar, Phil; Grigaliunas, Vyto; Petravick, Don; /Fermilab

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Search for Heavy Neutral MSSM Higgs Bosons with CMS: Reach and Higgs-Mass Precision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The search for MSSM Higgs bosons will be an important goal at the LHC. We analyze the search reach of the CMS experiment for the heavy neutral MSSM Higgs bosons with an integrated luminosity of 30 or 60 fb^-1. This is done by combining the latest results for the CMS experimental sensitivities based on full simulation studies with state-of-the-art theoretical predictions of MSSM Higgs-boson properties. The results are interpreted in MSSM benchmark scenarios in terms of the parameters tan_beta and the Higgs-boson mass scale, M_A. We study the dependence of the 5 sigma discovery contours in the M_A-tan_beta plane on variations of the other supersymmetric parameters. The largest effects arise from a change in the higgsino mass parameter mu, which enters both via higher-order radiative corrections and via the kinematics of Higgs decays into supersymmetric particles. While the variation of $\\mu$ can shift the prospective discovery reach (and correspondingly the ``LHC wedge'' region) by about Delta tan_beta = 10, we...

Gennai, S; Kalinowski, A; Kinnunen, R; Lethi, S; Nikitenko, A; Weiglein, G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Response evolution of the CMS ECAL and R&D studies for electromagnetic calorimetry at the High-Luminosity LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While the CMS experiment is currently harvesting LHC collision data at CERN, the performance of its electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is being constantly monitored, and work has started to assess the need for changes to the detector to ensure an adequate performance for High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) running, which is planned for 2022 and beyond. In this paper, results from CMS running, beam tests and laboratory measurements are combined to anticipate the detector performance evolution at the HL-LHC. Further, various R&D studies are illustrated, that will provide a useful choice for electromagnetic calorimetry at the HL-LHC.

Francesca Nessi Tedaldi; for the CMS Collaboration

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

444

WEB PUBLISHING APPLICATION FORM: REGISTRATION AS OPENTEXT CMS APPROVER This form should be printed and completed by members of staff of the University who wish to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WEB PUBLISHING APPLICATION FORM: REGISTRATION AS OPENTEXT CMS APPROVER This form should be printed and updating web information using OpenText CMS [Content Management System]. An Approver has the ability.e. the navigation or information architecture. If you only need to edit an existing web site and create or edit

Howie, Jim

445

WEB PUBLISHING APPLICATION FORM: REGISTRATION AS OPENTEXT CMS CONTRIBUTOR This form should be printed and completed by members of staff of the University who wish to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WEB PUBLISHING APPLICATION FORM: REGISTRATION AS OPENTEXT CMS CONTRIBUTOR This form should of entering and updating web information using OpenText CMS [Content Management System]. A contributor may only edit an existing web site and create or edit content ready for approval. If you require to approve

Howie, Jim

446

Detection and Imaging of High-Z Materials with a Muon Tomography Station Using GEM Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Muon tomography based on the measurement of multiple scattering of atmospheric cosmic ray muons is a promising technique for detecting and imaging heavily shielded high-Z nuclear materials such as enriched uranium. This technique could complement standard radiation detection portals currently deployed at international borders and ports, which are not very sensitive to heavily shielded nuclear materials. We image small targets in 3D using $2\\times 2 \\times 2$ mm^3 voxels with a minimal muon tomography station prototype that tracks muons with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors read out in 2D with x-y microstrips of 400 micron pitch. With preliminary electronics, the GEM detectors achieve a spatial resolution of 130 microns in both dimensions. With the next GEM-based prototype station we plan to probe an active volume of ~27 liters. We present first results on reading out all 1536 microstrips of a $30 \\times 30$ cm^2 GEM detector for the next muon tomography prototype with final frontend electronics and DAQ...

Gnanvo, K; Bittner, W; Costa, F; Grasso, L; Hohlmann, M; Locke, J B; Martoiu, S; Muller, H; Staib, M; Tarazona, A; Toledo, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Higgs mass and muon anomalous magnetic moment in supersymmetric models with vectorlike matters  

SciTech Connect

We study the muon anomalous magnetic moment (muon g-2) and the Higgs boson mass in a simple extension of the minimal supersymmetric (SUSY) standard model with extra vectorlike matters, in the frameworks of gauge-mediated SUSY breaking (GMSB) models and gravity mediation (mSUGRA) models. It is shown that the deviation of the muon g-2 and a relatively heavy Higgs boson can be simultaneously explained in large tan{beta} region. (i) In GMSB models, the Higgs mass can be more than 135 GeV (130 GeV) in the region where the muon g-2 is consistent with the experimental value at the 2{sigma} (1{sigma}) level, while maintaining the perturbative coupling unification. (ii) In the case of mSUGRA models with universal soft masses, the Higgs mass can be as large as about 130 GeV when the muon g-2 is consistent with the experimental value at the 2{sigma} level. In both cases, the Higgs mass can be above 140 GeV if the g-2 constraint is not imposed.

Endo, Motoi; Hamaguchi, Koichi [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Chiba, 277-8583 (Japan); Iwamoto, Sho; Yokozaki, Norimi [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Delayed muons in extensive air showers and double-front showers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a long-term experiment performed in the period between 1995 and 2006 with the aid of the MUON-T underground (20 mwe) scintillation facility arranged at the Tien Shan mountain research station at an altitude of 3340 m above sea level are presented. The time distribution of delayed muons with an energy in excess of 5 GeV in extensive air showers of energy not lower than 106 GeV with respect to the shower front was obtained with a high statistical significance in the delay interval between 30 and 150 ns. An effect of the geomagnetic field in detecting delayed muons in extensive air showers was discovered. This effect leads to the asymmetry of their appearance with respect to the north-south direction. The connection between delayed muons and extensive air showers featuring two fronts separated by a time interval of several tens of to two hundred nanoseconds is discussed. This connection gives sufficient grounds to assume that delayed muons originate from the decays of pions and kaons produced in the second, delayed, front of extensive air showers.

Beisembaev, R. U.; Vavilov, Yu. N., E-mail: yuvavil@mail.ru; Vildanov, N. G.; Kruglov, A. V.; Stepanov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Institute of Physics (Russian Federation); Takibaev, J. S. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University (Kazakhstan)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Improving Higgs Sensitivity at CDF by Introducing New Muon Triggers  

SciTech Connect

A search for Standard Model Higgs boson production in the H {yields} WW {yields} {ell}{nu}jj channel using 5.7 fb{sup -1} of CDF II data is presented. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which event probability densities for the signal and background hypotheses are calculated and used to create a powerful disciminator (called the event probability discriminant, EPD). The EPD distributions for signal and background are fit to the data using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. To improve the limits on the H production cross section, a new muon category, CMP, is added. No evidence for a Higgs boson signal is observed, and 95% confidence level upper limits on the H cross section times the branching ratio of the Higgs boson to decay to two W of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} H) x BR(H {yields} WW)/SM < 7.7 to 62.1 for Higgs boson masses of between m{sub H} = 150 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub H} = 200 GeV/c{sup 2} are found. The expected (median) limit estimated in pseudo-experiments is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} H) x BR(H {yields} WW)/SM < 12.5 to 41.0 at 95% C.L. The inclusion of the phi gap trigger lead to improvements in the sensitivity of up to 7.3%; on average, the improvement in the sensitivity was 3.3%.

Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; /Zurich, ETH

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Leon Lederman, the K-meson, the Muon Neutrino, and the Bottom Quark  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Leon Lederman, the K-meson, the Muon Leon Lederman, the K-meson, the Muon Neutrino, and the Bottom Quark His Honors · His Involvement in Science Education His Wisdom and Humor · Resources with Additional Information Leon Lederman started his career in Physics at Columbia University, where he earned his Ph.D. in 1952. He 'stayed on at Columbia following his studies, remaining for nearly 30 years, as the Eugene Higgins Professor and, from 1961 until 1979, as director of Nevis Laboratories in Irvington, the Columbia physics department center for experimental research in high-energy physics. ... Leon Lederman Courtesy of Fermilab In 1956, working with a Columbia team at the Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, Lederman discovered a new particle, the long-lived neutral K-meson, which had been predicted from theory. Further research at Columbia demonstrated the non-conservation of parity during muon decay. ...

451

Geek-Up[12.23.2010]: Muons at the South Pole and Dr. Nick Holoynak |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2.23.2010]: Muons at the South Pole and Dr. Nick Holoynak 2.23.2010]: Muons at the South Pole and Dr. Nick Holoynak Geek-Up[12.23.2010]: Muons at the South Pole and Dr. Nick Holoynak December 23, 2010 - 12:05pm Addthis Illustration of the IceCube neutrino observatory. Source: LBNL Illustration of the IceCube neutrino observatory. Source: LBNL Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Earlier today, the Energy Blog featured Los Alamos National Lab's system to track Santa. However, while there is a lot of attention focused on the North Pole right now, the Geek-Up[date] team is taking a look at the opposite end of the Earth. This past weekend, a collaborative group of 40 institutions from around the world, including DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, celebrated the completion of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory

452

Distortions of Experimental Muon Arrival Time Distributions of Extensive Air Showers by the Observation Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Event-by-event measured arrival time distributions of Extensive Air Shower (EAS) muons are affected and distorted by various interrelated effects which originate from the time resolution of the timing detectors, from fluctuations of the reference time and the number (multiplicity) of detected muons spanning the arrival time distribution of the individual EAS events. The origin of these effects is discussed, and different correction procedures, which involve detailed simulations, are proposed and illustrated. The discussed distortions are relevant for relatively small observation distances (R < 200 m) from the EAS core. Their significance decreases with increasing observation distance and increasing primary energies. Local arrival time distributions which refer to the observed arrival time of the first local muon prove to be less sensitive to the mass of the primary. This feature points to the necessity of arrival time measurements with additional information on the curvature of the EAS disk.

R. Haeusler; A. F. Badea; H. Rebel; I. M. Brancus; J. Oehlschlaeger

2001-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

453

ATLAS Great Lakes Tier-2 Computing and Muon Calibration Center Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large-scale computing in ATLAS is based on a grid-linked system of tiered computing centers. The ATLAS Great Lakes Tier-2 came online in September 2006 and now is commissioning with full capacity to provide significant computing power and services to the USATLAS community. Our Tier-2 Center also host the Michigan Muon Calibration Center which is responsible for daily calibrations of the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tubes for ATLAS endcap muon system. During the first LHC beam period in 2008 and following ATLAS global cosmic ray data taking period, the Calibration Center received a large data stream from the muon detector to derive the drift tube timing offsets and time-to-space functions with a turn-around time of 24 hours. We will present the Calibration Center commissioning status and our plan for the first LHC beam collisions in 2009.

Shawn McKee

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Search for new physics with same-sign isolated dilepton events with jets and missing transverse energy at CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of searches for Supersymmetry in events with two same-sign isolated leptons, hadronic jets, and missing transverse energy in the final state are presented. The searches use pp collisions at 7 TeV collected in 2011 by the CMS experiment.

Weinberg, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Prompt muon-induced fission: a probe for nuclear energy dissipation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve the time-dependent Dirac equation for a muon which is initially bound to a fissioning actinide nucleus. The computations are carried out on a 3-D cartesian lattice utilizing the Basis-Spline collocation method. The muon dynamics is sensitive to the nuclear energy dissipation between the outer fission barrier and the scission point. From a comparison with experimental data we find a dissipated energy of about 10 MeV and a fission time delay due to friction of order $2 \\times 10^{-21}$ s.

Volker E. Oberacker

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

456

Prompt muon-induced fission: a probe for nuclear energy dissipation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We solve the time-dependent Dirac equation for a muon which is initially bound to a fissioning actinide nucleus. The computations are carried out on a 3-D cartesian lattice utilizing the Basis-Spline collocation method. The muon dynamics is sensitive to the nuclear energy dissipation between the outer fission barrier and the scission point. From a comparison with experimental data we find a dissipated energy of about 10 MeV and a fission time delay due to friction of order 2 × 10 ?21 s.

Volker E. Oberacker

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Hadronic Light-by-Light Scattering Contribution to the Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the current status of theoretical calculations of the hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Different approaches and related issues such as OPE constraints and large breaking of chiral symmetry are discussed. Combining results of different models with educated guesses on the errors we come to the estimate $$a^{\\rm HLbL}=(10.5\\pm 2.6)\\times 10^{-10}.$$ The text is prepared as a contribution to the {\\it Glasgow White Paper on the present status of the Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment}.

Joaquim Prades; Eduardo de Rafael; Arkady Vainshtein

2009-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

458

Limits to the muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the AMANDA detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for an excess of muon-neutrinos from neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the AMANDA-II neutrino detector using data collected in 143.7 days of live-time in 2001. No excess over the expected atmospheric neutrino background has been observed. An upper limit at 90% confidence level has been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun, as well as the corresponding muon flux limit at the Earth, both as functions of the neutralino mass in the range 100 GeV-5000 GeV.

The AMANDA collaboration; M. Ackermann

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

459

The Detector Control Unit An ASIC for the monitoring of the CMS silicon tracker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Detector Control Unit (DCU) is an ASIC developed as the central building block of a monitoring system for the CMS Tracker. Leakage currents in the Silicon detectors, power supply voltages of the readout electronics and local temperatures will be monitored in order to guarantee safe operating conditions during the 10-years lifetime in the LHC environment. All these measurements can be performed by an A/D converter preceded by an analog multiplexer and properly interfaced to the central control system. The requirements in terms of radiation tolerance, low-power dissipation and integration with the rest of the system led to the design of a custom integrated circuit. Its structure and characteristics are described in this paper. (6 refs).

Magazzù, G; Moreira, P

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Efficiency Measurement of Momentum Imbalance Trigger at CMS for Supersymmetry Searches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In searches for new fundamental particles in high energy particle collisions, the ability for a detector to select collisions that might signify the presence of such particles is one of the top priorities. Equally important is to determine how well the selection is done so that procedures can be used to optimize the selection. One such method of collision event selection is known as the momentum imbalance trigger at the CMS detector at the LHC for use in a search for new particles from an extension of the standard model. In this thesis, We measure the efficiency as a function of the trigger as well as the effect the number of collisions that occur at the same time has on its performance.

Davis, Christopher J

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "muon solenoid cms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Search for Higgs boson production in association with b quarks at CMS in pp collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for neutral Higgs bosons produced in association with b-quark(s) and decaying into a pair of b-quarks is performed with the CMS detector at LHC. The Higgs boson signal is expected to emerge as an excess in the mass spectrum of two b-tagged jets. Dedicated triggers with on-line b-tagging in fully hadronic events were developed specifically for this kind of analysis. Limits on the cross section times branching fractions are derived model independently. The result was interpreted in the Minimal Supersymmetric Model (MSSM). Upper limits at $tan\\beta$ are derived as a function of MA, the mass of the Higgs boson A. In the analysis presented here data taken in 2011 at 7 TeV are used corresponding to a total luminosity of $ L = 2.7 - 4.0 fb^{-1} $ for low and medium Higgs boson masses, respectively.

Igor Marfin

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

462

Search for Heavy Neutral MSSM Higgs Bosons with CMS: Reach and Higgs-Mass Precision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The search for MSSM Higgs bosons will be an important goal at the LHC. We analyze the search reach of the CMS experiment for the heavy neutral MSSM Higgs bosons with an integrated luminosity of 30 or 60 fb^-1. This is done by combining the latest results for the CMS experimental sensitivities based on full simulation studies with state-of-the-art theoretical predictions of MSSM Higgs-boson properties. The results are interpreted in MSSM benchmark scenarios in terms of the parameters tan_beta and the Higgs-boson mass scale, M_A. We study the dependence of the 5 sigma discovery contours in the M_A-tan_beta plane on variations of the other supersymmetric parameters. The largest effects arise from a change in the higgsino mass parameter mu, which enters both via higher-order radiative corrections and via the kinematics of Higgs decays into supersymmetric particles. While the variation of $\\mu$ can shift the prospective discovery reach (and correspondingly the ``LHC wedge'' region) by about Delta tan_beta = 10, we find that the discovery reach is rather stable with respect to the impact of other supersymmetric parameters. Within the discovery region we analyze the accuracy with which the masses of the heavy neutral Higgs bosons can be determined. We find that an accuracy of 1-4% should be achievable, which could make it possible in favourable regions of the MSSM parameter space to experimentally resolve the signals of the two heavy MSSM Higgs bosons at the LHC.

S. Gennai; S. Heinemeyer; A. Kalinowski; R. Kinnunen; S. Lethi; A. Nikitenko; G. Weiglein

2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

463

Whistler Wave Excitation and Effects of Self-Focusing on Ion Beam Propagation through a Background Plasma along a Solenoidal Magnetic Field  

SciTech Connect

This paper extends studies of ion beam transport through a background plasma along a solenoidal magnetic field [I. Kaganovich et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 103108 (2008)] to the important regime of moderate magnetic field strength satisfying ?ce > 2?b?pe . Here, ?ce and ? pe are the electron cyclotron frequency and electron plasma frequency, respectively, and ?b = vb/ c is the directed ion beam velocity normalized to the speed of light. The electromagnetic field perturbations excited by the ion beam pulse in this regime are calculated analytically, and verified by comparison with the numerical simulations. The degrees of beam charge neutralization and current neutralization are estimated, and the transverse component of the Lorentz force associated with the excited electromagnetic field is calculated. It is found that the plasma response to the ion beam pulse is significantly different depending on whether the value of the solenoidal magnetic field is below or above the threshold value specified by ? cr ce = 2?b?pe, and corresponding to the resonant excitation of large-amplitude whistler waves. The use of intense whistler wave excitations for diagnostic purposes is also discussed.

Mikhail A. Dorf, Igor D. Kaganovich, Edward A. Startsev, and Ronald C. Davidson

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

464

Prompt muon-induced fission: a sensitive probe for nuclear energy dissipation and fission dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the formation of an excited muonic atom, inner shell transitions may proceed without photon emission by inverse internal conversion, i.e. the muonic excitation energy is transferred to the nucleus. In actinides, the 2p ? 1s and the 3d ? 1s muonic transitions result in excitation of the nuclear giant dipole and giant quadrupole resonances, respectively, which act as doorway states for fission. The nuclear excitation energy is typically 6.5 ? 10 MeV. Because the muon lifetime is long compared to the timescale of prompt nuclear fission, the motion of the muon in the Coulomb field of the fissioning nucleus may be utilized to learn about the dynamics of fission. If there is large friction between the outer fission barrier and the scission point the muon will remain in the lowest molecular energy level and emerge in the 1s bound state of the heavy fission fragment. On the other hand, if friction is small (i.e. the nuclear collective motion is fast) there is a nonvanishing probability that the muon may be promoted to higher-lying molecular orbitals, e.g. the 2p? level, from where

Volker E. Oberacker; A. Sait Umar; Feodor F. Karpeshin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

SciTech Connect

Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S.N.; Andersen, T.C.; Anthony, A.E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E.W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S.D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M.G.; Burritt, T.H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M.C.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P.J.; Dosanjh, R.S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J.TM.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Harvey, P.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hemingway, R.J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Klein, J.R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A.B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M.L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A.J.; Oblath, N.S.; Okada, C.E.; O?Keeffe, H.M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Oser, S.M.; Ott, R.A.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Secrest, J.A.; Seibert, S.R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J.J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M.W.E.; Sonley, T.J.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill, L.C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R.G.; VanDevender, B.A.; Virtue, C.J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C.E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D.L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wilson, J.R.; Wouters, J.M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

466

Test with cosmic rays of the GEM chambers for the LHCb muon system produced in Cagliari  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inner region of the first LHCb muon station will be equipped with twelve Gas Electron Multiplier chambers. The seven chambers produced in Cagliari were studied for several days each using cosmic rays. We measured the efficiency, timing resolution, and uniformity, cluster-size and out-of-time multiplicity. We find all seven chambers perform well.

Bonivento, W; Oldeman, R G C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Detection of Ionizing Radiation by Plasma-Panel Sensors: Cosmic Muons, Ion Beams, and Cancer Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The plasma panel sensor is an ionizing photon and particle radiation detector derived from PDP technology with high gain and nanosecond response. Experimental results in detecting cosmic ray muons and beta particles from radioactive sources are described along with applications including high energy and nuclear physics, homeland security and cancer therapeutics.

Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

SciTech Connect

Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S.N.; Andersen, T.C.; Anthony, A.E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E.W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S.D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M.G.; Burritt, T.H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M.C.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P.J.; Dosanjh, R.S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J.TM.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Harvey, P.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hemingway, R.J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Klein, J.R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A.B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M.L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A.J.; Oblath, N.S.; Okada, C.E.; O?Keeffe, H.M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Oser, S.M.; Ott, R.A.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Secrest, J.A.; Seibert, S.R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J.J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M.W.E.; Sonley, T.J.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill, L.C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R.G.; VanDevender, B.A.; Virtue, C.J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C.E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D.L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wilson, J.R.; Wouters, J.M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

469

Ballpark prediction for the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the muon (g-2)_?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the momentum dependence of the dressed quark mass and the well-known formulae for the mass dependent quark loop contribution to the light-by-light scattering insertions, we compute the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the the muon anomalous magnetic moment. We ascribe for the first time a systematic error on the calculation.

Pere Masjuan; Marc Vanderhaeghen

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

470

A Diffusion Cloud Chamber Study of Very Slow Mesons. II. Beta Decay of the Muon  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The spectrum of electrons arising from the decay of the negative mu meson has been determined. The muons are arrested in the gas of a high pressure hydrogen filled diffusion cloud chamber. The momenta of the decay electrons are determined from their curvature in a magnetic field of 7750 gauss. The spectrum of 415 electrons has been analyzed according to the theory of Michel.

Lederman, L. M.; Sargent, C. P.; Rinehart, M.; Rogers, K.

1955-03-00T23:59:59.000Z

471

Intensity of Upward Muon Flux Due to Cosmic-Ray Neutrinos Produced in the Atmosphere  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Calculations were performed to determine the upward going muon flux leaving the earth's surface after production by cosmic-ray neutrinos in the crust. Only neutrinos produced in the earth's atmosphere are considered. Rates of the order of one per 100 sq m/day might be expected if an intermediate boson exists and has a mass less than 2 Bev. (auth)

Lee, T. D.; Robinson, H.; Schwartz, M.; Cool, R.

1963-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

472

Possible evidence of a ground level enhancement of muons in association with a SWIFT Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting from April 2007, a search for solar daily variation of the muon intensity ($E_\\mu >0.2$ GeV) at sea level and using two directional muon telescopes is in progress. In this survey, several ground level enhancements (GLEs) on the muon counting rate background have been found. Here, we highlight one of them, observed in the vertical telescope on 07 August 2007 for the following reasons: The GLE consists of a single narrow peak, with a statistical significance of 4.4$\\sigma$. The GLE is in temporal coincidence with a SWIFT trigger $N^0287222$, at 21:16:05 UT according to the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board of the SWIFT spacecraft. However, the Swift StarTracker had lost stellar lock minutes before that and the resulting improper s/c attitude information caused BAT to "trigger" on a known source. Even so, the SWIFT trigger coordinates are inside the effective field of view of the vertical Tupi muon telescope. The temporal and directional coincidences between this GLE and the SWIFT satellite unknown event strongly suggest that they may be physically associated. Details and implications of this possible association are reported in this work.

C. R. A. Augusto; C. E. Navia; M. B. Robba; K. H. Tsui

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

473

Neutrinos from Decaying Muons, Pions, Kaons and Neutrons in Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the internal shock model of gamma ray bursts ultrahigh energy muons, pions, neutrons and kaons are likely to be produced in the interactions of shock accelerated relativistic protons with low energy photons (KeV-MeV). These particles subsequently decay to high energy neutrinos/antineutrinos and other secondaries. In the high internal magnetic fields of gamma ray bursts, the ultrahigh energy charged particles ($\\mu^+$, $\\pi^+$, $K^+$) lose energy significantly due to synchrotron radiations before decaying into secondary high energy neutrinos and antineutrinos. The relativistic neutrons decay to high energy antineutrinos, protons and electrons. We have calculated the total neutrino flux (neutrino and antineutrino) considering the decay channels of ultrahigh energy muons, pions, neutrons and kaons. We have shown that the total neutrino flux generated in neutron decay can be higher than that produced in $\\mu^+$ and $\\pi^+$ decay. The charged kaons being heavier than pions, lose energy slowly and their secondary total neutrino flux is more than that from muons and pions at very high energy. Our detailed calculations on secondary particle production in $p\\gamma$ interactions give the total neutrino fluxes and their flavour ratios expected on earth. Depending on the values of the parameters (luminosity, Lorentz factor, variability time, spectral indices and break energy in the photon spectrum) of a gamma ray burst the contributions to the total neutrino flux from the decay of different particles (muon, pion, neutron and kaon) may vary and they would also be reflected on the neutrino flavour ratios.

Reetanjali Moharana; Nayantara Gupta

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

474

nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee  

SciTech Connect

The idea of using a muon storage ring to produce a high-energy ({approx_equal} 50 GeV) neutrino beam for experiments was first discussed by Koshkarev in 1974. A detailed description of a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments was first produced by Neuffer in 1980. In his paper, Neuffer studied muon decay rings with E{sub {mu}} of 8, 4.5 and 1.5 GeV. With his 4.5 GeV ring design, he achieved a figure of merit of {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 9} useful neutrinos per 3 x 10{sup 13} protons on target. The facility we describe here ({nu}STORM) is essentially the same facility proposed in 1980 and would utilize a 3-4 GeV/c muon storage ring to study eV-scale oscillation physics and, in addition, could add significantly to our understanding of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} cross sections. In particular the facility can: (1) address the large {Delta}m{sup 2} oscillation regime and make a major contribution to the study of sterile neutrinos, (2) make precision {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-section measurements, (3) provide a technology ({mu} decay ring) test demonstration and {mu} beam diagnostics test bed, and (4) provide a precisely understood {nu} beam for detector studies. The facility is the simplest implementation of the Neutrino Factory concept. In our case, 60 GeV/c protons are used to produce pions off a conventional solid target. The pions are collected with a focusing device (horn or lithium lens) and are then transported to, and injected into, a storage ring. The pions that decay in the first straight of the ring can yield a muon that is captured in the ring. The circulating muons then subsequently decay into electrons and neutrinos. We are starting with a storage ring design that is optimized for 3.8 GeV/c muon momentum. This momentum was selected to maximize the physics reach for both oscillation and the cross section physics. See Fig. 1 for a schematic of the facility.

Kyberd, P.; Smith, D.R.; /Brunel U.; Coney, L.; /UC, Riverside; Pascoli, S.; /Durham U., IPPP; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cease, H.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; /Fermilab /Yerkes Observ. /Glasgow U. /Imperial Coll., London /Valencia U. /Jefferson Lab /Kyoto U. /Northwestern U. /Osaka U.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

OBSERVATION AND MEASUREMENT OF THE HIGGS-LIKE BOSON AT 125 GEV IN THE TWO-PHOTON DECAY CHANNEL WITH THE CMS EXPERIMENT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We present results for the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the two-photon channel using the full 2011+2012 dataset recorded by the CMS… (more)

Quan, Xiaohang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Role of Quench-back in the Passive Quench Protection of Uncoupled Solenoids in Series with and without Coil Sub-division  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the final paper in a series of papers that discusses passive quench protection for high inductance solenoid magnets. This report describes how passive quench protection system may be applied to superconducting magnets that are connected in series but not inductively coupled. Previous papers have discussed the role of magnet sub-division and quench back from a conductive mandrel in reducing the hot-spot temperature and the peak coil voltages to ground. When magnets are connected in series, quench-back from a conductive mandrel can cause other magnets in a string to quench even without inductive coupling between magnets. The magnet mandrels must be well coupled to the magnet circuit that is being quenched. When magnet circuit sub-division is employed to reduce the voltages-to-ground within magnets, the resistance across the subdivision becomes the most important factor in the successful quenching of the magnet string.

Guo, Xing Long; Green, Michael A; Wang, Li; Wu, Hong; Pan, Heng

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Conceptual design report for a superconducting coil suitable for use in the large solenoid detector at the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conceptual design of a large superconducting solenoid suitable for a magnetic detector at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) was done at Fermilab. The magnet will provide a magnetic field of 1.7 T over a volume 8 m in diameter by 16 m long. The particle-physics calorimetry will be inside the field volume and so the coil will be bath cooled and cryostable; the vessels will be stainless steel. Predictability of performance and the ability to safely negotiate all probable failure modes, including a quench, are important items of the design philosophy. Our conceptual design of the magnet and calorimeter has convinced us that this magnet is a reasonable extrapolation of present technology and is therefore feasible. The principal difficulties anticipated are those associated with the very large physical dimensions and stored energy of the magnet. 5 figs.

Fast, R.W.; Grimson, J.H.; Krebs, H.J.; Kephart, R.D.; Theriot, D.; Wands, R.H.

1989-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Advancements in Big Data Processing in the ATLAS and CMS Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ever-increasing volumes of scientific data present new challenges for distributed computing and Grid technologies. The emerging Big Data revolution drives exploration in scientific fields including nanotechnology, astrophysics, high-energy physics, biology and medicine. New initiatives are transforming data-driven scientific fields enabling massive data analysis in new ways. In petascale data processing scientists deal with datasets, not individual files. As a result, a task (comprised of many jobs) became a unit of petascale data processing on the Grid. Splitting of a large data processing task into jobs enabled fine-granularity checkpointing analogous to the splitting of a large file into smaller TCP/IP packets during data transfers. Transferring large data in small packets achieves reliability through automatic re-sending of the dropped TCP/IP packets. Similarly, transient job failures on the Grid can be recovered by automatic re-tries to achieve reliable six sigma production quality in petascale data processing o